WorldWideScience

Sample records for ceramic processing progress

  1. Progress on matrix SiC processing and properties for fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel form

    Terrani, K.A.; Kiggans, J.O.; Silva, C.M.; Shih, C.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L.L.

    2015-01-01

    The consolidation mechanism and resulting properties of the silicon carbide (SiC) matrix of fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel form are discussed. The matrix is produced via the nano-infiltration transient eutectic-forming (NITE) process. Coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, and strength characteristics of this SiC matrix have been characterized in the unirradiated state. An ad hoc methodology for estimation of thermal conductivity of the neutron-irradiated NITE–SiC matrix is also provided to aid fuel performance modeling efforts specific to this concept. Finally, specific processing methods developed for production of an optimal and reliable fuel form using this process are summarized. These various sections collectively report the progress made to date on production of optimal FCM fuel form to enable its application in light water and advanced reactors

  2. SRNL CRP progress report [Development of Melt Processed Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Marra, J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-10-02

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multiphase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing.

  3. SRNL CRP progress report [Development of Melt Processed Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear fuel. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multiphase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing

  4. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  5. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, October 1992--March 1993

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Although progress has been made in developing reliable structural ceramics, further work is needed to reduce cost. The work described in this report is organized according to the following work breakdown structure project elements: Materials and processing (monolithics [Si nitride, carbide], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining, cost effective ceramic machining), materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts), data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, nondestructive evaluation development), and technology transfer.

  6. Processing Nanostructured Structural Ceramics

    Binner, Jon

    2006-01-01

    .... As a result of the work performed, progress has been made into the ability to control the agglomerates present in the powder resulting in the production of a free-flowing and crushable powder for die pressing...

  7. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    Naslain , R.

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  8. Progress on Numerical Modeling of the Dispersion of Ceramic Nanoparticles During Ultrasonic Processing and Solidification of Al-Based Nanocomposites

    Zhang, Daojie; Nastac, Laurentiu

    2016-12-01

    In present study, 6061- and A356-based nano-composites are fabricated by using the ultrasonic stirring technology (UST) in a coreless induction furnace. SiC nanoparticles are used as the reinforcement. Nanoparticles are added into the molten metal and then dispersed by ultrasonic cavitation and acoustic streaming assisted by electromagnetic stirring. The applied UST parameters in the current experiments are used to validate a recently developed magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) model, which is capable of modeling the cavitation and nanoparticle dispersion during UST processing. The MHD model accounts for turbulent fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification, and electromagnetic field, as well as the complex interaction between the nanoparticles and both the molten and solidified alloys by using ANSYS Maxwell and ANSYS Fluent. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to analyze the complex interactions between the nanoparticle and the liquid/solid interface. The current modeling results demonstrate that a strong flow can disperse the nanoparticles relatively well during molten metal and solidification processes. MD simulation results prove that ultrafine particles (10 nm) will be engulfed by the solidification front instead of being pushed, which is beneficial for nano-dispersion.

  9. Formulation and synthesis by melting process of titanate enriched glass-ceramics and ceramics

    Advocat, T.; Fillet, C.; Lacombe, J.; Bonnetier, A.; McGlinn, P.

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to provide containment for the separated radionuclides in stable oxide phases with proven resistance to leaching and irradiation damage and in consequence to obtain a glass ceramic or a ceramic material using a vitrification process. Sphene glass ceramic, zirconolite glass ceramic and zirconolite enriched ceramic have been fabricated and characterized by XRD, SEM/EDX and DTA

  10. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report for April 1993 through September 1993

    1994-04-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. However, further work is needed to reduce the cost of ceramics to facilitate their commercial introduction, especially in the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. The work described in this report is organized according to the following WBS project elements: Project Management and Coordination; Materials and Processing; Materials Design Methodology; Data Base and Life Prediction; and Technology Transfer. This report includes contributions from all currently active project participants. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 47 projects reported here.

  11. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  12. Design and In-Situ Processing of Metal-Ceramic and Ceramic-Ceramic Microstructures

    Sass, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    .... Metal-ceramic microstructures have been synthesized in situ by a variety of novel processing techniques, including the partial reduction of oxide compounds and displacement reactions and sol-gel...

  13. LFCM [liquid-fed ceramic melter] vitrification technology: Quarterly progress report, January--March 1987

    Brouns, R. A.; Allen, C. R.; Powell, J. A.

    1988-05-01

    This report is compiled by the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to describe the progress in developing, testing, applying and documenting liquid-fed ceramic melter vitrification technology. Progress in the following technical subject areas during the second quarter of FY 1987 is discussed: melting process chemistry and glass development, feed preparation and transfer systems, melter systems, canister filling and handling systems, and process/product modeling. 23 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs

  14. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  15. Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains

    Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains ... is nearly impossible, shaping has to be done by a replication step in the green, unfired state. ... This process chain combines the fast and inexpensive supply of master models by ...

  16. Firing: the proof test for ceramic processing

    Kingery, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    The object of ceramic processing is to form ware having certain shapes and properties. Thus, one test of the success of processing procedures must be in terms of the resulting structure and characteristics of a material after firing. During the firing process some few variations resulting from processing may be evened out, but the great majority of variation tends to be amplified. Examination of a few cases illustrates the nature of the defect amplification process. (U.S.)

  17. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  18. Progress in tritium retention and release modeling for ceramic breeders

    Raffray, A.R.; Federici, G.; Billone, M.C.; Tanaka, S.

    1994-01-01

    Tritium behavior in ceramic breeder blankets is a key design issue for this class of blanket because of its impact on safety and fuel self-sufficiency. Over the past 10-15 years, substantial theoretical and experimental efforts have been dedicated world-wide to develop a better understanding of tritium transport in ceramic breeders. Models that are available today seem to cover reasonably well all the key physical transport and trapping mechanisms. They have allowed for reasonable interpretation and reproduction of experimental data and have helped in pointing out deficiencies in material property data base, in providing guidance for future experiments, and in analyzing blanket tritium behavior. This paper highlights the progress in tritium modeling over the last decade. Key tritium transport mechanisms are briefly described along with the more recent and sophisticated models developed to help understand them. Recent experimental data are highlighted and model calibration and validation discussed. Finally, example applications to blanket cases are shown as illustration of progress in the prediction of ceramic breeder blanket tritium inventory

  19. A comparative study of progressive wear of four dental monolithic, veneered glass-ceramics.

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Yi, Yuanping; Wang, Xuesong; Guo, Jiawen; Li, Ding; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the wear performance and wear mechanisms of four dental glass-ceramics, based on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the progressive wear process. Bar (N = 40, n = 10) and disk (N = 32, n = 8) specimens were prepared from (A) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (LD), (B) leucite reinforced glass-ceramic (LEU), (C) feldspathic glass-ceramic (FEL), and (D) fluorapatite glass-ceramic (FLU). The bar specimens were tested for three-point flexural strength, hardness, fracture toughness and elastic modulus. The disk specimens paired with steatite antagonists were tested in a pin-on-disk tribometer with 10N up to 1000,000 wear cycles. The wear analysis of glass-ceramics was performed using a 3D profilometer after every 200,000 wear cycles. Wear loss of steatite antagonists was calculated by measuring the weight and density using sensitive balance and Archimedes' method. Wear morphologies and microstructures were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystalline phase compositions were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data. Multiple pair-wise comparison of means was performed by Tukey's post-hoc test. LD showed the highest fracture toughness, flexural strength, elastic modulus and crystallinity, followed by LEU and FEL, and FLU showed the lowest. However, the hardness of LD was lower than all the other three types of ceramics. For steatite antagonists, LD produced the least wear loss of antagonist, followed by LEU and FEL, and FLU had the most wear loss. For glass-ceramic materials, LD exhibited similar wear loss as LEU, but more than FLU and FEL did. Moreover, fracture occurred on the wear surface of FLU. In the progressive wear process, veneering porcelains showed better wear resistance but fluorapatite veneering porcelains appeared fracture surface. Monolithic lithium disilicate glass-ceramics with higher mechanical properties showed more wear loss, however

  20. Advanced methods for processing ceramics

    Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) is a flame assisted, open air chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The process is capable of producing textured, epitaxial coatings on single crystal substrates using low cost reagents. Combustion chemical vapor deposition is a relatively inexpensive, alternative thin film deposition process with potential to replace conventional coating technologies for certain applications. The goals of this project are to develop the CCVD process to the point that potential industrial applications can be identified and reliably assessed.

  1. Laser processing of ceramics for microelectronics manufacturing

    Sposili, Robert S.; Bovatsek, James; Patel, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    Ceramic materials are used extensively in the microelectronics, semiconductor, and LED lighting industries because of their electrically insulating and thermally conductive properties, as well as for their high-temperature-service capabilities. However, their brittleness presents significant challenges for conventional machining processes. In this paper we report on a series of experiments that demonstrate and characterize the efficacy of pulsed nanosecond UV and green lasers in machining ceramics commonly used in microelectronics manufacturing, such as aluminum oxide (alumina) and aluminum nitride. With a series of laser pocket milling experiments, fundamental volume ablation rate and ablation efficiency data were generated. In addition, techniques for various industrial machining processes, such as shallow scribing and deep scribing, were developed and demonstrated. We demonstrate that lasers with higher average powers offer higher processing rates with the one exception of deep scribes in aluminum nitride, where a lower average power but higher pulse energy source outperformed a higher average power laser.

  2. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  3. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders: a comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics.

    Lazar, Dolores R R; Bottino, Marco C; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H A

    2008-12-01

    (1) To synthesize 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. A coprecipitation route was used to synthesize a 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic processed by uniaxial compaction and pressureless sintering. Commercially available alumina or alumina/zirconia ceramics, namely Procera AllCeram (PA), In-Ceram Zirconia Block (CAZ) and In-Ceram Zirconia (IZ) were chosen for comparison. All specimens (6mmx5mmx5mm) were polished and ultrasonically cleaned. Qualitative phase analysis was performed by XRD and apparent densities were measured on the basis of Archimedes principle. Ceramics were also characterized using SEM, TEM and EDS. The hardness measurements were made employing Vickers hardness test. Fracture toughness (K(IC)) was calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). ANOVA revealed that the Vickers hardness (pceramic materials composition. It was confirmed that the PA ceramic was constituted of a rhombohedral alumina matrix, so-called alpha-alumina. Both CAZ and IZ ceramics presented tetragonal zirconia and alpha-alumina mixture of phases. The SEM/EDS analysis confirmed the presence of aluminum in PA ceramic. In the IZ and CAZ ceramics aluminum, zirconium and cerium in grains involved by a second phase containing aluminum, silicon and lanthanum were identified. PA showed significantly higher mean Vickers hardness values (H(V)) (18.4+/-0.5GPa) compared to vitreous CAZ (10.3+/-0.2GPa) and IZ (10.6+/-0.4GPa) ceramics. Experimental Y-TZP showed significantly lower results than that of the other monophased ceramic (PA) (pceramics (pceramic processing conditions led to ceramics with mechanical properties comparable to commercially available reinforced ceramic materials.

  4. Magnetoresistive ceramics. Recent progress: from basic understanding to applications

    Fontcuberta, J.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoresistive ceramics, based on half-metallic ferromagnetic oxides have received renewed attention in the last few years because of their possible applications. Here, we review some recent progress on the development of magnetoresistive ceramic materials such as La2/3Sr1/ 3MnO3 and Sr2FeMoO6 ceramic materials. We shall revisit their basic properties, the strategies that have been employed to understand and to improve their intrinsic properties, pushing the limits of their operation at temperatures well above room-temperature, and the development of some applications. This effort has required the contribution of a number of actors. Starting from research laboratories, it has progressively involved industries that nowadays are able to supply high quality raw-materials or to manufacture magnetoresistive components at large scale.

    Las cerámicas magnetorresistivas, basadas en óxidos semi-metálicos ferromagnéticos han recibido una renovada atención en los últimos años debido a sus posibles aplicaciones. Se revisan aquí algunos de los recientes progresos en el desarrollo de materiales cerámicos magnetorresistivos como La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 y Sr2FeMoO6. Se revisitan sus propiedades básicas, las estrategias empleadas para entender y mejorar sus propiedades intrínsecas, llevando sus límites de operación a temperaturas muy por encima de temperatura ambiente, y el desarrollo de algunas aplicaciones. Este esfuerzo ha requerido al contribución de un gran número de actores. Comenzando por laboratorios de investigación, se ha implicado progresivamente a industrias que hoy en día están capacitadas para suministrar materias primas de alta calidad o para fabricar componentes magnetorresistivos a gran escala.

  5. Advanced methods for processing ceramics

    Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Combustion chemical vapor deposition (combustion CVD) is being developed for the deposition of high temperature oxide coatings. The process is being evaluated as an alternative to more capital intensive conventional coating processes. The thrusts during this reporting period were the development of the combustion CVD process for depositing lanthanum monazite, the determination of the influence of aerosol size on coating morphology, the incorporation of combustion CVD coatings into thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and related oxidation research, and continued work on the deposition of zirconia-yttria coatings.

  6. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    Brogden, I. (ed.)

    1984-09-01

    This progress report covers the research and development activities of the Metals and Ceramics Division from January 1, 1983, through June 30, 1984. The format of the report follows the organizational structure of the division. Short summaries of technical work in progress in the various experimental groups are presented in six parts. Chapter 1 deals with the research and development activities of the Engineering Materials Section, Chapter 2 with the Processing Science and Technology Section, Chapter 3 with the Materials Science Section, Chapter 4 with Project Activities, Chapter 5 with Specialized Research Facilities and Equipment, and Chapter 6 with Miscellaneous Activities.

  7. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    Brogden, I.

    1984-09-01

    This progress report covers the research and development activities of the Metals and Ceramics Division from January 1, 1983, through June 30, 1984. The format of the report follows the organizational structure of the division. Short summaries of technical work in progress in the various experimental groups are presented in six parts. Chapter 1 deals with the research and development activities of the Engineering Materials Section, Chapter 2 with the Processing Science and Technology Section, Chapter 3 with the Materials Science Section, Chapter 4 with Project Activities, Chapter 5 with Specialized Research Facilities and Equipment, and Chapter 6 with Miscellaneous Activities

  8. Manufacturing of ceramic microcomponents by a rapid prototyping process chain

    Knitter, R.; Bauer, W.; Goehring, D.; Hausselt, J.

    2001-01-01

    Manufacturing of new ceramic components may be improved significantly by the use of rapid prototyping processes especially in the development of miniaturized or micropatterned components. Most known generative ceramic molding processes do not provide a sufficient resolution for the fabrication of microstructured components. In contrast to this, a rapid prototyping process chain that for example, combines micro-stereolithography and low-pressure injection molding, allows the rapid manufacturing of ceramic microcomponents from functional models to preliminary or small-lot series. (orig.)

  9. ATTAP/AGT101 - Year 2 progress in ceramic technology development

    Kidwell, J. R.; Lindberg, L. J.; Morey, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The progress made by the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) is summarized, with emphasis on the following areas: ceramic materials assessment and characterization, ceramic impact damage assessment, ceramic combustor evaluation, turbine inlet particle separator development, impact-tolerant turbine designs, and net-shape ceramic component fabrications. In the evolutionary ceramics development in the Automotive Gas Turbine (AGT101) and ATTAP programs initial designs were conceived to reduce stresses by using well-established criteria: bodies of revolution were preferred over nonaxisymmetric geometries, sharp corners were avoided, the contact area between components was kept as large as possible, and small parts were preferred over large when feasible. Projects discussed include: initial ceramic component fabrication by ceramic suppliers in 1990, engine test to 1371 C in 1991, 100-hr test bed engine durability test in 1991, and 300-hr test bed engine durability in 1992.

  10. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders : A comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics

    Lazar, Dolores R. R.; Bottino, Marco C.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. (1) To synthesize 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. Methods.

  11. Processing and characterization of ceramic superconductor/polymer composites

    Kander, R.G.; Namboodri, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    One way to more easily process a brittle high-temperature ceramic superconductor into a useful structure is to combine it with a polymer to form a composite material. Processing of polymer-based composites into complex shapes is well established and relatively easy when compared with traditional ceramic processing unit operations. In addition, incorporating a ceramic superconductor into a polymer matrix can improve mechanical performance as compared with a monolithic ceramic. Finally, because ceramic superconductors are susceptible to attack by moisture, a polymer-based composite structure can also provide protection from deleterious environmental effects. This paper focuses on the processing and subsequent characterization of ceramic superconductor/polymer composites designed primarily for electromagnetic shielding and diamagnetic applications. YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x [YBCO] ceramic superconductor is combined with poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] to form novel composite structures. Composite structures have been molded with both a discontinuous superconducting phase (i.e., ceramic particulate reinforced polymers) and with a continuous superconducting phase (i.e., polymer infiltrated porous ceramics). Characterization of these composite structures includes the determination of diamagnetic strength, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, mechanical performance, and environmental resistance. The goal of this program is to produce a composite structure with increased mechanical integrity and environmental resistance at liquid nitrogen temperatures without compromising the electromagnetic shielding and diamagnetic properties of the superconducting phase. Composites structures of this type are potentially useful in numerous magnetic applications including electromagnetic shielding, magnetic sensors, energy storage, magnetic levitation, and motor windings

  12. Microwave processing for ceramic materials in microsystem technology

    Rhee, S.

    2002-11-01

    In this study, the applicability of microwaves for sintering of monolithic ceramics and ceramic microcomponents was investigated. Experiments with 2.45 GHz and 30 GHz microwaves were conducted and contrasted to conventional thermal processing. The advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing were then assessed. Nanoscale zirconia and sub-micron lead-zirconate-titanate electroceramics were selected for the evaluation. (orig.)

  13. Process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Caputo, Anthony J.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for preparing fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of a fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

  14. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report for October 1991--March 1992

    1992-09-01

    Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. Focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. The work is organized into the following elements: materials and processing (monolithics [SiC, SiN], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining), materials design methodology, data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, NDE), and technology transfer. Individual abstracts were prepared for the individual contributions.

  15. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project: Semiannual progress report for April through September 1986

    1987-03-01

    An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  16. Biomimetic processing of oriented crystalline ceramic layers

    Cesarano, J.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project was to develop the capabilities for Sandia to fabricate self assembled Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of various materials and to exploit their two-dimensional crystalline structure to promote the growth of oriented thin films of inorganic materials at room temperature. This includes the design and synthesis of Langmuir-active (amphiphilic) organic molecules with end groups offering high nucleation potential for various ceramics. A longer range goal is that of understanding the underlying principles, making it feasible to use the techniques presented in this report to fabricate unique oriented films of various materials for electronic, sensor, and membrane applications. Therefore, whenever possible, work completed in this report was completed with the intention of addressing the fundamental phenomena underlying the growth of crystalline, inorganic films on template layers of highly organized organic molecules. This problem was inspired by biological processes, which often produce exquisitely engineered structures via templated growth on polymeric layers. Seashells, for example, exhibit great toughness owing to their fine brick-and-mortar structure that results from templated growth of calcium carbonate on top of layers of ordered organic proteins. A key goal in this work, therefore, is to demonstrate a positive correlation between the order and orientation of the template layer and that of the crystalline ceramic material grown upon it. The work completed was comprised of several parallel efforts that encompassed the entire spectrum of biomimetic growth from solution. Studies were completed on seashells and the mechanisms of growth for calcium carbonate. Studies were completed on the characterization of LB films and the capability developed for the in-house fabrication of these films. Standard films of fatty acids were studied as well as novel polypeptides and porphyrins that were synthesized.

  17. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods.

    Silva, Lucas Hian da; Lima, Erick de; Miranda, Ranulfo Benedito de Paula; Favero, Stéphanie Soares; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2017-08-28

    The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I) monolithic zirconia restorations; II) multilayered dental prostheses; III) new glass-ceramics; IV) polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V) novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  18. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods

    Lucas Hian da SILVA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I monolithic zirconia restorations; II multilayered dental prostheses; III new glass-ceramics; IV polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  19. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project: Semiannual progress report, October 1986-March 1987

    1987-08-01

    This report contains four subelements: (1) Monolithics, (2) Ceramic Composites, (3) Thermal and Wear Coatings, and (4) Joining. Ceramic research conducted within the Monolithics subelement currently includes work activities on green state ceramic fabrication, characterization, and densification and on structural, mechanical, and physical properties of these ceramics. Research conducted within the Ceramic Composites subelement currently includes silicon carbide and oxide-based composites, which, in addition to the work activities cited for Monolithics, include fiber synthesis and characterization. Research conducted in the Thermal and Wear Coatings subelement is currently limited to oxide-base coatings and involves coating synthesis, characterization, and determination of the mechanical and physical properties of the coatings. Research conducted in the Joining subelement currently includes studies of processes to produce strong stable joints between zirconia ceramics and iron-base alloys. A major objective of the research in the Materials and Processing project element is to systematically advance the understanding of the relationships between ceramic raw materials such as powders and reactant gases, the processing variables involved in producing the ceramic materials, and the resultant microstructures and physical and mechanical properties of the ceramic materials. Success in meeting this objective will provide US companies with new or improved ways for producing economical highly reliable ceramic components for advanced heat engines.

  20. Supercritical fluid technologies for ceramic-processing applications

    Matson, D.W.; Smith, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the applications of supercritical fluid technologies for ceramic processing. The physical and chemical properties of these densified gases are summarized and related to their use as solvents and processing media. Several areas are identified in which specific ceramic processes benefit from the unique properties of supercritical fluids. The rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions provides a technique for producing fine uniform powders and thin films of widely varying materials. Supercritical drying technologies allow the formation of highly porous aerogel products with potentially wide application. Hydrothermal processes leading to the formation of large single crystals and microcrystalline powders can also be extended into the supercritical regime of water. Additional applications and potential applications are identified in the areas of extraction of binders and other additives from ceramic compacts, densification of porous ceramics, the formation of powders in supercritical micro-emulsions, and in preceramic polymer processing

  1. Stereolithographic processing of ceramics: Photon diffusion in colloidal dispersion

    Garg, Rajeev

    The technique of ceramic stereolithography (CSL) has been developed for fabricating near net shape ceramic objects. In stereolithography, the three-dimensional computer design file of the object is sliced into thin layers. Each layer is physically fabricated by photocuring the surface of a liquid photo-polymerizable resin bath by raster scanning an ultra-violet laser across the surface of the resin. In CSL, the liquid resin is a high concentration colloidal dispersion in a solution of ultraviolet curable polymers. The ceramic green body fabricated by ceramic stereolithography technique is subjected to the post processing steps of drying, binder burnout and sintering to form a dense ceramic object. An aqueous alumina dispersion in photocuring polymers with particle volume fraction greater than 0.5 was formulated for CSL process. Low molecular weight solution polymers were found to be best suited for formulating ceramic resins due to their inherently low viscosity and favorable interactions with the ceramic dispersant. A hydroxyapatite ceramic resin was also developed for the use in the CSL technique. A model is developed to describe the photocuring process in concentrated ceramic dispersion. The curing profile in ceramic dispersion is governed by multiple scattering from the ceramic particles and absorption by the photocuring polymers. Diffusion theory of light transport is used to model the multiple scattering and absorption phenomena. It is found that diffusive transport adequately describes the phenomena of laser pulse propagation in highly concentrated colloidal dispersions. A model was developed to describe the absorption in highly concentrated ceramic dispersion. Various complex-shaped monolithic alumina and hydroxyapatite objects were fabricated by CSL and shown to possess uniform microstructure. The mechanical properties and sintering behavior of the parts fabricated by CSL are shown to be comparable to those fabricated by other ceramic processing technique

  2. Present status of chemical research progress on ceramics, 1

    Hirooka, Yoshihiko; Imai, Hisashi

    1982-07-01

    Among silicon-based ceramics, silicon nitride and silicon carbide have generated considerable interest in recent years as potential materials for many high temperature engineering applications. Particularly in their dense high-strength forms, these materials are being proposed for use as structural materials, for instance, in HTGRs and in CTRs. Their potential usefulness and the maximum use temperature absolutely depend upon their chemical characteristics such as thermal stability and chemical reactivity against high temperature environment. There still remains, however, much room to investigate in chemistry of ceramics both in technological and academic aspects. From this point of view some chemical works mainly on silicon nitride, silicon carbide and supplementarily on their common oxide, silicon dioxide, are systematically reviewed and a prospect of the direction to which future research on these ceramics shall proceed is implied in this document. (author)

  3. Artificial organs: recent progress in metals and ceramics.

    Nomura, Naoyuki

    2010-04-01

    The superior properties and novel functions of biomaterials, including metals and ceramics commonly used as implants and medical devices, have been the focus of a number of recent papers. New functions have been explored in metastable beta-Ti alloys, Ni-free Co-Cr-Mo alloys, Mg alloys, and other materials. In addition, porous metals and ceramics with sophisticated structures have been studied as scaffolds for regenerative medicine. In this review, recent advances in bioceramics, metallic biomaterials, and their composites are discussed in terms of their material properties and morphology.

  4. Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    microsystems, however, the specific properties of ceramics, like their high hardness, high thermal and chemical resistance or special piezo- or dielectric properties are of great sig- nificance. Unfortunately, just the first indicated properties make the use of the established micropatterning techniques impossible or not frugal for ...

  5. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong

    2012-01-01

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced

  6. Novel gelforming process for near net shape ceramic component production

    Franks, G.V.; Johnson, S.B.; Dunstan, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    A novel gelforming process for producing near-net shape ceramic components has been developed. A low viscosity, high volume fraction, ceramic suspension containing a small amount of bio-polymer is poured or injected into a mould. The suspension is gelled within the mould by a temperature activated crosslinking mechanism. The rheological behaviour of the body within the mould is changed from liquid-like to solid-like in a short period of time. The wet mechanical strength of the gelled bodies is sufficient to allow the body to be demoulded and handled without damaging the component. Near net shapes of complex geometry are formed in this way. The wet green body is then dried and densified using traditional methods. Potentially this process can be used to produce inexpensive reliable high strength ceramic components quickly and safely. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  7. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced.

  8. The ultrastructure and processing properties of Straumann Bone Ceramic and NanoBone.

    Dietze, S; Bayerlein, T; Proff, P; Hoffmann, A; Gedrange, T

    2006-02-01

    The ultrastructure, fundamental chemistry, and processing modes of fully synthetic bone grafting materials are relevant to the reconstruction of osseous defects. Rapid progress in the profitable market of biomaterials has led to the development of various bone substitutes. Despite all these efforts, an ideal and full substitute of autologous bone is not yet in sight. With regard to anorganic calcium phosphate ceramics, Straumann Bone Ceramic and NanoBone are compared. These have a similar composition and are osteoconductive, which indispensably requires contact with well-vascularised bone.

  9. Ceramic Technology Project, semiannual progress report for October 1993 through March 1994

    Johnson, D.R.

    1994-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990, the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The original objective of the project was to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. The direction of the Ceramic Technology Project is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned.

  10. Potential ceramics processing applications with high-energy electron beams

    Struve, K.W.; Turman, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    High-energy, high-current electron beams may offer unique features for processing of ceramics that are not available with any other heat source. These include the capability to instantaneously heat to several centimeters in depth, to preferentially deposit energy in dense, high-z materials, to process at atmospheric pressures in air or other gases, to have large control over heating volume and heating rate, and to have efficient energy conversion. At a recent workshop organized by the authors to explore opportunities for electron beam processing of ceramics, several applications were identified for further development. These were ceramic joining, fabrication of ceramic powders, and surface processing of ceramics. It may be possible to join ceramics by either electron-beam brazing or welding. Brazing with refractory metals might also be feasible. The primary concern for brazing is whether the braze material can wet to the ceramic when rapidly heated by an electron beam. Raw ceramic powders, such as silicon nitride and aluminum nitride, which are difficult to produce by conventional techniques, could possibly be produced by vaporizing metals in a nitrogen atmosphere. Experiments need to be done to verify that the vaporized metal can fully react with the nitrogen. By adjusting beam parameters, high-energy beams can be used to remove surface flaws which are often sites of fracture initiation. They can also be used for surface cleaning. The advantage of electron beams rather than ion beams for this application is that the heat deposition can be graded into the material. The authors will discuss the capabilities of beams from existing machines for these applications and discuss planned experiments

  11. Process and device for forming imprints on ceramic tubes

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the present invention is a process and a device for making imprints on ceramic tubes and these ceramic tubes with imprints. It is known that in uranium enrichment processes by gaseous diffusion, microporous tubes are used to made the diffuser units used for the application of this isotope enrichment process. It is known that these microporous tubes are generally made in two stages. In a first stage, a macroporous ceramic tube called a ''support'' is made. In a second stage, an internal microporous deposit is made which makes it possible to obtain a tube called a ''barrier'' finally having the required porosity to apply the gaseous diffusion enrichment process. The present invention involves the first stage of the manufacturing process of the barriers and, more precisely, a step in the manufacturing process of the supports that makes it possible to improve the efficiency of these barriers

  12. Minimum additive waste stabilization using vitreous ceramics. Progress report, October 1994--September 1995

    Feng, X.; Hahn, W.K.; Gong, M.; Gong, W.; Wang, L.; Ewing, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Vitreous ceramic waste forms are being developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to complement glass waste forms in implementing the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) Program to support the US Department of Energy's environmental restoration efforts. These vitreous ceramics are composed of various metal-oxide crystalline phases embedded in a silicate-glass phase. This work extends the success of vitreous ceramic waste forms to treat wastes with both high metal and high alkali contents. Two successful approaches are discussed: developing high-durability alkali-binding crystals in a durable glassy matrix, and developing water-soluble crystals in a durable and continuous glassy matrix. Nepheline-vitreous ceramics were demonstrated for the immobilization of high-alkali wastes with alkali contents up to 21 wt%. The chemical durability of the nepheline-vitreous ceramics is better than the corresponding glasses, especially in over longer times. Vitreous ceramics with Cs 2 O loading up to 35.4 wt% have been developed. Vitreous ceramic waste forms were developed from 90 and 100% Oak Ridge National Laboratory K-25 pond sludge. Heat treatment resulted in targeted crystal formation of spinels, potassium feldspar, and Ca-P phases. The K-25 pond sludge vitreous ceramics were up to 42 times more durable than high-level environmental assessments (EA) glass. The toxicity characteristics leach procedure (TCLP) concentration of LVC-6 is at least 2,000 times lower than US Environmental Protection Agency limits. Idaho Chemical Process Plant (ICPP) calcined wastes were immobilized into vitreous ceramics with calcine loading up to 88%. These ICPP-vitreous ceramics were more durable than the EA glass by factors of 5 to 30. Vitreous ceramic waste forms are being developed to complement, not to replace, glass waste forms

  13. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project. Semiannual progress report, April-September 1985

    1986-05-01

    An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with input from private industry. Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. Focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. The work described in this report is organized according to the following WBS project elements: management and coordination; materials and processing (monolithics, ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining); materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts); data base and life prediction (time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, NDE development); and technology transfer. This report includes contributions from all currently active project participants.

  14. Ceramic/metal nanocomposites by lyophilization: Processing and HRTEM study

    Gutierrez-Gonzalez, C.F.; Agouram, S.; Torrecillas, R.; Moya, J.S.; Lopez-Esteban, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A cryogenic route has been used to obtain ceramic/metal nanostructured powders. ► The powders present good homogeneity and dispersion of metal. ► The metal nanoparticle size distributions are centred in 17–35 nm. ► Both phases, ceramic and metal, present a high degree of crystallinity. ► Good metal/ceramic interfaces due to epitaxial growth, studied by HRTEM. -- Abstract: This work describes a wet-processing route based on spray-freezing and subsequent lyophilization designed to obtain nanostructured ceramic/metal powders. Starting from the ceramic powder and the corresponding metal salt, a water-based suspension is sprayed on liquid nitrogen. The frozen powders are subsequently freeze-dried, calcined and reduced. The material was analyzed using X-ray diffraction analysis at all stages. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies showed a uniform distribution of metal nanoparticles on the ceramic grain surfaces, good interfaces and high crystallinity, with an average metal particle size in the nanometric range.

  15. Research Progress on Preparation for Biomass-based SiC Ceramic

    CUI He-shuai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC ceramics prepared by the conventional process has excellent properties and wide application prospects, but the increased cost of high-temperature preparation process restricts its further development. In contrast, the abundant porous structure of biomass makes itself to be ideal replacement of SiC ceramic prepared at low temperature. This paper reviewed the structure characteristics, preparation methods, pyrolysis mechanism and influence parameters of biomass-based SiC ceramic, and eventually explored the current problems and development trends of the pretreatment of carbon source and silicon source, the pyrolysis process and the application research on the preparation for biomass-based SiC ceramic.

  16. Modelling and analysis of CVD processes for ceramic membrane preparation

    Brinkman, H.W.; Cao, G.Z.; Meijerink, J.; de Vries, Karel Jan; Burggraaf, Anthonie

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented that describes the modified chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process (which takes place in advance of the electrochemical vapour deposition (EVD) process) to deposit ZrO2 inside porous media for the preparation and modification of ceramic membranes. The isobaric

  17. High temperature properties and processes in ceramics: thermomigration

    1978-01-01

    The focus of this program is on the effects of large temperature gradients on the transport processes, the defect structure and resulting physical properties of ceramics. In particular, the transport of ions due to thermal gradients is one of the least understood phenomenon in materials science and is presumably based on fundamental understanding of thermodynamics, atomistic kinetic processes, and structure-property relationships. The purpose of this research is to systematically consider each of the elements of atomic transport due to driving forces other than composition gradients in a model ceramic system

  18. Processing and properties of large-sized ceramic slabs

    Raimondo, M.; Dondi, M.; Zanelli, C.; Guarini, G.; Gozzi, A.; Marani, F.; Fossa, L.

    2010-07-01

    Large-sized ceramic slabs with dimensions up to 360x120 cm{sup 2} and thickness down to 2 mm are manufactured through an innovative ceramic process, starting from porcelain stoneware formulations and involving wet ball milling, spray drying, die-less slow-rate pressing, a single stage of fast drying-firing, and finishing (trimming, assembling of ceramic-fiberglass composites). Fired and unfired industrial slabs were selected and characterized from the technological, compositional (XRF, XRD) and microstructural (SEM) viewpoints. Semi-finished products exhibit a remarkable microstructural uniformity and stability in a rather wide window of firing schedules. The phase composition and compact microstructure of fired slabs are very similar to those of porcelain stoneware tiles. The values of water absorption, bulk density, closed porosity, functional performances as well as mechanical and tribological properties conform to the top quality range of porcelain stoneware tiles. However, the large size coupled with low thickness bestow on the slab a certain degree of flexibility, which is emphasized in ceramic-fiberglass composites. These outstanding performances make the large-sized slabs suitable to be used in novel applications: building and construction (new floorings without dismantling the previous paving, ventilated facades, tunnel coverings, insulating panelling), indoor furnitures (table tops, doors), support for photovoltaic ceramic panels. (Author) 24 refs.

  19. Processing and properties of large-sized ceramic slabs

    Raimondo, M.; Dondi, M.; Zanelli, C.; Guarini, G.; Gozzi, A.; Marani, F.; Fossa, L.

    2010-01-01

    Large-sized ceramic slabs with dimensions up to 360x120 cm 2 and thickness down to 2 mm are manufactured through an innovative ceramic process, starting from porcelain stoneware formulations and involving wet ball milling, spray drying, die-less slow-rate pressing, a single stage of fast drying-firing, and finishing (trimming, assembling of ceramic-fiberglass composites). Fired and unfired industrial slabs were selected and characterized from the technological, compositional (XRF, XRD) and microstructural (SEM) viewpoints. Semi-finished products exhibit a remarkable microstructural uniformity and stability in a rather wide window of firing schedules. The phase composition and compact microstructure of fired slabs are very similar to those of porcelain stoneware tiles. The values of water absorption, bulk density, closed porosity, functional performances as well as mechanical and tribological properties conform to the top quality range of porcelain stoneware tiles. However, the large size coupled with low thickness bestow on the slab a certain degree of flexibility, which is emphasized in ceramic-fiberglass composites. These outstanding performances make the large-sized slabs suitable to be used in novel applications: building and construction (new floorings without dismantling the previous paving, ventilated facades, tunnel coverings, insulating panelling), indoor furnitures (table tops, doors), support for photovoltaic ceramic panels. (Author) 24 refs.

  20. Accuracy of data processing in ceramics bend tests

    Grushevskij, Ya.L.

    1979-01-01

    Described is the approximation and differentiation technique for loading-deformation charts being used to determine the bending strength of ceramics with provision for the nonlinearity of the deformation charts and differences in mechanical behaviuor of material during tension and compression. A relation between the strength calculation accuracy and experimental data reading errors has been established for such ceramic mateirals as Al 2 O 3 +15 % ZrSiO 4 , Y 2 O 3 +2.8% Al, etc. The negligence of the found aspects of mechanical material behaviuor was shown to result in errors two or three times higher than those introduced by the experiment results processing method

  1. Process considerations for hot pressing ceramic nuclear waste forms

    Wilson, C.N.; Brite, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    Spray calcined simulated ceramic nuclear waste powders were hot pressed in graphite, nickel-lined graphite and ZrO 2 -lined Al 2 O 3 dies. Densification, initial off-gas, waste element retention and pellet-die interactions were evaluated. Indicated process considerations and limitations are discussed. 15 figures

  2. Process for producing ceramic nitrides anc carbonitrides and their precursors

    Brown, G.M.; Maya, L.

    1987-02-25

    A process for preparing ceramic nitrides and carbon nitrides in the form of very pure, fine particulate powder. Appropriate precursors is prepared by reaching a transition metal alkylamide with ammonia to produce a mixture of metal amide and metal imide in the form of an easily pyrolyzable precipitate.

  3. Ceramic technology report. Semi-annual progress report, April 1994--September 1994

    Johnson, D.R.

    1995-06-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.

  4. Process Development of Porcelain Ceramic Material with Binder Jetting Process for Dental Applications

    Miyanaji, Hadi; Zhang, Shanshan; Lassell, Austin; Zandinejad, Amirali; Yang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Custom ceramic structures possess significant potentials in many applications such as dentistry and aerospace where extreme environments are present. Specifically, highly customized geometries with adequate performance are needed for various dental prostheses applications. This paper demonstrates the development of process and post-process parameters for a dental porcelain ceramic material using binder jetting additive manufacturing (AM). Various process parameters such as binder amount, drying power level, drying time and powder spread speed were studied experimentally for their effect on geometrical and mechanical characteristics of green parts. In addition, the effects of sintering and printing parameters on the qualities of the densified ceramic structures were also investigated experimentally. The results provide insights into the process-property relationships for the binder jetting AM process, and some of the challenges of the process that need to be further characterized for the successful adoption of the binder jetting technology in high quality ceramic fabrications are discussed.

  5. Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of hazardous liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report

    Cohen, Y.

    1998-01-01

    'This report summarizes the work progress over the last 1.75 years of a 3 year project. The objectives of the project have been to develop a new class of ceramic-supported polymeric membranes that could be tailored-designed for a wide-range of applications in remediation and pollution prevention. To date, a new class of chemically-modified ceramic membranes was developed for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsions and for the pervaporation removal of volatile organics from aqueous systems. These new ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membranes are fabricated by modifying the pore surface of a ceramic membrane support by a graft polymerization process (Chaimberg and Cohen, 1994). The graft polymerization process consists of activating the membrane surface with alkoxy vinyl silanes onto which vinyl monomers are added via free-radical graft polymerization resulting in a thin surface layer of terminally anchored polymer chains. Reaction conditions are selected based on knowledge of the graft polymerization kinetics for the specific polymer/substrate system. The resultant ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membrane is a composite structure in which mechanical strength is provided by the ceramic support and the selectivity is determined by the covalently bonded polymer brush layer. Thus, one of the unique attributes of the CSP membrane is that it can be used in environments where the polymer layer is swollen (or even completely miscible) in the mixture to be separated (Castro et al., 1993). It is important to note that the above modification process is carried out under mild conditions (e.g., temperature of about 70 C) and is well suited for large scale commercial application. In a series of studies, the applicability of a polyvinylpyrrolidone CSP membrane was demonstrated for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsion under a variety of flow conditions (Castro et al.,1996). Improved membrane performance was achieved due to minimization of surface adsorption of the oil components

  6. Metals and Ceramics Division annual progress report, October 1, 1978-June 30, 1979

    Peterson, S.

    1979-09-01

    Research is reported concerning: (1) engineering materials including materials compatibility, mechanical properties, nondestructive testing, pressure vessel technology, and welding and brazing; (2) fuels and processes consisting of ceramic technology, fuel cycle technology, fuels evaluation, fuels fabrication and metals processing; and (3) materials science which includes, ceramic studies, physical metallurgy and properties, radiation effects and microstructural analysis, metastable and superconducting materials, structure and properties of surfaces, theoretical research, and x-ray research and applications. Highlights of the work of the metallographic group and the current status of the High-Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) and the Materials and Structures Technology Management Center (MSTMC) are presented

  7. Metals and Ceramics Division. Annual progress report, ending June 30, 1980

    1980-09-01

    Research is reported concerning: (1) engineering materials, including materials compatibility, mechanical properties, nondestructive testing, pressure vessel technology, and welding and brazing; (2) fuels and processes consisting of ceramic technology, fuel cycle technology, fuels evaluation, fuel fabrication and metals processing; and (3) materials science which includes, ceramic studies, physical metallurgy properties, radiation effects and microstructural analysis, metastable and superconducting materials, structure and properties of surfaces, theroretical research and x-ray research and applications. Highlights of the work of the metallographic group and the current state of the High-Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) and the Materials and Structures Technology Management Center (MSTMC) are presented. (FS)

  8. Metals and Ceramics Division annual progress report, October 1, 1978-June 30, 1979

    Peterson, S. (ed.)

    1979-09-01

    Research is reported concerning: (1) engineering materials including materials compatibility, mechanical properties, nondestructive testing, pressure vessel technology, and welding and brazing; (2) fuels and processes consisting of ceramic technology, fuel cycle technology, fuels evaluation, fuels fabrication and metals processing; and (3) materials science which includes, ceramic studies, physical metallurgy and properties, radiation effects and microstructural analysis, metastable and superconducting materials, structure and properties of surfaces, theoretical research, and x-ray research and applications. Highlights of the work of the metallographic group and the current status of the High-Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) and the Materials and Structures Technology Management Center (MSTMC) are presented. (FS)

  9. Metals and Ceramics Division. Annual progress report, ending June 30, 1980

    1980-09-01

    Research is reported concerning: (1) engineering materials, including materials compatibility, mechanical properties, nondestructive testing, pressure vessel technology, and welding and brazing; (2) fuels and processes consisting of ceramic technology, fuel cycle technology, fuels evaluation, fuel fabrication and metals processing; and (3) materials science which includes, ceramic studies, physical metallurgy properties, radiation effects and microstructural analysis, metastable and superconducting materials, structure and properties of surfaces, theroretical research and x-ray research and applications. Highlights of the work of the metallographic group and the current state of the High-Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) and the Materials and Structures Technology Management Center (MSTMC) are presented

  10. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  11. Proceedings of the national symposium on materials and processing: functional glass/glass-ceramics, advanced ceramics and high temperature materials

    Ghosh, A.; Sahu, A.K.; Viswanadham, C.S.; Ramanathan, S.; Hubli, R.C.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2012-10-01

    With the development of materials science it is becoming increasingly important to process some novel materials in the area of glass, advanced ceramics and high temperature metals/alloys, which play an important role in the realization of many new technologies. Such applications demand materials with tailored specifications. Glasses and glass-ceramics find exotic applications in areas like radioactive waste storage, optical communication, zero thermal expansion coefficient telescopic mirrors, human safety gadgets (radiation resistance windows, bullet proof apparels, heat resistance components etc), biomedical (implants, hyperthermia treatment, bone cement, bone grafting etc). Advanced ceramic materials have been beneficial in biomedical applications due to their strength, biocompatibility and wear resistance. Non-oxide ceramics such as carbides, borides, silicides, their composites, refractory metals and alloys are useful as structural and control rod components in high temperature fission/ fusion reactors. Over the years a number of novel processing techniques like selective laser melting, microwave heating, nano-ceramic processing etc have emerged. A detailed understanding of the various aspects of synthesis, processing and characterization of these materials provides the base for development of novel technologies for different applications. Keeping this in mind and realizing the need for taking stock of such developments a National Symposium on Materials and Processing -2012 (MAP-2012) was planned. The topics covered in the symposium are ceramics, glass/glass-ceramics and metals and materials. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. Ceramic matrix composites using polymer pyrolysis and liquid densification processing

    Davis, H.O.; Petrak, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    The polymer precursor approach for manufacture of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) is both flexible and tailorable to shape and engineering requirements. The tailorability includes a wide range of reinforcements, polymer matrix precursors and fillers. Processing is selected based on cure/pressure requirements to best produce the required shape, radii, fiber volume and fiber orientation. Combinations of tooling used for cure/pressure applications are discussed and fabricated components are shown. ((orig.))

  13. [Research progress in CoCr metal-ceramic alloy fabricated by selective laser melting].

    Yan, X; Lin, H

    2018-02-09

    Cobalt-chromium alloys have been applied to dental porcelain fused to metal (PFM) restorations over the past decades owing to their excellent corrosion resistance, good biocompatibility and low price. The production of CoCr metal-ceramic restorations has always been based on traditional lost-wax casting techniques. However, in recent years, selective laser melting (SLM) is becoming more and more highly valued by dental laboratories and dental practitioners due to its individuation, precision and efficiency. This paper mainly reviews the recent researches on the production process of copings, microstructure, mechanical property, metal-ceramic bond strength, fit of copings, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of SLM CoCr metal-ceramic alloy.

  14. Concept and construction process of the ceramic curtain of Vila-real Library

    A. Peñín Llobell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction of the Library of Vila-real, selected in 2012 in the VIII Latin American Biennial of Architecture and Urbanism, highlights the importance of collaboration with industry for the development and application of its outer membrane. The analysis of the construction process of the ceramic cylindrical curtain that defines it, performed by white glazed ceramic, 5 cm diameter and 7.5 m height, reveals this fact. The system builds an interstitial space, essential for its use and environmental integration. At the same time it links the building to both local industrial fabric, which aims to establish itself as one of its exponents, and to the Mediterranean culture of filters. The procedure followed is ascribed to the postartesanal and pragmatic perspective that beyond the modern heroes, introduced characters like Jean Prouvé and that today, we state, should find natural and legal channels for its development, on behalf of the progress of the construction sector.

  15. Fast densification processes for carbon and ceramic composites

    Delhaes, P.; Robin-Brosse, C.; David, P.

    2006-01-01

    A general introduction of the different vapour infiltration processes developed to prepare carbon-carbon composites is presented. Then a novel method with a liquid precursor, called film boiling or calefaction technique is described and compared with the usual ones. It is shown how this technique is very attractive to prepare carbon and ceramic composites within a short processing time together with a higher carbon yield. Finally the pertinent parameters of this process to evaluate its advantages and drawbacks for a further industrial development are analysed. (authors)

  16. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    McHargue, C.J.

    1977-09-01

    Progress is reported for research programs in the metals and ceramics division of ORNL. In structure of materials, theoretical research, x-ray diffraction studies, studies of erosion of ceramics, preparation and synthesis of high temperature and special service materials, and studies of stabilities of microphases in high-temperature structural materials. Research into deformation and mechanical properties included physical metallurgy, and grain boundary segregation and embrittlement. Physical properties and transport phenomena were studied and included mechanisms of surface and solid state reactions, and properties of superconducting materials. The radiation effects program, directed at understanding the effects of composition and microstructure on the structure and properties of materials irradiated at elevated temperatures, is also described

  17. Sol-gel processing of glasses and glass-ceramics for microelectronic packaging

    Sriram, M.A.; Kumta, P.N.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years considerable progress has been made in electronic packaging substrate technology. The future need of miniaturization of devices to increase the signal processing speeds calls for an increase in the device density requiring the substrates to be designed for better thermal, mechanical and electrical efficiency. Fast signal propagation with minimum delay requires the substrate to possess very low dielectric constant. Several glasses and glass-ceramic materials have been identified over the years which show good promise as candidate substrate materials. among these borophosphate and borophosphosilicate glass-ceramics have been recently identified to have the lowest dielectric constant. This paper reports that sol-gel processing has been used to synthesize borosilicate, borophosphosilicate and borophosphate glasses and glass-ceramics using inexpensive boron oxide and phosphorus pentoxide precursors. Preliminary results of the processing of these gels and the effect of volatility of boron alkoxide and its modification on the gel structure are described. X-ray diffraction, Differential thermal analyses and FTIR have been used to characterize the as-prepared and heat treated gels

  18. Processing of porous zirconia ceramics by direct consolidation with starch

    Garrido, Liliana B; Albano, Maria P

    2008-01-01

    Porous ceramics are used especially for those environments with high temperatures, heavy wear and in a corrosive medium. Zirconium-based materials are useful for such applications as sensors, filters, support for catalytic reactions, porous components for sofc and in biomedical applications. A conventional method for producing porous ceramics consists of the addition and later decomposition by calcination (pyrolisis) of different organic materials that act as pore formers. Several wet processing possibilities have been developed. Among these is a technique of direct consolidation with starch. This process begins with the preparation of an aqueous suspension of the ceramic with the dispersants needed to stabilize it, to which the starch is added. After casting in a waterproof mold, the suspension thermally hardens into the desired shape. The dry compacts undergo the sintering cycle to obtain pieces almost in their final form. This study aims to optimize the processing of porous zirconium ceramics using starch as a pore and binder forming agent. Zirconium with 3% yttrium molar stabilized in tetragonal phase was used. The aqueous suspensions (52-55% vol) of the zirconium-starch mixtures with different compositions were stabilized with a commercial solution of ammonium polyacrylate as a dispersant and were hardened in plastic molds at 90 o C for 30 min. The influence of added volume of starch on the physical characteristics of the pieces in green state was established while maintaining the temperature, the gelling time and the conditions of constant drying. The sintering was carried out at 1000-1500 o C-2h. The characteristics of the sintered product were evaluated by measuring density, volumetric contraction, intrusion of Hg and the evolution of the crystalline phases by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microstructural properties of ceramic (pore volume, the relation between open and closed porosity, size distribution, morphology of

  19. Raw materials for advanced ceramics: rare earths separation processes

    Ricci, D.R.; Nobre, J.S.M.; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of obtaining purified rare earths oxidesis related, mainly to the increasing use of these compounds as raw materials for advanced ceramics. Processes of rare earths separation and purification are almost always based on the solvent extraction, fractional precipitation and ion exchange chromatography techniques, whose association depends on the initial concentrate and on the desired purity. This paper describes some steps of fractionation of didymium carbonate by using the solvent extraction and fractional precipitation techniques. The experimental conditions presented here have enable the production of lantanium, neodimium - praseodimium, samarium - gadolinium and ytrium concentrates, which constitute the intermediate fractions of the overall process to obtain high purity rare earths. (author) [pt

  20. Numerical modelling of evaporation in a ceramic layer in the tape casting process

    Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Jambhekar, V. A.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    Evaporation of water from a ceramic layer is a key phenomenon in the drying process for the manufacturing of tape cast ceramics. This process contains mass, momentum and energy exchange between the porous medium and the free-flow region. In order to analyze such interaction processes, a Represent......Evaporation of water from a ceramic layer is a key phenomenon in the drying process for the manufacturing of tape cast ceramics. This process contains mass, momentum and energy exchange between the porous medium and the free-flow region. In order to analyze such interaction processes...

  1. The nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    A new low-temperature (50--60 degrees C) process for the reduction of nitrate or nitrite to ammonia gas in a stirred, ethylene glycol led reactor has been developed. The process has nearly completed 2 years of bench-top testing in preparation for a pilot-scale demonstration in the fall of 1994. The nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process utilizes the active metal Al (in powder or shot form) in alkaline solution to convert nitrate to ammonia gas with the liberation of heat. Between 0.8 and 1.6 kg of Al per kilogram of sodium nitrate is required to convert solutions of between 3.1 and 6.2 M nitrate to near zero concentration. Prior to feeding Al to the reactor, 40 μm quartz is added based upon the total sodium content of the waste. Upon adding the Al, a by-product of gibbsite precipitates in the reactor as the ammonia leaves the solution. At the end of the reaction, the alumina-silica-based solids are dewatered, calcined, pressed, and sintered into a hard ceramic. Comparing the volume of the final ceramic product with the volume of the starting waste solution, we obtain an ∼70% volume reduction. This compares with an expected 50% volume increase if the waste were immobilized in cement-based grout. The process is being developed for use at Hanford, where as much as 125,000 tonnes of nitrate salts is stored in 4 million liter tanks. DOE may be able to shred radioactively contaminated scrap aluminum, and use this metal to feed the NAC reactor

  2. Infiltration processing of metal matrix composites using coated ceramic particulates

    Leon-Patino, Carlos Alberto

    2001-07-01

    A new process was developed to fabricate particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs). The process involves three steps: (1) modifying the particulate surface by metal coating, (2) forming a particulate porous compact; and (3) introducing metal into the channel network by vacuum infiltration. MMCs with different reinforcements, volume fractions, and sizes can be produced by this technique. Powders of alumina and silicon carbide were successfully coated with nickel and copper in preparation for infiltration with molten aluminum. Electroless Ni and Cu deposition was used since it enhances the wettability of the reinforcements for composite fabrication. While Cu deposits were polycrystalline, traces of phosphorous co-deposited from the electroless bath gave an amorphous Ni-P coating. The effect of metal coating on wetting behavior was evaluated at 800°C on plain and metal-coated ceramic plates using a sessile drop technique. The metallic films eliminated the non-wetting behavior of the uncoated ceramics, leading to equilibrium contact angles in the order of 12° and below 58° for Ni and Cu coated ceramics, respectively. The spreading data indicated that local diffusion at the triple junction was the governing mechanism of the wetting process. Precipitation of intermetallic phases in the drop/ceramic interface delayed the formation of Al4C3. Infiltration with molten Al showed that the coated-particulates are suitable as reinforcing materials for fabricating MMCs, giving porosity-free components with a homogeneously distributed reinforcing phase. The coating promoted easy metal flow through the preform, compared to the non-infiltration behavior of the uncoated counterparts. Liquid state diffusion kinetics due to temperature dependent viscosity forces controlled the infiltration process. Microstructural analysis indicated the formation of intermetallic phases such as CuAl 2, in the case of Cu coating, and Ni2Al3 and NiAl 3 when Ni-coated powders were infiltrated. The

  3. Statistical process control applied to the manufacturing of beryllia ceramics

    Ferguson, G.P.; Jech, D.E.; Sepulveda, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    To compete effectively in an international market, scrap and re-work costs must be minimized. Statistical Process Control (SPC) provides powerful tools to optimize production performance. These techniques are currently being applied to the forming, metallizing, and brazing of beryllia ceramic components. This paper describes specific examples of applications of SPC to dry-pressing of beryllium oxide 2x2 substrates, to Mo-Mn refractory metallization, and to metallization and brazing of plasma tubes used in lasers where adhesion strength is critical

  4. An 8-year evaluation of sintered ceramic and glass ceramic inlays processed by the Cerec CAD/CAM system

    Pallesen, U.; Dijken van, J.W.V.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate Cerec CAD/CAM inlays processed of two industrially made machinable ceramics during an 8-yr follow-up period. Each of 16 patients received two similar ceramic inlays. Half the number of the inlays were made of a feldspathic (Vita Mark II) and the other...... of a glass ceramic (Dicor MGC) block. The inlays were luted with a dual resin composite and evaluated clinically using modified USPHS criteria at baseline, 8 months, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8 yr, and indirectly using models. At baseline, 84% of the inlays were estimated as optimal and 16% as acceptable. Postoperative...... sensitivity was reported by one patient for 8 months. Of the 32 inlays evaluated during the 8 yr, 3 failed due to fracture of the material. No secondary caries was found adjacent to the inlays. No significant differences in the clinical performance were found between inlays made of the two ceramics. It can...

  5. Ceramic membranes for gas processing in coal gasification

    Smart, S.; Lin, C.X.C.; Ding, L.; Thambimuthu, K.; da Costa, J.C.D. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia)

    2010-07-01

    Pre-combustion options via coal gasification, especially integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) processes, are attracting the attention of governments, industry and the research community as an attractive alternative to conventional power generation. It is possible to build an IGCC plant with CCS with conventional technologies however; these processes are energy intensive and likely to reduce power plant efficiencies. Novel ceramic membrane technologies, in particular molecular sieving silica (MSS) and pervoskite membranes, offer the opportunity to reduce efficiency losses by separating gases at high temperatures and pressures. MSS membranes can be made preferentially selective for H{sub 2}, enabling both enhanced production, via a water-gas shift membrane reactor, and recovery of H{sub 2} from the syngas stream at high temperatures. They also allow CO{sub 2} to be concentrated at high pressures, reducing the compression loads for transportation and enabling simple integration with CO{sub 2} storage or sequestration operations. Perovskite membranes provide a viable alternative to cryogenic distillation for air separation by delivering the tonnage of oxygen required for coal gasification at a reduced cost. In this review we examine ceramic membrane technologies for high temperature gas separation and discuss the operational, mechanical, design and process considerations necessary for their successful integration into IGCC with CCS systems.

  6. Safety assessment of the liquid-fed ceramic melter process

    Buelt, J.L.; Partain, W.L.

    1980-08-01

    As part of its development program for the solidification of high-level nuclear waste, Pacific Northwest Laboratory assessed the safety issues for a complete liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) process. The LFCM process, an adaption of commercial glass-making technology, is being developed to convert high-level liquid waste from the nuclear fuel cycle into glass. This safety assessment uncovered no unresolved or significant safety problems with the LFCM process. Although in this assessment the LFCM process was not directly compared with other solidification processes, the safety hazards of the LFCM process are comparable to those of other processes. The high processing temperatures of the glass in the LFCM pose no additional significant safety concerns, and the dispersible inventory of dried waste (calcine) is small. This safety assessment was based on the nuclear power waste flowsheet, since power waste is more radioactive than defense waste at the time of solidification, and all accident conditions for the power waste would have greater radiological consequences than those for defense waste. An exhaustive list of possible off-standard conditions and equipment failures was compiled. These accidents were then classified according to severity of consequence and type of accident. Radionuclide releases to the stack were calculated for each group of accidents using conservative assumptions regarding the retention and decontamination features of the process and facility. Two recommendations that should be considered by process designers are given in the safety assessment

  7. Processing and properties of large-sized ceramic slabs

    Fossa, L.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Large-sized ceramic slabs – with dimensions up to 360x120 cm2 and thickness down to 2 mm – are manufactured through an innovative ceramic process, starting from porcelain stoneware formulations and involving wet ball milling, spray drying, die-less slow-rate pressing, a single stage of fast drying-firing, and finishing (trimming, assembling of ceramic-fiberglass composites. Fired and unfired industrial slabs were selected and characterized from the technological, compositional (XRF, XRD and microstructural (SEM viewpoints. Semi-finished products exhibit a remarkable microstructural uniformity and stability in a rather wide window of firing schedules. The phase composition and compact microstructure of fired slabs are very similar to those of porcelain stoneware tiles. The values of water absorption, bulk density, closed porosity, functional performances as well as mechanical and tribological properties conform to the top quality range of porcelain stoneware tiles. However, the large size coupled with low thickness bestow on the slab a certain degree of flexibility, which is emphasized in ceramic-fiberglass composites. These outstanding performances make the large-sized slabs suitable to be used in novel applications: building and construction (new floorings without dismantling the previous paving, ventilated façades, tunnel coverings, insulating panelling, indoor furnitures (table tops, doors, support for photovoltaic ceramic panels.

    Se han fabricado piezas de gran formato, con dimensiones de hasta 360x120 cm, y menos de 2 mm, de espesor, empleando métodos innovadores de fabricación, partiendo de composiciones de gres porcelánico y utilizando, molienda con bolas por vía húmeda, atomización, prensado a baja velocidad sin boquilla de extrusión, secado y cocción rápido en una sola etapa, y un acabado que incluye la adhesión de fibra de vidrio al soporte cerámico y el rectificado de la pieza final. Se han

  8. Study on extrusion process of SiC ceramic matrix

    Dai, Xiao-Yuan; Shen, Fan; Ji, Jia-You; Wang, Shu-Ling; Xu, Man

    2017-11-01

    In this thesis, the extrusion process of SiC ceramic matrix has been systematically studied.The effect of different cellulose content on the flexural strength and pore size distribution of SiC matrix was discussed.Reselts show that with the increase of cellulose content, the flexural strength decreased.The pore size distribution in the sample was 1um-4um, and the 1um-2um concentration was more concentrated. It is found that the cellulose content has little effect on the pore size distribution.When the cellulose content is 7%, the flexural strength of the sample is 40.9Mpa. At this time, the mechanical properties of the sample are the strongest.

  9. Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms: Comparison Of Reference Process For Ceramic Waste Form Fabrication

    Brinkman, K. S. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Marra, J. C. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Amoroso, J. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Tang, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2013-08-22

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explore the phase formation and microstructural differences between lab scale melt processing in varying gas environments with alternative densification processes such as Hot Pressing (HP) and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a simulant derived from a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. Melt processing as well as solid state sintering routes SPS and HP demonstrated the formation of the targeted phases; however differences in microstructure and elemental partitioning were observed. In SPS and HP samples, hollandite, pervoskite/pyrochlore, zirconolite, metallic alloy and TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were observed distributed in a network of fine grains with small residual pores

  10. Composite elements with superconducting ceramic materials and preparation process

    Drifford, M.; Lambard, J.

    1990-01-01

    Supraconducting ceramic powder is introduced in a ductile metal with an open porosity, then the tube is sealed at both ends and necked to form a composite element which is sintered and the ceramic becomes superconductive by gaseous diffusion. Then the composite element can be placed into a gasproof cladding [fr

  11. Processing and optimization of functional ceramic coatings and inorganic nanomaterials

    Nyutu, Edward Kennedy G.

    Processing of functional inorganic materials including zero (0-D) dimensional (e.g. nanoparticles), 1-D (nanorods, nanofibers), and 2-D (films/coating) structures is of fundamental and technological interest. This research will have two major sections. The first part of section one focuses on the deposition of silicon dioxide onto a pre-deposited molybdenum disilicide coating on molybdenum substrates for both high (>1000 °C) and moderate (500-600 °C) temperature oxidation protection. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD/MOCVD) techniques will be utilized to deposit the metal suicide and oxide coatings. The focus of this study will be to establish optimum deposition conditions and evaluate the metal oxide coating as oxidation - thermal barriers for Mo substrates under both isothermal (static) and cyclic oxidation conditions. The second part of this section will involve a systematic evaluation of a boron nitride (BN) interface coating prepared by chemical vapor deposition. Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are prospective candidates for high (>1000 °C) temperature applications and fiber- matrix interfaces are the dominant design parameters in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). An important goal of the study is to determine a set of process parameters, which would define a boron nitride (BN) interface coating by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process with respect to coating. In the first part of the second section, we will investigate a new approach to synthesize ultrafine metal oxides that combines microwave heating and an in-situ ultrasonic mixing of two or more liquid precursors with a tubular flow reactor. Different metal oxides such as nickel ferrite and zinc aluminate spinels will be studied. The synthesis of metal oxides were investigated in order to study the effects of the nozzle and microwave (INM process) on the purity, composition, and particle size of the resulting powders. The second part of this research section involves a study of microwave frequency

  12. Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing

    Brown, Jr., Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Li, Tingkai

    1993-12-07

    Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

  13. Effect of machining fluid on the process performance of wire electrical discharge machining of nanocomposite ceramic

    Zhang Chengmao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wire electric discharge machining (WEDM promise to be effective and economical techniques for the production of tools and parts from conducting ceramic blanks. However, the manufacturing of nanocomposite ceramics blanks with these processes is a long and costly process. This paper presents a new process of machining nanocomposite ceramics using WEDM. WEDM uses water based emulsion, polyvinyl alcohol and distilled water as the machining fluid. Machining fluid is a primary factor that affects the material removal rate and surface quality of WEDM. The effects of emulsion concentration, polyvinyl alcohol concentration and distilled water of the machining fluid on the process performance have been investigated.

  14. Current Progress in Bioactive Ceramic Scaffolds for Bone Repair and Regeneration

    Gao, Chengde; Deng, Youwen; Feng, Pei; Mao, Zhongzheng; Li, Pengjian; Yang, Bo; Deng, Junjie; Cao, Yiyuan; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics have received great attention in the past decades owing to their success in stimulating cell proliferation, differentiation and bone tissue regeneration. They can react and form chemical bonds with cells and tissues in human body. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the application of bioactive ceramics for bone repair and regeneration. The review systematically summarizes the types and characters of bioactive ceramics, the fabrication methods for nanostructure and hierarchically porous structure, typical toughness methods for ceramic scaffold and corresponding mechanisms such as fiber toughness, whisker toughness and particle toughness. Moreover, greater insights into the mechanisms of interaction between ceramics and cells are provided, as well as the development of ceramic-based composite materials. The development and challenges of bioactive ceramics are also discussed from the perspective of bone repair and regeneration. PMID:24646912

  15. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Solidification of HLLW by glass-ceramic process

    Oguino, N.; Masuda, S.; Tsunoda, N.; Yamanaka, T.; Ninomiya, M.; Sakane, T.; Nakamura, S.; Kawamura, S.

    1979-01-01

    The compositions of glass-ceramics for the solidification of HLLW were studied, and the glass-ceramics in the diopside system was concluded to be the most suitable. Compared with the properties of HLW borosilicate glasses, those of diopside glass-ceramic were thought to be almost equal in leach rate and superior in thermal stability and mechanical strength. It was also found that the glass in this system can be crystallized simply by pouring it into a thermally insulated canister and then allowing it to cool to room temperature. 2 figures, 5 tables

  17. Ceramic process and plant design for high-level nuclear waste immobilization

    Grantham, L.F.; McKisson, R.L.; De Wames, R.E.; Guon, J.; Flintoff, J.F.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    In the last 3 years, significant advances in ceramic technology for high-level nuclear waste solidification have been made. Product quality in terms of leach-resistance, compositional uniformity, structural integrity, and thermal stability promises to be superior to borosilicate glass. This paper addresses the process effectiveness and preliminary designs for glass and ceramic immobilization plants. The reference two-step ceramic process utilizes fluid-bed calcination (FBC) and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidation. Full-scale demonstration of these well-developed processing steps has been established at DOE and/or commercial facilities for processing radioactive materials. Based on Savannah River-type waste, our model predicts that the capital and operating cost for the solidification of high-level nuclear waste is about the same for the ceramic and glass options. However, when repository costs are included, the ceramic option potentially offers significantly better economics due to its high waste loading and volume reduction. Volume reduction impacts several figures of merit in addition to cost such as system logistics, storage, transportation, and risk. The study concludes that the ceramic product/process has many potential advantages, and rapid deployment of the technology could be realized due to full-scale demonstrations of FBC and HIP technology in radioactive environments. Based on our finding and those of others, the ceramic innovation not only offers a viable backup to the glass reference process but promises to be a viable future option for new high-level nuclear waste management opportunities

  18. Preconceptual design of a salt splitting process using ceramic membranes

    Kurath, D.E.; Brooks, K.P.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Clemmer, R.; Balagopal, S.; Landro, T.; Sutija, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Inorganic ceramic membranes for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions are being developed for treating U. S. Department of Energy tank wastes. The process consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON) membranes. The primary NaSICON compositions being investigated are based on rare- earth ions (RE-NaSICON). Potential applications include: caustic recycling for sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes; reducing the volume of low-level wastes volume to be disposed of; adjusting pH and reducing competing cations to enhance cesium ion exchange processes; reducing sodium in high-level-waste sludges; and removing sodium from acidic wastes to facilitate calcining. These applications encompass wastes stored at the Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sites. The overall project objective is to supply a salt splitting process unit that impacts the waste treatment and disposal flowsheets and meets user requirements. The potential flowsheet impacts include improving the efficiency of the waste pretreatment processes, reducing volume, and increasing the quality of the final waste disposal forms. Meeting user requirements implies developing the technology to the point where it is available as standard equipment with predictable and reliable performance. This report presents two preconceptual designs for a full-scale salt splitting process based on the RE-NaSICON membranes to distinguish critical items for testing and to provide a vision that site users can evaluate

  19. Preconceptual design of a salt splitting process using ceramic membranes

    Kurath, D.E.; Brooks, K.P.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Clemmer, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Balagopal, S.; Landro, T.; Sutija, D.P. [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Inorganic ceramic membranes for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions are being developed for treating U. S. Department of Energy tank wastes. The process consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON) membranes. The primary NaSICON compositions being investigated are based on rare- earth ions (RE-NaSICON). Potential applications include: caustic recycling for sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes; reducing the volume of low-level wastes volume to be disposed of; adjusting pH and reducing competing cations to enhance cesium ion exchange processes; reducing sodium in high-level-waste sludges; and removing sodium from acidic wastes to facilitate calcining. These applications encompass wastes stored at the Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sites. The overall project objective is to supply a salt splitting process unit that impacts the waste treatment and disposal flowsheets and meets user requirements. The potential flowsheet impacts include improving the efficiency of the waste pretreatment processes, reducing volume, and increasing the quality of the final waste disposal forms. Meeting user requirements implies developing the technology to the point where it is available as standard equipment with predictable and reliable performance. This report presents two preconceptual designs for a full-scale salt splitting process based on the RE-NaSICON membranes to distinguish critical items for testing and to provide a vision that site users can evaluate.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Comparative Process Capabilities of Metal and Ceramic Injection Molding for Precision Applications

    Islam, Aminul; Giannekas, Nikolaos; Marhöfer, David Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    and discussion presented in the paper will be useful for thorough understanding of the MIM and CIM processes and to select the right material and process for the right application or even to combine metal and ceramic materials by molding to produce metal–ceramic hybrid components.......The purpose of this paper is to make a comparative study on the process capabilities of the two branches of the powder injection molding (PIM) process—metal injection molding (MIM) and ceramic injection molding (CIM), for high-end precision applications. The state-of-the-art literature does...

  1. Novel ceramic processing method for substitution of toxic plasticizers

    Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Teocoli, Francesca; Brodersen, K.

    2016-01-01

    properties, was also demonstrated. Incompatible systems were discarded in an initial broad screening while primary systems were further evaluated based on debinding properties, mechanical properties, flow behavior as well as sintering properties of ceramic tapes. The thermomechanical characterization...

  2. Application of exopolysaccharides to optimize the performance of ceramic bodies in the unidirectional dry pressing process

    Caneira I.; Machado-Moreira, B.; Dionísio, A.; Godinho, V.; Neves, O.; Dias, Diamantino; Sáiz-Jiménez, Cesáreo; Miller, A. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic industry represents an important sector of economic activity in the European countries and involves complex and numerous manufacturing processes. The unidirectional dry pressing process includes milling and stirring of raw materials (mainly clay and talc minerals) in aqueous suspensions, followed by spray drying to remove excess water obtaining spray-dried powders further subjected to dry pressing process (conformation). However, spray-dried ceramic powders exhibit an important variab...

  3. Progress in development of a source term for sphene glass-ceramic dissolution under vault conditions

    Hayward, P.J.; Tait, J.C.; George, I.M.; Carmichael, A.A.; Ross, J.M.P.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the results of ongoing leaching experiments, involving aluminosilicate glass and sphene (CaTiSiO/sub 5/) ceramics, doped with /sup 22/Na or /sup 45/Ca, and leached in a simulated Ca-NA-Cl brine at 25 0 or 100 0 C. The experiments are designed to aid development of separate models for the dissolution of the glass and the ceramic phase in a sphene glass-ceramic, and to help evaluate a composite model for the dissolution of the glass-ceramic

  4. Structure and grain coarsening during the processing of engineering ceramics

    Shaw, N.J.

    1987-11-01

    Studies have been made of three ceramic systems (Al 2 O 3 , Y 2 O 3 /MgO, and SiC/C/B), both to explore a surface area/density diagram approach to examining the coarsening processes during sintering and to explore an alternative coarsening parameter, i.e., the grain boundary surface area (raising it at a given value of the density) and not the pore surface area; therefore, pinning of the grain boundaries by solid-solution drag is the only function evidenced by these results. The importance of such pinning even at densities as low as 75% of theoretical is linked to the existence of microstructural inhomogeneities. The early stages of sintering of Y 2 O 3 powder have been examined using two techniques, BET surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Each has given some insight into the process occurring and, used together, have provided some indication of the effect of MgO on coarsening during sintering. Attempts to further elucidate effects of MgO on the coarsening behavior of Y 2 O 3 by the surface area/density diagram approach were unsuccessful due to masking effects of contaminating reactions during sintering and/or thermal etching. The behavior of the undoped SiC which only coarsens can be clearly distinguished by the surface area/density diagram from that of SiC/C/B which also concurrently densifies. Little additional information was obtainable by this method due to unfavorable sample etching characteristics. The advantages, disadvantages, and difficulties of application of these techniques to the study of coarsening during sintering are discussed

  5. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai (Australia)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R&D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 16}) and rutile (TiO{sub 2}). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}), zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), and monazite (CePO{sub 4}), to name a few of the most promising. R&D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO{sub 2} powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues.

  6. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A.

    1996-01-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R ampersand D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi 2 O 7 ), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl 2 Ti 6 O 16 ) and rutile (TiO 2 ). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 ), zircon (ZrSiO 4 ), and monazite (CePO 4 ), to name a few of the most promising. R ampersand D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO 2 powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues

  7. Porous ceramic materials for micro filtration processes I: Al2 O3 fabrication and characterization

    Salas K, J.; Reyes M, P.E.; Piderit A, G.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramic filters in separation processes are becoming more important every day. The use of these filters or membranes in the micro and ultrafiltration range, which origin goes back to the nuclear industry for uranium isotopes separation by gaseous diffusion and radioactive waste treatments, significantly improves some industrial processes efficiency. The present work describes the research done in the filters, or ceramic membrane supports fabrication field, the obtained operational results and their relation with the microstructure. (author)

  8. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    McHargue, C.J.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The major elements of the Materials Sciences Program can be grouped under the areas of (1) structural characterization, (2) high-temperature alloy studies, (3) structural ceramics, and (4) radiation effects

  9. Processing, microstructure and properties of grain-oriented ferroelectric ceramics

    Okazaki, K.; Igarashi, H.; Nagata, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Tashiro, S.

    1986-01-01

    Grain oriented ferroelectric ceramics such as PbBi/sub 2/Nb/sub 2/O/sub 9/, bismuth compound with layer structure, (PbLa)Nb/sub 2/O/sub 6/, tungsten-bronze structure and SbSI were prepared by an uni-axial hot-pressing, a double-stage hot-pressing and tape casting methods. Microstructures of them were examined by SEM and the prefered textures of the ceramics composed of thin plate and/or needle crystallites were ascertained. Grain orientation effects on electrical, piezoelectric, optical and mechanical properties are discussed

  10. Process of making porous ceramic materials with controlled porosity

    Anderson, Marc A.; Ku, Qunyin

    1993-01-01

    A method of making metal oxide ceramic material is disclosed by which the porosity of the resulting material can be selectively controlled by manipulating the sol used to make the material. The method can be used to make a variety of metal oxide ceramic bodies, including membranes, but also pellets, plugs or other bodies. It has also been found that viscous sol materials can readily be shaped by extrusion into shapes typical of catalytic or adsorbent bodies used in industry, to facilitate the application of such materials for catalytic and adsorbent applications.

  11. The Particle Distribution in Liquid Metal with Ceramic Particles Mould Filling Process

    Dong, Qi; Xing, Shu-ming

    2017-09-01

    Adding ceramic particles in the plate hammer is an effective method to increase the wear resistance of the hammer. The liquid phase method is based on the “with the flow of mixed liquid forging composite preparation of ZTA ceramic particle reinforced high chromium cast iron hammer. Preparation method for this system is using CFD simulation analysis the particles distribution of flow mixing and filling process. Taking the 30% volume fraction of ZTA ceramic composite of high chromium cast iron hammer as example, by changing the speed of liquid metal viscosity to control and make reasonable predictions of particles distribution before solidification.

  12. Ceramic nuclear waste forms. II. A ceramic-waste composite prepared by hot pressing. Progress report and preprint

    McCarthy, G.J.

    1975-01-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to determine whether nuclear waste calcine and a crystalline ceramic matrix can be fabricated by hot pressing into a composite waste form with suitable leaching resistance and thermal stability. It was found that a hard, dense composite could be formed using the typical commercial waste formulation PW-4b and a matrix of α-quartz with a small amount of a lead borosilicate glass added as a consolidation aide. Its density, waste loading, and leaching resistance are comparable to the glasses currently being considered for fixation of nuclear wastes. The hot pressed composite offers a closer approach to thermodynamic stability and improved thermal stability (in monolithic form) compared to glass waste forms. Recommendations for further optimization of the hot pressed waste form are given. (U.S.)

  13. Decorative design of ceramic tiles adapted to inkjet printing employing digital image processing

    Defez, B.; Santiago-Praderas, V.; Lluna, E.; Peris-Fajarnes, G.; Dunai, E.

    2013-01-01

    The ceramic tile sector is a very competitive industry. The designer's proficiency to offer new models of the decorated surface, adapted to the production means, plays a very important role in the competitiveness. In the present work, we analyze the evolution of the design process in the ceramic sector, as much as the changes experimented in parallel by the printing equipment. Afterwards, we present a new concept of ceramic design, based on digital image processing. This technique allows the generation of homogeneous and non-repetitive designs for large surfaces, especially thought for inkjet printing. With the programmed algorithms we have compiled a prototype software for the assistance of the ceramic design. This tool allows creating continuous designs for large surfaces saving developing time. (Author)

  14. Process description and plant design for preparing ceramic high-level waste forms

    Grantham, L.F.; McKisson, R.L.; Guon, J.; Flintoff, J.F.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The ceramics process flow diagram has been simplified and upgraded to utilize only two major processing steps - fluid-bed calcination and hot isostatic press consolidating. Full-scale fluid-bed calcination has been used at INEL to calcine high-level waste for 18 y; and a second-generation calciner, a fully remotely operated and maintained calciner that meets ALARA guidelines, started calcining high-level waste in 1982. Full-scale hot isostatic consolidation has been used by DOE and commercial enterprises to consolidate radioactive components and to encapsulate spent fuel elements for several years. With further development aimed at process integration and parametric optimization, the operating knowledge of full-scale demonstration of the key process steps should be rapidly adaptable to scale-up of the ceramic process to full plant size. Process flowsheets used to prepare ceramic and glass waste forms from defense and commercial high-level liquid waste are described. Preliminary layouts of process flow diagrams in a high-level processing canyon were prepared and used to estimate the preliminary cost of the plant to fabricate both waste forms. The estimated costs for using both options were compared for total waste management costs of SRP high-level liquid waste. Using our design, for both the ceramic and glass plant, capital and operating costs are essentially the same for both defense and commercial wastes, but total waste management costs are calculated to be significantly less for defense wastes using the ceramic option. It is concluded from this and other studies that the ceramic form may offer important advantages over glass in leach resistance, waste loading, density, and process flexibility. Preliminary economic calculations indicate that ceramics must be considered a leading candidate for the form to immobilize high-level wastes

  15. Processing and properties of pressable ceramic with non-uniform reinforcement for selective-toughening

    Yi, Wei [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); School of Dentistry, The University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Hu, Xiaozhi, E-mail: xiao.zhi.hu@uwa.edu.au [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Ichim, Paul [School of Dentistry, The University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia); Sun, Xudong [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Brittle low-strength and low-toughness pressable dental ceramic can be reinforced by ductile elongated gold-particles (GP). A customized crown structure can be adequately strengthened by distributing GP only in critical sections of the crown, where high tensile stresses are experienced. In the present study, a non-uniformly structured ceramic-matrix composite with excellent interfacial bonding, twofold fracture toughness and strength at desired locations, is fabricated using pressable dental ceramic and GP. The layout pattern and sequence of different GP/ceramic powder mixtures, high-temperature flow properties of these mixtures during hot-pressing and the sample mold geometry are used to control the distribution and locations of GP for selective toughening and strengthening. Nano-crystalline structures of the pressable ceramic-matrix and the nano-scaled interfacial region around GP have been revealed by high-magnification field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Toughening and strengthening mechanisms of the elongated GP including residual stresses from composite processing and ductile fracture of GP are discussed together with SEM observations. Bulk flexural strength and local micro-indentation fracture and deformation characteristics of the selective-toughened ceramic/metal composite have been compared to those of the monolithic pressable ceramic to validate the toughening and strengthening mechanisms.

  16. Generation of amorphous ceramic capacitor coatings on titanium using a continuous sol-gel process

    Dixon, B.G.; Walsh, M.A. III; Phillips, P.G.; Morris, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Thin amorphous films of ceramic capacitor materials were successfully deposited using sol-gel chemistry onto titanium wire using a continuous, computer controlled process. By repeatedly depositing and calcining very thin layers of material, smooth and even coats can be produced. Surface analyses revealed the layered nature of these thin coats, as well as the amorphous nature of the ceramic. The electrical properties of the better coatings, all composed of niobium, bismuth, zinc oxides, were then evaluated. copyright 1995 Materials Research Society

  17. Morphologies, Processing and Properties of Ceramic Foams and Their Potential as TPS Materials

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Simoes, Conan R.; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2002-01-01

    The current research is focused on processing ceramic foams with compositions that have potential as a thermal protection material. The use of pre-ceramic polymers with the addition of sacrificial blowing agents or sacrificial fillers offers a viable approach to form either open or closed cell insulation. Our work demonstrates that this is a feasible method to form refractory ceramic foams at relatively low processing temperatures. It is possible to foam complex shapes then pyrolize the system to form a ceramic while retaining the shape of the unfired foam. Initial work focused on identifying suitable pre-ceramic polymers with desired properties such as ceramic yield and chemical make up of the pyrolysis product after firing. We focused on making foams in the Si system (Sic, Si02, Si-0-C), which is in use in current acreage TPS systems. Ceramic foams with different architectures were formed from the pyrolysis of pre-ceramic polymers at 1200 C in different atmospheres. In some systems a sacrificial polyurethane was used as the blowing agent. We have also processed foams using sacrificial fillers to introduce controlled cell sizes. Each sacrificial filler or blowing agent leads to a unique morphology. The effect of different fillers on foam morphologies and the characterization of these foams in terms of mechanical and thermal properties are presented. We have conducted preliminary arc jet testing on selected foams with the materials being exposed to typical re-entry conditions for acreage TPS and these results will be discussed. Foams processed using these approaches have bulk densities ranging from 0.15 to 0.9 g/cm3 and cell sizes ranging from 5 to 500 pm. Compression strengths ranged from 2 to 7 MPa for these systems. Finally, preliminary oxidation studies have been conducted on selected systems and will be discussed.

  18. Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of liquid waste. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    Cohen, Y.

    1997-01-01

    'The project on ceramic-supported polymer membranes focuses on the development of a novel class of membranes for the separation of organics from both organic-aqueous and organic-organic mixtures, Theses membranes are fabricated by a graft polymerization process where polymer chains are grown onto the surface of a ceramic support membrane. The surface graft polymerization process, developed at UCLA, results in the formation of a thin polymer layer covalently bonded to the membrane pore surface as a layer of terminally anchored polymeric chains. Through the selection of the polymer most appropriate for the desired separation task, the graft polymerized surface layer can be synthesized to impart specific separation properties to the membrane. It is expected that this project will lead to the demonstration of a new technology for the tailor design of a new class of selective and robust ceramic-supported polymer membranes. This new approach will allow the rapid deployment of task-specific membranes for the separation of waste constituents for subsequent recovery, treatment or disposal. Progress to date includes the preparation of successful silica-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) membrane for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsions and a silica-polyvinylacetate (PVAc) pervaporation membrane for the separation of organics from water. Current work is ongoing to study the performance of the pervaporation membrane for the removal of chlorinated organics from water and to develop a pervaporation membrane for organic-organic separation. In another aspect of the study, the authors are studying the hydrophilic PVP CSP membrane for oil-in-water emulsion treatment with the goal of determining the optimal membrane polymer surface structure as a function of various operating conditions (e.g., tube-side Reynolds number and transmembrane pressure), Work is also in progress to characterize the polymer layer by AFM and internal reflection FTIR, and to model the conformation of the polymer

  19. Microwave processing of a dental ceramic used in computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing.

    Pendola, Martin; Saha, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Because of their favorable mechanical properties and natural esthetics, ceramics are widely used in restorative dentistry. The conventional ceramic sintering process required for their use is usually slow, however, and the equipment has an elevated energy consumption. Sintering processes that use microwaves have several advantages compared to regular sintering: shorter processing times, lower energy consumption, and the capacity for volumetric heating. The objective of this study was to test the mechanical properties of a dental ceramic used in computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) after the specimens were processed with microwave hybrid sintering. Density, hardness, and bending strength were measured. When ceramic specimens were sintered with microwaves, the processing times were reduced and protocols were simplified. Hardness was improved almost 20% compared to regular sintering, and flexural strength measurements suggested that specimens were approximately 50% stronger than specimens sintered in a conventional system. Microwave hybrid sintering may preserve or improve the mechanical properties of dental ceramics designed for CAD/CAM processing systems, reducing processing and waiting times.

  20. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Sciences Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1985

    Stiegler, J.O. (comp.)

    1986-06-01

    The report is divided into the following: structural characterization, high-temperature alloy research, structural ceramics, radiation effects, structure and properties of surfaces and interfaces, and collaborative research centers. (DLC)

  1. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    McHargue, C.J.

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys

  2. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys.

  3. Rare-earth doped transparent ceramics for spectral filtering and quantum information processing

    Kunkel, Nathalie; Ferrier, Alban; Thiel, Charles W.; Ramírez, Mariola O.; Bausá, Luisa E.; Cone, Rufus L.; Ikesue, Akio; Goldner, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Homogeneous linewidths below 10 kHz are reported for the first time in high-quality Eu3+ doped Y 2O3 transparent ceramics. This result is obtained on the 7F0→5D0 transition in Eu3+ doped Y 2O3 ceramics and corresponds to an improvement of nearly one order of magnitude compared to previously reported values in transparent ceramics. Furthermore, we observed spectral hole lifetimes of ˜15 min that are long enough to enable efficient optical pumping of the nuclear hyperfine levels. Additionally, different Eu3+ concentrations (up to 1.0%) were studied, resulting in an increase of up to a factor of three in the peak absorption coefficient. These results suggest that transparent ceramics can be useful in applications where narrow and deep spectral holes can be burned into highly absorbing lines, such as quantum information processing and spectral filtering.

  4. Chemical and ceramic methods for the safe storage of actinides using monazite. 1997 annual progress report

    Boatner, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    'Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Rockwell Science Center of Thousand Oaks, California, are carrying out a joint investigation of the chemical, physical, thermal, and radiation-resistance properties of the lanthanide orthophosphates (monazites) in both ceramic and single-crystal form with the objective of developing the scientific and technical base required for the application of these materials to the storage or disposal of actinide elements, including plutonium. An additional major objective of the research effort is to investigate the technical and scientific problems associated with the formation of both phase-pure monazite ceramics and multiphase monazite-ceramic composites for waste disposal or waste storage applications. These latter investigations encompass the development of low-temperature chemical synthesis routes for the formation of monoclinic monazite phases and the study of the densification properties of lanthanide orthophosphate powders to produce stable, high-density ceramics. Research Statement This research effort addresses several basic issues associated with the characteristics of lanthanide orthophosphates that make this class of materials extremely attractive candidates for application to the storage of actinide elements in general and plutonium in particular. Additionally, these materials are potentially important refractory ceramics in their own right, and many of the scientific issues addressed in this project are applicable to the development of what will constitute a new, highly stable family of ceramics for applications in a number of energy-related areas.'

  5. Challenges and Opportunities in Reactive Processing and Applications of Advanced Ceramic Materials

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2003-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in the research, development, and commercialization of innovative synthesis and processing technologies for advanced ceramics and composite materials. Reactive processing approaches have been actively considered due to their robustness, flexibility, and affordability. A wide variety of silicon carbide-based advanced ceramics and composites are currently being fabricated using the processing approaches involving reactive infiltration of liquid and gaseous species into engineered fibrous or microporous carbon performs. The microporous carbon performs have been fabricated using the temperature induced phase separation and pyrolysis of two phase organic (resin-pore former) mixtures and fiber reinforcement of carbon and ceramic particulate bodies. In addition, pyrolyzed native plant cellulose tissues also provide unique carbon templates for manufacturing of non-oxide and oxide ceramics. In spite of great interest in this technology due to their affordability and robustness, there is a lack of scientific basis for process understanding and many technical challenges still remain. The influence of perform properties and other parameters on the resulting microstructure and properties of final material is not well understood. In this presentation, mechanism of silicon-carbon reaction in various systems and the effect of perform microstructure on the mechanical properties of advanced silicon carbide based materials will be discussed. Various examples of applications of reactively processed advanced silicon carbide ceramics and composite materials will be presented.

  6. Analysis of process parameters for a DCMS process of a rotating ceramic ITO target

    Ries, Patrick; Wuttig, Matthias [Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    ITO is the most commonly used but at the same time rather expensive Transparent Conducting Oxide. This fact is due to the high Indium to Tin ratio of 90:10 that is necessary to obtain the best electrical conductivity. If it is possible to find another ratio with similar electrical properties but higher Tin content, this would be of great industrial relevance. To accomplish this goal and to check the hypothesis an in-house developed serial co-sputtering system is employed. The tool consists of a rotating primary cathode and up to two secondary cathodes for co-sputtering processes. The process parameters of a DC-sputtered ceramic ITO target installed on the primary cathode are analyzed and correlations with the thin film properties, especially the resistance and the transmittance are shown. The resistance behavior upon changing the Tin content via a co-deposition process from a secondary cathode will be presented.

  7. Application of sol-gel process on the elaboration of SnO2 based ceramics

    Prescatan, R.T.; Silva, D.V. da; Hiratsuka, R.S.; Santilli, C.V.; Pulcinelli, S.H.

    1990-01-01

    The electrical, optical and chemical peculiar properties of SnO 2 confers it-self some potential application. The densification difficulty during sintering of SnO 2 compromises its elaboration by ceramic conventional process. In this work the preparation of SnO 2 ceramics by sol-gel process was investigated. Some parameters envolved on the colloidal stability, sol-gel transition and drying process were analysed. The obtained materials were characterized by rheological, X-ray diffraction, infra-red spectroscopy and pores size distribution measurements. The results show that a considerable densification during sintering at 400 and 600 0 C was obtained. (author) [pt

  8. Processing of high-temperature simulated waste glass in a continuous ceramic melter

    Barnes, S.M.; Brouns, R.A.; Hanson, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent operations have demonstrated that high-melting-point glasses and glass-ceramics can be successfully processed in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters with minor modifications to the existing technology. Over 500 kg of simulated waste glasses have been processed at temperatures up to 1410 0 C. The processability of the two high-temperature waste forms tested is similar to existing borosilicate waste glasses. High-temperature waste glass formulations produced in the bench-scale melter exhibit quality comparing favorably to standard waste glass formulations

  9. Industrial science and technology frontier program progress reports for fiscal 1998. Research and development of synergy ceramics; 1998 nendo synergy ceramics no kenkyu kaihatsu

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In relation with research and development of 'synergy ceramics' which have begun since fiscal 1994 under a joint organization of the industries, Government and academic circles, reports were given on the achievement status of the whole of the first stage of the project, together with the results of researches made in fiscal 1998. With regard to high-order structure control technologies, reports were given on the following subjects: precursor design, structure formation design, nano-structure process and structuring reaction process as the basic technologies for structure creation, and inter-hierarchy deposition reaction control, phase boundary formation control, anisotropic particle interface control and high-order space production control as the structural element control technologies. With respect to analysis and evaluation technologies, reports were given on research achievements in fundamental technologies for analysis and evaluation, and property developing element evaluation technologies. In the field of overall survey and study, various committees and study meetings were held, research projects were planned, and technological trends were surveyed, whose results were reported. In the joint researches, reports were given on the survey and study on new material creation by means of high-order structure control, and the research on high-order structure control of ceramics by means of structuring reaction process control. (NEDO)

  10. Industrial science and technology frontier program progress reports for fiscal 1998. Research and development of synergy ceramics; 1998 nendo synergy ceramics no kenkyu kaihatsu

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In relation with research and development of 'synergy ceramics' which have begun since fiscal 1994 under a joint organization of the industries, Government and academic circles, reports were given on the achievement status of the whole of the first stage of the project, together with the results of researches made in fiscal 1998. With regard to high-order structure control technologies, reports were given on the following subjects: precursor design, structure formation design, nano-structure process and structuring reaction process as the basic technologies for structure creation, and inter-hierarchy deposition reaction control, phase boundary formation control, anisotropic particle interface control and high-order space production control as the structural element control technologies. With respect to analysis and evaluation technologies, reports were given on research achievements in fundamental technologies for analysis and evaluation, and property developing element evaluation technologies. In the field of overall survey and study, various committees and study meetings were held, research projects were planned, and technological trends were surveyed, whose results were reported. In the joint researches, reports were given on the survey and study on new material creation by means of high-order structure control, and the research on high-order structure control of ceramics by means of structuring reaction process control. (NEDO)

  11. Designing Advanced Ceramic Waste Forms for Electrochemical Processing Salt Waste

    Ebert, W. L.; Snyder, C. T.; Frank, Steven; Riley, Brian

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the scientific basis underlying the approach being followed to design and develop ''advanced'' glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form (ACWF) materials that can (1) accommodate higher salt waste loadings than the waste form developed in the 1990s for EBR-II waste salt and (2) provide greater flexibility for immobilizing extreme waste salt compositions. This is accomplished by using a binder glass having a much higher Na_2O content than glass compositions used previously to provide enough Na+ to react with all of the Cl- in the waste salt and generate the maximum amount of sodalite. The phase compositions and degradation behaviors of prototype ACWF products that were made using five new binder glass formulations and with 11-14 mass% representative LiCl/KCl-based salt waste were evaluated and compared with results of similar tests run with CWF products made using the original binder glass with 8 mass% of the same salt to demonstrate the approach and select a composition for further studies. About twice the amount of sodalite was generated in all ACWF materials and the microstructures and degradation behaviors confirmed our understanding of the reactions occurring during waste form production and the efficacy of the approach. However, the porosities of the resulting ACWF materials were higher than is desired. These results indicate the capacity of these ACWF waste forms to accommodate LiCl/KCl-based salt wastes becomes limited by porosity due to the low glass-to-sodalite volume ratio. Three of the new binder glass compositions were acceptable and there is no benefit to further increasing the Na content as initially planned. Instead, further studies are needed to develop and evaluate alternative production methods to decrease the porosity, such as by increasing the amount of binder glass in the formulation or by processing waste forms in a hot isostatic press. Increasing the amount of binder glass to eliminate porosity will decrease the waste

  12. Designing Advanced Ceramic Waste Forms for Electrochemical Processing Salt Waste

    Ebert, W. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Snyder, C. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frank, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Riley, Brian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the scientific basis underlying the approach being followed to design and develop “advanced” glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form (ACWF) materials that can (1) accommodate higher salt waste loadings than the waste form developed in the 1990s for EBR-II waste salt and (2) provide greater flexibility for immobilizing extreme waste salt compositions. This is accomplished by using a binder glass having a much higher Na2O content than glass compositions used previously to provide enough Na+ to react with all of the Cl– in the waste salt and generate the maximum amount of sodalite. The phase compositions and degradation behaviors of prototype ACWF products that were made using five new binder glass formulations and with 11-14 mass% representative LiCl/KCl-based salt waste were evaluated and compared with results of similar tests run with CWF products made using the original binder glass with 8 mass% of the same salt to demonstrate the approach and select a composition for further studies. About twice the amount of sodalite was generated in all ACWF materials and the microstructures and degradation behaviors confirmed our understanding of the reactions occurring during waste form production and the efficacy of the approach. However, the porosities of the resulting ACWF materials were higher than is desired. These results indicate the capacity of these ACWF waste forms to accommodate LiCl/KCl-based salt wastes becomes limited by porosity due to the low glass-to-sodalite volume ratio. Three of the new binder glass compositions were acceptable and there is no benefit to further increasing the Na content as initially planned. Instead, further studies are needed to develop and evaluate alternative production methods to decrease the porosity, such as by increasing the amount of binder glass in the formulation or by processing waste forms in a hot isostatic press. Increasing the amount of binder glass to eliminate porosity will decrease

  13. CVI-R gas phase processing of porous, biomorphic SiC-ceramics

    Sieber, H.; Vogli, E.; Mueller, F.; Greil, P. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (DE). Dept. of Materials Science (III) Glass and Ceramics; Popovska, N.; Gerhard, H. [Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Dept. of Industrial Chemistry I, Erlangen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Natural pine wood was converted into biomorphic SiC-ceramics by CVI-R processing (chemical vapour infiltration - reaction). The wood samples were first pyrolyzed in inert atmosphere at temperatures of 800 C to yield biocarbon-derived template structures. Subsequently, the biocarbon preforms were infiltrated with silicon by isothermal CVI processing with MTS (methyltrichlorosilane) in excess of hydrogen at temperatures between 800 and 850 C, then converted into SiC-ceramic by annealing in inert atmosphere at temperatures between 1200-1600 C. During processing, the inherent open porous structure of the pine wood is retained down to the submicrometer level, yielding a highly porous SiC-ceramic with a unique microcellular morphology. (orig.)

  14. Modelling of fracture processes in the ballistic impact on ceramic armours

    Zaera, R.; Sanchez-Galvez, V.

    1997-01-01

    This work examines the essential physical processes in the perforation of metal backed ceramic armours which include projectile erosion, fracture of the ceramic tile and ductile deformation of the metal backing plate. The impact of projectiles onto alumina and aluminium nitride ceramic materials is studied experimentally and numerically. Observations were performed using an X-ray shadowgraph technique to obtain accurate data of the penetration process at different times. From the examination of computer simulations and corresponding impact experiments a simple analytical model is developed by assuming some hypotheses simplifying the actual mechanisms of the penetration process. Material description is simplified by using simple equations and a few material parameters easily obtained experimentally, such as the elastic modulus, the compressive and tensile strength and the rupture strain. (orig.)

  15. Manufacturing process for cylindrical ceramic tubes with localized imprints and device for application of this process

    1985-01-01

    This invention involves a process for manufacturing permeable cylindrical ceramic tubes with localized relief such as annular, spiral or simple coiled or double crossed coils or even stipple imprints on their internal face. It is known that one of the techniques for the separation of the mixture of gases with close molecular masses is gaseous diffusion. According to this technique, the gas mixture is circulated under pressure inside tubes constituted by a microporous wall. These tubes, according to a known technique, are constituted by a macroporous ceramic tube, generally called a support, covered on the inside with a microporous layer deposited on this interior wall. The unit constituted by the tube itself or the ''support'' and the microporous layer makes it possible to adapt the total porosity of the covered tube or ''barrier'' in order to obtain an optimal coefficient of gas separation. This technique is used specifically for separation of two gases corresponding to various isotopes of the same simple body. 6 figs

  16. Effects of process variables on the properties of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics formed by investment casting

    Hooker, M. W.; Taylor, T. D.; Leigh, H. D.; Wise, S. A.; Buckley, J. D.; Vasquez, P.; Buck, G. M.; Hicks, L. P.

    1993-01-01

    An investment casting process has been developed to produce net-shape, superconducting ceramics. In this work, a factorial experiment was performed to determine the critical process parameters for producing cast YBa2Cu3O7 ceramics with optimum properties. An analysis of variance procedure indicated that the key variables in casting superconductive ceramics are the particle size distribution and sintering temperature. Additionally, the interactions between the sintering temperature and the other process parameters (e.g., particle size distribution and the use of silver dopants) were also found to influence the density, porosity, and critical current density of the fired ceramics.

  17. Statistical process control applied to the liquid-fed ceramic melter process

    Pulsipher, B.A.; Kuhn, W.L.

    1987-09-01

    In this report, an application of control charts to the apparent feed composition of a Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter (LFCM) is demonstrated by using results from a simulation of the LFCM system. Usual applications of control charts require the assumption of uncorrelated observations over time. This assumption is violated in the LFCM system because of the heels left in tanks from previous batches. Methods for dealing with this problem have been developed to create control charts for individual batches sent to the feed preparation tank (FPT). These control charts are capable of detecting changes in the process average as well as changes in the process variation. All numbers reported in this document were derived from a simulated demonstration of a plausible LFCM system. In practice, site-specific data must be used as input to a simulation tailored to that site. These data directly affect all variance estimates used to develop control charts. 64 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic

    Liao, Chang-Zhong [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Tang, Yuanyuan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Lee, Po-Heng [Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Liu, Chengshuai, E-mail: csliu@soil.gd.cn [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550009 (China); Shih, Kaimin, E-mail: kshih@hku.hk [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Li, Fangbai [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China)

    2017-01-05

    Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix. All Cr(VI) species is reduced to Cr(III) and most chromium contents are incorporated into spinel structure where the residual chromium are resided in the glass networks. - Highlights: • COPR was detoxified and immobilized in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix. • Cr-rich crystalline phase was determined to be MgCr{sub 1.32}Fe{sub 0.19}Al{sub 0.49}O{sub 4} spinel. • The partitioning ratio of Cr into spinel in the glass-ceramic can be up to 77%. • No Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic. • TCLP results demonstrate the superiority of the final product in immobilizing Cr. - Abstract: A promising strategy for the detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix is reported in this study. In the search for a more chemically durable matrix for COPR, the most critical crystalline phase for Cr immobilization was found to be a spinel solid solution with a chemical composition of MgCr{sub 1.32}Fe{sub 0.19}Al{sub 0.49}O{sub 4}. Using Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, we identified this final product is with the phases of spinel (3.5 wt.%), diopside (5.2 wt.%), and some amorphous contents (91.2 wt.%). The partitioning ratio of Cr reveals that about 77% of the Cr was incorporated into the more chemically durable spinel phase. The results of Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy show that no Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic, which indicates successful detoxification of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) in the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic. The leaching performances of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic were compared with a prolonged acid-leaching test, and the results demonstrate the superiority of the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic matrix in the

  19. Detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic

    Liao, Chang-Zhong; Tang, Yuanyuan; Lee, Po-Heng; Liu, Chengshuai; Shih, Kaimin; Li, Fangbai

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix. All Cr(VI) species is reduced to Cr(III) and most chromium contents are incorporated into spinel structure where the residual chromium are resided in the glass networks. - Highlights: • COPR was detoxified and immobilized in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix. • Cr-rich crystalline phase was determined to be MgCr 1.32 Fe 0.19 Al 0.49 O 4 spinel. • The partitioning ratio of Cr into spinel in the glass-ceramic can be up to 77%. • No Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic. • TCLP results demonstrate the superiority of the final product in immobilizing Cr. - Abstract: A promising strategy for the detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix is reported in this study. In the search for a more chemically durable matrix for COPR, the most critical crystalline phase for Cr immobilization was found to be a spinel solid solution with a chemical composition of MgCr 1.32 Fe 0.19 Al 0.49 O 4 . Using Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, we identified this final product is with the phases of spinel (3.5 wt.%), diopside (5.2 wt.%), and some amorphous contents (91.2 wt.%). The partitioning ratio of Cr reveals that about 77% of the Cr was incorporated into the more chemically durable spinel phase. The results of Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy show that no Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic, which indicates successful detoxification of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) in the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic. The leaching performances of Cr 2 O 3 and COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic were compared with a prolonged acid-leaching test, and the results demonstrate the superiority of the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic matrix in the immobilization of Cr. The overall results suggest that

  20. Investigations on the performance of ultrasonic drilling process with special reference to precision machining of advanced ceramics

    Adithan, M.; Laroiya, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced ceramics are assuming an important role in modern industrial technology. The applications and advantages of using advanced ceramics are many. There are several reasons why we should go in for machining of advanced ceramics after their compacting and sintering. These are discussed in this paper. However, precision machining of advanced ceramics must be economical. Critical technological issues to be addressed in cost effective machining of ceramics include design of machine tools, tooling arrangements, improved yield and precision, relationship of part dimensions and finish specifications to functional performance, and on-line inspection. Considering the above ultrasonic drilling is an important process used for the precision machining of advanced ceramics. Extensive studies on tool wear occurring in the ultrasonic machining of advanced ceramics have been carried out. In addition, production accuracy of holes drilled, surface finish obtained and surface integrity aspects in the machining of advanced ceramics have also been investigated. Some specific findings with reference to surface integrity are: a) there were no cracks or micro-cracks developed during or after ultrasonic machining of advanced ceramics, b) while machining Hexoloy alpha silicon carbide a recast layer is formed as a result of ultrasonic machining. This is attributed to the viscous heating resulting from high energy impacts during ultrasonic machining. While machining all other types of ceramics no such formation of recast layer was observed, and , c) there is no change in the microstructure of the advanced ceramics as a result of ultrasonic machining

  1. Interaction of elementary damage processes and their contribution to neutron damage of ceramics

    Itoh, Noriaki

    1989-01-01

    Specific features of radiation damage of ceramics as compared with those of metals are discussed. It is pointed out that the electronic excitation gives considerable contribution to radiation damage of ceramics not only by itself but also through interaction with knock-on processes. In the talk first I mention briefly the elementary damage processes; the knock-on process and the processes induced by electronic excitation; the latter is of particularly importance in ceramics because of large energy quantums. Then I discuss possible interactions between these elementary processes; why they may contribute to radiation damage and in what situation they are induced. The types of interactions discussed include those between knock-on processes, between electronic excitation and knock-on processes and between processes induced by electronic excitation. Experimental results which prove directly the significance of such interactions are also described. Importance of such interactions in radiation damage of ceramics and their relevance to other phenomena, such as laser damage, is emphasized. Possible experimental techniques, including those which uses high energy neutron sources, are described. (author)

  2. Addition of an expansive clay facies of Corumbatai formation from Porto Ferreira city to ceramic mass used in ceramic pole Santa Gertrudes for dry process

    Souza, Paulo Eduardo de Campos e; Christofoletti, Sergio Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    In the search for diversification of ceramic products by the dry-process, in this work was added in the composition of a ceramic mass of Santa Gertrudes Ceramic Pole-PCSG, an expansive clay of Corumbatai Formation found in Porto Ferreira city. The ceramics characterization was carried out in Porto Ferreira Ceramic Industry following the standards (ABNT, 1997). The samples were first pressed resulting in specimens of dimension 10x3 cm which were burned in a laboratory furnace at a temperature of 1160 ° C. The tests were conducted of the flexion strength (raw, dry and burning), water absorption, bulk density, firing shrinkage in individual samples and the composition of 30% of sample Porto Ferreira (APF) plus 70% sample of Santa Gertrudes (ASG). The results showed that the ceramic samples showed good results from individual MRF and AA: 633.76 Kgf/cm 2 and 0.37% for a sample of Santa Gertrudes (ASG) and 437.32 and 3.06% for the sample of Porto Ferreira (APF). The result of the composition showed an increase in values or MRF= 722.20 Kgf/cm 2 and increased values of AA to 0.75%. The expansive clay type 'montmorillonite' clays found in the sample Porto Ferreira (APF) have contributed in improving the packaging and therefore the improvement of the ceramic properties. (author)

  3. Chemical and ceramic methods toward safe storage of actinides using monazite. 1998 annual progress report

    Boatner, L.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1998-01-01

    'The use of ceramic monazite, (La,Ce)PO 4 , for sequestering actinides, especially plutonium, and some other radioactive waste elements (rare earths e.g.) and thus isolating them from the environment has been championed by Lynn Boatner of ORNL. It may be used alone or, as it is compatible with many other minerals in nature, can be used in composite combinations. Natural monazite, which almost invariably contains Th and U, is often formed in hydrothermal pegmatites and is extremely water resistant--examples are known where the mineral has been washed out of rocks (becoming a placer mineral as on the beach sands of India, Australia, Brazil etc.) then reincorporated into new rocks with new crystal overgrowths and then washed out again--being 2.5--3 billion years old. During this demanding water treatment it has retained Th and U. Where very low levels of water attack have been seen (in more siliceous waters), the Th is tied up as new ThSiO 4 and remains immobile. Lest it be thought that rare-earths are rare or expensive, this is not so. In fact, the less common lanthanides such as gadolinium, samarium, europium, and terbium, are necessarily extracted and much used by, e.g., the electronics industry, leaving La and Ce as not-sufficiently-used by-products. The recent development of large scale use of Nd in Nd-B-Fe magnets has further exaggerated this. Large deposits of the parent mineral bastnaesite are present in the USA and in China. (Mineral monazite itself is not preferred due to its thorium content.) In the last 5 years it has become apparent show that monazite (more specifically La-monazite) is an unrecognized/becoming-interesting ceramic material. PuPO4 itself has the monazite structure; the PO 4 3-unit strongly stabilizes actinides and rare earths in their trivalent state. Monazite melts without decomposition (in a closed system) at 2,074 C and, being compatible with common ceramic oxides such as alumina, mullite, zirconia and YAG, is useful in oxidatively

  4. Application of exopolysaccharides to improve the performance of ceramic bodies in the unidirectional dry pressing process

    Caneira, Inês; Machado-Moreira, Bernardino; Dionísio, Amélia; Godinho, Vasco; Neves, Orquídia; Dias, Diamantino; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Miller, Ana Z.

    2015-04-01

    Ceramic industry represents an important sector of economic activity in the European countries and involves complex and numerous manufacturing processes. The unidirectional dry pressing process includes milling and stirring of raw materials (mainly clay and talc minerals) in aqueous suspensions, followed by spray drying to remove excess water obtaining spray-dried powders further subjected to dry pressing process (conformation). However, spray-dried ceramic powders exhibit an important variability in their performance when subjected to the dry pressing process, particularly in the adhesion to the mold and mechanical strength, affecting the quality of the final conformed ceramic products. Therefore, several synthetic additives (deflocculants, antifoams, binders, lubricants and plasticizers) are introduced in the ceramic slips to achieve uniform and homogeneous pastes, conditioning their rheological properties. However, an important variability associated with the performance of the conformed products is still reported. Exopolysaccharides or Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) are polymers excreted by living organisms, such as bacteria, fungi and algae, which may confer unique and potentially interesting properties with potential industrial uses, such as viscosity control, gelation, and flocculation. Polysaccharides, such as pullulan, gellan, carrageenan and xanthan have found a wide range of applications in food, pharmaceutical, petroleum, and in other industries. The aim of this study was the assessment of exopolysaccharides as natural additives to optimize the performance of spray-dried ceramic powders during the unidirectional dry pressing process, replacing the synthetic additives used in the ceramic production process. Six exopolysaccharides, namely pullulan, gellan, xanthan gum, κappa- and iota-carrageenan, and guar gum were tested in steatite-based spray-dried ceramic powders at different concentrations. Subsequently, these ceramic powders were

  5. Characterization of natural organic matter treated by iron oxide nanoparticle incorporated ceramic membrane-ozonation process.

    Park, Hosik; Kim, Yohan; An, Byungryul; Choi, Heechul

    2012-11-15

    In this study, changes in the physical and structural properties of natural organic matter (NOM) were observed during hybrid ceramic membrane processes that combined ozonation with ultrafiltration ceramic membrane (CM) or with a reactive ceramic membrane (RM), namely, an iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) incorporated-CM. NOM from feed water and NOM from permeate treated with hybrid ceramic membrane processes were analyzed by employing several NOM characterization techniques. Specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and fractionation analyses showed that the hybrid ceramic membrane process effectively removed and transformed relatively high contents of aromatic, high molecular weight and hydrophobic NOM fractions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and 3-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that this process caused a significant decrease of the aromaticity of humic-like structures and an increase in electron withdrawing groups. The highest removal efficiency (46%) of hydroxyl radical probe compound (i.e., para-Chlorobenzoic acid (pCBA)) in RM-ozonation process compared with that in CM without ozonation process (8%) revealed the hydroxyl radical formation by the surface-catalyzed reaction between ozone and IONs on the surface of RM. In addition, experimental results on flux decline showed that fouling of RM-ozonation process (15%) was reduced compared with that of CM without ozonation process (30%). These results indicated that the RM-ozonation process enhanced the destruction of NOM and reduced the fouling by generating hydroxyl radicals from the catalytic ozonation in the RM-ozonation process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Uniaxially aligned ceramic nanofibers obtained by chemical mechanical processing

    Tararam, R. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Instituto de Química, Rua Prof. Francisco Degni n° 55, CEP 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Foschini, C.R. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Faculdade de Engenharia de Bauru, Dept. de Eng. Mecanica, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo C. Coube 14-01, CEP 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Destro, F.B. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratinguetá, Guaratinguetá 12516-410, SP (Brazil); Simões, A.Z., E-mail: alezipo@yahoo.com [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratinguetá, Guaratinguetá 12516-410, SP (Brazil); Longo, E.; Varela, J.A. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Instituto de Química, Rua Prof. Francisco Degni n° 55, CEP 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    For this study, we investigated a simple method to generate well aligned nanofibers over large areas using an organic polymer stretched over the substrate surface With this method, ZnO and CuO 3D parallel nanowire arrays were successfully prepared by calcinations of the polymer fibers. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the copper oxide has a monoclinic structure while the zinc oxide has a hexagonal structure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed ceramic nanofibers with an average diameter of 120 nm which were composed of small nanoparticles which are 10 nm in diameter. The ability to obtain uniaxially aligned nanofibers reveals a range of interesting properties with potential applications for sensors, catalysts and energy technologies.

  7. High temperature structural ceramic materials manufactured by the CNTD process

    Stiglich, J.J. Jr.; Bhat, D.G.; Holzl, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Controlled Nucleation Thermochemical Deposition (CNTD) has emerged from classical chemical deposition (CVD) technology. This paper describes the techniques of thermochemical grain refinement. The effects of such refinement on mechanical properties of materials at room temperature and at elevated temperatures are outlined. Emphasis is given to high temperature structural ceramic materials such as SiC, Si 3 N 4 , AlN, and TiB 2 and ZrB 2 . An example of grain refinement accompanied by improvements in mechanical properties is SiC. Grain sizes of 500 to 1000 A have been observed in CNTD SiC with room temperature MOR of 1380 to 2070 MPa (4 pt bending) and MOR of 3450 to 4140 MPa (4 pt bending) at 1350 0 C. Various applications of these materials to the solution of high temperature structural problems are described. (author)

  8. Stereolithography: A new method for processing dental ceramics by additive computer-aided manufacturing.

    Dehurtevent, Marion; Robberecht, Lieven; Hornez, Jean-Christophe; Thuault, Anthony; Deveaux, Etienne; Béhin, Pascal

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the physical and mechanical properties of stereolithography (SLA)- manufactured alumina ceramics of different composition to those of subtractive- manufactured ceramics and to produce suitable dental crown frameworks. The physical and mechanical properties of a control and six experimental SLA ceramics prepared from slurries with small (S) and large (L) particles (0.46±0.03 and 1.56±0.04μm, respectively) and three dry matter contents (70%, 75%, 80%) were evaluated by dynamic rheometry, hydrostatic weighing, three3-point flexural strength measurements, and Weibull analyses, and by the micrometrics measurement of shrinkage ratio before and after the heat treatments. S75 was the only small particle slurry with a significantly higher viscosity than L70. The viscosity of the S80 slurry made it impossible to take rheological measurements. The viscosities of the S75 and S80 slurries caused deformations in the printed layers during SLA manufacturing and were excluded from further consideration. SLA samples with low dry matter content had significantly lower and densityflexural strengths. Only SLA samples with a large particle size and high dry matter content (L75 and L80) were similar in density and flexural strength to the subtractive- manufactured samples. The 95% confidence intervals of the Weibull modulus of the L80 ceramic were higher (no overlap fraction) than those of the L75 ceramic and were similar to the control (overlap fraction). The Weibull characteristics of L80 ceramic were higher than those of L75 ceramic and the control. SLA can be used to process suitable crown frameworks but shows results in anisotropic shrinkage. The hH High particle size and dry matter content of the L80 slurry allowed made it possible to produce a reliable ceramic by SLA manufacturing with an anisotropic shrinkage, and a density, and flexural strength similar to those of a subtractive-manufactured ceramic. SLA allowed made it possible to build

  9. Methodology for automatic process of the fired ceramic tile's internal defect using IR images and artificial neural network

    Andrade, Roberto Márcio de; Eduardo, Alexandre Carlos

    2011-01-01

    In the ceramic industry, rarely testing systems were employed to on-line detect the presence of defects in ceramic tiles. This paper is concerned with the problem of automatic inspection of ceramic tiles using Infrared Images and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The performance of the technique has been evaluated theoretically and experimentally from laboratory and on line tile samples. It has been performed system for IR image processing and, utilizing an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), det...

  10. Processing and properties of pressable ceramic with non-uniform reinforcement for selective-toughening

    Yi, Wei; Hu, Xiaozhi; Ichim, Paul; Sun, Xudong

    2012-01-01

    Brittle low-strength and low-toughness pressable dental ceramic can be reinforced by ductile elongated gold-particles (GP). A customized crown structure can be adequately strengthened by distributing GP only in critical sections of the crown, where high tensile stresses are experienced. In the present study, a non-uniformly structured ceramic–matrix composite with excellent interfacial bonding, twofold fracture toughness and strength at desired locations, is fabricated using pressable dental ceramic and GP. The layout pattern and sequence of different GP/ceramic powder mixtures, high-temperature flow properties of these mixtures during hot-pressing and the sample mold geometry are used to control the distribution and locations of GP for selective toughening and strengthening. Nano-crystalline structures of the pressable ceramic–matrix and the nano-scaled interfacial region around GP have been revealed by high-magnification field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Toughening and strengthening mechanisms of the elongated GP including residual stresses from composite processing and ductile fracture of GP are discussed together with SEM observations. Bulk flexural strength and local micro-indentation fracture and deformation characteristics of the selective-toughened ceramic/metal composite have been compared to those of the monolithic pressable ceramic to validate the toughening and strengthening mechanisms.

  11. The Influence of Tool Composite's Structure During Process of Diamond Grinding of Ceramic Materials

    Gawlik Józef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the tests performed during the grinding process of the ceramic materials: – polycrystalline ceramics (Zirconium ZrO2 and mono-crystalline ceramics (sapphire α-Al2O3 by the diamond tools. Studies have shown that the concentration (thickening of the tool composite changes the tool's pore structure when using suitable wetted adamantine additives. Such modified composite has positive impact on tribological properties of the subsurface layer of the machined components. This is manifested by the reduction of the surface roughness and reduction of the vibration amplitude of the coefficient of friction. The possibilities of the positive effects when using wetted additives on the tool's composite during the pressing (briquetting stage confirm the study results.

  12. Process of producing a ceramic matrix composite article and article formed thereby

    Corman, Gregory Scot [Ballston Lake, NY; McGuigan, Henry Charles [Duanesburg, NY; Brun, Milivoj Konstantin [Ballston Lake, NY

    2011-10-25

    A CMC article and process for producing the article to have a layer on its surface that protects a reinforcement material within the article from damage. The method entails providing a body containing a ceramic reinforcement material in a matrix material that contains a precursor of a ceramic matrix material. A fraction of the reinforcement material is present and possibly exposed at a surface of the body. The body surface is then provided with a surface layer formed of a slurry containing a particulate material but lacking the reinforcement material of the body. The body and surface layer are heated to form the article by converting the precursor within the body to form the ceramic matrix material in which the reinforcement material is contained, and by converting the surface layer to form the protective layer that covers any fraction of the reinforcement material exposed at the body surface.

  13. Rapid processing of ferrite ceramics with promising magneto-dielectric characteristics

    Zhuohao Xiao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ferrite ceramics, Ni0.88Zn0.07Co0.05Fe1.98O4, with the addition of 4wt.% Bi2O3 as sintering aid, were fabricated by using a simple one-step processing without involving the step of calcination. X-ray diffraction (XRD results indicated that single phase ferrite ceramics can be achieved after sintering at 1000∘C for 2h. The samples demonstrated relative densities in the range of 97–99%. Desired magneto-dielectric properties have been approached by adjusting the sintering temperature and sintering time duration. This technique is believed to be applicable to other ceramic materials.

  14. Solidification of high level liquid waste (HLLW) into ceramics by sintering process

    Masuda, Sumio; Oguino, Naohiko; Tsunoda, Naomi; O-oka, Kazuo; Ohta, Takao.

    1979-01-01

    One of the alternatives to vitrified solid which is acceptable and well characterized for storing radioactive HLLW with desirable long-term stability is ceramics. On the other hand, the solidification process of highly radioactive wastes should be simple and suitable for continuous production. On the above described basis, the authors have made preliminary study on the production of sintered ceramics by the addition of several oxides to HLLW. The simulated waste and additive oxides were pressed in a mold to make the preforms of 50 mm diameter and 10 to 15 mm thick. The preforms were then normally sintered at temperature from 1000 to 1400 deg C for 2 to 4 hours. The characterization of the sintered solids revealed the following facts. (1) X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the expected crystals were formed by normal-sintering as well as by hot-pressing. (2) The bulk density of the ceramics by normal-sintering was around 90 to 95% of the assumed theoretical values. (3) The leach-rate of the solids was affected by the bulk density. (4) Other properties of the solids, such as thermal expansion or thermal conductivity, are dominantly determined by those of main crystals in the solids. Sintering process is generally simple and productive as far as normal sintering is concerned. However, hot-pressing is an intermittent and time consuming process. From this fact, the authors intended to adopt the normal sintering process for the ceramic solidification of high level liquid wastes. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  15. Use of the inverse temperature profile in microwave processing of advanced ceramics

    Binner, J.G.P.; Al-Dawery, I.A.; Aneziris, C.; Cross, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    Attempts are being made to exploit the inverse temperature profile which can be developed with microwave heating with respect to the processing of certain advanced ceramics. This paper discusses the results obtained to date during the microwave sintering of YBCO high-T c superconductors and the microwave reaction bonding of silicon nitride

  16. Ceramic Composites of 3Y-TZP Doped with CuO: Processing, Microstructure and Tribology

    Ran, S.

    2006-01-01

    The work described in this thesis is about processing, microstructure and tribology of CuO doped 3Y-TZP (3 mol% yttria stabilised tetragonal zirconia polycrystals) composite ceramics. This group of materials has shown attractive properties such as superplastic behaviour at elevated temperature and a

  17. Process control & monitoring for laser micromaching of Si3N4 ceramics

    Tshabalala, L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser machining which is a non-contact process that offers the advantage of machining advanced ceramics. In laser machining Si3N4, surface temperature is increased and controlled to evaporate the YSiAlON glassy phase of the Si3N4. However...

  18. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    Craig, D.F.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the division, whose purpose is to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by US DOE. Activities range from basic research to industrial research and technology transfer. The division (and the report) is divided into the following: Engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials, program activities, collaborative research facilities and technology transfer, and educational programs.

  19. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1978

    McHargue, C.J.; Peterson, S.

    1978-09-01

    Topics covered include: structure of materials, theoretical research; x-ray diffraction research; fundamental ceramics studies; preparation and synthesis of high-temperature and special service materials; physical metallurgy; grain boundary segregation and fracture; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; superconducting materials; radiation effects; facility and technique development; nuclear microanalysis; cooperative studies with universities and other research organizations; and fundamentals of welding and joining

  20. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1981-09-01

    Information is presented concerning the theoretical studies of metals and alloys; x-ray diffraction research; structural ceramics; structure of coal; analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy; deformation and mechanical properties; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; metastable materials; neutron radiation effects; charged particle radiation effects; theory and modeling of radiation effects; facility and advanced technique development; fundamentals of welding and joining; and studies in nondestructive evaluation.

  1. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    McHargue, C.J.

    1981-09-01

    Information is presented concerning the theoretical studies of metals and alloys; x-ray diffraction research; structural ceramics; structure of coal; analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy; deformation and mechanical properties; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; metastable materials; neutron radiation effects; charged particle radiation effects; theory and modeling of radiation effects; facility and advanced technique development; fundamentals of welding and joining; and studies in nondestructive evaluation

  2. Guidelines for the scale-up of an aqueous ceramic process: a case study of statistical process control

    Mortara, L.; Alcock, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Process-scale up is the change from a feasibility study in a laboratory to a full-scale prototype production process. It is an important issue for the ceramics industry, but has been the subject of relatively little systematic research. This paper will show how certain manufacturing concepts used in a number of industries - can be applied to the scale up of a feasibility study level, aqueous tape casting process. In particular, it examines the elements of process standardisa...

  3. Progress in Treatment of Oily Wastewater by Inorganic Porous Ceramic Membrane

    Dai Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition and complexity of oily wastewater contains many solid particles, free oil, emulsified oil and so on.It brought about a series of environmental pollution problems when oily wastewater was directly discharged into rivers, lakes and other water bodies. Therefore, researchers are committed to study how to deal with oily wastewater to deal with oily wastewater to apply it to meet the requirements of water injection.Inorganic porous ceramic membrane has excellent properties among many filtering methods. For example, high temperature and high pressure resistance, resistance to acid and alkali, low energy consumption, no pollution to the environment and has a good prospect in the field of oily wastewater treatment, which has attracted the attention of many scholars not only at home but also on abroad. This article describes the present situation of the research on the treatment of oily wastewater by ceramic membrane in recent years, and expounded the significance of the treatment of oily wastewater to people’s lives and makes an expectation for the development of inorganic porous ceramic membrane in the future.

  4. Use of solid waste from sand beneficiation process in the ceramic tile industry and its influence on the physical properties of the ceramic products

    Biff, Sergio; Silva, Manoel Ribeiro da

    2016-01-01

    The current paper had as main aim characterize and assess the use viability of a solid waste from sand beneficiation process in the production of ceramic tiles. To determine the main components the solid waste was characterized by X-ray fluorescence and the main crystalline phases were determined by X-ray diffraction. To evaluate the addition effects of the solid waste over the solid waste was introduced into a ceramic composition in proportions of 5% and 10%. The ceramics materials obtained were subjected to the linear retraction, water absorption and flexural strength analysis according to the Brazilian standard NBR 13818 (1997). Additionally, the solid waste and the ceramic materials obtained in this study were classified according to the Brazilian standard NBR 10004 (2004) to assess the potential environmental impact. The main solid waste constituents identified were silicon dioxide and aluminum oxide, respectively 50.2% e 19.2%, distributed in the crystal forms of quartz and kaolinite. The ceramic materials obtained after firing at 1100 deg C, without and with 10% of solid waste presented respectively flexural strength of 13.86 MPa and 14,52Mpa. The results of water absorption without and with addition of 10% of solid waste were respectively 16.96% and 16.63%, both appropriate performances for use in ceramic tiles according to the Brazilian standard NBR 13818 (1997). On the other hand, the ceramic materials obtained with the addition of 10% of solid waste were classified as inert materials according to Brazilian standard NBR 10004 (2004), showing the capability of incorporating solid waste in ceramic materials. (author)

  5. Carbon dioxide electrolysis using a ceramic electrolyte. [for space processing

    Erstfeld, T. E.; Mullins, O., Jr.; Williams, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of an experimental study of the electrical aspects of carbon dioxide electrolysis using a ceramic electrolyte. The electrolyte compositions used in this study are 8% Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2, 7.5% CaO stabilized ZrO2, and 5% Y2O3 stabilized ThO2. Results indicate that the 8% Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 is the best material to use for electrolysis, in terms of current as a function of voltage and temperature, and in terms of efficiency of oxide ion flow through it. The poorest results were obtained with the 5% Y2O3 stabilized ThO2 composition. An electrolysis system which might be employed to reclaim oxygen and carbon from effluents of space manufacturing, assuming that an industry would have to electrolyze 258,000 tonnes of CO2 per year, is predicted to require a total cell area of 110,000 sq m of 1 mm thickness and electrical capacity of 441 MW.

  6. Processes of Fatigue Destruction in Nanopolymer-Hydrophobised Ceramic Bricks

    Stanisław Fic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a proposal of a model of fatigue destruction of hydrophobised ceramic brick, i.e., a basic masonry material. The brick surface was hydrophobised with two inorganic polymers: a nanopolymer preparation based on dialkyl siloxanes (series 1–5 and an aqueous silicon solution (series 6–10. Nanosilica was added to the polymers to enhance the stability of the film formed on the brick surface. To achieve an appropriate blend of the polymer liquid phase and the nano silica solid phase, the mixture was disintegrated by sonication. The effect of the addition of nano silica and sonication on changes in the rheological parameters, i.e., viscosity and surface tension, was determined. Material fatigue was induced by cyclic immersion of the samples in water and drying at a temperature of 100 °C, which caused rapid and relatively dynamic movement of water. The moisture and temperature effect was determined by measurement of changes in surface hardness performed with the Vickers method and assessment of sample absorbability. The results provided an approximate picture of fatigue destruction of brick and hydrophobic coatings in relation to changes in their temporal stability. Additionally, SEM images of hydrophobic coatings in are shown.

  7. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  8. Study on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Foam Titanium Carbide Ceramics Fabricated by Reaction Sintering Process

    Ma, Yana; Bao, Chonggao; Chen, Jie; Song, Suocheng; Han, Longhao

    2018-05-01

    Foam titanium carbide (TiC) ceramics with a three-dimensional network structure were fabricated by the reaction sintering process, in which polyurethane foam was taken as the template, and TiO2 and phenolic resin were used as the reactants. Phase, microstructures and fracture morphologies of foam TiC ceramics were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results show that when the mass ratios of phenolic resin and TiO2 (F/T) are (0.8-1.2): 1, foam TiC ceramics with pure TiC phase can be formed. As the F/T ratios increase, crystal lattice parameters of fabricated foam TiC ceramics become bigger. When the value of F/T decreases from 1.2 to 0.8, grain size of TiC grows larger and microstructures get denser; meanwhile, the compressive strength increases from 0.10 to 1.05 MPa. Additionally, either raising the sintering temperatures or extending holding time can facilitate the completion of the reaction process and increase the compressive strength.

  9. Electrolytic process to produce sodium hypochlorite using sodium ion conductive ceramic membranes

    Balagopal, Shekar; Malhotra, Vinod; Pendleton, Justin; Reid, Kathy Jo

    2012-09-18

    An electrochemical process for the production of sodium hypochlorite is disclosed. The process may potentially be used to produce sodium hypochlorite from seawater or low purity un-softened or NaCl-based salt solutions. The process utilizes a sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane, such as membranes based on NASICON-type materials, in an electrolytic cell. In the process, water is reduced at a cathode to form hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. Chloride ions from a sodium chloride solution are oxidized in the anolyte compartment to produce chlorine gas which reacts with water to produce hypochlorous and hydrochloric acid. Sodium ions are transported from the anolyte compartment to the catholyte compartment across the sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane. Sodium hydroxide is transported from the catholyte compartment to the anolyte compartment to produce sodium hypochlorite within the anolyte compartment.

  10. The preparation of UO2 ceramic microspheres with an advanced process (TGU)

    Xu Zhichang; Tang Yaping; Zhang Fuhong

    1994-04-01

    The UO 2 ceramic microspheres are the most important materials in the spherical fuel elements for high temperature reactor (HTR). An advanced process for preparation of UO 2 ceramic microspheres has been developed at Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University. This process known as total gelation process of uranium (TGU), is based on the traditional sol-gel process, external gelation process and internal gelation process of uranium (EGU and IGU), and has been selected as the production process. The result of batch test is described. Accordance with the requirements of quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA), the stabilization of operating parameters and product quality is tested., The results on batch test have shown that as well as all of the operated parameters are fixed, then the product quality can be stable as well as the product specification can be met. When the colloidal flow rate and the vibration frequency of nozzle are fixed, the kernel's size is also fixed. When the sintering temperature and time are fixed, the product density is also fixed. When the hydrogen atmosphere is used, the O/U ratio is very near to stoichiometry. The performance and structure of UO 2 ceramic microspheres are also given

  11. The nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process: A newly developed low-temperature technology

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new low-temperature (50-60 degrees C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic, have conclusively shown that between 90 and 99% of the nitrate at Hanford can be readily converted to ammonia. In this process, aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an alumina-silica-based ceramic solid. The process may actually be able to utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various US DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final nitrate-free ceramic product can be calcined, pressed, and sintered like any other ceramic. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution (probable supernate concentrations resulting from salt-cake/sludge removal from the Hanford SSTs), volume reductions as high as 70% are currently obtained, compared with an expected 40 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data extracted from bench-top studies indicate that the process will be very economical. These data were used to cost a batch facility with a production rate of 1200 kilograms of nitrate per hour for processing all the Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Our process cost analysis indicates that between $2.01 and 2.66 will be required to convert each kilogram of nitrate. Based upon 1957 literature, these costs are one-third to one-half of the processing costs quoted for electrolytic and thermal processes

  12. Progress in gamma processing of commercial products

    Fraser, F.M.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper the global outlook for gamma radiation processing of commercial products is discussed. Canada's contribution to the development of the industry is presented. New developments in the applications of the process and its marketing are discussed. (U.K.)

  13. Numerical modelling of evaporation in a ceramic layer in the tape casting process

    Jabbari, M.; Hattel, J. H. [Process Modelling Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Nils Koppels Allé, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Jambhekar, V. A.; Helmig, R. [Department of Hydromechanics and Modelling of Hydrosystems, Institute for Modelling Hydraulic and Environmental Systems, Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-06-08

    Evaporation of water from a ceramic layer is a key phenomenon in the drying process for the manufacturing of tape cast ceramics. This process contains mass, momentum and energy exchange between the porous medium and the free–flow region. In order to analyze such interaction processes, a Representative Elementary Volume (REV)–scale model concept is presented for coupling non–isothermal multi–phase compositional porous–media flow and single–phase compositional laminar free–flow. The preliminary results show the typical expected evaporation behaviour from a porous medium initially saturated with water, and its transport to the free–flow region according to the existent results from the literature.

  14. Rare-earth doped transparent ceramics for spectral filtering and quantum information processing

    Kunkel, Nathalie, E-mail: nathalie.kunkel@chimie-paristech.fr; Goldner, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.goldner@chimie-paristech.fr [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech–CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Ferrier, Alban [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech–CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Sorbonnes Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, 75005 Paris (France); Thiel, Charles W.; Cone, Rufus L. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States); Ramírez, Mariola O.; Bausá, Luisa E. [Departamento Física de Materiales and Instituto Nicolás Cabrera, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ikesue, Akio [World Laboratory, Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-0023 (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    Homogeneous linewidths below 10 kHz are reported for the first time in high-quality Eu{sup 3+} doped Y {sub 2}O{sub 3} transparent ceramics. This result is obtained on the {sup 7}F{sub 0}→{sup 5}D{sub 0} transition in Eu{sup 3+} doped Y {sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics and corresponds to an improvement of nearly one order of magnitude compared to previously reported values in transparent ceramics. Furthermore, we observed spectral hole lifetimes of ∼15 min that are long enough to enable efficient optical pumping of the nuclear hyperfine levels. Additionally, different Eu{sup 3+} concentrations (up to 1.0%) were studied, resulting in an increase of up to a factor of three in the peak absorption coefficient. These results suggest that transparent ceramics can be useful in applications where narrow and deep spectral holes can be burned into highly absorbing lines, such as quantum information processing and spectral filtering.

  15. Progress in the processing of radioesterilized tissue

    Zarate S, H; Espinoza B, J; Ribbeck N, J; Vargas Q, M; Gutierrez D, K

    2003-01-01

    Since 1996, the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission has been carrying out work to implement the first Radiosterilized Tissue Processing Laboratory (RTPL) in Chile, in order to introduce the use of sterilized biological tissue for clinical application. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has provided collaboration and technical assistance for this work. The processing of biological tissues has been done in conjunction with physicians from different state hospital centers, mostly in the Metropolitan Region. Among the tissues primarily processed are allografts such as frozen human skin at - 80 o C, freeze-dried human bone and amniotic membrane. We have also been working with xenograft developments such as freeze-dried pig skin and demineralized ground cow bone. All these tissues are sterilized by means of gamma radiation, in order to obtain a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6 . This laboratory has already completed various stages, from the beginning when it was only just an idea up to the production stage where a large quantity of processed tissues have been delivered to physicians of different specialties, resulting in a contribution to medical science as well as to the treatment quality of a great many patients. The preliminary results and the opinions of those physicians who have used the processed products from our laboratory have encouraged us to continue developing new products, thus enlarging the scope of application (author)

  16. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1993

    Craig, D.F.; Bradley, R.A.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides an overview of activities and accomplishsments of the division from October 1992 through December 1993; the division is organized to provide technical support, mainly in the area of high-temperature materials, for technologies being developed by DOE. Activities span the range from basic research to industrial interactions (cooperative research and technology transfer). Sections 1-5 describe the different functional groups (engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials). Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines. Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative R and D programs and technology transfer functions. Finally, Sect. 8 briefly describes the division`s involvement in educational activities. Several organizational changes were effected during this period.

  17. Ceramic stabilization of hazardous wastes: a high performance room temperature process

    Maloney, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    ANL has developed a room-temperature process for converting hazardous materials to a ceramic structure. It is similar to vitrification but is achieved at low cost, similar to conventional cement stabilization. The waste constituents are both chemically stabilized and physically encapsulated, producing very low leaching levels and the potential for delisting. The process, which is pH-insensitive, is ideal for inorganic sludges and liquids, as well as mixed chemical-radioactive wastes, but can also handle significant percentages of salts and even halogenated organics. High waste loadings are possible and densification occurs,so that volumes are only slightly increased and in some cases (eg, incinerator ash) are reduced. The ceramic product has strength and weathering properties far superior to cement products

  18. Progress in radiation processing of polymers

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Haji-Saeid, Mohammad; Ahmed, Shamshad

    2005-07-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from ether radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation of noxious fumes and by products of peroxide degradation. Both the irradiation sources have their merits and limitations. Increased utilization of electron beams for modification and enhancement of polymer materials has been in particular witnessed over the past 40 years. The paper highlights several recent cases of EB utilization to improve key properties of selected plastic products. In paper is provided a survey of radiation processing methods of industrial interest, encompassing technologies which are already commercially well established, through developments in the active R&D stage which show pronounced promise for future commercial use. Radiation cross-linking technologies discussed include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, development of radiation crosslinked SiC fiber, polymer recycling, development of gamma compatible pp, hydrogels etc. Over the years, remarkable advancement has been achieved in radiation processing of natural polymers. Role of radiation in improving the processing of temperature of PCL for use as biodegradable polymer, in accelerated breakdown of cellulose into viscose and enhancement in yields of chitin/chitosan from sea-food waste, is described.

  19. Progress in radiation processing of polymers

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Haji-Saeid, Mohammad; Ahmed, Shamshad

    2005-01-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from ether radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation of noxious fumes and by products of peroxide degradation. Both the irradiation sources have their merits and limitations. Increased utilization of electron beams for modification and enhancement of polymer materials has been in particular witnessed over the past 40 years. The paper highlights several recent cases of EB utilization to improve key properties of selected plastic products. In paper is provided a survey of radiation processing methods of industrial interest, encompassing technologies which are already commercially well established, through developments in the active R and D stage which show pronounced promise for future commercial use. Radiation cross-linking technologies discussed include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, development of radiation crosslinked SiC fiber, polymer recycling, development of gamma compatible pp, hydrogels etc. Over the years, remarkable advancement has been achieved in radiation processing of natural polymers. Role of radiation in improving the processing of temperature of PCL for use as biodegradable polymer, in accelerated breakdown of cellulose into viscose and enhancement in yields of chitin/chitosan from sea-food waste, is described

  20. Progress in radiation processing of polymers

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Industrial Applications and Chemistry Section, Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Wagramer Street 5, Vienna 1400 (Austria) and Department of Process and Chemical Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)]. E-mail: a-g.chmielewski@iaea.org; Haji-Saeid, Mohammad [International Atomic Energy Agency, Industrial Applications and Chemistry Section, Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Wagramer Street 5, Vienna 1400 (Austria); Ahmed, Shamshad [Applied Chemistry Laboratories, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Box Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2005-07-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from ether radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation of noxious fumes and by products of peroxide degradation. Both the irradiation sources have their merits and limitations. Increased utilization of electron beams for modification and enhancement of polymer materials has been in particular witnessed over the past 40 years. The paper highlights several recent cases of EB utilization to improve key properties of selected plastic products. In paper is provided a survey of radiation processing methods of industrial interest, encompassing technologies which are already commercially well established, through developments in the active R and D stage which show pronounced promise for future commercial use. Radiation cross-linking technologies discussed include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, development of radiation crosslinked SiC fiber, polymer recycling, development of gamma compatible pp, hydrogels etc. Over the years, remarkable advancement has been achieved in radiation processing of natural polymers. Role of radiation in improving the processing of temperature of PCL for use as biodegradable polymer, in accelerated breakdown of cellulose into viscose and enhancement in yields of chitin/chitosan from sea-food waste, is described.

  1. Toward understanding dynamic annealing processes in irradiated ceramics

    Myers, Michael Thomas [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2013-05-01

    High energy particle irradiation inevitably generates defects in solids. The ballistic formation and thermalization of the defect creation process occur rapidly, and are believed to be reasonably well understood. However, knowledge of the evolution of defects after damage cascade thermalization, referred to as dynamic annealing, is quite limited. Unraveling the mechanisms associated with dynamic annealing is crucial since such processes play an important role in the formation of stable postirradiation disorder in ion-beam-processing of semiconductors, and determines the “radiation tolerance” of many nuclear materials. The purpose of this dissertation is to further our understanding of the processes involved in dynamic annealing. In order to achieve this, two main tasks are undertaken.

  2. Advances in materials science, Metals and Ceramics Division. Triannual progress report, October 1979-January 1980

    1980-03-31

    Progress is summarized concerning magnetic fusion energy materials, laser fusion energy, aluminium-air battery and vehicle, geothermal research, oil-shale research, nuclear waste management, office of basic energy sciences research, and materials research notes. (FS)

  3. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985

    1986-01-01

    This progress report is divided into: engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, program activities, and collaborative research facilities. Very little hard data is presented. The appendices include listings of seminars, publications, and conference papers. (DLC)

  4. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985

    1986-01-01

    This progress report is divided into: engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, program activities, and collaborative research facilities. Very little hard data is presented. The appendices include listings of seminars, publications, and conference papers

  5. Processing of non-oxide ceramics from sol-gel methods

    Landingham, Richard; Reibold, Robert A.; Satcher, Joe

    2014-12-12

    A general procedure applied to a variety of sol-gel precursors and solvent systems for preparing and controlling homogeneous dispersions of very small particles within each other. Fine homogenous dispersions processed at elevated temperatures and controlled atmospheres make a ceramic powder to be consolidated into a component by standard commercial means: sinter, hot press, hot isostatic pressing (HIP), hot/cold extrusion, spark plasma sinter (SPS), etc.

  6. Computer modeling of ceramic melters to assess impacts of process and design variables on performance

    Eyler, L.L.; Elliott, M.L.; Lowery, P.S.; Lessor, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical and physical simulation of existing and advanced melter designs conducted to assess impacts of process and design variables on performance of ceramic melters are presented. Coupled equations of flow, thermal, and electric fields were numerically solved in time-dependent three dimensional finite volume form. Recent simulation results of a three electrode melter design with sloped walls indicate the presence of bi-modal stable flow patterns dominated by boundary conditions

  7. Creep of crystals: High-temperature deformation processes in metals, ceramics and minerals

    Poirier, J. P.

    An introductory text describing high-temperature deformation processes in metals, ceramics, and minerals is presented. Among the specific topics discussed are: the mechanical aspects of crystal deformation; lattice defects; and phenomenological and thermodynamical analysis of quasi-steady-state creep. Consideration is also given to: dislocation creep models; the effect of hydrostatic pressure on deformation; creep polygonization; and dynamic recrystallization. The status of experimental techniques for the study of transformation plasticity in crystals is also discussed.

  8. Synthesis and ceramic processing of alumina and zirconia based composites infiltrated with glass phase for dental applications

    Duarte, Daniel Gomes

    2009-01-01

    The interest for the use of ceramic materials for dental applications started due to the good aesthetic appearance promoted by the similarity to natural teeth. However, the fragility of traditional ceramics was a limitation for their use in stress conditions. The development of alumina and zirconia based materials, that associate aesthetic results, biocompatibility and good mechanical behaviour, makes possible the employment of ceramics for fabrication of dental restorations. The incorporation of vitreous phase in these ceramics is an alternative to minimize the ceramic retraction and to improve the adhesion to resin-based cements, necessary for the union of ceramic frameworks to the remaining dental structure. In the dentistry field, alumina and zirconia ceramic infiltrated with glassy phase are represented commercially by the In-Ceram systems. Considering that the improvement of powder's synthesis routes and of techniques of ceramic processing contributes for good performance of these materials, the goal of the present work is the study of processing conditions of alumina and/or 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics infiltrated with aluminum borosilicate lanthanum glass. The powders, synthesized by hydroxide coprecipitation route, were pressed by uniaxial compaction and pre-sintered at temperature range between 950 and 1650 degree C in order to obtain porous ceramics bodies. Vitreous phase incorporation was performed by impregnation of aluminum borosilicate lanthanum powder, also prepared in this work, followed by heat treatment between 1200 and 1400 degree C .Ceramic powders were characterized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, gaseous adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. Sinterability of alumina and /or stabilized zirconia green pellets was evaluated by dilatometry. Pre-sintered ceramics were characterized by apparent density measurements (Archimedes method), X-ray diffraction and scanning electron

  9. Defense waste processing facility startup progress report

    Iverson, D.C.; Elder, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950's to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high level waste produced since operation began have been consolidated into 33 million gallons by evaporation at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy has authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters, prior to emplacement in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. Cold startup testing using simulated non-radioactive feeds is scheduled to begin in November 1992 with radioactive operation scheduled to begin in May 1994. While technical issues have been identified which can potentially affect DWPF operation, they are not expected to negatively impact the start of non-radioactive startup testing

  10. Final Air Toxics Standards for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing, Glass Manufacturing, and Secondary Nonferrous Metals Processing Area Sources Fact Sheet

    This page contains a December 2007 fact sheet with information regarding the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing, Glass Manufacturing, and Secondary Nonferrous Metals Processing Area Sources

  11. Noble Metal/Ceramic Composites in Flame Processes

    Schultz, Heiko; Madler, Lutz; Strobel, Reto

    conditions influence the resulting noble metal particles size in those systems [1]. For every specific application the particle size and the metal/metal oxide interaction affect the performance of these nano-composite materials [2]. Recently, aerosol processes have been successfully used to produce platinum...

  12. Research results on productivity stabilization by ultrasonic camera (plant with membrane ceramic elements during vine processing

    V. T. Antufyev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes solutions to the problems of declining productivity of ceramic membrane elements for wine processing on the final manufacturing phase. A relative stabilization of filtration velocity, venting efficiency and wine lightening were experimentally confirmed during contacts with oscillation waves of ultrasonic transmitter on the ceramic filter. Which significantly reduced the cost of various preservatives to increase periods storage. To study the processes of wine processing by the proposed method it was made an experimental installation on the basis of pilot machine MRp-1/2 for bottling of quiet liquids and an ultrasonic device "Volna– M" UZTA-1/22-OM with a firmly, waveguide which transmits sound, fixed filter frame on the ultrasound emitter. To stabilize the performance of ultrasonic units with ceramic membrane elements without quality deterioration of wines it was empirically determined rational parameters of power of ultrasound input and pressure in the system. The given derived dependencies and graphs allow to define the time of relatively stable operating filter regime. It was revealed a significant cost reduction on filtration, as it allows escape from the contamination of the product by various preservatives, and increasing of storage duration in a sealed container during aseptic filling without a thermal sterilization. Ultrasonic emitter contact by superposition wave vibrations on the ceramic filter increases not only the efficiency of gas removal, but also improves the organoleptic characteristics, stabilizes the filters, improves their productivity. Gas removal creates unfavorable conditions for development of the yeast, which in turn increases the shelf life of semisweet wine.

  13. Development of a technical process concerning the immobilisation of nuclear waste by embedding into ceramic matrix

    Schubert, G.; Krause, H.

    1993-12-01

    Ceramic is considered a highly qualified matrix for the embedding of all radioactive waste concentrates arising from reprocessing and fabricating UO 2 /PuO 2 -mixed oxide fuel elements and it may take up all long-lived or highly active radionuclides. Parallel to product development a technically feasible process has been started. The wastes are mixed with the ceramics-forming agents in a wet medium. A double-shaft extruder may be used. Backfitting of the extruder for use in a hot cell may be carried out easily. Experiments are presented and conceptions developed as to how the facility may be designed under aggravated boundary conditions of irradiation and remote handling. The process consists of the following stages: Preliminary treatment of the four waste suspensions, without dehydration; continuous dosage into a double-shaft extruder, where preliminary drying and then addition of the fifth waste type (dry ash) as well as of the mixture of ceramics-forming agents takes place; mixing and preferably extrusion. Heat treatment from the drying and calcination temperatures up to the sintering temperature of 1250-1300 C in a stationary heated electric furnace, filling of the hot material into canisters, filling of the cavities with liquid glas, and sealing of the cansiters. Except for an experiment with dissolver residues, all experiments were inactive. Conventional devices were applied with the aim of investigated their suitability for the process as well as for the conditions of remote handling and inrradiation. A facility, which was to be located downstream of a 350 t/a reprocessing plant, would have to have a throughput of about 40 kg/h ceramic product or 6 canisters per day. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Process engineering of ceramic composite coatings for fuel cell systems

    Li, G.; Kim, H.; Chen, M.; Yang, Q.; Troczynski, T. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Researchers at UBCeram at the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering at the University of British Columbia have developed a technology to chemically bond composite sol-gel (CB-CSG) coating onto metallic surfaces of complex or concave shapes. The process has been optimized for electrically resistive coatings and corrosion-resistant coatings. The CSG is sprayed onto metallic surfaces and is heat-treated at 300 degrees C to partially dehydrate the hydroxides. The CSG film is then chemically bonded through reaction of active alumina with metal phosphates, such as aluminium phosphate. A new chromate-free process is being developed to address the issue of coatings porosity. The electrodeposition technique involves polymer particles mixed with suspended fine alumina particles which are co-deposited by electrophoretic means or by electrocoagulation. The composite e-coatings have excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as a protective coating for various components of fuel cell systems. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  15. HNS steelmaking process using thermal plasma in a ceramic crucible

    Siwka, J.; Svyazhin, A.G.; Jowsa, J.; Derda, W.

    1999-01-01

    The problems related to HNS (high nitrogen steels) steelmaking technology in a laboratory plasma furnace (100 kW DC, 25 kg liquid metal) are discussed in the paper. Results of investigations on mass transfer in the bath, modelling of the temperature fields by the FEM method, the dynamics of nitriding and refining of the liquid metal are presented. The results show many advantageous features of this technology and identify the necessary modifications. Realization of the one-stage production process of HNS is possible using thermal plasma. This means that any kind of metallic scrap can be used with simultaneous nitriding of liquid metal by nitrogen gas phase and its refining. A technological scheme of the discussed process is presented. (orig.)

  16. Progress In Developing an Impermeable, High Temperature Ceramic Composite for Advanced Reactor Clad And Structural Applications

    Feinroth, Herbert; Hao, Bernard; Fehrenbacher, Larry; Patterson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Most Advanced Reactors for Energy and Space Applications require higher temperature materials for fuel cladding and core internal structures. For temperatures above 500 deg. C, metal alloys do not retain sufficient strength or long term corrosion resistance for use in either water, liquid metal or gas cooled systems. In the case of water cooled systems, such metals react exo-thermically with water during core overheating accidents, thus requiring extensive and expensive emergency systems to protect against major releases. Past efforts to apply ceramic composites (oxide, carbide or nitride based) having passive safety characteristics, good strength properties at high temperatures, and reasonable resistance to crack growth, have not been successful, either because of irradiation induced effects, or lack of impermeability to fission gases. Under a Phase 1 SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) project sponsored by DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, the authors have developed a new material system that may solve these problems. A hybrid tubular structure (0.6 inches in outside diameter) consisting of an inner layer of monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) and outer layers of SiC-SiC composite, bonded to the inner layer, has been fabricated in small lengths. Room temperature permeability tests demonstrate zero gas leakage at pressures up to 120 psig internal pressure. Four point flexural bending tests on these hybrid tubular specimens demonstrate a 'graceful' failure mode: i.e. - the outer composite structure sustains a failure mode under stress that is similar to the yield vs. stress characteristics of metal structures. (authors)

  17. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  18. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M ampersand C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings

  19. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Sciences Program: Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1987

    Stiegler, J.O. (comp.)

    1988-04-01

    The program is directed at uncovering principles for the scientific design of materials. The efforts emphasize three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys. The first two materials are central to the theme of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory, and the third supports the Laboratory's mission in fission and fusion reactor technology. We combine the use of unique structural characterization facilities, the activities of the Theory Group, and accurate property determination to establish structure-property relationships. An important aspect of the program is the interaction with universities, industry, and other laboratories. Two collaborative research centers established to aid these interactions are SHaRe and ORSOAR, which make our strong structural characterization capabilities available to researchers outside ORNL. Their research activities and capabilities are summarized in Chap. 1, ''Structural Characterization,'' and Chap. 6, ''Collaborative Research Centers.'' Other interactions with the scientific community are summarized in the Appendixes.

  20. Contact pressure distribution during the polishing process of ceramic tiles: A laboratory investigation

    Sani, A S A; Hamedon, Z; Azhari, A; Sousa, F J P

    2016-01-01

    During the polishing process of porcelain tiles the difference in scratching speed between innermost and peripheral abrasives leads to pressure gradients linearly distributed along the radial direction of the abrasive tool. The aim of this paper is to investigate such pressure gradient in laboratory scale. For this purpose polishing tests were performed on ceramic tiles according to the industrial practices using a custom-made CNC tribometer. Gradual wear on both abrasives and machined surface of the floor tile were measured. The experimental results suggested that the pressure gradient tends to cause an inclination of the abraded surfaces, which becomes stable after a given polishing period. In addition to the wear depth of the machined surface, the highest value of gloss and finest surface finish were observed at the lowest point of the worn out surface of the ceramic floor tile corresponding to the point of highest pressure and lowest scratching speed. (paper)

  1. Thick-film processing of Pb5Ge3O11-based ferroelectric glass-ceramics

    Cornejo, I.A.; Haun, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Processing techniques were investigated to produce c-axis orientation, or texture, of ferroelectric Pb 5 Ge 3 O 11 -based glass-ceramic compositions during crystallization of amorphous thick-film printed samples from the Pb 5 Ge 3 O 11 -PbTiO 3 (PG-PT) and Pb 5 Ge 3 O 11 -Pb(Zr 1/2 Ti 1/2 )O 3 (PG-PZT) systems. In these systems the PG crystallized into a ferroelectric phase, producing a multiple ferroelectric phase composite at low temperatures, PG-PT or PG-PZT. In this way the non-ferroelectric component of traditional ferroelectric glass-ceramics was eliminated

  2. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, which allows a shape to be formed prior to the cure, and is then pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Basalt fibers are used for the reinforcement in the composite system. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material.

  3. Eco-technological process of glass-ceramic production from galvanic sludge and aluminium slag

    Stanisavljević M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods of purification of waste water which are most commonly used in the Republic of Serbia belong to the type of conventional systems for purification such as chemical oxidation and reduction, neutralization, sedimentation, coagulation, and flocculation. Consequently, these methods generate waste sludge which, unless adequately stabilized, represents hazardous matter. The aluminium slag generated by melting or diecasting aluminium and its alloys is also hazardous matter. In this sense, this paper establishes ecological risk of galvanic waste sludge and aluminium slag and then describes the process of stabilization of these waste materials by means of transformation into a glass-ceramic structure through sintering. The obtained product was analyzed with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The object of the paper is the eco-technological process of producing glass-ceramics from galvanic sludge and aluminium slag. The aim of the paper is to incorporate toxic metals from galvanic sludge and aluminium slag into the glass-ceramic product, in the form of solid solutions.

  4. Effect of the pressed ceramic filters on the reoxidation process

    Brůna Marek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Article is focused on reoxidation processes during filtration of aluminium alloys. Many of our experiments proven, that when using filtration media in gating system, reoxidation occurs. Main goal of this article is to point out reoxidation problems occurring during filtration of aluminium alloys. Reason to conduct this work was anomalies discovered by experimental casts, which pointed out that after filtration of primary alloys, small oxide films was detected. Oxides was absent, when we poured without filtration media. Simulation software ProCAST was used during our research.

  5. A direct, single-step plasma arc-vitreous ceramic process for stabilizing spent nuclear fuels, sludges, and associated wastes

    Feng, X.; Einziger, R.E.; Eschenbach, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    A single-step plasma arc-vitreous ceramic (PAVC) process is described for converting spent nuclear fuel (SNF), SNF sludges, and associated wastes into a vitreous ceramic waste form. This proposed technology is built on extensive experience of nuclear waste form development and nuclear waste treatment using the commercially available plasma arc centrifugal (PAC) system. SNF elements will be loaded directly into a PAC furnace with minimum additives and converted into vitreous ceramics with up to 90 wt% waste loading. The vitreous ceramic waste form should meet the functional requirements for borosilicate glasses for permanent disposal in a geologic repository and for interim storage. Criticality safety would be ensured through the use of batch modes, and controlling the amount of fuel processed in one batch. The minimum requirements on SNF characterization and pretreatment, the one-step process, and minimum secondary waste generation may reduce treatment duration, radiation exposure, and treatment cost

  6. Effect of ozone on the performance of a hybrid ceramic membrane-biological activated carbon process.

    Guo, Jianning; Hu, Jiangyong; Tao, Yi; Zhu, Jia; Zhang, Xihui

    2014-04-01

    Two hybrid processes including ozonation-ceramic membrane-biological activated carbon (BAC) (Process A) and ceramic membrane-BAC (Process B) were compared to treat polluted raw water. The performance of hybrid processes was evaluated with the removal efficiencies of turbidity, ammonia and organic matter. The results indicated that more than 99% of particle count was removed by both hybrid processes and ozonation had no significant effect on its removal. BAC filtration greatly improved the removal of ammonia. Increasing the dissolved oxygen to 30.0 mg/L could lead to a removal of ammonia with concentrations as high as 7.80 mg/L and 8.69 mg/L for Processes A and B, respectively. The average removal efficiencies of total organic carbon and ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UV254, a parameter indicating organic matter with aromatic structure) were 49% and 52% for Process A, 51% and 48% for Process B, respectively. Some organic matter was oxidized by ozone and this resulted in reduced membrane fouling and increased membrane flux by 25%-30%. However, pre-ozonation altered the components of the raw water and affected the microorganisms in the BAC, which may impact the removals of organic matter and nitrite negatively. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Metals and ceramics division materials science program. Aunnual progress report for period ending June 30, 1979

    McHargue, C.J.; b.

    1979-10-01

    Progress is reported concerning theoretical studies of metals and alloys, deformation and mechanical properties, physical properties and transport phenomena, radiation effects, and engineering materials. During this period emphasis was shifted from support of nuclear technologies to support of nonnuclear energy systems

  8. Metals and ceramics division materials science program. Aunnual progress report for period ending June 30, 1979

    McHargue, C.J.

    1979-10-01

    Progress is reported concerning theoretical studies of metals and alloys, deformation and mechanical properties, physical properties and transport phenomena, radiation effects, and engineering materials. During this period emphasis was shifted from support of nuclear technologies to support of nonnuclear energy systems. (FS)

  9. Corrosion investigation of multilayered ceramics and experimental nickel alloys in SCWO process environments

    Garcia, K.M.; Mizia, R.

    1995-02-01

    A corrosion investigation was done at MODAR, Inc., using a supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) vessel reactor. Several types of multilayered ceramic rings and experimental nickel alloy coupons were exposed to a chlorinated cutting oil TrimSol, in the SCWO process. A corrosion casing was designed and mounted in the vessel reactor with precautions to minimize chances of degrading the integrity of the pressure vessel. Fifteen of the ceramic coated rings were stacked vertically in the casing at one time for each test. There was a total of 36 rings. The rings were in groupings of three rings that formed five sections. Each section saw a different SCWO environment, ranging from 650 to 300 degrees C. The metal coupons were mounted on horizontal threaded holders welded to a vertical rod attached to the casing cover in order to hang down the middle of the casing. The experimental nickel alloys performed better than the baseline nickel alloys. A titania multilayered ceramic system sprayed onto a titanium ring remained intact after 120-180 hours of exposure. This is the longest time any coating system has withstood such an environment without significant loss

  10. Corrosion investigation of multilayered ceramics and experimental nickel alloys in SCWO process environments

    Garcia, K.M.; Mizia, R.

    1995-02-01

    A corrosion investigation was done at MODAR, Inc., using a supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) vessel reactor. Several types of multilayered ceramic rings and experimental nickel alloy coupons were exposed to a chlorinated cutting oil TrimSol, in the SCWO process. A corrosion casing was designed and mounted in the vessel reactor with precautions to minimize chances of degrading the integrity of the pressure vessel. Fifteen of the ceramic coated rings were stacked vertically in the casing at one time for each test. There was a total of 36 rings. The rings were in groupings of three rings that formed five sections. Each section saw a different SCWO environment, ranging from 650 to 300{degrees}C. The metal coupons were mounted on horizontal threaded holders welded to a vertical rod attached to the casing cover in order to hang down the middle of the casing. The experimental nickel alloys performed better than the baseline nickel alloys. A titania multilayered ceramic system sprayed onto a titanium ring remained intact after 120-180 hours of exposure. This is the longest time any coating system has withstood such an environment without significant loss.

  11. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Wang, Xin; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000 deg C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200 deg C, Beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  12. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  13. Machinability of lithium disilicate glass ceramic in in vitro dental diamond bur adjusting process.

    Song, Xiao-Fei; Ren, Hai-Tao; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Esthetic high-strength lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDGC) are used for monolithic crowns and bridges produced in dental CAD/CAM and oral adjusting processes, which machinability affects the restorative quality. A machinability study has been made in the simulated oral clinical machining of LDGC with a dental handpiece and diamond burs, regarding the diamond tool wear and chip control, machining forces and energy, surface finish and integrity. Machining forces, speeds and energy in in vitro dental adjusting of LDGC were measured by a high-speed data acquisition and force sensor system. Machined LDGC surfaces were assessed using three-dimensional non-contact chromatic confocal optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Diamond bur morphology and LDGC chip shapes were also examined using SEM. Minimum tool wear but significant LDGC chip accumulations were found. Machining forces and energy significantly depended on machining conditions (pceramics (pceramics (pceramics. Surface roughness for machined LDGC was comparable for other glass ceramics. The removal mechanisms of LDGC were dominated by penetration-induced brittle fracture and shear-induced plastic deformation. Unlike most other glass ceramics, distinct intergranular and transgranular fractures of lithium disilicate crystals were found in LDGC. This research provides the fundamental data for dental clinicians on the machinability of LDGC in intraoral adjustments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Processes of hydration aging of superconducting ceramics and problem of regeneration of properties

    Komarov, A.V.; Popov, V.P.; Tikhonov, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The process of hydration aging (distilled water, saturated water vapors) of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.5+x specimens with T s of about 95 K was studied at 55 deg C and water vapors pressure of 119 mmHg. It is established that depending on exposure time and saturated vapors pressure, water affects electric properties of yttrium-barium ceramics with different degree of the effect reversibility. Valuable regeneration of the characteristics can occur only when the hydration process has not led to changes in the phase composition of the material. The mechanism of interaction between cermaics and water is given

  15. INFLUENCE OF QUARTZ CERAMICS SINGLE-STAGE PROCESSING BY GEL-FORMING WATER SOLUTIONS ON ITS STRENGTH

    S. K. Evstropiev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main research results of the influence of quartz ceramics processing by silicon- and aluminum-containing gel- forming water solutions on its durability and porosity are given. Aqueous-alcoholic solutions based on tetraethoxysilane (TEOS, Si(C2H5O4 with additives of aluminum nitrate are proposed for impregnation of porous quartz ceramics samples. Ceramic samples are being impregnated with solutions at the room temperature for 12 minutes. After impregnation they are being exposed to drying at the room temperature for 24 hours and heat treatment in the electric muffle furnace. The made experiments show that impregnation of quartz ceramics porous samples by gel-forming solutions leads to durability growth of not burned samples by 6-7 times even without additional heat treatment. High-temperature heat treatment of previously impregnated ceramic samples leads to decomposition of aluminum nitrate and removal of fossils, and also to hardening of the formed additional bonds between material particles. It considerably improves strength characteristics of quartz ceramics as well. Thus, the possibility of considerable hardening of porous quartz ceramics and stability growth of its strength properties by preliminary impregnation of silicon- and aluminum-bearing gel-forming solutions even without additional heat treatment is experimentally shown. It is revealed that impregnation of porous quartz ceramic samples by these solutions leads only to insignificant reduction of porosity of samples. Subsequent heat treatment of the impregnated porous ceramic samples at the temperatures, equal to 900-1200oC, results in additional significant increase in their mechanical durability.

  16. Disposal criticality analysis for the ceramic waste form from the ANL electrometallurgical treatment process - Internal configurations

    Lell, R. M.; Agrawal, R.; Morris, E. E.

    2000-01-01

    Criticality safety issues for disposal of the ANL ceramic waste were examined for configurations within the waste package. Co-disposal of ceramic waste and DOE spent fuel is discussed briefly; co-disposal of ANL ceramic and metal wastes is examined in detail. Calculations indicate that no significant potential for criticality exists until essentially all of the important neutron absorbers are flushed from the degraded ceramic waste. Even if all of the neutron absorbers are removed from the ceramic waste rubble, the package remains far subcritical if the blended salts used in ceramic waste production have an initial U-235 enrichment below 40%

  17. Ceramic Near-Net Shaped Processing Using Highly-Loaded Aqueous Suspensions

    Rueschhoff, Lisa

    Ceramic materials offer great advantages over their metal counterparts, due to their lower density, higher hardness and wear resistance, and higher melting temperatures. However, the use of ceramics in applications where their properties would offer tremendous advantages are often limited due to the difficulty of forming them into complex and near-net shaped parts. Methods that have been developed to injection-mold or cast ceramics into more complicated shapes often use significant volume fractions of a carrier (often greater than 35 vol.% polymer), elevated temperature processing, or less-than-environmentally friendly chemicals where a complex chemical synthesis reaction must be timed perfectly for the approach to work. Furthermore, the continuing maturation of additive manufacturing methods requires a new approach for flowing/placing ceramic powders into useful designs. This thesis addresses the limitations of the current ceramic forming approaches by developing highly-stabilized and therefore high solids loading ceramic suspensions, with the requisite rheology for a variety of complex and near-net shaped forming techniques. Silicon nitride was chosen as a material of focus due to its high fracture toughness compared to other ceramic materials. Designing ceramic suspensions that are flowable at room temperature greatly simplifies processing as neither heating nor cooling are required during forming. Highly-loaded suspensions (>40 vol.%) are desired because all formed ceramic bodies have to be sintered to remove pores. Finally, using aqueous-based suspensions reduces any detrimental effect on the environment and tooling. The preparation of highly-loaded suspensions requires the development of a suitable dispersant through which particle-particle interactions are controlled. However, silicon nitride is difficult to stabilize in water due to complex surface and solution chemistry. In this study, aqueous silicon nitride suspensions up to 45 vol.% solids loading were

  18. Process and equipment qualification of the ceramic and metal waste forms for spent fuel treatment

    Marsden, Ken; Knight, Collin; Bateman, Kenneth; Westphal, Brian; Lind, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The electrometallurgical process for treating sodium-bonded spent metallic fuel at the Materials and Fuels Complex of the Idaho National Laboratory separates actinides and partitions fission products into two waste forms. The first is the metal waste form, which is primarily composed of stainless steel from the fuel cladding. This stainless steel is alloyed with 15w% zirconium to produce a very corrosion-resistant metal which binds noble metal fission products and residual actinides. The second is the ceramic waste form which stabilizes fission product-loaded chloride salts in a sodalite and glass composite. These two waste forms will be packaged together for disposal at the Yucca Mountain repository. Two production-scale metal waste furnaces have been constructed. The first is in a large argon-atmosphere glovebox and has been used for equipment qualification, process development, and process qualification - the demonstration of process reliability for production of the DOE-qualified metal waste form. The second furnace will be transferred into a hot cell for production of metal waste. Prototype production-scale ceramic waste equipment has been constructed or procured; some equipment has been qualified with fission product-loaded salt in the hot cell. Qualification of the remaining equipment with surrogate materials is underway. (author)

  19. Numerical Modeling of the Flow of a Power Law Ceramic Slurry in the Tape Casting Process

    Jabbari, Masoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2012-01-01

    Multilayer ceramics and their application have increased recently. One of the most common ways used to produce these products is tape casting. In this process the wet tape thickness is one of the most determining parameters affecting the final properties of the product and it is therefore of great...... interest to be able to control it. In the present work the flow of La0.85Sr0.15MnO3 (LSM) material in the doctor blade region is modelled numerically with ANSYS Fluent in combination with an Ostwald power law constitutive equation. Based on rheometer experiments the constants in the Ostwald power law...

  20. Effect of sintering process parameters on the properties of 3Y-PSZ ceramics

    Chu, H L; Chen, R S; Wang, C L; Hwang, W S; Lee, H E; Sie, Y Y; Wang, M C

    2013-01-01

    The effect of sintering process parameters on the properties of 3 mol% yttria partially stability zirconia (3Y-PSZ) ceramics has been investigated. The relative density of the sintered pellet rapidly increases from 70.5 to 93.6% with rose temperature from 1473 to 1573 K. In addition, the relative density only slightly increases from 94.9 to 96.6 %, when rose sintered temperature from 1573 to 1773 K. This result shows that no significant influence on the densification behavior when sintering at 1573 to 1773 K for 2 h. The Vickers hardness and toughness also increase with the sintered temperature

  1. Oxide ceramics

    Ryshkewitch, E.; Richerson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book explores single-phase ceramic oxide systems from the standpoint of physical chemistry and technology. This second edition also focuses on advances in technology since publication of the original edition. These include improvements in raw materials and forming and sintering techniques, and the major role that oxide ceramics have had in development of advanced products and processes. The text is divided into five major sections: general fundamentals of oxide ceramics, advances in aluminum oxide technology, advances in zirconia technology, and advances in beryllium oxide technology

  2. Reactive Processing of Environment Conscious, Biomorphic Ceramics: A Novel and Eco-friendly Route to Advanced Ceramic

    Singh, M.

    2002-01-01

    Environment-conscious, biomorphic ceramics (Ecoceramics) are a new class of materials that can be produced with renewable resources (wood) and wood wastes (wood sawdust). These materials have tailorable properties with numerous potential applications. Silicon carbide-based ecoceramics have been fabricated by the infiltration of wood-derived carbonaceous preforms with oxide and silicon based materials. The wood-derived carbonaceous preforms have been shown to be quite useful in producing porous or dense materials with different microstructures and compositions. The microstructure and mechanical properties (flexural strength, fracture toughness, elastic modulus, and compressive strength) of a wide variety of Sic-based ecoceramics have been measured. Ecoceramics have tailorable properties and behave like ceramic materials manufactured by conventional approaches. In this presentation the fabrication approach, microstructure, and thermomechanical properties of a wide variety of Sic-based Ecoceramics will be reported.

  3. Analysis of grinding of superalloys and ceramics for off-line process optimization

    Sathyanarayanan, G.

    The present study has compared the performances of resinoid, vitrified, and electroplated CBN wheels in creep feed grinding of M42 and D2 tool steels. Responses such as a specific energy, normal and tangential forces, and surface roughness were used as measures of performance. It was found that creep feed grinding with resinoid, vitrified, and electroplated CBN wheels has its own advantages, but no single wheel could provide good finish, lower specific energy, and high material removal rates simultaneously. To optimize the CBN grinding with different bonded wheels, a Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) methodology was used. Creep feed grinding of superalloys, Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718, has been modeled by utilizing neural networks to optimize the grinding process. A parallel effort was directed at creep feed grinding of alumina ceramics with diamond wheels to investigate the influence of process variables on responses based on experimental results and statistical analysis. The conflicting influence of variables was observed. This led to the formulation of ceramic grinding process as a multi-objective nonlinear mixed integer problem.

  4. Effects of Surface Treatment Processes of SiC Ceramic on Interfacial Bonding Property of SiC-AFRP

    WEI Ru-bin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To improve the interfacial bonding properties of SiC-aramid fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites (SiC-AFRP, the influences of etching process of SiC ceramic, coupling treatment process, and the adhesives types on the interfacial peel strength of SiC-AFRP were studied. The results show that the surface etching process and coupling treatment process of silicon carbide ceramic can effectively enhance interfacial bonding property of the SiC-AFRP. After soaked the ceramic in K3Fe(CN6 and KOH mixed etching solution for 2 hours, and coupled with vinyl triethoxy silane coupling agent, the interfacial peel strength of the SiC-AFRP significantly increases from 0.45kN/m to 2.20kN/m. EVA hot melt film with mass fraction of 15%VA is ideal for interface adhesive.

  5. Process-generated nanoparticles from ceramic tile sintering: Emissions, exposure and environmental release.

    Fonseca, A S; Maragkidou, A; Viana, M; Querol, X; Hämeri, K; de Francisco, I; Estepa, C; Borrell, C; Lennikov, V; de la Fuente, G F

    2016-09-15

    The ceramic industry is an industrial sector in need of significant process changes, which may benefit from innovative technologies such as laser sintering of ceramic tiles. Such innovations result in a considerable research gap within exposure assessment studies for process-generated ultrafine and nanoparticles. This study addresses this issue aiming to characterise particle formation, release mechanisms and their impact on personal exposure during a tile sintering activity in an industrial-scale pilot plant, as a follow-up of a previous study in a laboratory-scale plant. In addition, possible particle transformations in the exhaust system, the potential for particle release to the outdoor environment, and the effectiveness of the filtration system were also assessed. For this purpose, a tiered measurement strategy was conducted. The main findings evidence that nanoparticle emission patterns were strongly linked to temperature and tile chemical composition, and mainly independent of the laser treatment. Also, new particle formation (from gaseous precursors) events were detected, with nanoparticles efficiency of the filtration system was successfully tested and evidenced a >87% efficiency in particle number concentrations removal. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High temperature fracture and fatigue of ceramics. Annual technical progress report No. 6, August 15, 1994--August 14, 1995

    Cox, B.

    1996-04-01

    This report covers work done in the first year of our new contract {open_quotes}High Temperature Fracture and Fatigue of Ceramics,{close_quotes} which commenced in August, 1995 as a follow-on from our prior contract {open_quotes}Mechanisms of Mechanical Fatigue in Ceramics.{close_quotes} Our activities have consisted mainly of studies of the failure of fibrous ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) at high temperature; with a little fundamental work on the role of stress redistribution in the statistics of fracture and cracking in the presence of viscous fluids.

  7. Continuous Fiber Wound Ceramic Composite (CFCC) for Commercial Water Reactor Fuel. Technical progress report for period ending April 1, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Our program began on August 1, 1999. As of April 1, 2000, the progress has been in materials selection and test planning. Three subcontracts are in place (McDermott Technologies Inc. for continuous fiber reinforced ceramic tubing fabrication, Swales Aerospace for LOCA testing of tubes, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology for In Reactor testing of tubes). With regard to materials selection we visited McDermott Technologies Inc. a number of times, including on February 23, 2000 to discuss the Draft Material Selection and Fabrication Report. The changes discussed at this meeting were implemented and the final version of this report is attached (attachment 1). McDermott Technologies Inc. will produce one type of tubing: Alumina oxide (Nextel 610) fiber, a carbon coating (left in place), and alumina-yttria matrix. A potentially desirable CFCC material of silicon carbide fiber with spinel matrix was discussed. That material selection was not adopted primarily due to material availability and cost. Gamma Engineering is exploring the available tube coatings at Northwestern University as a mechanism for reducing the permeability of the tubes, and thus, will use coating as a differentiating factor in the testing of tubing in the LOCA test as well as the In-Reactor Test. The conclusion of the Material Selection and Fabrication Report lists the possible coatings under evaluation. With regard to Test Planning, the MIT and Swales Aerospace have submitted draft Test Plans. MIT is attempting to accommodate an increased number of test specimens by evaluating alternative test configurations. Swales Aerospace held a design review at their facilities on February 24, 2000 and various engineering alternatives and safety issues were addressed. The final Test Plans are not expected until just before testing begins to allow for incorporation of changes during ''dry runs.''

  8. Combinatorial processing libraries for bulk BiFeO3-PbTiO3 piezoelectric ceramics

    Hu, W.; Tan, X.; Rajan, K.

    2010-01-01

    A high throughput approach for generating combinatorial libraries with varying processing conditions for bulk ceramics has been developed. This approach utilized the linear temperature gradient in a tube furnace to screen a whole temperature range for optimized preparation. With this approach, the processing of 0.98[0.6BiFeO 3 -0.4PbTiO 3 ]-0.02Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 ceramic powders and pellets for high-temperature piezoelectric applications was demonstrated to identify the best synthesis conditions for phase purity. The dielectric property measurement on the as-processed solid solution ceramics confirmed the high Curie temperature and the improved loss tangent with the Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 doping. (orig.)

  9. Processing and properties of ceramic matrix-polymer composites for dental applications

    Huang, Hsuan Yao

    The basic composite structure of natural hard tissue was used to guide the design and processing of dental restorative materials. The design incorporates the methodology of using inorganic minerals as the main structural phase reinforced with a more ductile but tougher organic phase. Ceramic-polymer composites were prepared by slip casting a porous ceramic structure, heating and chemical treating the porous preform, infiltrating with monomer and then curing. The three factors that determined the mechanical properties of alumina-polymer composites were the type of polymer used, the method of silane treatments, and the type of bond between particles in the porous preforms. Without the use of silane coupling agents, the composites were measured to have a lower strength. The composite with a more "flexible" porous alumina network had a greater ability to plastically dissipate the energy of propagating cracks. However, the aggressive nature of the alumina particles on opposing enamel requires that these alumina-polymer composites have a wear compatible coating for practical application. A route to dense bioactive apatite wollastonite glass ceramics (AWGC)-polymer composites was developed. The problems associated with glass dissolution into the aqueous medium for slip casting were overcome with the use of silane. The role of heating rate and development of ceramic compact microstructure on composite properties was explored. In general, if isothermal heating was not applied, decreasing heating rate increased glass crystallinity and particle-particle fusion, but decreased pore volume. Also composite strength and fracture toughness decreased while modulus and hardness increased with decreasing heating rate. If isothermal heating was applied, glass crystallinity, pore content, and composite mechanical properties showed relatively little change regardless of the initial heating rate. The potential of AWGC-polymer composites for dental and implant applications was explored

  10. The 1/4 technical scale, continuous process of obtaining the ceramic uranium dioxide from ammonium polyuranates containing fluoride

    Wlodarski, R.

    1977-01-01

    Based on the laboratory results, the 1/4 technical apparatus for the continuous reduction and defluorination of ammonium polyuranate containing fluoride was designed and constructed. The possibility of obtaining the ceramic uranium dioxide in a continuous process has been confirmed. The main part of the apparatus used in this process was the horizontal tubular oven with the extruder transporting material. (author)

  11. Electrolytic in process dressing (ELID) applied to double side grinding of ceramic materials

    Spanu, Cristian E.

    The objective of the present work is to design, optimize, and validate an electrolytic in-process dressing (ELID)-assisted double side grinding process for finishing advanced ceramic components. To attain this objective, an original ELID double side grinding system was designed, fabricated, and operated at Precision Micro-Machining Center at The University of Toledo, Ohio. The ELID technique was selected from among other options to assure the in-situ dressing of the metal-bonded superabrasive grinding wheel and to maintain its cutting ability throughout the operation, which is, otherwise, a challenging enterprise. Optimizing the ELID double side grinding process parameters is an important goal of the present study. To achieve this goal, a complex integrated model was developed and validated through extensive experimental testing. Four analytical computerized models were developed and integrated: (1) an improved kinematic model of double side grinding accounting for workpiece rotation, which is used to simulate the grinding trajectories; (2) a microscopic model of the interaction between a single diamond grit and the work surface, which is used to predict the volume of material removed; (3) a stochastic model for the topographical characterization of the superabrasive wheel, which leads to a new prediction method of depth of indentation; and (4) an electrolytic oxidation model, which explains the dynamics of the oxide layer. In order to validate the models and to confirm the optimized process, experimental tests were conducted under different conditions: with vitrified and metallic bond grinding wheels, with various average grain sizes of diamond grits, with different superabrasive concentrations, with different grinding fluids, with and without ELID assistance. Our findings show that an optimized ceramic double side grinding process using fine diamond grit is more efficient than lapping in producing very fine surfaces. The experiments confirmed the superiority of

  12. Progress in the characterisation of structural oxide/oxide ceramic matrix composites fabricated by electrophoretic deposition (EPD)

    Stoll, E.; Mahr, P.; Kruger, H. G.; Kern, H.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2006), s. 282-285 ISSN 1438-1656 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/05/0495 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : electorphoretic deposition * oxid/oxid ceramic matrix composites * flexural strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.402, year: 2006 http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jissue/112579545

  13. Pretreatment with ceramic membrane microfiltration in the clarification process of sugarcane juice by ultrafiltration

    Priscilla dos Santos Gaschi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the sugar cane juice from COCAFE Mill, was clarified using tubular ceramic membranes (α-Al2O3/TiO2 with pore size of 0.1 and 0.3 µm, and membrane area of 0.005 m2. Experiments were performed in batch with sugar cane juice, in a pilot unit of micro and ultrafiltration using the principle of tangential filtration. The sugar cane juice was settled for one hour and the supernatant was treated by microfiltration. After that, the MF permeate was ultrafiltered. The experiments of micro and ultrafiltration were carried out at 65ºC and 1 bar. The ceramic membranes were able to remove the colloidal particles, producing a limpid permeated juice with color reduction. The clarification process with micro- followed by ultrafiltration produced a good result with an average purity rise of 2.74 units, 99.4% lower turbidity and 44.8% lighter color in the permeate.

  14. Modeling of an improved chemical vapor infiltration process for ceramic composites fabrication

    Tai, N.H.; Chou, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    A quasi-steady-state approach is applied to model the pressure-driven, temperature-gradient chemical vapor infiltration (improved CVI process) for ceramic matrix composites fabrication. The deposited matrix in this study is SiC which is converted from the thermal decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane gas under excess hydrogen. A three-dimensional unit cell is adopted to simulate the spatial arrangements of reinforcements in discontinuous fiber mats and three-dimensionally woven fabrics. The objectives of this paper are to predict the temperature and density distributions in a fibrous preform during processing, the advancement of the solidified front, the total fabrication period, and the vapor inlet pressure variation for maintaining a constant flow rate

  15. Zirconolite glass-ceramics for plutonium immobilization: The effects of processing redox conditions on charge compensation and durability

    Zhang, Yingjie, E-mail: yzx@ansto.gov.au; Gregg, Daniel J.; Kong, Linggen; Jovanovich, Miodrag; Triani, Gerry

    2017-07-15

    Zirconolite glass-ceramic samples doped with plutonium have been prepared via hot isostatic pressing. The effects of processing redox and plutonium loadings on plutonium valences, the presence of cation vacancies, zirconolite phase compositions, microstructures and durability have been investigated. Either tetravalent or trivalent plutonium ions may be incorporated on the Ca-site of CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7} zirconolite with the Ca-site cation vacancies and the incorporation of Al{sup 3+} ions on the Ti-site for charge compensation. Plutonium and gadolinium (as a neutron absorber) are predominantly partitioned in zirconolite phases leading to the formation of chemically durable glass-ceramics suitable for the immobilization of impure plutonium wastes arising from the nuclear fuel cycle. - Highlights: •Plutonium validations of zirconolite glass-ceramics. •Effects of processing redox and plutonium loading. •Zirconolite phase compositions and plutonium valences. •Cation vacancies and chemical durability.

  16. Process Developed for Generating Ceramic Interconnects With Low Sintering Temperatures for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Zhong, Zhi-Min; Goldsby, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been considered as premium future power generation devices because they have demonstrated high energy-conversion efficiency, high power density, and extremely low pollution, and have the flexibility of using hydrocarbon fuel. The Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and private industries, is leading the development and commercialization of SOFCs for low-cost stationary and automotive markets. The targeted power density for the initiative is rather low, so that the SECA SOFC can be operated at a relatively low temperature (approx. 700 C) and inexpensive metallic interconnects can be utilized in the SOFC stack. As only NASA can, the agency is investigating SOFCs for aerospace applications. Considerable high power density is required for the applications. As a result, the NASA SOFC will be operated at a high temperature (approx. 900 C) and ceramic interconnects will be employed. Lanthanum chromite-based materials have emerged as a leading candidate for the ceramic interconnects. The interconnects are expected to co-sinter with zirconia electrolyte to mitigate the interface electric resistance and to simplify the processing procedure. Lanthanum chromites made by the traditional method are sintered at 1500 C or above. They react with zirconia electrolytes (which typically sinter between 1300 and 1400 C) at the sintering temperature of lanthanum chromites. It has been envisioned that lanthanum chromites with lower sintering temperatures can be co-fired with zirconia electrolyte. Nonstoichiometric lanthanum chromites can be sintered at lower temperatures, but they are unstable and react with zirconia electrolyte during co-sintering. NASA Glenn Research Center s Ceramics Branch investigated a glycine nitrate process to generate fine powder of the lanthanum-chromite-based materials. By simultaneously doping calcium on the lanthanum site, and cobalt and aluminum on the

  17. Synthesis and ceramic processing of zirconia alumina composites for application as solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes

    Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari

    2007-01-01

    The global warmness and the necessity to obtain clean energy from alternative methods than petroleum raises the importance of developing cleaner and more efficient systems of energy generation, among then, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Cubic stabilized zirconia (CSZ) has been the most studied material as electrolyte in SOFC, due to its ionic conductivity and great stability at operation conditions. However, its low fracture toughness difficulties its application as a thin layer, what could lead to an improvement of cell efficiency. In this sense, the alumina addition in CSZ forms a composite, which can shift its mechanical properties, without compromising its electrical properties. In this work, coprecipitation synthesis route and ceramic processing of zirconia-alumina composites were studied, in order to establish optimum conditions to attain high density, homogeneous microstructure, and better mechanical properties than CSZ, without compromising ionic conductivity. For this purpose, composites containing up to 40 wt % of alumina, in a 9 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (9Y-CSZ) matrix were evaluated. In order to optimize the synthesis of the composites, a preliminary study of powder obtaining and processing were carried out, at compositions containing 20 wt % of alumina, in 9Y-CSZ. The ceramic powders were characterized by helium picnometry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, granulometry by laser diffraction and gas adsorption (BET). The characterization of sinterized compacts were performed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, density measurements, Vickers indentation and impedance spectroscopy. The obtained results show that the alumina addition, in the 9Y-CSZ matrix powders, raises the specific surface area, promotes deagglomeration of powders and elevates the oxides crystallization temperature, requiring higher

  18. CVD apparatus and process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    Caputo, A.J.; Devore, C.E.; Lowden, R.A.; Moeller, H.H.

    1990-01-23

    An apparatus and process for the chemical vapor deposition of a matrix into a preform having circumferentially wound ceramic fibers, comprises heating one surface of the preform while cooling the other surface thereof. The resulting product may have fibers that are wound on radial planes or at an angle from the radial planes. The fibers can also be precoated with pyrolytic carbon before application of the matrix. The matrix is applied by passing reactant gas through the preform thereof to the other side thereof for the initial deposition of matrix near such other surface of the preform. The matrix fills in the preform from the other side surface thereof to the surface of the side of application thereof until a desired amount of matrix has been deposited. 6 figs.

  19. Macroencapsulation of low-level debris waste with the phosphate ceramic process

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Tlustochowicz, M.; Jeong, S.Y.

    1997-03-01

    Across the DOE complex, large quantities of contaminated debris and irradiated lead bricks require disposal. The preferred method for disposing of these wastes is macroencapsulation under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Alternative Treatment Standards. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics serve as a novel binder, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, for stabilizing and solidifying various low-level mixed wastes. Extremely strong, dense, and impervious to water intrusion, this material was developed with support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and Technology (DOE OST). In this investigation, CBPCs have been used to demonstrate macroencapsulation of various contaminated debris wastes, including cryofractured debris, lead bricks, and lead-lined plastic gloves. This paper describes the processing steps for fabricating the waste forms and the results of various characterizations performed on the waste forms. The conclusion is that simple and low-cost CBPCs are excellent material systems for macroencapsulating debris wastes

  20. Performance of Silicon carbide whisker reinforced ceramic inserts on Inconel 718 in end milling process

    Reddy, M M; Joshua, C X H

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation is planned in order to study the machinability of Inconel 718 with silicon carbide whisker reinforced ceramic inserts in end milling process. The relationship between the cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut against the response factors are studied to show the level of significance of each parameter. The cutting parameters are optimized by using Taguchi method. Implementing analysis of variance, the parameter which influences the surface roughness the most is determined to be the cutting speed, followed by the feed rate and depth of cut. Meanwhile, the optimal cutting condition is determined to have high cutting speed, low feed rate, and high depth of cut in the range of selected parameters. (paper)

  1. Combinatorial Production and Processing of Oxide Nanopowders for Transparent, Ceramic Lasers

    Laine, Richard M; Rand, Stephen C

    2007-01-01

    Since the discovery of transparent polycrystalline alumina by Coble in 1962, transparent and translucent alumina and yttria based ceramics have achieved a significant presence in our everyday lives...

  2. On the Sustainability and Progress of Energy Neutral Mineral Processing

    Frederik Reitsma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of primary ores such as phosphate rock, gold-, copper- and rare earth ores contain considerable amounts of accompanying uranium and other critical materials. Energy neutral mineral processing is the extraction of unconventional uranium during primary ore processing to use it, after enrichment and fuel production, to generate greenhouse gas lean energy in a nuclear reactor. Energy neutrality is reached if the energy produced from the extracted uranium is equal to or larger than the energy required for primary ore processing, uranium extraction, -conversion, -enrichment and -fuel production. This work discusses the sustainability of energy neutral mineral processing and provides an overview of the current progress of a multinational research project on that topic conducted under the umbrella of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

  3. Progress in ultrafast laser processing and future prospects

    Sugioka, Koji

    2017-03-01

    The unique characteristics of ultrafast lasers have rapidly revolutionized materials processing after their first demonstration in 1987. The ultrashort pulse width of the laser suppresses heat diffusion to the surroundings of the processed region, which minimizes the formation of a heat-affected zone and thereby enables ultrahigh precision micro- and nanofabrication of various materials. In addition, the extremely high peak intensity can induce nonlinear multiphoton absorption, which extends the diversity of materials that can be processed to transparent materials such as glass. Nonlinear multiphoton absorption enables three-dimensional (3D) micro- and nanofabrication by irradiation with tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses inside transparent materials. Thus, ultrafast lasers are currently widely used for both fundamental research and practical applications. This review presents progress in ultrafast laser processing, including micromachining, surface micro- and nanostructuring, nanoablation, and 3D and volume processing. Advanced technologies that promise to enhance the performance of ultrafast laser processing, such as hybrid additive and subtractive processing, and shaped beam processing are discussed. Commercial and industrial applications of ultrafast laser processing are also introduced. Finally, future prospects of the technology are given with a summary.

  4. Process and Microstructure to Achieve Ultra-high Dielectric Constant in Ceramic-Polymer Composites

    Zhang, Lin; Shan, Xiaobing; Bass, Patrick; Tong, Yang; Rolin, Terry D.; Hill, Curtis W.; Brewer, Jeffrey C.; Tucker, Dennis S.; Cheng, Z.-Y.

    2016-01-01

    Influences of process conditions on microstructure and dielectric properties of ceramic-polymer composites are systematically studied using CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) as filler and P(VDF-TrFE) 55/45 mol.% copolymer as the matrix by combining solution-cast and hot-pressing processes. It is found that the dielectric constant of the composites can be significantly enhanced–up to about 10 times – by using proper processing conditions. The dielectric constant of the composites can reach more than 1,000 over a wide temperature range with a low loss (tan δ ~ 10−1). It is concluded that besides the dense structure of composites, the uniform distribution of the CCTO particles in the matrix plays a key role on the dielectric enhancement. Due to the influence of the CCTO on the microstructure of the polymer matrix, the composites exhibit a weaker temperature dependence of the dielectric constant than the polymer matrix. Based on the results, it is also found that the loss of the composites at low temperatures, including room temperature, is determined by the real dielectric relaxation processes including the relaxation process induced by the mixing. PMID:27767184

  5. Grinding Parameter Optimization of Ultrasound-Aided Electrolytic in Process Dressing for Finishing Nanocomposite Ceramics

    Fan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve the precision and efficient processing of nanocomposite ceramics, the ultrasound-aided electrolytic in process dressing method was proposed. But how to realize grinding parameter optimization, that is, the maximum processing efficiency, on the premise of the assurance of best workpiece quality is a problem that needs to be solved urgently. Firstly, this research investigated the influence of grinding parameters on material removal rate and critical ductile depth, and their mathematic models based on the existing models were developed to simulate the material removal process. Then, on the basis of parameter sensitivity analysis based on partial derivative, the sensitivity models of material removal rates on grinding parameter were established and computed quantitatively by MATLAB, and the key grinding parameter for optimal grinding process was found. Finally, the theoretical analyses were verified by experiments: the material removal rate increases with the increase of grinding parameters, including grinding depth (ap, axial feeding speed (fa, workpiece speed (Vw, and wheel speed (Vs; the parameter sensitivity of material removal rate was in a descending order as ap>fa>Vw>Vs; the most sensitive parameter (ap was optimized and it was found that the better machining result has been obtained when ap was about 3.73 μm.

  6. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  7. Progress in fuel processing for PEMFC systems for transport applications

    Dams, A J; Hayter, P R; Moore, S C

    1998-07-01

    Wellman CJB Limited has been developing fuel processors for PEMFC systems for transport applications using a range of feedstocks. Feedstocks that can be processed to produce a hydrogen-rich gas stream suitable for use with a PEMFC include methanol, gasoline, diesel, LPG, dimethylether, marine diesel and aviation fuel. The basic fuel processor is a steam reformer combined with a selective carbon monoxide oxidation stage. Depending on the nature of the liquid feedstock, other process steps will be required such as vaporizer, desulfurizer, pre-reformer and high and low temperature shift reactors. Work on methanol reforming has been specifically targeted at a PEMFC driven passenger car as part of a multinational European Community JOULE programme called MERCATOX. The objective is to develop and test a compact and fast response methanol reformer and gas clean-up unit to meet a car manufacturer's specification. The method of construction is to coat a methanol reforming catalyst onto one side of a metal corrugated plate. On the other side is a coated combustion catalyst which burns fuel cell off-gas to provide the endothermic heat for the methanol reforming reaction. A number of these plates are assembled in a compact unit ensuring good heat transfer. The gas clean-up unit is similarly constructed with a selective oxidation catalyst on one side and a thermal fluid on the other. Initial tests have indicated a superior performance to conventional packed bed reformers in terms of response and start-up time. Steam reforming of gasoline, diesel, LPG, dimethylether, marine diesel and aviation fuel has been demonstrated on a bench scale (0.5kW). The process steps commence with vaporization (except for LPG), desulfurization (except for dimethylether), prereforming, reforming, low and high temperature shift and selective oxidation. A simple technology demonstrator has shown that a hydrogen-rich mixture (75% hydrogen, 25% carbon dioxide) with less than 2ppm carbon monoxide can be

  8. Optimization of the injection molding process for development of high performance calcium oxide -based ceramic cores

    Zhou, P. P.; Wu, G. Q.; Tao, Y.; Cheng, X.; Zhao, J. Q.; Nan, H.

    2018-02-01

    The binder composition used for ceramic injection molding plays a crucial role on the final properties of sintered ceramic and to avoid defects on green parts. In this study, the effects of binder compositions on the rheological, microstructures and the mechanical properties of CaO based ceramic cores were investigated. It was found that the optimized formulation for dispersant, solid loading was 1.5 wt% and 84 wt%, respectively. The microstructures, such as porosity, pore size distribution and grain boundary density were closely related to the plasticizer contents. The decrease of plasticizer contents can enhance the strength of the ceramic cores but with decreased shrinkage. Meanwhile, the creep resistance of ceramic cores was enhanced by decreasing of plasticizer contents. The flexural strength of the core was found to decrease with the increase of the porosity, the improvement of creep resistance is closely related to the decrease of porosity and grain boundary density.

  9. Supportability of a High-Yield-Stress Slurry in a New Stereolithography-Based Ceramic Fabrication Process

    He, Li; Song, Xuan

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, ceramic fabrication using stereolithography (SLA) has gained in popularity because of its high accuracy and density that can be achieved in the final part of production. One of the key challenges in ceramic SLA is that support structures are required for building overhanging features, whereas removing these support structures without damaging the components is difficult. In this research, a suspension-enclosing projection-stereolithography process is developed to overcome this challenge. This process uses a high-yield-stress ceramic slurry as the feedstock material and exploits the elastic force of the material to support overhanging features without the need for building additional support structures. Ceramic slurries with different solid loadings are studied to identify the rheological properties most suitable for supporting overhanging features. An analytical model of a double doctor-blade module is established to obtain uniform and thin recoating layers from a high-yield-stress slurry. Several test cases highlight the feasibility of using a high-yield-stress slurry to support overhanging features in SLA.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Porous MgAl₂O₄ Ceramics via a Novel Aqueous Gel-Casting Process.

    Yuan, Lei; Liu, Zongquan; Liu, Zhenli; He, Xiao; Ma, Beiyue; Zhu, Qiang; Yu, Jingkun

    2017-11-30

    A novel and aqueous gel-casting process has been successfully developed to fabricate porous MgAl₂O₄ ceramics by using hydratable alumina and MgO powders as raw materials and deionized water as hydration agent. The effects of different amounts of deionized water on the hydration properties, apparent porosity, bulk density, microstructure, pore size distribution and compressive strength of the samples were investigated. The results indicated that the porosity and the microstructure of porous MgAl₂O₄ ceramics were governed by the amounts of deionized water added. The porous structure was formed by the liberation of physisorbed water and the decomposition of hydration products such as bayerite, brucite and boehmite. After determining the addition amounts of deionized water, the fabricated porous MgAl₂O₄ ceramics had a high apparent porosity (52.5-65.8%), a small average pore size structure (around 1-3 μm) and a relatively high compressive strength (12-28 MPa). The novel aqueous gel-casting process with easy access is expected to be a promising candidate for the preparation of Al₂O₃-based porous ceramics.

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Porous MgAl2O4 Ceramics via a Novel Aqueous Gel-Casting Process

    Lei Yuan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel and aqueous gel-casting process has been successfully developed to fabricate porous MgAl2O4 ceramics by using hydratable alumina and MgO powders as raw materials and deionized water as hydration agent. The effects of different amounts of deionized water on the hydration properties, apparent porosity, bulk density, microstructure, pore size distribution and compressive strength of the samples were investigated. The results indicated that the porosity and the microstructure of porous MgAl2O4 ceramics were governed by the amounts of deionized water added. The porous structure was formed by the liberation of physisorbed water and the decomposition of hydration products such as bayerite, brucite and boehmite. After determining the addition amounts of deionized water, the fabricated porous MgAl2O4 ceramics had a high apparent porosity (52.5–65.8%, a small average pore size structure (around 1–3 μm and a relatively high compressive strength (12–28 MPa. The novel aqueous gel-casting process with easy access is expected to be a promising candidate for the preparation of Al2O3-based porous ceramics.

  12. Processing, microstructure, and electric properties of buried resistors in low-temperature co-fired ceramics

    Yang, Pin; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Kotula, Paul; Miera, Brandon K.; Dimos, Duane

    2001-01-01

    The electrical properties of ruthenium oxide based devitrifiable resistors embedded within low-temperature co-fired ceramics were investigated from -100 o C to 100 o C. Special attention was given to the processing conditions and their effects on resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). Results indicate that within this temperature range the conductance for these buried resistors is limited by tunneling of charge carriers through the thin glass layer between ruthenium oxide particles. A modified version of the tunneling barrier model is proposed to account for the microstructure ripening observed during thermal processing. The model parameters determined from curve fitting show that charging energy (i.e., the energy required for a charge carrier to tunnel through the glass barrier) is strongly dependent on particle size and particle--particle separation between ruthenium oxide grains. Initial coarsening of ruthenium oxide grains was found to reduce the charging energy and lower the resistance. However, when extended ripening occurs, the increase in particle--particle separation increases the charging energy, reduces the tunneling probability and gives rise to a higher resistance. The tradeoff between these two effects results in an optimum microstructure with a minimum resistance and TCR. Furthermore, the TCR of these buried resistors has been shown to be governed by the magnitude of the charging energy. Model parameters determined by our analysis appear to provide quantitative physical interpretations to the microstructural changes in the resistor, which in turn, are controlled by the processing conditions

  13. Preparation of soft-agglomerated nano-sized ceramic powders by sol-gel combustion process

    Feng, Q.; Ma, X.H.; Yan, Q.Z.; Ge, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    The soft-agglomerated Gd 2 BaCuO 5 (Gd211) nano-powders were synthesized by sol-gel combustion process with binary ligand and the special pretreatment on gel. The mechanism of the formation of weakly agglomerated structure was studied in detail. The results showed that network structure in gelation process was found to be a decisive factor for preventing agglomeration of colloidal particles. The removal of free water, coordinated water, and most of hydroxyl groups during pretreatment further inhibited the formation of hydrogen bonds between adjacent particles. The soft-agglomeration of the particles was confirmed by isolated particles in calcined Gd211 powders and in green compact, a narrow monomodal pore size distribution of the green compact and the low agglomeration coefficient of the calcined Gd211 powder. Extension this process to synthesis of BaCeO 3 , BaTiO 3 and Ce 0.8 Sm 0.2 O 1.9 powders, also led to weakly agglomerated nano-powders. It suggests that this method represents a powerful and facile method for the creation of doped and multi-component nano-sized ceramic powders.

  14. Effect of glass-ceramic-processing cycle on the metallurgical properties of candidate alloys for actuator housings

    Weirick, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes the results from an investigation on the effect of a glass ceramic processing cycle on the metallurgical properties of metal candidates for actuator housings. The cycle consists of a 980/sup 0/C sealing step, a 650/sup 0/C crystallization step and a 475/sup 0/C annealing step. These temperatue excursions are within the same temperature regime as annealing and heat treating processes normally employed for metals. Therefore, the effect of the processing cycle on metallurgical properties of microstructure, strength, hardness and ductility were examined. It was found that metal candidates which are single phase or solid solution alloys (such as 21-6-9, Hastelloy C-276 and Inconel 625) were not affected whereas multiphase or precipitation hardened alloys (such as Inconel 718 and Titanium ..beta..-C) were changed by the processing cycle for the glass ceramic.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and bioactivity of a calcium-phosphate glass-ceramics obtained by the sol-gel processing method

    Jmal, Nouha, E-mail: jmalnouha@gmail.com; Bouaziz, Jamel

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a calcium-phosphate glass-ceramics was successfully obtained by heat treatment of a mixture of 26.52 in wt.% of fluorapatite (Fap) and 73.48 in wt.% of 77S (77 SiO{sub 2}−14 CaO−9 P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in wt.%) gel. The calcium phosphate-glass-ceramics was prepared by sol-gel process with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), triethyl phosphate (TEP), calcium nitrate and fluorapatite. The synthesized powders were characterized by some commonly used tools such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), {sup 31}P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and thin-film X-ray diffraction (TF-XRD). The obtained results seemed to confirm the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite (Hap) nano-phase in the glass. Moreover, an in-vitro evaluation of the glass-ceramic was performed. In addition, to assess its bioactive capacity, it was soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF) at different time intervals. The SEM, EDS and TF-XRD analyses showed the deposition of hydroxyapatite on the surface of the specimens after three days of immersion in SBF solution. The mechanical properties of the obtained material such as rupture strength, Vickers hardness and elastic modulus were measured. In addition, the friction coefficient of calcium phosphate-glass-ceramics was tested. The values of the composite of rupture strength (24 MPa), Vickers hardness (214 Hv), Young's modulus (52.3 GPa), shear modulus (19 GPa) and friction coefficient (0.327) were obtained. This glass-ceramics can have useful applications in dental prostheses. Indeed, this material may have promising applications for implants because of its content of fluorine, the effective protector against dental caries. - Highlights: • A novel three phases Fap-Hap-glass-ceramics is prepared by sol–gel route. • Results showed a nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite nano-phase in the glass.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and bioactivity of a calcium-phosphate glass-ceramics obtained by the sol-gel processing method

    Jmal, Nouha; Bouaziz, Jamel

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a calcium-phosphate glass-ceramics was successfully obtained by heat treatment of a mixture of 26.52 in wt.% of fluorapatite (Fap) and 73.48 in wt.% of 77S (77 SiO 2 −14 CaO−9 P 2 O 5 in wt.%) gel. The calcium phosphate-glass-ceramics was prepared by sol-gel process with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), triethyl phosphate (TEP), calcium nitrate and fluorapatite. The synthesized powders were characterized by some commonly used tools such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), 31 P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and thin-film X-ray diffraction (TF-XRD). The obtained results seemed to confirm the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite (Hap) nano-phase in the glass. Moreover, an in-vitro evaluation of the glass-ceramic was performed. In addition, to assess its bioactive capacity, it was soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF) at different time intervals. The SEM, EDS and TF-XRD analyses showed the deposition of hydroxyapatite on the surface of the specimens after three days of immersion in SBF solution. The mechanical properties of the obtained material such as rupture strength, Vickers hardness and elastic modulus were measured. In addition, the friction coefficient of calcium phosphate-glass-ceramics was tested. The values of the composite of rupture strength (24 MPa), Vickers hardness (214 Hv), Young's modulus (52.3 GPa), shear modulus (19 GPa) and friction coefficient (0.327) were obtained. This glass-ceramics can have useful applications in dental prostheses. Indeed, this material may have promising applications for implants because of its content of fluorine, the effective protector against dental caries. - Highlights: • A novel three phases Fap-Hap-glass-ceramics is prepared by sol–gel route. • Results showed a nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite nano-phase in the glass. • Fap-Hap-glass-ceramics

  17. Electropolishing as a decontamination process: progress and applications

    Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; Charlot, L.A.; Hooper, J.L.

    1978-04-01

    Research studies demonstrated the ability of electropolishing to reduce the radiation levels of steel tools and stainless steel vacuum system components, which were heavily contaminated with plutonium oxide, from 1 million dis/min x 100 cm 2 to background in less than 10 min. Other examples of objects that have been decontaminated within minutes using electropolishing include hot cell manipulator assemblies, analytical instrument components, laboratory transfer containers, offsite shipping containers, fission product storage capsules, laboratory animal cages, and nuclear reactor process tube components. One of the major activities of this research has been the establishment and intensive operation of a 400-gal immersion electropolishing system. Progress has also been made in developing in situ electropolishing techniques that can be used to decontaminate metallic surfaces that cannot readily be transported to or immersed in a conventional electropolishing tank. Sectioning/pretreatment studies are under way to develop and demonstrate optimum disassembly, sectioning, surface preparation, and gross contamination removal procedures. Arc saw, plasma arc torch, and explosive cutting techniques are being evaluated in terms of the thickness and characteristics of the disturbed metal layer. Some of the pretreatment methods under consideration for removal of paint, grease, corrosion layers, and gross contamination include vibratory finishing, ultrasonics, dry and liquid abrasive blasting, and high-pressure spray systems. Other supporting studies are also in progress to provide a sound technical basis for scale-up and widespread application of this new decontamination process. 44 figures

  18. Effect of natural and synthetic organics on the processing of ceramics

    Schulz, Brett M.

    Dry pressing has been shown to be an efficient and cost effective method of manufacturing ceramic ware. Dry pressed parts are typically manufactured with a low moisture content which has the further advantage of eliminating the drying step that is necessary for plastic formed ware, i.e., jiggered or ram pressed. Problems associated with the use of dry pressing in an industrial setting involve the high loss rate during the bisque firing process and the poor surface finish of the green (unfired) ware. It was the goal of this research to improve the surface finish of dry pressed ware to a level that is satisfactory for decorating of the bisque fired ware. The adsorption of organic additives, specifically dispersants, on the surface of particles is an important aspect of ceramic processing. The interactions between organic additives, specifically sodium poly[acrylic acid] and poly[vinyl alcohol], have been demonstrated to result in phase separation into distinct domains during the spray-drying process. This phase separation leads to a poly[vinyl alcohol]-rich film on the surface of the granulate which will increase the P1 value, the pressure at the onset of granule deformation, of the granulate. This negative interaction between the organics increases the surface roughness of the dry pressed ware. The roughness of the industrially prepared ware was determined using an optical interferometer to set a baseline for improvements in the surface finish of the dry pressed ware. Blending of dried granulate was determined to significantly improve the surface finish of the ware. Alternative binders to replace a plasticized poly[vinyl alcohol] were observed to show improvements in the surface finish of the ware dry pressed in a semi-isostatic die. In summary the most important aspect to improving the surface finish of dry pressed ware, i.e. facilitating compaction, is the selection of the organic additives. Additives which are observed to have a negative interaction, i.e. to

  19. Luminescence and scintillation enhancement of Y2O3:Tm transparent ceramic through post-fabrication thermal processing

    Chapman, M.G.; Marchewka, M.R.; Roberts, S.A.; Schmitt, J.M.; McMillen, C.; Kucera, C.J.; DeVol, T.A.; Ballato, J.; Jacobsohn, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of post-fabrication thermal processing in O 2 flux on the luminescence and scintillation of a Y 2 O 3 :Tm transparent ceramic were investigated. The results showed that the strategy of post-fabrication processing can be beneficial to the performance of the ceramics, depending on the cumulative processing time. After the first hour of processing, about 40% enhancement in the luminescence output together with about 20% enhancement in the scintillation light yield were obtained. The enhancements were tentatively assigned to the incorporation of oxygen into vacancy sites. Longer cumulative processing times lead to the incorporation of oxygen as interstitials that is detrimental to scintillation light yield but not to luminescence output. This work also revealed that thermoluminescence measurements are a useful tool to predict scintillation light yield of Y 2 O 3 :Tm. - Highlights: • Scintillation and PL enhancement of transparent ceramics through thermal processing. • First thermoluminescence measurements of Y 2 O 3 :Tm above room temperature. • Observation of correlation between TL and scintillation light yield results

  20. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  1. Progressive sample processing of band selection for hyperspectral imagery

    Liu, Keng-Hao; Chien, Hung-Chang; Chen, Shih-Yu

    2017-10-01

    Band selection (BS) is one of the most important topics in hyperspectral image (HSI) processing. The objective of BS is to find a set of representative bands that can represent the whole image with lower inter-band redundancy. Many types of BS algorithms were proposed in the past. However, most of them can be carried on in an off-line manner. It means that they can only be implemented on the pre-collected data. Those off-line based methods are sometime useless for those applications that are timeliness, particular in disaster prevention and target detection. To tackle this issue, a new concept, called progressive sample processing (PSP), was proposed recently. The PSP is an "on-line" framework where the specific type of algorithm can process the currently collected data during the data transmission under band-interleavedby-sample/pixel (BIS/BIP) protocol. This paper proposes an online BS method that integrates a sparse-based BS into PSP framework, called PSP-BS. In PSP-BS, the BS can be carried out by updating BS result recursively pixel by pixel in the same way that a Kalman filter does for updating data information in a recursive fashion. The sparse regression is solved by orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm, and the recursive equations of PSP-BS are derived by using matrix decomposition. The experiments conducted on a real hyperspectral image show that the PSP-BS can progressively output the BS status with very low computing time. The convergence of BS results during the transmission can be quickly achieved by using a rearranged pixel transmission sequence. This significant advantage allows BS to be implemented in a real time manner when the HSI data is transmitted pixel by pixel.

  2. Mechanical properties of ceramic structures based on Triply Periodic Minimal Surface (TPMS) processed by 3D printing

    Restrepo, S.; Ocampo, S.; Ramírez, J. A.; Paucar, C.; García, C.

    2017-12-01

    Repairing tissues and organs has been the main goal of surgical procedures. Since the 1990s, the main goal of tissue engineering has been reparation, using porous scaffolds that serve as a three-dimensional template for the initial fixation of cells and subsequent tissue formation both in vitro and in vivo. A scaffold must have specific characteristics of porosity, interconnectivity, surface area, pore volume, surface tortuosity, permeability and mechanical properties, which makes its design, manufacturing and characterization a complex process. Inspired by nature, triply periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS) have emerged as an alternative for the manufacture of porous pieces with design requirements, such as scaffolds for tissue repair. In the present work, we used the technique of 3D printing to obtain ceramic structures with Gyroid, Schwarz Primitive and Schwarz Diamond Surfaces shapes, three TPMS that fulfil the geometric requirements of a bone tissue scaffold. The main objective of this work is to compare the mechanical properties of ceramic pieces of three different forms of TPMS printed in 3D using a commercial ceramic paste. In this way it will be possible to clarify which is the TPMS with appropriate characteristics to construct scaffolds of ceramic materials for bone repair. A dependence of the mechanical properties with the geometry was found being the Primitive Surface which shows the highest mechanical properties.

  3. Fabrication of samarium strontium aluminate ceramic and deposition of thermal barrier coatings by air plasma spray process

    Baskaran T

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBC with the metallic NiCrAlY bond coat are often used in many aircraft engines to protect superalloy components from high-temperature corrosion thereby to improve the life of gas turbine components. The search for new TBC material has been intensified in recent years due to lack of thermo-physical properties of conventionally used Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ TBCs. Recently, the rare earth containing Samarium Strontium Aluminate (SSA based ceramic was proposed as a new TBC material due to its matching thermo-physical properties with the substrate. The present work focused on the synthesis of SSA ceramics for TBCs application and its coatings development on Ni-based superalloy Inconel 718 substrate by air plasma spray process. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS result confirmed the formation of single phase SSA ceramic after synthesis. The surface morphology of SSA TBCs is mainly composed of melted splats, semi and un-melted particles. The cross-sectional SEM micrographs did not show any spallation at the interface which indicated good mechanical interlocking between the bond coat and ceramic top coat. The Young’s modulus and hardness of SSA TBCs were found to be 80 and 6.1 GPa, respectively. The load-depth curve of SSA TBC showed good elastic recovery about 47 %.

  4. Yb:Y2O3 transparent ceramics processed with hot isostatic pressing

    Wang, Jun; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Peng; Luo, Dewei; Yin, Danlei; Tang, Dingyuan; Kong, Ling Bing

    2017-09-01

    Highly transparent 5 at.% Yb:Y2O3 ceramics were fabricated by using a combination method of vacuum sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Co-precipitated Yb:Y2O3 powders, with 1 at.% ZrO2 as the sintering aid, were used as the starting material. The Yb:Y2O3 ceramics, vacuum sintered at 1700 °C for 2 h and HIPed at 1775 °C for 4 h, exhibited small grain size of 1.9 μm and highly dense microstructure. In-line optical transmittance of the ceramics reached 83.4% and 78.9% at 2000 and 600 nm, respectively. As the ceramic slab was pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode at about 940 nm, a maximum output power of 0.77 W at 1076 nm was achieved, with a corresponding slope efficiency of 10.6%.

  5. Deep Magnetic Diagenesis in Sediments: Progressive and Punctuated Processes.

    Musgrave, R. J.; Kars, M. A. C.; Vega, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic diagenesis in the tuffaceous muds, mudstones and volcaniclastic rocks cored at IODP Site U1437 is a product of progressive processes that continue throughout the 1800-m-thick sequence, punctuated by superimposed features corresponding to a series of influxes of fluids and concentrations of hydrocarbons. XRD, visual examination and SEM images indicate the presence of both magnetite and the magnetic sulfide greigite. Inferences from high values of saturation isothermal remanence normalised by magnetic susceptibility (SIRM/χ), distribution of hysteresis data near a diagenetic greigite curve on a Day plot, and 'humping' of low-temperature cycles of SIRM suggest that detrital magnetite and diagenetic greigite are both significant contributors to the magnetic assemblage, with greigite constituting a higher proportion in shallower samples. Progressive magnetic diagenesis is expressed as a continuing background decrease in SIRM/χ. FORC curves indicate an initial diagenetic growth of one or more higher-coercivity phases, followed downhole by increasing loss of all but low-coercivity material. The downhole pattern is consistent with progressive loss of fine-grained magnetite, initial authigenesis of greigite, and progressive pyritisation of the greigite. Some coarse-grained samples from the base of the sequence buck the trend, exhibiting SD behavior probably related to surviving magnetite inclusions in silicates. Shipboard fluid analysis revealed a complex profile of interstitial-water geochemistry, marked by several fluid influxes, including inputs of sulfate-rich water at about 275 and 460 meters below seafloor (mbsf). Methane concentrations, mostly low, markedly increase in the interval between 750 and 1460 mbsf, and ethane appears below an inferred fault at 1104 mbsf. Each of these fluid events is marked by offsets in the rock magnetic parameters SIRM/χ, S-0.3T, and DJH, representing repeated phases of late diagenetic growth of greigite in response to

  6. Progress in the development of the write process

    Guffey, F.D.; Fahy, J.; Worman, D.; Lowry, C.; Mones, C. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Corscadden, T.; Diduch, G. [MEG Energy Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation described the commercialization of a field deployable upgrader developed by the Western Research Institute (WRI). The WRI Thermal Enhancement (WRITE) process was first tested in a 1-bbl/day bench scale unit. Based on the results of the testing program, a 5 bbl/day WRITE Process pilot plant was designed and built. It is currently in operation at WRI's Advanced Technology Center in Laramie, Wyoming. The 5 bbl/day WRITE Process pilot plant includes a 5 bbl/day distillate recovery unit (DRU) and a continuous coker that receives the produced bottoms. The DRU recovers diluent for recycling. The bitumen undergoes thermal conversion in the WRITE reactor to produce a pipeline quality product. The pyrolyzate produced by the coker is blended with the DRU to produce a synthetic crude oil (SCO) that is pipelined to existing refineries. Studies are currently underway at the pilot plant using dilbit produced at EMG's Christina Lake site. This presentation described the experimental program that is in progress. It also discussed the commercial viability of the technology for producing a pipeline quality product. tabs., figs.

  7. Energy efficient process for making pyrophyllite-based ceramic tiles using phosphoric acid and mineralizers

    Amritphale, S.S.; Sanjeev Bhasin; Navin Chandra [Habib Ganj Naka, Pradesh (India). Regional Research Laboratory

    2006-07-01

    The processing parameters for making ceramic tiles in the pyrophyllite-phosphoric acid binder (P-PA) system have been optimized. The optimized raw material composition requires sintering at a lower temperature of 950{sup o}C. The X-ray powder diffraction studies on the powdered sample of optimized composition have confirmed the presence of dehydroxylate pyrophyllite, tridymite (T-AlPO{sub 4}), cristyoballite (C-AlPO{sub 4}) forms of aluminium phosphate and formation of silico-phosphate (SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}) and alkali aluminium silicates (NaAlSiO{sub 4}, KAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}). The IR studies of the sample show Al-O, Si-O.P-O and Na/K-O linkages. The thermal analysis shows the formation of dehydroxylate pyrophyllite and different forms of AlPO{sub 4}. Scanning electron microphotograph reveals the chunky morphology of the dehydroxylate pyrophyllite, the rhombohedral morphology of T-AlPO{sub 4} and spherical C-AlPO{sub 4} and silico-phosphate particles. (author)

  8. Treatment of textile dyehouse effluent using ceramic membrane based process in combination with chemical pretreatment.

    Bhattacharya, Priyankari; Ghosh, Sourja; Majumdar, Swachchha; Bandyopadhyay, Sibdas

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of highly concentrated dyebath effluent and comparatively dilute composite effluent having mixture of various reactive dyes collected from a cotton fabric dyeing unit was undertaken in the present study. Ceramic microfiltration membrane prepared from a cost effective composition of alumina and clay was used. Prior to microfiltration, a chemical pretreatment was carried out with aluminium sulphate in combination with a polymeric retention aid. An optimum dose of 100 mg/L of aluminium sulphate and 1 ml/L of a commercial flocculant Afilan RAMF was found effective for dye removal (> 98%) from the synthetic solutions of reactive dyes with initial concentration of 150 mg/L in both the single component and two component systems. In the microfiltration study, effect of operating pressure in the permeate flux was observed for both the pretreated and untreated effluents and permeate samples were analyzed for dye concentration, COD, turbidity, TSS, etc. during constant pressure filtration. About 98-99% removal of dyes was obtained in the combined process with COD reduction of 54-64%.

  9. Density and superconducting properties of metal-sheathed YBa2Cu3Oy ceramic processed by hydrostatic extrusion

    Karpov, M.I.; Korzhov, V.P.; Artamoshin, A.V.; Prokopenko, V.M.

    1994-01-01

    Brittle materials can be deformed without cracking and rupturing using hydrostatic extrusion, which provides the greatest pore annihilation in powder-processed materials and allows large degrees of one-step deformation, which is favorable for texturing. Earlier, a casting slip prepared by mixing a starting powder of Y-based ceramic with an organic binder was conventionally extruded to produce a wire 150 μm in diameter. After special sintering, the critical-current density in the material attained a few hundred amperes per square centimeter at 77 K, and the wire could be rolled into a winding ≥0.3 m in diameter. Hydrostatic extrusion of an assembly composed of Y-based ceramic in a bimetallic Nb/Cu tube 30 mm in diameter was used to produce rods 6 mm in diameter; drawing of these rods yielded samples of wire 2 to 3 mm in diameter. It was shown that the extrusion pressure and strain substantially influence the yield of the rupture-free wire. No signs of rupturing, cracking, or necking were observed in wire extruded at pressures ≤700 MPa and degrees of deformation ≤50%. A pronounced instability of the hydrostatic extrusion, the appearance of defects, and even the rupture of the rods were caused by an increase in the pressure up to 2000 MPa and in the degree of one-step deformation up to 80%. In this work, the authors focus on the possibility of producing thin YBa 2 Cu 3 O y superconductors using only hydrostatic extrusion. They determined the parameters for the hydrostatic extrusion of the metal-sheathed YBa 2 Cu 3 O y ceramic to a diameter of 3 mm or to a rectangular cross section. Effects of the ceramic core, and of the reduction coefficient on superconducting-transition parameters and the critical-current density of the ceramic were examined

  10. Analysis of the influence of process conditions on the surface finish of ceramic materials manufactured by EDM

    Puertas-Arbizu, I.; Luis-Perez, C. J.

    2004-01-01

    Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is an emerging alternative versus some other manufacturing processes of conductive ceramic materials, such as: laser machining, electrochemical machining, abrasive water jet, ultrasonic machining and diamond wheel grinding. Due to its interest in the industrial field, in this work a study of the influence of process conditions on the surface aspect of three conductive ceramic materials: hot-pressed boron carbide (B 4 C), reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiSiC) and cobalt-bonded tungsten carbide (WC-Co) is carried out. These materials are to be electrical discharge machined under different machining conditions and in the particular case of finish stages (Ra≤ 1 μm). (Author)

  11. Study on the Optimization and Process Modeling of the Rotary Ultrasonic Machining of Zerodur Glass-Ceramic

    Pitts, James Daniel

    Rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM), a hybrid process combining ultrasonic machining and diamond grinding, was created to increase material removal rates for the fabrication of hard and brittle workpieces. The objective of this research was to experimentally derive empirical equations for the prediction of multiple machined surface roughness parameters for helically pocketed rotary ultrasonic machined Zerodur glass-ceramic workpieces by means of a systematic statistical experimental approach. A Taguchi parametric screening design of experiments was employed to systematically determine the RUM process parameters with the largest effect on mean surface roughness. Next empirically determined equations for the seven common surface quality metrics were developed via Box-Behnken surface response experimental trials. Validation trials were conducted resulting in predicted and experimental surface roughness in varying levels of agreement. The reductions in cutting force and tool wear associated with RUM, reported by previous researchers, was experimentally verified to also extended to helical pocketing of Zerodur glass-ceramic.

  12. Manufacturing process scale-up of optical grade transparent spinel ceramic at ArmorLine Corporation

    Spilman, Joseph; Voyles, John; Nick, Joseph; Shaffer, Lawrence

    2013-06-01

    While transparent Spinel ceramic's mechanical and optical characteristics are ideal for many Ultraviolet (UV), visible, Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR), Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR), and multispectral sensor window applications, commercial adoption of the material has been hampered because the material has historically been available in relatively small sizes (one square foot per window or less), low volumes, unreliable supply, and with unreliable quality. Recent efforts, most notably by Technology Assessment and Transfer (TA and T), have scaled-up manufacturing processes and demonstrated the capability to produce larger windows on the order of two square feet, but with limited output not suitable for production type programs. ArmorLine Corporation licensed the hot-pressed Spinel manufacturing know-how of TA and T in 2009 with the goal of building the world's first dedicated full-scale Spinel production facility, enabling the supply of a reliable and sufficient volume of large Transparent Armor and Optical Grade Spinel plates. With over $20 million of private investment by J.F. Lehman and Company, ArmorLine has installed and commissioned the largest vacuum hot press in the world, the largest high-temperature/high-pressure hot isostatic press in the world, and supporting manufacturing processes within 75,000 square feet of manufacturing space. ArmorLine's equipment is capable of producing window blanks as large as 50" x 30" and the facility is capable of producing substantial volumes of material with its Lean configuration and 24/7 operation. Initial production capability was achieved in 2012. ArmorLine will discuss the challenges that were encountered during scale-up of the manufacturing processes, ArmorLine Optical Grade Spinel optical performance, and provide an overview of the facility and its capabilities.

  13. Nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process during batch and continuous operation

    Muguercia, I.; Solomon, S.; Ebadian, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process is an innovative technology for the denitration of radioactive sodium nitrate-based liquid waste found throughout Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in the United States. In the present investigation, two reaction systems were studied. The first utilized only sodium nitrate as the substrate for the aluminum. The second consisted of the multication composition of waste forms located at the Hanford facility. Studies were carried out on the batch reaction at three different starting nitrate ion concentrations, each at three different temperatures. For each of these conditions, the rate of nitrate depletion was determined, and rate constants were calculated. The reaction did not demonstrate simple kinetics; rather, it appeared to involve two zero order reactions. Certain generalities were obtained in both the batch reaction and in the continuous process, nonetheless. It was found that the conversion of nitrate to ammonia seemed to be most efficient at the lowest temperature studied, 50 degrees C. This behavior was more obvious in the case of the unadulterated nitrate solution than with the Hanford simulant. To elaborate a practical, marketable product, it was necessary to develop a process that could be carried out in a continuous matter, whereby reactants were continuously fed into a reactor while the products of the reaction were simultaneously removed. Thus, the objective has been to develop the prototype procedures for carrying out this continuous reaction. As a corollary of this research, it was first necessary to define the characteristics of the reaction with respect to rate, conversion efficiency, and safety. To achieve this end, reactions were run under various batch conditions, and an attempt was made to measure the rates of the depletion of nitrate and the production of ammonia and hydrogen as well as pH and temperature changes

  14. Reverse Engineering of Corinthian Pigment Processing and Firing Technologies on Archaic Polychrome Ceramics

    Klesner, Catherine Elizabeth

    Decorative, polychrome ceramics from Corinth, Greece, produced during the 8th-6th centuries B.C.E. are luxury goods that were widely traded throughout Greece and the Mediterranean. The decorated ceramics were produced in a variety of shapes, including aryballos, alabastron, and olpe. They were decorated with slip-glazes in distinctive white, black, red, yellow, and purple colors, and in a variety of surface finishes, matte, semi-matte and glossy. Artisans in Corinthian workshops experimented to change the colors of the slips by varying the type and amount of iron-rich raw materials. They also varied the composition of the clay used as a binder and the amount of flux used as a sintering aid to promote glass formation. This research reconstructs the technology used by the Corinthian craftsmen to produce the Archaic polychrome ceramics, and shows how these technologies differed from the production of better known, more prestigious Athenian black-figure and red-figure ceramics. Through microstructural examination of archaeological samples and replication experiments, this thesis proposes that the purple iron oxide pigment is the result of acid treatment and oxidation of iron metal. The firing temperature range of the Corinthian polychrome ceramics was determined experimentally to be 925-1025°C, which is higher than previously reported and similar to that reported for Corinthian transport amphoras. The firing range is higher by 50-150°C than the Athenian black-figure and red-figure ceramics. Samples of Corinthian polychrome and Athenian black-figure ceramics from the Marie Farnsworth collection at the University of Arizona were tested and compared to Corinthian clay collections. Analytical techniques included Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning-electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and wavelength-dispersive electron microprobe (EPMA with BSE-SEM).

  15. Improving the process of progressive preliming in sugar production

    V. A. Golybin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tasks progressive preliming are to conduct neutralization, coagulation, deposition of non-sugars, the formation of a precipitate structure. This is the first operation of physical and chemical cleaning of the raw juice in the case of it in optimum conditions enables the coagulation and transferred to precipitate a substantial portion of high-molecular non-sugars, poorly soluble calcium salts that provides the cleaning effect of 14–18%, that is, up to half of the total effect on the whole station lime-carbon dioxide purification. The results preliming felt not only on the properties of the filtration of the carbonated juices, but a lso on the quality of performance of all intermediates and produced of sugar, in particular the color and turbidity of an aqueous solution, the content of the ash. In our investigations using the raw juice from sugar beet low quality found that when a uniform progressi ve change in pH of the juice during warm preliming best results for deposition rate and volume solids of the resulting precipitate are achieved when the length of 7 to 10 minutes. If it increases to 15 minutes and further reduced the deposition rate of the solid phase with a significant increase in turbidity decantate. It found that as a result of excess visit a large part of the raw juice in a progressive preliming at 60 °C increase in color prelimed juice was 30–55%, which is in agreement with the calculated values decay reducing agents in alkaline solution and formation of any additional colorants. The results confirming the feasibility of the use preddefekatsionnoy for processing the raw juice of condensed carbonate refunds.

  16. Modeling and simulation of the atomization process in the ceramic tile industry

    Favalli, Renata Cristina

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to numerically simulate the behaviour of the drying system for several sets of operating conditions in order to improve and optimize this process. However, the mathematical modeling adopted here can be employed to simulate other systems such as the processes that occur in liquid-fueled engines with direct spray injection and ceramic spraying for hard surfacing. Then, mathematical and physical models were established to simulate the interaction of continuous and disperse phases in drying processes of ceramic slurries. Solving the set of governing coupled partial differential equations, it is possible to study the influence of drying air on the atomized droplets of alumina slurry, and vice-versa. The materials used as continuous and disperse phase, air and alumina slurry respectively, are representative since any kind of gas and slurry can be used if its thermodynamic and transport properties are known. Several experimental tests were carried out in a spray dryer in the 'Laboratorio de Insumos', at IPEN - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares for different sets of operating conditions: initial temperature of the drying air, the gas flow rate, the slurry feed rate and atomiser configuration among others. Measurements of the wet and the dry bulb temperatures were made in some experimental tests to allow the calculations of the air humidity. The dynamic pressure were also measured in order to determine the gas flow rate. Some samples of the material used in the tile industry and of the one produced at IPEN were analysed to determine: the morphology of the atomized material and the range of granules diameter through scanning electron microscopy; the amount of pores and the bulk density through porosimetry; the residual moisture of the material through thermogravimetry; and the granulometric distribution of granules and particles through laser diffraction. Important information about the process and the final material are given by

  17. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  18. Operating Conditions of Coagulation-Flocculation Process for High Turbidity Ceramic Wastewater

    Sameer Al-Asheh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This work attempted to determine the optimum conditions required for the coagulation and flocculation process as an essential stage of the ceramic wastewater treatment. Coagulation and flocculation is a very necessary step in industries as it lessens turbidity, color, and odor of wastewater. The experimental work was performed in several runs. The volume of wastewater used in each run was 200 mL and was kept at this value throughout. In certain runs, the speed of the mixer was varied while keeping the quantity of coagulant and flocculant constant in order to determine the optimum speed that resulted in the least turbidity. A speed of 5% was chosen as the ideal process speed according to the results obtained. Next, experiments were operated at this optimum speed while changing the dosage of coagulant and flocculant in order to decide the optimum dosage. Coagulant and flocculent amounts of 0.4 g (without booster and 0.2 g (with booster selected after the readings were taken. For all the readings, a turbidity meter was used providing results in Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU. Lowest turbidity was achieved when using 5% speed with 0.4 grams of coagulant and 0.4 grams of flocculant, or 5% speed with 0.2 grams of coagulant, 0.2 grams of flocculant and 0.25 g/L of booster coagulant. According to factorial design analysis, such as parameters as impeller speed and dosage have an influential impact on the turbidity; while the booster has insignificant influence and other interactions between parameters are important.

  19. A process efficiency assessment of serum protein removal from milk using ceramic graded permeability microfiltration membrane.

    Tremblay-Marchand, D; Doyen, A; Britten, M; Pouliot, Y

    2016-07-01

    Microfiltration (MF) is a well-known process that can be used in the dairy industry to separate caseins from serum proteins (SP) in skim milk using membranes with a pore diameter of 0.1μm. Graded permeability ceramic membranes have been studied widely as means of improving milk fractionation by overcoming problems encountered with other MF membranes. The ideal operating parameters for process efficiency in terms of membrane selectivity, permeate flux, casein loss, SP transmission, energy consumption, and dilution with water remain to be determined for this membrane. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of transmembrane pressure (TMP), volumetric concentration factor (VCF), and diafiltration on overall process efficiency. Skim milk was processed using a pilot-scale MF system equipped with 0.72-m(2) graded permeability membranes with a pore size of 0.1μm. In the first experiment, in full recycle mode, TMP was set at 124, 152, 179, or 207 kPa by adjusting the permeate pressure at the outlet. Whereas TMP had no significant effect on permeate and retentate composition, 152 kPa was found to be optimal for SP removal during concentration and concentration or diafiltration experiments. When VCF was increased to 3×, SP rejection coefficient increased along with energy consumption and total casein loss, whereas SP removal rate decreased. Diafiltering twice allowed an increase in total SP removal but resulted in a substantial increase in energy consumption and casein loss. It also reduced the SP removal rate by diluting permeate. The membrane surface area required for producing cheese milk by blending whole milk, cream, and MF retentate (at different VCF) was estimated for different cheese milk casein concentrations. For a given casein concentration, the same quantity of permeate and SP would be produced, but less membrane surface area would be needed at a lower retentate VCF. Microfiltration has great potential as a process of adding value to conventional

  20. Development of radiation-hardened ceramic composites for fusion applications. Technical progress report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    Osborne, M.C.; Steiner, D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The strength and toughness of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCC) are highly dependent on the fiber strength distribution. To first order, weaker fibers lead to low strength but higher toughness while stronger fibers lead to high strength composites of relatively low toughness. Toughness is associated with pullout of the fibers from the ceramic matrix. It has been shown previously that both strength and toughness of SiC/Nicalon{sup TM} composites are drastically changed following irradiation. This paper will present and discuss results for low oxygen Nicalon fibers irradiated at three damage levels; 0.013 dpa, 0.13 dpa, and 0.32 dpa. Single fibers were tensile tested and analyzed, using Weibull statistics, for mean strength and distribution. Tensile modulus was also determined. Using a diffractometer, the fiber grain size and percent crystallinity were determined. The initial results of these low level neutron irradiations exhibit no substantial degradation of the properties investigated. Therefore, continued research at higher doses is recommended.

  1. Development of radiation-hardened ceramic composites for fusion applications. Technical progress report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    Osborne, M.C.; Steiner, D.; Snead, L.L.

    1994-05-01

    The strength and toughness of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCC) are highly dependent on the fiber strength distribution. To first order, weaker fibers lead to low strength but higher toughness while stronger fibers lead to high strength composites of relatively low toughness. Toughness is associated with pullout of the fibers from the ceramic matrix. It has been shown previously that both strength and toughness of SiC/Nicalon TM composites are drastically changed following irradiation. This paper will present and discuss results for low oxygen Nicalon fibers irradiated at three damage levels; 0.013 dpa, 0.13 dpa, and 0.32 dpa. Single fibers were tensile tested and analyzed, using Weibull statistics, for mean strength and distribution. Tensile modulus was also determined. Using a diffractometer, the fiber grain size and percent crystallinity were determined. The initial results of these low level neutron irradiations exhibit no substantial degradation of the properties investigated. Therefore, continued research at higher doses is recommended

  2. Resurrecting the chimera: Progressions in parenting and peer processes.

    Forgatch, Marion S; Snyder, James J; Patterson, Gerald R; Pauldine, Michael R; Chaw, Yvonne; Elish, Katie; Harris, Jasmine B; Richardson, Eric B

    2016-08-01

    This report uses 6-year outcomes of the Oregon Divorce Study to examine the processes by which parenting practices affect deviant peer association during two developmental stages: early to middle childhood and late childhood to early adolescence. The participants were 238 newly divorced mothers and their 5- to 8-year-old sons who were randomly assigned to Parent Management Training-Oregon Model (PMTO®) or to a no-treatment control group. Parenting practices, child delinquent behavior, and deviant peer association were repeatedly assessed from baseline to 6 years after baseline using multiple methods and informants. PMTO had a beneficial effect on parenting practices relative to the control group. Two stage models linking changes in parenting generated by PMTO to children's growth in deviant peer association were supported. During the early to middle childhood stage, the relationship of improved parenting practices on deviant peer association was moderated by family socioeconomic status (SES); effective parenting was particularly important in mitigating deviant peer association for lower SES families whose children experience higher densities of deviant peers in schools and neighborhoods. During late childhood and early adolescence, the relationship of improved parenting to youths' growth in deviant peer association was mediated by reductions in the growth of delinquency during childhood; higher levels of early delinquency are likely to promote deviant peer association through processes of selective affiliation and reciprocal deviancy training. The results are discussed in terms of multilevel developmental progressions of diminished parenting, child involvement in deviancy producing processes in peer groups, and increased variety and severity of antisocial behavior, all exacerbated by ecological risks associated with low family SES.

  3. Fast densification processes for carbon and ceramic composites; Densification rapide par calefaction de materiaux composites carbones et ceramiques

    Delhaes, P. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, 33 (France); Robin-Brosse, C. [Societe Nationale d' Etude et de Construction de Moteurs d' Aviation (SNECMA), Lab. des Composites Thermo-Structuraux, 33 - Pessac (France); David, P. [CEA Centre d' Etudes du Ripault, Dept. Materiaux, 37 - Tours (France)

    2006-03-15

    A general introduction of the different vapour infiltration processes developed to prepare carbon-carbon composites is presented. Then a novel method with a liquid precursor, called film boiling or calefaction technique is described and compared with the usual ones. It is shown how this technique is very attractive to prepare carbon and ceramic composites within a short processing time together with a higher carbon yield. Finally the pertinent parameters of this process to evaluate its advantages and drawbacks for a further industrial development are analysed. (authors)

  4. Influence of ceramic particulate type on microstructure and tensile strength of aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP was applied to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. Aluminum alloy AA6082 was used as the matrix material. Various ceramic particles, such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC, were used as reinforcement particle. AA6082 AMCs were produced using a set of optimized process parameters. The microstructure was studied using optical microscopy, filed emission scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diagram. The results indicated that the type of ceramic particle did not considerably vary the microstructure and ultimate tensile strength (UTS. Each type of ceramic particle provided a homogeneous dispersion in the stir zone irrespective of the location and good interfacial bonding. Nevertheless, AA6082/TiC AMC exhibited superior hardness and wear resistance compared to other AMCs produced in this work under the same set of experimental conditions. The strengthening mechanisms and the variation in the properties are correlated to the observed microstructure. The details of fracture mode are further presented.

  5. Processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties of large-grained zirconium diboride ceramics

    Neuman, Eric W.; Hilmas, Gregory E., E-mail: ghilmas@mst.edu; Fahrenholtz, William G.

    2016-07-18

    Zirconium diboride ceramics produced using commercial ZrB{sub 2} powders, and milled with zirconium diboride grinding media, were fabricated by hot-pressing at temperatures of 2100–2200 °C with hold times of 30–120 min. This ZrB{sub 2} exhibits no additional impurities typically introduced by milling with grinding media of differing composition. Microstructure analysis revealed grain sizes ranging from ~25 to ~50 µm along with ~3 vol% porosity. Flexure strength ranged from 335 to 400 MPa, elastic modulus from 490 to 510 GPa, fracture toughness from 2.7 to 3.2 MPa m{sup ½}, and hardness from 13.0 to 14.4 GPa. Strength limiting flaws were identified as surface grain pullout induced by machining. Elastic modulus and hardness were found to increase with decreasing porosity. Compared to the fine grained ceramics typically reported, large grain zirconium diboride ceramics exhibit higher than expected room temperature strengths.

  6. Characterization of waste ceramic process for lost wax casting for employment as pozzolan

    Machado, C.F.; Moravia, W.G.

    2012-01-01

    There are about 30 companies of Lost Wax Casting in Brazil, and each one of them disposes around 50 to 100 tons of waste ceramic shell monthly. This work is concerned in the physical, chemical and microstructural characterization to evaluated the reactivity of this material. It was analyzed also the environmental risk of the material. The tests were made with a ceramic shell ground to evaluate the aspect of sustainable waste. In the physical characterization of the waste the density, specific surface area and distribution of the particle size were analyzed. In the chemical characterization, the powder was subjected to essays of fluorescence and pozzolanic activity. As for microstructural characterization scanning electron microscopy and Xray diffraction were carried out. The analysis of results shows that the ceramic shell powder is classified as non-inert waste, II-A Class, with density of 2,59 g/cm³. (author)

  7. Study on an integrated process combining ozonation with ceramic ultra-filtration for decentralized supply of drinking water.

    Zhu, Jia; Fan, Xiao J; Tao, Yi; Wei, De Q; Zhang, Xi H

    2014-09-19

    An integrated process was specifically developed for the decentralized supply of drinking water from micro-polluted surface water in the rural areas of China. The treatment process combined ozonation with ceramic ultra-filtration (UF), coagulation for pre-treatment and granular activated carbon filtration. A flat-sheet ceramic membrane was used with a cut-off of 60 nm and the measurement of 254 mm (length) × 240 mm (width) × 6 mm (thickness). Ozonation and ceramic UF was set up whthin one reactor. The experimental results showed that the removal efficiencies of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the formation potential of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and ammonia were 80%, 76%, 70% and 90%, respectively; that the turbidity of the product water was below 0.2 NTU and the particle count number (particles larger than 2 μm) was less than 50 counts per mL. The result also showed that all the pathogenic microorganisms were retained by the ceramic and that UF. Ozonation played a critical role in the control of membrane fouling and the removal of contaminants. Exactly, the membrane fouling can be controlled in situ with 3 mg L(-1) ozone at the permeate flux of 80 L m(-2) h(-1), yet the required dosage of ozone was dependent on the quality of the raw water. Therefore, this study is able to provide a highly compacted system for decentralized supply of high-quality drinking water in terms of both chemical and microbiological safety for the rural areas in China.

  8. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Farr, L.L.; Loghry, S.L.; Pitt, W.W.; Gibson, M.R.

    1994-12-01

    Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new, low-temperature (50 to 60C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 to 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted. In this process, aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid which might function as its own waste form. The process may actually be able to utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nearly nitrate-free ceramic-like product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 55% were obtained for the waste form produced, compared to an expected 35 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data extracted from bench-top studies indicate that the process will be very economical to operate, and data were used to cost a batch, 1,200-kg NO 3 /h plant for working off Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Their total process cost analysis presented in the appendix, indicates that between $2.01 to 2.66 per kilogram of nitrate converted will be required. Additionally, data on the fate of select radioelements present in solution are presented in this report as well as kinetic, operational, and control data for a number of experiments. Additionally, if the ceramic product functions as its own waste form, it too will offer other cost savings associated with having a smaller volume of waste form as well as eliminating other process steps such as grouting

  9. New progressive technology of flat gears processing development

    Михайло Володимирович Маргуліс

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Relevant scientific and technical problems in relation to mechanical engineering is development of new technological processes that make it possible to achieve high accuracy and durability of machine parts that meet the requirements imposed on them. So it is important to develop a new method to make a flat gear teeth by plastic deformation of the ingot. The article deals with the actual problem of improving productivity and quality of plane wheels teeth that are widely used in advanced wave, planetary and other transmissions. A progressive method to produce flat gear teeth gear by plastic deformation of the ingot with two knurl rollers alternately moving reciprocally in the direction not intersecting the axis of the ingot mounting surface has been described in the article. The working surface of the rollers corresponds to the resulting shape of the teeth. The schemes of the teeth installing and knurling have been shown. The necessary material and the heat treatment of the knurling tools have been described. Its use will significantly increase the wear resistance of the working surfaces of the teeth and their durability as well as to increase productivity and its manufacturing costs. The material of the rollers is BC15steel. The surface layer of the knurling tools was subjected to nitration, surface hardness being up to 65 HRC. Knurling is made in the5236P shaper suited for this purpose

  10. Characterization of early-age hydration processes in lime-ceramic binders using isothermal calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy

    Jerman, Miloš; Tydlitát, Vratislav; Keppert, Martin; Čáchová, Monika; Černý, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Early age hydration processes in lime-ceramic binders are analyzed within a wide range of component ratios. • The applied waste ceramic dust exhibits partial hydraulic properties, ettringite and calcite are formed. • Transition from tobermorite- to jennite-like structures is identified by SEM within the first 48 h. • The highest specific hydration heat after 300 h, 63 J/g, is measured for the binder containing 70% ceramic. • Substantial effect of the heat of wetting is observed, ranging from 10 J/g for lime to 3.9 J/g for ceramic. - Abstract: Early-age hydration processes in a lime-ceramic-water system are analyzed within the whole range of possible lime/ceramic ratios. The isothermal calorimetry shows a substantial effect of the heat of wetting on the total heat evolved, ranging from 10 J/g for lime to 3.9 J/g for ceramic. The highest specific hydration heat of 63 J/g during the analyzed 300-h hydration period exhibits the blended binder containing 70% ceramic and 30% lime which correlates well with the highest compressive and bending strengths of the paste prepared using this blend. Portlandite, ettringite and calcite are the main phases identified by the X-ray diffraction analysis after the hydration of ceramic-rich blends. According to the results of scanning electron microscopy, the initial course of pozzolanic reaction is for this type of binders characterized by the transition from tobermorite-like calcium-silicate-hydrate structures into jennite-like structures within the first 48 h. Blends with the ceramic content lower than 70% show a high portion of portlandite, calcite is present in low amount, and the jennite-like structures are observed after 48 h, following the initial formation of components with a very high Ca content. The favorable properties of the ceramic-rich blended binders can be explained by the partial hydraulic character of the ceramic. With the specific hydration heat of 29 J/g after 300 h and compressive strength

  11. Characterization of early-age hydration processes in lime-ceramic binders using isothermal calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy

    Jerman, Miloš; Tydlitát, Vratislav; Keppert, Martin; Čáchová, Monika; Černý, Robert, E-mail: cernyr@fsv.cvut.cz

    2016-06-10

    Highlights: • Early age hydration processes in lime-ceramic binders are analyzed within a wide range of component ratios. • The applied waste ceramic dust exhibits partial hydraulic properties, ettringite and calcite are formed. • Transition from tobermorite- to jennite-like structures is identified by SEM within the first 48 h. • The highest specific hydration heat after 300 h, 63 J/g, is measured for the binder containing 70% ceramic. • Substantial effect of the heat of wetting is observed, ranging from 10 J/g for lime to 3.9 J/g for ceramic. - Abstract: Early-age hydration processes in a lime-ceramic-water system are analyzed within the whole range of possible lime/ceramic ratios. The isothermal calorimetry shows a substantial effect of the heat of wetting on the total heat evolved, ranging from 10 J/g for lime to 3.9 J/g for ceramic. The highest specific hydration heat of 63 J/g during the analyzed 300-h hydration period exhibits the blended binder containing 70% ceramic and 30% lime which correlates well with the highest compressive and bending strengths of the paste prepared using this blend. Portlandite, ettringite and calcite are the main phases identified by the X-ray diffraction analysis after the hydration of ceramic-rich blends. According to the results of scanning electron microscopy, the initial course of pozzolanic reaction is for this type of binders characterized by the transition from tobermorite-like calcium-silicate-hydrate structures into jennite-like structures within the first 48 h. Blends with the ceramic content lower than 70% show a high portion of portlandite, calcite is present in low amount, and the jennite-like structures are observed after 48 h, following the initial formation of components with a very high Ca content. The favorable properties of the ceramic-rich blended binders can be explained by the partial hydraulic character of the ceramic. With the specific hydration heat of 29 J/g after 300 h and compressive strength

  12. Industrial ceramics

    Mengelle, Ch.

    1999-04-01

    After having given the definition of the term 'ceramics', the author describes the different manufacturing processes of these compounds. These materials are particularly used in the fields of 1)petroleum industry (in primary and secondary reforming units, in carbon black reactors and ethylene furnaces). 2)nuclear industry (for instance UO 2 and PuO 2 as fuels; SiC for encapsulation; boron carbides for control systems..)

  13. Use of residues proceeding from marbles and granites finishing and manufacturing processes as raw material for structural ceramic

    Mello, Roberta Monteiro de

    2006-01-01

    In order to decrease environmental impact, caused by mud discarding and clay extraction in the ceramic industry, it was used residual mud from marble and granite companies for structural ceramic. Samples were collected in twelve different marble companies located at the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo. However, only four samples were selected, based on its different characteristics. Clay stone was the raw material chosen to prepare the structural ceramic, considering its high use in this segment. Samples and clay stone were both analysed by the following procedures: granulometric analysis, x-rays fluorescent chemical analysis and x-rays diffraction mineralogical analysis, besides, tests in the samples were conducted following NBR 10004 standards. Once raw materials were characterized, the plasticity test was conducted. Test specimen were molded with different levels of mud, then burned and submitted to technological tests, such as: mechanical resistance, water absorption, porosity, specific gravity and retraction, material dilation before burning process and scanning electron microscopy. The final results have shown the viability of using this kind of mud, and pointed some advantages on its usage, but taking in consideration some previous conditions to be adopted. (author)

  14. Research & Development of Materials/Processing Methods for Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Phase 2 Final Report.

    Szweda, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Initiative that begun in 1992 has led the way for Industry, Academia, and Government to carry out a 10 year R&D plan to develop CFCCs for these industrial applications. In Phase II of this program, Dow Corning has led a team of OEM's, composite fabricators, and Government Laboratories to develop polymer derived CFCC materials and processes for selected industrial applications. During this phase, Dow Corning carried extensive process development and representative component demonstration activities on gas turbine components, chemical pump components and heat treatment furnace components.

  15. Water-Vapor Sorption Processes in Nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 Ceramics: the PAL Spectroscopy Study

    Klym, Halyna; Ingram, Adam; Shpotyuk, Oleh; Hadzaman, Ivan; Solntsev, Viacheslav

    2016-01-01

    The water-vapor sorption processes in nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 ceramics are studied with positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy employing positron trapping and positronium (Ps)-decaying modes. It is demonstrated that the longest-lived components in the four-term reconstructed PAL spectra with characteristic lifetimes near 2 and 60?70?ns can be, respectively, attributed to ortho-positronium (o-Ps) traps in nanopores with 0.3- and 1.5?1.8-nm radii. The first o-Ps decaying process include...

  16. Study parameters process for production of red glazed ceramic plates with waste of stones

    Santos, J.C.; Taguchi, S.P.; Silva, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The volume of fine waste's solid dimension stone industry has required a destination appropriate for them due to environmental and economic issues. The main goal of this work was to study the produce plates of glazed pottery with dimension stone waste. For analyzing the crystal structure, the test was conducted X-ray and X-ray fluorescence to determine the chemical composition of clay and the waste. Particle size was analysed too. Ceramic duo type (120x30x10mm) were sintered at 1280° C for 15 and 60 minutes. Characterized the samples for water absorption. The glaze had a strong anchorage in the ceramic base, but the high melting temperature caused cracks in the ceramic base, increasing the water absorption values. Thus, flux was added, based on the phase diagram Na_2O: CaO: SiO_2, which reduced the melting temperature of the glaze to 980 °C, enabling to produce the ceramic at 1100°C for 30 minutes, more uniform surface and best technological properties. (author)

  17. Process for making a titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-04-28

    A ceramic composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to about 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness. No Drawings

  18. Laser melt injection of ceramic particles in metals : Processing, microstructure and properties

    Ocelík, V.; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an overview of the possibilities of the laser melt injection (LMI) methodology to enhance the surface of light-weighted metals by adding hard ceramic particles in the top layer, with the aim to enhance the wear resistance and to increase the hardness. In

  19. Development and optimization of manufacture process for heat resistant fibre reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Glogar, Petr; Hron, P.; Burian, M.; Balík, Karel; Černý, Martin; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Vymazalová, Z.; Červencl, J.; Pivoňka, M.

    -, č. 14 (2005), 25-32 ISSN 1214-9691 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/02/0177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : polysiloxane resin * pyrolysis * ceramic matrix composite Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  20. Decorative design of ceramic tiles adapted to inkjet printing employing digital image processing; Diseno decorativo de pavimentos ceramicos adaptado a inyeccion de tinta mediante tratamiento digital de imagen

    Defez, B.; Santiago-Praderas, V.; Lluna, E.; Peris-Fajarnes, G.; Dunai, E.

    2013-09-01

    The ceramic tile sector is a very competitive industry. The designer's proficiency to offer new models of the decorated surface, adapted to the production means, plays a very important role in the competitiveness. In the present work, we analyze the evolution of the design process in the ceramic sector, as much as the changes experimented in parallel by the printing equipment. Afterwards, we present a new concept of ceramic design, based on digital image processing. This technique allows the generation of homogeneous and non-repetitive designs for large surfaces, especially thought for inkjet printing. With the programmed algorithms we have compiled a prototype software for the assistance of the ceramic design. This tool allows creating continuous designs for large surfaces saving developing time. (Author)

  1. Colloidal processing of Fe-based metalceramic composites with high content of ceramic reinforcement

    Escribano, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Major difficulties of processing metal-matrix composites by means of conventional powder metallurgy techniques are the lack of dispersion of the phases within the final microstructure. In this work, processing through colloidal techniques of the Fe-based metal-matrix composites, with a high content of a ceramic reinforcement (Ti(C,N , is presented for the first time in the literature. The colloidal approach allows a higher control of the powders packing and a better homogenization of phases since powders are mixed in a liquid medium. The chemical stability of Fe in aqueous medium determines the dispersion conditions of the mixture. The Fe slurries were formulated by optimising their zeta potential and their rheology, in order to shape bulk pieces by slip-casting. Preliminary results demonstrate the viability of this procedure, also opening new paths to the microstructural design of fully sintered Fe-based hard metal, with 50 vol. % of Ti(C,N in its composition.Las principales dificultades de procesamiento de materiales compuestos de matriz metálica por medio de técnicas convencionales pulvimetalúrgicas es la falta de dispersión entre fases dentro de la microestructura final. Este trabajo describe por primera vez el procesamiento de materiales compuestos de matriz metálica de Fe, con un alto contenido de un refuerzo cerámico (Ti (C, N, mediante técnicas coloidales. El procesamiento coloidal permite un mayor control sobre el empaquetamiento de polvos y una mejor homogeneización de las fases al mezclarse los polvos en un medio líquido. La estabilidad química del Fe en medio acuoso determina las condiciones de dispersión de la mezcla. Las suspensiones de Fe se formularon mediante la optimización del potencial zeta y de su reología, con el fin de dar forma a piezas compactas por colaje en molde de escayola. Los resultados preliminares mostrados demuestran la viabilidad del proceso, además de abrir nuevas vías al dise

  2. Processing, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties of Si3N4/SiC Nanocomposites from Precursor Derived Ceramics

    Strong, Kevin Thomas, Jr.

    Polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs) provides a unique processing route to create Si3N4/SiC composites. Silazane precursor polyureasilazane (Ceraset PURS20) produce's an amorphous SiCN ceramic at temperatures of ~800 -- 1200 °C and crystallizes to a Si3N4/SiC nanocomposite at temperatures >1500 °C. A novel processing technique was developed where crosslinked polymers were heat-treated in a reactive NH3 atmosphere to control the stoichiometry of the pyrolyzed SiCN ceramic. Using this technique processing parameters were established to produce SiCN powders that resulted in nanocomposites with approximately 0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 vol. % SiC. Lu2O3 was added to these powders as a sintering aid and were densified using Hot Pressing and Field Assisted Sintering. The sintered nanocomposites resulted in microstructures with multiple-length scales. These length-scales included Si3N4 (0.1 -- 5 microm), SiC (10 -- 100 nm) and the intergranular grain boundary phase (<1 nm). Using a combination of SEM and TEM it was possible to quantify some of these microstructural features such as the size and location of the SiC. Hardness and fracture toughness testing was conducted to compared the room temperature mechanical properties of these resultant microstructures. This research was intended to develop robust processing approaches that can be used to control the nanostructures of Si3N4/SiC composites with significant structural features at multiple length scales. The control of their features and the investigation of their affect on the properties of composites can be used to simulate the affect of the structure on properties. These models can then be used to design optimal microstructures for specific applications.

  3. Using mathematical modelling of the changes in the characteristics of the bodies during SHS-process for porous ceramic filters manufacture

    Юлія Славоміровна Повстяна

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Porous ceramic materials possess great lifetime, high mechanical strength, are resistant to household effects and easy to use. The binder volume fraction and normalized pressure as a function of the temperature in the SHS process in the ceramic body have been studied in this work. Basing on theoretical calculations the temperature range of the binder burnout has been determined. The theoretical results can be used to predict and obtain porous ceramic filters with predetermined characteristics. The theoretical calculations were used in the manufacture of experimental samples of porous ceramic bodies obtained on the basis of 18H2N4MA steel scale and the saponite. Pressing in a hydraulic press was used to manufacture ceramic pieces. Unilateral press mould made of stainless steel was used to form the samples. Pressing was carried out in the pressure range of 10-25 MPa. The resulting pieces were formed in cylinders of 30mm in diameter and 40 mm height. Sintering of the samples was conducted in the modernized reactor for the SHS process. Mathematical justification of SHS process made it possible to avoid the formation of cracks in the ceramic bodies and crumble areas

  4. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  5. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  6. Ceramic piezoelectric materials

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic piezoelectric materials conert reversibility electric energy into mechanical energy. In the presence of electric field piezoelectric materials exhibit deformations up to 0.15% (for single crystals up to 1.7%). The deformation energy is in the range of 10 2 - 10 3 J/m 3 and working frequency can reach 10 5 Hz. Ceramic piezoelectric materials find applications in many modern disciplines such as: automatics, micromanipulation, measuring techniques, medical diagnostics and many others. Among the variety of ceramic piezoelectric materials the most important appear to be ferroelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate so called PZT ceramics. Ceramic piezoelectric materials can be processed by methods widely applied for standard ceramics, i.e. starting from simple precursors e.g. oxides. Application of sol-gel method has also been reported. Substantial drawback for many applications of piezoelectric ceramics is their brittleness, thus much effort is currently being put in the development of piezoelectric composite materials. Other important research directions in the field of ceramic piezoelectric materials composite development of lead free materials, which can exhibit properties similar to the PZT ceramics. Among other directions one has to state processing of single crystals and materials having texture or gradient structure. (author)

  7. Processing and characterizations of BNT-KNN ceramics for actuator applications

    Mallam Chandrasekhar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BNT-KNN powder (with composition 0.93Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3–0.07K0.5Na0.5NbO3 was synthesized as a single perovskite phase by conventional solid state reaction route and dense ceramics were obtained by sintering of powder compacts at 1100 °C for 4 h. Dielectric study confirmed relaxor behaviour, whereas the microstructure study showed sharp cornered cubic like grains with an average grain size ∼1.15 µm. The saturated polarization vs. electric field (P-E hysteresis loops confirmed the ferroelectric (FE nature while the butterfly shaped strain vs. electric field (S-E loops suggested the piezoelectric nature of the BNT-KNN ceramic samples. Maximum electric field induced strain of ∼0.62% suggested the usefulness of this system for actuator applications.

  8. Novel processing of bioglass ceramics from silicone resins containing micro- and nano-sized oxide particle fillers.

    Fiocco, L; Bernardo, E; Colombo, P; Cacciotti, I; Bianco, A; Bellucci, D; Sola, A; Cannillo, V

    2014-08-01

    Highly porous scaffolds with composition similar to those of 45S5 and 58S bioglasses were successfully produced by an innovative processing method based on preceramic polymers containing micro- and nano-sized fillers. Silica from the decomposition of the silicone resins reacted with the oxides deriving from the fillers, yielding glass ceramic components after heating at 1000°C. Despite the limited mechanical strength, the obtained samples possessed suitable porous architecture and promising biocompatibility and bioactivity characteristics, as testified by preliminary in vitro tests. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Influence of Solution Properties and Process Parameters on the Formation and Morphology of YSZ and NiO Ceramic Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Gerard Cadafalch Gazquez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication process of ceramic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ and nickel oxide nanofibers by electrospinning is reported. The preparation of hollow YSZ nanofibers and aligned nanofiber arrays is also demonstrated. The influence of the process parameters of the electrospinning process, the physicochemical properties of the spinning solutions, and the thermal treatment procedure on spinnability and final microstructure of the ceramic fibers was determined. The fiber diameter can be varied from hundreds of nanometers to more than a micrometer by controlling the solution properties of the electrospinning process, while the grain size and surface roughness of the resulting fibers are mainly controlled via the final thermal annealing process. Although most observed phenomena are in qualitative agreement with previous studies on the electrospinning of polymeric nanofibers, one of the main differences is the high ionic strength of ceramic precursor solutions, which may hamper the spinnability. A strategy to control the effective ionic strength of precursor solutions is also presented.

  10. Processing, properties, and application of textured 0.72lead(magnesium niobate)-0.28lead titanate ceramics

    Brosnan, Kristen H.

    electromechanical coupling (k 33) of 81 vol% textured PMN-28PT (k33 = 0.79) was a significant fraction of single crystal (k33 = 0.91) and was higher than a commercial PMN-PT ceramic (k33 ˜ 0.74). The nonlinearity of the dielectric and piezoelectric response were investigated in textured ceramics and single crystal PMN-28PT using the Rayleigh approach. The reversible piezoelectric coefficient was found to increase significantly and the hysteretic contribution to the piezoelectric coefficient decreased significantly with an increase in texture volume. This indicates that increasing the texture volume decreases the non-180° domain wall contribution to the piezoelectric response in PMN-28PT. Finally, 81 vol% textured ceramics were also integrated into a Navy SONAR transducer design. In-water characterization of the transducers showed higher source levels, higher in-water coupling, higher acoustic intensity, and more bandwidth for the 81 vol% textured PMN-28PT tonpilz single elements compared to the ceramic PMN-28PT tonpilz element. In addition, an 81 vol% textured PMN-28PT tonpilz element showed large scale linearity in sound pressure levels as a function of drive level under high drive conditions (up to 2.33 kV/cm). The maximum electromechanical coupling obtained by the 81 vol% textured PMN-28PT transducer under high drive conditions was keff = 0.69. However, the resonance frequency shifted significantly during high drive tests (Deltafs = -19% at 3.7 kV/cm), evidence of a "soft" characteristic of the 81 vol% textured PMN-28PT, possibly caused by Sr2+ from the template particles. The results suggest there are limitations on the preload compressive stress (and thus drive level) for these textured ceramics, but this could be addressed with compositional modifications. The dielectric, piezoelectric and electromechanical properties have been significantly improved in textured PMN-PT ceramics of this study. Furthermore, scale-up in processing for incorporation into devices of highly

  11. Hybrid Processes Combining Photocatalysis and Ceramic Membrane Filtration for Degradation of Humic Acids in Saline Water

    Lili Song

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the combined effects of photocatalysis with ceramic membrane filtration for the removal of humic acid in the presence of salt; to simulate saline wastewater conditions. The effects of operating parameters, such as salinity and TiO2 concentration on permeate fluxes, total organic carbon (TOC, and UV absorbance removal, were investigated. The interaction between the humic acids and TiO2 photocatalyst played an important role in the observed flux change during ceramic membrane filtration. The results for this hybrid system showed that the TOC removal was more than 70% for both without NaCl and with the 500 ppm NaCl concentration, and 62% and 66% for 1000 and 2000 ppm NaCl concentrations. The reduction in UV absorbance was more complete in the absence of NaCl compared to the presence of NaCl. The operation of the integrated photoreactor-ceramic membrane filter over five repeat cycles is described. It can be concluded that the overall removal performance of the hybrid system was influenced by the presence of salts, as salt leads to agglomeration of TiO2 particles by suppressing the stabilising effects of electrostatic repulsion and thereby reduces the effective surface contact between the pollutant and the photocatalyst.

  12. Hybrid Processes Combining Photocatalysis and Ceramic Membrane Filtration for Degradation of Humic Acids in Saline Water.

    Song, Lili; Zhu, Bo; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel; Muthukumaran, Shobha

    2016-03-01

    This study explored the combined effects of photocatalysis with ceramic membrane filtration for the removal of humic acid in the presence of salt; to simulate saline wastewater conditions. The effects of operating parameters, such as salinity and TiO₂ concentration on permeate fluxes, total organic carbon (TOC), and UV absorbance removal, were investigated. The interaction between the humic acids and TiO₂ photocatalyst played an important role in the observed flux change during ceramic membrane filtration. The results for this hybrid system showed that the TOC removal was more than 70% for both without NaCl and with the 500 ppm NaCl concentration, and 62% and 66% for 1000 and 2000 ppm NaCl concentrations. The reduction in UV absorbance was more complete in the absence of NaCl compared to the presence of NaCl. The operation of the integrated photoreactor-ceramic membrane filter over five repeat cycles is described. It can be concluded that the overall removal performance of the hybrid system was influenced by the presence of salts, as salt leads to agglomeration of TiO₂ particles by suppressing the stabilising effects of electrostatic repulsion and thereby reduces the effective surface contact between the pollutant and the photocatalyst.

  13. New ceramic materials

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-01-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  14. Students' Progress throughout Examination Process as a Markov Chain

    Hlavatý, Robert; Dömeová, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    The paper is focused on students of Mathematical methods in economics at the Czech university of life sciences (CULS) in Prague. The idea is to create a model of students' progress throughout the whole course using the Markov chain approach. Each student has to go through various stages of the course requirements where his success depends on the…

  15. AECL's progress in developing the DUPIC fuel fabrication process

    Sullivan, J.D.; Cox, D.S.

    1995-01-01

    Spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel can be used directly in CANDU reactors without the need for wet chemical reprocessing or reenrichment. Considerable experimental progress has been made in verifying the practicality of this fuel cycle, including hot-cell experiments using spent PWR fuels and out-cell trials using surrogate fuels. This paper describes the current status of these experiments. (author)

  16. Progress of R&D on water cooled ceramic breeder for ITER test blanket system and DEMO

    Kawamura, Yoshinori, E-mail: kawamura.yoshinori@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Tanigawa, Hisashi; Hirose, Takanori; Enoeda, Mikio [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Sato, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ochiai, Kentaro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Konno, Chikara; Edao, Yuki; Hayashi, Takumi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Nakamichi, Masaru; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Nishi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ezato, Koichiro; Seki, Yohji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Yamanishi, Toshihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Thermo-hydraulic calculation in the TBM at the water ingress event has been done. • Shielding calculations for the ITER equatorial port #18 were conducted by using C-lite model. • Prototypic pebbles of Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} and Be{sub 12}V had a good oxidation property similar to Be{sub 12}Ti pebble. • Li rich Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles were successfully fabricated using the emulsion method by controlling sintering atmosphere. • New tritium production/recovery experiments at FNS have been started by using ionization chamber as on-line gas monitor. - Abstract: The development of a water cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) test blanket module (TBM) is being performed as one of the most important steps toward DEMO blanket in Japan. For the TBM testing and development of DEMO blanket, R&D has been performed on the module fabrication technology, breeder and multiplier pebble fabrication technology, tritium production rate evaluation, as well as structural and safety design activities. The fabrication of full-scale first wall, side walls, breeder pebble bed box and back wall was completed, and assembly of TBM with box structure was successfully achieved. Development of advanced breeder and multiplier pebbles for higher chemical stability was continued for future DEMO blanket application. From the view point of TBM test result evaluation and DEMO blanket performance design, the development of the blanket tritium transport simulation technology, investigation of the TBM neutron measurement technology and the evaluation of the tritium production and recovery test using D-T neutron in the fusion neutron source (FNS) facility has been performed. This paper provides an overview of the recent achievements of the development of the WCCB Blanket in Japan.

  17. Ceramic research on transformational superplasticity and stoichiometry effects on fracture. Research progress report, June 1, 1975--May 31, 1976

    Bradt, R.C.; Hoke, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    The progress of the program is reviewed by treating each of the areas separately. In the superplasticity investigation, the results of the Bi 2 WO 6 and Bi 2 MoO 3 systems are discussed both in terms of the transformational deformation and also the thermal cycling growth phenomenon. The growth phenomenon on thermal cycling through the phase transition shows some interesting bulk and microstructural features in terms of specimen strain and highly anisotropic grain growth. The stoichiometry effects on the fracture (K/sub Ic/ and K-V behavior) of TiO/sub 2-x/ and Fe/sub 1-x/ are reviewed as that study has been completed. Progress on the MgO . X Al 2 O 3 system is discussed

  18. Finite Progressive Planning for the Assembly Process in Footwear

    Reyes, John; Aldás, Darwin; Salazar, Edisson; Armendáriz, Evelyn; Álvarez, Kevin; Núñez, José; García, Mario

    2017-06-01

    The scheduling of the operations of a manufacturing system is recognized for its efficiency in establishing a characteristic rate of production based on the forecasting of the ending date of an order. However, progressive planning focused on the footwear industries has not been studied in detail, since it is limited by the use of machines and supply according to the demand of the production line, whose development is based on just in time. The study proposes a finite progressive planning model in the area of footwear assembly that begins with analysis of the demand and identification of manufacturing constraints in order to establish an optimal ordering sequence. The results show manufacturing requirements through production orders that automatically determine production shifts per order, through experimentation of scenarios, the 25% increase in productivity indicators and a 31% improvement in efficiency are established. This improvement represents higher benefits for the industrial sector when establishing planning in the workplace.

  19. Ceramic Technology Project

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  20. Electrolytic In-process Dressing (ELID) for high-efficiency, precision grinding of ceramic parts: An experiment study

    Bandyopadhyay, B.P.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes Electrolytic In-process Dressing (ELID) as applied to the efficient, high-precision grinding of structural ceramics, and describes work performed jointly by Dr. B.P. Bandyopadhyay, University of North Dakota, and Dr. R. Ohmori, of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RINEN), Tokyo, Japan, from June through August, 1994. Dr. Ohmori pioneered the novel ELID grinding technology which incorporates electrolytically enhanced, in-process dressing of metal bonded superabrasive wheels. The principle of ELID grinding technology is discussed in the report as will its application for rough grinding and precision grinding. Two types of silicon nitride based ceramics (Kyocerals Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and Eaton`s SRBSN) were ground under various conditions with ELID methods. Mirror surface finishes were obtained with {number_sign} 4000 mesh size wheel (average grain size = 4 {mu}m). Results of these investigations are presented in this report. These include the effects of wheel bond type, type of power supply, abrasive grit friability, and cooling fluid composition. The effects of various parameters are discussed in terms of the mechanisms of ELID grinding, and in particular, the manner of boundary layer formation on the wheels and abrasive grit protrusion.

  1. Water-Vapor Sorption Processes in Nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 Ceramics: the PAL Spectroscopy Study.

    Klym, Halyna; Ingram, Adam; Shpotyuk, Oleh; Hadzaman, Ivan; Solntsev, Viacheslav

    2016-12-01

    The water-vapor sorption processes in nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 ceramics are studied with positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy employing positron trapping and positronium (Ps)-decaying modes. It is demonstrated that the longest-lived components in the four-term reconstructed PAL spectra with characteristic lifetimes near 2 and 60-70 ns can be, respectively, attributed to ortho-positronium (o-Ps) traps in nanopores with 0.3- and 1.5-1.8-nm radii. The first o-Ps decaying process includes "pick-off" annihilation in the "bubbles" of liquid water, while the second is based on o-Ps interaction with physisorbed water molecules at the walls of the pores. In addition, the water vapor modifies structural defects located at the grain boundaries in a vicinity of pores, this process being accompanied by void fragmentation during water adsorption and agglomeration during water desorption after drying.

  2. Water-Vapor Sorption Processes in Nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 Ceramics: the PAL Spectroscopy Study

    Klym, Halyna; Ingram, Adam; Shpotyuk, Oleh; Hadzaman, Ivan; Solntsev, Viacheslav

    2016-03-01

    The water-vapor sorption processes in nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 ceramics are studied with positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy employing positron trapping and positronium (Ps)-decaying modes. It is demonstrated that the longest-lived components in the four-term reconstructed PAL spectra with characteristic lifetimes near 2 and 60-70 ns can be, respectively, attributed to ortho-positronium (o-Ps) traps in nanopores with 0.3- and 1.5-1.8-nm radii. The first o-Ps decaying process includes "pick-off" annihilation in the "bubbles" of liquid water, while the second is based on o-Ps interaction with physisorbed water molecules at the walls of the pores. In addition, the water vapor modifies structural defects located at the grain boundaries in a vicinity of pores, this process being accompanied by void fragmentation during water adsorption and agglomeration during water desorption after drying.

  3. Processing and characterization of lead-free ceramics on the base of sodium-potassium niobate

    Politova, E. D.; Golubko, N. V.; Kaleva, G. M.; Mosunov, A. V.; Sadovskaya, N. V.; Stefanovich, S. Yu.; Kiselev, D. A.; Kislyuk, A. M.; Panda, P. K.

    Lead-free sodium-potassium niobate-based piezoelectric materials are most intensively studied in order to replace the widely used Pb-based ones. In this work, the effects of modification of compositions by donor and acceptor dopants in the A- and B-sites of perovskite lattice on structure, dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties of ceramics from Morphotropic Phase Boundary in the (1-x)(K0.5Na0.5)NbO3-xBaTiO3 system and in compositions with x=0.05 and 0.06 additionally doped by Ni3+ cations have been studied.

  4. Mechanisms of flow through compressible porous beds in sedimentation, centrifugation, deliquoring, and ceramic processing

    NONE

    1996-01-25

    The major topics covered in the investigation include: centrifugation; cake filtration; sedimentation and thickening; capillary suction operations; ceramics, slip casting; optimization studies; and wastewater. The research program was aimed at the specific areas of solid/liquid separation including sedimentation, thickening, cake filtration, centrifugation, expression, washing, deep-bed filtration, screening, and membrane separation. Unification of the theoretical approaches to the various solid/liquid separation operations was the principle objective of the research. Exploring new aspects of basic separation mechanisms, verification of theory with experiment, development of laboratory procedures for obtaining data for design, optimizing operational methods, and transferring the results to industry were part of the program.

  5. Processing Science of Advanced Ceramics. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. Volume 155

    1990-09-01

    VAPOR DEPOSITION OF CERAMIC FILMS AND COATIINGyS R. F. Davis 213 BARRIERS TOTHEl NUCI.EATION OF METHYL GROUPS ON THE D)IAMOND) (II11) SURF ACE S. M... Seefeldt , 1987, ISBN 0-931837-49-9 Volume 85-Microstructural Development During the Hydration of Cement, L. Struble, P. Brown, 1987, ISBN 0-931837-50-2...includes the postulate that, depending on r m m lmm m mm 27 the relative magnitude between the electrostatic barrier VT to aggregation and the aver- age

  6. Processing and characterization of lead-free ceramics on the base of sodium–potassium niobate

    E. D. Politova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lead-free sodium–potassium niobate-based piezoelectric materials are most intensively studied in order to replace the widely used Pb-based ones. In this work, the effects of modification of compositions by donor and acceptor dopants in the A- and B-sites of perovskite lattice on structure, dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties of ceramics from Morphotropic Phase Boundary in the (1−x(K0.5Na0.5NbO3–xBaTiO3 system and in compositions with x=0.05 and 0.06 additionally doped by Ni3+ cations have been studied.

  7. Defining Incident Management Processes for CSIRTs: A Work in Progress

    Alberts, Chris; Dorofee, Audrey; Killcrece, Georgia; Ruefle, Robin; Zajicek, Mark

    2004-01-01

    .... Workflow diagrams and descriptions are provided for each of these processes. One advantage of the model is that it enables examination of incident management processes that cross organizational boundaries, both internally and externally...

  8. Improving the process of progressive preliming in sugar production

    V. A. Golybin; V. A. Fedoruk; N. A. Voronkova; I. S. Bushmin

    2016-01-01

    Tasks progressive preliming are to conduct neutralization, coagulation, deposition of non-sugars, the formation of a precipitate structure. This is the first operation of physical and chemical cleaning of the raw juice in the case of it in optimum conditions enables the coagulation and transferred to precipitate a substantial portion of high-molecular non-sugars, poorly soluble calcium salts that provides the cleaning effect of 14–18%, that is, up to half of the total effect on the whole stat...

  9. Fundamental studies of separation processes. Technical progress report

    Rogers, L.B.

    1975-06-01

    Studies using high-precision gas chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography have produced new types of information on liquid crystals and on behavior of substances in the region of the critical temperature, respectively. In addition, the first successful studies of the effects of pressure on cation exchange have been made using aqueous solutions of alkali metal nitrates. In contrast, progress on separations of isotopic species using gas chromatography has been disappointing. In that area, the chief accomplishment has been a determination of the levels of accuracy and precision with which isotopic abundances can be measured using our quadrupole mass spectrometer. (U.S.)

  10. International Engineering Foundation Conference on the Plastic Deformation of Ceramics

    Brookes, Chris; Routbort, Jules

    1995-01-01

    This proceedings volume, "Plastic Deformation of Ceramics," constitutes the papers of an international symposium held at Snowbird, Utah from August 7-12, 1994. It was attended by nearly 100 scientists and engineers from more than a dozen countries representing academia, national laboratories, and industry. Two previous conferences on this topic were held at The Pennsylvania State University in 1974 and 1983. Therefore, the last major international conference focusing on the deformation of ceramic materials was held more than a decade ago. Since the early 1980s, ceramic materials have progressed through an evolutionary period of development and advancement. They are now under consideration for applications in engineering structures. The contents of the previous conferences indicate that considerable effort was directed towards a basic understanding of deformation processes in covalently bonded or simple oxide ceramics. However, now, more than a decade later, the focus has completely shifted. In particular, the...

  11. Comparison of structure, morphology, and leach characteristics of multi-phase ceramics produced via melt processing and hot isostatic pressing

    Dandeneau, Christopher S.; Hong, Tao; Brinkman, Kyle S.; Vance, Eric R.; Amoroso, Jake W.

    2018-04-01

    Melt processing of multi-phase ceramic waste forms offers potential advantages over traditional solid-state synthesis methods given both the prevalence of melters currently in use and the ability to reduce the possibility of airborne radionuclide contamination. In this work, multi-phase ceramics with a targeted hollandite composition of Ba1.0Cs0.3Cr1.0Al0.3Fe1.0Ti5.7O16 were fabricated by melt processing at 1675 °C and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1250 and 1300 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed hollandite as the major phase in all specimens. Zirconolite/pyrochlore peaks and weaker perovskite reflections were observed after melt processing, while HIP samples displayed prominent perovskite peaks and low-intensity zirconolite reflections. Melt processing produced specimens with large (>50 μm) well-defined hollandite grains, while HIP yielded samples with a more fine-grained morphology. Elemental analysis showed "islands" rich in Cs and Ti across the surface of the 1300 °C HIP sample, suggesting partial melting and partitioning of Cs into multiple phases. Photoemission data revealed multiple Cs 3d spin-orbit pairs for the HIP samples, with the lower binding energy doublets likely corresponding to Cs located in more leachable phases. Among all specimens examined, the melt-processed sample exhibited the lowest fractional release rates for Rb and Cs. However, the retention of Sr and Mo was greater in the HIP specimens.

  12. Crystallization kinetics of magnetic glass-ceramics prepared by the processing of waste materials

    Francis, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to study the feasibility of conversion of an intimate mixture of blast furnace slag and blast furnace flue dust generated by a single industrial company into magnetic glass-ceramic product. Blast furnace slag (BFS) and blast furnace flue dust (BFD) are generated at a rate of 300,000 and 30,000 tons/year, respectively, from iron and steel factory. The crystallization mechanisms of a composition containing BFS and BFD in a 50/50 proportion were investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystallization temperature was found to vary from 900 to 1100 deg. C and two phases appeared in the crystallized samples: pyroxene Ca(Mg, Fe, Al)(Si, Al) 2 O 6 and magnetite/maghemite. Heating rate and particle sizes effects on crystal growth of powdered samples were studied by DTA. The apparent activation energy of crystal growth using the particle size 180-315 μm was determined to be 355 and 329 kJ/mol for the first and second peak, respectively. The presence of sharp and broad crystallization peaks indicate simultaneous surface and internal crystallization mechanism. Good wear resistance and chemical durability particularly in alkaline environment, combine with good hardness and magnetic properties make this glass-ceramic material potentially useful for various industrial applications

  13. Insertion Process of Ceramic Nanoporous Microneedles by Means of a Novel Mechanical Applicator Design

    Xavier H. M. Hartmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Arrays of microneedles (MNAs are integrated in an out-of-plane fashion with a base plate and can serve as patches for the release of drugs and vaccines. We used soft-lithography and micromolding to manufacture ceramic nanoporous (npMNAs. Failure modes of ceramic npMNAs are as yet poorly understood and the question remained: is our npMNA platform technology ready for microneedle (MN assembly into patches? We investigated npMNAs by microindentation, yielding average crack fracture forces above the required insertion force for a single MN to penetrate human skin. We further developed a thumb pressure-actuated applicator-assisted npMNA insertion method, which enables anchoring of MNs in the skin by an adhesive in one handling step. Using a set of simple artificial skin models, we found a puncture efficiency of this insertion method a factor three times higher than by applying thumb pressure on the npMNA base plate directly. In addition, this new method facilitated zero MN-breakage due to a well-defined force distribution exerted onto the MNs and the closely surrounding area prior to bringing the adhesive into contact with the skin. Owing to the fact that such parameter space exists, we can conclude that npMNAs by soft lithography are a platform technology for MN assembly into a patch.

  14. Recent status and progress of radiation processing in the world

    Lee, Yun Jong; Lee, Byoung Hun; Im, Don Sun; Kim, Jae Ho; Nho, Young Chang

    2008-01-01

    Radiation technology is currently used in a number of industrial processes such as sterilization, cross linking of polymer, food irradiation, rubber vulcanization in the tire manufacturing, contaminated medical waste, etc. Gamma ray and electron beam are the key examples of well-established economical applications of radiation processes. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent technological trends and activities for radiation processes in order for the industrial end users to better understand, and obtain useful information about the technology. It is clear that the radiation processing technology has potential for a variety of the industrial applications

  15. Recent status and progress of radiation processing in the world

    Lee, Yun Jong; Lee, Byoung Hun; Im, Don Sun; Kim, Jae Ho; Nho, Young Chang [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup(Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-15

    Radiation technology is currently used in a number of industrial processes such as sterilization, cross linking of polymer, food irradiation, rubber vulcanization in the tire manufacturing, contaminated medical waste, etc. Gamma ray and electron beam are the key examples of well-established economical applications of radiation processes. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent technological trends and activities for radiation processes in order for the industrial end users to better understand, and obtain useful information about the technology. It is clear that the radiation processing technology has potential for a variety of the industrial applications.

  16. Processing, Mechanical and Optical Properties of Additive-Free ZrC Ceramics Prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Clara Musa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, nearly fully dense monolithic ZrC samples are produced and broadly characterized from microstructural, mechanical and optical points of view. Specifically, 98% dense products are obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS after 20 min dwell time at 1850 °C starting from powders preliminarily prepared by Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS followed by 20 min ball milling. A prolonged mechanical treatment up to 2 h of SHS powders does not lead to appreciable benefits. Vickers hardness of the resulting samples (17.5 ± 0.4 GPa is reasonably good for monolithic ceramics, but the mechanical strength (about 250 MPa up to 1000 °C could be further improved by suitable optimization of the starting powder characteristics. The very smoothly polished ZrC specimen subjected to optical measurements displays high absorption in the visible-near infrared region and low thermal emittance at longer wavelengths. Moreover, the sample exhibits goodspectral selectivity (2.1–2.4 in the 1000–1400 K temperature range. These preliminary results suggest that ZrC ceramics produced through the two-step SHS/SPS processing route can be considered as attractive reference materials for the development of innovative solar energy absorbers.

  17. Polysiloxanes derived from the controlled hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane as precursors to silica for use in ceramic processing

    Philipp, Warren H.

    1990-01-01

    Synthesis, properties, and potential applications in ceramic processing for two polysiloxane silica precursors derived from the controlled hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) are presented. The higher molecular weight TEOS-A is a thick adhesive liquid of viscosity 8000 to 12,000 c.p. having a SiO2 char yield of about 55 percent. The lower molecular weight TEOS-B is a more fluid liquid of viscosity 150 to 200 c.p. having a SiO2 char yield of about 52 percent. The acid catalyzed hydrolysis of TEOS to hydrated silica gel goes through a series of polysiloxane intermediates. The rate of this transition increases with the quantity of water added to the TEOS; thus, for ease of polymer isolation, the amount of water added must be carefully determined so as to produce the desired polymer in a reasonable time. The water to TEOS mole ratio falls in the narrow range of 1.05 for TEOS-A and 0.99 for TEOS-B. Further polymerization or gelation is prevented by storing at -5 C in a freezer. Both polysiloxanes thermoset to a glassy solid at 115 C. The liquid polymers are organic in nature in that they are miscible with toluene and ethanol, slightly souble in heptane, but immiscible with water. For both polymers, results on viscosity versus time are given at several temperatures and water additions. Based on these results, some examples of practical utilization of the precursors for ceramic fabrication are given.

  18. Processing, Structure and High Temperature Oxidation Properties of Polymer-Derived and Hafnium Oxide Based Ceramic Systems

    Terauds, Kalvis

    Demands for hypersonic aircraft are driving the development of ultra-high temperature structural materials. These aircraft, envisioned to sustain Mach 5+, are expected to experience continuous temperatures of 1200--1800°C on the aircraft surface and temperatures as high as 2800°C in combustion zones. Breakthroughs in the development of fiber based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are opening the door to a new class of high-tech UHT structures for aerospace applications. One limitation with current carbon fiber or silicon carbide fiber based CMC technology is the inherent problem of material oxidation, requiring new approaches for protective environmental barrier coatings (EBC) in extreme environments. This thesis focuses on the development and characterization of SiCN-HfO2 based ceramic composite EBC systems to be used as a protective layer for silicon carbide fiber based CMCs. The presented work covers three main architectures for protection (i) multilayer films, (ii) polymer-derived HfSiCNO, and (iii) composite SiCN-HfO 2 infiltration. The scope of this thesis covers processing development, material characterization, and high temperature oxidation behavior of these three SiCN-HfO2 based systems. This work shows that the SiCN-HfO 2 composite materials react upon oxidation to form HfSiO4, offering a stable EBC in streaming air and water vapor at 1600°C.

  19. Effect of B2O3 and P2O5 on fluorosilicic mica glass-ceramic sintering process

    Wu S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of B2O3 and P2O5 on fluorosilicic mica glass-ceramic sintering process, six sets of K2O-MgO-SiO2-F glasses were prepared by using B2O3 and P2O5 as sintering aid, respectively. Green bodies of the glass powder were formed by gel casting and sintered at 800, 850, 900, 950, 1000oC for 6 hours, resectively. The sintering and crystallization behavior were studied by thermal shrinkage , X-ray diffraction and SEM. The results showed that the shrinkage rate of the glass with 2wt% B2O3 and P2O5 was highest, while the rate of the glass with 5wt% P2O5 was lowest. An additional crystal other than fluorosilicic mica was precipitated in the glass ceramics generated by sintering of glass powder. The present results confirmed that the glass powder of pure K2O-MgO-SiO2-Fsystem had poor sinterability, while glass powder with minor addition of P2O5 and/or B2O3 showed good sinterability. This result was also verified by SEM.

  20. Technical evaluation of the direct denitration process to obtain ceramic-grade UO2 powders using microwaves

    Lorenzo, Viviana J.; Marchi, Daniel E.; Menghini, Jorge E.

    1999-01-01

    The direct denitration process to obtain ceramic-grade UO 2 powders using microwaves has been studied and developed at laboratory scale. Conditions were given to obtain powders apt for fuel pellets fabrication within the required specifications, where mechanical treatments before pressing are not necessary. This work describes the equipment used in the process, evaluates the necessary supply and waste generation and describes the characteristics of the product obtained, as well as the conditions for its fabrication. Results show that this method allows to reduce the volume of liquid wastes generated due to their partial re-utilization, simplifying their final disposal treatment, which, in addition to their operational advantages, make this method attractive from the economical point of view. (author)

  1. Motivated information processing in organizational teams: Progress, puzzles, and prospects

    Nijstad, B.A.; de Dreu, C.K.W.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the research into group and team functioning looks at groups that perform cognitive tasks, such as decision making, problem solving, and innovation. The Motivated Information Processing in Groups Model (MIP-G; De Dreu, Nijstad, & Van Knippenberg, 2008) conjectures that information processing

  2. Using Statistical Process Control to Enhance Student Progression

    Hanna, Mark D.; Raichura, Nilesh; Bernardes, Ednilson

    2012-01-01

    Public interest in educational outcomes has markedly increased in the most recent decade; however, quality management and statistical process control have not deeply penetrated the management of academic institutions. This paper presents results of an attempt to use Statistical Process Control (SPC) to identify a key impediment to continuous…

  3. Progress in catalytic naphtha reforming process: A review

    Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Mitra; Iranshahi, Davood

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic naphtha reforming process is a vital process for refineries due to the production of high-octane components, which is intensely demanded in our modern life. The significance of this industrial process induced researchers to investigate different aspects of catalytic naphtha reforming process intensively. Some of the investigators try to improve this process by representing more effective catalysts, while others try to elucidate its kinetic and deactivation mechanisms and design more efficient reactor setups. The amount of these established papers is so much that may confuse some of the researchers who want to find collective information about catalytic naphtha reforming process. In the present paper, the published studies from 1949 until now are categorized into three main groups including finding suitable catalyst, revealing appropriate kinetic and deactivation model, and suggesting efficient reactor configuration and mode of operation. These studies are reviewed separately, and a suitable reference is provided for those who want to have access to generalized information about catalytic naphtha reforming process. Finally, various suggestions for revamping the catalytic naphtha reforming process have been proposed as a guideline for further investigations

  4. Present status and expected progress in radiation processing dosimetry

    Kovács, A.; Miller, A.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the present status of radiation processing dosimetry including the methods used most widely in gamma- and electron processing as well as the new methods under development or introduction. The recent trends with respect to calibrationof routine dosimetry systems as well...

  5. Purex process extraction cycles: a potential for progress today

    Boullis, B.; Germain, M.; Goumondy, J.P.; Rouyer, H.

    1994-12-31

    The Purex process very quickly and very widely supplanted the other concepts considered for nuclear fuel reprocessing after the presentation made at the Geneva Conference in 1955. The selectivity and radiolytic stability of tributylphosphate (T.B.P) clearly appeared to augur an extremely attractive process for completing the separation of valuable elements in the irradiated fuel. The concept has confirmed its validity, and subsequently its ability to adapt to changing requirements or constraints. Its industrial viability is in fact unquestioned today: Purex process is the basis of all the reprocessing plants in operation or planned throughout the world, and recent commissioning of the UP3 plant in France, in remarkable conditions, attests to such a level of maturity that one is tempted to ask the question: ``What remains to be proved, discovered or improved in the core of the Purex process?``. (authors). 7 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Purex process extraction cycles: a potential for progress today

    Boullis, B.; Germain, M.; Goumondy, J.P.; Rouyer, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Purex process very quickly and very widely supplanted the other concepts considered for nuclear fuel reprocessing after the presentation made at the Geneva Conference in 1955. The selectivity and radiolytic stability of tributylphosphate (T.B.P) clearly appeared to augur an extremely attractive process for completing the separation of valuable elements in the irradiated fuel. The concept has confirmed its validity, and subsequently its ability to adapt to changing requirements or constraints. Its industrial viability is in fact unquestioned today: Purex process is the basis of all the reprocessing plants in operation or planned throughout the world, and recent commissioning of the UP3 plant in France, in remarkable conditions, attests to such a level of maturity that one is tempted to ask the question: ''What remains to be proved, discovered or improved in the core of the Purex process?''. (authors). 7 refs., 4 tabs

  7. Ceramic Transactions. Volume 21. Proceedings of the Symposium on Microwave Theory and Application in Materials Processing Annual Meeting of the American Ceramic Society (23rd) Held in Cincinnati, Ohio on April 29-May 3 1991

    1992-04-27

    organic vehicles , and porosity present in the green ceramic body. In this case we must be aware that electic fields are also "inhomogeneous (Meek, 1987...from the earth and use them as heat sources for thermolectric devices in space vehicles . ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The information contained in this article...Microwaves SI / MICROWAVE ( HIBRID ) HEATING OF ALUMINA AT 2.45 GHZ- 12. EFFECT OF PROCESSING VARIABLES. HEATING RATES AND PARTICLE SIZE Arindam D6

  8. Advanced Ceramics

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  9. Novel Processing of Unique Ceramic-Based Nuclear Materials and Fuels

    Zhang, Hui; Singh, Raman P.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These include refractory alloys base on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as those based on silicon carbide (SiCf-SiC); carbon-carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the materials used in nuclear fuels and other temperature critical components can lower the center-line fuel temperature and thereby enhance durability and reduce the risk of premature failure.

  10. PROCESSING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF TUBULAR CERAMIC SUPPORT FOR MICROFILTRATION MEMBRANE PREPARED FROM PYROPHYLLITE CLAY

    Abedallah Talidi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Tubular macroporous support for ceramic microfiltration membranes were prepared by extrusion followed by sintering of the low cost pyrophyllite clay. Clay powders mixed with some organic additives can be extruded to form a porous tubular support. The average pore size of the membrane is observed to increase from 5 µm to 10.8 µm when sintering temperature increase from 900 °C to 1200 °C. However, with the increase in temperature from 900 °C to 1200 °C, the support porosity is reduced from 47% to 30% and flexural strength is increased from 4 MPa to 17 MPa. The fabricated macro-porous supports are expected to have potential applications in the pre-treatment and also can be used like support for membranes of ultra-filtration.

  11. Novel Processing of Unique Ceramic-Based Nuclear Materials and Fuels

    Hui Zhang; Raman P. Singh

    2008-11-30

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These include refractory alloys base on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as those based on silicon carbide (SiCf-SiC); carbon-carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor componets is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the materials used in nuclear fuels and other temperature critical components can lower the center-line fuel temperature and thereby enhance durability and reduce the risk of premature failure.

  12. Progress in a novel architecture for high performance processing

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Liu, Meng; Liu, Zijun; Du, Xueliang; Xie, Shaolin; Ma, Hong; Ding, Guangxin; Ren, Weili; Zhou, Fabiao; Sun, Wenqin; Wang, Huijuan; Wang, Donglin

    2018-04-01

    The high performance processing (HPP) is an innovative architecture which targets on high performance computing with excellent power efficiency and computing performance. It is suitable for data intensive applications like supercomputing, machine learning and wireless communication. An example chip with four application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) cores which is the first generation of HPP cores has been taped out successfully under Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 40 nm low power process. The innovative architecture shows great energy efficiency over the traditional central processing unit (CPU) and general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU). Compared with MaPU, HPP has made great improvement in architecture. The chip with 32 HPP cores is being developed under TSMC 16 nm field effect transistor (FFC) technology process and is planed to use commercially. The peak performance of this chip can reach 4.3 teraFLOPS (TFLOPS) and its power efficiency is up to 89.5 gigaFLOPS per watt (GFLOPS/W).

  13. Final technical report to Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. ''Oxide ceramic alloys and microlaminates'' (1996-1999) and ''Low temperature processing and kinetics of ceramics and ceramic matrix composites with large interfacial areas'' (1999-2000)

    Chen, I-Wei

    2001-03-26

    We have discovered a novel two-step sintering method that opened up a low temperature processing window within which fully dense nanocrystalline yttrium oxide was obtained with no concurrent grain growth during final-stage sintering. We have developed a new method of processing laminate ceramics using deformation processing in the green state. We have lastly developed a colloidal processing technique to encapsulate biomolecules at ambient, neutral-pH, aqueous conditions.

  14. Cyclic mechanical fatigue in ceramic-ceramic composites: an update

    Lewis, D. III

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to cyclic mechanical fatigue effects in a number of ceramics and ceramic composites, including several monolithic ceramics in which significant residual stresses should be present as a result of thermal expansion mismatches and anisotropy. Fatigue is also noted in several BN-containing ceramic matrix-particulate composites and in SiC fiber-ceramic matrix composites. These results suggest that fatigue testing is imperative for ceramics and ceramic composites that are to be used in applications subject to cyclic loading. Fatigue process models are proposed which provide a rationale for fatigue effect observations, but do not as yet provide quantitative results. Fiber composite fatigue damage models indicate that design stresses in these materials may have to be maintained below the level at which fiber pullout occurs

  15. FY09 PROGRESS: MULTI-ISOTOPE PROCESS (MIP) MONITOR

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard; Laspe, Amy R.; Ward, Rebecca M.

    2009-01-01

    Model and experimental estimates of the Multi-Isotope Process Monitor performance for determining burnup after dissolution and acid concentration during solvent extraction steps during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are presented. Modern industrial reprocessing techniques, including the PUREX and UREX+ family of separations technologies, are based on solvent extraction between organic and aqueous phases. In these bi-phase systems, product (actinide) and contaminant (fission and activation products) elements are preferentially driven (thermodynamically) to opposite phases, with small amounts of each remaining in the other phase. The distribution of each element, between the organic and aqueous phases, is determined by major process variables such as acid concentration, organic ligand concentration, reduction potential, and temperature. Hence, for consistent performance of the separation process, the distribution of each element between the organic and aqueous phases should be relatively constant. During 'normal' operations the pattern of elements distributing into the product and waste streams at each segment of the facility should be reproducible, resulting in a statistically significant signature of the nominal process conditions. Under 'abnormal' conditions, such as those expected under some protracted diversion scenarios, patterns of elements within the various streams would be expected to change measurably. The MIP monitoring approach utilizes changes in the concentrations of gamma-emitting elements as evidence of changes to the process chemistry. It exploits a suite of gamma emitting isotopes to track multiple chemical species and behaviors simultaneously, thus encompassing a large array of elements that are affected by chemical and physical changes. In-process surveillance by the MIP monitor is accomplished by coupling the gamma spectrometry of the streams with multivariate techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA). PCA is a chemometrics tool

  16. Processing highly porous calcium phosphate ceramics for use in bioreactor cores for culturing human liver cells in-vitro

    Finoli, Anthony

    Chronic liver disease is the 11th highest cause of death in the United States claiming over 30,000 lives in 2009. The current treatment for chronic liver failure is liver transplantation but the availability of tissue is far less than the number of patients in need. To develop human liver tissue in the lab a 3D culturing environment must be created to support the growth of a complex tissue. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) has been chosen as a scaffold material because of its biocompatibility in the body and the ability to create a bioresorbable scaffold. By using a ceramic material, it is possible to create a three dimensional, protective environment in which tissue can grow. The first part of this study is to examine the behavior of adult human liver cells grown on composites of HAp and different biocompatible hydrogels. Porous HAp has been created using an emulsion foaming technique and cells are injected into the structure after being suspended in a hydrogel and are kept in culture for up to 28 days. Functional assays, gene expression and fluorescent microscopy will be used to examine these cultures. The second part of this study will be to develop a processing technique to create a resorbable scaffold that incorporates a vascular system template. Previous experiments have shown the high temperature decomposition of HAp into resorbable calcium phosphates will be used to create a multiphase material. By controlling the amount of transformation product formed, it is proposed that the resorption of the scaffold can be tailored. To introduce a pore network to guide the growth of a vascular system, a positive-negative casting technique has also been developed. A positive polymer copy can be made of a natural vascular system and ceramic is foamed around the copy. During sintering, the polymer is pyrolyzed leaving a multiscale pore network in the ceramic. By combining these techniques, it is proposed that a calcium phosphate bioreactor core can be processed that is suitable for

  17. Preparation of a ceramic superconductor from ultrafine particles by freeze-dry process in Ba-Y-Cu-O system

    Chen Zuyao; Qian Yitai; Wan Yanjian; Rong Jingfang; Zhang Han; Pan Guoqiang; Zhao Yong; Zhang Qirui

    1989-01-01

    Freeze-dry technique is first reported for preparing ceramic ultrafines. The single-phase complex oxide Ba 2 YCu 3 O/sub 9-δ/, a poly-crystallized compound, and ceramic superconductor have been synthesized successfully. The experimental results show that not only is the ceramic superconductor obtained uniform with fine particles and excellent superconductivity, but the conditions for solid reactions are relatively limited

  18. The fabrication process of ceramic grade UO2 powder via fluorid system AUC and the treatment on AUC precipitation filtrate

    Liu Jinhong; Xu Kui; Li Zhiwan; Yi Wei; Tang Yueming; Li Guangrong; Lei Maolin; Cui Chuanjiang

    2006-10-01

    It is described about the technology of fabricating AUC powder by Circum-fluence Precipitation Reactor with Gas (CPRG) from UF 6 hydrolyzed liquid, manufacturing nuclear pure ceramic grade UO 2 powder via fluorid system AUC process with fluidized bed method, recovering U(VI) with ion exchange resin, depositing fluorin in an outflow of effusion wastewater from the ion exchange using calces. The primary control parameters on the fabricating AUC powder is study, it is discussed to character difference of AUC powder between fluorid system and nitrate. Result show that the composing the manufacture AUC powder is invariable by CORG, and that the AUC quality is consistent, and that by decomposition and reduction of AUC and stabilization of UO 2 powder with fluidized bed, through optimum technological parameters, the excellent UO 2 powder is obtained on the quality. (authors)

  19. The use of an electric field as a processing parameter in the combustion synthesis of ceramics and composites

    Munir, Z.A.

    1996-01-01

    The imposition of an electric field is shown to activate self-propagating combustion reactions and thus makes possible the synthesis of a variety of ceramic and composite phases. Experimental observations and modeling studies indicated that activation is accomplished by the localized effect of the current. The relationship between wave propagation and the direction of the applied field was investigated. The synthesis of composites by field-activated combustion synthesis (FACS) was demonstrated. It was shown that the imposition of a field during the combustion synthesis of MoSi 2 results in a decrease /in the product particle size. The results suggest that the field can be used as a processing parameter in self-propagating combustion synthesis

  20. Convective heat transfer behavior of the product slurry of the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process

    Muguercia, I.; Yang, G.; Ebadian, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process is an innovative technology for immobilizing liquid form low level radioactive waste (LLW). An experimental study has been conducted to measure the heat transfer properties of the NAC product slurry. The results indicate that the heat transfer coefficient for both concentration slurries is much higher than that of pure water, which may be due to the higher conductivity of the gibbsite powder. For the 20% concentration slurry, the heat transfer coefficient increased as the generalized Reynolds number and slurry temperature increased. The heat transfer coefficient of 40% is a function of the Reynolds number only. The test results also indicate that the thermal entrance region can be observed only when the generalized Reynolds number is smaller than 1,000. The correlation equation is also developed based on the experimental data in this paper

  1. Demonstration of an approach to waste form qualification through simulation of liquid-fed ceramic melter process operations

    Reimus, P.W.; Kuhn, W.L.; Peters, R.D.; Pulsipher, B.A.

    1986-07-01

    During fiscal year 1982, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assigned responsibility for managing civilian nuclear waste treatment programs in the United States to the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). One of the principal objectives of this program is to establish relationships between vitrification process control and glass quality. Users of the liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) process will need such relationships in order to establish acceptance of vitrified high-level nuclear waste at a licensed federal repository without resorting to destructive examination of the canisters. The objective is to be able to supply a regulatory agency with an estimate of the composition, durability, and integrity of the glass in each waste glass canister produced from an LFCM process simply by examining the process data collected during the operation of the LFCM. The work described here will continue through FY-1987 and culminate in a final report on the ability to control and monitor an LFCM process through sampling and process control charting of the LFCM feed system

  2. Progress on China nuclear data processing code system

    Liu, Ping; Wu, Xiaofei; Ge, Zhigang; Li, Songyang; Wu, Haicheng; Wen, Lili; Wang, Wenming; Zhang, Huanyu

    2017-09-01

    China is developing the nuclear data processing code Ruler, which can be used for producing multi-group cross sections and related quantities from evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format [1]. The Ruler includes modules for reconstructing cross sections in all energy range, generating Doppler-broadened cross sections for given temperature, producing effective self-shielded cross sections in unresolved energy range, calculating scattering cross sections in thermal energy range, generating group cross sections and matrices, preparing WIMS-D format data files for the reactor physics code WIMS-D [2]. Programming language of the Ruler is Fortran-90. The Ruler is tested for 32-bit computers with Windows-XP and Linux operating systems. The verification of Ruler has been performed by comparison with calculation results obtained by the NJOY99 [3] processing code. The validation of Ruler has been performed by using WIMSD5B code.

  3. Research progress on trifluoromethyl-based radical reaction process

    Song, Hao

    2017-12-01

    Due to the unique properties imparted by the trifluoromethyl group, such as high electron density and strong lipotropy, which effectively improve acidity, lipophilicity and metabolic stability of the molecule itself, trifluoromethyl-substituted organic compounds are becoming increasingly important as structural motifs in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. In this review, we present several methods developed for the direct introduction of a trifluoromethyl group, beginning with its rich and storied history. Then the present article addresses mechanism and process in carbon-carbon bond forming reaction based on radical process which is divided into three parts according to the way of CF3 radical generation. Finally, challenges and opportunities of researches on trifluoromethylation reactions facing are prospected.

  4. Parton dynamics in hadronic processes. Technical progress report

    Sukhatme, U.P.

    1985-02-01

    We have studied the production of strangeness, charm and other heavy flavors in hadronic collisions in the framework of the dual parton model. This model allows us to understand why heavy flavors have ''delayed thresholds'' and noticeable production at large x values. We have also studied the leading particle effect in a variety of processes. We suggest the intriguing possibility that certain experimentally feasible non-diffractive processes involving soft gluons might have forward ''diffraction-like'' peak as x → 1. Finally, we have extended the techniques previously developed by us to get accurate analytic expressions for energy eigenstates. This enables us to get much-improved expansions for bound state wave functions, which compare remarkably well with numerical computations. 9 refs

  5. Fragmentation process of vitrified ceramic waste (VCW) aiming its incorporation in silico-aluminous refractory concrete for production of refractory bricks

    Gomes, L.B.; Brandalise, R.N.; Santos, V. dos; Bergmann, C.P.

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic industry generates large amounts of waste, usually disposed in landfills. Reuse could minimize their generation and provides sustainable solutions. However, the energy cost of grinding these waste becomes a hindrance to their reuse. This work aims to obtain particle sizes of vitrified ceramic waste (VCW) using a fast, efficient and low cost fragmentation process as well as its use in refractory concrete. The results shows a wide range of particle size of VCW, which can be used as a promising source of raw material for production of refractory concrete. (author)

  6. Progress of electron processing system useful for environmental preservation

    Hoshi, Yasuhisa

    1998-01-01

    Electron Processing has been used in the field of industrial application, mainly to process plastics or polymers, which is represented by the cross-linking of Polyethylene to improve heat resistance. On the other hand, there has been many research studies to use Electron Beam for an environmental preservation. Typical examples are Sterilization of Food, Flue Gas Treatment, Sterilization of Waste Water Sludge, Purification of Water, Removal of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC), etc. These research works have been done in the USA, Germany, Austria, Japan, etc. They reported some of the features of electron beam method. In addition, there is an unique report that the combination of Ozone and Electron Beam provides a better efficiency of the purification of the water. Recently, they have started the investigation for the practical use of Electron Beam in the environmental application. Flue gas treatment is a remarkable example of the investigation. They built the demonstration plant last year and they started the operation last fall. Presently, the system is in a demonstrative operation. This paper will report an outline of the R and D works of environmental applications of Electron Beam and also will introduce the latest technologies of Electron Processing Systems which will be available for the environmental preservation. (author)

  7. RECENT PROGRESS IN DYNAMIC PROCESS SIMULATION OF CRYOGENIC REFRIGERATORS

    Kuendig, A.

    2008-01-01

    At the CEC 2005 a paper with the title ''Helium refrigerator design for pulsed heat load in Tokamaks'' was presented. That paper highlighted the control requirements for cryogenic refrigerators to cope with the expected load variations of future nuclear fusion reactors. First dynamic computer simulations have been presented.In the mean time, the computer program is enhanced and a new series of process simulations are available. The new program considers not only the heat flows and the temperature variations within the heat exchangers, but also the variation of mass flows and pressure drops. The heat transfer numbers now are calculated in dependence of the flow speed and the gas properties. PI-controllers calculate the necessary position of specific valves for maintaining pressures, temperatures and the rotation speed of turbines.Still unsatisfactory is the fact, that changes in the process arrangement usually are attended by adjustments in the program code. It is the main objective of the next step of development a more flexible code which enables that any user defined process arrangements can be assembled by input data

  8. Fracture-dissociation of ceramic liner.

    Hwang, Sung Kwan; Oh, Jin-Rok; Her, Man Seung; Shim, Young Jun; Cho, Tae Yeun; Kwon, Sung Min

    2008-08-01

    The use of BIOLOX delta ceramic (CeramTec AG, Plochingen, Germany) has been increasing. This ceramic prevents cracking by restraining the phase transformation due to the insertion of nano-sized, yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia into the alumina matrix. This restrains the progress of cracking through the formation of platelet-like crystal or whiskers due to the addition of an oxide additive. We observed a case of BIOLOX delta ceramic liner (CeramTec AG) rim fracture 4 months postoperatively. Radiographs showed that the ceramic liner was subluxated from the acetabular cup. Scratches on the acetabular cup and femoral neck were seen, and the fracture was visible on the rim of the liner. Under electron microscope, metal particle coatings from the ceramic liner were identified. The ceramic liner, fracture fragments, and adjacent tissues were removed and replaced with a ceramic liner and femoral head of the same size and design. We believe the mechanism of the fracture-dissociation of the ceramic liner in this case is similar to a case of separation of the ceramic liner from the polyethylene shell in a sandwich-type ceramic-ceramic joint. To prevent ceramic liner fracture-dissociation, the diameter of the femoral neck needs to be decreased in a new design, while the diameter of the femoral head needs to be increased to ensure an increase in range of motion.

  9. Fabrication of low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) chip couplers for high frequencies : I. Effect of binder burnout process on the formation of electrode line

    Cho, N.T.; Shim, K.B.; Lee, S.W. [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea); Koo, K.D. [K-Cera Inc., Yongin (Korea)

    1999-06-01

    In the fabrication of ceramic chip couplers for high frequency applications such as the mobile communication equipment, the formation of electrode lines and Ag diffusion were investigated with heat treatment conditions for removing organic binders. The deformation and densification of the electrode line greatly depended on the binder burnout process due to the overlapped temperature zone near 400{sup o} C of the binder dissociation and the solid phase sintering of the silver electrode. Ag ions were diffused into the glass ceramic substrate. The Ag diffusion was led by the glassy phase containing Pb ions rather than by the crystalline phase containing Ca ions. The fact suggests that the Ag diffusion could be controlled by managing the composition of the glass ceramic substrate. 9 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, Task 17208: Final report

    Amoroso, J. W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  11. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, task 17208: Final report

    Amoroso, J. W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  12. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  13. Calcium-borosilicate glass-ceramics wasteforms to immobilize rare-earth oxide wastes from pyro-processing

    Kim, Miae [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Jong, E-mail: jheo@postech.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Adama Science and Technology University (ASTU), PO Box 1888, Adama (Ethiopia)

    2015-12-15

    Glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) oxide silicate [Ca{sub 2}Nd{sub 8-x}Ce{sub x}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}] crystals were fabricated for the immobilization of radioactive wastes that contain large portions of rare-earth ions. Controlled crystallization of alkali borosilicate glasses by heating at T ≥ 750 °C for 3 h formed hexagonal Ca–silicate crystals. Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca–silicate crystals compared to the glass matrix; the rare-earth wastes are efficiently immobilized inside the crystalline phases. The concentrations of Ce and Nd ions released in a material characterization center-type 1 test were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb) of inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Normalized release values performed by a product consistency test were 2.64·10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Ce ion and 2.19·10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Nd ion. Results suggest that glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) silicate crystals are good candidate wasteforms for immobilization of lanthanide wastes generated by pyro-processing. - Highlights: • Glass-ceramic wasteforms containing Ca{sub 2}Nd{sub 8-x}Ce{sub x}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} crystals were synthesized to immobilize lanthanide wastes. • Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. • Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca–Nd–silicate crystals compared to glass matrix. • Amounts of Ce and Nd ions released in the material characterization center-type 1 were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb). • Normalized release values performed by a PCT were 2.64• 10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Ce ions and 2.19• 10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Nd ions.

  14. USGCRP's Sustained Assessment Process: Progress to date and future plans

    DeAngelo, B. J.; Reidmiller, D.; Lipschultz, F.; Cloyd, E. T.

    2016-12-01

    One of the four main objectives of the U.S. Global Change Research Program's (USGCRP's) Strategic Plan is to "Conduct Sustained Assessments", which seeks to build a process that synthesizes and advances the state of scientific knowledge on global change, develops future scenarios and potential impacts, and evaluates how effectively science is being and can be used to inform and support the Nation's response to climate change. To do so, USGCRP strives to establish a standing capacity to conduct national climate assessments with sectoral and regional information to evaluate climate risks and opportunities, and to inform decision-making, especially with regard to resiliency planning and adaptation measures. Building on the success of the 3rd National Climate Assessment (NCA) (2014), we discuss the range of USGCRP activities that embody the sustained assessment concept. Special reports, such as the recent Climate and Human Health Assessment and upcoming Climate Science Special Report, fill gaps in our understanding and provide crucial building blocks for next NCA report (NCA4). To facilitate the use of consistent assumptions across NCA4, new scenario products for climate, population, and land use will be made available through initiatives such as NOAA's Climate Resilience Toolkit. NCA4 will be informed by user engagement to advance the customization of knowledge. The report will strive to advance our ability to quantify various risks, monetize certain impacts, and communicate the benefits (i.e., avoided impacts) of various mitigation pathways. NCAnet (a national network of climate-interested stakeholders) continues to grow and foster collaborations across levels of governance and within civil society. Finally, USGCRP continues to actively engage with other assessment processes, at international, state, city, and tribal levels, to exchange ideas and to facilitate the potential for "linked" assessments across spatial scales.

  15. Perturbation and characterization of nonlinear processes: Progress report, November 15, 1983-June 1, 1987

    Swinney, H.L.; Swift, J.

    1987-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the principal accomplishments dealing with perturbation and characterization of nonlinear processes. Topics of research include Lyapunov equations, mutual information and metric entropy, the dimensions, complex dynamics and transition sequences and spatial patterns

  16. A review of glass-ceramics for the immobilization of nuclear fuel recycle wastes

    Hayward, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    This report reviews the status of the Canadian, German, U.S., Japanese, U.S.S.R. and Swedish programs for the development of glass-ceramic materials for immobilizing the high-level radioactive wastes arising from the recycling of used nuclear fuel. The progress made in these programs is described, with emphasis on the Canadian program for the development of sphene-based glass-ceramics. The general considerations of product performance and process feasibility for glass-ceramics as a category of waste form material are discussed. 137 refs

  17. Progress and improvement of the manufacturing process of snake antivenom

    Zolfagharian H.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Antivenoms have been used successfully for more than a century and up to now constitute the only effectivetreatment for snakebites .The production of antivenin started long time ago when the calmette was preparedthe antivenom in 1894.The method currently used to prepare antivenom by most of the manufacturers areoriginated from the method of Pope which was develop in 1938. Several new approaches in the production ofantivenom have been proposed to produce IgG, F(ab2, F(ab antivenin to improve their quality .Theseimprovement include complete or partial modification in the antivenom production regarding animal,immunization protocols , new adjuvants in hyperimmunization of animals , purification processes ( caprylicacid ,chromatography , diafiltration and ulterafiltration ,enzymatic digestion of IgG (pepsin, papain andfractionation of venom .When the IgG is digested enzymatically, different fragments are obtained depending on the enzyme used, that is, if papain is used, three fragments are obtained, the crystallizing fragment (Fc and two antigen-binding fragments F(ab and, if pepsin is used, one F(ab'2 fragment is obtained, while thecrystallizing fragment is digested. Fab and F(ab2 fragments conserve their capacity to specifically bind to the antigen that gave rise to them.

  18. Cohesive zone model for intergranular slow crack growth in ceramics: influence of the process and the microstructure

    Romero de la Osa, M; Olagnon, C; Chevalier, J; Estevez, R; Tallaron, C

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic polycrystals are prone to slow crack growth (SCG) which is stress and environmentally assisted, similarly to observations reported for silica glasses. The kinetics of fracture are known to be dependent on the load level, the temperature and the relative humidity. In addition, evidence is available on the influence of the microstructure on the SCG rate with an increase in the crack velocity with decreasing the grain size. Crack propagation takes place beyond a load threshold, which is grain size dependent. We present a cohesive zone model for the intergranular failure process. The methodology accounts for an intrinsic opening that governs the length of the cohesive zone and allows the investigation of grain size effects. A rate and temperature-dependent cohesive model is proposed (Romero de la Osa M, Estevez R et al 2009 J. Mech. Adv. Mater. Struct. 16 623–31) to mimic the reaction–rupture mechanism. The formulation is inspired by Michalske and Freiman's picture (Michalske and Freiman 1983 J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 66 284–8) together with a recent study by Zhu et al (2005 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 53 1597–623) of the reaction–rupture mechanism. The present investigation extends a previous work (Romero de la Osa et al 2009 Int. J. Fracture 158 157–67) in which the problem is formulated. Here, we explore the influence of the microstructure in terms of grain size, their elastic properties and residual thermal stresses originating from the cooling from the sintering temperature down to ambient conditions. Their influence on SCG for static loadings is reported and the predictions compared with experimental trends. We show that the initial stress state is responsible for the grain size dependence reported experimentally for SCG. Furthermore, the account for the initial stresses enables the prediction of a load threshold below which no crack growth is observed: a crack arrest takes place when the crack path meets a region in compression

  19. Accuracy of optical scanning methods of the Cerec®3D system in the process of making ceramic inlays

    Trifković Branka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. One of the results of many years of Cerec® 3D CAD/CAM system technological development is implementation of one intraoral and two extraoral optical scanning methods which, depending on the current indications, are applied in making fixed restorations. The aim of this study was to determine the degree of precision of optical scanning methods by the use of the Cerec®3D CAD/CAM system in the process of making ceramic inlays. Methods. The study was conducted in three experimental groups of inlays prepared using the procedure of three methods of scanning Cerec ®3D system. Ceramic inlays made by conventional methodology were the control group. The accuracy of optical scanning methods of the Cerec®3D system computer aided designcomputer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM was indirectly examined by measuring a marginal gap size between inlays and demarcation preparation by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results. The results of the study showed a difference in the accuracy of the existing methods of scanning dental CAD/CAM systems. The highest level of accuracy was achieved by the extraoral optical superficial scanning technique. The value of marginal gap size inlays made with the technique of extraoral optical superficial scanning was 32.97 ± 13.17 μ. Techniques of intraoral optical superficial and extraoral point laser scanning showed a lower level of accuracy (40.29 ± 21.46 μ for inlays of intraoral optical superficial scanning and 99.67 ± 37.25 μ for inlays of extraoral point laser scanning. Conclusion. Optical scanning methods in dental CAM/CAM technologies are precise methods of digitizing the spatial models; application of extraoral optical scanning methods provides the hightest precision.

  20. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1980-March 1980. [In process streams

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) project at the SRC Pilot Plant in Fort Lewis, Wahsington, and the Process Development Unit (P-99) in Harmarville, Pennsylvania. After the remaining runs of the slurry preheater survey test program were completed January 14, the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant was shut down to inspect Slurry Preheater B and to insulate the coil for future testing at higher rates of heat flux. Radiographic inspection of the coil showed that the welds at the pressure taps and the immersion thermowells did not meet design specifications. Slurry Preheater A was used during the first 12 days of February while weld repairs and modifications to Slurry Preheater B were completed. Two attempts to complete a material balance run on Powhatan No. 6 Mine coal were attempted but neither was successful. Slurry Preheater B was in service the remainder of the quarter. The start of a series of runs at higher heat flux was delayed because of plugging in both the slurry and the hydrogen flow metering systems. Three baseline runs and three slurry runs of the high heat flux program were completed before the plant was shut down March 12 for repair of the Inert Gas Unit. Attempts to complete a fourth slurry run at high heat flux were unsuccessful because of problems with the coal feed handling and the vortex mix systems. Process Development Unit (P-99) completed three of the four runs designed to study the effect of dissolver L/D ratio. The fourth was under way at the end of the period. SRC yield correlations have been developed that include coal properties as independent variables. A preliminary ranking of coals according to their reactivity in PDU P-99 has been made. Techniques for studying coking phenomenona are now in place.

  1. Producing ceramic laminate composites by EPD

    Nicholson, P.S.; Sarkar, P.; Datta, S.

    1996-01-01

    The search for tough structural ceramics to operate at high temperatures in hostile environments has led to the development of ceramic composites. This class of material includes laminar ceramic-ceramic composites, continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic composites and functionally graded materials. The present authors developed electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to synthesize lamellar, fiber-reinforced and functionally graded composites. This paper briefly describes the synthesis and characterization of these EPD composites and introduces a novel class of lamellar composites with nonplanar layers. The synthesis of the latter demonstrates the facility of the EPD process for the synthesis of ceramic composites. The process is totally controllable via suspension concentration, deposition current, voltage and time

  2. Processing of pure titanium containing titanium-based reinforcing ceramics additives using spark plasma sintering

    Mondiu Olayinka DUROWOJU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The densification behaviour, microstructural changes and hardness characteristics during spark plasma sintering of CP-Ti reinforced with TiC, TiN, TiCN and TiB2 were investigated. Commercially pure Ti powders were dry mixed with varied amounts (2.5 and 5 wt. % of the ceramic additives using a T2F Turbula mixer for 5 h and at a speed of 49 rpm. The blended composite powders were then sintered using spark plasma sintering system (model HHPD-25 from FCT Germany at a heating rate of 100oC min-1, dwell time of 5 min and sintering temperature of 950ºC. The sintering of CP-Ti was used as a base study to select the proper spark plasma sintering temperature for full density. Densification was monitored through analysis of the recorded punch displacement and the measured density of the sintered samples using Archimedes method. High densities ranging from 97.8% for 5% TiB2 addition to 99.6% for 5% TiCN addition were achieved at a relatively low temperature of 950°C. Microstructural analyses show a uniform distribution of the additives and finer structure showing their inhibitive effect on grain growth. An improved hardness was observed in all the cases with highest values obtained with TiCN as a result of the combined effect of TiC and TiN. A change in the fracture mode from trans granular to intergranular was also observed.

  3. Process for forming unusually strong joints between metals and ceramics by brazing at temperatures that do no exceed 750 degree C.

    Hammond, Joseph P.; David, Stan A.; Woodhouse, John J.

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a process for joining metals to ceramics to form very strong bonds using low brazing temperature, i.e., less than 750.degree. C., and particularly for joining nodular cast iron to partially stabilized zirconia. The process provides that the ceramic be coated with an active metal, such as titanium, that can form an intermetallic with a low melting point brazing alloy such as 60Ag-30Cu-10Sn. The nodular cast iron is coated with a noncarbon containing metal, such as copper, to prevent carbon in the nodular cast iron from dissolving in the brazing alloy. These coated surfaces can be brazed together with the brazing alloy between at less than 750.degree. C. to form a very strong joint. An even stronger bond can be formed if a transition piece is used between the metal and ceramic. It is preferred for the transition piece to have a coefficient of thermal compatible with the coefficient of thermal expansion of the ceramic, such as titanium.

  4. Ceramic joining

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  5. A process for developing and revising a learning progression on sea level rise using learners' explanations

    McDonald, Robert Christopher

    The purpose of this study was to explore the process of developing a learning progression (LP) on constructing explanations about sea level rise. I used a learning progressions theoretical framework informed by the situated cognition learning theory. During this exploration, I explicitly described my decision-making process as I developed and revised a hypothetical learning progression. Correspondingly, my research question was: What is a process by which a hypothetical learning progression on sea level rise is developed into an empirical learning progression using learners' explanations? To answer this question, I used a qualitative descriptive single case study with multiple embedded cases (Yin, 2014) that employed analytic induction (Denzin, 1970) to analyze data collected on middle school learners (grades 6-8). Data sources included written artifacts, classroom observations, and semi-structured interviews. Additionally, I kept a researcher journal to track my thinking about the learning progression throughout the research study. Using analytic induction to analyze collected data, I developed eight analytic concepts: participant explanation structures varied widely, global warming and ice melt cause sea level rise, participants held alternative conceptions about sea level rise, participants learned about thermal expansion as a fundamental aspect of sea level rise, participants learned to incorporate authentic scientific data, participants' mental models of the ocean varied widely, sea ice melt contributes to sea level rise, and participants held vague and alternative conceptions about how pollution impacts the ocean. I started with a hypothetical learning progression, gathered empirical data via various sources (especially semi-structured interviews), revised the hypothetical learning progression in response to those data, and ended with an empirical learning progression comprising six levels of learner thinking. As a result of developing an empirically based LP

  6. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  7. Sensitive Ceramics

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive Ceramics is showing an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics. The experiment is working on two levels. One which has to do with designing compositions and patterns in a virtual 3d universe based on a digital dynamic system that responds on ...... with realizing the modules in ceramics by 3d printing directly in porcelain with a RapMan printer that coils up the 3d shape in layers. Finally the ceramic modules are mounted in a laser cut board that reflects the captured composition of the movement of the hands....

  8. Ceramic injection molding

    Agueda, Horacio; Russo, Diego

    1988-01-01

    Interest in making complex net-shape ceramic parts with good surface finishing and sharp tolerances without machining is a driving force for studying the injection molding technique. This method consists of softhening the ceramic material by means of adding some plastic and heating in order to inject the mixture under pressure into a relatively cold mold where solidification takes place. Essentially, it is the same process used in thermoplastic industry but, in the present case, the ceramic powder load ranges between 80 to 90 wt.%. This work shows results obtained from the fabrication of pieces of different ceramic materials (alumina, barium titanate ferrites, etc.) in a small scale, using equipments developed and constructed in the laboratory. (Author) [es

  9. Luminescence and scintillation enhancement of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tm transparent ceramic through post-fabrication thermal processing

    Chapman, M.G.; Marchewka, M.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Roberts, S.A.; Schmitt, J.M. [COMSET – Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies, Clemson University, Anderson, SC 29625 (United States); McMillen, C. [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Kucera, C.J. [COMSET – Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies, Clemson University, Anderson, SC 29625 (United States); DeVol, T.A. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences Department, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29625 (United States); Ballato, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); COMSET – Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies, Clemson University, Anderson, SC 29625 (United States); Jacobsohn, L.G., E-mail: luiz@clemson.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); COMSET – Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies, Clemson University, Anderson, SC 29625 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The effects of post-fabrication thermal processing in O{sub 2} flux on the luminescence and scintillation of a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tm transparent ceramic were investigated. The results showed that the strategy of post-fabrication processing can be beneficial to the performance of the ceramics, depending on the cumulative processing time. After the first hour of processing, about 40% enhancement in the luminescence output together with about 20% enhancement in the scintillation light yield were obtained. The enhancements were tentatively assigned to the incorporation of oxygen into vacancy sites. Longer cumulative processing times lead to the incorporation of oxygen as interstitials that is detrimental to scintillation light yield but not to luminescence output. This work also revealed that thermoluminescence measurements are a useful tool to predict scintillation light yield of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tm. - Highlights: • Scintillation and PL enhancement of transparent ceramics through thermal processing. • First thermoluminescence measurements of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tm above room temperature. • Observation of correlation between TL and scintillation light yield results.

  10. Dielectric material in lead-based perovskite and fabrication process for multilayer ceramic capacitor with copper internal electrode

    Kato, J.; Yokotani, Y.; Kagata, H.; Nakatani, S.; Kugimiya, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a multilayer ceramic capacitor with copper internal electrodes. Dielectric materials of the capacitor is lead- based perovskite (Pb a Ca b ) (Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 ) x Ti y (Ni 1/2 W 1/2 ) z O 2 + a + b where a + b gt 1 and x + y + z = 1. The materials can be fired below 1000 degrees C and have high resistivity even when fired in the atmosphere below the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of copper and CuO. The fabrication process of the capacitor has following features. The electrode paste is composed of copper oxide to prevent breaking of the laminated body in a burn out process. Then the copper oxide is first metalized and fired in a controlled atmosphere. The obtained capacitor of 20 dielectric layers of 17 micron meter meets to Z5U specification and has low loss tangent of 0.6% and stability under d.c. bias voltage and high a.c. field

  11. The Powdering Process with a Set of Ceramic Mills for Green Tea Promoted Catechin Extraction and the ROS Inhibition Effect

    Kouki Fujioka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For serving green tea, there are two prominent methods: steeping the leaf or the powdered leaf (matcha style in hot water. The purpose of the present study was to reveal chemical and functional differences before and after the powdering process of green tea leaf, since powdered green tea may contribute to expanding the functionality because of the different ingesting style. In this study, we revealed that the powdering process with a ceramic mill and stirring in hot water increased the average extracted concentration of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG by more than three times compared with that in leaf tea using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and liquid chromatography–tandem mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analyses. Moreover, powdered green tea has a higher inhibition effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS production in vitro compared with the same amount of leaf tea. Our data suggest that powdered green tea might have a different function from leaf tea due to the higher catechin contents and particles.

  12. Recent Progress on Data-Based Optimization for Mineral Processing Plants

    Jinliang Ding

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the globalized market environment, increasingly significant economic and environmental factors within complex industrial plants impose importance on the optimization of global production indices; such optimization includes improvements in production efficiency, product quality, and yield, along with reductions of energy and resource usage. This paper briefly overviews recent progress in data-driven hybrid intelligence optimization methods and technologies in improving the performance of global production indices in mineral processing. First, we provide the problem description. Next, we summarize recent progress in data-based optimization for mineral processing plants. This optimization consists of four layers: optimization of the target values for monthly global production indices, optimization of the target values for daily global production indices, optimization of the target values for operational indices, and automation systems for unit processes. We briefly overview recent progress in each of the different layers. Finally, we point out opportunities for future works in data-based optimization for mineral processing plants.

  13. Portland blended cements: demolition ceramic waste management

    Trezza, M.A.; Zito, S.; Tironi, A.; Irassar, E.F.; Rahhal, V.F.

    2017-01-01

    Demolition ceramic wastes (DCWs) were investigated in order to determine their potential use as supplementary cementitious materials in Portland Blended Cements (PBCs). For this purpose, three ceramic wastes were investigated. After characterization of the materials used, the effect of ceramic waste replacement (8, 24 and 40% by mass) was analyzed. Pozzolanic activity, hydration progress, workability and compressive strength were determined at 2, 7 and 28 days. The results showed that the ground wastes behave as filler at an early age, but as hydration progresses, the pozzolanic activity of ceramic waste contributes to the strength requirement. [es

  14. Fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites processed by a hybrid technique based on chemical vapor infiltration, slurry impregnation and spark plasma sintering

    Magnant, J.; Pailler, R.; Le Petitcorps, Y.; Maille, L.; Guette, A.; Marthe, J.

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of multidirectional continuous carbon and silicon carbide fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) by a new short time hybrid process was studied. This process is based, first, on the deposition of fiber interphase and coating by chemical vapor infiltration, next, on the introduction of silicon nitride powders into the fibrous preform by slurry impregnation and, finally, on the densification of the composite by liquid phase spark plasma sintering (LP-SPS). The homogeneous introduction of the ceramic charges into the multidirectional fiber pre-forms was realized by slurry impregnation from highly concentrated and well-dispersed aqueous colloid suspensions. The chemical degradation of the carbon fibers during the fabrication was prevented by adapting the sintering pressure cycle. The composites manufactured are dense. Microstructural analyses were conducted to explain the mechanical properties achieved. One main important result of this study is that LP-SPS can be used in some hybrid processes to densify fiber reinforced CMC. (authors)

  15. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  16. Ling classification describes endoscopic progressive process of achalasia and successful peroral endoscopy myotomy prevents endoscopic progression of achalasia.

    Zhang, Wen-Gang; Linghu, En-Qiang; Chai, Ning-Li; Li, Hui-Kai

    2017-05-14

    To verify the hypothesis that the Ling classification describes the endoscopic progressive process of achalasia and determine the ability of successful peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) to prevent endoscopic progression of achalasia. We retrospectively reviewed the endoscopic findings, symptom duration, and manometric data in patients with achalasia. A total of 359 patients (197 women, 162 men) with a mean age of 42.1 years (range, 12-75 years) were evaluated. Symptom duration ranged from 2 to 360 mo, with a median of 36 mo. Patients were classified with Ling type I ( n = 119), IIa ( n = 106), IIb ( n = 60), IIc ( n = 60), or III ( n = 14), according to the Ling classification. Of the 359 patients, 349 underwent POEM, among whom 21 had an endoscopic follow-up for more than 2 years. Pre-treatment and post-treatment Ling classifications of these 21 patients were compared. Symptom duration increased significantly with increasing Ling classification (from I to III) ( P achalasia and may be able to serve as an endoscopic assessment criterion for achalasia. Successful POEM (Eckardt score ≤ 3) seems to have the ability to prevent endoscopic evolvement of achalasia. However, studies with larger populations are warranted to confirm our findings.

  17. [Ceramic posts].

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  18. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  19. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    Husband, P; Selim, F A; Bartošová, I; Slugeň, V

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics. (paper)

  20. A novel processing approach for free-standing porous non-oxide ceramic supports from polycarbosilane and polysilazane precursors

    Konegger, Thomas; Patidar, Rajesh; Bordia, Rajendra K.

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution, a low-pressure/low-temperature casting technique for the preparation of novel free-standing macrocellular polymer-derived ceramic support structures is presented. Preceramic polymers (polycarbosilane and poly(vinyl)silazane) are combined with sacrificial porogens (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene microbeads) to yield porous ceramic materials in the Si?C or Si?C?N systems, exhibiting well-defined pore structures after thermal conversion. The planar-disc-type speci...

  1. Development of a sintering process for recycling oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash into glass ceramic composite

    Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Glass ceramic composite is prepared from oil shale fly ash and MSWI bottom ash. • A novel method for the production of glass ceramic composite is presented. • It provides simple route and lower energy consumption in terms of recycling waste. • The vitrified slag can promote the sintering densification process of glass ceramic. • The performances of products decrease with the increase of oil shale fly ash content. - Abstract: Oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash are industrial and municipal by-products that require further treatment before disposal to avoid polluting the environment. In the study, they were mixed and vitrified into the slag by the melt-quench process. The obtained vitrified slag was then mixed with various percentages of oil shale fly ash and converted into glass ceramic composites by the subsequent sintering process. Differential thermal analysis was used to study the thermal characteristics and determine the sintering temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to analyze the crystalline phase compositions. Sintering shrinkage, weight loss on ignition, density and compressive strength were tested to determine the optimum preparation condition and study the co-sintering mechanism of vitrified amorphous slag and oil shale fly ash. The results showed the product performances increased with the increase of sintering temperatures and the proportion of vitrified slag to oil shale fly ash. Glass ceramic composite (vitrified slag content of 80%, oil shale fly ash content of 20%, sintering temperature of 1000 °C and sintering time of 2 h) showed the properties of density of 1.92 ± 0.05 g/cm 3 , weight loss on ignition of 6.14 ± 0.18%, sintering shrinkage of 22.06 ± 0.6% and compressive strength of 67 ± 14 MPa. The results indicated that it was a comparable waste-based material compared to previous researches. In particular, the energy consumption in the production process was reduced

  2. Development of a sintering process for recycling oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash into glass ceramic composite

    Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin, E-mail: leeam@dlut.edu.cn

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Glass ceramic composite is prepared from oil shale fly ash and MSWI bottom ash. • A novel method for the production of glass ceramic composite is presented. • It provides simple route and lower energy consumption in terms of recycling waste. • The vitrified slag can promote the sintering densification process of glass ceramic. • The performances of products decrease with the increase of oil shale fly ash content. - Abstract: Oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash are industrial and municipal by-products that require further treatment before disposal to avoid polluting the environment. In the study, they were mixed and vitrified into the slag by the melt-quench process. The obtained vitrified slag was then mixed with various percentages of oil shale fly ash and converted into glass ceramic composites by the subsequent sintering process. Differential thermal analysis was used to study the thermal characteristics and determine the sintering temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to analyze the crystalline phase compositions. Sintering shrinkage, weight loss on ignition, density and compressive strength were tested to determine the optimum preparation condition and study the co-sintering mechanism of vitrified amorphous slag and oil shale fly ash. The results showed the product performances increased with the increase of sintering temperatures and the proportion of vitrified slag to oil shale fly ash. Glass ceramic composite (vitrified slag content of 80%, oil shale fly ash content of 20%, sintering temperature of 1000 °C and sintering time of 2 h) showed the properties of density of 1.92 ± 0.05 g/cm{sup 3}, weight loss on ignition of 6.14 ± 0.18%, sintering shrinkage of 22.06 ± 0.6% and compressive strength of 67 ± 14 MPa. The results indicated that it was a comparable waste-based material compared to previous researches. In particular, the energy consumption in the production process was reduced

  3. Real-time progressive hyperspectral image processing endmember finding and anomaly detection

    Chang, Chein-I

    2016-01-01

    The book covers the most crucial parts of real-time hyperspectral image processing: causality and real-time capability. Recently, two new concepts of real time hyperspectral image processing, Progressive Hyperspectral Imaging (PHSI) and Recursive Hyperspectral Imaging (RHSI). Both of these can be used to design algorithms and also form an integral part of real time hyperpsectral image processing. This book focuses on progressive nature in algorithms on their real-time and causal processing implementation in two major applications, endmember finding and anomaly detection, both of which are fundamental tasks in hyperspectral imaging but generally not encountered in multispectral imaging. This book is written to particularly address PHSI in real time processing, while a book, Recursive Hyperspectral Sample and Band Processing: Algorithm Architecture and Implementation (Springer 2016) can be considered as its companion book. Includes preliminary background which is essential to those who work in hyperspectral ima...

  4. Initiating the Validation of CCIM Processability for Multi-phase all Ceramic (SYNROC) HLW Form: Plan for Test BFY14CCIM-C

    Maio, Vince [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This plan covers test BFY14CCIM-C which will be a first–of–its-kind demonstration for the complete non-radioactive surrogate production of multi-phase ceramic (SYNROC) High Level Waste Forms (HLW) using Cold Crucible Induction Melting (CCIM) Technology. The test will occur in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) CCIM Pilot Plant and is tentatively scheduled for the week of September 15, 2014. The purpose of the test is to begin collecting qualitative data for validating the ceramic HLW form processability advantages using CCIM technology- as opposed to existing ceramic–lined Joule Heated Melters (JHM) currently producing BSG HLW forms. The major objectives of BFY14CCIM-C are to complete crystalline melt initiation with a new joule-heated resistive starter ring, sustain inductive melting at temperatures between 1600 to 1700°C for two different relatively high conductive materials representative of the SYNROC ceramic formation inclusive of a HLW surrogate, complete melter tapping and pouring of molten ceramic material in to a preheated 4 inch graphite canister and a similar canister at room temperature. Other goals include assessing the performance of a new crucible specially designed to accommodate the tapping and pouring of pure crystalline forms in contrast to less recalcitrant amorphous glass, assessing the overall operational effectiveness of melt initiation using a resistive starter ring with a dedicated power source, and observing the tapped molten flow and subsequent relatively quick crystallization behavior in pans with areas identical to standard HLW disposal canisters. Surrogate waste compositions with ceramic SYNROC forming additives and their measured properties for inductive melting, testing parameters, pre-test conditions and modifications, data collection requirements, and sampling/post-demonstration analysis requirements for the produced forms are provided and defined.

  5. The chemistry, waste form development, and properties of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Walker, J.F. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1994-01-01

    A process for the conversion of alkaline, aqueous nitrate wastes to ammonia gas at low temperature, based upon the use of the active metal reductant aluminum, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The process is also well suited for the removal of low-level waste (LLW) radioelements and hazardous metals which report to the solid, alumina-based by-product. ne chemistry of the interaction of aluminum powders with nitrate, and other waste stream metals is presented

  6. Comparative risk assessments for the production and interim storage of glass and ceramic waste forms: defense waste processing facility

    Huang, J.C.; Wright, W.V.

    1982-04-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for immobilizing nuclear high level waste (HLW) is scheduled to be built at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). High level waste is produced when SRP reactor components are subjected to chemical separation operations. Two candidates for immobilizing this HLW are borosilicate glass and crystalline ceramic, either being contained in weld-sealed stainless steel canisters. A number of technical analyses are being conducted to support a selection between these two waste forms. The present document compares the risks associated with the manufacture and interim storage of these two forms in the DWPF. Process information used in the risk analysis was taken primarily from a DWPF processibility analysis. The DWPF environmental analysis provided much of the necessary environmental information. To perform the comparative risk assessments, consequences of the postulated accidents are calculated in terms of: (1) the maximum dose to an off-site individual; and (2) the dose to off-site population within 80 kilometers of the DWPF, both taken in terms of the 50-year inhalation dose commitment. The consequences are then multiplied by the estimated accident probabilities to obtain the risks. The analyses indicate that the maximum exposure risk to an individual resulting from the accidents postulated for both the production and interim storage of either waste form represents only an insignificant fraction of the natural background radiation of about 90 mrem per year per person in the local area. They also show that there is no disaster potential to the off-site population. Therefore, the risks from abnormal events in the production and the interim storage of the DWPF waste forms should not be considered as a dominant factor in the selection of the final waste form

  7. Effects of sintering processes on mechanical properties and microstructure of TiB2–TiC + 8 wt% nano-Ni composite ceramic cutting tool material

    Zou Bin; Huang Chuanzhen; Song Jinpeng; Liu Ziye; Liu Lin; Zhao Yan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► TiB 2 –TiC + 8 wt% nano-Ni ceramic tool material was sintered by six processes. ► The properties of material depended mainly on the holding stages and duration. ► SP1 process was involved with the multiple holding stages and longer duration. ► SP1 process led to many pores, and coarsening and brittle rupture of grains. ► Tool material sintered by SP6 process exhibited the optimum mechanical properties. - Abstract: TiB 2 –TiC composite powder was prepared by ball-milled with ethanol and vacuum dry, and TiB 2 –TiC + 8 wt% nano-Ni composite ceramic cutting tool material was sintered using vacuum hot-pressed sintering technique by six processes which included the different holding stages and times. The effects of sintering processes on the mechanical properties and microstructure were investigated. The polished surface and fracture surface of TiB 2 –TiC + 8 wt% nano-Ni ceramics sintered by the different sintering processes were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS), and the relationships between mechanical properties and microstructure were discussed. The mechanical properties and microstructure depended mainly on the total holding time and the different holding stages. The longer holding time and multiple holding stages led to coarsening of TiB 2 and TiC grains, formation of pores and the brittle rupture of grains, which deteriorated the mechanical properties of TiB 2 –TiC + 8 wt% nano-Ni ceramic. TiB 2 –TiC + 8 wt% nano-Ni composite ceramic cutting tool material sintered by SP6 process exhibited the optimum resultant mechanical properties because of its finer microstructure and higher relative density, and its flexural strength, fracture toughness and hardness were 916.8 MPa, 7.80 MPa m 1/2 and 22.54 GPa, respectively.

  8. Micromolding for ceramic microneedle arrays

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Lüttge, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic microneedle arrays (MNAs) is presented. This includes the manufacturing of an SU-8/Si-master, its double replication resulting in a PDMS mold for production by micromolding and ceramic sintering. The robustness of the replicated structures was tested by means of

  9. Rapid, cool sintering of wet processed yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic electrolyte thin films.

    Park, Jun-Sik; Kim, Dug-Joong; Chung, Wan-Ho; Lim, Yonghyun; Kim, Hak-Sung; Kim, Young-Beom

    2017-09-29

    Here we report a photonic annealing process for yttria-stabilized zirconia films, which are one of the most well-known solid-state electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Precursor films were coated using a wet-chemical method with a simple metal-organic precursor solution and directly annealed at standard pressure and temperature by two cycles of xenon flash lamp irradiation. The residual organics were almost completely decomposed in the first pre-annealing step, and the fluorite crystalline phases and good ionic conductivity were developed during the second annealing step. These films showed properties comparable to those of thermally annealed films. This process is much faster than conventional annealing processes (e.g. halogen furnaces); a few seconds compared to tens of hours, respectively. The significance of this work includes the treatment of solid-state electrolyte oxides for SOFCs and the demonstration of the feasibility of other oxide components for solid-state energy devices.

  10. Development of advanced ceramics at AECL

    Palmer, B.J.F.; MacEwen, S.R.; Sawicka, B.D.; Hayward, P.J.; Sridhar, S.

    1986-12-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has a long history of developing ceramics for nuclear fission and fusion applications. AECL is now applying its multidisciplinary materials R and D capabilities, including unique capabilities in ceramic processing and nondestructive evaluation, to develop advanced ceramic materials for commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an overview of the facilities and programs associated with the development of advanced ceramics at AECL

  11. A Novel Manufacturing Processing Route for Forming High-Density Ceramic Armor Materials: Phase I - SBIR

    Raman, Ramas

    1999-01-01

    .... The effects of applied pressure and pressure-transmitting media (PTM) temperature in controlling density, as well as thermal management issues to prevent cracking in applying the CS/Ceracon process to form TiC and TiB2, have been identified...

  12. High Temperature Advanced Structural Composites. Volume 2. Ceramic Matrix Composites, Fiber Processing and Properties, and Interfaces

    1993-04-02

    furfural . toughness and a pseudoplasticity. the latter of treated to a higher temperature. The mamx or acetylenic resins provide simple processing...crystalline by TU/SAD and has an effective surface area of 250 m /go based on BET measurments with N2 adsorption . This solid crystallizes to high purity

  13. Improving the temperature performance of low-density ceramic heatshields through sol-gel processing

    Bull, Jeffrey; Leiser, Daniel; Sommers, Jeneen; Esfahani, Lili

    1991-01-01

    The performance of rigid insulations for use as thermal protection materials on reentry vehicles can be characterized by their resistance to dimensional and morphological change when exposed to an isothermal environment equivalent to that generated in entry. Improvements in these material characteristics for alumina-enhanced thermal barrier insulation by compositional modification through sol-gel processing are reported.

  14. Structure and grain coarsening during the processing of engineering ceramics. Ph.D. Thesis - Leeds Univ., United Kingdom

    Shaw, Nancy J.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been made of three ceramic systems (Al2O3, Y2O3/MgO, and SiC/C/B), both to explore a surface area/density diagram approach to examining the coarsening processes during sintering and to explore an alternative coarsening parameter, i.e., the grain boundary surface area (raising it at a given value of the density) and not the pore surface area; therefore, pinning of the grain boundaries by solid-solution drag is the only function evidenced by these results. The importance of such pinning even at densities as low as 75% of theoretical is linked to the existence of microstructural inhomogeneities. The early stages of sintering of Y2O3 powder have been examined using two techniques, BET surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Each has given some insight into the process occurring and, used together, have provided some indication of the effect of MgO on coarsening during sintering. Attempts to further elucidate effects of MgO on the coarsening behavior of Y2O3 by the surface area/density diagram approach were unsuccessful due to masking effects of contaminating reactions during sintering and/or thermal etching. The behavior of the undoped SiC which only coarsens can be clearly distinguished by the surface area/density diagram from that of SiC/C/B which also concurrently densifies. Little additional information was obtainable by this method due to unfavorable sample etching characteristics. The advantages, disadvantages, and difficulties of application of these techniques to the study of coarsening during sintering are discussed.

  15. Electrochemical behaviour of ceramic yttria stabilized zirconia on carbon steel synthesized via sol-gel process

    Crespo, M.A. Dominguez; Murillo, A. Garcia; Torres-Huerta, A.M.; Yanez-Zamora, C.; Carrillo-Romo, F. de J

    2009-01-01

    Chromate conversion coatings have been widely applied for the corrosion of different metallic substrates. However, the waste containing Cr 6+ has many limitations due to the environmental consideration and health hazards. An interesting alternative seems to be the deposition on metallic surface of thin layers of yttria or zirconia or both by the sol-gel process. In this study, Ytttria and Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ, 8% Y 2 O 3 ) thin films were used for coating commercial carbon steel substrates by sol-gel method and the dip-coating process. The evolution of organic compounds up to crystallization process as a function of heat treatments was study by FT-IR spectroscopy. The structure and morphology of the coatings were analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The anticorrosion performance of the coatings has been evaluated by using electrochemical techniques in an aggressive media (3.5 wt.% NaCl). The corrosion behaviour of sol-gel method was compared with traditional chromate conversion coatings. Differences in the electrochemical behaviour of YSZ coatings are related to the development of microcracks during the sintering process and to the presence of organic compounds during growth film. Electrochemical results showed that sol-gel YSZ and Y 2 O 3 coatings can act as protective barriers against wet corrosion; however yttria films displayed low adhesion to substrate. The corrosion parameters provide an explanation of the role of each film and show a considerable increase in the corrosion resistance for coated samples in comparison to the bare steel samples.

  16. Electrochemical behaviour of ceramic yttria stabilized zirconia on carbon steel synthesized via sol-gel process

    Crespo, M.A. Dominguez, E-mail: mdominguezc@ipn.m [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Altamira (CICATA-IPN) km 14.5 Carr. Tampico-Puerto Industrial, C.P. 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Murillo, A. Garcia; Torres-Huerta, A.M. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Altamira (CICATA-IPN) km 14.5 Carr. Tampico-Puerto Industrial, C.P. 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Yanez-Zamora, C. [Estudiante del postgrado en Tecnologia Avanzada del CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, km 14.5, Carr. Tampico-Puerto Industrial. C.P. 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Carrillo-Romo, F. de J [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Altamira (CICATA-IPN) km 14.5 Carr. Tampico-Puerto Industrial, C.P. 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico)

    2009-08-26

    Chromate conversion coatings have been widely applied for the corrosion of different metallic substrates. However, the waste containing Cr{sup 6+} has many limitations due to the environmental consideration and health hazards. An interesting alternative seems to be the deposition on metallic surface of thin layers of yttria or zirconia or both by the sol-gel process. In this study, Ytttria and Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ, 8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films were used for coating commercial carbon steel substrates by sol-gel method and the dip-coating process. The evolution of organic compounds up to crystallization process as a function of heat treatments was study by FT-IR spectroscopy. The structure and morphology of the coatings were analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The anticorrosion performance of the coatings has been evaluated by using electrochemical techniques in an aggressive media (3.5 wt.% NaCl). The corrosion behaviour of sol-gel method was compared with traditional chromate conversion coatings. Differences in the electrochemical behaviour of YSZ coatings are related to the development of microcracks during the sintering process and to the presence of organic compounds during growth film. Electrochemical results showed that sol-gel YSZ and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings can act as protective barriers against wet corrosion; however yttria films displayed low adhesion to substrate. The corrosion parameters provide an explanation of the role of each film and show a considerable increase in the corrosion resistance for coated samples in comparison to the bare steel samples.

  17. Progress and safety aspects in process heat utilization from nuclear systems

    Barnert, H.

    1995-01-01

    Report about the Status and the Progress in the Various Programs and Projects in the Federal Republic of Germany in Process Heat Utilization from the High Temperature Reactor and on Recent Changes of the Atomic Law in the Federal Republic of Germany with Big Influence on the Safety of Nuclear Energy Technology. (author)

  18. Chronic Family Economic Hardship, Family Processes and Progression of Mental and Physical Health Symptoms in Adolescence

    Lee, Tae Kyoung; Wickrama, K. A. S.; Simons, Leslie Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Research has documented the relationship between family stressors such as family economic hardship and marital conflict and adolescents' mental health symptoms, especially depressive symptoms. Few studies, however, have examined the processes whereby supportive parenting lessens this effect and the progression of mental health and physical health…

  19. Economic Benefit from Progressive Integration of Scheduling and Control for Continuous Chemical Processes

    Logan D. R. Beal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Performance of integrated production scheduling and advanced process control with disturbances is summarized and reviewed with four progressive stages of scheduling and control integration and responsiveness to disturbances: open-loop segregated scheduling and control, closed-loop segregated scheduling and control, open-loop scheduling with consideration of process dynamics, and closed-loop integrated scheduling and control responsive to process disturbances and market fluctuations. Progressive economic benefit from dynamic rescheduling and integrating scheduling and control is shown on a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR benchmark application in closed-loop simulations over 24 h. A fixed horizon integrated scheduling and control formulation for multi-product, continuous chemical processes is utilized, in which nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC and continuous-time scheduling are combined.

  20. The role of technical progress in the process of recalculating oil reserves

    Boulard, J.N.

    1999-01-01

    Contrary to the concept of resources (which is essentially a geological one), the notion of reserves designates the quantities that are technically and economically recoverable. Beyond the production-related effect, the reserves therefore evolve over time in accordance with numerous technical and economic parameters. Among these parameters, it can be seen that technical progress plays a considerable role throughout the process of converting resources into reserves, including progress in the identification, accessibility and processing of the resources, and improvements in economic viability. After having tackled the problem of measuring the 'technical progress effects' and citing examples, we demonstrate that the evolution in oil reserves is subject to three types of impact. These are a quantitative impact by significantly improving the recovery rates or making it possible to identify hitherto undetectable oil fields, a qualitative impact by widening the resource base thanks to the adoption of new categories of oil (in particular the so-called 'unconventional' oils) and by carrying out the gradual substitution between these resources of differing qualities. There is also a dynamic impact, through the acceleration of resource availability. Through these three approaches, technical progress makes makes it possible to ensure continuity in oil supply and contributes significantly to the recalculation of reserves. It therefore acts as a compensating factor, counterbalancing the progressive depletion of resources. (author)

  1. A fast synthesis of Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 crystals via glass-ceramic processing and their battery performance

    Nagamine, Kenta; Honma, Tsuyoshi; Komatsu, Takayuki

    A synthesis of Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 being a potential cathode material for lithium ion batteries was attempted via a glass-ceramic processing. A glass with the composition of 37.5Li 2O-25V 2O 5-37.5P 2O 5 (mol%) was prepared by a melt-quenching method and precursor glass powders were crystallized with/without 10 wt% glucose in N 2 or 7%H 2/Ar atmosphere. It was found that heat treatments with glucose at 700 °C in 7%H 2/Ar can produce well-crystallized Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 in the short time of 30 min. The battery performance measurements revealed that the precursor glass shows the discharge capacity of 14 mAh g -1 at the rate of 1 μA cm -2 and the glass-ceramics with Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 prepared with glucose at 700 °C in 7%H 2/Ar show the capacities of 117-126 mAh g -1 (∼96% of the theoretical capacity) which are independent of heat treatment time. The present study proposes that the glass-ceramic processing is a fast synthesizing route for Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 crystals.

  2. Effects of ultrasonication and conventional mechanical homogenization processes on the structures and dielectric properties of BaTiO3 ceramics.

    Akbas, Hatice Zehra; Aydin, Zeki; Yilmaz, Onur; Turgut, Selvin

    2017-01-01

    The effects of the homogenization process on the structures and dielectric properties of pure and Nb-doped BaTiO 3 ceramics have been investigated using an ultrasonic homogenization and conventional mechanical methods. The reagents were homogenized using an ultrasonic processor with high-intensity ultrasonic waves and using a compact mixer-shaker. The components and crystal types of the powders were determined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The complex permittivity (ε ' , ε″) and AC conductivity (σ') of the samples were analyzed in a wide frequency range of 20Hz to 2MHz at room temperature. The structures and dielectric properties of pure and Nb-doped BaTiO 3 ceramics strongly depend on the homogenization process in a solid-state reaction method. Using an ultrasonic processor with high-intensity ultrasonic waves based on acoustic cavitation phenomena can make a significant improvement in producing high-purity BaTiO 3 ceramics without carbonate impurities with a small dielectric loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rapid, cool sintering of wet processed yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic electrolyte thin films

    Park, Jun-Sik; Kim, Dug-Joong; Chung, Wan-Ho; Lim, Yonghyun; Kim, Hak-Sung; Kim, Young-Beom

    2017-01-01

    Here we report a photonic annealing process for yttria-stabilized zirconia films, which are one of the most well-known solid-state electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Precursor films were coated using a wet-chemical method with a simple metal-organic precursor solution and directly annealed at standard pressure and temperature by two cycles of xenon flash lamp irradiation. The residual organics were almost completely decomposed in the first pre-annealing step, and the fluorite cr...

  4. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  5. Mobility as Progressivity: Ranking Income Processes According to Equality of Opportunity

    Roland Benabou; Efe A. Ok

    2001-01-01

    Interest in economic mobility stems largely from its perceived role as an equalizer of opportunities, though not necessarily of outcomes. In this paper we show that this view leads very naturally to a methodology for the measurement of social mobility which has strong parallels with the theory of progressive taxation. We characterize opportunity--equalizing mobility processes, and provide simple criteria to determine when one process is more equalizing than another. We then explain how this m...

  6. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  7. [Study on friction and wear properties of dental zirconia ceramics processed by microwave and conventional sintering methods].

    Guoxin, Hu; Ying, Yang; Yuemei, Jiang; Wenjing, Xia

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the wear of an antagonist and friction and wear properties of dental zirconia ceramic that was subjected to microwave and conventional sintering methods. Ten specimens were fabricated from Lava brand zirconia and randomly assigned to microwave and conventional sintering groups. A profile tester for surface roughness was used to measure roughness of the specimens. Wear test was performed, and steatite ceramic was used as antagonist. Friction coefficient curves were recorded, and wear volume were calculated. Finally, optical microscope was used to observe the surface morphology of zirconia and steatite ceramics. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the microstructure of zirconia. Wear volumes of microwave and conventionally sintered zirconia were (6.940±1.382)×10⁻², (7.952±1.815) ×10⁻² mm³, respectively. Moreover, wear volumes of antagonist after sintering by the considered methods were (14.189±4.745)×10⁻², (15.813±3.481)×10⁻² mm³, correspondingly. Statistically significant difference was not observed in the wear resistance of zirconia and wear volume of steatite ceramic upon exposure to two kinds of sintering methods. Optical microscopy showed that ploughed surfaces were apparent in zirconia. The wear surface of steatite ceramic against had craze, accompanied by plough. Scanning electron microscopy showed that zirconia was sintered compactly when subjected to both conventional sintering and microwave methods, whereas grains of zirconia sintered by microwave alone were smaller and more uniform. Two kinds of sintering methods are successfully used to produce dental zirconia ceramics with similar friction and wear properties.
.

  8. Improvement of hospital processes through business process management in Qaem Teaching Hospital: A work in progress.

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H; Ebrahimipour, Hossein; Doosty, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    In a world of continuously changing business environments, organizations have no option; however, to deal with such a big level of transformation in order to adjust the consequential demands. Therefore, many companies need to continually improve and review their processes to maintain their competitive advantages in an uncertain environment. Meeting these challenges requires implementing the most efficient possible business processes, geared to the needs of the industry and market segments that the organization serves globally. In the last 10 years, total quality management, business process reengineering, and business process management (BPM) have been some of the management tools applied by organizations to increase business competiveness. This paper is an original article that presents implementation of "BPM" approach in the healthcare domain that allows an organization to improve and review its critical business processes. This project was performed in "Qaem Teaching Hospital" in Mashhad city, Iran and consists of four distinct steps; (1) identify business processes, (2) document the process, (3) analyze and measure the process, and (4) improve the process. Implementing BPM in Qaem Teaching Hospital changed the nature of management by allowing the organization to avoid the complexity of disparate, soloed systems. BPM instead enabled the organization to focus on business processes at a higher level.

  9. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Characterization

    Calomino, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) SiC fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  10. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Development

    DiCarlo, James

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) Sic fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  11. Interactions of aqueous NOM with nanoscale TiO2: implications for ceramic membrane filtration-ozonation hybrid process.

    Kim, Jeonghwan; Shan, Wenqian; Davies, Simon H R; Baumann, Melissa J; Masten, Susan J; Tarabara, Volodymyr V

    2009-07-15

    The combined effect of pH and calcium on the interactions of nonozonated and ozonated natural organic matter (NOM) with nanoscale TiO2 was investigated. The approach included characterization of TiO2 nanoparticles and NOM, extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) modeling of NOM-TiO2 and NOM-NOM interactions, batch study on the NOM adsorption onto TiO2 surface, and bench-scale study on the treatment of NOM-containing feed waters using a hybrid process that combines ozonation and ultrafiltration with a 5 kDa ceramic (TiO2 surface) membrane. It was demonstrated that depending on pH and TiO2 loading, the adsorption of NOM species is controlled by either the availability of divalent cations or by preozonation of NOM. XDLVO surface energy analysis predicts NOM adsorption onto TiO2 in the ozone-controlled regime but not in the calcium-controlled regime. In both regimes, short-range NOM-NOM and NOM-TiO2 interactions were governed by acid-base and van der Waals forces, whereas the role of electrostatic forces was relatively insignificant. Ozonation increased the surface energy of NOM, contributing to the hydrophilic repulsion component of the NOM-NOM and NOM-TiO2 interactions. In the calcium-controlled regime, neither NOM-TiO2 nor NOM-NOM interaction controlled adsorption. Non-XDLVO interactions such as intermolecular bridging by calcium were hypothesized to be responsible for the observed adsorption behavior. Adsorption data proved to be highly predictive of the permeate flux performance.

  12. Measurements for the production of aluminium oxide ceramics with defined microstructure parameters by using colloidal-chemical processings

    Baer, D.; Foerthmann, R.; Naoumidis, A.; Nickel, H.

    1992-04-01

    The aim of this work is to verify the influences of the different single procedure steps on the microstructure of sintered alumina and to get a correlation between the product characteristics and the characteristic data. The powder production was carried out by using the sol-gel-process followed by freeze-drying of the gel. From the boehmit-powder porous and inhomogen microstructure of the sintered pellets was obtained. The unfavourable morphology of the hydroxide-powder could be eliminated by pre-calcination followed by powder-milling. Because of the wet-milling after the pre-calcination the powder was doped with α-Al 2 O 3 , caused by the abrasion of the milling-mug and -balls, and therefore the calcinating temperature could be reduced to 1050deg C. Two charges of the colloidal-chemical produced powder and four commercial powders with different characteristics with regard to the purity or doping and particle-size and -distribution were compared with themselves. These powders were cold-isostatically pressed and sintered under different conditions. It could be shown that the influence of the impurities on the microstructure is higher than the influence of the grain size distribution. Impurities lead to a discontinous grain size distribution and intracristalline pores in sintered bodies, even using powders with a small grain size distribution. Measurements on the slip casted samples yielded for all powders different relationships between the viscosity and the pH. There was no visible influence of different pH-values on the microstructure (pH always measured at the minimum of the viscosity). Here the influence of the purity and the grain size distribution on the microstructure was less pronounced compared with the isostatically pressed ceramics. (orig.) [de

  13. Investigation of the relaxor behavior of sol gel processed lanthanum lead titanium ceramics

    Limame, K.; Sayouri, S.; Yahyaoui, M.M.; Housni, A.; Jaber, B.

    2016-01-01

    A series of La doped lead titanate samples, with composition Pb_1_−_xLa_xTi_1_−_x_/_4O_3 (PLTx), where x=0.00; 0.02; 0.04; 0.06; 0.07; 0.08; 0.10; 0.12; 0.14; 0.16; 0.18; 0.21 and 0.22 was prepared using the sol–gel process. Addition of La gives rise to the two well-known phenomena: diffuseness and relaxation around the ferro-to-paraelectric transition; the two parameters related to these phenomena, and which give a satisfactory interpretation of them, have been estimated using the Uchino's quadratic law. This diffuse phase transition (DPT) has been investigated with the help of the Landau–Devonshire cluster theory and the model of Cheng et al., to show that polar regions may be generated around the DPT and far from the temperature, T_m, of the maximum of the dielectric permittivity, which have as a direct consequence a non vanishing polarization even if T>T_m.

  14. Investigation of the relaxor behavior of sol gel processed lanthanum lead titanium ceramics

    Limame, K. [Centre Régional des Metiers de l' Education et de la Formation (CRMEF) de Fès, Rue deKuwait, BP 49, Fès (Morocco); Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Appliquée, (LPTA), FSDM, B.P. 1796, Fès-Atlas, Fès (Morocco); Sayouri, S., E-mail: ssayouri@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Appliquée, (LPTA), FSDM, B.P. 1796, Fès-Atlas, Fès (Morocco); Yahyaoui, M.M. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Appliquée, (LPTA), FSDM, B.P. 1796, Fès-Atlas, Fès (Morocco); Housni, A. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Appliquée, (LPTA), FSDM, B.P. 1796, Fès-Atlas, Fès (Morocco); Institut Supérieur des Professions Infirmières et Techniques de Santé (ISPITS), Fès (Morocco); Jaber, B. [Centre National pour la Recherche Scientifique et Technique (CNRST), Angle Avenue Allal El Fassi avenue des FAR, Quartie Hay Ryad, BP8027 Nation Unies, Rabat (Morocco)

    2016-08-01

    A series of La doped lead titanate samples, with composition Pb{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x/4}O{sub 3} (PLTx), where x=0.00; 0.02; 0.04; 0.06; 0.07; 0.08; 0.10; 0.12; 0.14; 0.16; 0.18; 0.21 and 0.22 was prepared using the sol–gel process. Addition of La gives rise to the two well-known phenomena: diffuseness and relaxation around the ferro-to-paraelectric transition; the two parameters related to these phenomena, and which give a satisfactory interpretation of them, have been estimated using the Uchino's quadratic law. This diffuse phase transition (DPT) has been investigated with the help of the Landau–Devonshire cluster theory and the model of Cheng et al., to show that polar regions may be generated around the DPT and far from the temperature, T{sub m}, of the maximum of the dielectric permittivity, which have as a direct consequence a non vanishing polarization even if T>T{sub m}.

  15. Phase equilibria, leaching characteristics and ceramic processing of SYNROC D formulations for US defense wastes

    Newkirk, H.; Ryerson, F.; Coles, D.; Hoenig, C.; Rozsa, R.; Rossington, C.; Bazan, F.; Tewhey, J.

    1980-01-01

    The assemblage of coexisting phases in SYNROC D is perovskite, zirconolite, nepheline and spinel. Cesium from the supernate is to be immobilized in hollandite. In the current processing scheme, presynthesized granules of hollandite are added to calcined SYNROC D powders prior to hot procesing or sintering. The disposition of inert and radwaste components of Savannah River Plant (SRP) wastes in SYNROC D formulations has been determined by means of optical microscopy, XRD, XRF, SEM, STEM, electron microprobe analysis and autoradiography. A summary of results is presented. Leaching studies of SYNROC D have been done by means of static, high temperature experiments and continuous-flow experiments. The data reported are from high-temperature experiments (distilled water, powdered sample, 150 0 C, one day). The elements reported are the only ones observed in the leachate. Analysis was done by means of XRF. The flowsheet which depicts the current experimental methods that are being employed at LLNL to produce SYNROC D samples containing presynthesized Cs-bearing hollandite is presented. The starting material for SYNROC D (high Fe, high Al and composite compositions) is simulated sludge obtained in 55 gallon quantities from Southwestern Chemical Corporation. Hot pressing temperatures for SYNROC D are 1000 to 1150 0 C. Hot pressing temperatures for hollandite are 1200 to 1400 0 C

  16. Color machine vision system for process control in the ceramics industry

    Penaranda Marques, Jose A.; Briones, Leoncio; Florez, Julian

    1997-08-01

    This paper is focused on the design of a machine vision system to solve a problem found in the manufacturing process of high quality polished porcelain tiles. This consists of sorting the tiles according to the criteria 'same appearance to the human eye' or in other words, by color and visual texture. In 1994 this problem was tackled and led to a prototype which became fully operational at production scale in a manufacturing plant, named Porcelanatto, S.A. The system has evolved and has been adapted to meet the particular needs of this manufacturing company. Among the main issues that have been improved, it is worth pointing out: (1) improvement to discern subtle variations in color or texture, which are the main features of the visual appearance; (2) inspection time reduction, as a result of algorithm optimization and the increasing computing power. Thus, 100 percent of the production can be inspected, reaching a maximum of 120 tiles/sec.; (3) adaptation to the different types and models of tiles manufactured. The tiles vary not only in their visible patterns but also in dimensions, formats, thickness and allowances. In this sense, one major problem has been reaching an optimal compromise: The system must be sensitive enough to discern subtle variations in color, but at the same time insensitive thickness variations in the tiles. The following parts have been used to build the system: RGB color line scan camera, 12 bits per channel, PCI frame grabber, PC, fiber optic based illumination and the algorithm which will be explained in section 4.

  17. Recent progress of partitioning process in JAERI: development of amide-based artist process

    Shoichi, Tachimori; Yuji, Sasaki; Yasuji, Morita; Shin-ichi, Suzuki

    2003-01-01

    A branched-alkyl monoamide which extracts An(VI) exclusively by the steric effect and tridentate diglycol-amide; TODGA, which recovers all actinides and Sr(II) from highly acidic waste solutions, were developed. Then, a new chemical process, ARTIST process, is proposed for the treatment of nuclear spent fuel consolidating plutonium management and the partitioning concept. (author)

  18. Product consistency test and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure results of the ceramic waste form from the electrometallurgical treatment process for spent fuel

    Johnson, S. G.; Adamic, M. L.: DiSanto, T.; Warren, A. R.; Cummings, D. G.; Foulkrod, L.; Goff, K. M.

    1999-01-01

    The ceramic waste form produced from the electrometallurgical treatment of sodium bonded spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II was tested using two immersion tests with separate and distinct purposes. The product consistency test is used to assess the consistency of the waste forms produced and thus is an indicator of a well-controlled process. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure is used to determine whether a substance is to be considered hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency. The proposed high level waste repository will not be licensed to receive hazardous waste, thus any waste forms destined to be placed there cannot be of a hazardous nature as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Results are presented from the first four fully radioactive ceramic waste forms produced and from seven ceramic waste forms produced from cold surrogate materials. The fully radioactive waste forms are approximately 2 kg in weight and were produced with salt used to treat 100 driver subassemblies of spent fuel

  19. A novel highly porous ceramic foam with efficient thermal insulation and high temperature resistance properties fabricated by gel-casting process

    Yu, Jiahong; Wang, Guixiang; Tang, Di; Qiu, Ya; Sun, Nali; Liu, Wenqiao

    2018-01-01

    The design of super thermal insulation and high-temperature resistant materials for high temperature furnaces is crucial due to the energy crisis and the huge wasting. Although it is told that numerous studies have been reported about various of thermal insulation materials prepared by different methods, the applications of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic foams fabricated through tert-butyl alcohol (TBA)-based gel-casting process in bulk thermal isolators were barely to seen. In this paper, highly porous yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic foams were fabricated by a novel gel-casting method using tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as solvent and pore-forming agent. Different raw material ratio, sintering temperature and soaking time were all investigated to achieve optimal thermal insulation and mechanical properties. We can conclude that porosity drops gradually while compressive strength increases significantly with the rising temperature from 1000-1500°C. With prolonged soaking time, there is no obvious change in porosity but compressive strength increases gradually. All specimens have uniformly distributed pores with average size of 0.5-2μm and show good structural stability at high temperature. The final obtained ceramic foams displayed an outstanding ultra-low thermal conductivity property with only 200.6 °C in cold surface while the hot side was 1000 °C (hold 60 min to keep thermal balance before testing) at the thickness of 10 mm.

  20. The production of grain oriented lanthanum titanate (La2Ti2O7) ceramics by uniaxial hot-forging process for improved fracture toughness

    Ceylan, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The layered-structural ceramics, such as lanthanum titanate (La 2 Ti 2 O 7 ), have been known for their good electrical and optical properties at high frequencies and temperatures. However, few studies have been conducted on the mechanical properties of these ceramics. The interest in ceramic hot-forging (HF) has been greatly increased recently due to the enhancement in fracture toughness via bridging effect of oriented grains. In this study, grain oriented lanthanum titanate was produced by the hot-forging process. The characterizations of the samples were achieved by density measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers indentation and three-point bending test. According to X-ray diffraction patterns, the orientation factor (f) was found to be 0.73 for certain hot-forging conditions resulting an improved fracture toughness. The improved fracture toughness of La 2 Ti 2 O 7 (3.2 MPa m 1/2 ) reached to the value of monolithic alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) between 3 and 4 MPa m 1/2

  1. Novel Water Treatment Processes Based on Hybrid Membrane-Ozonation Systems: A Novel Ceramic Membrane Contactor for Bubbleless Ozonation of Emerging Micropollutants

    Stylianos K. Stylianou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the presentation of novel water treatment systems based on ozonation combined with ceramic membranes for the treatment of refractory organic compounds found in natural water sources such as groundwater. This includes, firstly, a short review of possible membrane based hybrid processes for water treatment from various sources. Several practical and theoretical aspects for the application of hybrid membrane-ozonation systems are discussed, along with theoretical background regarding the transformation of target organic pollutants by ozone. Next, a novel ceramic membrane contactor, bringing into contact the gas phase (ozone and water phase without the creation of bubbles (bubbleless ozonation, is presented. Experimental data showing the membrane contactor efficiency for oxidation of atrazine, endosulfan, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE are shown and discussed. Almost complete endosulfan degradation was achieved with the use of the ceramic contactor, whereas atrazine degradation higher than 50% could not be achieved even after 60 min of reaction time. Single ozonation of water containing MTBE could not result in a significant MTBE degradation. MTBE mineralization by O3/H2O2 combination increased at higher pH values and O3/H2O2 molar ratio of 0.2 reaching a maximum of around 65%.

  2. Effects of improved process for CuO-doped NKN lead-free ceramics on high-power piezoelectric transformers.

    Yang, Song-Ling; Tsai, Cheng-Che; Liou, Yi-Cheng; Hong, Cheng-Shong; Li, Bing-Jing; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the effects of the electrical proper- ties of CuO-doped (Na(0.5)K(0.5))NbO(3) (NKN) ceramics prepared separately using the B-site oxide precursor method (BO method) and conventional mixed-oxide method (MO method) on high-power piezoelectric transformers (PTs) were investigated. The performances of PTs made with these two substrates were compared. Experimental results showed that the output power and temperature stability of PTs could be enhanced because of the lower resonant impedance of the ceramics prepared using the BO method. In addition, the output power of PTs was more affected by the resonant impedance than by the mechanical quality factor (Q(m)) of the ceramics. The PTs fabricated with ceramics prepared using the BO method showed a high efficiency of more than 94% and a maximum output power of 8.98 W (power density: 18.3 W/cm(3)) with temperature increase of 3°C under the optimum load resistance (5 kΩ) and an input voltage of 150 V(pp). This output power of the lead-free disk-type PTs is the best reported so far.

  3. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  4. Remedial processing of oil shale fly ash (OSFA) and its value-added conversion into glass-ceramics.

    Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-12-01

    Recently, various solid wastes such as sewage sludge, coal fly ash and slag have been recycled into various products such as sintered bricks, ceramics and cement concrete. Application of these recycling approaches is much better and greener than conventional landfills since it can solve the problems of storage of industrial wastes and reduce exploration of natural resources for construction materials to protect the environment. Therefore, in this study, an attempt was made to recycle oil shale fly ash (OSFA), a by-product obtained from the extracting of shale oil in the oil shale industry, into a value-added glass-ceramic material via melting and sintering method. The influence of basicity (CaO/SiO2 ratio) by adding calcium oxide on the performance of glass-ceramics was studied in terms of phase transformation, mechanical properties, chemical resistances and heavy metals leaching tests. Crystallization kinetics results showed that the increase of basicity reduced the activation energies of crystallization but did not change the crystallization mechanism. When increasing the basicity from 0.2 to 0.5, the densification of sintering body was enhanced due to the promotion of viscous flow of glass powders, and therefore the compression strength and bending strength of glass-ceramics were increased. Heavy metals leaching results indicated that the produced OSFA-based glass-ceramics could be taken as non-hazardous materials. The maximum mechanical properties of compression strength of 186 ± 3 MPa, bending strength of 78 ± 6 MPa, good chemical resistances and low heavy metals leaching concentrations showed that it could be used as a substitute material for construction applications. The proposed approach will be one of the potential sustainable solutions in reducing the storage of oil shale fly ash as well as converting it into a value-added product. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi, E-mail: kinsakai@ngk.co.jp [Corporate R and D, NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya 467-8530 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R and D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  6. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  7. Prototyping of radially oriented piezoelectric ceramic-polymer tube composites using fused deposition and lost mold processing techniques

    McNulty, Thomas Francis

    Piezoelectric tube composite hydrophones of 3-1, 3-2, and 2-2 connectivity were developed using Fused Deposition (FD) and lost mold processing (LMP). In this work, a new series of thermoplastic binder formulations, named the ECG series, were developed for the FD process. The ECG-9 formulation exhibits mechanical, thermal, and rheological properties suitable for the Fused Deposition of functional lead zirconate titanate ceramic devices. This binder consists of 100 parts (by weight) Vestoplast 408, 20 parts Escorez 2520, 15 parts Vestowax A-227, and 5 parts Indopol H-1500. Oleic acid, oleyl alcohol, stearic acid, and stearyl alcohol (in toluene) were tested for use as a dispersant in the PZT/ECG-9 system. It was found that stearic acid adsorbs the most onto PZT powder, adsorbing 8.1 mg/m2. Using stearic acid, solutions of increasing concentration (5.0--50.0 g/l) were measured for adsorption. It was found that 30.0 g/l is the minimum concentration necessary for optimum surface coverage. The surfactant-coated powder was compounded with ECG-9 binder to create a 54 vol.% mix. The mix was extruded using a single screw extrusion apparatus into continuous lengths (>30 m) of 1.78 mm diameter filament. Fused Deposition was used to create composite designs of 3-1, 3-2, and 2-2 connectivity. After sintering, samples exhibit a sintered density greater than 97%. Sanders Prototyping (SPI) was used to manufacture molds for use with LMP techniques. Molds of 3-1, 3-2, and 2-2 connectivity were developed. The molds were infiltrated with a 55 vol.% aqueous based PZT slurry. The parts were subjected to a binder decomposition cycle, followed by sintering. Resultant samples were highly variable due to random macro-pores present in the samples after sintering. The resultant preforms were embedded in epoxy, and polished to dimensions of 8.0 mm inside diameter (ID), 14.0 mm outside diameter (OD), and 10.0 mm length (l) the OD and l dimensions are accurate to +/--2%, while the ID is accurate

  8. Non destructive evaluation of ceramics

    Green, R.E. Jr

    1992-01-01

    While monolithic and composite ceramics have been successfully manufactured, inconsistencies in processing and the unpredictable nature of their failure have limited their use as engineering materials. The optimization of the processing and properties of ceramics and the structures, devices and systems made from them demand the innovative application of modern nondestructive materials characterization techniques to monitor and control as many stages of the production process as possible. This paper will describe the state-of-the-art of nondestructive evaluation techniques for characterization of monolithic ceramics and ceramic composites. Among the techniques to be discussed are laser ultrasonics, acoustic microscopy, thermography, microfocus and x-ray tomography, and micro-photoelasticity. Application of these and other nondestructive evaluation techniques for more effective and efficient real-time process control will result in improved product quality and reliability. 27 refs

  9. Werkstoffwoche 98. Vol. 7. Symposium 9: Ceramics. Symposium 14: Simulation of ceramics

    Heinrich, J.; Ziegler, G.; Hermel, W.; Riedel, H.

    1999-01-01

    The leading subject of this proceedings volume is ceramic materials, with papers on the following subject clusters: Processing (infiltration, sintering, forming) - Physics and chemistry of ceramics (functional ceramics, SiC, ceramic precursors, microstructural properties) - Novel concepts (composites, damage induced by oxidation and mechanical stress, performance until damage under mechanical and thermal stress, layers, nanocomposites). 28 of the conference papers have been prepared for individual retrieval from the ENERGY database. (orig./CB) [de

  10. Use of solid waste from sand beneficiation process in the ceramic tile industry and its influence on the physical properties of the ceramic products; Uso do residuo solido proveniente do processo de beneficiamento de areia na industria de revestimentos ceramicos e sua influencia nas propriedades fisicas dos produtos ceramicos

    Biff, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.biff@sc.senai.br [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Criciuma, SC (Brazil); Silva, Manoel Ribeiro da, E-mail: mrsilva@unifei.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    The current paper had as main aim characterize and assess the use viability of a solid waste from sand beneficiation process in the production of ceramic tiles. To determine the main components the solid waste was characterized by X-ray fluorescence and the main crystalline phases were determined by X-ray diffraction. To evaluate the addition effects of the solid waste over the solid waste was introduced into a ceramic composition in proportions of 5% and 10%. The ceramics materials obtained were subjected to the linear retraction, water absorption and flexural strength analysis according to the Brazilian standard NBR 13818 (1997). Additionally, the solid waste and the ceramic materials obtained in this study were classified according to the Brazilian standard NBR 10004 (2004) to assess the potential environmental impact. The main solid waste constituents identified were silicon dioxide and aluminum oxide, respectively 50.2% e 19.2%, distributed in the crystal forms of quartz and kaolinite. The ceramic materials obtained after firing at 1100 deg C, without and with 10% of solid waste presented respectively flexural strength of 13.86 MPa and 14,52Mpa. The results of water absorption without and with addition of 10% of solid waste were respectively 16.96% and 16.63%, both appropriate performances for use in ceramic tiles according to the Brazilian standard NBR 13818 (1997). On the other hand, the ceramic materials obtained with the addition of 10% of solid waste were classified as inert materials according to Brazilian standard NBR 10004 (2004), showing the capability of incorporating solid waste in ceramic materials. (author)

  11. Manufacturing of superconductive silver/ceramic composites

    Seifi, Behrouz; Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Eriksen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    Manufacturing of superconducting metal/ceramic composites is a rather new discipline within materials forming processes. High Temperature SuperConductors, HTSC, are manufactured applying the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube process, OPIT. A ceramic powder containing lead, calcium, bismuth, strontium, and cop......Manufacturing of superconducting metal/ceramic composites is a rather new discipline within materials forming processes. High Temperature SuperConductors, HTSC, are manufactured applying the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube process, OPIT. A ceramic powder containing lead, calcium, bismuth, strontium...

  12. Development of a sintering process for recycling oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash into glass ceramic composite.

    Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-04-01

    Oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash are industrial and municipal by-products that require further treatment before disposal to avoid polluting the environment. In the study, they were mixed and vitrified into the slag by the melt-quench process. The obtained vitrified slag was then mixed with various percentages of oil shale fly ash and converted into glass ceramic composites by the subsequent sintering process. Differential thermal analysis was used to study the thermal characteristics and determine the sintering temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to analyze the crystalline phase compositions. Sintering shrinkage, weight loss on ignition, density and compressive strength were tested to determine the optimum preparation condition and study the co-sintering mechanism of vitrified amorphous slag and oil shale fly ash. The results showed the product performances increased with the increase of sintering temperatures and the proportion of vitrified slag to oil shale fly ash. Glass ceramic composite (vitrified slag content of 80%, oil shale fly ash content of 20%, sintering temperature of 1000 °C and sintering time of 2h) showed the properties of density of 1.92 ± 0.05 g/cm(3), weight loss on ignition of 6.14 ± 0.18%, sintering shrinkage of 22.06 ± 0.6% and compressive strength of 67 ± 14 MPa. The results indicated that it was a comparable waste-based material compared to previous researches. In particular, the energy consumption in the production process was reduced compared to conventional vitrification and sintering method. Chemical resistance and heavy metals leaching results of glass ceramic composites further confirmed the possibility of its engineering applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Progression Analysis and Stage Discovery in Continuous Physiological Processes Using Image Computing

    Ferrucci Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an image computing-based method for quantitative analysis of continuous physiological processes that can be sensed by medical imaging and demonstrate its application to the analysis of morphological alterations of the bone structure, which correlate with the progression of osteoarthritis (OA. The purpose of the analysis is to quantitatively estimate OA progression in a fashion that can assist in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. Ultimately, the texture analysis will be able to provide an alternative OA scoring method, which can potentially reflect the progression of the disease in a more direct fashion compared to the existing clinically utilized classification schemes based on radiology. This method can be useful not just for studying the nature of OA, but also for developing and testing the effect of drugs and treatments. While in this paper we demonstrate the application of the method to osteoarthritis, its generality makes it suitable for the analysis of other progressive clinical conditions that can be diagnosed and prognosed by using medical imaging.

  14. A two-stage ceramic tile grout sealing process using a high power diode laser—Grout development and materials characteristics

    Lawrence, J.; Li, L.; Spencer, J. T.

    1998-04-01

    Work has been conducted using a 60 Wcw high power diode laser (HPDL) in order to determine the feasibility and characteristics of sealing the void between adjoining ceramic tiles with a specially developed grout material having an impermeable enamel surface glaze. A two-stage process has been developed using a new grout material which consists of two distinct components: an amalgamated compound substrate and a glazed enamel surface; the amalgamated compound seal providing a tough, heat resistant bulk substrate, whilst the enamel provides an impervious surface. HPDL processing has resulted in crack free seals produced in normal atmospheric conditions. The basic process phenomena are investigated and the laser effects in terms of seal morphology, composition and microstructure are presented. Also, the resultant heat affects are analysed and described, as well as the effects of the shield gases, O 2 and Ar, during laser processing. Tiles were successfully sealed with power densities as low as 500 W/cm 2 and at rates up to 600 mm/min. Contact angle measurements revealed that due to the wettability characteristics of the amalgamated oxide compound grout (AOCG), laser surface treatment was necessary in order to alter the surface from a polycrystalline to a semi-amorphous structure, thus allowing the enamel to adhere. Bonding of the enamel to the AOCG and the ceramic tiles was identified as being principally due to van der Waals forces, and on a very small scale, some of the base AOCG material dissolving into the glaze.

  15. A novel processing approach for free-standing porous non-oxide ceramic supports from polycarbosilane and polysilazane precursors.

    Konegger, Thomas; Patidar, Rajesh; Bordia, Rajendra K

    2015-09-01

    In this contribution, a low-pressure/low-temperature casting technique for the preparation of novel free-standing macrocellular polymer-derived ceramic support structures is presented. Preceramic polymers (polycarbosilane and poly(vinyl)silazane) are combined with sacrificial porogens (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene microbeads) to yield porous ceramic materials in the Si-C or Si-C-N systems, exhibiting well-defined pore structures after thermal conversion. The planar-disc-type specimens were found to exhibit biaxial flexural strengths of up to 60 MPa. In combination with their observed permeability characteristics, the prepared structures were found to be suitable for potential applications in filtration, catalysis, or membrane science.

  16. Fabrication of ceramic oxide-coated SWNT composites by sol-gel process with a polymer glue

    Zhang, Cheng; Gao, Lei; Chen, Yongming

    2011-09-01

    The functional copolymer bearing alkoxysilyl and pyrene groups, poly[3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate]- co-[(1-pyrene-methyl) methacrylate] (TEPM13- co-PyMMA3), was synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization. Attributing the π-π interaction of pyrene units with the walls of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), this polymer could disperse and exfoliate SWNTs in different solvents through physical interaction as demonstrated by TEM, UV/Vis absorption, and FT-IR analysis. The alkoxysilyl groups functionalized SWNTs were reacted with different inorganic precursors via sol-gel reaction, and, as a results, silica, titania, and alumina were coated onto the surface of SWNTs, respectively via copolymers as a molecular glue. The nanocomposites of ceramic oxides/SWNTs were characterized by SEM analysis. Dependent upon the feed, the thickness of inorganic coating can be tuned easily. This study supplies a facile and general way to coat SWNTs with ceramic oxides without deteriorating the properties of pristine SWNTs.

  17. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  18. Ceramic containers for spent nuclear fuel. II. Reactions between TiO2 and the steel canning during hot isostatic processing

    Bergman, B.; Forberg, S.

    1984-01-01

    Rutile was selected for some practical studies of processing and properties of ceramic containers. Hot isostatic pressing at 1280 0 C has resulted in reaction zones between the TiO 2 powder and the steel canning. The phases ilmenite, pseudobrookite, rutile, and iron have been identified by x-ray diffraction and by microprobe analysis. The microstructures have been interpreted by classical metallographic methods, and some microstructures obtained by hot pressing and rapid cooling have also been examined for purposes of comparison. Some implications of the microstructures have been discussed in terms of microcracking and slow crack growth. 13 refs., 7 figs

  19. Processing of phase pure and dense bulk EuTiO.sub.3./sub. ceramics and their infrared reflectivity spectra

    Kachlik, M.; Máca, K.; Goian, Veronica; Kamba, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 74, MAY (2012), s. 16-18 ISSN 0167-577X R&D Projects: GA ČR GD202/09/H041; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0682 Grant - others:GAUK(CZ) SVV-2011-263303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : functional ceramics, * europium titanate * sintering * infrared reflectivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.224, year: 2012

  20. Domestic Ritual and Identity in the Teotihuacan State: Exploring Regional Processes of Social Integration Through Ceramic Figurines

    Hagerman, Kiri Louise

    2018-01-01

    Teotihuacan was a sprawling urban center that came to rule an eponymous expansive polity in the central Mexican highlands from approximately 200 to 600 CE. The conditions that facilitated its initial expansion, however, are not fully understood. This dissertation examines ceramic figurines from Teotihuacan and the three rural sites of Axotlan, Cerro Portezuelo, and Huixtoco in the Basin of Mexico to investigate ancient social relationships, cultural changes, and political transformations duri...

  1. Investigation and characterization of densification, processing and mechanical properties of TiB2–SiC ceramics

    Chen, Hongbo; Wang, Zhi; Wu, Zhanjun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper is first to use induction heating to densify TiB 2 –SiC ceramic. • The grinding parameters on microstructure and flexural strength were investigated. • The residual stress was measured using X-ray diffraction. • The high-frequency induction heating has more advantages over hot-pressing. - Abstract: In the present work, high-frequency induction heating was firstly used to densify TiB 2 –SiC ceramic, and the microstructure analysis indicated that the average grain size of the sample, which was sintered through induction heating, was smaller than that of the sample sintered through hot-pressing. The flexural strength and fracture toughness were improved after refining the grains and increasing the relative density. In order to characterize the densification behavior of TiB 2 –SiC ceramic sintered through induction heating, the typical curve of measured linear shrinkage of a sample was calculated and used. The tangential and normal grinding forces were substituted by the horizontal and vertical forces measured from the dynamometer in order to characterize intuitively the effect of grinding parameters on the microstructure and residual stress. The above-mentioned results revealed that the high-frequency induction heating has more advantages over hot-pressing. The results and way of these works can be applied to aid materials engineering design for the development of new materials, quality assurance, and characterization assessment of durability

  2. Barium zirconate-titanate/barium calcium-titanate ceramics via sol-gel process: novel high-energy-density capacitors

    Puli, Venkata Sreenivas; Kumar, Ashok; Scott, J F; Katiyar, Ram S; Chrisey, Douglas B; Tomozawa, M

    2011-01-01

    Lead-free barium zirconate-titanate/barium calcium-titanate, [(BaZr 0.2 Ti 0.80 )O 3 ] 1-x -[(Ba 0.70 Ca 0.30 )TiO 3 ] x (x = 0.10, 0.15, 0.20) (BZT-BCT) ceramics with high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss and moderate electric breakdown field were prepared by the sol-gel synthesis technique. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed tetragonal crystal structure and this was further confirmed by Raman spectra. Well-behaved ferroelectric hysteresis loops and moderate polarizations (spontaneous polarization, P s ∼ 3-6 μC cm -2 ) were obtained in these BZT-BCT ceramics. Frequency-dependent dielectric spectra confirmed that ferroelectric diffuse phase transition (DPT) exists near room temperature. Scanning electron microscope images revealed monolithic grain growth in samples sintered at 1280 deg. C. 1000/ε versus (T) plots revealed ferroelectric DPT behaviour with estimated γ values of ∼1.52, 1.51 and 1.88, respectively, for the studied BZT-BCT compositions. All three compositions showed packing-limited breakdown fields of ∼47-73 kV cm -1 with an energy density of 0.05-0.6 J cm -3 for thick ceramics (>1 mm). Therefore these compositions might be useful in Y5V-type capacitor applications.

  3. Barium zirconate-titanate/barium calcium-titanate ceramics via sol-gel process: novel high-energy-density capacitors

    Puli, Venkata Sreenivas; Kumar, Ashok; Scott, J F; Katiyar, Ram S [SPECLAB, Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00936 (Puerto Rico); Chrisey, Douglas B; Tomozawa, M, E-mail: rkatiyar@uprrp.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180-3590 (United States)

    2011-10-05

    Lead-free barium zirconate-titanate/barium calcium-titanate, [(BaZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.80})O{sub 3}]{sub 1-x}-[(Ba{sub 0.70}Ca{sub 0.30})TiO{sub 3}]{sub x} (x = 0.10, 0.15, 0.20) (BZT-BCT) ceramics with high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss and moderate electric breakdown field were prepared by the sol-gel synthesis technique. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed tetragonal crystal structure and this was further confirmed by Raman spectra. Well-behaved ferroelectric hysteresis loops and moderate polarizations (spontaneous polarization, P{sub s} {approx} 3-6 {mu}C cm{sup -2}) were obtained in these BZT-BCT ceramics. Frequency-dependent dielectric spectra confirmed that ferroelectric diffuse phase transition (DPT) exists near room temperature. Scanning electron microscope images revealed monolithic grain growth in samples sintered at 1280 deg. C. 1000/{epsilon} versus (T) plots revealed ferroelectric DPT behaviour with estimated {gamma} values of {approx}1.52, 1.51 and 1.88, respectively, for the studied BZT-BCT compositions. All three compositions showed packing-limited breakdown fields of {approx}47-73 kV cm{sup -1} with an energy density of 0.05-0.6 J cm{sup -3} for thick ceramics (>1 mm). Therefore these compositions might be useful in Y5V-type capacitor applications.

  4. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) or nitrate to ammonia and glass (NAG) process: Phase 2 report

    Mattus, A.J.; Walker, J.F. Jr.; Youngblood, E.L.; Farr, L.L.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1994-12-01

    Continuing benchtop studies using Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants and actual Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) low-level waste (LLW), employing a new denitration process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 and 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted to gaseous ammonia. In this process, aluminum powders can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid. The process may be able to use contaminated aluminum scrap metal from DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nitrate-free ceramic product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics or silica and/or fluxing agents can be added to form a glassy ceramic or a flowable glass product. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 70% were obtained for the waste form produced. Sintered pellets produced from supernate from Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) have been leached in accordance with the 16.1 leach test for the radioelements 85 Sr and 137 Cs. Despite lengthy counting times, 85 Sr could not be detected in the leachates. 137 Cs was only slightly above background and corresponded to a leach index of 12.2 to 13.7 after 8 months of leaching. Leach testing of unsintered and sintered reactor product spiked with hazardous metals proved that both sintered and unsintered product passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. Design of the equipment and flowsheet for a pilot demonstration-scale system to prove the nitrate destruction portion of the NAC process and product formation is under way

  5. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications, Phase 1. Final report

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Wilkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The program goals were to develop and demonstrate significant improvements in processing methods, process controls and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1,370{degrees}C. The program focused on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} high temperature ceramic composition and hot-isostatic-pressing as the method of densification. Stage I had as major objectives: (1) comparing injection molding and colloidal consolidation process routes, and selecting one route for subsequent optimization, (2) comparing the performance of water milled and alcohol milled powder and selecting one on the basis of performance data, and (3) adapting several NDE methods to the needs of ceramic processing. The NDE methods considered were microfocus X-ray radiography, computed tomography, ultrasonics, NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent liquid dye penetrant and X-ray diffraction residual stress analysis. The colloidal consolidation process route was selected and approved as the forming technique for the remainder of the program. The material produced by the final Stage II optimized process has been given the designation NCX 5102 silicon nitride. According to plan, a large number of specimens were produced and tested during Stage III to establish a statistically robust room temperature tensile strength database for this material. Highlights of the Stage III process demonstration and resultant database are included in the main text of the report, along with a synopsis of the NCX-5102 aqueous based colloidal process. The R and D accomplishments for Stage I are discussed in Appendices 1--4, while the tensile strength-fractography database for the Stage III NCX-5102 process demonstration is provided in Appendix 5. 4 refs., 108 figs., 23 tabs.

  6. Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition from RKKP targets (sol-gel vs melt-processing route)

    Rau, J.V., E-mail: giulietta.rau@ism.cnr.it [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133 Rome (Italy); Teghil, R. [Universita della Basilicata, Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Via dell' Ateneo Lucano, 10-85100 Potenza (Italy); CNR-IMIP U.O.S. di Potenza, Zona Industriale di Tito scalo (PZ) (Italy); Fosca, M. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133 Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Chimica, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5-00185 Rome (Italy); De Bonis, A. [Universita della Basilicata, Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Via dell' Ateneo Lucano, 10-85100 Potenza (Italy); CNR-IMIP U.O.S. di Potenza, Zona Industriale di Tito scalo (PZ) (Italy); Cacciotti, I.; Bianco, A. [Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, UR INSTM ' Roma Tor Vergata' , Via del Politecnico, 1-00133 Rome (Italy); Albertini, V. Rossi [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133 Rome (Italy); Caminiti, R. [Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Chimica, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5-00185 Rome (Italy); Ravaglioli, A. [Parco Torricelli delle Arti e delle Scienze, Via Granarolo, 64-48018 Faenza (Ra) (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings for bone tissue repair and regeneration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pulsed Lased Deposition allowed congruent transfer of target composition to coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target was prepared by sol-gel process suitable for compositional tailoring. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium, widely used for orthopaedics and dental implants, was used as substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The physico-chemical properties of the prepared coatings are reported. -- Abstract: The deposition of innovative glass-ceramic composition (i.e. RKKP) coatings by Pulsed Lased Deposition (PLD) technique is reported. RKKP was synthesised following two methodologies: melt-processing and sol-gel, the latter being particularly suitable to tailor the compositional range. The PLD advantage with respect to other deposition techniques is the congruent transfer of the target composition to the coating. The physico-chemical properties of films were investigated by Scanning Electron and Atomic Force Microscopies, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Angular and Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction, and Vickers microhardness. The deposition performed at 12 J/cm{sup 2} and 500 Degree-Sign C allows to prepare crystalline films with the composition that replicates rather well that of the initial targets. The 0.6 {mu}m thin melt-processing RKKP films, possessing the hardness of 25 GPa, and the 4.3 {mu}m thick sol-gel films with the hardness of 17 GPa were obtained.

  7. Bioactive glass–ceramic coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition from RKKP targets (sol–gel vs melt-processing route)

    Rau, J.V.; Teghil, R.; Fosca, M.; De Bonis, A.; Cacciotti, I.; Bianco, A.; Albertini, V. Rossi; Caminiti, R.; Ravaglioli, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bioactive glass–ceramic coatings for bone tissue repair and regeneration. ► Pulsed Lased Deposition allowed congruent transfer of target composition to coating. ► Target was prepared by sol–gel process suitable for compositional tailoring. ► Titanium, widely used for orthopaedics and dental implants, was used as substrate. ► The physico-chemical properties of the prepared coatings are reported. -- Abstract: The deposition of innovative glass–ceramic composition (i.e. RKKP) coatings by Pulsed Lased Deposition (PLD) technique is reported. RKKP was synthesised following two methodologies: melt-processing and sol–gel, the latter being particularly suitable to tailor the compositional range. The PLD advantage with respect to other deposition techniques is the congruent transfer of the target composition to the coating. The physico-chemical properties of films were investigated by Scanning Electron and Atomic Force Microscopies, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Angular and Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction, and Vickers microhardness. The deposition performed at 12 J/cm 2 and 500 °C allows to prepare crystalline films with the composition that replicates rather well that of the initial targets. The 0.6 μm thin melt-processing RKKP films, possessing the hardness of 25 GPa, and the 4.3 μm thick sol–gel films with the hardness of 17 GPa were obtained.

  8. CBCT Post-Processing Tools to Manage the Progression of Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Case Report.

    Vasconcelos, Karla de Faria; de-Azevedo-Vaz, Sergio Lins; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz; Haiter-Neto, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This case report aimed to highlight the usefulness of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and its post-processing tools for the diagnosis, follow-up and treatment planning of invasive cervical resorption (ICR). A 16-year-old female patient was referred for periapical radiographic examination, which revealed an irregular but well demarcated radiolucency in the mandibular right central incisor. In addition, CBCT scanning was performed to distinguish between ICR and internal root resorption. After the diagnosis of ICR, the patient was advised to return shortly but did so only six years later. At that time, another CBCT scan was performed and CBCT registration and subtraction were done to document lesion progress. These imaging tools were able to show lesion progress and extent clearly and were fundamental for differential diagnosis and treatment decision.

  9. Ceramic Seal.

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  10. Ceramic Seal

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  11. Acid-base properties of ceramic powders

    Bleier, A.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter addresses the fundamental aspects of potentiometric titration, electrokinetics, and conductometric titration in evaluating surface and interfacial thermodynamic behavior. Emphasizes the characterization of aqueous systems which are pertinent to the processing of ceramic powders. Attempts to clarify the role of novel analytical techniques that will increasingly contribute to the advanced characterization of ceramic powders. Evaluates recently developed acid-base and complexation concepts and their applications to the processing of oxide ceramics

  12. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  13. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  14. Study progression in application of process analytical technologies on film coating

    Tingting Peng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Film coating is an important unit operation to produce solid dosage forms, thereby, the monitoring of this process is helpful to find problems in time and improve the quality of coated products. Traditional methods adopted to monitor this process include measurement of coating weight gain, performance of disintegration and dissolution test, etc. However, not only do these methods cause destruction to the samples, but also consume time and energy. There have recently emerged the applications of process analytical technologies (PAT on film coating, especially some novel spectroscopic and imaging technologies, which have the potential to real-time track the progress in film coating and optimize production efficiency. This article gives an overview on the application of such technologies for film coating, with the goal to provide a reference for the further researches.

  15. Effect of aluminum and silicon reactants and process parameters on glass-ceramic waste form characteristics for immobilization of high-level fluorinel-sodium calcined waste

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    In this report, the effects of aluminum and silicon reactants, process soak time and the initial calcine particle size on glass-ceramic waste form characteristics for immobilization of the high-level fluorinel-sodium calcined waste stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are investigated. The waste form characteristics include density, total and normalized elemental leach rates, and microstructure. Glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing (HIPing) a pre-compacted mixture of pilot plant fluorinel-sodium calcine, Al, and Si metal powders at 1050 degrees C, 20,000 psi for 4 hours. One of the formulations with 2 wt % Al was HIPed for 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours at the same temperature and pressure. The calcine particle size range include as calcined particle size smaller than 600 μm (finer than -30 mesh, or 215 μm Mass Median Diameter, MMD) and 180 μm (finer than 80 mesh, or 49 μm MMD)

  16. Simulation of an Aspheric Glass Lens Forming Behavior in Progressive GMP Process

    Chang, Sung Ho; Lee, Young Min; Kang, Jeong Jin; Hong, Seok Kwan; Shin, Gwang Ho; Heo, Young Moo; Jung, Tae Sung

    2007-01-01

    Recently, GMP(Glass Molding Press) process is mainly used to produce aspheric glass lenses. Because glass lens is heated at high temperature above Tg (Transformation Temperature) for forming the glass, the quality of aspheric glass lens is deteriorated by residual stresses which are generated in a aspheric glass lens after forming. In this study, as a fundamental study to develop the mold for progressive GMP process, we conducted a aspheric glass lens forming simulation. Prior to a aspheric glass lens forming simulation, compression and thermal conductivity tests were carried out to obtain mechanical and thermal properties of K-PBK40 which is newly developed material for precision molding, and flow characteristics of K-PBK40 were obtained at high temperature. Then, using the flow characteristics obtained, compression simulation was carried out and compared with the experimental result for the purpose of verifying the obtained flow characteristics. Finally, a glass lens press simulation in progressive GMP process was carried out and we could forecast the shape of deformed glass lenses and residual stresses contribution in the structure of deformed glass lenses after forming

  17. Sequential inflammatory processes define human progression from M. tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis disease.

    Scriba, Thomas J; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Shankar, Smitha; Hraha, Tom; Thompson, Ethan G; Sterling, David; Nemes, Elisa; Darboe, Fatoumatta; Suliman, Sara; Amon, Lynn M; Mahomed, Hassan; Erasmus, Mzwandile; Whatney, Wendy; Johnson, John L; Boom, W Henry; Hatherill, Mark; Valvo, Joe; De Groote, Mary Ann; Ochsner, Urs A; Aderem, Alan; Hanekom, Willem A; Zak, Daniel E

    2017-11-01

    Our understanding of mechanisms underlying progression from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to pulmonary tuberculosis disease in humans remains limited. To define such mechanisms, we followed M. tuberculosis-infected adolescents longitudinally. Blood samples from forty-four adolescents who ultimately developed tuberculosis disease (“progressors”) were compared with those from 106 matched controls, who remained healthy during two years of follow up. We performed longitudinal whole blood transcriptomic analyses by RNA sequencing and plasma proteome analyses using multiplexed slow off-rate modified DNA aptamers. Tuberculosis progression was associated with sequential modulation of immunological processes. Type I/II interferon signalling and complement cascade were elevated 18 months before tuberculosis disease diagnosis, while changes in myeloid inflammation, lymphoid, monocyte and neutrophil gene modules occurred more proximally to tuberculosis disease. Analysis of gene expression in purified T cells also revealed early suppression of Th17 responses in progressors, relative to M. tuberculosis-infected controls. This was confirmed in an independent adult cohort who received BCG re-vaccination; transcript expression of interferon response genes in blood prior to BCG administration was associated with suppression of IL-17 expression by BCG-specific CD4 T cells 3 weeks post-vaccination. Our findings provide a timeline to the different immunological stages of disease progression which comprise sequential inflammatory dynamics and immune alterations that precede disease manifestations and diagnosis of tuberculosis disease. These findings have important implications for developing diagnostics, vaccination and host-directed therapies for tuberculosis. Clincialtrials.gov, NCT01119521.

  18. THE IMPACT OF THE ELEVATOR GUIDES CONTAMINATION ON THE BRAKING PROCESS DELAY FOR SELECTED PROGRESSIVE GEARS

    Rafał Longwic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors’ tests results on the impact of the guiding system (the guides contamination in the friction lift on the delay of progressive gears braking process are presented in this article. The tests were conducted using a free fall method and a test bench built for that purpose. In order to render all working conditions the guiding system of tested gears was lubricated with the most commonly used lubricating agents. Solid grease (SM, mineral oil (OL, the mixture of solid grease and quartz sand (S50 as well as the mixture of mineral oil and quartz sand (O50 were used.

  19. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-01-09

    A process is disclosed for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and nickel aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m{sup 1/2}, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa. 5 figs.

  20. Fabrication of ceramic oxide-coated SWNT composites by sol–gel process with a polymer glue

    Zhang Cheng; Gao Lei; Chen Yongming

    2011-01-01

    The functional copolymer bearing alkoxysilyl and pyrene groups, poly[3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate]-co-[(1-pyrene-methyl) methacrylate] (TEPM 13 -co-PyMMA 3 ), was synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization. Attributing the π–π interaction of pyrene units with the walls of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), this polymer could disperse and exfoliate SWNTs in different solvents through physical interaction as demonstrated by TEM, UV/Vis absorption, and FT-IR analysis. The alkoxysilyl groups functionalized SWNTs were reacted with different inorganic precursors via sol–gel reaction, and, as a results, silica, titania, and alumina were coated onto the surface of SWNTs, respectively via copolymers as a molecular glue. The nanocomposites of ceramic oxides/SWNTs were characterized by SEM analysis. Dependent upon the feed, the thickness of inorganic coating can be tuned easily. This study supplies a facile and general way to coat SWNTs with ceramic oxides without deteriorating the properties of pristine SWNTs.

  1. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  2. The Integration Method of Ceramic Arts in the Product Design

    Shuxin, Wang

    2018-03-01

    As one of the four ancient civilization countries, the firing technology of ceramic invented by China has made a great contribution to the progress and development of human society. In modern life, even the development of technology still needs the ceramics, there are large number of artists who take the ceramics as carrier active in the field of contemporary art. The ceramics can be seen everywhere in our daily life, this paper mainly discusses the integration means of ceramic art in the product design.

  3. Process development studies on the bioconversion of cellulose and production of ethanol. Progress report, September 1, 1978

    Wilke, C.R.

    1978-09-01

    Progress is reported in studies on the pretreatment of cellulosic materials to facilitate enzymatic hydrolysis, sulfuric acid hydrolysis, investigation of the Purdue processing scheme including an economic analysis, and the fermentability of the enzymatic hydrolyzate. Progress is also reported on enzyme fermentation studies, hydrolysis reactor development, and utilization of hemicellulose sugars. (JSR)

  4. The Process-Oriented Simulation (POS) model for common cause failures: recent progress

    Berg, H.P.; Goertz, R.; Schimetschka, E.; Kesten, J.

    2006-01-01

    A common-cause failure (CCF) model based on stochastic simulation has been developed to complement the established approaches and to overcome some of their shortcomings. Reflecting the models proximity to the CCF process it was called Process Oriented Simulation (POS) Model. In recent years, some progress has been made to render the POS model fit for practical applications comprising the development of parameter estimates and a number of test applications in areas where results were already available - especially from CCF benchmarks - and comparison can provide insights in strong and weak points of the different approaches. In this paper, a detailed description of the POS model is provided together with the approach to parameter estimation and representative test applications. It is concluded, that the POS model has a number of strengths - especially the feature to provide reasonable extrapolation to CCF groups with high degrees of redundancy - and thus a considerable potential to complement the insights obtained from existing modeling. (orig.)

  5. Influence of sintering temperature on microstructures and energy-storage properties of barium strontium titanate glass-ceramics prepared by sol-gel process

    Zhu, Jia; Zhang, Yong; Song, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Dongliang; Chen, Yongzhou [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The sol-gel processing, microstructures, dielectric properties and energy-storage properties of barium strontium titanate glass-ceramics over the sintering temperature range of 1000-1150 C were studied. Through the X-ray diffraction result, it is revealed that the crystallinity increases as the sintering temperature increased from 1000 to 1080 C and has reached a steady-state regime above 1100 C. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that with the increase of sintering temperature, the crystal size increased. Dielectric measurements revealed that the increase in the sintering temperature resulted in a significant increase in the dielectric constant, a strong sharpness of the temperature-dependent dielectric response and a pronounced decrease of the temperature of the dielectric maximum. The correlation between charge spreading behavior and activation energies of crystal and glass was discussed by the employment of the impedance spectroscopy studies. As a result of polarization-electric field hysteresis loops, both the charged and discharged densities increased with increasing sintering temperature. And the maximum value of energy storage efficiency was found to occur at 1130 C. Finally, the dependence of released energy and power densities calculated from the discharged current-time (I-t) curves on the sintering temperature was studied. The relationship between the energy storage properties and microstructure was correlated. Polarization-electric field hysteresis loops for the BST glass-ceramics sintered at different temperatures. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Microstructure and High Temperature Oxidation Property of Fe-Cr-B Based Metal/Ceramic Composite Manufactured by Powder Injection Molding Process

    Joo, Yeun-Ah; Kim, Young-Kyun; Yoon, Tae-Sik; Lee, Kee-Ahn

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the microstructure and high temperature oxidation property of Fe-Cr-B metal/ceramic composite manufactured using powder injection molding process. Observations of initial microstructure showed a unique structure where α-Fe and (Cr, Fe)2B form a continuous three-dimensional network. High temperature oxidation tests were performed at 900, 1000 and 1100 °C, for 24 h, and the oxidation weight gain according to each temperature condition was 0.13, 0.84 and 6.4 mg/cm2, respectively. The oxidation results according to time at 900 and 1000 °C conditions represented parabolic curves, and at 1100 °C condition formed a rectilinear curve. Observation and phase analysis results of the oxides identified Cr2O3 and SiO2 at 900 and 1000 °C. In addition to Cr2O3 and SiO2, CrBO3 and FeCr2O4 formed due to phase decomposition of boride were identified at 1100 °C. Based on the findings above, this study suggested the high temperature oxidation mechanism of Fe-Cr-B metal/ceramic composite manufactured using powder injection molding, and the possibility of its application as a high temperature component material was also discussed.

  7. Progress in centralised ethics review processes: Implications for multi-site health evaluations.

    Prosser, Brenton; Davey, Rachel; Gibson, Diane

    2015-04-01

    Increasingly, public sector programmes respond to complex social problems that intersect specific fields and individual disciplines. Such responses result in multi-site initiatives that can span nations, jurisdictions, sectors and organisations. The rigorous evaluation of public sector programmes is now a baseline expectation. For evaluations of large and complex multi-site programme initiatives, the processes of ethics review can present a significant challenge. However in recent years, there have been new developments in centralised ethics review processes in many nations. This paper provides the case study of an evaluation of a national, inter-jurisdictional, cross-sector, aged care health initiative and its encounters with Australian centralised ethics review processes. Specifically, the paper considers progress against the key themes of a previous five-year, five nation study (Fitzgerald and Phillips, 2006), which found that centralised ethics review processes would save time, money and effort, as well as contribute to more equitable workloads for researchers and evaluators. The paper concludes with insights for those charged with refining centralised ethics review processes, as well as recommendations for future evaluators of complex multi-site programme initiatives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Recent progress in thin film processing by magnetron sputtering with plasma diagnostics

    Han, Jeon G

    2009-01-01

    The precise control of the structure and related properties becomes crucial for sophisticated applications of thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering in emerging industries including the flat panel display, digital electronics and nano- and bio-industries. The film structure is closely related to the total energy delivered to the substrate surface for nucleation and growth during all kinds of thin film processes, including magnetron sputtering. Therefore, the energy delivered to the surface for nucleation and growth during magnetron sputtering should be measured and analysed by integrated diagnostics of the plasma parameters which are closely associated with the process parameters and other external process conditions. This paper reviews the background of thin film nucleation and growth, the status of magnetron sputtering technology and the progress of plasma diagnostics for plasma processing. The evolution of the microstructure during magnetron sputtering is then discussed with respect to the change in the process variables in terms of the plasma parameters along with empirical data of the integrated plasma diagnostics for various magnetron sputtering conditions with conventional dc, pulsed dc and high power pulsed dc sputtering modes. Among the major energy terms to be discussed are the temperature change in the top surface region and the energies of ions and neutral species. (topical review)

  9. Quantum mechanical studies of heavy ion scattering processes. Progress report, July 15, 1983-March, 1984

    Heil, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    The research done under this contract should provide valuable contributions to our understanding of atomic collision processes. The essence of this project is the description of low energy atomic collision process using molecular states formed by the collision partners in the interaction region. Over the eight months that this contract has been in effect, significant progress has been made on both fundamental and applied levels. On the most basic level, we have recently developed a new diabatic representation of the scattering which has none of the defects associated with the most commonly used formulation of Smith. This may prove to be of great importance since a proper diabatic description is thought to be a more reasonable representation of the actual physical scattering process than the adiabatic description. It should be noted that there is a great deal of controversy surrounding the word proper but our new formulation satisfies most, if not all, criteria for diabatic states. In addition, we have carried out or initiated theoretical studies on a number of atomic scattering processes involving charge transfer reactions and proton-induced fine-structure transitions. Our calculations of differential scattering cross sections for low energy charge transfer reaction should be of particular importance. A number of experimental groups are now proposing to measure these cross sections which our calculations predict should have large, striking features. Such comparisons would provide valuable tests of the theory of low energy atomic collision processes on a more fundamental level than previous comparisons of the total cross sections

  10. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  11. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  12. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  13. Incorporation of gypsum waste in ceramic block production: Proposal for a minimal battery of tests to evaluate technical and environmental viability of this recycling process.

    Godinho-Castro, Alcione P; Testolin, Renan C; Janke, Leandro; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2012-01-01

    Civil engineering-related construction and demolition debris is an important source of waste disposed of in municipal solid waste landfills. After clay materials, gypsum waste is the second largest contributor to the residential construction waste stream. As demand for sustainable building practices grows, interest in recovering gypsum waste from construction and demolition debris is increasing, but there is a lack of standardized tests to evaluate the technical and environmental viability of this solid waste recycling process. By recycling gypsum waste, natural deposits of gypsum might be conserved and high amounts of the waste by-product could be reused in the civil construction industry. In this context, this paper investigates a physical property (i.e., resistance to axial compression), the chemical composition and the ecotoxicological potential of ceramic blocks constructed with different proportions of clay, cement and gypsum waste, and assesses the feasibility of using a minimal battery of tests to evaluate the viability of this recycling process. Consideration of the results for the resistance to axial compression tests together with production costs revealed that the best formulation was 35% of plastic clay, 35% of non-plastic clay, 10% of Portland cement and 20% of gypsum waste, which showed a mean resistance of 4.64MPa. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry showed calcium and sulfur to be the main elements, while quartz, gypsum, ettringite and nacrite were the main crystalline compounds found in this formulation. Ecotoxicity tests showed that leachate from this formulation is weakly toxic toward daphnids and bacteria (EC(20%)=69.0 and 75.0, respectively), while for algae and fish the leachate samples were not toxic at the EC(50%) level. Overall, these results show that the addition of 20% of gypsum waste to the ceramic blocks could provide a viable substitute for clay in the ceramics industry and the tests applied in this study proved to be a useful tool

  14. Using microwave for processing nanostructured PZT ceramics; Utilizacao de microondas no processamento de ceramicas nanoestruturadas de PZT

    Lanza, A.C.; Berti, T.G.; Thomazini, D.; Gelfuso, M.V., E-mail: lanza.work@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica; Eiras, J.A. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    The PZT ceramics have dielectric and piezoelectric properties of technological interest. The method of microwave assisted hydrothermal synthesis becomes interesting since it occurs in a closed environment, the low temperature and time, compared to conventional methods. In this work, PZT powders were dissolved in acid medium, and by adjusting the pH of the solutions obtained were precipitated, subjected to hydrothermal treatment at 120 °C for intervals of 15, 30 and 60 min. The powders were characterized by differential thermal and gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results confirm the formation of PZT phase in one hour with particle size around 55 nm, showing the feasibility of the proposed method. (author)

  15. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques

  16. Exploring hypothetical learning progressions for the chemistry of nitrogen and nuclear processes

    Henry, Deborah McKern

    Chemistry is a bridge that connects a number of scientific disciplines. High school students should be able to determine whether scientific information is accurate, how chemistry applies to daily life, and the mechanism by which systems operate (NRC, 2012). This research focuses on describing hypothetical learning progressions for student understanding of the chemical reactions of nitrogen and nuclear processes and examines whether there is consistency in scientific reasoning between these two distinct conceptual areas. The constant comparative method was used to analyze the written products of students including homework, formative and summative tests, laboratory notebooks, reflective journals, written presentations, and discussion board contributions via Edmodo (an online program). The ten participants were 15 and 16 year old students enrolled in a general high school chemistry course. Instruction took place over a ten week period. The learning progression levels ranged from 0 to 4 and were described as missing, novice, intermediate, proficient, and expert. The results were compared to the standards set by the NRC with a lower anchor (expectations for grade 8) and upper anchor (expectations for grade 12). The results indicate that, on average, students were able to reach an intermediate level of understanding for these concepts.

  17. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  18. Recent progress in the melt-process technique of high-temperature superconductors

    Ikuta, H; Mizutani, U

    1999-01-01

    Recently, the performance of high-temperature super conductors prepared by the melt-process technique has been greatly improved. This progress was accomplished by the addition of Ag into the starting materials of the Sm-Ba-CuO $9 system, which prevents the formation of severe macro-sized cracks in the finished samples. The magnetic flux density trapped by this material has now reached 9 T at 25 K, which is comparable to the magnetic flux density produced by $9 ordinary superconducting magnets. The amount of magnetic flux density that can be trapped by the sample is limited by the mechanical strength rather than superconducting properties of the material. The increase in the mechanical $9 strength of the material is important both for further improvement of the material properties and for ensuring reliability of the material in practical applications. (20 refs).

  19. The 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2): Process, Progress and Institutional Context

    Shrestha, G.; Cavallaro, N.; Zhu, Z.; Larson, E. K.; Butler, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Over 200 scientists and program managers from U.S., Mexican and Canadian government and non-government institutions have been collaborating on SOCCR-2 since 2015. Responding to the U.S. Global Change Research Act (1990) and the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan (2011), this special Sustained National Climate Assessment report covers many of the GCRA mandated sectors such as agriculture, energy, forestry, aquatic systems, coasts, wetlands, atmospheric and human social systems, integrating the scientific uncertainties and analyzing the effects of global change on the carbon cycle and vice versa, including projections for both human- induced and natural changes. This presentation covers the SOCCR-2 process, progress and institutional context, providing a historical perspective on the interagency instruments and mechanisms that have facilitated the last decades of carbon cycle science reflected in SOCCR-2.

  20. Micellar casein concentrate production with a 3X, 3-stage, uniform transmembrane pressure ceramic membrane process at 50°C.

    Hurt, E; Zulewska, J; Newbold, M; Barbano, D M

    2010-12-01

    The production of serum protein (SP) and micellar casein from skim milk can be accomplished using microfiltration (MF). Potential commercial applications exist for both SP and micellar casein. Our research objective was to determine the total SP removal and SP removal for each stage, and the composition of retentates and permeates, for a 3×, continuous bleed-and-feed, 3-stage, uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP) system with 0.1-μm ceramic membranes, when processing pasteurized skim milk at 50°C with 2 stages of water diafiltration. For each of 4 replicates, about 1,100 kg of skim milk was pasteurized (72°C, 16s) and processed at 3× through the UTP MF system. Retentate from stage 1 was cooled to <4°C and stored until the next processing day, when it was diluted with reverse osmosis water back to a 1× concentration and again processed through the MF system (stage 2) to a 3× concentration. The retentate from stage 2 was stored at <4°C, and, on the next processing day, was diluted with reverse osmosis water back to a 1× concentration, before running through the MF system at 3× for a total of 3 stages. The retentate and permeate from each stage were analyzed for total nitrogen, noncasein nitrogen, and nonprotein nitrogen using Kjeldahl methods; sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE analysis was also performed on the retentates from each stage. Theoretically, a 3-stage, 3× MF process could remove 97% of the SP from skim milk, with a cumulative SP removal of 68 and 90% after the first and second stages, respectively. The cumulative SP removal using a 3-stage, 3× MF process with a UTP system with 0.01-μm ceramic membranes in this experiment was 64.8 ± 0.8, 87.8 ± 1.6, and 98.3 ± 2.3% for the first, second, and third stages, respectively, when calculated using the mass of SP removed in the permeate of each stage. Various methods of calculation of SP removal were evaluated. Given the analytical limitations in the various methods for measuring SP removal, calculation