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Sample records for ceramic membrane reactor

  1. Ceramic oxygen transport membrane array reactor and reforming method

    Kelly, Sean M.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Robinson, Charles; Wilson, Jamie R.; Gonzalez, Javier E.; Doraswami, Uttam R.

    2016-11-08

    The invention relates to a commercially viable modular ceramic oxygen transport membrane reforming reactor configured using repeating assemblies of oxygen transport membrane tubes and catalytic reforming reactors.

  2. Reactor vessel using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    Anderson, Marc A.; Zeltner, Walter A.

    1992-08-11

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane.

  3. Ceramic membrane microfilter as an immobilized enzyme reactor.

    Harrington, T J; Gainer, J L; Kirwan, D J

    1992-10-01

    This study investigated the use of a ceramic microfilter as an immobilized enzyme reactor. In this type of reactor, the substrate solution permeates the ceramic membrane and reacts with an enzyme that has been immobilized within its porous interior. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of permeation rate on the observed kinetic parameters for the immobilized enzyme in order to assess possible mass transfer influences or shear effects. Kinetic parameters were found to be independent of flow rate for immobilized penicillinase and lactate dehydrogenase. Therefore, neither mass transfer nor shear effects were observed for enzymes immobilized within the ceramic membrane. Both the residence time and the conversion in the microfilter reactor could be controlled simply by regulating the transmembrane pressure drop. This study suggests that a ceramic microfilter reactor can be a desirable alternative to a packed bed of porous particles, especially when an immobilized enzyme has high activity and a low Michaelis constant.

  4. Ceramic oxygen transport membrane array reactor and reforming method

    Kelly, Sean M.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Robinson, Charles; Wilson, Jamie R; Gonzalez, Javier E.; Doraswami, Uttam R.

    2017-10-03

    The invention relates to a commercially viable modular ceramic oxygen transport membrane system for utilizing heat generated in reactively-driven oxygen transport membrane tubes to generate steam, heat process fluid and/or provide energy to carry out endothermic chemical reactions. The system provides for improved thermal coupling of oxygen transport membrane tubes to steam generation tubes or process heater tubes or reactor tubes for efficient and effective radiant heat transfer.

  5. Ceramic membrane reactor with two reactant gases at different pressures

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Mieville, Rodney L.

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a ceramic membrane reactor for syngas production having a reaction chamber, an inlet in the reactor for natural gas intake, a plurality of oxygen permeating ceramic slabs inside the reaction chamber with each slab having a plurality of passages paralleling the gas flow for transporting air through the reaction chamber, a manifold affixed to one end of the reaction chamber for intake of air connected to the slabs, a second manifold affixed to the reactor for removing the oxygen depleted air, and an outlet in the reaction chamber for removing syngas.

  6. Simulation of a porous ceramic membrane reactor for hydrogen production

    Yu, W.; Ohmori, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Endo, A.; Nakaiwa, M.; Hayakawa, T. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Itoh, N. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Utsunomiya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2005-08-01

    A systematic simulation study was performed to investigate the performance of a porous ceramic membrane reactor for hydrogen production by means of methane steam reforming. The results show that the methane conversions much higher than the corresponding equilibrium values can be achieved in the membrane reactor due to the selective removal of products from the reaction zone. The comparison of isothermal and non-isothermal model predictions was made. It was found that the isothermal assumption overestimates the reactor performance and the deviation of calculation results between the two models is subject to the operating conditions. The effects of various process parameters such as the reaction temperature, the reaction side pressure, the feed flow rate and the steam to methane molar feed ratio as well as the sweep gas flow rate and the operation modes, on the behavior of membrane reactor were analyzed and discussed. (author)

  7. A forced-flow membrane reactor for transfructosylation using ceramic membrane.

    Nishizawa, K; Nakajima, M; Nabetani, H

    2000-04-05

    A forced-flow membrane reactor system for transfructosylation was investigated using several ceramic membranes having different pore sizes. beta-Fructofuranosidase from Aspergillus niger ATCC 20611 was immobilized chemically to the inner surface of a ceramic membrane activated by a silane-coupling reagent. Sucrose solution was forced through the ceramic membrane by crossflow filtration while transfructosylation took place. The saccharide composition of the product, which was a mixture of fructooligosaccharides (FOS), was a function of the permeate flux, which was easily controlled by pressure. Using 0.2 micrometer pore size of symmetric ceramic membrane, the volumetric productivity obtained was 3.87 kg m(-3) s(-1), which was 560 times higher than that in a reported batch system, with a short residence time of 11 s. The half-life of the immobilized enzyme in the membrane was estimated to be 35 days by a long-term operation. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Use of a Ceramic Membrane to Improve the Performance of Two-Separate-Phase Biocatalytic Membrane Reactor

    Ranieri, G; Mazzei, R; Wu, Z; Li, K; Giorno, L

    2016-01-01

    Biocatalytic membrane reactors (BMR) combining reaction and separation within the same unit have many advantages over conventional reactor designs. Ceramic membranes are an attractive alternative to polymeric membranes in membrane biotechnology due to their high chemical, thermal and mechanical resistance. Another important use is their potential application in a biphasic membrane system, where support solvent resistance is highly needed. In this work, the preparation of asymmetric ceramic ho...

  9. Use of a Ceramic Membrane to Improve the Performance of Two-Separate-Phase Biocatalytic Membrane Reactor.

    Ranieri, Giuseppe; Mazzei, Rosalinda; Wu, Zhentao; Li, Kang; Giorno, Lidietta

    2016-03-14

    Biocatalytic membrane reactors (BMR) combining reaction and separation within the same unit have many advantages over conventional reactor designs. Ceramic membranes are an attractive alternative to polymeric membranes in membrane biotechnology due to their high chemical, thermal and mechanical resistance. Another important use is their potential application in a biphasic membrane system, where support solvent resistance is highly needed. In this work, the preparation of asymmetric ceramic hollow fibre membranes and their use in a two-separate-phase biocatalytic membrane reactor will be described. The asymmetric ceramic hollow fibre membranes were prepared using a combined phase inversion and sintering technique. The prepared fibres were then used as support for lipase covalent immobilization in order to develop a two-separate-phase biocatalytic membrane reactor. A functionalization method was proposed in order to increase the density of the reactive hydroxyl groups on the surface of ceramic membranes, which were then amino-activated and treated with a crosslinker. The performance and the stability of the immobilized lipase were investigated as a function of the amount of the immobilized biocatalytst. Results showed that it is possible to immobilize lipase on a ceramic membrane without altering its catalytic performance (initial residual specific activity 93%), which remains constant after 6 reaction cycles.

  10. Use of a Ceramic Membrane to Improve the Performance of Two-Separate-Phase Biocatalytic Membrane Reactor

    Giuseppe Ranieri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biocatalytic membrane reactors (BMR combining reaction and separation within the same unit have many advantages over conventional reactor designs. Ceramic membranes are an attractive alternative to polymeric membranes in membrane biotechnology due to their high chemical, thermal and mechanical resistance. Another important use is their potential application in a biphasic membrane system, where support solvent resistance is highly needed. In this work, the preparation of asymmetric ceramic hollow fibre membranes and their use in a two-separate-phase biocatalytic membrane reactor will be described. The asymmetric ceramic hollow fibre membranes were prepared using a combined phase inversion and sintering technique. The prepared fibres were then used as support for lipase covalent immobilization in order to develop a two-separate-phase biocatalytic membrane reactor. A functionalization method was proposed in order to increase the density of the reactive hydroxyl groups on the surface of ceramic membranes, which were then amino-activated and treated with a crosslinker. The performance and the stability of the immobilized lipase were investigated as a function of the amount of the immobilized biocatalytst. Results showed that it is possible to immobilize lipase on a ceramic membrane without altering its catalytic performance (initial residual specific activity 93%, which remains constant after 6 reaction cycles.

  11. Planar ceramic membrane assembly and oxidation reactor system

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Dyer, legal representative, Kathryn Beverly; Wilson, Merrill Anderson; Ohm, Ted R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Peterson, David; Chen, Christopher M.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Dyer, deceased, Paul Nigel

    2007-10-09

    Planar ceramic membrane assembly comprising a dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material, wherein the dense layer has a first side and a second side, a porous layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material in contact with the first side of the dense layer, and a ceramic channeled support layer in contact with the second side of the dense layer. The planar ceramic membrane assembly can be used in a ceramic wafer assembly comprising a planar ceramic channeled support layer having a first side and a second side; a first dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the first side of the ceramic channeled support layer; a first outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the first dense layer; a second dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the second side of the ceramic channeled layer; and a second outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the second dense layer.

  12. Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual Phase Ceramic-Carbonate Membrane Reactor

    Lin, Jerry Y. S. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This report documents synthesis, characterization and carbon dioxide permeation and separation properties of a new group of ceramic-carbonate dual-phase membranes and results of a laboratory study on their application for water gas shift reaction with carbon dioxide separation. A series of ceramic-carbonate dual phase membranes with various oxygen ionic or mixed ionic and electronic conducting metal oxide materials in disk, tube, symmetric, and asymmetric geometric configurations was developed. These membranes, with the thickness of 10 μm to 1.5 mm, show CO2 permeance in the range of 0.5-5×10-7 mol·m-2·s-1·Pa-1 in 500-900°C and measured CO2/N2 selectivity of up to 3000. CO2 permeation mechanism and factors that affect CO2 permeation through the dual-phase membranes have been identified. A reliable CO2 permeation model was developed. A robust method was established for the optimization of the microstructures of ceramic-carbonate membranes. The ceramic-carbonate membranes exhibit high stability for high temperature CO2 separations and water gas shift reaction. Water gas shift reaction in the dual-phase membrane reactors was studied by both modeling and experiments. It is found that high temperature syngas water gas shift reaction in tubular ceramic-carbonate dual phase membrane reactor is feasible even without catalyst. The membrane reactor exhibits good CO2 permeation flux, high thermal and chemical stability and high thermal shock resistance. Reaction and separation conditions in the membrane reactor to produce hydrogen of 93% purity and CO2 stream of >95% purity, with 90% CO2 capture have been identified. Integration of the ceramic-carbonate dual-phase membrane reactor with IGCC process for carbon dioxide capture was analyzed. A methodology was developed to identify optimum operation conditions for a

  13. Oxyfuel combustion using a catalytic ceramic membrane reactor

    Tan, Xiaoyao; Li, K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, University of London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Thursfield, A.; Metcalfe, I.S. [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-29

    Membrane catalytic combustion (MCC) is an environmentally friendly technique for heat and power generation from methane. This work demonstrates the performances of a MCC perovskite hollow fibre membrane reactor for the catalytic combustion of methane. The ionic-electronic La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{alpha}} (LSCF6428) mixed conductor, in the form of an oxygen-permeable hollow fibre membrane, has been prepared successfully by means of a phase-inversion spinning/sintering technique. For this process polyethersulfone (PESf) was used as a binder, N-methyl-2-pyrrollidone (NMP) as solvent and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, K16-18) as an additive. With the prepared LSCF6428 hollow fibre membranes packed with catalyst, hollow fibre membrane reactors (HFMRs) have been assembled to perform the catalytic combustion of methane. A simple mathematical model that combines the local oxygen permeation rate with approximate catalytic reaction kinetics has been developed and can be used to predict the performance of the HFMRs for methane combustion. The effects of operating temperature and methane and air feed flow rates on the performance of the HFMR have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Both the methane conversion and oxygen permeation rate can be improved by means of coating platinum on the air side of the hollow fibre membranes. (author)

  14. A submerged ceramic membrane reactor for the p-nitrophenol hydrogenation over nano-sized nickel catalysts.

    Chen, R Z; Sun, H L; Xing, W H; Jin, W Q; Xu, N P

    2009-02-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol over nano-sized nickel catalysts was carried out in a submerged ceramic membrane reactor. It has been demonstrated that the submerged ceramic membrane reactor is more suitable for the p-nitrophenol hydrogenation over nano-sized nickel catalysts compared with the side-stream ceramic membrane reactor, and the membrane module configuration has a great influence on the reaction rate of p-nitrophenol hydrogenation and the membrane treating capacity. The deactivation of nano-sized nickel is mainly caused by the adsorption of impurity on the surface of nickel and the increase of oxidation degree of nickel.

  15. A dense cell retention culture system using stirred ceramic membrane reactor.

    Suzuki, T; Sato, T; Kominami, M

    1994-11-20

    A novel reactor design incorporating porous ceramic tubes into a stirred jar fermentor was developed. The stirred ceramic membrane reactor has two ceramic tubular membrane units inside the vessel and maintains high filtration flux by alternating use for filtering and recovering from clogging. Each filter unit was linked for both extraction of culture broth and gas sparging. High permeability was maintained for long periods by applying the periodical control between filtering and air sparging during the stirred retention culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ceramic filter aeration system increased the k(L)a to about five times that of ordinary gas sparing. Using the automatic feeding and filtering system, cell mass concentration reached 207 g/L in a short time, while it was 64 g/L in a fed-batch culture. More than 99% of the growing cells were retained in the fermentor by the filtering culture. Both yield and productivity of cells were also increased by controlling the feeding of fresh medium and filtering the supernatant of the dense cells culture. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. The Enhancement of the Selectivity of Complex Reactions by a Catalytic Membrane Reactor -Ethylene Oxidation Over a Ag Catalyst Supported in a Ceramic Membrane-

    馮, 臨; 小林, 正義; Lin, FENG; Masayoshi, KOBAYASHI

    1991-01-01

    This research demonstrated that, using a membrane reactor consisting of a tubular, microporous, glass-ceramic membrane, it is possible to achieve selective oxidation of ethylene to ethylene oxide with an Ag catalyst. In experiments which a reaction temperature range of 115 to 300℃ and a contact time of 1.5 to 5 seconds, resulting data illustrated the following characteristics of this membrane reactor : 1) compared with a classic tubular reactor, the selectivity of ethylene oxide is increased ...

  17. Hydrogen amplification of coke oven gas by reforming of methane in a ceramic membrane reactor

    Zhang, Yuwen; Li, Qian; Shen, Peijun; Liu, Yong; Yang, Zhibin; Ding, Weizhong; Lu, Xionggang [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, No. 275 Mail Box, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2008-07-15

    To maximize hydrogen production from coke oven gas (COG), partial oxidation of methane in COG was studied thermodynamically and experimentally. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that an optimal hydrogen yield of 1.04-1.10 mole per mole of the consumed COG can be achieved when the initial ratio of O{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} is 0.57-0.46 in a temperature range of 800-900 C, and the corresponding amplification of original hydrogen in COG reaches 1.8-1.9 times. The amplification of original hydrogen was carried out in a BaCo{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BCFNO) membrane reactor, and the hydrogen yield in the lab scale was about 80% more than that of original H{sub 2} in model COG. In a large hydrogen content in COG, the ceramic membrane reactors made from perovskite mixed-conducting oxygen-permeable materials must have higher stability to withstand the harsh reduction condition. (author)

  18. Potentiality of a ceramic membrane reactor for the laccase-catalyzed removal of bisphenol A from secondary effluents.

    Arca-Ramos, A; Eibes, G; Feijoo, G; Lema, J M; Moreira, M T

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the removal of bisphenol A (BPA) by laccase in a continuous enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR) was investigated. The effects of key parameters, namely, type of laccase, pH, and enzyme activity, were initially evaluated. Once optimal conditions were determined, the continuous removal of the pollutant in an EMR was assessed in synthetic and real biologically treated wastewaters. The reactor configuration consisted of a stirred tank reactor coupled to a ceramic membrane, which prevented the sorption of the pollutant and allowed the recovery and recycling of laccase. Nearly complete removal of BPA was attained under both operation regimes with removal yields above 94.5 %. In experiments with real wastewater, the removal of BPA remained high while the presence of colloids and certain ions and the formation of precipitates on the membrane potentially affected enzyme stability and made necessary the periodic addition of laccase. Polymerization and degradation were observed as probable mechanisms of BPA transformation by laccase.

  19. Carbon-coated ceramic membrane reactor for the production of hydrogen by aqueous-phase reforming of sorbitol.

    Neira D'Angelo, M F; Ordomsky, V; Schouten, J C; van der Schaaf, J; Nijhuis, T A

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen was produced by aqueous-phase reforming (APR) of sorbitol in a carbon-on-alumina tubular membrane reactor (4 nm pore size, 7 cm long, 3 mm internal diameter) that allows the hydrogen gas to permeate to the shell side, whereas the liquid remains in the tube side. The hydrophobic nature of the membrane serves to avoid water loss and to minimize the interaction between the ceramic support and water, thus reducing the risks of membrane degradation upon operation. The permeation of hydrogen is dominated by the diffusivity of the hydrogen in water. Thus, higher operation temperatures result in an increase of the flux of hydrogen. The differential pressure has a negative effect on the flux of hydrogen due to the presence of liquid in the larger pores. The membrane was suitable for use in APR, and yielded 2.5 times more hydrogen than a reference reactor (with no membrane). Removal of hydrogen through the membrane assists in the reaction by preventing its consumption in undesired reactions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  1. Carbon-coated ceramic membrane reactor for production of hydrogen via aqueous phase reforming of sorbitol

    Neira d'Angelo, M.F.; Ordomskiy, V.; Schouten, J.C.; Schaaf, van der J.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen was produced by aqueous-phase reforming (APR) of sorbitol in a carbon-on-alumina tubular membrane reactor (4 nm pore size, 7 cm long, 3 mm internal diameter) that allows the hydrogen gas to permeate to the shell side, whereas the liquid remains in the tube side. The hydrophobic nature of

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques

  3. Dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion

    Bouwmeester, Henny J.M. [Laboratory for Inorganic Materials Science, Department of Science and Technology and MESA Research Institute, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2003-07-30

    Dense ceramic membranes made from mixed oxygen-ionic and electronic conducting perovskite-related oxides allow separation of oxygen from an air supply at elevated temperatures (>700C). By combining air separation and catalytic partial oxidation of methane to syngas into a ceramic membrane reactor, this technology is expected to significantly reduce the capital costs of conversion of natural gas to liquid added-value products. The present survey is mainly concerned with the material properties that govern the performance of the mixed-conducting membranes in real operating conditions and highlights significant developments in the field.

  4. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  5. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi, E-mail: kinsakai@ngk.co.jp [Corporate R and D, NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya 467-8530 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R and D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  6. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  7. A theoretical analysis of methanol synthesis from CO2 and H2 in a ceramic membrane reactor

    Gallucci, F.; Basile, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this theoretical work the CO2 conversion into methanol in both a traditional reactor (TR) and a membrane reactor (MR) is considered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of increasing CO2 conversion into methanol with respect to a TR. A zeolite MR, able to combine

  8. Continuous production of lactic acid from molasses by perfusion culture of Lactococcus lactis using a stirred ceramic membrane reactor.

    Ohashi, R; Yamamoto, T; Suzuki, T

    1999-01-01

    A perfusion culture system was used for continuous production of lactic acid by retaining cells at a high density of Lactococcus lactis in a stirred ceramic membrane reactor (SCMR). After the cell concentration increased to 248 g/l, half of the culture broth volume was replaced with the fermentation medium. Subsequently, a substrate solution containing glucose (run 1) or molasses (run 2) was continuously supplied to the cells retained in the SCMR. Simultaneously, the culture supernatant was extracted using a ceramic filter with a pore size of 0.2 mum. The dilution rate was initially set at 0.4 h(-1) and gradually decreased to 0.2 h(-1) due to reduction in the permeability of the filter. The concentration of glucose in the substrate solution was adjusted to 60 g/l for the transition and the first period until 240 h, 90 g/l for the second period from 240 h to 440 h, and 70 g/l for the third period from 440 h to 643 h. The average concentration of lactic acid in the filtrate reached 46 g/l in the first period, 43 g/l in the second period, and 33 g/l for the third period. The productivity obtained for the first period reached 15.8 g.l(-1).h(-1), twice as much as that achieved in repeated batch fermentations. Based on the results obtained in run 1, the substrate solution containing 120 g/l of molasses was continuously supplied for 240 h in run 2. The concentration and productivity of lactic acid reached 40 g/l and 10.6 g.l(-1).h(-1), respectively, by continuously replenishing the culture medium at a dilution rate of 0.26 h(-1). These results demonstrated that the filtration capacity of the SCMR was sufficient for a continuous and rapid replenishment of molasses solution from the dense cell culture and, therefore, the perfusion culture system is considered to provide a low-cost process for continuous production of lactic acid from cheap resources.

  9. Ceramics as nuclear reactor fuels

    Reeve, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Ceramics are widely accepted as nuclear reactor fuel materials, for both metal clad ceramic and all-ceramic fuel designs. Metal clad UO 2 is used commercially in large tonnages in five different power reactor designs. UO 2 pellets are made by familiar ceramic techniques but in a reactor they undergo complex thermal and chemical changes which must be thoroughly understood. Metal clad uranium-plutonium dioxide is used in present day fast breeder reactors, but may eventually be replaced by uranium-plutonium carbide or nitride. All-ceramic fuels, which are necessary for reactors operating above about 750 0 C, must incorporate one or more fission product retentive ceramic coatings. BeO-coated BeO matrix dispersion fuels and silicate glaze coated UO 2 -SiO 2 have been studied for specialised applications, but the only commercial high temperature fuel is based on graphite in which small fuel particles, each coated with vapour deposited carbon and silicon carbide, are dispersed. Ceramists have much to contribute to many aspects of fuel science and technology. (author)

  10. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  11. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C in N{sub 2}. Space group of R3c was found to result in a better refinement and is used in this study. The difference for crystal structure, lattice parameters and local crystal chemistry for LSFT nearly unchanged when gas environment switched from air to N{sub 2}. Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at room temperature in air. A bridge-compression fixture was fabricated to achieve stable pre-cracks from Vickers indents. Post fracture evaluation indicated stable crack growth from the indent and a regime of fast fracture. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. The thermal and chemical expansion of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were studied at 800 {le} T {le} 1000 C and at {approx} 1 x 10{sup -15} {le} pO{sub 2} {le} 0.21 atm. The thermal expansion coefficient of the sample was calculated from the dilatometric analysis in the temperature range between room temperature and 1200 C in air. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of

  12. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    Kurath, D.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures

  13. Gas pollutant cleaning by a membrane reactor

    Topis, S.; Koutsonikolas, D.; Kaldis, S. (and others) [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    An alternative technology for the removal of gas pollutants at the integrated gasification combined cycle process for power generation is the use of a catalytic membrane reactor. In the present study, ammonia decomposition in a catalytic reactor, with simultaneous removal of hydrogen through a ceramic membrane, was investigated. A Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was prepared by the dry and wet impregnation method and characterized by ICP, SEM, XRD and N{sub 2} adsorption before and after activation. Commercially available {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes were also characterized and the permeabilities and selectivities of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} were measured by the variable volume method. In parallel with the experimental analysis, the necessary mathematical models were developed to describe the operation of the catalytic membrane reactor and to compare its performance with the conventional reactor. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Gas pollutant cleaning by a membrane reactor

    Kaldis Sotiris

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An alternative technology for the removal of gas pollutants at the integrated gasification combined cycle process for power generation is the use of a catalytic membrane reactor. In the present study, ammonia decomposition in a catalytic reactor, with a simultaneous removal of hydrogen through a ceramic membrane, was investigated. A Ni/Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by the dry and wet impregnation method and characterized by the inductively coupled plasma method, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and N2 adsorption before and after activation. Commercially available a-Al2O3 membranes were also characterized and the permeabilities and permselectivities of H2, N2, and CO2 were measured by the variable volume method. In parallel with the experimental analysis, the necessary mathematical models were developed to describe the operation of the catalytic membrane reactor and to compare its performance with the conventional reactor. .

  15. Gas pollutant cleaning by a membrane reactor

    George E. Skodras; Sotiris Kaldis; Savas G. Topis; Dimitris Koutsonikolas; George P. Sakellaropoulos [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Laboratory, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    An alternative technology for the removal of gas pollutants at the intergrated gasification combined cycle process for power generation is the use of a catalytic membrane reactor. In the present study, ammonia decomposition in a catalytic reactor, with a simultaneous removal of hydrogen through a ceramic membrane, was investigated. A Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was prepared by the dry and wet impregnation method and characterized by ICP, SEM, XRD and N{sub 2} adsorption before and after activation. Commercially available {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes were also characterized and the permeabilities and permselectivities of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} were measured by the variable volume method. In parallel with the experimental analysis, the necessary mathematical models were developed to describe the operation of the catalytic membrane reactor and to compare its performance with the conventional reactor. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    Kurath, D.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  17. Ceramic membranes with mixed conductivity and their application

    Kozhevnikov, V L; Leonidov, I A; Patrakeev, M V

    2013-01-01

    Data on the catalytic reactors with ceramic membranes possessing mixed oxygen ion and electronic conductivity that make it possible to integrate the processes of oxygen separation and oxidation are analyzed and generalized. The development of this approach is of interest for the design of energy efficient and environmentally friendly processes for processing natural gas and other raw materials. The general issues concerning the primary processing of light alkanes in reactors with oxygen separating membranes are expounded and general demands to the membrane materials are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the process of oxidative conversion of methane to synthesis gas. The bibliography includes 110 references

  18. A perfusion culture system using a stirred ceramic membrane reactor for hyperproduction of IgG2a monoclonal antibody by hybridoma cells.

    Dong, Haodi; Tang, Ya-Jie; Ohashi, Ryo; Hamel, Jean-François P

    2005-01-01

    A novel perfusion culture system for efficient production of IgG2a monoclonal antibody (mAb) by hybridoma cells was developed. A ceramic membrane module was constructed and used as a cell retention device installed in a conventional stirred-tank reactor during the perfusion culture. Furthermore, the significance of the control strategy of perfusion rate (volume of fresh medium/working volume of reactor/day, vvd) was investigated. With the highest increasing rate (deltaD, vvd per day, vvdd) of perfusion rate, the maximal viable cell density of 3.5 x 10(7) cells/mL was obtained within 6 days without any limitation and the cell viability was maintained above 95%. At lower deltaD's, the cell growth became limited. Under nutrient-limited condition, the specific cell growth rate (mu) was regulated by deltaD. During the nonlimited growth phase, the specific mAb production rate (qmAb) remained constant at 0.26 +/- 0.02 pg/cell x h in all runs. During the cell growth-limited phase, qmAb was regulated by deltaD within the range of 0.25-0.65 vvdd. Under optimal conditions, qmAb of 0.80 and 2.15 pg/cell x h was obtained during the growth-limited phase and stationary phase, respectively. The overall productivity and yield were 690 mg/L x day and 340 mg/L x medium, respectively. This study demonstrated that this novel perfusion culture system for suspension mammalian cells can support high cell density and efficient mAb production and that deltaD is an important control parameter to regulate and achieve high mAb production.

  19. Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels

    Air Products and Chemicals

    2008-09-30

    An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

  20. Ceramic nanostructure materials, membranes and composite layers

    Burggraaf, A.J.; Keizer, Klaas; van Hassel, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Synthesis methods to obtain nanoscale materials will be briefly discussed with a focus on sol-gel methods. Three types of nanoscale composites (powders, membranes and ion implanted layers) will be discussed and exemplified with recent original research results. Ceramic membranes with a thickness of

  1. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue

    2004-01-01

    technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...

  2. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  3. Innovative hybrid biological reactors using membranes

    Diez, R.; Esteban-Garcia, A. L.; Florio, L. de; Rodriguez-Hernandez, L.; Tejero, I.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present two lines of research on hybrid reactors including the use of membranes, although with different functions: RBPM, biofilm reactors and membranes filtration RBSOM, supported biofilm reactors and oxygen membranes. (Author) 14 refs.

  4. Forced-flow bioreactor for sucrose inversion using ceramic membrane activated by silanization.

    Nakajima, M; Watanabe, A; Jimbo, N; Nishizawa, K; Nakao, S

    1989-02-20

    A forced-flow enzyme membrane reactor system for sucrose inversion was investigated using three ceramic membranes having different pore sizes. Invertase was immobilized chemically to the inner surface of a ceramic membrane activated by a silane-glutaraldehyde technique. With the cross-flow filtration of sucrose solution, the reaction rate was a function of the permeate flux, easily controlled by pressure. Using 0.5 microm support pore size of membrane, the volumetric productivity obtained was 10 times higher than that in a reported immobilized enzyme column reactor, with a short residence time of 5 s and 100% conversion of the sucrose inversion.

  5. Experimental study on ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation

    Jiang Dongsheng; Bu Xueqin; Sun Bing; Lin Guiping; Zhao Hongtao; Cai Yan; Fang Ling

    2016-01-01

    The ceramic membrane oxygen generation technology has advantages of high concentration of produced oxygen and potential nuclear and biochemical protection capability. The present paper studies the ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation. Comparisons are made to have knowledge of the effects of two kinds of ceramic membrane separation technologies on oxygen generation, namely electricity driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (EDCMSOGT) and pressure d...

  6. Method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane and associated product

    Liu, Paul K. T.; Gallaher, George R.; Wu, Jeffrey C. S.

    1993-01-01

    A method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane including passing a selected hydrocarbon vapor through a ceramic membrane and controlling ceramic membrane exposure temperature and ceramic membrane exposure time. The method produces a carbon coated ceramic membrane of reduced pore size and modified surface properties having increased chemical, thermal and hydrothermal stability over an uncoated ceramic membrane.

  7. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  8. Recent advances on polymeric membranes for membrane reactors

    Buonomenna, M. G.; Choi, Seung Hak

    2012-01-01

    . The successful use of membranes in membrane reactors is primary the result of two developments concerning: (i) membrane materials and (ii) membrane structures. The selection of a suited material and preparation technique depends on the application the membrane

  9. Ceramic membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation

    Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Ceramic gas separation membranes can provide very high separation factors if the pore size is sufficiently small to separate gas molecules by molecular sieving and if oversized pores are adequately limited. Ceramic membranes typically have some pores that are substantially larger than the mean pore size and that should be regarded as defects. To assess the effects of such defects on the performance of ceramic membranes, a simple mathematical model has been developed to describe flow through a gas separation membrane that has a primary mode of flow through very small pores but that has a secondary mode of flow through undesirably large pores. This model permits separation factors to be calculated for a specified gas pair as a function of the molecular weights and molecular diameters of the gases, the membrane pore diameter, and the diameter and number of defects. This model will be described, and key results from the model will be presented. The separation factors of the authors membranes continue to be determined using a permeance test system that measures flows of pure gases through a membrane at temperatures up to 275{degrees}C. A primary goal of this project for FY 1996 is to develop a mixed gas separation system for measuring the separation efficiency of membranes at higher temperatures. Performance criteria have been established for the planned mixed gas separation system and design of the system has been completed. The test system is designed to measure the separation efficiency of membranes at temperatures up to 600{degrees}C and pressures up to 100 psi by separating the constituents of a gas mixture containing hydrogen. The system will accommodate the authors typical experimental membrane that is tubular and has a diameter of about 9 mm and a length of about 23 cm. The design of the new test system and its expected performance will be discussed.

  10. Ceramic membranes for gas processing in coal gasification

    Smart, S.; Lin, C.X.C.; Ding, L.; Thambimuthu, K.; da Costa, J.C.D. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia)

    2010-07-01

    Pre-combustion options via coal gasification, especially integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) processes, are attracting the attention of governments, industry and the research community as an attractive alternative to conventional power generation. It is possible to build an IGCC plant with CCS with conventional technologies however; these processes are energy intensive and likely to reduce power plant efficiencies. Novel ceramic membrane technologies, in particular molecular sieving silica (MSS) and pervoskite membranes, offer the opportunity to reduce efficiency losses by separating gases at high temperatures and pressures. MSS membranes can be made preferentially selective for H{sub 2}, enabling both enhanced production, via a water-gas shift membrane reactor, and recovery of H{sub 2} from the syngas stream at high temperatures. They also allow CO{sub 2} to be concentrated at high pressures, reducing the compression loads for transportation and enabling simple integration with CO{sub 2} storage or sequestration operations. Perovskite membranes provide a viable alternative to cryogenic distillation for air separation by delivering the tonnage of oxygen required for coal gasification at a reduced cost. In this review we examine ceramic membrane technologies for high temperature gas separation and discuss the operational, mechanical, design and process considerations necessary for their successful integration into IGCC with CCS systems.

  11. FAS grafted superhydrophobic ceramic membrane

    Lu Jun [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute, 333001 Jingdezhen (China); Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, CAS, 1295 DingXi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Yu Yun, E-mail: yunyush@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, CAS, 1295 DingXi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhou Jianer [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute, 333001 Jingdezhen (China); Song Lixin; Hu Xingfang [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, CAS, 1295 DingXi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Larbot, Andre [Institut Europeen des Membranes, UMR 5635-CNRS, ENSCM, UMII, 1919 Route de Mende 34293, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2009-08-30

    The hydrophobic properties of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane have been obtained by grafting fluoroalkylsilane (FAS) on the surface of the membrane. The following grafting parameters were studied: the eroding time of the original membrane, the grafting time, the concentration of FAS solution and the multiplicity of grafting. Hydrophobicity of the membranes was characterized by contact angle (CA) measurement. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to investigate the weight loss process (25-800 deg. C) of the fluoroalkylsilane grafted on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders under different grafting conditions. The morphologies of the membranes modified under different parameters were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and the surface roughness (Ra) was measured using white light interferometers. A needle-like structure was observed on the membrane surface after modification, which causes the change of Ra. On the results above, we speculated a model to describe the reaction between FAS and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane surface as well as the formed surface morphology.

  12. FAS grafted superhydrophobic ceramic membrane

    Lu, Jun; Yu, Yun; Zhou, Jianer; Song, Lixin; Hu, Xingfang; Larbot, Andre

    2009-08-01

    The hydrophobic properties of γ-Al 2O 3 membrane have been obtained by grafting fluoroalkylsilane (FAS) on the surface of the membrane. The following grafting parameters were studied: the eroding time of the original membrane, the grafting time, the concentration of FAS solution and the multiplicity of grafting. Hydrophobicity of the membranes was characterized by contact angle (CA) measurement. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to investigate the weight loss process (25-800 °C) of the fluoroalkylsilane grafted on Al 2O 3 powders under different grafting conditions. The morphologies of the membranes modified under different parameters were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and the surface roughness (Ra) was measured using white light interferometers. A needle-like structure was observed on the membrane surface after modification, which causes the change of Ra. On the results above, we speculated a model to describe the reaction between FAS and γ-Al 2O 3 membrane surface as well as the formed surface morphology.

  13. Precursors-Derived Ceramic Membranes for High-Temperature Separation of Hydrogen

    Yuji, Iwamoto

    2007-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the development of hydrogen-permselective ceramic membranes derived from organometallic precursors. Microstructure and gas transport property of microporous amorphous silica-based membranes are briefly described. Then, high-temperature hydrogen permselectivity, hydrothermal stability as well as hydrogen/steam selectivity of the amorphous silica-based membranes are discussed from a viewpoint of application to membrane reactors for conversion enhancement...

  14. Refining of biodiesel by ceramic membrane separation

    Wang, Yong; Ou, Shiyi; Tan, Yanlai; Tang, Shuze [Department of Food Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Wang, Xingguo; Liu, Yuanfa [School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214112 (China)

    2009-03-15

    A ceramic membrane separation process for biodiesel refining was developed to reduce the considerable usage of water needed in the conventional water washing process. Crude biodiesel produced by refined palm oil was micro-filtered by ceramic membranes of the pore size of 0.6, 0.2 and 0.1 {mu}m to remove the residual soap and free glycerol, at the transmembrane pressure of 0.15 MPa and temperature of 60 C. The flux through membrane maintained at 300 L m{sup -} {sup 2} h{sup -} {sup 1} when the volumetric concentrated ratio reached 4. The content of potassium, sodium, calcium and magnesium in the whole permeate was 1.40, 1.78, 0.81 and 0.20 mg/kg respectively, as determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. These values are lower than the EN 14538 specifications. The residual free glycerol in the permeate was estimated by water extraction, its value was 0.0108 wt.%. This ceramic membrane technology was a potential environmental process for the refining of biodiesel. (author)

  15. Robust, high temperature-ceramic membranes for gas separation

    Berchtold, Kathryn A.; Young, Jennifer S.

    2014-07-29

    A method of making ceramic membranes, and the ceramic membranes so formed, comprising combining a ceramic precursor with an organic or inorganic comonomer, forming the combination as a thin film on a substrate, photopolymerizing the thin film, and pyrolyzing the photopolymerized thin film.

  16. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    None

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will focus on the development and application of nonporous high gas flux perfluoro membranes with high temperature rating and excellent chemical resistance.

  17. Ceramic membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation

    Adcock, K.D.; Fain, D.E.; James, D.L.; Powell, L.E.; Raj, T.; Roettger, G.E.; Sutton, T.G. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The separative performance of the authors` ceramic membranes has been determined in the past using a permeance test system that measured flows of pure gases through a membrane at temperatures up to 275 C. From these data, the separation factor was determined for a particular gas pair from the ratio of the pure gas specific flows. An important project goal this year has been to build a Mixed Gas Separation System (MGSS) for measuring the separation efficiencies of membranes at higher temperatures and using mixed gases. The MGSS test system has been built, and initial operation has been achieved. The MGSS is capable of measuring the separation efficiency of membranes at temperatures up to 600 C and pressures up to 100 psi using a binary gas mixture such as hydrogen/methane. The mixed gas is fed into a tubular membrane at pressures up to 100 psi, and the membrane separates the feed gas mixture into a permeate stream and a raffinate stream. The test membrane is sealed in a stainless steel holder that is mounted in a split tube furnace to permit membrane separations to be evaluated at temperatures up to 600 C. The compositions of the three gas streams are measured by a gas chromatograph equipped with thermal conductivity detectors. The test system also measures the temperatures and pressures of all three gas streams as well as the flow rate of the feed stream. These data taken over a range of flows and pressures permit the separation efficiency to be determined as a function of the operating conditions. A mathematical model of the separation has been developed that permits the data to be reduced and the separation factor for the membrane to be determined.

  18. Experimental study on ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation

    Jiang Dongsheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ceramic membrane oxygen generation technology has advantages of high concentration of produced oxygen and potential nuclear and biochemical protection capability. The present paper studies the ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation. Comparisons are made to have knowledge of the effects of two kinds of ceramic membrane separation technologies on oxygen generation, namely electricity driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (EDCMSOGT and pressure driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (PDCMSOGT. Experiments were conducted under different temperatures, pressures of feed air and produced oxygen flow rates. On the basis of these experiments, the flow rate of feed air, electric power provided, oxygen recovery rate and concentration of produced oxygen are compared under each working condition. It is concluded that the EDCMSOGT is the oxygen generation means more suitable for onboard conditions.

  19. Ceramic membrane defouling (cleaning) by air Nano Bubbles.

    Ghadimkhani, Aliasghar; Zhang, Wen; Marhaba, Taha

    2016-03-01

    Ceramic membranes are among the most promising technologies for membrane applications, owing to their excellent resistance to mechanical, chemical, and thermal stresses. However, membrane fouling is still an issue that hampers the applications at large scales. Air Nano Bubbles (NBs), due to high mass transfer efficiency, could potentially prevent fouling of ceramic membrane filtration processes. In this study, bench and pilot scale ceramic membrane filtration was performed with air NBs to resist fouling. To simulate fouling, humic acid, as an organic foulant, was applied to the membrane flat sheet surface. Complete membrane clogging was achieved in less than 6 h. Membrane defouling (cleaning) was performed by directly feeding of air NBs to the membrane cells. The surface of the ceramic membrane was superbly cleaned by air NBs, as revealed by atomic force microscope (AFM) images before and after the treatment. The permeate flux recovered to its initial level (e.g., 26.7 × 10(-9) m(3)/m(2)/s at applied pressure of 275.8 kPa), which indicated that NBs successfully unclogged the pores of the membrane. The integrated ceramic membrane and air NBs system holds potential as an innovative sustainable technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent advances on polymeric membranes for membrane reactors

    Buonomenna, M. G.

    2012-06-24

    Membrane reactors are generally applied in high temperature reactions (>400 °C). In the field of fine chemical synthesis, however, much milder conditions are generally applicable and polymeric membranes were applied without their damage. The successful use of membranes in membrane reactors is primary the result of two developments concerning: (i) membrane materials and (ii) membrane structures. The selection of a suited material and preparation technique depends on the application the membrane is to be used in. In this chapter a review of up to date literature about polymers and configuration catalyst/ membranes used in some recent polymeric membrane reactors is given. The new emerging concept of polymeric microcapsules as catalytic microreactors has been proposed. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. All rights reserved.

  1. One Step Biomass Gas Reforming-Shift Separation Membrane Reactor

    Roberts, Michael J. [Gas Technology Institute; Souleimanova, Razima [Gas Technology Institute

    2012-12-28

    GTI developed a plan where efforts were concentrated in 4 major areas: membrane material development, membrane module development, membrane process development, and membrane gasifier scale-up. GTI assembled a team of researchers to work in each area. Task 1.1 Ceramic Membrane Synthesis and Testing was conducted by Arizona State University (ASU), Task 1.2 Metallic Membrane Synthesis and Testing was conducted by the U.S. National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Task 1.3 was conducted by SCHOTT, and GTI was to test all membranes that showed potential. The initial focus of the project was concentrated on membrane material development. Metallic and glass-based membranes were identified as hydrogen selective membranes under the conditions of the biomass gasification, temperatures above 700C and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. Membranes were synthesized by arc-rolling for metallic type membranes and incorporating Pd into a glass matrix for glass membranes. Testing for hydrogen permeability properties were completed and the effects of hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide were investigated for perspective membranes. The initial candidate membrane of Pd80Cu20 chosen in 2008 was selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. Although the H2A analysis results indicated a $1.96 cost per gge H2 based on a 5A (micron) thick PdCu membrane, there was not long-term operation at the required flux to satisfy the go/no go decision. Since the future PSA case yielded a $2.00/gge H2, DOE decided that there was insufficient savings compared with the already proven PSA technology to further pursue the membrane reactor design. All ceramic membranes synthesized by ASU during the project showed low hydrogen flux as compared with metallic membranes. The best ceramic membrane showed hydrogen permeation flux of 0.03 SCFH/ft2 at the required process conditions while the metallic membrane, Pd80Cu20 showed a flux of 47.2 SCFH/ft2 (3 orders of magnitude difference). Results from

  2. ENHANCEMENT OF EQUILIBRIUMSHIFT IN DEHYDROGENATION REACTIONS USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR; FINAL

    Shamsuddin Ilias, Ph.d., P.E.; Franklin G. King, D.Sc.

    2001-01-01

    With the advances in new inorganic materials and processing techniques, there has been renewed interest in exploiting the benefits of membranes in many industrial applications. Inorganic and composite membranes are being considered as potential candidates for use in membrane-reactor configuration for effectively increasing reaction rate, selectivity and yield of equilibrium limited reactions. To investigate the usefulness of a palladium-ceramic composite membrane in a membrane reactor-separator configuration, we investigated the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane by equilibrium shift. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model was developed to study the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane by equilibrium shift in a tubular membrane reactor. Radial diffusion was considered to account for the concentration gradient in the radial direction due to permeation through the membrane. For a dehydrogenation reaction, the feed stream to the reaction side contained cyclohexane and argon, while the separation side used argon as the sweep gas. Equilibrium conversion for dehydrogenation of cyclohexane is 18.7%. The present study showed that 100% conversion could be achieved by equilibrium shift using Pd-ceramic membrane reactor. For a feed containing cyclohexane and argon of 1.64 x 10(sup -6) and 1.0 x 10(sup -3) mol/s, over 98% conversion could be readily achieved. The dehydrogenation of cyclohexane was also experimentally investigated in a palladium-ceramic membrane reactor. The Pd-ceramic membrane was fabricated by electroless deposition of palladium on ceramic substrate. The performance of Pd-ceramic membrane was compared with a commercially available hydrogen-selective ceramic membrane. From limited experimental data it was observed that by appropriate choice of feed flow rate and sweep gas rate, the conversion of cyclohexane to benzene and hydrogen can increased to 56% at atmospheric pressure and 200 C in a Pd-ceramic membrane reactor. In the commercial ceramic membrane

  3. Sol-gel applications for ceramic membrane preparation

    Erdem, I.

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic membranes possessing superior properties compared to polymeric membranes are more durable under severe working conditions and therefore their service life is longer. The ceramic membranes are composed of some layers. The support is the layer composed of coarser ceramic structure and responsible for mechanical durability under filtration pressure and it is prepared by consolidation of ceramic powders. The top layer is composed of a finer ceramic micro-structure mainly responsible for the separation of components present in the fluid to be filtered and sol-gel method is a versatile tool to prepare such a tailor-made ceramic filtration structure with finer pores. Depending on the type of filtration (e.g. micro-filtration, ultra-filtration, nano-filtration) aiming separation of components with different sizes, sols with different particulate sizes should be prepared and consolidated with varying precursors and preparation conditions. The coating of sol on the support layer and heat treatment application to have a stable ceramic micro-structure are also important steps determining the final properties of the top layer. Sol-gel method with various controllable parameters (e.g. precursor type, sol formation kinetics, heat treatment conditions) is a practical tool for the preparation of top layers of ceramic composite membranes with desired physicochemical properties.

  4. A Catalytically Active Membrane Reactor for Fast, Highly Exothermic, Heterogeneous Gas Reactions. A Pilot Plant Study

    Veldsink, Jan W.; Versteeg, Geert F.; Swaaij, Wim P.M. van

    1995-01-01

    Membrane reactors have been frequently studied because of their ability to combine chemical activity and separation properties into one device. Due to their thermal stability and mechanical strength, ceramic membranes are preferred over polymeric ones, but small transmembrane fluxes obstruct a

  5. A catalytically membrane reactor for fast, highly exothermic, heterogeneous gas reactions : a pilot plant study

    Veldsink, J.W.; Veldsink, J.W.; Versteeg, Geert; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1995-01-01

    Membrane reactors have been frequently studied because of their ability to combine chemical activity and separation properties into one device. Due to their thermal stability and mechanical strength, ceramic membranes are preferred over polymeric ones, but small transmembrane fluxes obstruct a

  6. NOVEL CERAMIC MEMBRANE FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION; SEMIANNUAL

    Jerry Y.S. Lin; Jun-ichi Ida

    2001-01-01

    This project is aimed at demonstrating technical feasibility for a lithium zirconate based dense ceramic membrane for separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas at high temperature. The research work conducted in this reporting period was focused on several fundamental issues of lithium zirconate important to the development of the dense inorganic membrane. These fundamental issues include material synthesis of lithium zirconate, phases and microstructure of lithium zirconate and structure change of lithium zirconate during sorption/desorption process. The results show difficulty to prepare the dense ceramic membrane from pure lithium zirconate, but indicate a possibility to prepare the dense inorganic membrane for carbon dioxide separation from a composite lithium zirconate

  7. Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane

    Peterson, Reid A.; Hill, Jr., Charles G.; Anderson, Marc A.

    1996-01-01

    Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

  8. Deposition and consolidation of porous ceramic films for membrane separation

    Elmøe, Tobias Dokkedal; Tricoli, Antonio; Johannessen, Tue

    The deposition of porous ceramic films for membrane separation can be done by several processes such as thermophoresis [1], dip-coating [2] and spray pyrolysis [3]. Here we present a high-speed method, in which ceramic nano-particles form a porous film by filtration on top of a porous ceramic...... substrate [4]. Ceramic nano-particles are generated in a flame, using either a premixed (gas) flame, in which a metal-oxide precursor is evaporated in an N2 stream, which is combusted with methane and air, or using a flame spray pyrolysis, in which a liquid metal-oxide precursor is sprayed through a nozzle...

  9. Recent advances on membranes and membrane reactors for hydrogen production

    Gallucci, F.; Fernandez Gesalaga, E.; Corengia, P.; Sint Annaland, van M.

    2013-01-01

    Membranes and membrane reactors for pure hydrogen production are widely investigated not only because of the important application areas of hydrogen, but especially because mechanically and chemically stable membranes with high perm-selectivity towards hydrogen are available and are continuously

  10. Deashing of coal liquids with ceramic membrane microfiltration and diafiltration

    Bishop, B.; Goldsmith, R. [CeraMem Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Removal of mineral matter from liquid hydrocarbons derived from the direct liquefaction of coal is required for product acceptability. Current methods include critical solvent deashing (Rose{sup {reg_sign}} process from Kerr-McGee) and filtration (U.S. Filter leaf filter as used by British Coal). These methods produce ash reject streams containing up to 15% of the liquid hydrocarbon product. Consequently, CeraMem proposed the use of low cost, ceramic crossflow membranes for the filtration of coal liquids bottoms to remove mineral matter and subsequent diafiltration (analogous to cake washing in dead-ended filtration) for the removal of coal liquid from the solids stream. The use of these ceramic crossflow membranes overcomes the limitations of traditional polymeric crossflow membranes by having the ability to operate at elevated temperature and to withstand prolonged exposure to hydrocarbon and solvent media. In addition, CeraMem`s membrane filters are significantly less expensive than competitive ceramic membranes due to their unique construction. With these ceramic membrane filters, it may be possible to reduce the product losses associated with traditional deashing processes at an economically attractive cost. The performance of these ceramic membrane microfilters is discussed.

  11. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    Feinroth, H.

    2000-01-01

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  12. Development of ceramic vacuum pumps for fusion reactors

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    To achieve the magnetic field resistance and tritium resistance which are required for vacuum pumps for fusion reactors, a vacuum pump consisting of middle-ceramic turbo molecular pump (TMP), using ceramic rotor and ceramic turbo roughing pump was developed. In colaboration with the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, performance tests on pumping speed, compression ratio of middle-ceramic TMP and both of pumping characteristics were carried out. Sufficient performances were obtained. It was showed that middle-ceramic TMP had pumping speed of more than 500 l/s, and could achieve the pressure below 4 x 10 -7 Pa. Ceramic turbo roughing pump could vacuum from atmospheric pressure. It is concluded that complete oil-free ceramic vacuum pump can be put into practical use (K.S.)

  13. Breakthrough in ceramic membranes; Doorbraak in keramische membranen

    Vente, J.F.; Van Veen, H.M. [ECN Energy Efficiency in the Industry, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-06-15

    Ceramic membranes have a promising potential for carrying out separations in a more energy efficient manner in the petrochemical industry. Researchers of ECN and the Universities of Twente and Amsterdam developed a new ceramic membrane that has a higher hydrothermal stability than existing membranes. [mk]. [Dutch] Keramische membranen gelden als potentieel veelbelovend om scheidingen in de petrochemische industrie energiezuiniger uit te voeren. Onderzoekers van ECN en de universiteiten van Twente en Amsterdam ontwikkelden een nieuw keramisch membraan dat een hogere hydrothermische stabiliteit heeft dan bestaande membranen.

  14. Application of ceramic membranes to SAGD produced water treatment for enhanced recycle and reuse

    Minnich, K. [Veolia Water Solutions and Technologies, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Drivers for using ceramic membranes in steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) include reduced investment cost; alternative treatment technologies that reduce energy and greenhouse gas emissions; and ceramic membranes can be chemically and steam cleaned. This presentation discussed the application of ceramic membranes to SAGD produced water treatment for enhanced recycle and reuse. The presentation illustrated conventional ceramic membranes as well as surface enhanced membranes and provided background information on oil separation. Other topics that were discussed included issues regarding desalter bottoms de-oiling; challenges in de-oiling oil sands produced water; CeraMem surface enhanced membranes; surface facilities and ceramic membrane opportunities; and water treatment using ceramic membranes. The presentation concluded with a discussion of the application of ceramic membranes to SAGD next steps such as a demonstration test of industrial prototype membranes for de-oiling, and pilot testing of ceramic desilication. tabs., figs.

  15. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF CERAMICS MICROFILTRATION MEMBRANE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    F.T. Owoeye

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic membranes are especially suitable for processes with high temperatures and harsh chemical environments or for processes where sterilizability of the membrane is important. The main objective of this work is to determine the evaluation of four different ceramic membranes with different material compositions. Ceramic disc type microfiltration membranes were fabricated by the mould and press method from different percentage compositions of clay, kaolin, sawdust and wood charcoal. The fabricated membranes were sintered at a temperature of 1100°C and characterized by an X-ray diffractometer and optical scanner. Compressibility tests and physical properties of the membranes were also examined. It was observed that, as the percentage composition of kaolin increased from 0 to 80% and the percentage composition of clay decreased from 80 to 0% respectively, the compressive stress of all the sample membranes increased, with an increase in compressive strain from 1.8 to 2.4. Sample A had the highest value of compressive stress from 1.8 to 2.2 compressive strain, but sample B had the highest value of compressive stress of 150MPa at a compressive strain of 2.4. Optical micrographs of all membranes showed the presence of uniformly distributed pores and no cracks were seen around them. It was concluded that, with increasing percentage of kaolin and decreasing percentage of clay, there was a decrease in porosity and water absorption, as well as a decrease in the mechanical properties of the fabricated membranes.

  16. Innovative hybrid biological reactors using membranes; Reactores biologico hibrido innovadores utilizando membranas

    Diez, R.; Esteban-Garcia, A. L.; Florio, L. de; Rodriguez-Hernandez, L.; Tejero, I.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we present two lines of research on hybrid reactors including the use of membranes, although with different functions: RBPM, biofilm reactors and membranes filtration RBSOM, supported biofilm reactors and oxygen membranes. (Author) 14 refs.

  17. Fabrication of Ceramic Membrane Chromatography for Biologics Purification

    Maizirwan Mel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromatography is one of the most important separation processes of choice for the recovery/purification of proteins and complex bio-structures. Fabrication of chromatographic membranes and their efficiency in the chromatography process has been the subject of many recent researches. In this study, a coin-like, 13 mm diameter and 3 mm thick, ceramic membrane was fabricated to be used as a chromatographic medium. The membrane is used to replace the conventional resin-based chromatography columns. Hydroxyapatite (HA powder was used as a material for the membrane fabrication. In this project, a HA powder was produced using starch as pore creating agents. Characterization processes were done for the ceramic membrane using the suitable apparatuses. Three parameters of the fabrication process (starch wt %, compaction pressure and sintering temperature were manipulated to optimize the performance of the membrane. The fabricated membrane was placed in a (FPLC system to be tested for its performance as an adsorptive membrane. (IMAC process was run by immobilizing Ni2+ ions at the membrane particles surfaces. NP protein of the (NDV was used to test the membrane's ability to bind Histidine-tagged proteins. The optimum set of process parameters that yielded in the highest porosity and good chromatogram was determined to be 5 wt % starch, 3000 psi compaction pressure and 1100°C sintering temperature.ABSTRAK: Kromatografi merupakan satu daripada proses pengasingan yang penting yang dipilih untuk perolehan/penapisan protein dan biostruktur yang kompleks. Pemfabrikatan membran kromatografi dan kecekapannya dalam proses kromatografi merupakan fokus beberapa kajian terkini. Dalam kajian ini, membran seramik berbentuk duit syiling, berdiameter 13 mm dengan ketebalan 3 mm, direka untuk digunakan sebagai perantara kromatografi. Membran ini digunakan untuk menggantikan turus kromatografi berasaskan resin yang lazim. Serbuk hidroksiapatit (HA digunakan sebagai bahan

  18. CO2 separation from biogas with ceramic membranes

    Fassauer, Burkhardt; Richter, Hannes; Schwarz, Bjoern; Reger-Wagner, Norman; Kaemnitz, Susanne; Lubenau, Udo; Mothes, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Biogas contains after the production of up to 55% CO 2 . In order to use biogas as a fuel or to feed it into the natural gas network, it must be purified before. Adsorption and scrubbing processes are primarily used technically. Membrane processes offer the advantage of continuous operation and a simple modular and flexible system design, which imply relatively low investment costs and low energy needs. Moreover, membrane systems can be started up and shut down quickly without any problems. Ceramic membranes are characterised by high stability (thermal, chemical, mechanical) and very high flows in comparison to polymeric membranes. [de

  19. CFD Simulation of an Anaerobic Membrane BioReactor (AnMBR to Treat Industrial Wastewater

    Laura C. Zuluaga

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulation has been developed for an Anaerobic Membrane BioReactor (AnMBR to treat industrial wastewater. As the process consists of a side-stream MBR, two separate simulations were created: (i reactor and (ii membrane. Different cases were conducted for each one, so the surrounding temperature and the total suspended solids (TSS concentration were checked. For the reactor, the most important aspects to consider were the dead zones and the mixing, whereas for the ceramic membrane, it was the shear stress over the membrane surface. Results show that the reactor's mixing process was adequate and that the membrane presented higher shear stress in the 'triangular' channel.

  20. APPLICATION OF MEMBRANE SORPTION REACTOR TECHNOLOGY FOR LRW MANAGEMENT

    Glagolenko, Yuri; Dzekun, Evgeny; Myasoedovg, Boris; Gelis, Vladimir; Kozlitin, Evgeny; Milyutin, Vitaly; Trusov, Lev; Rengel, Mike; Mackay, Stewart M.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A new membrane-sorption technology has been recently developed and industrially implemented in Russia for the treatment of the Liquid (Low-Level) Radioactive Waste (LRW). The first step of the technology is a precipitation of the radionuclides and/or their adsorption onto sorbents of small particle size. The second step is filtration of the precipitate/sorbent through the metal-ceramic membrane, Trumem.. The unique feature of the technology is a Membrane-Sorption Reactor (MSR), in which the precipitation / sorption and the filtration of the radionuclides occur simultaneously, in one stage. This results in high efficiency, high productivity and compactness of the equipment, which are the obvious advantages of the developed technology. Two types of MSR based on Flat Membranes device and Centrifugal Membrane device were developed. The advantages and disadvantages of application of each type of the reactors are discussed. The MSR technology has been extensively tested and efficiently implemented at ''Mayak '' nuclear facility near Chelyabinsk, Russia as well as at other Russian sites. The results of this and other applications of the MSR technology at the different Russian nuclear facilities are discussed. The results of the first industrial applications of the MSR technology for radioactive waste treatment in Russia and analysis of the available information about LRW accumulated in other countries imply that this technology can be successfully used for the Low Level Radioactive Waste treatment in the USA and in other nuclear countries

  1. Comparison of filtration and treatment performance between polymeric and ceramic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor treatment of domestic wastewater

    Jeong, Yeongmi

    2018-02-28

    The feasibility of an anaerobic ceramic membrane bioreactor (AnCMBR) was investigated by comparison with a conventional anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). With regard to treatment performance, the AnCMBR achieved higher organic removal rates than the AnMBR because the ceramic membranes retained a high concentration of biomass in the reactor. Despite a high mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS) concentration, the AnCMBR exhibited lower membrane fouling. To elucidate effects of sludge properties on membrane fouling in the AnCMBR and AnMBR, soluble microbial products (SMPs) and extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) were analyzed. The SMP and EPS concentrations in the AnCMBR were higher than in the AnMBR. This may be because some suspended solids bio-degraded and likely released protein-like SMPs in the AnCMBR. Hydrophobicity and surface charges were analyzed; the sludge in the AnCMBR was found to be more hydrophobic and less negative than in the AnMBR because protein was abundant in the AnCMBR. Despite the adverse properties of the sludge in the AnCMBR, it showed more stable filtration performance than the AnMBR. This is because the alumina-based ceramic membrane had a superhydrophilic surface and could thus mitigate membrane fouling by hydrophilic-hydrophobic repulsion. The findings from this study have significant implications for extending the application of AnCMBRs to, for example, treatment of high-strength organic waste such as food waste or livestock manure.

  2. Comparison of filtration and treatment performance between polymeric and ceramic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor treatment of domestic wastewater

    Jeong, Yeongmi; Kim, Youngjin; Jin, Yongxun; Hong, Seungkwan; Park, Chanhyuk

    2018-01-01

    The feasibility of an anaerobic ceramic membrane bioreactor (AnCMBR) was investigated by comparison with a conventional anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). With regard to treatment performance, the AnCMBR achieved higher organic removal rates than the AnMBR because the ceramic membranes retained a high concentration of biomass in the reactor. Despite a high mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS) concentration, the AnCMBR exhibited lower membrane fouling. To elucidate effects of sludge properties on membrane fouling in the AnCMBR and AnMBR, soluble microbial products (SMPs) and extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) were analyzed. The SMP and EPS concentrations in the AnCMBR were higher than in the AnMBR. This may be because some suspended solids bio-degraded and likely released protein-like SMPs in the AnCMBR. Hydrophobicity and surface charges were analyzed; the sludge in the AnCMBR was found to be more hydrophobic and less negative than in the AnMBR because protein was abundant in the AnCMBR. Despite the adverse properties of the sludge in the AnCMBR, it showed more stable filtration performance than the AnMBR. This is because the alumina-based ceramic membrane had a superhydrophilic surface and could thus mitigate membrane fouling by hydrophilic-hydrophobic repulsion. The findings from this study have significant implications for extending the application of AnCMBRs to, for example, treatment of high-strength organic waste such as food waste or livestock manure.

  3. Hydrogen Production by Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Coke Oven Gas in BaCo0.7Fe0.3-xZrxO3-δ Ceramic Membrane Reactors

    Yao Weilin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The BaCo0.7Fe0.3-xZrxO3-δ (BCFZ, x = 0.04–0.12 mixed ionic–electronic conducting (MIEC membranes were synthesized with a sol–gel method and evaluated as potential membrane reactor materials for the partial oxidation of coke oven gas (COG. The effect of zirconium content on the phase structure, microstructure and performance of the BCFZ membrane under He or COG atmosphere were systemically investigated. The BaCo0.7Fe0.24Zr0.06O3-δ membrane exhibited the best oxygen permeability and good operation stability, which could be a potential candidate of the membrane materials for hydrogen production through the partial oxidation of COG.

  4. Modelling and analysis of CVD processes for ceramic membrane preparation

    Brinkman, H.W.; Cao, G.Z.; Meijerink, J.; de Vries, Karel Jan; Burggraaf, Anthonie

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented that describes the modified chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process (which takes place in advance of the electrochemical vapour deposition (EVD) process) to deposit ZrO2 inside porous media for the preparation and modification of ceramic membranes. The isobaric

  5. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2012-09-11

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  6. Hydrogenation of Maltose in Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Maltitol Production

    Makertihartha I.G.B.N.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Maltitol is one of the low-calorie sweeteners which has a major role in food industries. Due to its characteristics of comparable sweetness level to sucrose, maltitol can be a suitable sugar replacement. In this work, catalytic membrane reactor (CMR was examined in maltitol production through hydrogenation of maltose. Commercial ceramic membrane impregnated with Kalcat 8030 Nickel was used as the CMR. The reaction was conducted at a batch mode operation, 95 to 110°C of temperature, and 5 to 8 bar of pressure. In the range of working conditions used in this study, up to 47% conversion was achieved. The reaction conversion was significantly affected by temperature and pressure. Results of this preliminary study indicated that CMR can be used for hydrogenation of maltose with good performance under a relatively low operating pressure.

  7. Hydrophilic Fe2O3 dynamic membrane mitigating fouling of support ceramic membrane in ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsion

    Lu, Dongwei; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Lu, Xinglin; Liu, Qianliang; Jiang, Jin; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Oil/water (O/W) emulsion is daily produced and difficult to be treated effectively. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration is one of reliable processes for the treatment of O/W emulsion, yet still hindered by membrane fouling. In this study, two types of Fe2O3 dynamic membranes (i.e., pre-coated dynamic membrane and self-forming dynamic membrane) were prepared to mitigate the fouling of support ceramic membrane in O/W emulsion treatment. Pre-coated dynamic membrane (DM) significantly reduced the fouling of ceramic membrane (i.e., 10% increase of flux recovery rate), while self-forming dynamic membrane aggravated ceramic membrane fouling (i.e., 8.6% decrease of flux recovery rate) after four filtration cycles. A possible fouling mechanism was proposed to explain this phenomenon, which was then confirmed by optical images of fouled membranes and the analysis of COD rejection. In addition, the cleaning efficiency of composite membranes (i.e., Fe2O3 dynamic membrane and support ceramic membrane) was enhanced by substitution of alkalescent water backwash for deionized water backwash. The possible reason for this enhancement was also explained. Our result suggests that pre-coated Fe2O3 dynamic membrane with alkalescent water backwash can be a promising technology to reduce the fouling of ceramic membrane and enhance membrane cleaning efficiency in the treatment of oily wastewater.

  8. Hydrophilic Fe2O3 dynamic membrane mitigating fouling of support ceramic membrane in ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsion

    Lu, Dongwei

    2016-03-17

    Oil/water (O/W) emulsion is daily produced and difficult to be treated effectively. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration is one of reliable processes for the treatment of O/W emulsion, yet still hindered by membrane fouling. In this study, two types of Fe2O3 dynamic membranes (i.e., pre-coated dynamic membrane and self-forming dynamic membrane) were prepared to mitigate the fouling of support ceramic membrane in O/W emulsion treatment. Pre-coated dynamic membrane (DM) significantly reduced the fouling of ceramic membrane (i.e., 10% increase of flux recovery rate), while self-forming dynamic membrane aggravated ceramic membrane fouling (i.e., 8.6% decrease of flux recovery rate) after four filtration cycles. A possible fouling mechanism was proposed to explain this phenomenon, which was then confirmed by optical images of fouled membranes and the analysis of COD rejection. In addition, the cleaning efficiency of composite membranes (i.e., Fe2O3 dynamic membrane and support ceramic membrane) was enhanced by substitution of alkalescent water backwash for deionized water backwash. The possible reason for this enhancement was also explained. Our result suggests that pre-coated Fe2O3 dynamic membrane with alkalescent water backwash can be a promising technology to reduce the fouling of ceramic membrane and enhance membrane cleaning efficiency in the treatment of oily wastewater.

  9. Compatibility of sodium with ceramic oxides employed in nuclear reactors

    Acena, V.

    1981-01-01

    A review of experiments carried out up to the present time on the corrosion and compatibility of ceramic oxides with liquid sodium at temperatures corresponding to those in fast breeder reactors, is presented. The results of a thermo-dynamic/liquid sodium reactions are included. The exercise has been conducted with a view to effecting experimental studies in the future. (author) [es

  10. Compatibility of sodium with ceramic oxides employed in nuclear reactors

    Acena Moreno, V.

    1981-01-01

    This work is a review of experiments carried out up to the present time on the corrosion and compatibility of ceramic oxides with liquid sodium at temperatures corresponding to those in fast breeder reactors. The review also includes the results of a thermo-dynamic/liquid sodium reactions. The exercise has been conducted with a view to effecting experimental studies in the future. (Author)

  11. Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass in a Ceramic Reactor

    Castello, Daniele; Rolli, Birgit; Kruse, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    of stainless steel and Inconel 625. The results show that the three devices have similar performance patterns in terms of gas production, although in the ceramic reactor higher yields of C2+ hydrocarbons were obtained. The SEM observation of the reacted alumina surface revealed a good resistance...

  12. Counter-current membrane reactor for WGS process: Membrane design

    Piemonte, Vincenzo; Favetta, Barbara [Department of Chemical Engineering Materials and Environment, University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); De Falco, Marcello [Faculty of Engineering, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, via Alvaro del Portillo 21, 00128 Rome (Italy); Basile, Angelo [CNR-ITM, c/o University of Calabria, Via Pietro Bucci, Cubo 17/C, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy)

    2010-11-15

    Water gas shift (WGS) is a thermodynamically limited reaction which has to operate at low temperatures, reducing kinetics rate and increasing the amount of catalyst required to reach valuable CO conversions. It has been widely demonstrated that the integration of hydrogen selective membranes is a promising way to enhance WGS reactors performance: a Pd-based MR operated successfully overcoming the thermodynamic constraints of a traditional reactor thanks to the removal of hydrogen from reaction environment. In the first part of a MR, the H{sub 2} partial pressure starts from a minimum value since the reaction has not started. As a consequence, if the carrier gas in the permeation zone is sent in counter-current, which is the most efficient configuration, in the first reactor section the H{sub 2} partial pressure in reaction zone is low while in the permeation zone is high, potentially implying back permeation. This means a bad utilization of the first part of the membrane area and thus, a worsening of the MR performance with lower H{sub 2} recovery and lower CO conversion with respect to the case in which the whole selective surface is properly used. To avoid this problem different MR configurations were evaluated by a 1-D pseudo-homogeneous model, validated with WGS industrial data reported in scientific literature. It was demonstrated that the permeated H{sub 2} flow rate per membrane surface, i.e. the membrane flux, strongly improves if selective membrane is placed only in the second part of the reactor: in fact, if the membrane is placed at L{sub m}/L{sub tot} = 0.5, the membrane flux is 0.2 kmol/(m{sup 2}h) about, if it is placed along all reactor tube (L{sub m}/L{sub tot} = 1), flux is 0.05 kmol/(m{sup 2}h). The effect of the L/D reactor ratio and of the reactor wall temperature on the CO conversion were also assessed. (author)

  13. Ceramic membrane technologies for gas separation

    Badwal, S.P.S.; Ciacchi, F.T.

    2000-01-01

    Solid state electrochemical cells based on oxygen-ion or proton conduction (pure ionic or mixed ionic/electronic conductors) allow selective transport of oxygen (oxygen-ion conducting materials) or hydrogen (for proton conducting materials) in the form of ionic flux at high temperatures. Thus these systems can act as filters for molecular oxygen or hydrogen and can be used for both generation or removal of these gases selectively. The usage of such devices are numerous including control of atmosphere in industrial environments to production of power and chemicals, in petroleum and medical industries, and in combustion processes. In this paper, a brief overview of the technology has been given and various doped materials for construction of such devices, such as zirconia, ceria, bismuth oxides or lanthanum gallates have been briefly reviewed. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  14. Electroviscous Effects in Ceramic Nanofiltration Membranes.

    Farsi, Ali; Boffa, Vittorio; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2015-11-16

    Membrane permeability and salt rejection of a γ-alumina nanofiltration membrane were studied and modeled for different salt solutions. Salt rejection was predicted by using the Donnan-steric pore model, in which the extended Nernst-Planck equation was applied to predict ion transport through the pores. The solvent flux was modeled by using the Hagen-Poiseuille equation by introducing electroviscosity instead of bulk viscosity. γ-Alumina particles were used for ζ-potential measurements. The ζ-potential measurements show that monovalent ions did not adsorb on the γ-alumina surface, whereas divalent ions were highly adsorbed. Thus, for divalent ions, the model was modified, owing to pore shrinkage caused by ion adsorption. The ζ-potential lowered the membrane permeability, especially for membranes with a pore radius lower than 3 nm, a ζ-potential higher than 20 mV, and an ionic strength lower than 0.01 m. The rejection model showed that, for a pore radius lower than 3 nm and for solutions with ionic strengths lower than 0.01 m, there is an optimum ζ-potential for rejection, because of the concurrent effects of electromigration and convection. Hence, the model can be used as a prediction tool to optimize membrane perm-selectivity by designing a specific pore size and surface charge for application at specific ionic strengths and pH levels. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of ceramic membranes for micro filtration

    Mohammad Idrees; Lim Yan Ne; Hamdani Saidi

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary research work in the development of ceramic membranes by moulding process. The two major objectives were to determine the effect of operating parameters ori- the membrane sheet and membrane characterization. The starting material for the membrane was powdered aluminum oxide and alumina granules. Alumina granules were obtained by spray drying of mixture of alumina with additives and binders under specific conditions. The membrane sheet was produced by mould pressing at various pressures and then sintering at different temperatures. Membrane characterization was done based on microstructure using SEM, pore size distribution, density, and porosity. Strong and porous membranes were produced at pressing force of 120 -140 kN and sintering temperature of 1400 -1500 'C. Pore size and porosity obtained was in the range of 2 -10 μ m, and 13 - 48% respectively. These membranes can be used for, microfiltration at elevated temperature and under extreme environmental condition. They can also be used as porous support for the production qf composite asymmetric UF/hyperfiltration, and gas separation membranes. Further work in the refinement of' pore-size and permeation studies is envisaged

  16. The use of ceramic membranes for radioactive solutions purification

    Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane permeation combined with complexation was tested for radioactive wastes processing purpose. The results of experiments with MEMBRALOX and CeRAM INSIDE filtering elements are presented in the paper. The pore size of ceramic membranes was in 1kD-100 nm range. The experiments were performed with non-active and with radioactive model solutions and original radioactive waste samples. To achieve high decontamination factors the process was enhanced by chemical complexation. Such complexants as poly(acrylic) acid and polyacrylic)acid salts of different crosslinking, polyethylenimine and cyanoferrates were tested. The experiments showed the significant increase of retention and decontamination factors while before ultrafiltration macromolecular ligands were added. The effectiveness of complexation by each ligand is strongly dependent on pH and alkali metals concentration. (author)

  17. Ceramic membranes for gas separation in advanced fossil power plants

    Meulenberg, W.A.; Baumann, S.; Ivanova, M.; Gestel, T. van; Bram, M.; Stoever, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energieforschung (IEF)

    2010-07-01

    The reduction or elimination of CO{sub 2} emissions from electricity generation power plants fuelled by coal or gas is a major target in the current socio-economic, environmental and political discussion to reduce green house gas emissions such as CO{sub 2}. This mission can be achieved by introducing gas separation techniques making use of membrane technology, which is, as a rule, associated with significantly lower efficiency losses compared with the conventional separation technologies. Depending on the kind of power plant process different membrane types (ceramic, polymer, metal) can be implemented. The possible technology routes are currently investigated to achieve the emission reduction. They rely on different separation tasks. The CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation is the main target in the post-combustion process. Air separation (O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) is the focus of the oxyfuel process. In the pre-combustion process an additional H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation is included. Although all separation concepts imply different process requirements they have in common a need in membranes with high permeability, selectivity and stability. In each case CO{sub 2} is obtained in a readily condensable form. CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation membranes like microporous membranes or polymer membranes are applicable in post-combustion stages. In processes with oxyfuel combustion, where the fuel is combusted with pure oxygen, oxygen transport membranes i.e. mixed ionic electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes with mainly perovskite or fluorite structure can be integrated. In the pre-combustion stages of the power plant process, H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation membranes like microporous membranes e.g. doped silica or mixed protonic electronic conductors or metal membranes can be applied. The paper gives an overview about the considered ceramic materials for the different gas separation membranes. The manufacturing of bulk materials as well as supported thin films of these membranes along

  18. Oxygen transport by oxygen potential gradient in dense ceramic oxide membranes

    Maiya, P.S.; Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Udovich, C.A. [Amoco Exploration/Production, Naperville, IL (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in recent years on the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas: CO + H{sub 2}) with air as the oxidant. In partial oxidation, a mixed-oxide ceramic membrane selectively transports oxygen from the air; this transport is driven by the oxygen potential gradient. Of the several ceramic materials the authors have tested, a mixed oxide based on the Sr-Fe-Co-O system has been found to be very attractive. Extensive oxygen permeability data have been obtained for this material in methane conversion experiments carried out in a reactor. The data have been analyzed by a transport equation based on the phenomenological theory of diffusion under oxygen potential gradients. Thermodynamic calculations were used to estimate the driving force for the transport of oxygen ions. The results show that the transport equation deduced from the literature describes the permeability data reasonably well and can be used to determine the diffusion coefficients and the associated activation energy of oxygen ions in the ceramic membrane material.

  19. Understanding ozone mechanisms to alleviate ceramic membrane fouling

    Chu, Irma Giovanna Llamosas

    Ceramic membranes are a strong prospect as an advanced treatment in the drinking water domain. But their high capital cost and the lack of specific research on their performance still discourage their application in this field. Thus, knowing that fouling is the main drawback experienced in filtration processes, this bench-scale study was aimed to assess the impact of an ozonation pre-treatment on the alleviation of the fouling of UF ceramic membranes. Preozonation and filtration steps were performed under two different pH and ozone doses. Chosen pH values were at the limits of natural surface waters range (6.5 and 8.5) to keep practicability. Raw water from the Thousand Isle's river at Quebec-Canada was used for the tests. The filtration setup involved an unstirred dead-end filtration cell operated at constant flux. Results showed that pre-oxidation by ozone indeed reduced the fouling degree of the membranes according to the dose applied (up to 60 and 85% for membranes 8 and 50 kDa, respectively). Direct NOM oxidation was found responsible for this effect as the presence of molecular ozone was not essential to achieve these results. In the context of this experiment, however, pH showed to be more effective than the ozonation pre-treatment to keep fouling at low levels: 70% lower at pH 6.5 than at pH 8.5 for un-ozonated waters, which was contrary to most of the literature found on the topic (Changwon, 2013; De Angelis & Fidalgo, 2013; Karnik et al., 2005; S. Lee & Kim, 2014). This behaviour results mainly from the operation mode used in the experiment, the electrical repulsions between MON molecules at basic pH that led to the accumulation of material on the feed side of the membranes (concentration polarisation) and ulterior cake formation. In addition, solution pH showed an influence in the definition of fouling mechanisms. At solution pH 6.5, which was precisely the isoelectric point of the membranes (+/-6.5), the blocking fouling mode was frequently detected

  20. Support influence on the properties of the alumina ceramic membranes

    Clar, C.; Scian, A.N.; Aglietti, E.F.

    2003-01-01

    The ceramic substrates used as supports for the formation of a top layer membrane must meet several requirements.Some of them are: have an average pore size and a suitable surface rugosity to obtain a homogenous top layer preventing the penetration of the membrane precursor particles into the support pores.This work analyzes the performance of the three α-Al 2 O 3 supports, with different average pore sizes and surface textures, for the formation of a membrane top layer by the dipcoating technique from colloids in suspension of aluminum basic acetate and later thermal treatment at 1000degC.The pore size distribution of the supports, the support-membrane systems and the top layer membrane was obtained by the mercury intrusion porosimetry technique.The microstructural differences of the supports and the top layer thickness were observed by MEB.It could be observed that for numerous deposits the membrane layer pore size obtained is independent on the support used and that the thickness of the last layer is lower for the greater pore size supports.The possibility of an intermediate layer between the support and the top layer was considered in every case

  1. A porous ceramic membrane tailored high-temperature supercapacitor

    Zhang, Xin; He, Benlin; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Tang, Qunwei

    2018-03-01

    The supercapacitor that can operate at high-temperature are promising for markedly increase in capacitance because of accelerated charge movement. However, the state-of-the-art polymer-based membranes will decompose at high temperature. Inspired by solid oxide fuel cells, we present here the experimental realization of high-temperature supercapacitors (HTSCs) tailored with porous ceramic separator fabricated by yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and nickel oxide (NiO). Using activated carbon electrode and supporting electrolyte from potassium hydroxide (KOH) aqueous solution, a category of symmetrical HTSCs are built in comparison with a conventional polymer membrane based device. The dependence of capacitance performance on temperature is carefully studied, yielding a maximized specific capacitance of 272 F g-1 at 90 °C for the optimized HTSC tailored by NiO/YSZ membrane. Moreover, the resultant HTSC has relatively high durability when suffer repeated measurement over 1000 cycles at 90 °C, while the polymer membrane based supercapacitor shows significant reduction in capacitance at 60 °C. The high capacitance along with durability demonstrates NiO/YSZ membrane tailored HTSCs are promising in future advanced energy storage devices.

  2. Rejection of Bromide and Bromate Ions by a Ceramic Membrane.

    Moslemi, Mohammadreza; Davies, Simon H; Masten, Susan J

    2012-12-01

    Effects of pH and the addition of calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) on bromate (BrO(3) (-)) and bromide (Br(-)) rejection by a ceramic membrane were investigated. Rejection of both ions increased with pH. At pH 8, the rejection of BrO(3) (-) and Br(-) was 68% and 63%, respectively. Donnan exclusion appears to play an important role in determining rejection of BrO(3) (-) and Br(-). In the presence of CaCl(2), rejection of BrO(3) (-) and Br(-) ions was greatly reduced, confirming the importance of electrostatic interactions in determining rejection of BrO(3) (-) and Br(-). The effect of Ca(2+) is so pronounced that in most natural waters, rejection of both BrO(3) (-) and Br(-) by the membrane would be extremely small.

  3. Microfiltration of wheat starch suspensions using multichannel ceramic membrane

    Ikonić Bojana B.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates influence of different process parameters such as transmembrane pressure, flow rate and concentration of wheat starch suspension on the average permeate flux and permeate flux decline. Used membrane in all experiments was 19 channels ceramic membrane with 0.2 μm pore size. Experimental results were analyzed using response surface methodology. It is observed that the significant average permeate flux enhancement of 200% was achieved by the increase of the transmembrane pressure, while the increase of flow rate and concentration affected the increase in average permeate flux in the range of 40-100%. Permeate flux decline was almost independent of the transmembrane pressure, but the increase of the flow rate, as well as the decrease of the concentration led to decrease of permeate flux decline in the range of 20-50%.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Microfiltration Ceramic Membranes Based on Natural Quartz Sand

    Andrei Ivanets

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of phase and chemical composition of natural quartz sand, binder and burnable additives was studied. The conditions of application of the membrane and biocide layers on the formation of porous ceramic and microfiltration membranes were investigated. It is shown that a crystalline oxide of Si(IV is determinant for obtaining the ceramic materials. The presence of carbonates (calcite, dolomite, aragonite, etc. and crystalline aluminosilicates (microcline, albite, phlogopit, etc. leads to a decrease in mechanical strength of ceramics. The biocide coating designed to protect the ceramic membrane surfaces from biofouling was applied and its anti-bacterial activity was shown.

  5. Fluidized-bed Fenton coupled with ceramic membrane separation for advanced treatment of flax wastewater.

    Fan, Dong; Ding, Lili; Huang, Hui; Chen, Mengtian; Ren, Hongqiang

    2017-10-15

    Fluidized-bed Fenton coupled with ceramic membrane separation to treat the flax secondary effluent was investigated. The operating variables, including initial pH, dosage of H 2 O 2 and Fe 0 , air flow rate, TMP and pore size, were optimized. The distributions of DOMs in the treatment process were analyzed. Under the optimum condition (600mgL -1 H 2 O 2 , 1.4gL -1 Fe 0 , pH=3, 300Lh -1 air flow rate and 15psi TMP), the highest TOC and color removal efficiencies were 84% and 94% in the coupled reactor with 100nm ceramic membrane, reducing 39% of total iron with similar removal efficiency compared with Fluidized-bed Fenton. Experimental results showed that the ceramic membrane could intercept catalyst particles (average particle size >100nm), 10.4% macromolecules organic matter (AMW>20000Da) and 12.53% hydrophobic humic-like component. EEM-PARAFAC identified four humic-like (M1-M4) and one protein-like components (M5), and the fluorescence intensities of M1-M5 in the secondary effluent were 63.27, 63.05, 33.41, 16.71 and 0.72 QSE, respectively. After the coupled treatment, the removal efficiencies of M1(81%), M2(86%) were higher than M3, M4(63%, 61%). Pearson correlation analysis suggested that M1, M2 and M3 were the major contributors to the cake layer, and M4, M5 might more easily lead to pore blockages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Desolventizing of soybean oil/azeotrope mixtures using ceramic membranes.

    de Melo, Jonas R M; Tiggeman, Lidia; Rezzadori, Katia; Steffens, Juliana; Palliga, Marshall; Oliveira, J Vladimir; Di Luccio, Marco; Tres, Marcus V

    2017-08-01

    This work investigates the use of ceramic membranes with different molecular weight cut-offs (MWCOs: 5, 10 and 20 kDa) to desolventize azeotropic solvent mixtures (ethanol/n-hexane and isopropyl alcohol/n-hexane) from soybean oil/azeotrope micelles. Results show that a decrease in the MWCO of a membrane and an increase in the solvent mass ratio in the mixture resulted in a significant reduction in the permeate flux. The 20 kDa membrane presented the highest permeate flux, 80 and 60 kg/m 2 h for the soybean oil/n-hexane/isopropyl alcohol and soybean oil/n-hexane/ethanol azeotropes, respectively, for an oil to solvent ratio of 1:3 (w/w). The highest oil retention was found using the n-hexane/isopropyl alcohol azeotrope, around 25% in the membrane with the lowest MWCO, that is, 5 kDa. It is shown that the azeotropic mixtures provided intermediate characteristics compared to the original pure solvent behavior.

  7. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Terrani, Kurt A.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Worrall, Andrew; Robb, Kevin R.; Snead, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  8. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    Snead, Lance Lewis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snead, Mary A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  9. Flux recovery of ceramic tubular membranes fouled with whey proteins: Some aspects of membrane cleaning

    Popović Svetlana S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of membrane processes is greatly affected by the flux reduction due to the deposits formation at the surface and/or in the pores of the membrane. Efficiency of membrane processes is affected by cleaning procedure applied to regenerate flux. In this work, flux recovery of ceramic tubular membranes with 50 and 200 nm pore size was investigated. The membranes were fouled with reconstituted whey solution for 1 hour. After that, the membranes were rinsed with clean water and then cleaned with sodium hydroxide solutions or formulated detergents (combination of P3 Ultrasil 67 and P3 Ultrasil 69. Flux recovery after the rinsing step was not satisfactory although fouling resistance reduction was significant so that chemical cleaning was necessary. In the case of 50 nm membrane total flux recovery was achieved after cleaning with 1.0% (w/w sodium hydroxide solution. In the case of 200 nm membrane total flux recovery was not achieved irrespective of the cleaning agent choice and concentration. Cleaning with commercial detergent was less efficient than cleaning with the sodium hydroxide solution.

  10. Mathematical modeling of methyl ester concentration distribution in a continuous membrane tubular reactor and comparison with conventional tubular reactor

    Talaghat, M. R.; Jokar, S. M.; Modarres, E.

    2017-10-01

    The reduction of fossil fuel resources and environmental issues made researchers find alternative fuels include biodiesels. One of the most widely used methods for production of biodiesel on a commercial scale is transesterification method. In this work, the biodiesel production by a transesterification method was modeled. Sodium hydroxide was considered as a catalyst to produce biodiesel from canola oil and methanol in a continuous tubular ceramic membranes reactor. As the Biodiesel production reaction from triglycerides is an equilibrium reaction, the reaction rate constants depend on temperature and related linearly to catalyst concentration. By using the mass balance for a membrane tubular reactor and considering the variation of raw materials and products concentration with time, the set of governing equations were solved by numerical methods. The results clearly show the superiority of membrane reactor than conventional tubular reactors. Afterward, the influences of molar ratio of alcohol to oil, weight percentage of the catalyst, and residence time on the performance of biodiesel production reactor were investigated.

  11. Treatment of the Bleaching Effluent from Sulfite Pulp Production by Ceramic Membrane Filtration

    Ebrahimi, Mehrdad; Busse, Nadine; Kerker, Steffen; Schmitz, Oliver; Hilpert, Markus; Czermak, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pulp and paper waste water is one of the major sources of industrial water pollution. This study tested the suitability of ceramic tubular membrane technology as an alternative to conventional waste water treatment in the pulp and paper industry. In this context, in series batch and semi-batch membrane processes comprising microfiltration, ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, ceramic membranes were developed to reduce the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and remove residual lignin from the effluen...

  12. Ceramic membrane ozonator for soluble organics removal from produced water

    Siagian, U. W. R.; Dwipramana, A. S.; Perwira, S. B.; Khoiruddin; Wenten, I. G.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the performance of ozonation for degradation of soluble organic compounds in produced water was investigated. Tubular ceramic membrane diffuser (with and without a static mixer in the lumen side) was used to facilitate contact between ozone and produced water. The ozonation was conducted at ozone flow rate of 8 L.min-1, ozone concentration of 0.4 ppm, original pH of the solution, and pressure of 1.2 bar, while the flow rates of the produced water were varied (192, 378 and 830 mL.min-1). It was found that the reduction of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were 85%, 99%, 85%, and 95%, respectively. A lower liquid flow rate in a laminar state showed a better component reduction due to the longer contacting time between the liquid and the gas phase. The introduction of the static mixer in the lumen side of the membrane as a turbulence promoter provided a positive effect on the performance of the membrane diffuser. The twisted static mixer exhibited the better removal rate than the spiral static mixer.

  13. Ceramic membrane fuel cells based on solid proton electrolytes

    Meng, Guangyao; Ma, Qianli; Peng, Ranran; Liu, Xingqin [USTC Lab. for Solid State Chemistry and Inorganic Membranes, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Ma, Guilin [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2007-04-15

    The development of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) has reached its new stage characterized with thin electrolytes on porous electrode support, and the most important fabrication techniques developed in which almost all are concerned with inorganic membranes, and so can be named as ceramic membrane fuel cells (CMFCs). CMFCs based on proton electrolytes (CMFC-H) may exhibit more advantages than CMFCs based on oxygen-ion electrolytes (CMFC-O) in many respects, such as energy efficiency and avoiding carbon deposit. Ammonia fuelled CMFC with proton-conducting BaCe{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2.9} (BCGO) electrolyte (50 {mu}m in thickness) is reported in this works, which showed the open current voltage (OCV) values close to theoretical ones and rather high power density. And also, we have found that the well known super oxide ion conductor, La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{alpha}} (LSGM), is a pure proton conductor in H{sub 2} and mixed proton and oxide ion conductor in wet air, while it is a pure oxide ion conductor in oxygen or dry air. To demonstrate the CMFC-H concept to get high performance fuel cells the techniques for thin membranes, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), particularly novel CVD techniques, should be given more attention because of their many advantages. (author)

  14. Cross-flow micro-filtration using ceramic membranes

    Thern, Gerardo G.; Marajofsky, Adolfo; Rossi, Federico; La Gamma, Ana M.; Chocron, Mauricio

    2004-01-01

    Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors have a system devoted to the purification and upgrading of the collected heavy water leaks. The purification train is fed with different degradation ratios (D 2 O/H 2 O), activities and impurities. The water is distilled in a packed bed column filled with a mesh type packing. With the purpose of minimizing the column stack corrosion, the water is pre-treated in a train consisting on an activated charcoal bed-strong cationic-anionic resin and a final polishing anionic bed resin. Traces of oils are retained by the charcoal bed but some of them pass through and could be responsible for the resins fouling. The process of micro filtration using ceramic materials is particularly applied to the treatment of waters with oil micro droplets. We describe the development stages of single and double layer filtration ceramic tubes, their characterization and the adaptation to test equipment. The efficiency was evaluated by means of tangential ('cross-flow') filtration of aqueous solutions containing dodecane at the micrograms per ml concentration level. This compound simulates the properties of a typical oil contaminant. A 100-fold reduction in the amount of dodecane in water was observed after the filtration treatment. (author)

  15. Comparison of fouling characteristics in different pore-sized submerged ceramic membrane bioreactors.

    Jin, Le; Ong, Say Leong; Ng, How Yong

    2010-12-01

    Membrane fouling, the key disadvantage that inevitably occurs continuously in the membrane bioreactor (MBR), baffles the wide-scale application of MBR. Ceramic membrane, which possesses high chemical and thermal resistance, has seldom been used in MBR to treat municipal wastewater. Four ceramic membranes with the same materials but different pore sizes, ranging from 80 to 300 nm, were studied in parallel using four lab-scale submerged MBRs (i.e., one type of ceramic membrane in one MBR). Total COD and ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies were observed to be consistently above 94.5 and 98%, respectively, in all submerged ceramic membrane bioreactors. The experimental results showed that fouling was mainly affected by membrane's microstructure, surface roughness and pore sizes. Ceramic membrane with the roughest surface and biggest pore size (300 nm) had the highest fouling potential with respect to the TMP profile. The 80 nm membrane with a smoother surface and relatively uniform smaller pore openings experienced least membrane fouling with respect to TMP increase. The effects of the molecular weight distribution, particle size distribution and other biomass characteristics such as extracellular polymeric substances, zeta potential and capillary suction time, were also investigated in this study. Results showed that no significant differences of these attributes were observed. These observations indicate that the membrane surface properties are the dominant factors leading to different fouling potential in this study. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential natural organic matter fouling of ceramic versus polymeric ultrafiltration membranes.

    Lee, Seung-Jin; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic ultrafiltration membranes has drawn increasing attention in drinking water treatment sectors as an alternative to traditional polymeric counterparts, yet only limited information has been made available about the characteristics of ceramic membrane fouling by natural organic matter. The effects of solution chemistry including ionic strength, divalent ion concentration and pH on the flux behavior were comparatively evaluated for ceramic and polymeric ultrafiltration of synthetic water containing model natural organic matter. Filtration characteristics were further probed via resistance-in-series model analysis, fouling visualization using quantum dots, batch adsorption test, contact angle measurement, solute-membrane surface adhesion force measurement, and quantitative comparison of fouling characteristics between ceramic and polymeric membranes. The results collectively suggested that the effects of solution chemistry on fouling behavior of ceramic membranes were generally similar to polymeric counterparts in terms of trends, while the extent varied significantly depending on water quality parameters. Lower fouling tendency and enhanced cleaning efficiency were observed with the ceramic membrane, further promoting the potential for ceramic membrane application to surface water treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Review on Development of Ceramic Membrane From Sol-Gel Route: Parameters Affecting Characteristics of the Membrane

    M. R. Othman and H. Mukhtar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of laboratory scale ceramic membrane preparation using sol-gel technique with pore sizes in the range of 1-10nm is reviewed. Parameters affecting the characteristics of membrane during membrane development are highlighted and discussed in detail. Experimental results from literatures have shown that the correct amount of acid, water, PVA, appropriate membrane thickness, proper control of drying rate, and appropriate temperature profile selection during sintering process are necessary in order to acquire sufficient strength and reduce the formation of crack in the membrane. The different temperature setting during sintering process also influences the size of pore formed.Key Words: Sol-Gel, Inorganic Membrane, Ceramic Membrane, Gas Permeation, Sintering, Sol Properties, Membrane Morphologies, Pore Size Distribution.

  18. Catalytic membrane reactors for tritium recovery from tritiated water in the ITER fuel cycle

    Tosti, S.; Violante, V.; Basile, A.; Chiappetta, G.; Castelli, S.; De Francesco, M.; Scaglione, S.; Sarto, F.

    2000-01-01

    Palladium and palladium-silver permeators have been obtained by coating porous ceramic tubes with a thin metal layer. Three coating techniques have been studied and characterized: chemical electroless deposition (PdAg film thickness of 10 μm), ion sputtering (about 1 μm) and rolling of thin metal sheets (50 μm). The Pd-ceramic membranes have been used for manufacturing catalytic membrane reactors (CMR) for hydrogen and its isotopes recovering and purifying. These composite membranes and the CMR have been studied and developed for a closed-loop process with reference to the design requirements of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) blanket tritium recovery system in the enhanced performance phase of operation. The membranes and CMR have been tested in a pilot plant equipped with temperature, pressure and flow-rate on-line measuring and controlling devices. The conversion value for the water gas shift reaction in the CMR has been measured close to 100% (always above the equilibrium one, 80% at 350 deg. C): the effect of the membrane is very clear since the reaction is moved towards the products because of the continuous hydrogen separation. The rolled thin film membranes have separated the hydrogen from other gases with a complete selectivity and exhibited a slightly larger mass transfer resistance with respect to the electroless membranes. Preliminary tests on the sputtered membranes have also been carried out with a promising performance. Considerations on the use of different palladium alloy in order to improve the performances of the membranes in terms of permeation flux and mechanical strength, such as palladium/yttrium, are also reported

  19. Ozonation and/or Coagulation - Ceramic Membrane Hybrid for Filtration of Impaired-Quality Source Waters

    Ha, Changwon

    2013-09-01

    When microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes are applied for drinking water treatment/wastewater reuse, membrane fouling is an evitable problem, causing the loss of productivity over time. Polymeric membranes have been often reported to experience rapid and/or problematical fouling, restraining sustainable operation. Ceramic membranes can be effectively employed to treat impaired-quality source waters due to their inherent robustness in terms of physical and chemical stability. This research aimed to identify the effects of coagulation and/or ozonation on ceramic membrane filtration for seawater and wastewater (WW) effluent. Two different types of MF and UF ceramic membranes obtained by sintering (i.e., TAMI made of TiO2+ZrO2) and anodic oxidation process (i.e., AAO made of Al2O3) were employed for bench-scale tests. Precoagulation was shown to play an important role in both enhancing membrane filterability and natural organic matter (NOM) removal efficacy for treating a highorganic surface water. The most critical factors were found to be pH and coagulant dosage with the highest efficiency resulting under low pH and high coagulant dose. Due to the ozone-resistance nature of the ceramic membranes, preozonation allowed the ceramic membranes to be operated at higher flux, especially leading to significant flux improvement when treating seawater in the presence of calcium and magnesium. 4 Dissolved ozone in contact with the TAMI ceramic membrane surface accelerated the formation of hydroxyl (˙OH) radicals in WW effluent treatment. Flux restoration of both ceramic membranes, fouled with seawater and WW effluent, was efficiently achieved by high backwash (BW) pressure and ozone in chemically enhanced backwashing (CEB). Ceramic membranes exhibited a pH-dependent permeate flux while filtering WW effluent, showing reduced fouling with increased pH. On the other hand, for filtering seawater, differences in permeate flux between the two membranes was

  20. Newly Developed Ceramic Membranes for Dehydration and Separation of Organic Mixtures by Pervaporation

    Gemert, van R.W.; Cuperus, F.P.

    1995-01-01

    Polymeric pervaporation membranes sometimes show great variety in performance when they are alternately used for different solvent mixtures. In addition, membrane stability in time is a problem in case of some solvents. Therefore, newly developed ceramic silica membranes with a 'dense' top layer

  1. Lactose hydrolysis in an enzymatic membrane reactor

    Mertens, B; Huyghebaert, A

    1987-10-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose in whey permeate with subsequent recuperation of Saccharomyces lactis lactase by means of ultrafiltration was investigated. In whey permeate, S. lactis lactase shows maximal activity at pH 6.5; the optimal temperature was found to be 45/sup 0/C and is limited by strong thermal inactivation beyond this temperature. High activity combined with acceptable thermal inactivation (< 10% after 5 h incubation) was established at 30/sup 0/C. S. lactis lactase also displays considerable activity at low temperature (5/sup 0/C). Enzyme stability is reduced drastically by demineralisation: addition of low concentrations of manganese ions (10/sup -3/ M) considerably enhances stability. Using a DDS Lab-Unit 35 fitted with GR61PP polysulphon membranes (cut-off: 20.000), pilot scale experiments were carried out (pH 6.5; 30/sup 0/C) in which whey permeate was hydrolyzed to a degree of hydrolysis of 82% minimum. Enzyme recuperation amounted to 96.5% per batch, all enzyme activity loss being due to thermal inactivation. Microbiological examination of the enzymatic membrane reactor showed that growth of mcicroorganisms can largely be suppressed by working at lower temperature (5/sup 0/C). Eventually, 50 ppm H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or sterile filtration will adequately solve microbiological problems without affecting enzyme activity.

  2. Enhancing oxygen transport through Mixed-Ionic-and-Electronic-Conducting ceramic membranes

    Yu, Anthony S.

    Ceramic membranes based on Mixed-Ionic-and-Electronic-Conducting (MIEC) oxides are capable of separating oxygen from air in the presence of an oxygen partial-pressure gradient. These MIEC membranes show great promise for oxygen consuming industrial processes, such as the production of syngas from steam reforming of natural gas (SRM), as well as for electricity generation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). For both applications, the overall performance is dictated by the rate of oxygen transport across the membrane. Oxygen transport across MIEC membranes is composed of a bulk oxygen-ion diffusion process and surface processes, such as surface reactions and adsorption/desorption of gaseous reactants/products. The main goal of this thesis was to determine which process is rate-limiting in order to significantly enhance the overall rate of oxygen transport in MIEC membrane systems. The rate-limiting step was determined by evaluating the total resistance to oxygen transfer, Rtot. Rtot is the sum of a bulk diffusion resistance in the membrane itself, Rb, and interfacial loss components, Rs. Rb is a function of the membrane's ionic conductivity and thickness, while Rs arises primarily from slow surface-exchange kinetics that cause the P(O2) at the surfaces of the membrane to differ from the P(O 2) in the adjacent gas phases. Rtot can be calculated from the Nernst potential across the membrane and the measured oxygen flux. The rate-limiting process can be determined by evaluating the relative contributions of the various losses, Rs and Rb, to Rtot. Using this method, this thesis demonstrates that for most membrane systems, Rs is the dominating factor. In the development of membrane systems with high oxygen transport rates, thin membranes with high ionic conductivities are required to achieve fast bulk oxygen-ion diffusion. However, as membrane thickness is decreased, surface reaction kinetics become more important in determining the overall transport rate. The two

  3. Economic evaluation of pre-combustion CO2-capture in IGCC power plants by porous ceramic membranes

    Franz, Johannes; Maas, Pascal; Scherer, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Process simulations of IGCC with pre-combustion capture via membranes were done. • Most promising technology is the water–gas-shift-membrane-reactor (WGSMR). • Energetic evaluations showed minimum efficiency loss of 5.8%-points for WGSMR. • Economic evaluations identified boundary limits of membrane technology. • Cost of electricity for optimum WGSMR-case is 57 €/MW h under made assumptions. - Abstract: Pre-combustion-carbon-capture is one of the three main routes for the mitigation of CO 2 -emissions by fossil fueled power plants. Based on the data of a detailed technical evaluation of CO 2 -capture by porous ceramic membranes (CM) and ceramic membrane reactors (WGSMR) in an Integrated-Gasification-Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power plant this paper focuses on the economic effects of CO 2 -abatement. First the results of the process simulations are presented briefly. The analysis is based on a comparison with a reference IGCC without CO 2 -capture (dry syngas cooling, bituminous coal, efficiency of 47.4%). In addition, as a second reference, an IGCC process with CO 2 removal based on standard Selexol-scrubbing is taken into account. The most promising technology for CO 2 -capture by membranes in IGCC applications is the combination of a water gas shift reactor and a H 2 -selective membrane into one water gas shift membrane reactor. For the WGSRM-case efficiency losses can be limited to about 6%-points (including losses for CO 2 compression) for a CO 2 separation degree of 90%. This is a severe reduction of the efficiency loss compared to Selexol (10.3% points) or IGCC–CM (8.6% points). The economic evaluation is based on a detailed analysis of investment and operational costs. Parameters like membrane costs and lifetime, costs of CO 2 -certificates and annual operating hours are taken into account. The purpose of these evaluations is to identify the minimum cost of electricity for the different capture cases for the variation of the boundary

  4. Treatment of secondary effluent by sequential combination of photocatalytic oxidation with ceramic membrane filtration.

    Song, Lili; Zhu, Bo; Jegatheesan, Veeriah; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel; Muthukumaran, Shobha

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to experimentally evaluate an alternative advanced wastewater treatment system, which combines the action of photocatalytic oxidation with ceramic membrane filtration. Experiments were carried out using laboratory scale TiO 2 /UV photocatalytic reactor and tubular ceramic microfiltration (CMF) system to treat the secondary effluent (SE). A 100-nm pore size CMF membrane was investigated in cross flow mode under constant transmembrane pressure of 20 kPa. The results show that specific flux decline of CMF membrane with and without TiO 2 /UV photocatalytic treatment was 30 and 50%, respectively, after 60 min of filtration. Data evaluation revealed that the adsorption of organic compounds onto the TiO 2 particles was dependent on the pH of the suspension and was considerably higher at low pH. The liquid chromatography-organic carbon detector (LC-OCD) technique was used to characterise the dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in the SE and was monitored following photocatalysis and CMF. The results showed that there was no removal of biopolymers and slight removal of humics, building blocks and the other oxidation by-products after TiO 2 /UV photocatalytic treatment. This result suggested that the various ions present in the SE act as scavengers, which considerably decrease the efficiency of the photocatalytic oxidation reactions. On the other hand, the CMF was effective for removing 50% of biopolymers with no further removal of other organic components after photocatalytic treatment. Thus, the quantity of biopolymers in SE has an apparent correlation with the filterability of water samples in CMF.

  5. Chemical and microstructural analyses for heavy metals removal from water media by ceramic membrane filtration.

    Ali, Asmaa; Ahmed, Abdelkader; Gad, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the ability of low cost ceramic membrane filtration in removing three common heavy metals namely; Pb 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Cd 2+ from water media. The work includes manufacturing ceramic membranes with dimensions of 15 by 15 cm and 2 cm thickness. The membranes were made from low cost materials of local clay mixed with different sawdust percentages of 0.5%, 2.0%, and 5.0%. The used clay was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence analysis. Aqueous solutions of heavy metals were prepared in the laboratory and filtered through the ceramic membranes. The influence of the main parameters such as pH, initial driving pressure head, and concentration of heavy metals on their removal efficiency by ceramic membranes was investigated. Water samples were collected before and after the filtration process and their heavy metal concentrations were determined by chemical analysis. Moreover, a microstructural analysis using scanning electronic microscope (SEM) was performed on ceramic membranes before and after the filtration process. The chemical analysis results showed high removal efficiency up to 99% for the concerned heavy metals. SEM images approved these results by showing adsorbed metal ions on sides of the internal pores of the ceramic membranes.

  6. Preconceptual design of a salt splitting process using ceramic membranes

    Kurath, D.E.; Brooks, K.P.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Clemmer, R.; Balagopal, S.; Landro, T.; Sutija, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Inorganic ceramic membranes for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions are being developed for treating U. S. Department of Energy tank wastes. The process consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON) membranes. The primary NaSICON compositions being investigated are based on rare- earth ions (RE-NaSICON). Potential applications include: caustic recycling for sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes; reducing the volume of low-level wastes volume to be disposed of; adjusting pH and reducing competing cations to enhance cesium ion exchange processes; reducing sodium in high-level-waste sludges; and removing sodium from acidic wastes to facilitate calcining. These applications encompass wastes stored at the Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sites. The overall project objective is to supply a salt splitting process unit that impacts the waste treatment and disposal flowsheets and meets user requirements. The potential flowsheet impacts include improving the efficiency of the waste pretreatment processes, reducing volume, and increasing the quality of the final waste disposal forms. Meeting user requirements implies developing the technology to the point where it is available as standard equipment with predictable and reliable performance. This report presents two preconceptual designs for a full-scale salt splitting process based on the RE-NaSICON membranes to distinguish critical items for testing and to provide a vision that site users can evaluate

  7. Preconceptual design of a salt splitting process using ceramic membranes

    Kurath, D.E.; Brooks, K.P.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Clemmer, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Balagopal, S.; Landro, T.; Sutija, D.P. [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Inorganic ceramic membranes for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions are being developed for treating U. S. Department of Energy tank wastes. The process consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON) membranes. The primary NaSICON compositions being investigated are based on rare- earth ions (RE-NaSICON). Potential applications include: caustic recycling for sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes; reducing the volume of low-level wastes volume to be disposed of; adjusting pH and reducing competing cations to enhance cesium ion exchange processes; reducing sodium in high-level-waste sludges; and removing sodium from acidic wastes to facilitate calcining. These applications encompass wastes stored at the Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sites. The overall project objective is to supply a salt splitting process unit that impacts the waste treatment and disposal flowsheets and meets user requirements. The potential flowsheet impacts include improving the efficiency of the waste pretreatment processes, reducing volume, and increasing the quality of the final waste disposal forms. Meeting user requirements implies developing the technology to the point where it is available as standard equipment with predictable and reliable performance. This report presents two preconceptual designs for a full-scale salt splitting process based on the RE-NaSICON membranes to distinguish critical items for testing and to provide a vision that site users can evaluate.

  8. OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS

    Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

  9. Comparison of porosity assessment techniques for low-cost ceramic membranes

    Maria-Magdalena Lorente-Ayza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several characterization methods were applied to low cost ceramic membranes developed for wastewater treatment in membrane bioreactors (MBRs and/or tertiary treatments. The membranes were prepared by four different procedures (uniaxial pressing and extrusion, both with and without starch addition to generate pores. The pore size of these symmetric ceramic membranes was measured by two different methods: bubble point and intrusion mercury porosimetry. A good agreement between both methods was achieved, confirming the validity of the bubble point method for the measurement of the mean pore size of membranes. Air and water permeations of these ceramic membranes were also studied. The relationship between the permeation of both fluids is consistent with the ratio of viscosities, according to the Hagen–Poiseuille equation.

  10. Comparison of porosity assessment techniques for low-cost ceramic membranes

    Lorente-Ayza, M.M.; Perez-Fernandez, O.; Alcala, R.; Sanchez, A.; Mestre, S.; Coronas, J.; Menendez, M.

    2017-07-01

    Several characterization methods were applied to low cost ceramic membranes developed for wastewater treatment in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) and/or tertiary treatments. The membranes were prepared by four different procedures (uniaxial pressing and extrusion, both with and without starch addition to generate pores). The pore size of these symmetric ceramic membranes was measured by two different methods: bubble point and intrusion mercury porosimetry. A good agreement between both methods was achieved, confirming the validity of the bubble point method for the measurement of the mean pore size of membranes. Air and water permeations of these ceramic membranes were also studied. The relationship between the permeation of both fluids is consistent with the ratio of viscosities, according to the Hagen–Poiseuille equation. (Author)

  11. Ceramic membrane in production of recycled water; Keraamikalvo uusioveden valmistuksessa - EKT 05

    Laitinen, N; Luonsi, A; Levaenen, E; Maentylae, T; Vilen, J [Haemeen ympaeristoekeskus, Tampere (Finland)

    1999-12-31

    Applicability of ceramic ultrafiltration membrane modifications were studied with laboratory units to purify clear filtrate and biologically treated combined wastewater from high quality board manufacturing process for reuse. Also performance of polymeric membrane and ceramic membrane was compared. The performance of the membrane filtration cell, developed according to requirements of the fixed dimensions of ceramic membrane was compared with the performance of the cross-rotational commercial test unit (CR-filter) of polymeric membranes. The quality of ultrafiltration permeate, namely suspended solids, turbidity and colour, was better than the quality of lake water used in the mill. The permeate fluxes were in the range of 60-75 l/m{sup 2}h. The fouling layer primarily controlled the flux and the retention, leaving the effects of surface modifications as the secondary function. The flux was slightly higher with the biologically treated wastewater. Differences in membrane material and pore size had an effect on the cleaning ability of the membranes. The polymeric membrane and the membrane with smaller pore size were easier to clean. Tests with the CR-filter showed that the rotor increases shear forces, reduces the filtration resistance and thus increases the flux compared to the cell for ceramic membranes where the increase of shear forces can be done by increasing the flow velocities. (orig.)

  12. Ceramic membrane in production of recycled water; Keraamikalvo uusioveden valmistuksessa - EKT 05

    Laitinen, N.; Luonsi, A.; Levaenen, E.; Maentylae, T.; Vilen, J. [Haemeen ympaeristoekeskus, Tampere (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Applicability of ceramic ultrafiltration membrane modifications were studied with laboratory units to purify clear filtrate and biologically treated combined wastewater from high quality board manufacturing process for reuse. Also performance of polymeric membrane and ceramic membrane was compared. The performance of the membrane filtration cell, developed according to requirements of the fixed dimensions of ceramic membrane was compared with the performance of the cross-rotational commercial test unit (CR-filter) of polymeric membranes. The quality of ultrafiltration permeate, namely suspended solids, turbidity and colour, was better than the quality of lake water used in the mill. The permeate fluxes were in the range of 60-75 l/m{sup 2}h. The fouling layer primarily controlled the flux and the retention, leaving the effects of surface modifications as the secondary function. The flux was slightly higher with the biologically treated wastewater. Differences in membrane material and pore size had an effect on the cleaning ability of the membranes. The polymeric membrane and the membrane with smaller pore size were easier to clean. Tests with the CR-filter showed that the rotor increases shear forces, reduces the filtration resistance and thus increases the flux compared to the cell for ceramic membranes where the increase of shear forces can be done by increasing the flow velocities. (orig.)

  13. Steam reforming of heptane in a fluidized bed membrane reactor

    Rakib, Mohammad A.; Grace, John R.; Lim, C. Jim; Elnashaie, Said S. E. H.

    n-Heptane served as a model compound to study steam reforming of naphtha as an alternative feedstock to natural gas for production of pure hydrogen in a fluidized bed membrane reactor. Selective removal of hydrogen using Pd 77Ag 23 membrane panels shifted the equilibrium-limited reactions to greater conversion of the hydrocarbons and lower yields of methane, an intermediate product. Experiments were conducted with no membranes, with one membrane panel, and with six panels along the height of the reactor to understand the performance improvement due to hydrogen removal in a reactor where catalyst particles were fluidized. Results indicate that a fluidized bed membrane reactor (FBMR) can provide a compact reformer for pure hydrogen production from a liquid hydrocarbon feedstock at moderate temperatures (475-550 °C). Under the experimental conditions investigated, the maximum achieved yield of pure hydrogen was 14.7 moles of pure hydrogen per mole of heptane fed.

  14. Oxidative coupling of methane using inorganic membrane reactor

    Ma, Y.H.; Moser, W.R.; Dixon, A.G. [Worcester Polytechnic Institute, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this research is to improve the oxidative coupling of methane in a catalytic inorganic membrane reactor. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and relatively higher yields than in fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause for decreased selectivity in oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Modeling work which aimed at predicting the observed experimental trends in porous membrane reactors was also undertaken in this research program.

  15. Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems

    Repasky, John Michael

    2012-10-16

    A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

  16. Polymer-derived microporous ceramics for membranes and sensors for high temperature hydrogen purification and sensing

    Prasad, Ravi Mohan

    2012-06-11

    The growing interest in the use of hydrogen as main fuel has increased the need for pure hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production and purification. There are several by-products (CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}) associated with the production of hydrogen which might damage the production rate. Therefore, separation of hydrogen from other gases is an important step in the hydrogen production process. If H{sub 2} can be selectively removed from the product side during hydrogen production in membrane reactors, then it would be possible to achieve complete CO conversion in a single-step under high temperature conditions. The main goal of the present work is the high temperature H{sub 2} purification and sensing by applying polymer-derived ceramics. To prove the concept, the microporous SiBCN, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiCN ceramic membranes have been synthesized by the polymer-pyrolysis route and their performance for the hydrogen separation have been evaluated in tubular membranes as well as in planar chemiresistors. The synthesis of amorphous SiBCN ceramics has been realized through pyrolysis of poly(organoborosilazanes) in argon. Multilayered amorphous SiBCN/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes with gradient porosity have been realized and assessed with respect to the thermal stability, pore-size distribution and H{sub 2}/CO permeance. N{sub 2}-adsorption measurement indicates micropores in the range of 0.68-0.73 nm for three-fold SiBCN/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane. SEM characterization of three-fold SiBCN/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane shows the thickness of SiBCN membrane layer is 2.8 {mu}m; gas permeance measurements of the membrane shows H{sub 2}/CO selectivity of about 10.5 and the H{sub 2} permeance of about 1.05 x 10{sup -8} mol m{sup -2}s{sup -1}Pa{sup -1}. The observed gas permeation properties point out that the transportation of gas molecules through the membrane is governed by both

  17. 3. International conference on catalysis in membrane reactors

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The 3. International Conference on Catalysis in Membrane Reactors, Copenhagen, Denmark, is a continuation of the previous conferences held in Villeurbanne 1994 and Moscow 1996 and will deal with the rapid developments taking place within membranes with emphasis on membrane catalysis. The approx. 80 contributions in form of plenary lectures and posters discuss hydrogen production, methane reforming into syngas, selectivity and specificity of various membranes etc. The conference is organised by the Danish Catalytic Society under the Danish Society for Chemical Engineering. (EG)

  18. Challege and Opportunities of Membrane Bioelctrochemical Reactors for Wastewater Treatment

    Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are potentially advantageous as an energy-efficient approach for wastewater treatment. Integrating membrane filtration with MFCs could be a viable option for advanced wastewater treatment with a low energy input. Such an integration is termed as membrane bioelectrochemical reactors (MBERs). Comparing to the conventional membrane bioreactors or anaerobic membrane bioreactors, MBER could be a competitive technology, due to the its advantages on energy consumption and...

  19. Determination of the gas-to-membrane mass transfer coefficient in a catalytic membrane reactor

    Veldsink, J.W.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1995-01-01

    A novel method to determine the external mass transfer coefficient in catalytic membrane reactors (Sloot et al., 1992a, b) was presented in this study. In a catalytically active membrane reactor, in which a very fast reaction occurs, the external transfer coefficient can conveniently be measured by

  20. Recent Advances on Carbon Molecular Sieve Membranes (CMSMs and Reactors

    Margot A. Llosa Tanco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon molecular sieve membranes (CMSMs are an important alternative for gas separation because of their ease of manufacture, high selectivity due to molecular sieve separation, and high permeance. The integration of separation by membranes and reaction in only one unit lead to a high degree of process integration/intensification, with associated benefits of increased energy, production efficiencies and reduced reactor or catalyst volume. This review focuses on recent advances in carbon molecular sieve membranes and their applications in membrane reactors.

  1. Production of Biodiesel Using a Membrane Reactor to Minimize Separation Cost

    Olagunju, O. A.; Musonge, P.

    2017-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of a packed bed membrane reactor in the transesterification process of triglycerides to methyl ester using soyabean oil as feedstock. A TiO2/Al2O3 ceramic microporous membrane was selected due to its chemical inert nature and thermal stability to selectively remove the product from the reaction medium. CaO impregnated on the surface of activated carbon was packed into the membrane and acted as catalyst. The synthesized catalyst had a total loading of 40.50 % and was characterized by XRD and temperature-programmed desorption of CO2 (CO2-TPD). The crude biodiesel produced was micro-filtered by the ceramic membrane with a pore size of 0.02 μm to retain the unreacted oil and free glycerol, at the transmembrane pressure of 100 KPa. The best condition was achieved with a temperature of 65 °C, methanol/oil molar ratio of 6:1 for 150 minutes, which resulted in the highest FAME yield of 94 %. Methyl ester produced met the ASTM D6751 and SANS 1935 specifications. The product obtained was mainly composed of methyl esters. Glycerol was not detected in the product stream due to the ability of the membrane to retain the glycerol and the unreacted oil in the medium, which solved the issue of glycerol separation from biodiesel.

  2. CERAMIC MEMBRANE ENABLING TECHNOLOGY FOR IMPROVED IGCC EFFICIENCY

    Ravi Prasad

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this program is to conduct a technology development program to advance the state-of-the-art in ceramic Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTM) to the level required to produce step change improvements in process economics, efficiency, and environmental benefits for commercial IGCC systems and other applications. The IGCC program is focused on addressing key issues in materials, processing, manufacturing, engineering and system development that will make the OTM a commercial reality. The objective of the OTM materials development task is to identify a suitable material that can be formed into a thin film to produce the target oxygen flux. This requires that the material have an adequate permeation rate, and thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical properties such that the material is able to be supported on the desired substrate and sufficient mechanical strength to survive the stresses involved in operation. The objective of the composite OTM development task is to develop the architecture and fabrication techniques necessary to construct stable, high performance, thin film OTMs supported on suitable porous, load bearing substrates. The objective of the process development task of this program to demonstrate the program objectives on a single OTM tube under test conditions simulating those of the optimum process cycle for the power plant

  3. Performance and fouling characteristics of different pore-sized submerged ceramic membrane bioreactors (SCMBR).

    Jin, Le; Ng, How Yong; Ong, Say Leong

    2009-01-01

    The membrane bioreactor (MBR), a combination of activated sludge process and the membrane separation system, has been widely used in wastewater treatment. However, 90% of MBR reported were employing polymeric membranes. The usage of ceramic membranes in MBR is quite rare. Four submerged ceramic membrane bioreactors (SCMBRs) with different membrane pore size were used in this study to treat sewage. The results showed that the desirable carbonaceous removal of 95% and ammonia nitrogen removal of 98% were obtained for all the SCMBRs. It was also showed that the ceramic membranes were able to reject some portions of the protein and carbohydrate, whereby the carbohydrate rejection rate was much higher than that of protein. Membrane pore size did not significantly affect the COD and TOC removal efficiencies, the composition of EPS and SMP or the membrane rejection rate, although slight differences were observed. The SCMBR with the biggest membrane pore size fouled fastest, and membrane pore size was a main contributor for the different fouling potential observed.

  4. Ceramic membranes applied in separation of hot gases; Membranas Ceramicas para Separacion de Gases en Caliente

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this project is to develop and evaluate inorganic membranes of a ceramic type, with nanometric pore size, applied in separation of contaminants and fuel enrichment, gas mixture in coal gasification . etc. Using ceramic materials have the advantage of being highly physical and chemical resistance, which makes these membranes more adequate then metal equivalent for these applications. A support manufacture and the development of natricum membranes technology to estimate the potential fields of applications and industrial viability of ceramic membranes are the intermediate goals so that the project could be considered successful one. The project has been carried out jointly by the following entities: TGI, S. A. (Tecnologia y Gestion de la Innovacion, Spain). CIEMAT (Centro de Investigaciones energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Spain) and CSIC-UAM (Centro mixto Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas-Universidad Autonoma de Madrid. Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales, Spain). The range of activities proposed in this project is to get the sufficient knowledge of preparation and behaviour of separation membranes to be able to procede to the desing and manufacture of an industrial filter. The project phases include; the ameiloration of ceramic support processing methods, the fluid dynamic evaluation, technology for membrane desing and manufacturing, the mounting (setting up) of an experimental installation for testing and evaluation. As a previous step a state of the art review about the following topics was made: high temperature inorganic membranes, technology separation mechanisms, gasifications process and its previous experience applications of membranes and determination of membranes specifications and characteristics of testing conditions. At the end a new inorganic ceramic membrane, with nanometric pore size and useful in several industrial processes (filtration, separation of contaminants, fuel enrichment, purification of gas mixtures

  5. Field testing of polymeric mesh and ash-based ceramic membranes ...

    This paper presents the initial findings of field testing of 2 low-cost membrane filters, viz. 30 ìm polymeric mesh and 2–6 ìm macroporous waste-ash based ceramic filter, in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) employing batch anoxic and aerobic conditions. The influent was raw wastewater from a residential complex ...

  6. Positively charged microporous ceramic membrane for the removal of Titan Yellow through electrostatic adsorption.

    Cheng, Xiuting; Li, Na; Zhu, Mengfu; Zhang, Lili; Deng, Yu; Deng, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    To develop a depth filter based on the electrostatic adsorption principle, positively charged microporous ceramic membrane was prepared from a diatomaceous earth ceramic membrane. The internal surface of the highly porous ceramic membrane was coated with uniformly distributed electropositive nano-Y2O3 coating. The dye removal performance was evaluated through pressurized filtration tests using Titan Yellow aqueous solution. It showed that positively charged microporous ceramic membrane exhibited a flow rate of 421L/(m(2)·hr) under the trans-membrane pressure of 0.03bar. Moreover it could effectively remove Titan Yellow with feed concentration of 10mg/L between pH3 to 8. The removal rate increased with the enhancement of the surface charge properties with a maximum rejection of 99.6%. This study provides a new and feasible method of removing organic dyes in wastewater. It is convinced that there will be a broad market for the application of charged ceramic membrane in the field of dye removal or recovery from industry wastewater. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Achievements of European projects on membrane reactor for hydrogen production

    di Marcoberardino, G.; Binotti, M.; Manzolini, G.; Viviente, J.L.; Arratibel Plazaola, A.; Roses, L.; Gallucci, F.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane reactors for hydrogen production can increase both the hydrogen production efficiency at small scale and the electric efficiency in micro-cogeneration systems when coupled with Polymeric Electrolyte Membrane fuel cells. This paper discusses the achievements of three European projects

  8. Treatment of the Bleaching Effluent from Sulfite Pulp Production by Ceramic Membrane Filtration

    Mehrdad Ebrahimi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulp and paper waste water is one of the major sources of industrial water pollution. This study tested the suitability of ceramic tubular membrane technology as an alternative to conventional waste water treatment in the pulp and paper industry. In this context, in series batch and semi-batch membrane processes comprising microfiltration, ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, ceramic membranes were developed to reduce the chemical oxygen demand (COD and remove residual lignin from the effluent flow during sulfite pulp production. A comparison of the ceramic membranes in terms of separation efficiency and performance revealed that the two-stage process configuration with microfiltration followed by ultrafiltration was most suitable for the efficient treatment of the alkaline bleaching effluent tested herein, reducing the COD concentration and residual lignin levels by more than 35% and 70%, respectively.

  9. Treatment of the Bleaching Effluent from Sulfite Pulp Production by Ceramic Membrane Filtration.

    Ebrahimi, Mehrdad; Busse, Nadine; Kerker, Steffen; Schmitz, Oliver; Hilpert, Markus; Czermak, Peter

    2015-12-31

    Pulp and paper waste water is one of the major sources of industrial water pollution. This study tested the suitability of ceramic tubular membrane technology as an alternative to conventional waste water treatment in the pulp and paper industry. In this context, in series batch and semi-batch membrane processes comprising microfiltration, ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, ceramic membranes were developed to reduce the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and remove residual lignin from the effluent flow during sulfite pulp production. A comparison of the ceramic membranes in terms of separation efficiency and performance revealed that the two-stage process configuration with microfiltration followed by ultrafiltration was most suitable for the efficient treatment of the alkaline bleaching effluent tested herein, reducing the COD concentration and residual lignin levels by more than 35% and 70%, respectively.

  10. Effects of dissolved organic matters (DOMs) on membrane fouling in anaerobic ceramic membrane bioreactors (AnCMBRs) treating domestic wastewater.

    Yue, Xiaodi; Koh, Yoong Keat Kelvin; Ng, How Yong

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) have been regarded as a potential solution to achieve energy neutrality in the future wastewater treatment plants. Coupling ceramic membranes into AnMBRs offers great potential as ceramic membranes are resistant to corrosive chemicals such as cleaning reagents and harsh environmental conditions such as high temperature. In this study, ceramic membranes with pore sizes of 80, 200 and 300 nm were individually mounted in three anaerobic ceramic membrane bioreactors (AnCMBRs) treating real domestic wastewater to examine the treatment efficiencies and to elucidate the effects of dissolved organic matters (DOMs) on fouling behaviours. The average overall chemical oxygen demands (COD) removal efficiencies could reach around 86-88%. Although CH4 productions were around 0.3 L/g CODutilised, about 67% of CH4 generated was dissolved in the liquid phase and lost in the permeate. When filtering mixed liquor of similar properties, smaller pore-sized membranes fouled slower in long-term operations due to lower occurrence of pore blockages. However, total organic removal efficiencies could not explain the fouling behaviours. Liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection, fluorescence spectrophotometer and high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence and ultra-violet detectors were used to analyse the DOMs in detail. The major foulants were identified to be biopolymers that were produced in microbial activities. One of the main components of biopolymers--proteins--led to different fouling behaviours. It is postulated that the proteins could pass through porous cake layers to create pore blockages in membranes. Hence, concentrations of the DOMs in the soluble fraction of mixed liquor (SML) could not predict membrane fouling because different components in the DOMs might have different interactions with membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels in light water reactors

    Gentry, C.; George, N.; Maldonado, I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); Godfrey, A.; Terrani, K.; Gehin, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This study performs a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of incorporation of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels in light water reactors (LWRs). In particular, pin cell, lattice, and full core analyses are carried out on FCM fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Using uranium-based fuel and Pu/Np-based fuel in TRistructural isotropic (TRISO) particle form, each fuel design was examined using the SCALE 6.1 analytical suite. In regards to the uranium-based fuel, pin cell calculations were used to determine which fuel material performed best when implemented in the fuel kernel as well as the size of the kernel and surrounding particle layers. The higher fissile material density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, while the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design with 19.75% enrichment would need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO{sub 2} rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a 'color-set' array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In regards to the Pu/Np-based fuel, lattice calculations were performed to determine an optimal lattice design based on reactivity behavior, pin power peaking, and isotopic content. After obtaining a satisfactory lattice design, the feasibility of core designs fully loaded with Pu/Np FCM lattices was demonstrated using the NESTLE three-dimensional core simulator. (authors)

  12. Application of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels in light water reactors

    Gentry, C.; George, N.; Maldonado, I.; Godfrey, A.; Terrani, K.; Gehin, J.

    2012-01-01

    This study performs a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of incorporation of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels in light water reactors (LWRs). In particular, pin cell, lattice, and full core analyses are carried out on FCM fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Using uranium-based fuel and Pu/Np-based fuel in TRistructural isotropic (TRISO) particle form, each fuel design was examined using the SCALE 6.1 analytical suite. In regards to the uranium-based fuel, pin cell calculations were used to determine which fuel material performed best when implemented in the fuel kernel as well as the size of the kernel and surrounding particle layers. The higher fissile material density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, while the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design with 19.75% enrichment would need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO 2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a 'color-set' array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In regards to the Pu/Np-based fuel, lattice calculations were performed to determine an optimal lattice design based on reactivity behavior, pin power peaking, and isotopic content. After obtaining a satisfactory lattice design, the feasibility of core designs fully loaded with Pu/Np FCM lattices was demonstrated using the NESTLE three-dimensional core simulator. (authors)

  13. Application of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuels in Light Water Reactors

    Gentry, Cole A [ORNL; George, Nathan M [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to perform a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of incorporation of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels in Light Water Reactors (LWRs). In particular pin cell, lattice, and full core analyses are carried out on FCM fuel in a pressurized water reactor. Using uranium-based fuel and transuranic (TRU) based fuel in TRistructural ISOtropic (TRISO) particle form, each fuel design was examined using the SCALE 6.1 analytical suite. In regards to the uranium-based fuel, pin cell calculations were used to determine which fuel material performed best when implemented in the fuel kernel as well as the size of the kernel and surrounding particle layers. The higher physical density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, while the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design would need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a color-set array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In regards to the TRU based fuel, lattice calculations were performed to determine an optimal lattice design based on reactivity behavior, pin power peaking, and isotopic content. After obtaining a satisfactory lattice design, feasibility of core designs fully loaded with TRU FCM lattices was demonstrated using the NESTLE three-dimensional core simulator.

  14. Performance study of mullite and mullite-alumina ceramic MF membranes for oily wastewaters treatment

    Abbasi, Mohsen; Mirfendereski, Mojtaba; Fini, Mahdi Nikbakht

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, results of an experimental study on separation of oil from actual and synthetic oily wastewaters with mullite and mullite-alumina tubular ceramic membranes are presented. Mullite and mullite-alumina microfiltration (MF) symmetric membranes were synthesized from kaolin clay and α......-alumina membranes for treatment of synthetic wastewaters were investigated. In order to determine the best operating conditions, 250-3000ppm condensate gas in water emulsions was employed as synthetic oily wastewaters using mullite membrane. At the best operating conditions (3bar pressure, 1.5m/s cross flow...... velocity and 35°C temperature), performance of mullite and mullite-alumina membranes for treatment of real and synthetic wastewaters were also compared. The results for treatment of emulsions showed that the mullite ceramic membrane has the highest R (93.8%) and the lowest FR (28.97%). Also, the mullite...

  15. Water Reclamation Using a Ceramic Nanofiltration Membrane and Surface Flushing with Ozonated Water

    Hoang, Anh T.; Okuda, Tetsuji; Takeuchi, Haruka; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Nghiem, Long D.

    2018-01-01

    A new membrane fouling control technique using ozonated water flushing was evaluated for direct nanofiltration (NF) of secondary wastewater effluent using a ceramic NF membrane. Experiments were conducted at a permeate flux of 44 L/m2h to evaluate the ozonated water flushing technique for fouling mitigation. Surface flushing with clean water did not effectively remove foulants from the NF membrane. In contrast, surface flushing with ozonated water (4 mg/L dissolved ozone) could effectively remove most foulants to restore the membrane permeability. This surface flushing technique using ozonated water was able to limit the progression of fouling to 35% in transmembrane pressure increase over five filtration cycles. Results from this study also heighten the need for further development of ceramic NF membrane to ensure adequate removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) for water recycling applications. The ceramic NF membrane used in this study showed approximately 40% TOC rejection, and the rejection of PPCPs was generally low and highly variable. It is expected that the fouling mitigation technique developed here is even more important for ceramic NF membranes with smaller pore size and thus better PPCP rejection. PMID:29671797

  16. Water Reclamation Using a Ceramic Nanofiltration Membrane and Surface Flushing with Ozonated Water

    Takahiro Fujioka

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A new membrane fouling control technique using ozonated water flushing was evaluated for direct nanofiltration (NF of secondary wastewater effluent using a ceramic NF membrane. Experiments were conducted at a permeate flux of 44 L/m2h to evaluate the ozonated water flushing technique for fouling mitigation. Surface flushing with clean water did not effectively remove foulants from the NF membrane. In contrast, surface flushing with ozonated water (4 mg/L dissolved ozone could effectively remove most foulants to restore the membrane permeability. This surface flushing technique using ozonated water was able to limit the progression of fouling to 35% in transmembrane pressure increase over five filtration cycles. Results from this study also heighten the need for further development of ceramic NF membrane to ensure adequate removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs for water recycling applications. The ceramic NF membrane used in this study showed approximately 40% TOC rejection, and the rejection of PPCPs was generally low and highly variable. It is expected that the fouling mitigation technique developed here is even more important for ceramic NF membranes with smaller pore size and thus better PPCP rejection.

  17. Gradient composite metal-ceramic foam as supportive component for planar SOFCs and MIEC membranes

    Smorygo, Oleg; Mikutski, Vitali; Marukovich, Alexander; Sadykov, Vladislav; Usoltsev, Vladimir; Mezentseva, Natalia; Borodinecs, Anatolijs; Bobrenok, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach to the design of planar gradient porous supports for the thin-film SOFCs and MIEC membranes is described. The support's thermal expansion is controlled by the creation of a two-component composite metal-ceramic foam structure. Thin MIEC membranes and SOFCs were prepared on the composite supports by the layerwise deposition of composite functional layers including complex fluorites and perovskites. Lab-scale studies demonstrated promising performance of both MIEC membrane and SOFC.

  18. Gradient composite metal-ceramic foam as supportive component for planar SOFCs and MIEC membranes

    Smorygo, Oleg; Mikutski, Vitali; Marukovich, Alexander; Sadykov, Vladislav; Usoltsev, Vladimir; Mezentseva, Natalia; Borodinecs, Anatolijs; Bobrenok, Oleg

    2011-06-01

    A novel approach to the design of planar gradient porous supports for the thin-film SOFCs and MIEC membranes is described. The support's thermal expansion is controlled by the creation of a two-component composite metal-ceramic foam structure. Thin MIEC membranes and SOFCs were prepared on the composite supports by the layerwise deposition of composite functional layers including complex fluorites and perovskites. Lab-scale studies demonstrated promising performance of both MIEC membrane and SOFC.

  19. Recovery of hydrogen from impurities using a palladium membrane reactor

    Willms, R.S.; Okuno, K.

    1993-01-01

    One of the important steps in processing the exhaust from a fusion reactor is recovering tritium which is incorporated into molecules such as water and methane. One device which may prove to be very effective for this purpose is a palladium membrane reactor. This is a reactor which incorporates a Pd/Ag membrane in the reactor geometry. Reactions such as water gas shift, steam reforming and methane cracking can be carried out over the reactor catalyst, and the product hydrogen can be simultaneously removed from the reacting mixture. Because product is removed, greater than usual conversions can be obtained. In addition ultrapure hydrogen is produced, eliminating the need for an additional processing step. A palladium membrane reactor has been built and tested with three different catalysts. Initial results with a Ni-based catalyst show that it is very effective at promoting all three reactions listed above. Under the proper conditions, hydrogen recoveries approaching 100% have been observed. This study serves to experimentally validate the palladium membrane reactor as potentially important tool for fusion fuel processing

  20. A Dual-Phase Ceramic Membrane with Extremely High H2 Permeation Flux Prepared by Autoseparation of a Ceramic Precursor.

    Cheng, Shunfan; Wang, Yanjie; Zhuang, Libin; Xue, Jian; Wei, Yanying; Feldhoff, Armin; Caro, Jürgen; Wang, Haihui

    2016-08-26

    A novel concept for the preparation of multiphase composite ceramics based on demixing of a single ceramic precursor has been developed and used for the synthesis of a dual-phase H2 -permeable ceramic membrane. The precursor BaCe0.5 Fe0.5 O3-δ decomposes on calcination at 1370 °C for 10 h into two thermodynamically stable oxides with perovskite structures: the cerium-rich oxide BaCe0.85 Fe0.15 O3-δ (BCF8515) and the iron-rich oxide BaCe0.15 Fe0.85 O3-δ (BCF1585), 50 mol % each. In the resulting dual-phase material, the orthorhombic perovskite BCF8515 acts as the main proton conductor and the cubic perovskite BCF1585 as the main electron conductor. The dual-phase membrane shows an extremely high H2 permeation flux of 0.76 mL min(-1)  cm(-2) at 950 °C with 1.0 mm thickness. This auto-demixing concept should be applicable to the synthesis of other ionic-electronic conducting ceramics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Advanced Material-Ordered Nanotubular Ceramic Membranes Covalently Capped with Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Samer Al-Gharabli

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Advanced ceramic materials with a well-defined nano-architecture of their surfaces were formed by applying a two-step procedure. Firstly, a primary amine was docked on the ordered nanotubular ceramic surface via a silanization process. Subsequently, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs were covalently grafted onto the surface via an amide building block. Physicochemical (e.g., hydrophobicity, and surface free energy (SFE, mechanical, and tribological properties of the developed membranes were improved significantly. The design, preparation, and extended characterization of the developed membranes are presented. Tools such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, single-area electron diffraction (SAED analysis, microscopy, tribology, nano-indentation, and Raman spectroscopy, among other techniques, were utilized in the characterization of the developed membranes. As an effect of hydrophobization, the contact angles (CAs changed from 38° to 110° and from 51° to 95° for the silanization of ceramic membranes 20 (CM20 and CM100, respectively. SWCNT functionalization reduced the CAs to 72° and 66° for ceramic membranes carbon nanotubes 20 (CM-CNT-20 and CM-CNT-100, respectively. The mechanical properties of the developed membranes improved significantly. From the nanotribological study, Young’s modulus increased from 3 to 39 GPa for CM-CNT-20 and from 43 to 48 GPa for pristine CM-CNT-100. Furthermore, the nanohardness increased by about 80% after the attachment of CNTs for both types of ceramics. The proposed protocol within this work for the development of functionalized ceramic membranes is both simple and efficient.

  2. Alternative movement : collaborative project has researchers looking to ceramic membranes to improve produced water treatment

    Wells, P.

    2009-10-15

    Ceramic membranes have high chemical and thermal stability coupled with mechanical strength and are therefore used in a range of microfiltration, ultrafiltration and nanofiltration applications. This article described a new technology that involves the use of ceramic membranes in the treatment of produced water in thermal heavy oil recovery operations. The efficacy of advanced ceramic nano-membrane technology (CMT) is being examined in bench-scale experiments at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) in collaboration with the department of chemical and petroleum engineering at the University of Calgary. In one project, next-generation ceramic membrane technology is being used as part of the overall treatment process of produced water. The project is funded through a Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers fund and the Alberta Department of Energy. It is facilitated by the Petroleum Technology Alliance Canada in an effort to find cost-effective treatment solutions for recycling produced water for the conventional oil and gas industry. The key objective is to increase the amount of produced water that can be reused rather than disposed into deep saline aquifers. The research focuses on the pre-treatment of produced water and related salt impacted water by using ceramic membranes for the removal of organic compounds for beneficial reuse downstream. Ceramic membranes consist of a multilayer system and their performance depends on the separation and permeation properties of the membrane as well as its mechanical integrity. It was concluded that the CMT findings will be beneficial to the oil and gas industry in providing practical solutions for the challenging issues associated with de-oiling and produced water treatment. 2 figs.

  3. Ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsions: Roles played by stabilization surfactants of oil droplets

    Lu, Dongwei

    2015-04-07

    Oil/water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by surfactants is the part of oily wastewater that is most difficult to handle. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration presently is an ideal process to treat O/W emulsions. However, little is known about the fouling mechanism of the ceramic membrane during O/W emulsion treatment. This paper investigated how stabilization surfactants of O/W emulsions influence the irreversible fouling of ceramic membranes during ultrafiltration. An unexpected phenomenon observed was that irreversible fouling was much less when the charge of the stabilization surfactant of O/W emulsions is opposite to the membrane. The less ceramic membrane fouling in this case was proposed to be due to a synergetic steric effect and demulsification effect which prevented the penetration of oil droplets into membrane pores and led to less pore blockage. This proposed mechanism was supported by cross section images of fouled and virgin ceramic membranes taken with scanning electron microscopy, regression results of classical fouling models, and analysis of organic components rejected by the membrane. Furthermore, this mechanism was also verified by the existence of a steric effect and demulsification effect. Our finding suggests that ceramic membrane oppositely charged to the stabilization surfactant should be applied in ultrafiltration of O/W emulsions to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling. It could be a useful rule for ceramic membrane ultrafiltration of oily wastewater. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  4. Ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsions: roles played by stabilization surfactants of oil droplets.

    Lu, Dongwei; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Jun

    2015-04-07

    Oil/water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by surfactants is the part of oily wastewater that is most difficult to handle. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration presently is an ideal process to treat O/W emulsions. However, little is known about the fouling mechanism of the ceramic membrane during O/W emulsion treatment. This paper investigated how stabilization surfactants of O/W emulsions influence the irreversible fouling of ceramic membranes during ultrafiltration. An unexpected phenomenon observed was that irreversible fouling was much less when the charge of the stabilization surfactant of O/W emulsions is opposite to the membrane. The less ceramic membrane fouling in this case was proposed to be due to a synergetic steric effect and demulsification effect which prevented the penetration of oil droplets into membrane pores and led to less pore blockage. This proposed mechanism was supported by cross section images of fouled and virgin ceramic membranes taken with scanning electron microscopy, regression results of classical fouling models, and analysis of organic components rejected by the membrane. Furthermore, this mechanism was also verified by the existence of a steric effect and demulsification effect. Our finding suggests that ceramic membrane oppositely charged to the stabilization surfactant should be applied in ultrafiltration of O/W emulsions to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling. It could be a useful rule for ceramic membrane ultrafiltration of oily wastewater.

  5. Novel Ceramic-Polymer Composite Membranes for the Separation of Hazardous Liquid Waste

    Yoram Cohen

    2001-12-01

    The present project was conceived to address the need for robust yet selective membranes suitable for operating in harsh ph, solvent, and temperature environments. An important goal of the project was to develop a membrane chemical modification technology that would allow one to tailor-design membranes for targeted separation tasks. The method developed in the present study is based on the process of surface graft polymerization. Using essentially the same base technology of surface modification the research was aimed at demonstrating that improved membranes can be designed for both pervaporation separation and ultrafiltration. In the case of pervaporation, the present study was the first to demonstrate that pervaporation can be achieved with ceramic support membranes modified with an essentially molecular layer of terminally anchored polymer chains. The main advantage of the above approach, relative to other proposed membranes, is that the separating polymer layer is covalently attached to the ceramic support. Therefore, such membranes have a potential use in organic-organic separations where the polymer can swell significantly yet membrane robustness is maintained due to the chemical linkage of the chains to be inorganic support. The above membrane technology was also useful in developing fouling resistant ultrafiltration membranes. The prototype membrane developed in the project was evaluated for the treatment of oil-in-water microemulsions, demonstrating lack of irreversible fouling common with commercial membranes.

  6. Ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsions: Roles played by stabilization surfactants of oil droplets

    Lu, Dongwei; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    of classical fouling models, and analysis of organic components rejected by the membrane. Furthermore, this mechanism was also verified by the existence of a steric effect and demulsification effect. Our finding suggests that ceramic membrane oppositely charged

  7. Behavior of micro-particles in monolith ceramic membrane filtration with pre-coagulation.

    Yonekawa, H; Tomita, Y; Watanabe, Y

    2004-01-01

    This paper is intended to clarify the characteristics unique to monolith ceramic membranes with pre-coagulation by referring to the behavior of micro-particles. Flow analysis and experiments have proved that monolith ceramic membranes show a unique flow pattern in the channels within the element, causing extremely rapid flocculation in the channel during dead-end filtration. It was assumed that charge-neutralized micro-particles concentrated near the membrane surface grow in size due to flocculation, and as a result, coarse micro-particles were taken up by the shearing force to flow out. As the dead end points of flow in all the channels are located near the end of the channels with higher filterability, most of the flocculated coarse particles are formed to a columnar cake intensively at the dead end point. Therefore cake layer forming on the membrane other than around the dead end point is alleviated. This behavior of particle flocculation and cake formation at the dead end point within the channels are unique characteristics of monolith ceramic membranes. This is why all monolith ceramic membrane water purification systems operating in Japan do not have pretreatment equipment for flocculation and sedimentation.

  8. Facilitated transport ceramic membranes for high-temperature gas cleanup. Final report, February 1990--April 1994

    Quinn, R.; Minford, E.; Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.; Hart, B.A.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of developing high temperature, high pressure, facilitated transport ceramic membranes to control gaseous contaminants in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. Meeting this objective requires that the contaminant gas H{sub 2}S be removed from an IGCC gas mixture without a substantial loss of the other gaseous components, specifically H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. As described above this requires consideration of other, nonconventional types of membranes. The solution evaluated in this program involved the use of facilitated transport membranes consisting of molten mixtures of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salts immobilized in a microporous ceramic support. To accomplish this objective, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Golden Technologies Company Inc., and Research Triangle Institute worked together to develop and test high temperature facilitated membranes for the removal of H{sub 2}S from IGCC gas mixtures. Three basic experimental activities were pursued: (1) evaluation of the H{sub 2}S chemistry of a variety of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salt mixtures; (2) development of microporous ceramic materials which were chemically and physically compatible with molten carbonate salt mixtures under IGCC conditions and which could function as a host to support a molten carbonate mixture and; (3) fabrication of molten carbonate/ceramic immobilized liquid membranes and evaluation of these membranes under conditions approximating those found in the intended application. Results of these activities are presented.

  9. Enhanced water desalination performance through hierarchically-structured ceramic membranes

    Liu, Tong; Lei, Libin; Gu, Jianqiang; Wang, Yao; Winnubst, Louis; Chen, Chusheng; Ye, Chunsong; Chen, Fanglin

    2017-01-01

    Developments of membrane water desalination are impeded by low water vapor flux across the membrane. We present an innovative membrane design to significantly enhance the water vapor flux. A bilayer zirconia-based membrane with a thick hierarchically-structured support and a thin functional layer is

  10. Vibrational Spectroscopy as a Promising Toolbox for Analyzing Functionalized Ceramic Membranes.

    Kiefer, Johannes; Bartels, Julia; Kroll, Stephen; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2018-01-01

    Ceramic materials find use in many fields including the life sciences and environmental engineering. For example, ceramic membranes have shown to be promising filters for water treatment and virus retention. The analysis of such materials, however, remains challenging. In the present study, the potential of three vibrational spectroscopic methods for characterizing functionalized ceramic membranes for water treatment is evaluated. For this purpose, Raman scattering, infrared (IR) absorption, and solvent infrared spectroscopy (SIRS) were employed. The data were analyzed with respect to spectral changes as well as using principal component analysis (PCA). The Raman spectra allow an unambiguous discrimination of the sample types. The IR spectra do not change systematically with functionalization state of the material. Solvent infrared spectroscopy allows a systematic distinction and enables studying the molecular interactions between the membrane surface and the solvent.

  11. Serviceability of rod ceramic fuel pins on motoring conditions of FTP or NEMF reactor

    Deryavko, I.I.

    2004-01-01

    The operation conditions of rod ceramic fuel pins in the running hydrogen-cooled technological canals of FTP or NEMF reactor on the motoring conditions are considered. The available postreactor researches of the fuel pins are presented and the additional postreactor researches of fuel pins, tested on this mode in IVG.1 and IRGIT reactors, are carried out. The fuel pins serviceability on motoring conditions of FTP or NEF reactor operation is concluded. (author)

  12. The Membrane Gradostat Reactor: Secondary metabolite production ...

    This manuscript focuses on the aspect of a membrane gradostat as an entirely different concept compared to submerged hollow fibre modules. The use of membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology is rapidly advancing in the wastewater treatment industries. However, this is not the case in the biopharmaceutical ...

  13. NOVEL CERAMIC MEMBRANE FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION

    Ida, Jun-ichi; Yang, Zhaohui; Lin, Jerry Y.S.

    2002-01-01

    A new CO 2 semi-permeable dense inorganic membrane consisting of a porous metal phase and molten carbonate was proposed. A simple direct infiltration method was used to synthesize the metal-carbonate dual-phase membrane. Hermetic (gas-tight) dual phase membrane was successfully obtained. Permeation data showed that nitrogen or helium is not permeable through the membrane (only CO 2 , with O 2 can permeate through the membrane based on transport mechanism)

  14. Elaboration by tape-casting and co-sintering of multilayer catalytic membrane reactor- performances

    Julian, A.

    2008-12-01

    This research deals with the increasing interest of the conversion of natural gas into liquid fuels (diesel, kerosene) using the Gas To Liquid (GTL) process. Within this context, Catalytic Membrane-based Reactors (CMR) would allow an improvement of the process efficiency and a reduction of investment and production costs with respect to the present technologies. They allow performing the separation of oxygen from air, and the conversion of natural gas into synthesis gas within a single step. After having highlighted the economical and technological advantages of using a ceramic membrane for the production of syngas (H 2 + CO 2 ), the author describes the protocols of synthesis of powders selected for the dense membrane and the porous support, and their physical characteristics. The obtained powders are then adapted to the tape-casting forming process. Graded-composition multilayer structures and microstructure are then elaborated by co-sintering. Performances in terms of membrane oxygen flows are presented. Mechanisms limiting the oxygen flow are discussed in order to propose ways of improving membrane performances. The limits of the studied system are defined in terms of elastic properties, and optimization ways are proposed for the dense membrane material composition in terms of mechanical properties and performance in oxygen semi-permeation

  15. A combined SEM, CV and EIS study of multi-layered porous ceramic reactors for flue gas purification

    He, Zeming; Andersen, Kjeld Bøhm; Nygaard, Frederik Berg

    2013-01-01

    The effect of sintering temperature of 12-layered porous ceramic reactors (comprising 5 cells) was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The difference in microstructures of the reactors was evaluated by SEM...

  16. Biofilm formation on membranes used for membrane aerated biological reactors, under different stress conditions

    Andrade-Molinar, C.; Ballinas-Casarrubias, M. L.; Solis-Martinez, F. J.; Rivera-Chavira, B. E.; Cuevas-Rodirguez, G.; Nevarez-Moorillon, G. V.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm play an important role in wastewater treatment processes, and have been optimized in the membrane aerated biofilm reactors (MABR). In MABR, a hydrophobic membrane is used as support for the formation of biofilm, and supplements enough aeration to assure an aerobic process. (Author)

  17. Effects of irradiation on ceramics for fusion-reactor applications

    Porter, D.L.

    1982-12-01

    The purpose of this study, coordinated with efforts of LANL and Grumman Aircraft, was to lay some basic groundwork to study the irradiation effects on the engineering properties of some useful classes of ceramic materials; ANL's efforts were pointed towards multiphase materials (glass ceramics and partially-stabilized zirconias). The materials were irradiated at 400 and 550 0 C to fast (E > 0.1 MeV) neutron fluences of approx. 2 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . Fluorophlogapite mica based glass ceramics (Macor, etc.) were found susceptible to weakening due to void formtion between mica plates. Composition variations within this class of glass ceramics seemed to cause sharp variations in the magnitude of the effect. Lithium silicate glass ceramic (ReX) showed sharp contrasts between the effects of ionization irradiation and displacement damage, neutron irradiation having little effect on the ReX structure while electron irradiation creating lithium silicate vitrification and rapid structural annealing

  18. Membrane reactor technology for ultrapure hydrogen production

    Patil, Charudatta Subhash

    2005-01-01

    The suitability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) for stationary and vehicular applications because of its low operating temperatures, compactness, higher power density, cleaner exhausts and higher efficiencies compared to conventional internal combustion engines and gas turbines

  19. Removal of bacteriophages with different surface charges by diverse ceramic membrane materials in pilot spiking tests.

    Hambsch, B; Bösl, M; Eberhagen, I; Müller, U

    2012-01-01

    This study examines mechanisms for removal of bacteriophages (MS2 and phiX174) by ceramic membranes without application of flocculants. The ceramic membranes considered included ultra- and microfiltration membranes of different materials. Phages were spiked into the feed water in pilot scale tests in a waterworks. The membranes with pore sizes of 10 nm provided a 2.5-4.0 log removal of the phages. For pore sizes of 50 nm, the log removal dropped to 0.96-1.8. The membrane with a pore size of 200 nm did not remove phages. So, the removal of both MS2- and phiX174-phages depended on the pore size of the membranes. But apart from pore size also other factors influence the removal of phages. Removal was 0.5-0.9 log higher for MS2-phages compared with phiX174-phages. Size exclusion seems to be the major but not the only mechanism which influences the efficiency of phage removal by ceramic membranes.

  20. Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes - annual report for FY 2010.

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J. (Energy Systems)

    2011-03-14

    The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation without using an external power supply or circuitry. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen using OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

  1. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration of natural surface water with ultrasound enhanced backwashing.

    Boley, A; Narasimhan, K; Kieninger, M; Müller, W-R

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafiltration membrane cleaning with ultrasound enhanced backwashing was investigated with two ceramic membrane systems in parallel. One of them was subjected to ultrasound during backwashing, the other acted as a reference system. The feed water was directly taken from a creek with a sedimentation process as only pre-treatment. The cleaning performance was improved with ultrasound but after 3 weeks of operation damages occurred on the membranes. These effects were studied with online measurements of flux, trans-membrane-pressure and temperature, but also with integrity tests, turbidity measurements and visual examination.

  2. design of ceramic membrane supports: permeability, tensile strength and stress

    Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Verweij, H.

    1999-01-01

    A membrane support provides mechanical strength to a membrane top layer to withstand the stress induced by the pressure difference applied over the entire membrane and must simultaneously have a low resistance to the filtrate flow. In this paper an experimental and a theoretical approach toward the

  3. Compatibility of sodium with ceramic oxides employed in nuclear reactors; Compatibilidad del sodio con oxidos ceramicos utilizados en reactores nucleares

    Acena Moreno, V

    1981-07-01

    This work is a review of experiments carried out up to the present time on the corrosion and compatibility of ceramic oxides with liquid sodium at temperatures corresponding to those in fast breeder reactors. The review also includes the results of a thermo-dynamic/liquid sodium reactions. The exercise has been conducted with a view to effecting experimental studies in the future. (Author)

  4. Investigation of a submerged membrane reactor for continuous biomass hydrolysis

    Malmali, Mohammadmahdi; Stickel, Jonathan; Wickramasinghe, S. Ranil

    2015-10-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is one of the most costly steps in the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass. Use of a submerged membrane reactor has been investigated for continuous enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose thus allowing for greater use of the enzyme compared to a batch process. Moreover, the submerged 0.65 μm polyethersulfone microfiltration membrane avoids the need to pump a cellulose slurry through an external loop. Permeate containing glucose is withdrawn at pressures slightly below atmospheric pressure. The membrane rejects cellulose particles and cellulase enzyme bound to cellulose. Our proof-of-concept experiments have been conducted using a modified, commercially available membrane filtration cell under low fluxes around 75 L/(m2 h). The operating flux is determined by the rate of glucose production. Maximizing the rate of glucose production involves optimizing mixing, reactor holding time, and the time the feed is held in the reactor prior to commencement of membrane filtration and continuous operation. When we maximize glucose production rates it will require that we operate it at low glucose concentration in order to minimize the adverse effects of product inhibition. Consequently practical submerged membrane systems will require a combined sugar concentration step in order to concentrate the product sugar stream prior to fermentation.

  5. Ultrafiltration technology with a ceramic membrane for reactive dye removal: optimization of membrane performance.

    Alventosa-deLara, E; Barredo-Damas, S; Alcaina-Miranda, M I; Iborra-Clar, M I

    2012-03-30

    An ultrafiltration (UF) ceramic membrane was used to decolorize Reactive Black 5 (RB5) solutions at different dye concentrations (50 and 500 mg/L). Transmembrane pressure (TMP) and cross-flow velocity (CFV) were modified to study their influence on initial and steady-state permeate flux (J(p)) and dye rejection (R). Generally, J(p) increased with higher TMP and CFV and lower feed concentration, up to a maximum steady-state J(p) of 266.81 L/(m(2)h), obtained at 3 bar, 3m/s and 50mg/L. However, there was a TMP value (which changed depending on operating CFV and concentration) beyond which slight or no further increase in steady-state J(p) was observed. Similarly, the higher the CFV was, the more slightly the steady-state J(p) increased. Furthermore, the effectiveness of ultrafiltration treatment was evaluated through dye rejection coefficient. The results showed significant dye removals, regardless of the tested conditions, with steady-state R higher than 79.8% for the 50mg/L runs and around 73.2% for the 500 mg/L runs. Finally response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize membrane performance. At 50mg/L, a TMP of 4 bar and a CFV of 2.53 m/s were found to be the conditions giving the highest steady-state J(p), 255.86 L/(m(2)h), and the highest R, 95.2% simultaneously. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of the oleophilicity of different alkoxysilane modified ceramic membranes through wetting dynamic measurements

    Gao, Nengwen, E-mail: nengwengao@cqut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400050 (China); Ke, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Fan, Yiqun, E-mail: yiqunfan@njut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Xu, Nanping [State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Wettability has been recognized as one of the most important properties of porous materials for both fundamental and practical applications. In this study, the oleophilicity of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes modified by four alkoxysilanes with different length of alkyl group was investigated through oil wetting dynamic test. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimertric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were measured to confirm that ceramic membrane surfaces have been grafted with alkoxysilanes without changing the membrane morphology. A high speed video camera was used to record the spreading and imbibition process of oil on the modified membrane surface. The value of oil contact angle and its change during the wetting process were used to characterize the membrane oleophilicity. Characterization results showed that the oleophilicity of the modified membranes increased along with the increasing of the silane alkyl group. The influence of oleophilicity on the filtration performance of water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions was experimentally studied. A higher oil flux was obtained for membranes grafted with a longer alkyl group, indicating that increase oleophilicity can increase the membrane antifouling property. This work presents a valuable route to the surface oleophilicity control and testing of ceramic membranes in the filtration of non-polar organic solvents.

  7. Nanostructured Ceramic Photocatalytic Membrane Modified with a Polymer Template for Textile Wastewater Treatment

    Rizwan Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalytic ceramic membranes have attracted considerable attention for industrial wastewater treatment. However, morphological control of the membrane surface to improve its photocatalytic reactivity for the degradation of organic pollutants remains a challenge. Herein, we report a new nanostructured TiO2/Al2O3 composite ceramic membrane prepared from a poly(oxyethylene methacrylate (POEM template through a sol–gel method and its photocatalytic performance in the treatment of a model dye compound. The POEM polymeric template allowed the homogeneous distribution of catalytic sites, i.e., the TiO2 layer, on the Al2O3 membrane surface, resulting in improved organic dye degradation along with effective fouling mitigation. The immobilization of a TiO2 layer on the Al2O3 membrane support also significantly enhanced the membrane adsorption capacity toward dye organic compounds. An organic removal efficiency of over 96% was achieved with the TiO2/Al2O3 composite membrane under Ultraviolet (UV irradiation. In addition, the self-cleaning efficiency of the TiO2/Al2O3 composite membrane was remarkably improved by the degradation of organic foulants on the membrane under UV illumination.

  8. Removal of chromium from synthetic wastewater using MFI zeolite membrane supported on inexpensive tubular ceramic substrate

    R. Vinoth Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A mordenite framework inverted (MFI type zeolite membrane was produced on inexpensive tubular ceramic substrate through hydrothermal synthesis and applied for the removal of chromium from synthetic wastewater. The fabricated ceramic substrate and membrane was characterized by diverse standard techniques such as X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, porosity, water permeability and pore size measurements. The porosity of the ceramic substrate (53% was reduced by the deposition of MFI (51% zeolite layer. The pore size and water permeability of the membrane was evaluated as 0.272 μm and 4.43 × 10–7 m3/m2s.kPa, respectively, which are lower than that of the substrate pore size (0.309 μm and water permeability (5.93 × 10–7 m3/m2s.kPa values. To identify the effectiveness of the prepared membrane, the applied pressure of the filtration process and initial chromium concentration and cross flow rate were varied to study their influence on the permeate flux and percentage of removal. The maximum removal of chromium achieved was 78% under an applied pressure of 345 kPa and an initial feed concentration of 1,000 ppm. Finally, the efficiency of the membrane for chromium removal was assessed with other membranes reported in the literature.

  9. Cake layers and long filtration times protect ceramic micro-filtration membranes for fouling

    Lu, J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to decrease membrane fouling of a ceramic microfiltration system and at the same time increase the recovery. A conventional operation in micro- and ultrafiltration is an in-line coagulation and a frequent hydraulic backwash. The idea about these frequent backwashes

  10. Facile synthesis of mesoporous silica sublayer with hierarchical pore structure on ceramic membrane using anionic polyelectrolyte.

    Kang, Taewook; Oh, Seogil; Kim, Honggon; Yi, Jongheop

    2005-06-21

    A facile method for introducing mesoporous silica sublayer onto the surface of a ceramic membrane for use in liquid-phase separation is described. To reduce the electrostatic repulsion between the mesoporous silica sol and the ceramic membrane in highly acidic conditions (pH ceramic membrane, as confirmed by experimental titration data. Consistent with the titration results, the amount of mesoporous silica particles on the surface of the ceramic membrane was low, in the absence of PSS- treatment, whereas mesoporous silica sublayer with hierarchical pore structure was produced, when 1 wt % PSS- was used. The results show that mesoporous silica grows in the confined surface, eventually forming a multistacked surface architecture. The mesoporous silica sublayer contained uniform, ordered (P6 mm) mesopores of ca. 7.5 nm from mesoporous silica as well as macropores ( approximately mum) from interparticle voids, as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The morphologies of the supported mesoporous silica could be manipulated, thus permitting the generation of uniform needlelike forms or uniform spheroid particles by varying the concentration of PSS-.

  11. Ceramic microsieves: influence of perforation shape and distribution on flow resistance and membrane strength

    Kuiper, S.; Brink, R.; Nijdam, W.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic microsieves with slit-shaped perforations were compared to sieves with circular-shaped perforations, regarding flow resistance and membrane strength. Destructive tests show that the highest strength is obtained if the perforations are placed in a non-alternating pattern. Especially for

  12. A POLYMER-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MEMBRANE FOR RECOVERING VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM WASTEWATERS BY PERVAPORATION

    A composite membrane was constructed on a porous ceramic support from a block copolymer of styrene and butadiene (SBS). It was tested in a laboratory pervaporation apparatus for recovering volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such a 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethylene ...

  13. New ceramics for nuclear industry. Case of fission and fusion reactors

    Yvars, M.

    1979-10-01

    The ceramics used in the nuclear field are described as is their behaviour under radiation. 1) Power reactors - nuclear fission. Ceramics enter into the fabrication of nuclear fuels: oxides, carbides, uranium or plutonium nitrides or oxy-nitrides. Silicon carbide SiC is used for preparing the fuels of helium cooled high temperature reactors. Its use is foreseen in the design of gas high temperature gas thermal exchangers, as is silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ). In the materials for safety or control rods, the intense neutron flows induce nuclear reactions which increase the temperature of the neutron absorbing material. Boron carbide B 4 C, rare earth oxides Ln 2 O 3 , or B 4 C-Cu or B 4 C-Al cermets are employed. Burnable poison materials are formed of Al 2 O 3 -B 4 C or Al 2 O 3 -Ln 2 O 3 cermets. The moderators of thermal neutron reactors are in high purety polycrystalline graphite. For the thermal insulation of reactor vessels and jackets, honeycomb ceramics are used as well as ceramic fibres on an increasing scale (kaolin, alumina and other fibres). 2) fusion reactors (Tokomak). These require refractory materials with a low atomic number. Carbon fibres, boron carbide, some borons (Al B 12 ), silicon nitrides and oxy-nitrides and high density alumina are the substances considered [fr

  14. Fouling-induced enzyme immobilization for membrane reactors

    Luo, Jianquan; Meyer, Anne S.; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2013-01-01

    A simple enzyme immobilization method accomplished by promoting membrane fouling formation is proposed. The immobilization method is based on adsorption and entrapment of the enzymes in/on the membrane. To evaluate the concept, two membrane orientations, skin layer facing feed (normal mode......, but the reverse mode allowed for higher enzyme loading and stability, and irreversible fouling (i.e. pore blocking) developed more readily in the support structure than in the skin layer. Compared with an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR) with free enzymes, the novel EMR with enzymes immobilized in membrane......) and support layer facing feed (reverse mode), were used to immobilize alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.1.3), respectively. The nature of the fouling in each mode was determined by filtration fouling models. The permeate flux was larger in the normal mode...

  15. Fabrication of silica ceramic membrane via sol-gel dip-coating method at different nitric acid amount

    Kahlib, N. A. Z.; Daud, F. D. M.; Mel, M.; Hairin, A. L. N.; Azhar, A. Z. A.; Hassan, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    Fabrication of silica ceramics via the sol-gel method has offered more advantages over other methods in the fabrication of ceramic membrane, such as simple operation, high purity homogeneous, well defined-structure and complex shapes of end products. This work presents the fabrication of silica ceramic membrane via sol-gel dip-coating methods by varying nitric acid amount. The nitric acid plays an important role as catalyst in fabrication reaction which involved hydrolysis and condensation process. The tubular ceramic support, used as the substrate, was dipped into the sol of Tetrethylorthosilicate (TEOS), distilled water and ethanol with the addition of nitric acid. The fabricated silica membrane was then characterized by (Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope) FESEM and (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) FTIR to determine structural and chemical properties at different amount of acids. From the XRD analysis, the fabricated silica ceramic membrane showed the existence of silicate hydrate in the final product. FESEM images indicated that the silica ceramic membrane has been deposited on the tubular ceramic support as a substrate and penetrate into the pore walls. The intensity peak of FTIR decreased with increasing of amount of acids. Hence, the 8 ml of acid has demonstrated the appropriate amount of catalyst in fabricating good physical and chemical characteristic of silica ceramic membrane.

  16. Simulation of Water Gas Shift Zeolite Membrane Reactor

    Makertiharta, I. G. B. N.; Rizki, Z.; Zunita, Megawati; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    The search of alternative energy sources keeps growing from time to time. Various alternatives have been introduced to reduce the use of fossil fuel, including hydrogen. Many pathways can be used to produce hydrogen. Among all of those, the Water Gas Shift (WGS) reaction is the most common pathway to produce high purity hydrogen. The WGS technique faces a downstream processing challenge due to the removal hydrogen from the product stream itself since it contains a mixture of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and also the excess reactants. An integrated process using zeolite membrane reactor has been introduced to improve the performance of the process by selectively separate the hydrogen whilst boosting the conversion. Furthermore, the zeolite membrane reactor can be further improved via optimizing the process condition. This paper discusses the simulation of Zeolite Membrane Water Gas Shift Reactor (ZMWGSR) with variation of process condition to achieve an optimum performance. The simulation can be simulated into two consecutive mechanisms, the reaction prior to the permeation of gases through the zeolite membrane. This paper is focused on the optimization of the process parameters (e.g. temperature, initial concentration) and also membrane properties (e.g. pore size) to achieve an optimum product specification (concentration, purity).

  17. Characterization of natural organic matter treated by iron oxide nanoparticle incorporated ceramic membrane-ozonation process.

    Park, Hosik; Kim, Yohan; An, Byungryul; Choi, Heechul

    2012-11-15

    In this study, changes in the physical and structural properties of natural organic matter (NOM) were observed during hybrid ceramic membrane processes that combined ozonation with ultrafiltration ceramic membrane (CM) or with a reactive ceramic membrane (RM), namely, an iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) incorporated-CM. NOM from feed water and NOM from permeate treated with hybrid ceramic membrane processes were analyzed by employing several NOM characterization techniques. Specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and fractionation analyses showed that the hybrid ceramic membrane process effectively removed and transformed relatively high contents of aromatic, high molecular weight and hydrophobic NOM fractions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and 3-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that this process caused a significant decrease of the aromaticity of humic-like structures and an increase in electron withdrawing groups. The highest removal efficiency (46%) of hydroxyl radical probe compound (i.e., para-Chlorobenzoic acid (pCBA)) in RM-ozonation process compared with that in CM without ozonation process (8%) revealed the hydroxyl radical formation by the surface-catalyzed reaction between ozone and IONs on the surface of RM. In addition, experimental results on flux decline showed that fouling of RM-ozonation process (15%) was reduced compared with that of CM without ozonation process (30%). These results indicated that the RM-ozonation process enhanced the destruction of NOM and reduced the fouling by generating hydroxyl radicals from the catalytic ozonation in the RM-ozonation process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Membrane contactor/separator for an advanced ozone membrane reactor for treatment of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water

    Chan, Wai Kit; Jouët, Justine; Heng, Samuel; Yeung, King Lun; Schrotter, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    An advanced ozone membrane reactor that synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone gas, membrane contactor for pollutant adsorption and reaction, and membrane separator for clean water production is described. The membrane reactor represents an order of magnitude improvement over traditional semibatch reactor design and is capable of complete conversion of recalcitrant endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in water at less than three minutes residence time. Coating the membrane contactor with alumina and hydrotalcite (Mg/Al=3) adsorbs and traps the organics in the reaction zone resulting in 30% increase of total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Large surface area coating that diffuses surface charges from adsorbed polar organic molecules is preferred as it reduces membrane polarization that is detrimental to separation. - Graphical abstract: Advanced ozone membrane reactor synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone, membrane contactor for sorption and reaction and membrane separator for clean water production to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement in treatment performance compared to traditional ozone reactor. Highlights: ► Novel reactor using membranes for ozone distributor, reaction contactor and water separator. ► Designed to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement over traditional reactor. ► Al 2 O 3 and hydrotalcite coatings capture and trap pollutants giving additional 30% TOC removal. ► High surface area coating prevents polarization and improves membrane separation and life.

  19. Dense ceramic membranes based on ion conducting oxides

    Fontaine, M.L.; Larring, Y.; Bredesen, R.; Norby, T.; Grande, T.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter reviews the recent progress made in the fields of high temperature oxygen and hydrogen separation membranes. Studies of membranes for oxygen separation are mainly focusing on materials design to improve flux, and to lesser extent, related to stability issues. High oxygen fluxes satisfying industrial requirements can be obtained but, for many materials, the surface exchange rate is limiting the performance. The current status on electrolyte-type and mixed proton and electron conducting membranes is outlined, highlighting materials with improved stability in typical applications as solid oxide fuel cell technology and gas separation. In our presentation more fundamental aspects related to transport properties, chemical and mechanical stability of membrane materials are also treated. It is concluded that a significantly better understanding of the long term effects of operation in chemical gradients is needed for these types of membrane materials. (authors)

  20. System and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    Kelly, Sean M

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  1. Application of ceramic membranes for seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) pre-treatment

    Hamad, Juma

    2013-05-30

    Low-pressure (microfiltration/ultrafiltration (MF/UF)) membranes are being increasingly used as pre-treatment, prior to seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO). The objective of pre-treatment before reverse osmosis (RO) membranes is to remove undesirable and particulate fouling materials (algae, suspended and colloidal particles). Also, a pre-treatment barrier reduces organics and provides better feed water quality for RO membranes. MF and UF pre-treatment prior to SWRO provides Low Silt Density Index (SDI) values recommended for RO operation. Ceramic membranes are more attractive as they made of more chemically resistant materials, which allow for more stable operation and aggressive backwashing (BW) and cleaning. A pilot plant with a monolith ceramic MF membrane (0.1 μm pore size) from METAWATER was used to carry out the study. Red Sea water pumped from a distance of 700 m offshore from Thuwal (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia) was used as feed water. The pilot plant was operated automatically at constant flux of 150 LMH that involved BW, air flushing and forward flushing at the end of filtration cycle. Seawater permeates were used for hydraulic BW, while sodium hypochlorite, citric acid and sodium hydroxide were used for chemical cleaning (CIP) to restore the membrane permeability after use. Filtration cycles of 2.5 h were adopted for initial experiments. Aggressive BW flux of 1,800 LMH for 15 s, air flushing of 4 bars for 10 s and forward flushing of 300 LMH for 40 s were applied for regular membrane hydraulic cleaning. The increase of membrane resistances over time was monitored. Further studies were also performed by using Anopore ceramic membranes AAO100 (pore sizes of 0.1 μm) using a constant pressure bench-scale set-up. The feed water and permeate were analysed using an SDI unit, flow cytometre (FCM) and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD). The results showed that ceramic membrane filtration reduced the SDI15 of seawater from 6.1 to 2.1 which

  2. Treatment of domestic wastewater with an anaerobic ceramic membrane bioreactor (AnCMBR).

    Yue, Xiaodi; Koh, Yoong Keat Kelvin; Ng, How Yong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a ceramic membrane with a pore size of 80 nm was incorporated into an anaerobic membrane bioreactor for excellent stability and integrity. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies by biodegradation reached 78.6 ± 6.0% with mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) of 12.8 ± 1.2 g/L. Even though the total methane generated was 0.3 ± 0.03 L/g CODutilized, around 67.4% of it dissolved in permeate and was lost beyond collection. As a result, dissolved methane was 2.7 times of the theoretical saturating concentration calculated from Henry's law. When transmembrane pressure (TMP) of the ceramic membrane reached 30 kPa after 25.3 d, 95.2% of the total resistance was attributed to the cake layer, which made it the major contributor to membrane fouling. Compared to the mixed liquor, cake layer was rich in colloids and soluble products that could bind the solids to form a dense cake layer. The Methanosarcinaceae family preferred to attach to the ceramic membranes.

  3. Comprehensive Study on Ceramic Membranes for Low‐Cost Microbial Fuel Cells

    Pasternak, Grzegorz; Greenman, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) made with different types of ceramic membranes were investigated to find a low‐cost alternative to commercially available proton exchange membranes. The MFCs operated with fresh human urine as the fuel. Pyrophyllite and earthenware produced the best performance to reach power densities of 6.93 and 6.85 W m−3, respectively, whereas mullite and alumina achieved power densities of 4.98 and 2.60 W m−3, respectively. The results indicate the dependence of bio‐film growth and activity on the type of ceramic membrane applied. The most favourable conditions were created in earthenware MFCs. The performance of the ceramic membranes was related to their physical and chemical properties determined by environmental scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X‐ray spectroscopy. The cost of mullite, earthenware, pyrophyllite and alumina was estimated to be 13.61, 4.14, 387.96 and 177.03 GBP m−2, respectively. The results indicate that earthenware and mullite are good substitutes for commercially available proton exchange membranes, which makes the MFC technology accessible in developing countries. PMID:26692569

  4. Performance of zeolite ceramic membrane synthesized by wet mixing method as methylene blue dye wastewater filter

    Masturi; Widodo, R. D.; Edie, S. S.; Amri, U.; Sidiq, A. L.; Alighiri, D.; Wulandari, N. A.; Susilawati; Amanah, S. N.

    2018-03-01

    Problem of pollution in water continues in Indonesia, with its manufacturing sector as biggest contributor to economic growth. One out of many technological solutions is post-treating industrial wastewater by membrane filtering technology. We presented a result of our fabrication of ceramic membrane made from zeolite with simple mixing and he. At 5% of (poring agent):(total weight), its permeability stays around 2.8 mD (10‑14m2) with slight variance around it, attributed to the mixture being in far below percolating threshold. All our membranes achieve remarkable above 90% rejection rate of methylene blue as solute waste in water solvent.

  5. Salt splitting of sodium-dominated radioactive waste using ceramic membranes

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Carlson, C.D.; Virkar, A.; Joshi, A.

    1994-08-01

    The potential for salt splitting of sodium dominated radioactive wastes by use of a ceramic membrane is reviewed. The technical basis for considering this processing technology is derived from the technology developed for battery and chlor-alkali chemical industry. Specific comparisons are made with the commercial organic membranes which are the standard in nonradioactive salt splitting. Two features of ceramic membranes are expected to be especially attractive: high tolerance to gamma irradiation and high selectivity between sodium and other ions. The objective of the salt splitting process is to separate nonradioactive sodium from contaminated sodium salts prior to other pretreatment processes in order to: (1) concentrate the waste in order to reduce the volume of subsequent additives and capacity of equipment, (2) decrease the pH of the waste in preparation for further processing, and (3) provide sodium with very low radioactivity levels for caustic washing of sludge or low level and mixed waste vitrification

  6. Electrolytic process to produce sodium hypochlorite using sodium ion conductive ceramic membranes

    Balagopal, Shekar; Malhotra, Vinod; Pendleton, Justin; Reid, Kathy Jo

    2012-09-18

    An electrochemical process for the production of sodium hypochlorite is disclosed. The process may potentially be used to produce sodium hypochlorite from seawater or low purity un-softened or NaCl-based salt solutions. The process utilizes a sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane, such as membranes based on NASICON-type materials, in an electrolytic cell. In the process, water is reduced at a cathode to form hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. Chloride ions from a sodium chloride solution are oxidized in the anolyte compartment to produce chlorine gas which reacts with water to produce hypochlorous and hydrochloric acid. Sodium ions are transported from the anolyte compartment to the catholyte compartment across the sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane. Sodium hydroxide is transported from the catholyte compartment to the anolyte compartment to produce sodium hypochlorite within the anolyte compartment.

  7. Effect of irradiation-induced defects on fusion reactor ceramics

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Structural, thermal, and electrical properties critical to performance of ceramics in a fusion environment can be profoundly altered by irradiation effects. Neutron damage may cause swelling, reduction of thermal conductivity, increase in dielectric loss, and either reduction or enhancement of strength depending on the crystal structure and defect content of the material. Absorption of ionizing energy inevitably leads to degradation of insulating properties, but these changes can be reduced by alterations in structural or compositional makeup. Assessment of the irradiation response of candidate ceramics Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , SiC and Si 3 N 4 shows that each may find use in advanced fusion devices. The present understanding of irradiation-induced defects in ceramics, while far from complete, nevertheless points the way to methods for developing improved materials for fusion applications

  8. Microporous nano-MgO/diatomite ceramic membrane with high positive surface charge for tetracycline removal.

    Meng, Xian; Liu, Zhimeng; Deng, Cheng; Zhu, Mengfu; Wang, Deyin; Li, Kui; Deng, Yu; Jiang, Mingming

    2016-12-15

    A novel microporous nano-MgO/diatomite ceramic membrane with high positive surface charge was prepared, including synthesis of precursor colloid, dip-coating and thermal decomposition. Combined SEM, EDS, XRD and XPS studies show the nano-MgO is irregularly distributed on the membrane surface or pore walls and forms a positively charged nano coating. And the nano-MgO coating is firmly attached to the diatomite membrane via SiO chemical bond. Thus the nano-MgO/diatomite membrane behaves strong electropositivity with the isoelectric point of 10.8. Preliminary filtration tests indicate that the as-prepared nano-MgO/diatomite membrane could remove approximately 99.7% of tetracycline in water through electrostatic adsorption effect. The desirable electrostatic property enables the nano-MgO/diatomite membrane to be a candidate for removal of organic pollutants from water. And it is convinced that there will be a great application prospect of charged ceramic membrane in water treatment field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Strength degradation and failure limits of dense and porous ceramic membrane materials

    Pećanac, G.; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Lipińska-Chwałek, M.

    2013-01-01

    Thin dense membrane layers, mechanically supported by porous substrates, are considered as the most efficient designs for oxygen supply units used in Oxy-fuel processes and membrane reactors. Based on the favorable permeation properties and chemical stability, several materials were suggested...

  10. Edible Oil Industry Wastewater Treatment by Microfiltration with Ceramic Membrane

    Zita Šereš; Dragana Šoronja Simović; Ljubica Dokić; Lidietta Giorno; Biljana Pajin; Cecilia Hodur; Nikola Maravić

    2016-01-01

    Membrane technology is convenient for separation of suspended solids, colloids and high molecular weight materials that are present. The idea is that the waste stream from edible oil industry, after the separation of oil by using skimmers is subjected to microfiltration and the obtained permeate can be used again in the production process. The wastewater from edible oil industry was used for the microfiltration. For the microfiltration of this effluent a tubular membrane was used with a pore ...

  11. Anaerobic membrane bio-reactors for severe industrial effluents and urban spill waters : The AMBROSIUS project

    Van Lier, J.B.; Ozgun, H.; Ersahin, M.E.; Dereli, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors, combination of membrane and anaerobic processes become more and more attractive and feasible. In anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs), biomass and particulate organic matter are physically retained inside the reactor,

  12. Dry Reforming of Methane Using a Nickel Membrane Reactor

    Jonas M. Leimert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dry reforming is a very interesting process for synthesis gas generation from CH 4 and CO 2 but suffers from low hydrogen yields due to the reverse water–gas shift reaction (WGS. For this reason, membranes are often used for hydrogen separation, which in turn leads to coke formation at the process temperatures suitable for the membranes. To avoid these problems, this work shows the possibility of using nickel self-supported membranes for hydrogen separation at a temperature of 800 ∘ C. The higher temperature effectively suppresses coke formation. The paper features the analysis of the dry reforming reaction in a nickel membrane reactor without additional catalyst. The measurement campaign targeted coke formation and conversion of the methane feedstock. The nickel approximately 50% without hydrogen separation. The hydrogen removal led to an increase in methane conversion to 60–90%.

  13. Halloysite nanotube-based electrospun ceramic nanofibre mat: a novel support for zeolite membranes

    Chen, Zhuwen; Zeng, Jiaying; Lv, Dong; Gao, Jinqiang; Zhang, Jian; Bai, Shan; Li, Ruili; Hong, Mei; Wu, Jingshen

    2016-12-01

    Some key parameters of supports such as porosity, pore shape and size are of great importance for fabrication and performance of zeolite membranes. In this study, we fabricated millimetre-thick, self-standing electrospun ceramic nanofibre mats and employed them as a novel support for zeolite membranes. The nanofibre mats were prepared by electrospinning a halloysite nanotubes/polyvinyl pyrrolidone composite followed by a programmed sintering process. The interwoven nanofibre mats possess up to 80% porosity, narrow pore size distribution, low pore tortuosity and highly interconnected pore structure. Compared with the commercial α-Al2O3 supports prepared by powder compaction and sintering, the halloysite nanotube-based mats (HNMs) show higher flux, better adsorption of zeolite seeds, adhesion of zeolite membranes and lower Al leaching. Four types of zeolite membranes supported on HNMs have been successfully synthesized with either in situ crystallization or a secondary growth method, demonstrating good universality of HNMs for supporting zeolite membranes.

  14. [Effect of solution environments on ceramic membrane microfiltration of model system of Chinese medicines].

    Zhang, Lianjun; Lu, Jin; Le, Kang; Fu, Tingming; Guo, Liwei

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the effect of differents solution environments on the ceramic membrane microfiltration of model system of Chinese medicines. Taking binary system of soybean protein-berberine as the research object, flux, transmittance of berberine and traping rate of protein as indexes, different solution environment on membrane process were investigated. When the concentration of soybean protein was under 1 g x L(-1), the membrane flux was minimum with the traping of berberine decreased slightly as the concentration increased. When pH was 4, the flux was maximum with the traping rate of protein was 99%, and the transmittance of berberine reached above 60%. The efficiency of membrane separation can be improved by optimizing the solution environment of water-extraction of chinese medicines. The efficiency of membrane separation is the best when adjust the pH to the isoelectric point of proteins for the proteins as the main pollutant in aqueous solution.

  15. Pressureless sintering and gas flux properties of porous ceramic membranes for gas applications

    David O. Obada

    Full Text Available The preparation and characterization of kaolin based ceramic membranes using styrofoam (STY and sawdust (SD as pore formers have been prepared by mechano-chemical synthesis using pressureless sintering technique with porogen content between (0–20 wt% by die pressing. Pellets were fired at 1150 °C and soaking time of 4 h. The membranes cast as circular disks were subjected to characterization studies to evaluate the effect of the sintering temperature and pore former content on porosity, density, water absorption and mechanical strength. Obtained membranes show effective porosity with maximum at about 43 and 47% respectively for membranes formulated with styrofoam and sawdust porogens but with a slightly low mechanical strength that does not exceed 19 MPa. The resultant ceramic bodies show a fine porous structure which is mainly caused by the volatilization of the porogens. The fabricated membrane exhibited high N2 gas flux, hence, these membranes can be considered as efficient for potential application for gas separation by reason of the results shown in the gas flux tests. Keywords: Porosity, Pore formers, Kaolin, Physico-mechanical properties, Gas separation, Gas flux

  16. Glycerin purification using asymmetric nano-structured ceramic membranes from production of waste fish oil biodiesel

    Maghami, M.; Sadrameli, S. M.; Shamloo, M.

    2018-02-01

    Biodiesel is an environmental friendly alternative liquid transportation fuel that can be used in diesel engines without major modifications. The scope of this research work is to produce biodiesel from waste fish oil and its purification from the byproducts using a ceramic membrane. Transesterification of waste fish oil was applied for the biodiesel production using methanol in the presence of KOH as a catalyst. Effect of catalyst weight percent, temperature and methanol to oil molar ratio (MR) on the biodiesel yield have been studied and the results show that highest methyl ester yield of 79.2% has been obtained at 60 °C, MR: 6 and 1% KOH. The produced biodiesel purified by a ceramic membrane. Membrane flux and glycerin removal at different operating conditions such as temperature, trans-membrane pressures and cross flow velocities have been measured. Glycerin purity by membrane method is 99.97% by weight at the optimum condition. The highest membrane flux occurred at 50 °C temperature, 1 bar pressure and 3 m/s velocity.

  17. Effect of ceramic membrane channel diameter on limiting retentate protein concentration during skim milk microfiltration.

    Adams, Michael C; Barbano, David M

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the effect of retentate flow channel diameter (4 or 6mm) of nongraded permeability 100-nm pore size ceramic membranes operated in nonuniform transmembrane pressure mode on the limiting retentate protein concentration (LRPC) while microfiltering (MF) skim milk at a temperature of 50°C, a flux of 55 kg · m(-2) · h(-1), and an average cross-flow velocity of 7 m · s(-1). At the above conditions, the retentate true protein concentration was incrementally increased from 7 to 11.5%. When temperature, flux, and average cross-flow velocity were controlled, ceramic membrane retentate flow channel diameter did not affect the LRPC. This indicates that LRPC is not a function of the Reynolds number. Computational fluid dynamics data, which indicated that both membranes had similar radial velocity profiles within their retentate flow channels, supported this finding. Membranes with 6-mm flow channels can be operated at a lower pressure decrease from membrane inlet to membrane outlet (ΔP) or at a higher cross-flow velocity, depending on which is controlled, than membranes with 4-mm flow channels. This implies that 6-mm membranes could achieve a higher LRPC than 4-mm membranes at the same ΔP due to an increase in cross-flow velocity. In theory, the higher LRPC of the 6-mm membranes could facilitate 95% serum protein removal in 2 MF stages with diafiltration between stages if no serum protein were rejected by the membrane. At the same flux, retentate protein concentration, and average cross-flow velocity, 4-mm membranes require 21% more energy to remove a given amount of permeate than 6-mm membranes, despite the lower surface area of the 6-mm membranes. Equations to predict skim milk MF retentate viscosity as a function of protein concentration and temperature are provided. Retentate viscosity, retentate recirculation pump frequency required to maintain a given cross-flow velocity at a given retentate viscosity, and retentate protein

  18. DETERMINATION OF THE MASS TRANSFER CHARACTERIZATION OF A CERAMIC-POLYMER COMPOSITE MEMBRANE IN THE PERVAPORATION MODE

    The effect of the coating layer thickness on VOC extraction performance of a ceramic polymer composite membrane has been investigated. It was found, under experimental condiitons representing typical field operation, the overall mass transfer rates of feed components were control...

  19. Syngas upgrading in a membrane reactor with thin Pd-alloy supported membrane

    Brunetti, A.; Caravella, A.; Fernandez Gesalaga, E.; Pacheco Tanaka, D. A.; Gallucci, F.; Drioli, E.; Curcio, E.; Viviente, J. L.; Barbieri, G.

    2015-01-01

    In hydrogen production, the syngas streams produced by reformers and/or coal gasification plants contain a large amount of H2 and CO in need of upgrading. To this purpose, reactors using Pd-based membranes have been widely studied as they allow separation and recovery of a pure hydrogen stream.

  20. Continuous hyperpolarization with parahydrogen in a membrane reactor

    Lehmkuhl, Sören; Wiese, Martin; Schubert, Lukas; Held, Mathias; Küppers, Markus; Wessling, Matthias; Blümich, Bernhard

    2018-06-01

    Hyperpolarization methods entail a high potential to boost the sensitivity of NMR. Even though the "Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange" (SABRE) approach uses para-enriched hydrogen, p-H2, to repeatedly achieve high polarization levels on target molecules without altering their chemical structure, such studies are often limited to batch experiments in NMR tubes. Alternatively, this work introduces a continuous flow setup including a membrane reactor for the p-H2, supply and consecutive detection in a 1 T NMR spectrometer. Two SABRE substrates pyridine and nicotinamide were hyperpolarized, and more than 1000-fold signal enhancement was found. Our strategy combines low-field NMR spectrometry and a membrane flow reactor. This enables precise control of the experimental conditions such as liquid and gas pressures, and volume flow for ensuring repeatable maximum polarization.

  1. Novel Ceramic Materials for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Water Electrolysers' Anodes

    Polonsky, J.; Bouzek, K.; Prag, Carsten Brorson

    2012-01-01

    Tantalum carbide was evaluated as a possible new support for the IrO2 for use in anodes of polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolysers. A series of supported electrocatalysts varying in mass content of iridium oxide was prepared. XRD, powder conductivity measurements and cyclic and linear...

  2. Ultrasonic control of ceramic membrane fouling: Effect of particle characteristics.

    Chen, Dong; Weavers, Linda K; Walker, Harold W

    2006-02-01

    In this study, the effect of particle characteristics on the ultrasonic control of membrane fouling was investigated. Ultrasound at 20 kHz was applied to a cross-flow filtration system with gamma-alumina membranes in the presence of colloidal silica particles. Experimental results indicated that particle concentration affected the ability of ultrasound to control membrane fouling, with less effective control of fouling at higher particle concentrations. Measurements of sound wave intensity and images of the cavitation region indicated that particles induced additional cavitation bubbles near the ultrasonic source, which resulted in less turbulence reaching the membrane surface and subsequently less effective control of fouling. When silica particles were modified to be hydrophobic, greater inducement of cavitation bubbles near the ultrasonic source occurred for a fixed concentration, also resulting in less effective control of fouling. Particle size influenced the cleaning ability of ultrasound, with better permeate recovery observed with larger particles. Particle size did not affect sound wave intensity, suggesting that the more effective control of fouling by large particles was due to greater lift and cross-flow drag forces on larger particles compared to smaller particles.

  3. CO2 sorption of a ceramic separation membrane

    Wormeester, Herbert; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Spijksma, G.I.; Verweij, H.; Poelsema, Bene

    2004-01-01

    The ellipsometric characterization of the CO2 sorption of a silica membrane provides a fast and accurate technique for the characterization of maximum sorption and the heat of adsorption. Both parameters are evaluated for the 73 nm thick silica layer as well as the 1650 nm thick supporting γ-layer.

  4. Effective and highly recyclable ceramic membrane based on amorphous nanosilica for dye removal from t

    Gehan M.K. Tolba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an adsorptive ceramic membrane was prepared by a simple dry pressing of a mixture of nanosilica produced from low cost rice husk by hydrothermal technique at sub-critical water conditions, calcium phosphate, and ammonium acetate together and then calcined at 600 °C in air. Optimization of the raw materials ratio was found to be necessary to avoid crack formation during sintering process. The membrane microstructure, dye removal efficiency and the permeation flux of the membranes were investigated. The membrane was tested to remove the methylene blue from aqueous solution. Results show that the removal of the dye increases as the silica content increases in the all given membranes and it decreases with an increase in the ammonium acetate. Moreover, the water flux decreases with an increase in the silica content. The methylene blue adsorbed onto the silica membrane can be removed by calcination and the membrane could be recycled several times without any obvious loss in the adsorption performance. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a convenient strategy to prepare an effective adsorptive membrane, which can be applied as a highly recyclable membrane for the adsorption of organic maters.

  5. Determination of porosity in supports for ceramic membranes of titanium dioxide by gamma spectroscopy

    Siciliano, Umberto C.C.S.; Oliveira, Elizabeth E.M.; Brandão, Luís E.B.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R., E-mail: ucsiciliano@gmail.com, E-mail: eemo@ien.gov.br, E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.br, E-mail: paulov@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Membrane separation processes (MSP) have been widely used to fractionate, concentrate and purity solutions, such as: food industry, pharmaceutical, water desalination and for treatment of the radioactive liquid waste in the nuclear industry. The MSP are more economical than traditional methods because most of them are athermic. Increased membrane application has led to the expansion of the manufacturing technology knowledge base, resulting in membranes with high permeability, improved selectivity and long-term stability. The demand for high operating temperatures and chemical resistance have stimulated the development of inorganic structures, mainly porous ceramics. The materials most used to obtain ceramic membranes are oxides like Ab0{sub 3}, Si0{sub 2}, Zr0{sub 2} and Ti0{sub 2} or combination of these. Despite the favorable characteristics, ceramic membranes has not been applied extensively, mainly due to the difficulty of obtaining porous structures without cracks and with adequate pore size. The objective of this work is obtain a support of titanium oxide using potato starch as a pore former. The titanium oxide used is commercial, with average particle size of 0.13 μm. Three suspensions were prepared containing 0,5 and 10 % of the potato starch and the drying in spray dryer, obtaining a homogeneous and granulated powder, with flow ability suitable for compaction. The supports were uniaxial pressing with l.5 kgf.cm{sup -2} and sintering at temperatures of 1050, 1100 and 1150 °C for 1h in oven resistance. The results showed that the porosity obtained by gamma ray transmission method was approximately 50%. This value is within range for applications as membrane support. (author)

  6. Planar, Polysilazane?Derived Porous Ceramic Supports for Membrane and Catalysis Applications

    Konegger, Thomas; Williams, Lee F.; Bordia, Rajendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Porous, silicon carbonitride?based ceramic support structures for potential membrane and catalysis applications were generated from a preceramic polysilazane precursor in combination with spherical, ultrahigh?molecular weight polyethylene microparticles through a sacrificial filler approach. A screening evaluation was used for the determination of the impact of both porogen content and porogen size on pore structure, strength, and permeability characteristics of planar specimens. By optimizin...

  7. Dense ceramic membranes: A review of the state of the art

    Kozhukharov, V.

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available During the past several years the concepts of oxygen permeation through mixed valency ceramic membranes possess special interest. In this context, a classification and brief review of the major membrane ceramic materials will be presented. The focus will be on dense ceramic membranes as elements for advanced application. A discussion will be proposed for mixed conductor ceramics as perovskite ABO3 compounds. Dense membranes on perovskite base are the object of the present review and some details about processing and characterization of double (A- and B-site substituted La1-x Sr(BaxCo0.8Fe0.2O3-d perovskites will be presented.

    El concepto de permeación de oxígeno a través de membranas cerámicas de valencia mixta, ha venido adquiriendo especial relevancia a lo largo de los últimos años. En este contexto se hace se efectúa una clasificación y breve revisión de los materiales cerámicos más relevantes utilizados como membranas. En particular se orienta la descripción hacia las membranas cerámicas densas para aplicaciones avanzadas. Se propone un análisis de los conductores cerámicos mixtos, como los compuestos de tipo perovskita ABO3. Se realiza una revisión de los materiales de este tipo existentes, así como se describen algunos aspectos sobre el procesamiento y caracterización de las perovskitas tipo La1-x Sr(BaxCo0.8Fe0.2O3-d doblemente sustituidas (lugares A- y B-.

  8. Hybrid Processes Combining Photocatalysis and Ceramic Membrane Filtration for Degradation of Humic Acids in Saline Water

    Lili Song

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the combined effects of photocatalysis with ceramic membrane filtration for the removal of humic acid in the presence of salt; to simulate saline wastewater conditions. The effects of operating parameters, such as salinity and TiO2 concentration on permeate fluxes, total organic carbon (TOC, and UV absorbance removal, were investigated. The interaction between the humic acids and TiO2 photocatalyst played an important role in the observed flux change during ceramic membrane filtration. The results for this hybrid system showed that the TOC removal was more than 70% for both without NaCl and with the 500 ppm NaCl concentration, and 62% and 66% for 1000 and 2000 ppm NaCl concentrations. The reduction in UV absorbance was more complete in the absence of NaCl compared to the presence of NaCl. The operation of the integrated photoreactor-ceramic membrane filter over five repeat cycles is described. It can be concluded that the overall removal performance of the hybrid system was influenced by the presence of salts, as salt leads to agglomeration of TiO2 particles by suppressing the stabilising effects of electrostatic repulsion and thereby reduces the effective surface contact between the pollutant and the photocatalyst.

  9. Hybrid Processes Combining Photocatalysis and Ceramic Membrane Filtration for Degradation of Humic Acids in Saline Water.

    Song, Lili; Zhu, Bo; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel; Muthukumaran, Shobha

    2016-03-01

    This study explored the combined effects of photocatalysis with ceramic membrane filtration for the removal of humic acid in the presence of salt; to simulate saline wastewater conditions. The effects of operating parameters, such as salinity and TiO₂ concentration on permeate fluxes, total organic carbon (TOC), and UV absorbance removal, were investigated. The interaction between the humic acids and TiO₂ photocatalyst played an important role in the observed flux change during ceramic membrane filtration. The results for this hybrid system showed that the TOC removal was more than 70% for both without NaCl and with the 500 ppm NaCl concentration, and 62% and 66% for 1000 and 2000 ppm NaCl concentrations. The reduction in UV absorbance was more complete in the absence of NaCl compared to the presence of NaCl. The operation of the integrated photoreactor-ceramic membrane filter over five repeat cycles is described. It can be concluded that the overall removal performance of the hybrid system was influenced by the presence of salts, as salt leads to agglomeration of TiO₂ particles by suppressing the stabilising effects of electrostatic repulsion and thereby reduces the effective surface contact between the pollutant and the photocatalyst.

  10. Progress in Treatment of Oily Wastewater by Inorganic Porous Ceramic Membrane

    Dai Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition and complexity of oily wastewater contains many solid particles, free oil, emulsified oil and so on.It brought about a series of environmental pollution problems when oily wastewater was directly discharged into rivers, lakes and other water bodies. Therefore, researchers are committed to study how to deal with oily wastewater to deal with oily wastewater to apply it to meet the requirements of water injection.Inorganic porous ceramic membrane has excellent properties among many filtering methods. For example, high temperature and high pressure resistance, resistance to acid and alkali, low energy consumption, no pollution to the environment and has a good prospect in the field of oily wastewater treatment, which has attracted the attention of many scholars not only at home but also on abroad. This article describes the present situation of the research on the treatment of oily wastewater by ceramic membrane in recent years, and expounded the significance of the treatment of oily wastewater to people’s lives and makes an expectation for the development of inorganic porous ceramic membrane in the future.

  11. Treatment of wastewater containing phenol using a tubular ceramic membrane bioreactor.

    Ersu, C B; Ong, S K

    2008-02-01

    The performance of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a tubular ceramic membrane for phenol removal was evaluated under varying hydraulic retention times (HRT) and a fixed sludge residence time (SRT) of 30 days. The tubular ceramic membrane was operated with a mode of 15 minutes of filtration followed by 15 seconds of permeate backwashing at a flux of 250 l m(-2)hr(-1) along with an extended backwashing of 30 seconds every 3 hours of operation, which maintained the transmembrane pressure (TMP) below 100 kPa. Using a simulated municipal wastewater with varying phenol concentrations, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removals observed were greater than 88% with excellent suspended solids (SS) removal of 100% at low phenol concentrations (approx. 100 mg l(-1) of phenol). Step increases in phenol concentration showed that inhibition was observed between 600 to 800 mg l(-1) of phenol with decreased sludge production rate, mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration, and removal performance. The sludge volume index (SVI) of the biomass increased to about 450 ml g(-1) for a phenol input concentration of 800 mg l(-1). When the phenol concentration was decreased to 100 mg l(-1), the ceramic tubular MBR was found to recover rapidly indicating that the MBR is a robust system retaining most of the biomass. Experimental runs using wastewater containing phenol indicated that the MBR can be operated safely without upsets for concentrations up to 600 mg l(-1) of phenol at 2-4 hours HRT and 30 days SRT.

  12. PERFORMANCE AND SELECTIVITY OF CERAMIC MEMBRANES IN THE ULTRAFILTRATION OF MODEL EMULSION IN SALINE

    Konrad ĆWIRKO

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Oily wastewaters from different onshore and offshore installations and from maritime transport pose a serious threat to the environment so they must be treated by multistage separation also including membrane processes. The main advantages of such membranes are high performance and selectivity, high resistance for temperature and pressure, resistance for acids, bases and solvents, long service life and for application – significant reduction of industries and transport environmental impact. This work presents the results of the process of separation of oil from the emulsion with NaCl addition. Research was performed with a use of laboratory installation with ceramic 300 kDa membrane. The analysis concerned performance and selectivity of a membrane in the function of time and test results have been subsequently compared with the requirements of the IMO.

  13. Development of a mixed-conductive ceramic membrane for syngas production

    Etchegoyen, G.

    2005-10-01

    Natural gas conversion into syngas (H 2 +CO) is very attractive for hydrogen and clean fuel production via GTL technology by providing an alternative to oil products and reducing greenhouse gas emission. Syngas production, using a mixed ionic-electronic conducting ceramic membrane, is thought to be particularly promising. The purpose of this PhD thesis was to develop this type of membrane. Mixed-conducting oxide was synthesized, characterized and then, shaped via tape casting and co-sintered in order to obtain multilayer membranes with controlled architectures and microstructures. Oxygen permeation fluxes were measured with a specific device to evaluate membrane performances. As a result, the optimisation of architecture and microstructure made it possible to increase oxygen permeation flux by a factor 30. Additional researches were focused on the oxide composition in order to achieve higher dimensional stability. (author)

  14. Catalytic membrane reactor for tritium extraction system from He purge

    Santucci, Alessia; Incelli, Marco; Sansovini, Mirko; Tosti, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • In the HCBB blanket, the produced tritium is recovered by purging with helium; membrane technologies are able to separate tritium from helium. • The paper presents the results of two experimental campaigns. • In the first, a Pd–Ag diffuser for hydrogen separation is tested at several operating conditions. • In the second, the ability of a Pd–Ag membrane reactor for water decontamination is assessed by performing isotopic swamping and water gas shift reactions. - Abstract: In the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket concept, the produced tritium is recovered purging the breeder with helium at low pressure, thus a tritium extraction system (TES) is foreseen to separate the produced tritium (which contains impurities like water) from the helium gas purge. Several R&D activities are running in parallel to experimentally identify most promising TES technologies: particularly, Pd-based membrane reactors (MR) are under investigation because of their large hydrogen selectivity, continuous operation capability, reliability and compactness. The construction and operation under DEMO relevant conditions (that presently foresee a He purge flow rate of about 10,000 Nm 3 /h and a H 2 /He ratio of 0.1%) of a medium scale MR is scheduled for next year, while presently preliminary experiments on a small scale reactor are performed to identify most suitable operative conditions and catalyst materials. This work presents the results of an experimental campaign carried out on a Pd-based membrane aimed at measuring the capability of this device in separating hydrogen from the helium. Many operative conditions have been investigated by considering different He/H 2 feed flow ratios, several lumen pressures and reactor temperatures. Moreover, the performances of a membrane reactor (composed of a Pd–Ag tube having a wall thickness of about 113 μm, length 500 mm and diameter 10 mm) in processing the water contained in the purge gas have been measured by using

  15. Catalytic membrane reactor for tritium extraction system from He purge

    Santucci, Alessia, E-mail: alessia.santucci@enea.it [ENEA for EUROfusion, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Incelli, Marco [ENEA for EUROfusion, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); DEIM, University of Tuscia, Via del Paradiso 47, 01100 Viterbo (Italy); Sansovini, Mirko; Tosti, Silvano [ENEA for EUROfusion, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • In the HCBB blanket, the produced tritium is recovered by purging with helium; membrane technologies are able to separate tritium from helium. • The paper presents the results of two experimental campaigns. • In the first, a Pd–Ag diffuser for hydrogen separation is tested at several operating conditions. • In the second, the ability of a Pd–Ag membrane reactor for water decontamination is assessed by performing isotopic swamping and water gas shift reactions. - Abstract: In the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket concept, the produced tritium is recovered purging the breeder with helium at low pressure, thus a tritium extraction system (TES) is foreseen to separate the produced tritium (which contains impurities like water) from the helium gas purge. Several R&D activities are running in parallel to experimentally identify most promising TES technologies: particularly, Pd-based membrane reactors (MR) are under investigation because of their large hydrogen selectivity, continuous operation capability, reliability and compactness. The construction and operation under DEMO relevant conditions (that presently foresee a He purge flow rate of about 10,000 Nm{sup 3}/h and a H{sub 2}/He ratio of 0.1%) of a medium scale MR is scheduled for next year, while presently preliminary experiments on a small scale reactor are performed to identify most suitable operative conditions and catalyst materials. This work presents the results of an experimental campaign carried out on a Pd-based membrane aimed at measuring the capability of this device in separating hydrogen from the helium. Many operative conditions have been investigated by considering different He/H{sub 2} feed flow ratios, several lumen pressures and reactor temperatures. Moreover, the performances of a membrane reactor (composed of a Pd–Ag tube having a wall thickness of about 113 μm, length 500 mm and diameter 10 mm) in processing the water contained in the purge gas have been

  16. Surface Modification of Ceramic Membranes with Thin-film Deposition Methods for Wastewater Treatment

    Jahangir, Daniyal

    2017-12-01

    -TiO2 and ALD-SnO2 modified membranes were tested for alginate fouling inhibition performance in a dead-end constant-pressure filtration system. This is the first report on the application of SnO2-modified ceramic membrane for testing its alginate fouling potential; which was determined to be nearly-same for both modified membranes with a negligible amount of difference. This revealed SnO2 as a potential future anti-foulant to be tested for membrane modification/fabrication for application in water/wastewater treatment systems.

  17. Environmentally benign synthesis of amides and ureas via catalytic dehydrogenation coupling of volatile alcohols and amines in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    Chen, Tao

    2016-05-31

    In this study, we report the direct synthesis of amides and ureas via the catalytic dehydrogenation of volatile alcohols and amines using the Milstein catalyst in a Pd-Ag/ceramic membrane reactor. A series of amides and ureas, which could not be synthesized in an open system by catalytic dehydrogenation coupling, were obtained in moderate to high yields via catalytic dehydrogenation of volatile alcohols and amines. This process could be monitored by the hydrogen produced. Compared to the traditional method of condensation, this catalytic system avoids the stoichiometric pre-activation or in situ activation of reagents, and is a much cleaner process with high atom economy. This methodology, only possible by employing the Pd-Ag/ceramic membrane reactor, not only provides a new environmentally benign synthetic approach of amides and ureas, but is also a potential method for hydrogen storage.

  18. Environmentally benign synthesis of amides and ureas via catalytic dehydrogenation coupling of volatile alcohols and amines in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    Chen, Tao; Zeng, Gaofeng; Lai, Zhiping; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the direct synthesis of amides and ureas via the catalytic dehydrogenation of volatile alcohols and amines using the Milstein catalyst in a Pd-Ag/ceramic membrane reactor. A series of amides and ureas, which could not be synthesized in an open system by catalytic dehydrogenation coupling, were obtained in moderate to high yields via catalytic dehydrogenation of volatile alcohols and amines. This process could be monitored by the hydrogen produced. Compared to the traditional method of condensation, this catalytic system avoids the stoichiometric pre-activation or in situ activation of reagents, and is a much cleaner process with high atom economy. This methodology, only possible by employing the Pd-Ag/ceramic membrane reactor, not only provides a new environmentally benign synthetic approach of amides and ureas, but is also a potential method for hydrogen storage.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of ceramic/carbon nanotubes composite adsorptive membrane for copper ion removal from water

    Tofighy, Maryam Ahmadzadeh; Mohammadi, Toraj [Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    We prepared a novel adsorptive membrane by implanting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in pore channels of ceramic (α-alumina) support via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using cyclohexanol and ferrocene as carbon precursor and catalyst, respectively. Optimization of CNTs growth conditions resulted in uniform distribution of the CNTs in the pore channels of the support. The optimized CNTs-ceramic membrane was oxidized with concentrated nitric acid, and chitosan was employed for filling intertube-CNT gaps. The modified CNTs-ceramic membrane was used for copper ion removal from water, and the effects of the modification steps (oxidation and filling intertube-CNT gaps with chitosan) and pH on permeation flux and rejection of the prepared adsorptive membrane were investigated. Moreover, static adsorption was also investigated and Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetics models were used to describe adsorption behavior of copper ions by the prepared adsorptive membrane.

  20. Synthesis of a catalytic reactor membrane for synthesis gas production; Elaboration d'une membrane de reacteur catalytique pour la production de gaz de synthese

    Juste, E.; Julian, A.; Chartier, T. [Limoges Univ., Lab. Science des Procedes Ceramiques et de Traitements de Surface (SPCTS, UMR 6638 CNRS), 87 (France); Juste, E.; Julian, A.; Del Gallo, P.; Richet, N. [Centre de Recherche Claude-Delorme, Air Liquide, 78 - Jouy en Josas (France)

    2007-07-01

    The conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas (mixture of H{sub 2} and CO) is a main challenge for the hydrogen and clean fuels production. Mixed (ionic O{sup 2-} and electronic) conducing ceramics membrane reactors seem particularly promising. The design considered for the membrane is a tri-layer system integrating a reforming catalyst and a dense membrane laying on a porous support. Among the materials considered for the dense membrane, perovskites La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Fe{sub 1-y}Ga{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} seem to be interesting for their performances and stability. The oxygen flux through the membrane is measured in terms of temperature under different oxygen partial pressure gradients. In the industrial experimental conditions, the membrane is submitted to a strong oxygen (air/methane) partial pressure gradient of about 900 C which induces mechanical stresses, on account of the material expansion difference, in terms of p{sub O2}. In this framework, the evolutions of the performances and of the expansion coefficient have been followed in terms of the substitutions rates in La{sub (1-x)}Sr{sub x}Fe{sub (1-y)}Ga{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} with x{<=}0.5 and y{<=}0.5. (O.M.)

  1. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibing Zhao; Sanil John

    2006-09-30

    The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. Several pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactors have been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. Visual observation shows that the corona is not uniform throughout the reactor. The corona is stronger near the top of the reactor in argon, while nitrogen and mixtures of argon or nitrogen with H{sub 2}S produce stronger coronas near the bottom of the reactor. Both of these effects appear to be explainable base on the different electron collision interactions with monatomic versus polyatomic gases. A series of experiments varying reactor operating parameters, including discharge capacitance, pulse frequency, and discharge voltage were performed while maintaining constant power input to the reactor. At constant reactor power input, low capacitance, high pulse frequency, and high voltage operation appear to provide the highest conversion and the highest energy efficiency for H{sub 2}S decomposition. Reaction rates and energy efficiency per H{sub 2}S molecule increase with increasing flow rate, although overall H{sub 2}S conversion decreases at constant power input. Voltage and current waveform analysis is ongoing to determine the fundamental operating characteristics of the reactors. A metal infiltrated porous ceramic membrane was prepared using vanadium as the metal and an alumina tube. Experiments with this type of membrane are continuing, but the results thus far have been consistent with those obtained in previous project years: plasma driven permeation or superpermeability

  2. Ceramic membrane by tape casting and sol-gel coating for microfiltration and ultrafiltration application

    Das, Nandini; Maiti, H. S.

    2009-11-01

    Alumina membrane filters in the form of thin (0.3-0.8 mm) discs of 25-30 mm diameter suitable for microfiltration application have been fabricated by tape-casting technique. Further using this microfiltration membrane as substrate, boehmite sol coating was applied on it and ultrafiltration membrane with very small thickness was formed. The pore size of the microfiltration membrane could be varied in the range of 0.1-0.7 μm through optimisation of experimental parameter. In addition, each membrane shows a very narrow pore size distribution. The most important factor, which determines the pore size of the membrane, is the initial particle size and its distribution of the ceramic powder. The top thin ultrafiltration, boehmite layer was prepared by sol-gel method, with a thickness of 0.5 μm. Particle size of the sol was approximately 30-40 nm. The structure and formation of the layer was analysed through TEM. At 550 °C formation of the top layer was completed. The pore size of the ultrafiltration membrane measured from TEM micrograph was almost 10 nm. Results of microbial (Escherichia coli—smallest-sized water-borne bacteria) test confirm the possibility of separation through this membrane

  3. Treating domestic sewage by Integrated Inclined-Plate-Membrane bio-reactor

    Song, Li Ming; Wang, Zi; Chen, Lei; Zhong, Min; Dong, Zhan Feng

    2017-12-01

    Membrane fouling shorten the service life of the membrane and increases aeration rate for membrane surface cleaning. Two membrane bio-reactors, one for working and another for comparing, were set up to evaluate the feasibility of alleviating membrane fouling and improving wastewater treatment efficiency by integrating inclined-plate precipitation and membrane separation. The result show that: (1) Inclined-plate in reactor had a good effect on pollutant removal of membrane bioreactor. The main role of inclined-plate is dividing reactor space and accelerating precipitation. (2) Working reactor have better performance in COD, TN and TP removal, which can attribute to that working reactor (integrated inclined-plate-Membrane bioreactor) takes both advantages of membrane separation and biological treatment. When influent COD, TP and TN concentration is 163-248 mg/L, 2.08-2.81 mg/L and 24.38-30.49 mg/L in working reactor, effluent concentration is 27-35 mg/L, 0.53-0.59 mg/L and 11.28-11.56 mg/L, respectively. (3) Membrane fouling was well alleviated in integrated inclined-plate-Membrane bioreactor, and membrane normal service time is significantly longer than that in comparing reactor, which can attribute to accelerating precipitation of inclined-plate. In summary, integrated inclined-plate-Membrane bioreactor is a promising technology to alleviating membrane fouling and improving wastewater treatment efficiency, having good performance and bright future in application.

  4. Cross flow microfiltration of oil-water emulsions using clay based ceramic membrane support and TiO2 composite membrane

    Kanchapogu Suresh; G. Pugazhenthi

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to study the effect of cross flow filtration conditions on the separation of oily wastewater using ceramic support and TiO2 membrane. Firstly, the low cost clay based ceramic membrane support was prepared by uniaxial compaction method using combination of pyrophyllite, quartz, feldspar, kaolin, ball clay and calcium carbonate along with PVA as a binder. Subsequently, TiO2 composite membrane was fabricated via hydrothermal route employing TiO2 sol derived fro...

  5. Theoretical comparison of packed bed and fluidized bed membrane reactors for methane reforming

    Gallucci, F.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this theoretical work the performance of different membrane reactor concepts, both fluidized bed and packed bed membrane reactors, has been compared for ultra-pure hydrogen production via methane reforming. Using detailed theoretical models, the required membrane area to reach a given conversion

  6. Comparison of packed bed and fluidized bed membrane reactors for methane reforming

    Gallucci, F.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the performance of different membrane reactor concepts, both fluidized bed and packed bed membrane reactors, have been compared for the reforming of methane for the production of ultra-pure hydrogen. Using detailed theoretical models, the required membrane area to reach a given

  7. Application of high temperature ceramic superconductors (CSC) to commercial tokamak reactors

    Ehst, D.A.; Kim, S.; Gohar, Y.; Turner, L.; Smith, D.L.; Mattas, R.

    1987-10-01

    Ceramic superconductors operating near liquid nitrogen temperature may experience higher heating rates without losing stability, compared to conventional superconductors. This will permit cable design with less stabilizer, reducing fabrication costs for large fusion magnets. Magnet performance is studied for different operating current densities in the superconductor, and cost benefits to commercial tokamak reactors are estimated. It appears that 10 kA . cm -2 (at 77 K and ∼10 T) is a target current density which must be achieved in order for the ceramic superconductors to compete with conventional materials. At current densities around 50 kA . cm -2 most potential benefits have already been gained, as magnet structural steel begins to dominate the cost at this point. For a steady state reactor reductions of ∼7% are forecast for the overall capital cost of the power plant in the best case. An additional ∼3% cost saving is possible for pulsed tokamaks. 9 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs

  8. Hydrogen separation from high temperature CO-containing syn-gas flow using molecular ceramic membranes

    Soudarev, A.; Konakov, G.; Souryaninov, A.; Molchanov, A. [Boyko Research Engineering Ceramic Heat Engines Center Ltd., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lelait, L.; Stevens, P.H. [European Inst. for Power Studies, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Poisoning of the platinum (Pt) metals used as catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) can negatively impact on PEMFC operation efficiency. In order to address this issue, a supply of hydrogen with a carbon monoxide (CO) admixtures is required. This paper provided details of a new type of molecular ceramic membrane (MCM) that allows the separation of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from the hydrocarbon fuel reforming products that contain CO and has higher temperature and pressure capacity than other membranes. After various tests, alumo-magnesium spinel (AMS) was selected as the most promising porous material for the ceramic multi-layer membrane. The crystalline structure of the AMS showed good thermo-dynamic stability during tests that ranged between 20 and 1400 degrees C, as well as a chemical resistance relative to the effects of the aggressive fuel cell environment, and no exposure to the oxidation-recovery processes in the CO and H{sub 2} flow. The macroporous substrate of the AMS and the membrane selection layers have the same composition. The formation of the carrier was conducted by a semi-dry molding on a hydraulic press. Formation of the nano-porous structure in the carrier macro-pores by the polysilicon acid sol solution treatment allowed the synthesis of the amorphous silica and crystobalite crystals with a developed surface and nano-dimension subporosity. Test results have shown that the MCM has optimum penetrability and selectivity values as well as admissible thermo-mechanical properties. H{sub 2} flow through the membrane was 1.5-1.7 times greater than the CO flow. It was concluded that the AMS-based membrane devices will increase the efficiency of the PEMFC power plants and reduce their degradation capacity. 2 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  9. Role of membranes and membrane reactors in the hydrogen supply of fuel cells for transports

    Julbe, A.; Guizard, Ch. [Institut Europeen des Membranes, UMII, Lab. des Materiaux et des Procedes Membranaires, CNRS UMR 5635, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2000-07-01

    Production, storage and supply of high-purity hydrogen as a clean and efficient fuel is central to fuel cells technology, in particular in vehicle traction. Actually, technologies for handling liquefied or gaseous hydrogen in transports are not available so that a number of alternative fuels are considered with the aim of in-situ generation of hydrogen through catalytic processes. The integrated concept of membrane reactors (MRs) can greatly benefit to these technologies. Particular emphasis is put on inorganic membranes and their role in MRs performance for H{sub 2} production.

  10. Integrated nitrogen removal biofilter system with ceramic membrane for advanced post-treatment of municipal wastewater.

    Son, Dong-Jin; Yun, Chan-Young; Kim, Woo-Yeol; Zhang, Xing-Ya; Kim, Dae-Gun; Chang, Duk; Sunwoo, Young; Hong, Ki-Ho

    2016-12-01

    The pre-denitrification biofilm process for nitrogen removal was combined with ceramic membrane with pore sizes of 0.05-0.1 µm as a system for advanced post-treatment of municipal wastewater. The system was operated under an empty bed hydraulic retention time of 7.8 h, recirculation ratio of 3, and transmembrane pressure of 0.47 bar. The system showed average removals of organics, total nitrogen, and solids as high as 93%, 80%, and 100%, respectively. Rapid nitrification could be achieved and denitrification was performed in the anoxic filter without external carbon supplements. The residual particulate organics and nitrogen in effluent from biofilm process could be also removed successfully through membrane filtration and the removal of total coliform was noticeably improved after membrane filtration. Thus, a system composed of the pre-denitrification biofilm process with ceramic membrane would be a compact and flexible option for advanced post-treatment of municipal wastewater.

  11. Method to remove ammonia using a proton-conducting ceramic membrane

    Balachandran, Uthamalinga; Bose, Arun C

    2003-10-07

    An apparatus and method for decomposing NH.sub.3. A fluid containing NH.sub.3 is passed in contact with a tubular membrane that is a homogeneous mixture of a ceramic and a first metal, with the ceramic being selected from one or more of a cerate having the formula of M'Ce.sub.1-x M".sub.3-.delta., zirconates having the formula M'Zr.sub.1-x M"O.sub.3-.delta., stannates having the formula M'Sn.sub.1-x M'O.sub.3-.delta., where M' is a group IIA metal, M" is a dopant metal of one or more of Ca, Y, Yb, In, Nd, Gd or mixtures thereof and .delta. is a variable depending on the concentration of dopant and is in the range of from 0.001 to 0.5, the first metal is a group VIII or group IB element selected from the group consisting of Pt, Ag, Pd, Fe, Co, Cr, Mn, V, Ni, Au, Cu, Rh, Ru and mixtures thereof. The tubular membrane has a catalytic metal on the side thereof in contact with the fluid containing NH.sub.3 which is effective to cause NH.sub.3 to decompose to N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. When the H.sub.2 contacts the membrane H.sup.+ ions are formed which pass through the membrane driving the NH.sub.3 decomposition toward completion.

  12. Low energy single-staged anaerobic fluidized bed ceramic membrane bioreactor (AFCMBR) for wastewater treatment.

    Aslam, Muhammad; McCarty, Perry L; Shin, Chungheon; Bae, Jaeho; Kim, Jeonghwan

    2017-09-01

    An aluminum dioxide (Al 2 O 3 ) ceramic membrane was used in a single-stage anaerobic fluidized bed ceramic membrane bioreactor (AFCMBR) for low-strength wastewater treatment. The AFCMBR was operated continuously for 395days at 25°C using a synthetic wastewater having a chemical oxygen demand (COD) averaging 260mg/L. A membrane net flux as high as 14.5-17L/m 2 h was achieved with only periodic maintenance cleaning, obtained by adding 25mg/L of sodium hypochlorite solution. No adverse effect of the maintenance cleaning on organic removal was observed. An average SCOD in the membrane permeate of 23mg/L was achieved with a 1h hydraulic retention time (HRT). Biosolids production averaged 0.014±0.007gVSS/gCOD removed. The estimated electrical energy required to operate the AFCMBR system was 0.039kWh/m 3 , which is only about 17% of the electrical energy that could be generated with the methane produced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of ozone on the performance of a hybrid ceramic membrane-biological activated carbon process.

    Guo, Jianning; Hu, Jiangyong; Tao, Yi; Zhu, Jia; Zhang, Xihui

    2014-04-01

    Two hybrid processes including ozonation-ceramic membrane-biological activated carbon (BAC) (Process A) and ceramic membrane-BAC (Process B) were compared to treat polluted raw water. The performance of hybrid processes was evaluated with the removal efficiencies of turbidity, ammonia and organic matter. The results indicated that more than 99% of particle count was removed by both hybrid processes and ozonation had no significant effect on its removal. BAC filtration greatly improved the removal of ammonia. Increasing the dissolved oxygen to 30.0 mg/L could lead to a removal of ammonia with concentrations as high as 7.80 mg/L and 8.69 mg/L for Processes A and B, respectively. The average removal efficiencies of total organic carbon and ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UV254, a parameter indicating organic matter with aromatic structure) were 49% and 52% for Process A, 51% and 48% for Process B, respectively. Some organic matter was oxidized by ozone and this resulted in reduced membrane fouling and increased membrane flux by 25%-30%. However, pre-ozonation altered the components of the raw water and affected the microorganisms in the BAC, which may impact the removals of organic matter and nitrite negatively. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Membrane bio-reactor for textile wastewater treatment plant upgrading.

    Lubello, C; Gori, R

    2005-01-01

    Textile industries carry out several fiber treatments using variable quantities of water, from five to forty times the fiber weight, and consequently generate large volumes of wastewater to be disposed of. Membrane Bio-reactors (MBRs) combine membrane technology with biological reactors for the treatment of wastewater: micro or ultrafiltration membranes are used for solid-liquid separation replacing the secondary settling of the traditional activated sludge system. This paper deals with the possibility of realizing a new section of one existing WWTP (activated sludge + clariflocculation + ozonation) for the treatment of treating textile wastewater to be recycled, equipped with an MBR (76 l/s as design capacity) and running in parallel with the existing one. During a 4-month experimental period, a pilot-scale MBR proved to be very effective for wastewater reclamation. On average, removal efficiency of the pilot plant (93% for COD, and over 99% for total suspended solids) was higher than the WWTP ones. Color was removed as in the WWTP. Anionic surfactants removal of pilot plant was lower than that of the WWTP (90.5 and 93.2% respectively), while the BiAS removal was higher in the pilot plant (98.2 vs. 97.1). At the end cost analysis of the proposed upgrade is reported.

  15. An investigation of structural design methodology for HTGR reactor internals with ceramic materials (Contract research)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2008-03-01

    To advance the performance and safety of HTGR, heat-resistant ceramic materials are expected to be used as reactor internals of HTGR. C/C composite and superplastic zirconia are the promising materials for this purpose. In order to use these new materials as reactor internals in HTGR, it is necessary to establish a structure design method to guarantee the structural integrity under environmental and load conditions. Therefore, C/C composite expected as reactor internals of VHTR is focused and an investigation on the structural design method applicable to the C/C composite and a basic applicability of the C/C composite to representative structures of HTGR were carried out in this report. As the results, it is found that the competing risk theory for the strength evaluation of the C/C composite is applicable to design method and C/C composite is expected to be used as reactor internals of HTGR. (author)

  16. Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass in a Ceramic Reactor: Long-Time Batch Experiments

    Daniele Castello

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical water gasification (SCWG is an emerging technology for the valorization of (wet biomass into a valuable fuel gas composed of hydrogen and/or methane. The harsh temperature and pressure conditions involved in SCWG (T > 375 °C, p > 22 MPa are definitely a challenge for the manufacturing of the reactors. Metal surfaces are indeed subject to corrosion under hydrothermal conditions, and expensive special alloys are needed to overcome such drawbacks. A ceramic reactor could be a potential solution to this issue. Finding a suitable material is, however, complex because the catalytic effect of the material can influence the gas yield and composition. In this work, a research reactor featuring an internal alumina inlay was utilized to conduct long-time (16 h batch tests with real biomasses and model compounds. The same experiments were also conducted in batch reactors made of stainless steel and Inconel 625. The results show that the three devices have similar performance patterns in terms of gas production, although in the ceramic reactor higher yields of C2+ hydrocarbons were obtained. The SEM observation of the reacted alumina surface revealed a good resistance of such material to supercritical conditions, even though some intergranular corrosion was observed.

  17. Analysis and measurement of residual stress distribution of vanadium/ceramics joints for fusion reactor applications

    Nemoto, Y.; Ueda, K.

    1998-01-01

    Vanadium alloys are considered as candidate structural materials for fusion reactor system. When vanadium alloys are used in fusion reactor system, joining with ceramics for insulating is one of material issues to be solved to make component of fusion reactor. In the application of ceramics/metal jointing and coating, residual stress caused by difference of thermal expansion rate between ceramics and metals is an important factor in obtaining good bonding strength and soundness of coating. In this work, residual stress distribution in direct diffusion bonded vanadium/alumina joint (jointing temperature: 1400 C) was measured by small area X-ray diffraction method. And the comparison of finite element method (FEM) analysis and actual stress distribution was carried out. Tensile stress concentration at the edge of the boundary of the joint in alumina was observed. The residual stress concentration may cause cracks in alumina, or failure of bonding. Actually, cracks in alumina caused by thermal stress after bonding at 1500 C was observed. The stress concentration of the joint must be reduced to obtain good bonded joint. Lower bonding temperature or to devise the shape of the outer surface of the joint will reduce the stress concentration. (orig.)

  18. EFFICIENCY OF ULTRAFILTRATION CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR TOXIC ELEMENTS REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATERS

    S. Alami Younssi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and characterization of porous ceramics multilayer ultrafiltration membrane is described. The first step consisted to prepare high-quality macroporous support in Moroccan clay. The choice of this material is based on its natural abundance and thermal stability.The microporous interlayer was then prepared by slip casting from zirconia commercial powders and finally the active UF toplayers was obtained by sol-gel route using ZnAl2O4 and TiO2 mixed sols. The performance of ultrafiltration membrane (TiO2 (50�20– ZnAl2O4 (50� was evaluated by pores diameter, water flux, thickness and molecular weight cut off (MWCO. The water permeability measured for this composite membrane is 9.42 L/(m2•h•bar, the thickness is less than 700 nm, the pore diameter is centered near 5 nm and the MWCO was about 4500 Da.

  19. PROCESSING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF TUBULAR CERAMIC SUPPORT FOR MICROFILTRATION MEMBRANE PREPARED FROM PYROPHYLLITE CLAY

    Abedallah Talidi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Tubular macroporous support for ceramic microfiltration membranes were prepared by extrusion followed by sintering of the low cost pyrophyllite clay. Clay powders mixed with some organic additives can be extruded to form a porous tubular support. The average pore size of the membrane is observed to increase from 5 µm to 10.8 µm when sintering temperature increase from 900 °C to 1200 °C. However, with the increase in temperature from 900 °C to 1200 °C, the support porosity is reduced from 47% to 30% and flexural strength is increased from 4 MPa to 17 MPa. The fabricated macro-porous supports are expected to have potential applications in the pre-treatment and also can be used like support for membranes of ultra-filtration.

  20. Hybrid membrane-microfluidic components using a novel ceramic MEMS technology

    Lutz, Brent J.; Polyakov, Oleg; Rinaldo, Chris

    2012-03-01

    A novel hybrid nano/microfabrication technology has been employed to produce unique MEMS and microfluidic components that integrate nanoporous membranes. The components are made by micromachining a self-organized nanostructured ceramic material that is biocompatible and amenable to surface chemistry modification. Microfluidic structures, such as channels and wells, can be made with a precision of membranes can be integrated into the bottom of these structures, featuring a wide range of possible thicknesses, from 100 micron to membranes may be non-porous or porous (with controllable pore sizes from 200 nm to technology is highly scaleable, and thus can yield low-cost, reliable, disposable microcomponents and devices. Specific applications that can benefit from this technology includes cell culturing and assays, imaging by cryo-electron tomography, environmental sample processing, as well as many others.

  1. Efficiency of serum protein removal from skim milk with ceramic and polymeric membranes at 50 degrees C.

    Zulewska, J; Newbold, M; Barbano, D M

    2009-04-01

    Raw milk (2,710 kg) was separated at 4 degrees C, the skim milk was pasteurized (72 degrees C, 16 s), split into 3 batches, and microfiltered using pilot-scale ceramic uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP; Membralox model EP1940GL0.1microA, 0.1 microm alumina, Pall Corp., East Hills, NY), ceramic graded permeability (GP; Membralox model EP1940GL0.1microAGP1020, 0.1 microm alumina, Pall Corp.), and polymeric spiral-wound (SW; model FG7838-OS0x-S, 0.3 microm polyvinylidene fluoride, Parker-Hannifin, Process Advanced Filtration Division, Tell City, IN) membranes. There were differences in flux among ceramic UTP, ceramic GP, and polymeric SW microfiltration membranes (54.08, 71.79, and 16.21 kg/m2 per hour, respectively) when processing skim milk at 50 degrees C in a continuous bleed-and-feed 3x process. These differences in flux among the membranes would influence the amount of membrane surface area required to process a given volume of milk in a given time. Further work is needed to determine if these differences in flux are maintained over longer processing times. The true protein contents of the microfiltration permeates from UTP and GP membranes were higher than from SW membranes (0.57, 0.56, and 0.38%, respectively). Sodium-dodecyl-sulfate-PAGE gels for permeates revealed a higher casein proportion in GP and SW permeate than in UTP permeate, with the highest passage of casein through the GP membrane under the operational conditions used in this study. The slight cloudiness of the permeates produced using the GP and SW systems may have been due to the presence of a small amount of casein, which may present an obstacle in their use in applications when clarity is an important functional characteristic. More beta-lactoglobulin passed through the ceramic membranes than through the polymeric membrane. The efficiency of removal of serum proteins in a continuous bleed-and-feed 3x process at 50 degrees C was 64.40% for UTP, 61.04% for GP, and 38.62% for SW microfiltration

  2. Beer Clarification by Novel Ceramic Hollow-Fiber Membranes: Effect of Pore Size on Product Quality.

    Cimini, Alessio; Moresi, Mauro

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the crossflow microfiltration performance of rough beer samples was assessed using ceramic hollow-fiber (HF) membrane modules with a nominal pore size ranging from 0.2 to 1.4 μm. Under constant operating conditions (that is, transmembrane pressure difference, TMP = 2.35 bar; feed superficial velocity, v S = 2.5 m/s; temperature, T = 10 °C), quite small steady-state permeation fluxes (J * ) of 32 or 37 L/m 2 /h were achieved using the 0.2- or 0.5-μm symmetric membrane modules. Both permeates exhibited turbidity beer quality parameters. Moreover, it exhibited J * values of the same order of magnitude of those claimed for the polyethersulfone HF membrane modules currently commercialized. The 1.4-μm asymmetric membrane module yielded quite a high steady-state permeation flux (196 ± 38 L/m 2 /h), and a minimum decline in permeate quality parameters, except for the high levels of turbidity at room temperature and chill haze. In the circumstances, such a membrane module might be regarded as a real valid alternative to conventional powder filters on condition that the resulting permeate were submitted to a final finishing step using 0.45- or 0.65-μm microbially rated membrane cartridges prior to aseptic bottling. A novel combined beer clarification process was thus outlined. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  3. Reduced membrane fouling in a novel bio-entrapped membrane reactor for treatment of food and beverage processing wastewater.

    Ng, Kok-Kwang; Lin, Cheng-Fang; Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Andy Hong, Pui-Kwan; Yang, Ping-Yi

    2011-08-01

    A novel Bio-Entrapped Membrane Reactor (BEMR) packed with bio-ball carriers was constructed and investigated for organics removal and membrane fouling by soluble microbial products (SMP). An objective was to evaluate the stability of the filtration process in membrane bioreactors through backwashing and chemical cleaning. The novel BEMR was compared to a conventional membrane bioreactor (CMBR) on performance, with both treating identical wastewater from a food and beverage processing plant. The new reactor has a longer sludge retention time (SRT) and lower mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) content than does the conventional. Three different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 6, 9, and 12 h were studied. The results show faster rise of the transmembrane pressure (TMP) with decreasing hydraulic retention time (HRT) in both reactors, where most significant membrane fouling was associated with high SMP (consisting of carbohydrate and protein) contents that were prevalent at the shortest HRT of 6 h. Membrane fouling was improved in the new reactor, which led to a longer membrane service period with the new reactor. Rapid membrane fouling was attributed to increased production of biomass and SMP, as in the conventional reactor. SMP of 10-100 kDa from both MBRs were predominant with more than 70% of the SMP <100 kDa. Protein was the major component of SMP rather than carbohydrate in both reactors. The new reactor sustained operation at constant permeate flux that required seven times less frequent chemical cleaning than did the conventional reactor. The new BEMR offers effective organics removal while reducing membrane fouling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Research results on productivity stabilization by ultrasonic camera (plant with membrane ceramic elements during vine processing

    V. T. Antufyev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes solutions to the problems of declining productivity of ceramic membrane elements for wine processing on the final manufacturing phase. A relative stabilization of filtration velocity, venting efficiency and wine lightening were experimentally confirmed during contacts with oscillation waves of ultrasonic transmitter on the ceramic filter. Which significantly reduced the cost of various preservatives to increase periods storage. To study the processes of wine processing by the proposed method it was made an experimental installation on the basis of pilot machine MRp-1/2 for bottling of quiet liquids and an ultrasonic device "Volna– M" UZTA-1/22-OM with a firmly, waveguide which transmits sound, fixed filter frame on the ultrasound emitter. To stabilize the performance of ultrasonic units with ceramic membrane elements without quality deterioration of wines it was empirically determined rational parameters of power of ultrasound input and pressure in the system. The given derived dependencies and graphs allow to define the time of relatively stable operating filter regime. It was revealed a significant cost reduction on filtration, as it allows escape from the contamination of the product by various preservatives, and increasing of storage duration in a sealed container during aseptic filling without a thermal sterilization. Ultrasonic emitter contact by superposition wave vibrations on the ceramic filter increases not only the efficiency of gas removal, but also improves the organoleptic characteristics, stabilizes the filters, improves their productivity. Gas removal creates unfavorable conditions for development of the yeast, which in turn increases the shelf life of semisweet wine.

  5. Mixed reforming of simulated gasoline to hydrogen in a BSCFO membrane reactor

    Zhu, Wenliang; Han, Wei; Xiong, Guoxing; Yang, Weishen [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2006-10-30

    Currently, fuel cells are receiving more and more attention as the most promising new power generation technology, and fuel processing by the mixed reforming of liquid hydrocarbons (MRL) with water and oxygen is regarded as a desirable way for fuel cells. In this paper, we developed a new mixed reforming method for hydrogen production by combining a dense ceramic membrane Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}}(BSCFO) with a catalyst LiLaNiO/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in a membrane reactor and reforming a simulated gasoline. During a 500-h long-term test at optimized reaction conditions, all the components in the simulated gasoline converted completely, and around 90% selectivity of CO, around 95% selectivity of H{sub 2} and around 8.0mLcm{sup -2}min{sup -1} oxygen permeation flux were achieved. This provides a new optional way of hydrogen production for fuel cells. (author)

  6. Design of a tubular ceramic membrane for gas separation in a PEMFC system

    Kamarudin, S.K.; Daud, W.R.W.; Mohammad, A.W.; Som, A.Md.; Takriff, M.S. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, National University of Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to introduce a shortcut in the method of design for a tubular ceramic membrane (TCM) for gas separation. Generally, it explains the permeation of the multi component gas using cross flow models in a porous membrane and the surface area of the membrane required. The novel aspect of this method is that the expression for the length of the membrane is simplified to a number unit (NTU) and a height of transfer unit (HTU). The HTU term for porous membranes is characterised by the physical properties of the membrane; the feed flow rate, n{sub F}, membrane thickness, l{sub M}, feed pressure, P{sub F}, K the permeability of gas and the diameter of the membrane, D{sub M}. The integral for NTU of a porous membrane is the solution for the local permeate along the length of the membrane. It is found that, NTU mainly depends on the rejection stream, x{sub R,}, along the membrane and it describes the relative degree of separation. The Proton Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) system is taken as the case study. CO is the main culprit in reducing the performance of the PEMFC and will act as a catalyst poison for the fuel cell anode at a concentration as low as 100 ppm. Thus, the reformate, from primary reforming, contains a significant amount of CO and must be purified. The effect of some important parameters such as temperature, pressure and the thickness of membrane to the degree of separation are presented in this paper. From the results, it can be seen that the system could reduce the CO concentration from 2000 - 500 ppm. Basically the TCM will operate, in series, with a pressure swing adsorber in order to further reduce the concentration of CO to less than 10 ppm before entering the fuel cell stack. However, this paper only focuses on the design of the TCM. Besides this, it is observed that the purity of the hydrogen increased from 72.8 - 96% (at {theta} = 0.5) after the membrane. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Water Gas Shift Reaction with A Single Stage Low Temperature Membrane Reactor

    Ciora, Richard J [Media and Process Technology Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Liu, Paul KT [Media and Process Technology Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Palladium membrane and Palladium membrane reactor were developed under this project for hydrogen separation and purification for fuel cell applications. A full-scale membrane reactor was designed, constructed and evaluated for the reformate produced from a commercial scale methanol reformer. In addition, the Pd membrane and module developed from this project was successfully evaluated in the field for hydrogen purification for commercial fuel cell applications.

  8. Cross flow microfiltration of oil-water emulsions using clay based ceramic membrane support and TiO2 composite membrane

    Kanchapogu Suresh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to study the effect of cross flow filtration conditions on the separation of oily wastewater using ceramic support and TiO2 membrane. Firstly, the low cost clay based ceramic membrane support was prepared by uniaxial compaction method using combination of pyrophyllite, quartz, feldspar, kaolin, ball clay and calcium carbonate along with PVA as a binder. Subsequently, TiO2 composite membrane was fabricated via hydrothermal route employing TiO2 sol derived from TiCl4 and NH4OH solution. Cross flow microfiltration investigations were carried out by utilizing oil-water emulsion concentration of 200 mg/L at three distinct applied pressures (69–207 kPa and three cross flow velocities (0.0885, 0.1327, and 0.1769 m/s. Compared to ceramic support, TiO2 composite membrane demonstrates better performance in terms of flux and removal efficiency of oil and also the rate of flux decline during filtration operation is lower due to highly hydrophilic surface of the TiO2 membrane. TiO2 membrane displays the oil removal efficiency of 99% in the entire range of applied pressures investigation, while ceramic support shows 93–96% of oil removal.

  9. Pretreatment with ceramic membrane microfiltration in the clarification process of sugarcane juice by ultrafiltration

    Priscilla dos Santos Gaschi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the sugar cane juice from COCAFE Mill, was clarified using tubular ceramic membranes (α-Al2O3/TiO2 with pore size of 0.1 and 0.3 µm, and membrane area of 0.005 m2. Experiments were performed in batch with sugar cane juice, in a pilot unit of micro and ultrafiltration using the principle of tangential filtration. The sugar cane juice was settled for one hour and the supernatant was treated by microfiltration. After that, the MF permeate was ultrafiltered. The experiments of micro and ultrafiltration were carried out at 65ºC and 1 bar. The ceramic membranes were able to remove the colloidal particles, producing a limpid permeated juice with color reduction. The clarification process with micro- followed by ultrafiltration produced a good result with an average purity rise of 2.74 units, 99.4% lower turbidity and 44.8% lighter color in the permeate.

  10. Noncatalytic hydrogenation of decene-1 with hydrogen accumulated in a hybrid carbon nanostructure in nanosized membrane reactors

    Soldatov, A. P.

    2014-08-01

    Studies on the creation of nanosized membrane reactors (NMRs) of a new generation with accumulated hydrogen and a regulated volume of reaction zone were continued at the next stage. Hydrogenation was performed in the pores of ceramic membranes with hydrogen preliminarily adsorbed in mono- and multilayered orientated carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs)—a new hybrid carbon nanostructure formed on the inner pore surface. Quantitative determination of hydrogen adsorption in OCNTGs was performed using TRUMEM ultrafiltration membranes with D av = 50 and 90 nm and showed that hydrogen adsorption was up to ˜1.5% of the mass of OCNTG. The instrumentation and procedure for noncatalytic hydrogenation of decene-1 at 250-350°C using hydrogen accumulated and stored in OCNTG were developed. The conversion of decene-1 into decane was ˜0.2-1.8% at hydrogenation temperatures of 250 and 350°C, respectively. The rate constants and activation energy of hydrogenation were determined. The latter was found to be 94.5 kJ/mol, which is much smaller than the values typical for noncatalytic hydrogenations and very close to the values characteristic for catalytic reactions. The quantitative distribution of the reacting compounds in each pore regarded as a nanosized membrane reactor was determined. The activity of hydrogen adsorbed in a 2D carbon nanostructure was evaluated. Possible mechanisms of noncatalytic hydrogenation were discussed.

  11. Multienzyme Immobilized Polymeric Membrane Reactor for the Transformation of a Lignin Model Compound

    Rupam Sarma

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an integrated, multienzyme functionalized membrane reactor for bioconversion of a lignin model compound involving enzymatic catalysis. The membrane bioreactors were fabricated through the layer-by-layer assembly approach to immobilize three different enzymes (glucose oxidase, peroxidase and laccase into pH-responsive membranes. This novel membrane reactor couples the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide (by glucose oxidase to oxidative conversion of a lignin model compound, guaiacylglycerol-β-guaiacyl ether (GGE. Preliminary investigation of the efficacy of these functional membranes towards GGE degradation is demonstrated under convective flow mode. Over 90% of the initial feed could be degraded with the multienzyme immobilized membranes at a residence time of approximately 22 s. GGE conversion product analysis revealed the formation of oligomeric oxidation products upon reaction with peroxidase, which may be a potential hazard to membrane bioreactors. These oxidation products could further be degraded by laccase enzymes in the multienzymatic membranes, explaining the potential of multi enzyme membrane reactors. The multienzyme incorporated membrane reactors were active for more than 30 days of storage time at 4 °C. During this time span, repetitive use of the membrane reactor was demonstrated involving 5–6 h of operation time for each cycle. The membrane reactor displayed encouraging performance, losing only 12% of its initial activity after multiple cycles of operation.

  12. Application of proton-conducting ceramics and polymer permeable membranes for gaseous tritium recovery

    Asakura, Yamato; Sugiyama, Takahiko; Kawano, Takao; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tsuji, Naruhito; Katahira, Koji; Iwahara, Hiroyasu

    2004-01-01

    In order to carry out deuterium plasma experiments on the Large Helical Device (LHD), the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) is planning to install a system for the recovery of tritium from exhaust gas and effluent liquid. As well as adopting proven conventional tritium recovery systems, NIFS is planning to apply the latest technologies such as proton-conducting ceramics and membrane-type dehumidifiers in an overall strategy to ensure minimal risk in the tritium recovery process. Application of these new technologies to the tritium recovery system for the LHD deuterium plasma experiment is evaluated quantitatively using recent experimental data. (author)

  13. Integration of ceramic membrane and compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX) for metal recovery.

    Li, Chi-Wang; Chiu, Chun-Hao; Lee, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Hao; Lee, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Yi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    In our previous publications, compressed air-assisted solvent extraction process (CASX) was developed and proved to be kinetically efficient process for metal removal. In the current study, CASX with a ceramic MF membrane integrated for separation of spent solvent was employed to remove and recover metal from wastewater. MF was operated either in crossflow mode or dead-end with intermittent flushing mode. Under crossflow mode, three distinct stages of flux vs. TMP (trans-membrane pressure) relationship were observed. In the first stage, flux increases with increasing TMP which is followed by the stage of stable flux with increasing TMP. After reaching a threshold TMP which is dependent of crossflow velocity, flux increases again with increasing TMP. At the last stage, solvent was pushed through membrane pores as indicated by increasing permeate COD. In dead-end with intermittent flushing mode, an intermittent flushing flow (2 min after a 10-min or a 30-min dead-end filtration) was incorporated to reduce membrane fouling by flush out MSAB accumulated on membrane surface. Effects of solvent concentration and composition were also investigated. Solvent concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1% (w/w) have no adverse effect in terms of membrane fouling. However, solvent composition, i.e. D(2)EHPA/kerosene ratio, shows impact on membrane fouling. The type of metal extractants employed in CASX has significant impact on both membrane fouling and the quality of filtrate due to the differences in their viscosity and water solubility. Separation of MSAB was the limiting process controlling metal removal efficiency, and the removal efficiency of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) followed the same trend as that for COD.

  14. Membrane steam reforming of natural gas for hydrogen production by utilization of medium temperature nuclear reactor

    Djati Hoesen Salimy

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of steam reforming process with membrane reactor for hydrogen production by utilizing of medium temperature nuclear reactor has been carried out. Difference with the conventional process of natural gas steam reforming that operates at high temperature (800-1000°C), the process with membrane reactor operates at lower temperature (~500°C). This condition is possible because the use of perm-selective membrane that separate product simultaneously in reactor, drive the optimum conversion at the lower temperature. Besides that, membrane reactor also acts the role of separation unit, so the plant will be more compact. From the point of nuclear heat utilization, the low temperature of process opens the chance of medium temperature nuclear reactor utilization as heat source. Couple the medium temperature nuclear reactor with the process give the advantage from the point of saving fossil fuel that give direct implication of decreasing green house gas emission. (author)

  15. Food industrial wastewater reuse by membrane bio-reactor

    Patthanant Natpinit

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation was to study the possibility and performance of treating food industrial wastewater by Membrane BioReactor (MBR. In addition, the effluent of MBR was treated by Reverse Osmosis system (RO to reuse in boiler or cooling tower. The membranes of hollow fiber type were filled in the aerobic tank with aerobe bacteria. The total area of membrane 6 units was 630 m2 so the flux of the operation was 0.25 m/d or 150 m3/d. The spiral wound RO was operated at 100 m3/d of influent and received 72 m3/d of permeate. The sludge volume (MLSS of MBR was maintained at 8,000-10,000 mg/l. The average COD and SS of MBR influent were 600 mg/l and 300 mg/l respectively. After treating by MBR, COD and SS of effluent were maintained at less than 100 mg/l and less than 10 mg/l respectively. In the same way, COD and SS of RO permeate were less than 10 mg/l and less than 5 mg/l respectively.

  16. Carbon dioxide (hydrogen sulfide) membrane separations and WGS membrane reactor modeling for fuel cells

    Huang, Jin

    Acid-gas removal is of great importance in many environmental or energy-related processes. Compared to current commercial technologies, membrane-based CO2 and H2S capture has the advantages of low energy consumption, low weight and space requirement, simplicity of installation/operation, and high process flexibility. However, the large-scale application of the membrane separation technology is limited by the relatively low transport properties. In this study, CO2 (H2S)-selective polymeric membranes with high permeability and high selectivity have been studied based on the facilitated transport mechanism. The membrane showed facilitated effect for both CO2 and H2S. A CO2 permeability of above 2000 Barrers, a CO2/H2 selectivity of greater than 40, and a CO2/N2 selectivity of greater than 200 at 100--150°C were observed. As a result of higher reaction rate and smaller diffusing compound, the H2S permeability and H2S/H2 selectivity were about three times higher than those properties for CO2. The novel CO2-selective membrane has been applied to capture CO 2 from flue gas and natural gas. In the CO2 capture experiments from a gas mixture with N2 and H2, a permeate CO 2 dry concentration of greater than 98% was obtained by using steam as the sweep gas. In CO2/CH4 separation, decent CO 2 transport properties were obtained with a feed pressure up to 500 psia. With the thin-film composite membrane structure, significant increase on the CO2 flux was achieved with the decrease of the selective layer thickness. With the continuous removal of CO2, CO2-selective water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor is a promising approach to enhance CO conversion and increase the purity of H2 at process pressure under relatively low temperature. The simultaneous reaction and transport process in the countercurrent WGS membrane reactor was simulated by using a one-dimensional non-isothermal model. The modeling results show that a CO concentration of less than 10 ppm and a H2 recovery of greater

  17. Effect of operating conditions on the performances of multichannel ceramic UF membranes for textile mercerization wastewater treatment.

    Zebić Avdičević, Maja; Košutić, Krešimir; Dobrović, Slaven

    2017-01-01

    Textile wastewaters are rated as one of the most polluting in all industrial sectors, and membrane separation is the most promising technology for their treatment and reuse of auxiliary chemicals. This study evaluates the performance of three types of tubular ceramic ultrafiltration membranes differing by mean pore size (1, 2 and 500 kDa) treating textile mercerization wastewater from a textile mill at different operating conditions: cross-flow velocity (CFV) and temperature. Acceptable results were obtained with 1 kDa ceramic membrane, with rejection efficiencies 92% for suspended solids, 98% for turbidity, 98% for color and 53% for total organic carbon at 20°C and 3 m s -1 CFV. Highest fouling effect was observed for 500 kDa membrane and lowest CFV. According to the observed results, 1 kDa membrane could be used for the treatment of wastewater from the textile mercerization process in terms of permeate quality.

  18. Design and R and D activities on ceramic breeder blanket for fusion experimental reactors in JAERI

    Kurasawa, T.; Takatsu, H.; Sato, S.; Nakahira, M.; Furuya, K.; Hashimoto, T.; Kawamura, H.; Kuroda, T.; Tsunematsu, T.; Seki, M.

    1995-01-01

    Design and R and D activities on ceramic breeder blanket of a fusion experimental reactor have been progressed in JAERI. A layered pebble bed type ceramic breeder blanket with water cooling is a prime candidate concept. Design activities have been concentrated on improvement of the design by conducting detailed analyses and also by fabrication procedure consideration based on the current technologies. A wide variety of R and Ds have also been conducted in accordance with the design activities. Development of fabrication technology of the blanket box structure and its mechanical testing, elementary testing on thermal performances of the pebble bed, and engineering-oriented material tests of breeder and beryllium pebbles are the main achievements during the last two years. (orig.)

  19. Pore surface fractal analysis of palladium-alumina ceramic membrane using Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) model.

    Ahmad, A L; Mustafa, N N N

    2006-09-15

    The alumina ceramic membrane has been modified by the addition of palladium in order to improve the H(2) permeability and selectivity. Palladium-alumina ceramic membrane was prepared via a sol-gel method and subjected to thermal treatment in the temperature range 500-1100 degrees C. Fractal analysis from nitrogen adsorption isotherm is used to study the pore surface roughness of palladium-alumina ceramic membrane with different chemical composition (nitric acid, PVA and palladium) and calcinations process in terms of surface fractal dimension, D. Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) model was used to determine the D value of palladium-alumina membrane. Following FHH model, the D value of palladium-alumina membrane increased as the calcinations temperature increased from 500 to 700 degrees C but decreased after calcined at 900 and 1100 degrees C. With increasing palladium concentration from 0.5 g Pd/100 ml H(2)O to 2 g Pd/100 ml H(2)O, D value of membrane decreased, indicating to the smoother surface. Addition of higher amount of PVA and palladium reduced the surface fractal of the membrane due to the heterogeneous distribution of pores. However, the D value increased when nitric acid concentration was increased from 1 to 15 M. The effect of calcinations temperature, PVA ratio, palladium and acid concentration on membrane surface area, pore size and pore distribution also studied.

  20. Thermodynamics of ceramic breeder materials for fusion reactors

    Goetzmann, O.

    1989-05-01

    Based on known or deduced phase relationships in ternary lithium oxygen systems such as Li-Al-O, Li-Si-O and Li-Zr-O, the unknown free enthalpy of formation values of ternary compounds are calculated starting from the known data of the compounds of the binary border systems. Criterion for the data assessment is interconsistency of the data of all the compounds within a given multi-component system. With the help of these data the development of partial pressures during the breeding process can be calculated for all the compounds of interest. In order to facilitate a compatibility assessment the quaternary systems Cr-Li-Si-O, Fe-Li-Si-O and Be-Li-Si-O were also investigated and thermodynamic data of pertinent ternary and quaternary compounds determined. Both the partial pressure development and the compatibility behaviour of a lithium containing compound are criteria for its qualification as a breeder material for a fusion reactor. (orig.) [de

  1. Interfacial microstructure and shear strength of reactive air brazed oxygen transport membrane ceramic-metal alloy joints

    FR, Wahid Muhamad; Yoon, Dang-Hyok; Raju, Kati; Kim, Seyoung; Song, Kwang-sup; Yu, Ji Haeng

    2018-01-01

    To fabricate a multi-layered structure for maximizing oxygen production, oxygen transport membrane (OTM) ceramics need to be joined or sealed hermetically metal supports for interfacing with the peripheral components of the system. Therefore, in this study, Ag-10 wt% CuO was evaluated as an effective filler material for the reactive air brazing of dense Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ-La0.7Sr0.3MnO3±δ (GDC-LSM) OTM ceramics. Thermal decomposition in air and wetting behavior of the braze filler was performed. Reactive air brazing was performed at 1050 °C for 30 min in air to join GDC-LSM with four different commercially available high temperature-resistant metal alloys, such as Crofer 22 APU, Inconel 600, Fecralloy, and AISI 310S. The microstructure and elemental distribution of the ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal interfaces were examined from polished cross-sections. The mechanical shear strength at room temperature for the as-brazed and isothermally aged (800 °C for 24 h) joints of all the samples was compared. The results showed that the strength of the ceramic-ceramic joints was decreased marginally by aging; however, in the case of metal-ceramic joints, different decreases in strengths were observed according to the metal alloy used, which was explained based on the formation of different oxide layers at the interfaces.

  2. Pd-Ag membrane reactor for steam reforming reactions: a comparison between different fuels

    Gallucci, F.; Basile, A.

    2008-01-01

    The simulation of a dense Pd-based membrane reactor for carrying out the methane, the methanol and the ethanol steam reforming (SR) reactions for pure hydrogen production is performed. The same simulation is also performed in a traditional reactor. This modelling work shows that the use of membrane

  3. Performance of Hybrid Photocatalytic-Ceramic Membrane System for the Treatment of Secondary Effluent.

    Song, Lili; Zhu, Bo; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel; Muthukumaran, Shobha

    2017-03-28

    Evaluation of an advanced wastewater treatment system that combines photocatalysis with ceramic membrane filtration for the treatment of secondary effluent was undertaken. The results showed that, after photocatalysis and ceramic membrane filtration, the removal of dissolved organic carbon and UV 254 was 60% and 54%, respectively, at a concentration of 4 g/L of TiO₂. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in the secondary effluent was characterised with a liquid chromatography-organic carbon detector (LC-OCD) technique. The results showed low removal of humics, building blocks, the other oxidation by-products and no removal of biopolymers after TiO₂/UV photocatalytic treatment. This suggested that the radical non-selective oxidation mechanisms of TiO₂/UV process resulted in secondary effluent in which all of the DOM fractions were present. However, the hybrid system was effective for removing biopolymers with the exception of low molecular weight (LMW) compounds acids, which accumulated from the beginning of the reaction. In addition, monitoring of the DOM fractions with LC-OCD analysis demonstrated that the reduction of the effluent aromaticity was not firmly correlated with the removal of humic substances for the combined processes.

  4. A submerged tubular ceramic membrane bioreactor for high strength wastewater treatment.

    Sun, D D; Zeng, J L; Tay, J H

    2003-01-01

    A 4 L submerged tubular ceramic membrane bioreactor (MBR) was applied in laboratory scale to treat 2,400 mg-COD/L high strength wastewater. A prolonged sludge retention time (SRT) of 200 day, in contrast to the conventional SRT of 5 to 15 days, was explored in this study, aiming to reduce substantially the amount of disposed sludge. The MBR system was operated for a period of 142 days in four runs, differentiated by specific oxygen utilization rate (SOUR) and hydraulic retention time (HRT). It was found that the MBR system produced more than 99% of suspended solid reduction. Mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) was found to be adversely proportional to HRT, and in general higher than the value from a conventional wastewater treatment plant. A chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was achieved as high as 98% in Run 1, when SOUR was in the range of 100-200 mg-O/g-MLVSS/hr. Unexpectedly, the COD removal efficiency in Run 2 to 4 was higher than 92%, on average, where higher HRT and abnormally low SOUR of 20-30 mg-O/g-MLVSS/hr prevailed. It was noted that the ceramic membrane presented a significant soluble nutrient rejection when the microbial metabolism of biological treatment broke down.

  5. Preparation and characterization of superfine ammonium perchlorate (AP) crystals through ceramic membrane anti-solvent crystallization

    Ma, Zhenye; Li, Cheng; Wu, Rujun; Chen, Rizhi; Gu, Zhenggui

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, a novel ceramic membrane anti-solvent crystallization (CMASC) method was proposed for the safe and rapid preparation ammonium perchlorate (AP) crystals, in which the acetone and ethyl acetate were chosen as solvent and anti-solvent, respectively. Comparing with the conventional liquid anti-solvent crystallization (LASC), CMASC which successfully introduces ceramic membrane with regular pore structure to the LASC as feeding medium, is favorable to control the rate of feeding rate and, therefore, to obtain size and morphology controllable AP. Several kinds of micro-sized AP particles with different morphology were obtained including polyhedral-like, quadrate-like to rod-like. The effect of processing parameters on the crystal size and shape of AP crystals such as volume ratio of anti-solvent to solvent, feeding pressure and crystallization temperature were investigated. It is found that higher volume ratio of anti-solvent to solvent, higher feeding pressure and higher temperature result in smaller particle size. Scaning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the resulting AP crystals. The nucleation and growth kinetic of the resulting AP crystals were also discussed.

  6. The application of ceramic membranes for treating effluent water from closed-circuit fish farming

    Bonisławska Małgorzata

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze and assess the possibility of using a two-stage filtration system with ceramic membranes: a 3-tube module with 1.0 kDa cut-off (1st stage and a one-tube module with 0.45 kDa cut-off (2nd stage for treating effluent water from a juvenile African catfish aquaculture. The study revealed that during the 1st filtration stage of the effluent water, the highest degrees of retention were obtained with respect to: suspended solids SS (rejection coefficient RI=100%, turbidity (RI=99.40%, total iron (RI=89.20%, BOD5 (RI=76.0%, nitrite nitrogen (RI=62.30%, and CODCr (RI=41.74%. The 2nd filtration stage resulted in a lower reduction degree of the tested indicators in comparison to the 1st filtration stage. At the 2nd stage, the highest values of the rejection coefficient were noted in for the total iron content (RIV=100%, CODCr (RIV=59.52%; RV=64.28%, RVI=63.49% and turbidity (RIV and RV = 45.0%, RVI=50.0%. The obtained results indicate that ceramic membranes (with 1.0 and 0.45 kDa cut-offs may be used in recirculation aquaculture systems as one of the stages of effluent water treatment.

  7. Planar, Polysilazane-Derived Porous Ceramic Supports for Membrane and Catalysis Applications.

    Konegger, Thomas; Williams, Lee F; Bordia, Rajendra K

    2015-10-01

    Porous, silicon carbonitride-based ceramic support structures for potential membrane and catalysis applications were generated from a preceramic polysilazane precursor in combination with spherical, ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene microparticles through a sacrificial filler approach. A screening evaluation was used for the determination of the impact of both porogen content and porogen size on pore structure, strength, and permeability characteristics of planar specimens. By optimizing both the composition as well as cross-linking parameters, maximum characteristic biaxial flexural strengths of 65 MPa and porosities of 42% were achieved. The evolution of an interconnected, open-pore network during thermal porogen removal and conversion of the preceramic polymer led to air permeabilities in the order of 10 -14 m 2 . The materials were further exposed to long-term heat treatments to demonstrate the stability of properties after 100 h at 800°C in oxidizing, inert, and reducing environments. The determined performance, in combination with the versatile preparation method, illustrates the feasibility of this processing approach for the generation of porous ceramic support structures for applications at elevated temperatures in a variety of fields, including membrane and catalysis science.

  8. Conditioning spent fuels from research nuclear reactor in ceramic dies

    Russo, D.O; Rodriguez, D.S; Mateos, P; Heredia, A; Sangilippo, M; Sterba, M

    2002-01-01

    The problem of immobilizing nuclear wastes is a complex one and is vitally important in the nuclear fuels cycle. In the case of spent elements from research reactors, the presence of large amounts of aluminum makes the procedure more complex and, therefore, onerous. There are various alternatives proposed for processing these materials. Two methods were studied in the Nuclear Materials Division for obtaining, as a final product, a vitreous block that could be place definitively in a geological repository. The processes are briefly, as follows: 1.By mechanical and chemical processes eliminating all the exterior aluminum from the fuel plates and then placing the product which we will call 'meat' (with some additional treatment and mixing with the amount needed to produce a natural uranium compound or weakened by decreasing the isotope enrichment in U-235) in a vitreous matrix. 2.Mechanically eliminate the aluminum from the exterior frame (as shown below) by shearing and cutting off the sectors containing only the Al, but leaving the rest of the aluminum, a big part of which is still present (4511.03), then doing the same procedure as in the case above: mixing with a natural uranium compound or weakening and vitrifying this mixture. In both cases, the vitrification can be carried out by fusion as well as by sintering. Given that these methods imply a big increase in volume together with a big mass of uranium and an even bigger amount of glass we decided to study an alternative. The proposed process involves synthesizing the mixtures obtained from the pre-treatment of the fuel plates (as described later) with natural isotope uranium oxide in order to obtain a block with the appropriate properties for its final disposal in a deep geological repository (CW)

  9. Sewage disposal using anaerobic membrane reactor. Kenkiseimaku reactor ni yoru gesui shori

    Fujita, Y. (Dic-Degremont Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Discussions were given on a small-scale sewage disposal of about bod 200 mg/l, for which no many examples of use have been hitherto available, using a system combining an anaerobic reactor and membrane modules. Experiments had been carried out from 1988 through 1990 as a part of the Aqua-Renaissance Project. The test equipment wza installed in the premises of the Chigasaki Coastal Research Facilities operated by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, which used sewage flowing from the adjoining sewage treatment plant for the southern area of the Fujisawa City. The test facility consisted of a system comprising a pretreatment facility, SS decomposing reactor, fluid-bed reactor, separation membrane modules, nitrogen removing facility and micro-organism activity measurement. The test facility was constucted assuming a treatment of 10 m{sup 3} a day. The system was divided into a composite system, A system and B system to operate the system in simplified flows. As a result of comparing the composite system, A system and B system, it was found that B system can deal with wider range of disposal for a small-scale sewage treatment of about 1000 m{sup 3} a day. 6 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Ceramic membrane as a pretreatment for reverse osmosis: Interaction between marine organic matter and metal oxides

    Dramas, Laure

    2013-02-01

    Scaling and (bio)fouling phenomena can severely alter the performance of the reverse osmosis process during desalination of seawater. Pretreatments must be applied to efficiently remove particles, colloids, and also precursors of the organic fouling and biofouling. Ceramic membranes offer a lot of advantages for micro and ultrafiltration pretreatments because their initial properties can be recovered using more severe cleaning procedure. The study focuses on the interaction between metal oxides and marine organic matter. Experiments were performed at laboratory scale. The first series of experiments focus on the filtration of different fractions of natural organic matter and model compounds solutions on flat disk ceramic membranes (47 mm of diameter) characterized with different pore size and composition. Direct filtration experiments were conducted at 0.7 bar or 2 bars and at room temperature (20 ± 0.5 °C). The efficiency of backflush and alkaline cleaning were eval, and titanium oxides. Each metal oxide corresponds to a specific pore size for the disk ceramic membranes: 80, 60, and 30 nm. Different sizes of metal oxide particles are used to measure the impact of the surface area on the adsorption of the organic matter. Seawaters from the Arabian Gulf and from the Red Sea were collected during algal blooms. Cultures of algae were also performed in the laboratory and in cooperation with woods hole oceanographic institute. Solutions of algal exudates were obtained after a couple of weeks of cultivation followed by sonication. Solutions were successively filtered through GFF (0.7 lm) and 0.45 lm membrane filters before use. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of final solution was between 1 and 4 mg/L and showed strong hydrophilic character. These various solutions were prepared with the objective to mimic the dissolved organic matter composition of seawater subjected to algal bloom. Characterization of the solutions of filtration experiments (feed

  11. Feasibility study of a reverse flow catalytic membrane reactor with porous membranes for the production of syngas

    Smit, J.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a novel reverse flow catalytic membrane reactor (RFCMR) is proposed for the partial oxidation of CH4 to syngas. The feasibility of the RFCMR concept has been investigated for industrial conditions on basis of a simulation study employing a reactor model, which includes a detailed

  12. Performance of integrated bioelectrochemical membrane reactor: Energy recovery, pollutant removal and membrane fouling alleviation

    Dong, Yue; He, Weihua; Li, Chao; Liang, Dandan; Qu, Youpeng; Han, Xiaoyu; Feng, Yujie

    2018-04-01

    A novel hybrid bioelectrochemical membrane reactor with integrated microfiltration membrane as the separator between electrodes is developed for domestic wastewater treatment. After accumulation of biofilm, the organic pollutants are mainly degraded in anodic compartment, and microfiltration membrane blocks the adverse leakage of dissolved oxygen from aerated cathodic compartment. The maximum system power output is restricted by gas-water ratio following a Monod-like relationship. Within the tested gas-water ratios ranging from 0.6 to 42.9, the half-saturation constant (KQ) is 5.9 ± 0.9 with a theoretic maximum power density of 20.4 ± 1.0 W m-3. Energy balance analysis indicates an appropriate gas-water ratio regulation (from 2.3 to 28.6) for cathodic compartment is necessary to obtain positive energy output for the system. A maximum net electricity output is 9.09 × 10-3 kWh m-3 with gas-water ratio of 17.1. Notably, the system achieves the chemical oxygen demand removal of 98.3 ± 0.3%, ammonia nitrogen removal of 99.6 ± 0.1%, and total nitrogen removal of 80.0 ± 0.9%. This work verifies an effective integration of microfiltration membrane into bioelectrochemical system as separator for high-quality effluent and provides an insight into the operation and regulation of biocathode system for effective electrical energy output.

  13. Performance assessment of MCM-48 ceramic composite membrane by separation of AlCl3 from aqueous solution.

    Kumar Basumatary, Ashim; Kumar Ghoshal, Aloke; Pugazhenthi, G

    2016-12-01

    Three dimensional ordered mesoporous MCM-48 membrane was fabricated on a circular shaped ceramic support by in-situ hydrothermal method. The synthesized MCM-48 powder and MCM-48 ceramic composite membrane were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The porosity and pore size of the composite membrane are reduced considerably by the deposition of MCM-48 on the support. The formation of MCM-48 is verified by the XRD analysis. Three stepwise mechanisms for surfactant removal are observed by TGA analysis. FESEM images clearly signify the deposition of MCM-48 on the ceramic support. The pure water flux of the support and MCM-48 composite membrane is found to be 3.63×10 -6 and 4.18×10 -8 m 3 /m 2 skPa, respectively. The above prepared MCM-48 ceramic composite membrane is employed for the removal of AlCl 3 from aqueous solution and the highest rejection of 81% is obtained at an applied pressure of 276kPa with salt concentration of 250ppm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. EVALUATING HYDROGEN PRODUCTION IN BIOGAS REFORMING IN A MEMBRANE REACTOR

    F. S. A. Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Syngas and hydrogen production by methane reforming of a biogas (CH4/CO2 = 2.85 using carbon dioxide was evaluated in a fixed bed reactor with a Pd-Ag membrane in the presence of a nickel catalyst (Ni 3.31% weight/γ-Al2O3 at 773 K, 823 K, and 873 K and 1.01×105 Pa. Operation with hydrogen permeation at 873 K increased the methane conversion to approximately 83% and doubled the hydrogen yield relative to operation without hydrogen permeation. A mathematical model was formulated to predict the evolution of the effluent concentrations. Predictions based on the model showed similar evolutions for yields of hydrogen and carbon monoxide at temperatures below 823 K for operations with and without the hydrogen permeation. The hydrogen yield reached approximately 21% at 823 K and 47% at 873 K under hydrogen permeation conditions.

  15. Nuclear power plant laundry drain treatment using membrane bio reactor

    Tsukamoto, Masaaki; Kohanawa, Osamu; Kinugasa, Atsushi; Ogawa, Naoki; Murogaki, Kenta

    2012-01-01

    In nuclear power plant, the radioactive effluent generated by washing the clothes worn in controlled area and the hand and shower water used at the controlled area are treated in laundry drain treatment system. Although various systems which treat such liquid waste preexist, the traditional treatment system has disadvantages such as high running cost and a large amount of secondary waste generation. To solve these matters, we have considered application of an activated sludge system, membrane bio reactor, which has been practically used in general industry. For nuclear power plant, the activated sludge system has been developed, tested in its adaptability and the adequacy has been proved. Some preexisting treatment systems have been replaced with this activated sludge system for the first time in a domestic nuclear power plant, and the renewal system is now in operation. The result is reported. (author)

  16. Hydraulically irreversible fouling on ceramic MF/UF membranes: comparison of fouling indices, foulant composition and irreversible pore narrowing

    Shang, Ran

    2015-05-06

    The application of ceramic membranes in water treatment is becoming increasing attractive because of their long life time and excellent chemical, mechanical and thermal stability. However, fouling of ceramic membranes, especially hydraulically irreversible fouling, is still a critical aspect affecting the operational cost and energy consumption in water treatment plants. In this study, four ceramic membranes with pore sizes or molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) of 0.20 μm, 0.14 μm, 300 kDa and 50 kDa were compared during natural surface water filtration with respect to hydraulically irreversible fouling index (HIFI), foulant composition and narrowing of pore size due to the irreversible fouling. Our results showed that the hydraulically irreversible fouling index (HIFI) was proportional to the membrane pore size (r2=0.89) when the same feed water was filtrated. The UF membranes showed lower HIFI values than the MF membranes. Pore narrowing (internal fouling) was found to be a main fouling pattern of the hydraulically irreversible fouling. The internal fouling was caused by monolayer adsorption of foulants with different sizes that is dependent on the size of the membrane pore.

  17. Hydraulically irreversible fouling on ceramic MF/UF membranes: comparison of fouling indices, foulant composition and irreversible pore narrowing

    Shang, Ran; Vuong, Francois; Hu, Jingyi; Li, Sheng; Kemperman, Antoine J.B.; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Cornelissen, Emile R.; Heijman, Sebastiaan G.J.; Rietveld, Luuk C.

    2015-01-01

    The application of ceramic membranes in water treatment is becoming increasing attractive because of their long life time and excellent chemical, mechanical and thermal stability. However, fouling of ceramic membranes, especially hydraulically irreversible fouling, is still a critical aspect affecting the operational cost and energy consumption in water treatment plants. In this study, four ceramic membranes with pore sizes or molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) of 0.20 μm, 0.14 μm, 300 kDa and 50 kDa were compared during natural surface water filtration with respect to hydraulically irreversible fouling index (HIFI), foulant composition and narrowing of pore size due to the irreversible fouling. Our results showed that the hydraulically irreversible fouling index (HIFI) was proportional to the membrane pore size (r2=0.89) when the same feed water was filtrated. The UF membranes showed lower HIFI values than the MF membranes. Pore narrowing (internal fouling) was found to be a main fouling pattern of the hydraulically irreversible fouling. The internal fouling was caused by monolayer adsorption of foulants with different sizes that is dependent on the size of the membrane pore.

  18. A flexible, robust and antifouling asymmetric membrane based on ultra-long ceramic/polymeric fibers for high-efficiency separation of oil/water emulsions.

    Wang, Kui; Yiming, Wubulikasimu; Saththasivam, Jayaprakash; Liu, Zhaoyang

    2017-07-06

    Polymeric and ceramic asymmetric membranes have dominated commercial membranes for water treatment. However, polymeric membranes are prone to becoming fouled, while ceramic membranes are mechanically fragile. Here, we report a novel concept to develop asymmetric membranes based on ultra-long ceramic/polymeric fibers, with the combined merits of good mechanical stability, excellent fouling resistance and high oil/water selectivity, in order to meet the stringent requirements for practical oil/water separation. The ultra-long dimensions of ceramic nanofibers/polymeric microfibers endow this novel membrane with mechanical flexibility and robustness, due to the integrated and intertwined structure. This membrane is capable of separating oil/water emulsions with high oil-separation efficiency (99.9%), thanks to its nanoporous selective layer made of ceramic nanofibers. Further, this membrane also displays superior antifouling properties due to its underwater superoleophobicity and ultra-low oil adhesion of the ceramic-based selective layer. This membrane exhibits high water permeation flux (6.8 × 10 4 L m -2 h -1 bar -1 ) at low operation pressures, which is attributed to its 3-dimensional (3D) interconnected fiber-based structure throughout the membrane. In addition, the facile fabrication process and inexpensive materials required for this membrane suggest its significant potential for industrial applications.

  19. Evaluation of Removal Mechanisms in a Graphene Oxide-Coated Ceramic Ultrafiltration Membrane for Retention of Natural Organic Matter, Pharmaceuticals, and Inorganic Salts.

    Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Fathizadeh, Mahdi; Yu, Miao; Flora, Joseph R V; Jang, Am; Jang, Min; Park, Chang Min; Yoo, Sung Soo; Her, Namguk; Yoon, Yeomin

    2017-11-22

    Functionalized graphene oxide (GO), derived from pure graphite via the modified Hummer method, was used to modify commercially available ceramic ultrafiltration membranes using the vacuum method. The modified ceramic membrane functionalized with GO (ceramic GO ) was characterized using a variety of analysis techniques and exhibited higher hydrophilicity and increased negative charge compared with the pristine ceramic membrane. Although the pure water permeability of the ceramic GO membrane (14.4-58.6 L/m 2 h/bar) was slightly lower than that of the pristine membrane (25.1-62.7 L/m 2 h/bar), the removal efficiencies associated with hydrophobic attraction and charge effects were improved significantly after GO coating. Additionally, solute transport in the GO nanosheets of the ceramic GO membrane played a vital role in the retention of target compounds: natural organic matter (NOM; humic acid and tannic acid), pharmaceuticals (ibuprofen and sulfamethoxazole), and inorganic salts (NaCl, Na 2 SO 4 , CaCl 2 , and CaSO 4 ). While the retention efficiencies of NOM, pharmaceuticals, and inorganic salts in the pristine membrane were 74.6%, 15.3%, and 2.9%, respectively, these increased to 93.5%, 51.0%, and 31.4% for the ceramic GO membrane. Consequently, the improved removal mechanisms of the membrane modified with functionalized GO nanosheets can provide efficient retention for water treatment under suboptimal environmental conditions of pH and ionic strength.

  20. Desolventizing of Jatropha curcas oil from azeotropes of solvents using ceramic membranes.

    Carniel, Naira; Zabot, Giovani L; Paliga, Marshall; Mignoni, Marcelo L; Mazutti, Marcio A; Priamo, Wagner L; Oliveira, J V; Di Luccio, Marco; Tres, Marcus V

    2017-12-01

    The separation of Jatropha curcas oil from azeotropes of ethyl alcohol-n-hexane and isopropyl alcohol-n-hexane using ceramic membranes with different cutoffs (5, 10 and 20 kDa) is presented. The mass ratios of oil:azeotropes (O:S) studied were 1:3 for feeding pressures of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 MPa, and 1:1 for the feeding pressure of 0.1 MPa. Isopropyl alcohol was the best solvent for the membranes conditioning to permeate n-hexane (240 kg/m 2  h). In the separation of J. curcas oil and azeotropes of solvents, both membranes showed oil retention and total flux decreases with time. Overall, the lowest decrease in the retentions was reached in the 5 kDa membrane, while the lowest decrease in the total flux was reached in the 20 kDa. In the separation of oil and ethyl alcohol-n-hexane azeotrope, the best retention at 60 min of the process was equal to 17.3 wt% in the 20 kDa membrane at 0.3 MPa and O:S ratio equalled to 1:3. In this condition, the total permeate flux was 17.5 kg/m 2  h. Different retentions and permeabilities are provided when changing the O:S ratio, the feeding pressure and the molecular weight cutoff of membranes.

  1. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    Lin, Jerry Y.S. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  2. Field-scale electrolysis/ceramic membrane system for the treatment of sewage from decentralized small communities.

    Son, Dong-Jin; Kim, Woo-Yeol; Yun, Chan-Young; Kim, Dae-Gun; Chang, Duk; Sunwoo, Young; Hong, Ki-Ho

    2017-07-05

    The electrolysis process adopting copper electrodes and ceramic membrane with pore sizes of 0.1-0.2 μm were consisted to a system for the treatment of sewage from decentralized small communities. The system was operated under an HRT of 0.1 hour, voltage of 24 V, and TMP of 0.05 MPa. The system showed average removals of organics, nitrogen, phosphorus, and solids of up to 80%, 52%, 92%, and 100%, respectively. Removal of organics and nitrogen dramatically increased in proportion to increment of influent loading. Phosphorus and solids were remarkably eliminated by both electro-coagulation and membrane filtration. The residual particulate constituents could also be removed successfully through membrane process. A system composed of electrolysis process with ceramic membrane would be a compact, reliable, and flexible option for the treatment of sewage from decentralized small communities.

  3. Low-activation structural ceramic composites for fusion power reactors: materials development and main design issues

    Perez, A.S.; Le Bars, N.; Giancarli, L.; Proust, E.; Salavy, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Development of advanced Low-Activation Materials (LAMs) with favourable short-term activation characteristics is discussed, for the use as structural materials in a fusion power reactor (in order to reduce the risk associated with a major accident, in particular those related with radio-isotopes release in the environment), and to try to approach the concept of an inherently safe reactor. LA Ceramics Composites (LACCs) are the most promising LAMs because of their relatively good thermo-mechanical properties. At present, SiC/SiC composite is the only LACC considered by the fusion community, and therefore is the one having the most complete data base. The preliminary design of a breeding blanket using SiC/SiC as structural material indicated that significant improvement of its thermal conductivity is required. (author) 11 refs.; 3 figs

  4. Integrated Water Gas Shift Membrane Reactors Utilizing Novel, Non Precious Metal Mixed Matrix Membrane

    Ferraris, John P. [Univ. of Texas-Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-09-30

    Nanoparticles of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks and other related hybrid materials were prepared by modifying published synthesis procedures by introducing bases, changing stoichiometric ratios, or adjusting reaction conditions. These materials were stable at temperatures >300 °C and were compatible with the polymer matrices used to prepare mixed- matrix membranes (MMMs). MMMs tested at 300 °C exhibited a >30 fold increase in permeability, compared to those measured at 35 °C, while maintaining H2/CO2 selectivity. Measurements at high pressure (up to 30 atm) and high temperature (up to 300 °C) resulted in an increase in gas flux across the membrane with retention of selectivity. No variations in permeability were observed at high pressures at either 35 or 300 °C. CO2-induced plasticization was not observed for Matrimid®, VTEC, and PBI polymers or their MMMs at 30 atm and 300 °C. Membrane surface modification by cross-linking with ethanol diamine resulted in an increase in H2/CO2 selectivity at 35 °C. Spectrometric analysis showed that the cross-linking was effective to temperatures <150 °C. At higher temperatures, the cross-linked membranes exhibit a H2/CO2 selectivity similar to the uncross-linked polymer. Performance of the polybenzimidazole (PBI) hollow fibers prepared at Santa Fe Science and Technology (SFST, Inc.) showed increased flux and selectivity at 300 °C, which is comparable to a flat PBI membrane. A water-gas shift reactor has been built and currently being optimized for testing under DOE conditions.

  5. A novel catalytic ceramic membrane fabricated with CuMn2O4 particles for emerging UV absorbers degradation from aqueous and membrane fouling elimination.

    Guo, Yang; Song, Zilong; Xu, Bingbing; Li, Yanning; Qi, Fei; Croue, Jean-Philippe; Yuan, Donghai

    2018-02-15

    A novel catalytic ceramic membrane (CM) for improving ozonation and filtration performance was fabricated by surface coating CuMn 2 O 4 particles on a tubular CM. The degradation of ultraviolet (UV) absorbers, reduction of toxicity, elimination of membrane fouling and catalytic mechanism were investigated. The characterization results suggested the particles were well-fixed on membrane surface. The modified membrane showed improved benzophenone-3 removal performance (from 28% to 34%), detoxification (EC 50 as 12.77%) and the stability of catalytic activity. In the degradation performance of model UV absorbers, the developed membrane significantly decreased the UV254 and DOC values in effluent. Compared with a virgin CM, this CM ozonation increased water flux as 29.9% by in-situ degrade effluent organic matters. The CuMn 2 O 4 modified membrane enhanced the ozone self-decompose to generate O 2 - and initiated the chain reaction of ozone decomposition, and subsequently reacted with molecule ozone to produce OH. Additionally, CM was able to promote the interaction between ozone and catalyst/organic chemicals to form H 2 O 2 that promoted the formation of OH. This catalytic ceramic membrane combining with ozonation showed potential applications in emerging pollutant degradation and membrane fouling elimination, and acted as a novel ternary technology for wastewater treatment and water reuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of PAC Fines in Fouling of Polymeric and Ceramic Low-Pressure Membranes for Drinking Water Treatment.

    Oligny, Laurent; Bérubé, Pierre R; Barbeau, Benoit

    2016-07-07

    This study assessed the issue of membrane fouling in a Hybrid Membrane Process (HMP) due to the export of powdered activated carbon (PAC) fines from a pretreatment contactor. Two parallel pilot-scale ceramic and polymeric membranes were studied. Reversible and irreversible foulings were measured following three cleaning procedures: Physical backwashing (BW), chemically enhanced backwashing (CEB) and Clean-in-Place (CIP). The impacts on fouling of membrane type, operation flux increase and the presence/absence of the PAC pretreatment were investigated. Membranes without pretreatment were operated in parallel as a control. In addition, CIP washwaters samples were analyzed to measure organic and inorganic foulants removed from the membranes. It was observed that for the polymeric membranes, fouling generally increased with the presence of the PAC pretreatment because of the export of fines. On the contrary, the ceramic membranes were not significantly impacted by their presence. The analysis of CIP washwaters showed a greater total organic carbon (TOC) content on membranes with a PAC pretreatment while no similar conclusion could be made for inorganic foulants.

  7. Impact of PAC Fines in Fouling of Polymeric and Ceramic Low-Pressure Membranes for Drinking Water Treatment

    Oligny, Laurent; Bérubé, Pierre R.; Barbeau, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the issue of membrane fouling in a Hybrid Membrane Process (HMP) due to the export of powdered activated carbon (PAC) fines from a pretreatment contactor. Two parallel pilot-scale ceramic and polymeric membranes were studied. Reversible and irreversible foulings were measured following three cleaning procedures: Physical backwashing (BW), chemically enhanced backwashing (CEB) and Clean-in-Place (CIP). The impacts on fouling of membrane type, operation flux increase and the presence/absence of the PAC pretreatment were investigated. Membranes without pretreatment were operated in parallel as a control. In addition, CIP washwaters samples were analyzed to measure organic and inorganic foulants removed from the membranes. It was observed that for the polymeric membranes, fouling generally increased with the presence of the PAC pretreatment because of the export of fines. On the contrary, the ceramic membranes were not significantly impacted by their presence. The analysis of CIP washwaters showed a greater total organic carbon (TOC) content on membranes with a PAC pretreatment while no similar conclusion could be made for inorganic foulants. PMID:27399788

  8. Impact of PAC Fines in Fouling of Polymeric and Ceramic Low-Pressure Membranes for Drinking Water Treatment

    Laurent Oligny

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the issue of membrane fouling in a Hybrid Membrane Process (HMP due to the export of powdered activated carbon (PAC fines from a pretreatment contactor. Two parallel pilot-scale ceramic and polymeric membranes were studied. Reversible and irreversible foulings were measured following three cleaning procedures: Physical backwashing (BW, chemically enhanced backwashing (CEB and Clean-in-Place (CIP. The impacts on fouling of membrane type, operation flux increase and the presence/absence of the PAC pretreatment were investigated. Membranes without pretreatment were operated in parallel as a control. In addition, CIP washwaters samples were analyzed to measure organic and inorganic foulants removed from the membranes. It was observed that for the polymeric membranes, fouling generally increased with the presence of the PAC pretreatment because of the export of fines. On the contrary, the ceramic membranes were not significantly impacted by their presence. The analysis of CIP washwaters showed a greater total organic carbon (TOC content on membranes with a PAC pretreatment while no similar conclusion could be made for inorganic foulants.

  9. Application of high temperature ceramic superconductors (CSC) to commercial tokamak reactors

    Ehst, D.A.; Kim, S.; Gohar, Y.; Turner, L.; Smith, D.L.; Mattas, R.

    1988-08-01

    Ceramic superconductors operating near liquid nitrogen temperature may experience higher heating rates without losing stability, compared conventional superconductors. This will permit cable design with less stabilizer, reducing fabrication costs for large fusion magnets. Magnet performance is studied for different operating current densities in the superconductor, and cost benefits to commercial tokamak reactors are estimated. It appears that 10 kA /center dot/ cm/sup /minus/2/ (at 77 K and /approximately/10 T) is a target current density which must be achieved in order for the ceramic superconductors to compete with conventional materials. At current densities around 50 kA /center dot/ cm/sup /minus/2/ most potential benefits have already been gained, as magnet structural steel begins to dominate the cost at this point. For a steady state reactor reductions of /approximately/7% are forecast for the overall capital cost of the power plant in the best case. An additional /approximately/3% cost saving is possible for pulsed tokamaks. 9 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs

  10. A ceramic breeder in a poloidal tube blanket for a tokamak reactor

    Amici, A.; Anzidei, L.; Gallina, M.; Rado, V.; Simbolotti, G.; Violante, V.; Zampaglione, V.; Petrizzi, L.

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual study of a helium-cooled solid breeder blanket for a tokamak reactor is presented. Tritium breeding capability together with system reliability are taken as the main design criteria. The blanket consists of tubular poloidal modules made of a central bundle of ceramic rods (γLiAlO 2 ) with a coaxial distribution of the inlet/outlet coolant flow (He) surrounded by a multiplier material (Be) in the form of bored bricks. The Be to γLiAlO 2 volume ratio is 4/1. The He inlet and outlet branches are cooling Be and γLiAlO 2 , respectively. A purge He flow running through small central holes of the ceramic rods is derived from the main flow. Under the typical conditions of a tokamak reactor (neutron wall load=2 MW/m 2 ), a full coverage tritium breeding ratio of 1.47 is achieved for the following design and operating parameters: outlet He temperature=570 0 C; inlet He temperature=250 0 ; total extracted power=2700 MW; He pumping power percentage=2%; minimum/maximum γLiAlO 2 temperature=400/900 0 C; maximum structural temperature=475 0 C; and maximum Be temperature=525 0 C. (orig.)

  11. Waste-to-resource preparation of a porous ceramic membrane support featuring elongated mullite whiskers with enhanced porosity and permeance

    Zhu, Li; Dong, Yingchao; Hampshire, Stuart; Cerneaux, Sophie; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Different from traditional particle packing structure, a porous structure of ceramic membrane support was fabricated, featuring elongated mullitewhiskers with enhanced porosity, permeance and sufficient mechanical strength. The effect of additives (MoO3and AlF3) and sintering procedureon open

  12. Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of hazardous liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report

    Cohen, Y.

    1998-01-01

    'This report summarizes the work progress over the last 1.75 years of a 3 year project. The objectives of the project have been to develop a new class of ceramic-supported polymeric membranes that could be tailored-designed for a wide-range of applications in remediation and pollution prevention. To date, a new class of chemically-modified ceramic membranes was developed for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsions and for the pervaporation removal of volatile organics from aqueous systems. These new ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membranes are fabricated by modifying the pore surface of a ceramic membrane support by a graft polymerization process (Chaimberg and Cohen, 1994). The graft polymerization process consists of activating the membrane surface with alkoxy vinyl silanes onto which vinyl monomers are added via free-radical graft polymerization resulting in a thin surface layer of terminally anchored polymer chains. Reaction conditions are selected based on knowledge of the graft polymerization kinetics for the specific polymer/substrate system. The resultant ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membrane is a composite structure in which mechanical strength is provided by the ceramic support and the selectivity is determined by the covalently bonded polymer brush layer. Thus, one of the unique attributes of the CSP membrane is that it can be used in environments where the polymer layer is swollen (or even completely miscible) in the mixture to be separated (Castro et al., 1993). It is important to note that the above modification process is carried out under mild conditions (e.g., temperature of about 70 C) and is well suited for large scale commercial application. In a series of studies, the applicability of a polyvinylpyrrolidone CSP membrane was demonstrated for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsion under a variety of flow conditions (Castro et al.,1996). Improved membrane performance was achieved due to minimization of surface adsorption of the oil components

  13. Alkali-assisted membrane cleaning for fouling control of anaerobic ceramic membrane bioreactor.

    Mei, Xiaojie; Quek, Pei Jun; Wang, Zhiwei; Ng, How Yong

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a chemically enhanced backflush (CEB) cleaning method using NaOH solution was proposed for fouling mitigation in anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs). Ex-situ cleaning tests revealed that NaOH dosages ranging from 0.05 to 1.30mmol/L had positive impacts on anaerobic biomass, while higher dosages (>1.30mmol/L) showed inhibition and/or toxic impacts. In-situ cleaning tests showed that anaerobic biomass could tolerate much higher NaOH concentrations due to the alkali consumption by anaerobic process and/or the buffering role of mixed liquor. More importantly, 10-20mmol-NaOH/L could significantly reduce membrane fouling rates (4-5.5 times over the AnMBR with deionized water backflush) and slightly improve methanogenic activities. COD removal efficiencies were over 87% and peaked at 20mmol-NaOH/L. However, extremely high NaOH concentration had adverse effects on filtration and treatment performance. Economic analysis indicated that 12mmol/L of NaOH was the cost-efficient and optimal fouling-control dosage for the CEB cleaning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel Water Treatment Processes Based on Hybrid Membrane-Ozonation Systems: A Novel Ceramic Membrane Contactor for Bubbleless Ozonation of Emerging Micropollutants

    Stylianos K. Stylianou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the presentation of novel water treatment systems based on ozonation combined with ceramic membranes for the treatment of refractory organic compounds found in natural water sources such as groundwater. This includes, firstly, a short review of possible membrane based hybrid processes for water treatment from various sources. Several practical and theoretical aspects for the application of hybrid membrane-ozonation systems are discussed, along with theoretical background regarding the transformation of target organic pollutants by ozone. Next, a novel ceramic membrane contactor, bringing into contact the gas phase (ozone and water phase without the creation of bubbles (bubbleless ozonation, is presented. Experimental data showing the membrane contactor efficiency for oxidation of atrazine, endosulfan, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE are shown and discussed. Almost complete endosulfan degradation was achieved with the use of the ceramic contactor, whereas atrazine degradation higher than 50% could not be achieved even after 60 min of reaction time. Single ozonation of water containing MTBE could not result in a significant MTBE degradation. MTBE mineralization by O3/H2O2 combination increased at higher pH values and O3/H2O2 molar ratio of 0.2 reaching a maximum of around 65%.

  15. Ultrathin Ceramic Membranes as Scaffolds for Functional Cell Coculture Models on a Biomimetic Scale

    Jud, Corinne; Ahmed, Sher; Müller, Loretta; Kinnear, Calum; Vanhecke, Dimitri; Umehara, Yuki; Frey, Sabine; Liley, Martha; Angeloni, Silvia; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epithelial tissue serves as an interface between biological compartments. Many in vitro epithelial cell models have been developed as an alternative to animal experiments to answer a range of research questions. These in vitro models are grown on permeable two-chamber systems; however, commercially available, polymer-based cell culture inserts are around 10 μm thick. Since the basement membrane found in biological systems is usually less than 1 μm thick, the 10-fold thickness of cell culture inserts is a major limitation in the establishment of realistic models. In this work, an alternative insert, accommodating an ultrathin ceramic membrane with a thickness of only 500 nm (i.e., the Silicon nitride Microporous Permeable Insert [SIMPLI]-well), was produced and used to refine an established human alveolar barrier coculture model by both replacing the conventional inserts with the SIMPLI-well and completing it with endothelial cells. The structural–functional relationship of the model was evaluated, including the translocation of gold nanoparticles across the barrier, revealing a higher translocation if compared to corresponding polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes. This study demonstrates the power of the SIMPLI-well system as a scaffold for epithelial tissue cell models on a truly biomimetic scale, allowing construction of more functionally accurate models of human biological barriers. PMID:26713225

  16. Use of nano filtration membrane technology for ceramic industry wastewater treatment

    Moliner-Salvador, R.; Deratani, A.; Palmeri, J.; Sanchez, E.

    2012-07-01

    A study has been undertaken of an advanced wastewater treatment approach using polymer nano filtration membranes, in an attempt to obtain water of sufficient quality to allow it to be reused in the same production process or, alternatively, to be discharged without any problems. The study has initially focused on the removal of organic matter (reduction of COD) and the most representative ions present in the wastewater, such as Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2}+, Cl{sup -}, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2}. In a first part of the study, with a view to optimising the experimental phase, a simulation has been performed of the nano filtration process using the Nano Flux software. Among other things, the simulation allows the most suitable membranes to be selected as a function of the permeate flow rate and desired level of retention in the substances to be removed. The subsequent experimentation was carried out in a laboratory tangential filtration system that works with flat membranes. It was found that retention values of about 90% were obtained for the studied substances, with a good permeate flow rate, using low operating pressures. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the studied technology and its potential as a treatment for improving ceramic industry wastewater quality.

  17. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  18. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  19. A process efficiency assessment of serum protein removal from milk using ceramic graded permeability microfiltration membrane.

    Tremblay-Marchand, D; Doyen, A; Britten, M; Pouliot, Y

    2016-07-01

    Microfiltration (MF) is a well-known process that can be used in the dairy industry to separate caseins from serum proteins (SP) in skim milk using membranes with a pore diameter of 0.1μm. Graded permeability ceramic membranes have been studied widely as means of improving milk fractionation by overcoming problems encountered with other MF membranes. The ideal operating parameters for process efficiency in terms of membrane selectivity, permeate flux, casein loss, SP transmission, energy consumption, and dilution with water remain to be determined for this membrane. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of transmembrane pressure (TMP), volumetric concentration factor (VCF), and diafiltration on overall process efficiency. Skim milk was processed using a pilot-scale MF system equipped with 0.72-m(2) graded permeability membranes with a pore size of 0.1μm. In the first experiment, in full recycle mode, TMP was set at 124, 152, 179, or 207 kPa by adjusting the permeate pressure at the outlet. Whereas TMP had no significant effect on permeate and retentate composition, 152 kPa was found to be optimal for SP removal during concentration and concentration or diafiltration experiments. When VCF was increased to 3×, SP rejection coefficient increased along with energy consumption and total casein loss, whereas SP removal rate decreased. Diafiltering twice allowed an increase in total SP removal but resulted in a substantial increase in energy consumption and casein loss. It also reduced the SP removal rate by diluting permeate. The membrane surface area required for producing cheese milk by blending whole milk, cream, and MF retentate (at different VCF) was estimated for different cheese milk casein concentrations. For a given casein concentration, the same quantity of permeate and SP would be produced, but less membrane surface area would be needed at a lower retentate VCF. Microfiltration has great potential as a process of adding value to conventional

  20. Optimization of a membrane reactor for hydrogen production with genetic algorithms

    Raceanu, Mircea; Iordache, Ioan; Curuia, Marian; Rasoi, Gabriel; Patularu, Laurentiu; Enache, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Hydrogen is produced via steam reforming of hydrocarbons such as natural gas or methane by using conventional systems. Unfortunately, these systems need at least four different stages, consisting of three reactors and a purification system. Moreover, the steam reforming reaction is an endothermic thermodynamically limited system, meaning that high temperature energy supply is needed for complete conversion. Among different technologies related to production, separation and purification of H 2 , membrane technologies seem to really play a fundamental role. The specific thermodynamic limits are overcome using the so-called membrane reactors, systems in which both reaction and separation occur simultaneously. The hydrogen is driven across the membrane by the pressure difference, depending on the temperature, pressure and reactor length the methane can be completely converted and consequently very pure hydrogen is produced. A membrane reactor has two components which can be optimized namely, the membrane and the reactor dimensions. This paper presents a study on optimization of membrane reactor for enhancing the overall production. A mathematical heterogeneous model of the reactor was used for optimization of reactor performance. Genetic algorithms were used as powerful methods for optimization of complex problems. (authors)

  1. Les réacteurs à membranes : possibilités d'application dans l'industrie pétrolière et pétrochimique Membrane Reactors: Possibilities of Application in the Petroleum and Petrochemical Industry

    Guy C.

    2006-11-01

    use is very limited in membrane reactors as they cannot withstand temperatures higher than 150°C. Metal, ceramic or glass membrane are preferred. Published work on membrane reactors is mainly concerned with dehydrogenation reactions and the in-situ separation of hydrogen. Dense palladium membranes or microporous inorganic membranes are used. A typical membrane reactor is presented in Fig. 1. The catalyst constitutes a fixed bed in the inside tube where dehydrogenation of cyclohexane into benzene takes place. Hydrogen produced by the reaction, permeates through the palladium wall. Carrier argon is used on the permeate side to lower the partial pressure of hydrogen and therefore increase the permeation rate. The main factors enhancing the equilibrium shift and therefore the conversion are presented in Table 1. Potential applications in the petroleum and petrochemical industry. Three potentially interesting applications are identified and the advantages of using a membrane reactor are discussed. They are : propane dehydrogenation into propylene, cyclohexanic naphthene dehydrogenation and natural gas steam reforming. For these chemical reactions, palladium based membranes show the best performance in terms of temperature resistance, hydrogen selectivity and permeability. The conversion of the dehydrogenation reaction of propane is increased by a higher temperature or a lower pressure as presented in Table 2. Selective draw-off of hydrogen from the reactor through a permeable wall increases the conversion from 48. 6% to 75. 5% (Table 3 or decreases the reaction temperature from 600 to 500°C (Table 4. Table 5 presents the effect of the selective draw-off of hydrogen on the conversion or the operating temperature for conditions found in industrial propane dehydrogenation processes. For a specified conversion, the use of a membrane reactor results in a lower operating temperature which reduces considerably catalyst coking. It allows also the use of common materials for the

  2. Synthesis of inorganic materials in a supercritical carbon dioxide medium. Application to ceramic cross-flow filtration membranes preparation

    Papet, Sebastien

    2000-01-01

    Membrane separations, using cross-flow mineral ceramic membranes, allows fractionation of aqueous solutions due to the molecular sieve effect and electrostatic charges. To obtain a high selectivity, preparation of new selective ceramic membranes is necessary. We propose in this document two different routes to prepare such cross-flow tubular mineral membranes. In the first exposed method, a ceramic material is used, titanium dioxide, synthesized in supercritical carbon dioxide by the hydrolysis of an organometallic precursor of the oxide. The influence of operating parameters is similar to what is observed during a liquid-phase synthesis (sol-gel process), and leads us to control the size and texture of the prepared particles. This material is then used to prepare mineral membrane with a compressed layer process. The particles are mixed with organic components to form a liquid suspension. A layer is then deposited on the internal surface of a tubular porous support by slip-casting. The layer is then dried and compressed on the support before sintering. The obtained membranes arc in the ultrafiltration range. A second process has been developed in this work. It consists on the hydrolysis, in a supercritical CO 2 medium, of a precursor of titanium dioxide infiltrated into the support. The obtained material is then both deposited on the support but also infiltrated into the porosity. This new method leads to obtain ultrafiltration membranes that retain molecules which molecular weight is round 4000 g.mol -1 . Furthermore, we studied mass transfer mechanisms in cross-flow filtration of aqueous solutions. An electrostatic model, based on generalized Nernst-Planck equation that takes into account electrostatic interactions between solutes and the ceramic material, lead us to obtain a good correlation between experimental results and the numerical simulation. (author) [fr

  3. A novel zincum-doped perovskite-type ceramic membrane for oxygen separation

    Chen Xinzhi; Liu Hongfei; Wei Yanying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, No. 381 Wushan Road, 510640 Guangzhou (China); Caro Juergen [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstr. 3-3A D-30179 Hannover (Germany); Wang Haihui, E-mail: hhwang@scut.edu.c [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, No. 381 Wushan Road, 510640 Guangzhou (China)

    2009-09-18

    Zincum-doped ceramic membrane materials based on BaCo{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 0.4}Zn{sub x}Zr{sub (0.2-x)}O{sub 3-delta} with 0 <= x <= 0.2 were synthesized by combining citric acid and ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) complexing method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns show that the BaCo{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-delta} ceramic oxide exhibits a pure cubic perovskite structure. Oxygen temperature-programmed desorption (O{sub 2}-TPD) profile indicates that BaCo{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-delta} possesses a good phase reversibility. An oxygen permeation flux of 0.65 ml/min cm{sup 2} was obtained at 950 deg. C and a single activation energy of 67 kJ/mol was observed for the oxygen permeation in the temperature range of 600-950 deg. C. No decline was found during more than 100 h oxygen permeation.

  4. High temperature resistant materials and structural ceramics for use in high temperature gas cooled reactors and fusion plants

    Nickel, H.

    1992-01-01

    Irrespective of the systems and the status of the nuclear reactor development lines, the availability, qualification and development of materials are crucial. This paper concentrates on the requirements and the status of development of high temperature metallic and ceramic materials for core and heat transferring components in advanced HTR supplying process heat and for plasma exposed, high heat flux components in Tokamak fusion reactor types. (J.P.N.)

  5. Wettability modified nanoporous ceramic membrane for simultaneous residual heat and condensate recovery

    Hu, H. W.; Tang, G. H.; Niu, D.

    2016-06-01

    Recovery of both latent heat and condensate from boiler flue gas is significant for improving boiler efficiency and water conservation. The condensation experiments are carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer across the nanoporous ceramic membranes (NPCMs) which are treated to be hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using the semicontinuous supercritical reactions. The effects of typical parameters including coolant flow rate, vapor/nitrogen gas mixture temperature, water vapor volume fraction and transmembrane pressure on heat and mass transfer performance are studied. The experimental results show that the hydrophilic NPCM exhibits higher performances of condensation heat transfer and condensate recovery. However, the hydrophobic modification results in remarkable degradation of heat and condensate recovery from the mixture. Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to establish a hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore/water liquid system, and the infiltration characteristics of the single hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore is revealed.

  6. Wettability modified nanoporous ceramic membrane for simultaneous residual heat and condensate recovery.

    Hu, H W; Tang, G H; Niu, D

    2016-06-07

    Recovery of both latent heat and condensate from boiler flue gas is significant for improving boiler efficiency and water conservation. The condensation experiments are carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer across the nanoporous ceramic membranes (NPCMs) which are treated to be hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using the semicontinuous supercritical reactions. The effects of typical parameters including coolant flow rate, vapor/nitrogen gas mixture temperature, water vapor volume fraction and transmembrane pressure on heat and mass transfer performance are studied. The experimental results show that the hydrophilic NPCM exhibits higher performances of condensation heat transfer and condensate recovery. However, the hydrophobic modification results in remarkable degradation of heat and condensate recovery from the mixture. Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to establish a hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore/water liquid system, and the infiltration characteristics of the single hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore is revealed.

  7. Optimization of the flux values in multichannel ceramic membrane microfiltration of Baker`s yeast suspension

    Milović Nemanja R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to estimate the effects of the operating parameters on the baker's yeast microfiltration through multichannel ceramic membrane. The selected parameters were transmembrane pressure, suspension feed flow, and initial suspension concentration. In order to investigate the influence and interaction effects of these parameters on the microfiltration operation, two responses have been chosen: average permeate flux and flux decline. The Box-Behnken experimental design and response surface methodology was used for result processing and process optimization. According to the obtained results, the most important parameter influencing permeate flux during microfiltration is the initial suspension concentration. The maximum average flux value was achieved at an initial concentration of 0.1 g/L, pressure around 1.25 bars and a flow rate at 16 L/h. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31002

  8. Preparation and characterization of a nickel/alumina composite membrane for high temperature hydrogen separation. Application in a membrane reactor for the dry reforming of methane; De la synthese d'une membrane composite nikel/ceramique permselective a l'hydrogene au reacteur membranaire. Application au reformage du methane

    Haag, St.

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this work was to develop composite inorganic membranes based on nickel or palladium supported on a porous ceramic for high temperature hydrogen separation. These membranes were used in a membrane reactor for the dry reforming of methane in order to shift the chemical equilibrium towards the production of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The metal layers were deposited on a tubular alumina support by electroless plating. The Ni and the Pd layers are 1 micron thick. The hydrogen permeation tests were done for high temperatures. The Pd/ceramic membrane is permselective to hydrogen and the H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation factor (single gas) is 60 at 400 deg C with a transmembrane pressure difference of 1 bar. With a gas mixture, the H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation factor is 13. This membrane is not completely dense and the transport mechanism of hydrogen through the Pd layer is mixed: solution-diffusion through the metal bulk and surface diffusion through the defects of the film. However, an embrittlement of the palladium layer under hydrogen atmosphere was observed at 500 deg C. The Ni/ceramic membrane is stable until 600 deg C, its permselectivity to hydrogen increases with the temperature. The use of a sweep gas can provide a H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation factor (mixture) of about 25. The main diffusion mechanism is surface diffusion through the pores. Both membranes are not catalytic. Thus, some catalysts composed of nickel and cobalt supported on MgO, SiO{sub 2} or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared. These systems allow to reach theoretical limits of conversion calculated for a conventional fixed bed reactor. In the membrane reactor, an enhancement of the methane conversion (15-20%) is observed with both membranes due the selective removal of hydrogen during the reaction. The Ni/ceramic membrane more stable, more permeable and as selective as the palladium one is a brand new material for high temperature hydrogen separation. (author)

  9. Impact of ozonation and biological activated carbon filtration on ceramic membrane fouling.

    Ibn Abdul Hamid, Khaled; Sanciolo, Peter; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel; Muthukumaran, Shobha

    2017-12-01

    Ozone pre-treatment (ozonation, ozonisation) and biological activated carbon (BAC) filtration pre-treatment for the ceramic microfiltration (CMF) treatment of secondary effluent (SE) were studied. Ozone pre-treatment was found to result in higher overall removal of UV absorbance (UVA 254 ) and colour, and higher permeability than BAC pre-treatment or the combined use of ozone and BAC (O3+BAC) pre-treatment. The overall removal of colour and UVA 254 by ceramic filtration of the ozone pre-treated water was 97% and 63% respectively, compared to 86% and 48% respectively for BAC pre-treatment and 29% and 6% respectively for the untreated water. Ozone pre-treatment, however, was not effective in removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The permeability of the ozone pre-treated water through the ceramic membrane was found to decrease to 50% of the original value after 200 min of operation, compared to approximately 10% of the original value for the BAC pre-treated, O3+BAC pre-treated water and the untreated water. The higher permeability of the ozone pre-treated water was attributed to the excellent removal of biopolymer particles (100%) and high removal of humic substances (84%). The inclusion of a BAC stage between ozone pre-treatment and ceramic filtration was detrimental. The O3+BAC+CMF process was found to yield higher biopolymer removal (96%), lower humic substance (HS) component removal (66%) and lower normalized permeability (0.1) after 200 min of operation than the O3+CMF process (86%, 84% and 0.5 respectively). This was tentatively attributed to the chemical oxidation effect of ozone on the BAC biofilm and adsorbed components, leading to the generation of foulants that are not generated in the O3+CMF process. This study demonstrated the potential of ozone pre-treatment for reducing organic fouling and thus improving flux for the CMF of SE compared to O3+BAC pre-treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cross flow ultrafiltration of Cr (VI) using MCM-41, MCM-48 and Faujasite (FAU) zeolite-ceramic composite membranes.

    Basumatary, Ashim Kumar; Kumar, R Vinoth; Ghoshal, Aloke Kumar; Pugazhenthi, G

    2016-06-01

    This work describes the removal of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution in cross flow mode using MCM-41, MCM-48 and FAU zeolite membranes prepared on circular shaped porous ceramic support. Ceramic support was manufactured using locally available clay materials via a facile uni-axial compaction method followed by sintering process. A hydrothermal technique was employed for the deposition of zeolites on the ceramic support. The porosity of ceramic support (47%) is reduced by the formation of MCM-41 (23%), MCM-48 (22%) and FAU (33%) zeolite layers. The pore size of the MCM-41, MCM-48 and FAU membrane is found to be 0.173, 0.142, and 0.153 μm, respectively, which is lower than that of the support (1.0 μm). Cross flow ultrafiltration experiments of Cr (VI) were conducted at five different applied pressures (69-345 kPa) and three cross flow rates (1.11 × 10(-7) - 2.22 × 10(-7) m(3)/s). The filtration studies inferred that the performance of the fabricated zeolite composite membranes is optimum at the maximum applied pressure (345 kPa) and the highest rejection is obtained with the lowest cross flow rate (1.11 × 10(-7) m(3)/s) for all three zeolite membrane. The permeate flux of MCM-41, MCM-48 and FAU zeolite composite membranes are almost remained constant in the entire duration of the separation process. The highest removal of 82% is shown by FAU membrane, while MCM-41 and MCM-48 display 75% and 77% of Cr (VI) removal, respectively for the initial feed concentration of 1000 ppm with natural pH of the solution at an applied pressure of 345 kPa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The use of nanoparticles in polymeric and ceramic membrane structures: Review of manufacturing procedures and performance improvement for water treatment

    Kim, Jeonghwan [Department of Environmental Engineering, INHA University, Nam-gu, Yonghyun-dong 253, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Van der Bruggen, Bart, E-mail: bart.vanderbruggen@cit.kuleuven.b [K.U. Leuven, Department of Chemical Engineering, Laboratory for Applied Physical Chemistry and Environmental Technology, W. de Croylaan 46, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-07-15

    Membrane separations are powerful tools for various applications, including wastewater treatment and the removal of contaminants from drinking water. The performance of membranes is mainly limited by material properties. Recently, successful attempts have been made to add nanoparticles or nanotubes to polymers in membrane synthesis, with particle sizes ranging from 4 nm up to 100 nm. Ceramic membranes have been fabricated with catalytic nanoparticles for synergistic effects on the membrane performance. Breakthrough effects that have been reported in the field of water and wastewater treatment include fouling mitigation, improvement of permeate quality and flux enhancement. Nanomaterials that have been used include titania, alumina, silica, silver and many others. This paper reviews the role of engineered nanomaterials in (pressure driven) membrane technology for water treatment, to be applied in drinking water production and wastewater recycling. Benefits and drawbacks are described, which should be taken into account in further studies on potential risks related to release of nanoparticles into the environment. - Nanoparticles show a great potential for application in polymeric and ceramic membrane structures, in view of fouling mitigation and catalytic breakdown processes.

  12. The use of nanoparticles in polymeric and ceramic membrane structures: Review of manufacturing procedures and performance improvement for water treatment

    Kim, Jeonghwan; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2010-01-01

    Membrane separations are powerful tools for various applications, including wastewater treatment and the removal of contaminants from drinking water. The performance of membranes is mainly limited by material properties. Recently, successful attempts have been made to add nanoparticles or nanotubes to polymers in membrane synthesis, with particle sizes ranging from 4 nm up to 100 nm. Ceramic membranes have been fabricated with catalytic nanoparticles for synergistic effects on the membrane performance. Breakthrough effects that have been reported in the field of water and wastewater treatment include fouling mitigation, improvement of permeate quality and flux enhancement. Nanomaterials that have been used include titania, alumina, silica, silver and many others. This paper reviews the role of engineered nanomaterials in (pressure driven) membrane technology for water treatment, to be applied in drinking water production and wastewater recycling. Benefits and drawbacks are described, which should be taken into account in further studies on potential risks related to release of nanoparticles into the environment. - Nanoparticles show a great potential for application in polymeric and ceramic membrane structures, in view of fouling mitigation and catalytic breakdown processes.

  13. Evaluation of process performance, energy consumption and microbiota characterization in a ceramic membrane bioreactor for ex-situ biomethanation of H2 and CO2.

    Alfaro, Natalia; Fdz-Polanco, María; Fdz-Polanco, Fernando; Díaz, Israel

    2018-06-01

    The performance of a pilot ceramic membrane bioreactor for the bioconversion of H 2 and CO 2 to bioCH 4 was evaluated in thermophilic conditions. The loading rate was between 10 and 30 m 3  H 2 /m 3 reactor  d and the system transformed 95% of H 2 fed. The highest methane yield found was 0.22 m 3  CH 4 /m 3  H 2 , close to the maximum stoichiometric value (0.25 m 3  CH 4 /m 3  H 2 ) thus indicating that archaeas employed almost all H 2 transferred to produce CH 4 . k L a value of 268 h -1 was reached at 30 m 3  H 2 /m 3 reactor  d. DGGE and FISH revealed a remarkable archaeas increase related to the selection-effect of H 2 on community composition over time. Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus was the archaea found with high level of similarity. This study verified the successful application of membrane technology to efficiently transfer H 2 from gas to the liquid phase, the development of a hydrogenotrophic community from a conventional thermophilic sludge and the technical feasibility of the bioconversion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bromate formation in a hybrid ozonation-ceramic membrane filtration system.

    Moslemi, Mohammadreza; Davies, Simon H; Masten, Susan J

    2011-11-01

    The effect of pH, ozone mass injection rate, initial bromide concentration, and membrane molecular weight cut off (MWCO) on bromate formation in a hybrid membrane filtration-ozonation reactor was studied. Decreasing the pH, significantly reduced bromate formation. Bromate formation increased with increasing gaseous ozone mass injection rate, due to increase in dissolved ozone concentrations. Greater initial bromide concentrations resulted in higher bromate concentrations. An increase in the bromate concentration was observed by reducing MWCO, which resulted in a concomitant increase in the retention time in the system. A model to estimate the rate of bromate formation was developed. Good correlation between the model simulation and the experimental data was achieved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Numerical simulation of ion transport membrane reactors: Oxygen permeation and transport and fuel conversion

    Hong, Jongsup; Kirchen, Patrick; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2012-01-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) based reactors have been suggested as a novel technology for several applications including fuel reforming and oxy-fuel combustion, which integrates air separation and fuel conversion while reducing complexity

  16. Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal in a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactor Under Continuous Aeration: A Demonstration

    Gilmore, Kevin R.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the successful coupling of partial nitrification (nitritation) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in a membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) with continuous aeration. Controlling the relative surface loadings of oxygen versus ammonium prevented complete nitrite oxidation and a...

  17. Modification of the Selectivity Properties of Tubular Ceramic Membranes after Alkaline Treatment

    Patrick Dutournié

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the selectivity modification of ceramic membranes after a mild alkaline treatment. Filtration of pure salt-water solutions was carried out with commercial titania membranes before and after the treatment. After treatment, the rejection of NaF significantly decreased, while the rejection of NaCl and NaBr increased. Additionally, NaI and Na2SO4 remained close to zero. Pore size and electrical charge being almost unchanged, only significant modifications in the dielectric effects can explain this modification of selectivity. Therefore, the surface chemistry and the interaction (nature and magnitude with the solvent and with the species present in the solution appear to be modified by the alkaline treatment. This trend is also illustrated by discussing the electric and the dielectric properties that were numerically identified before and after treatment. The alkaline treatment significantly decreased the apparent dielectric constant of NaCl-water solution in the pore, highlighting the rejection of sodium chloride. Contrariwise, the modification of the surface chemistry increased the apparent dielectric constant of NaF-water solution by promoting fluoride transmission.

  18. Cordierite containing ceramic membranes from smectetic clay using natural organic wastes as pore-forming agents

    W. Misrar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cordierite ceramic membranes were manufactured from natural clay, oxides and organic wastes as pore forming agents. Mixtures aforementioned materials with the pore-forming agents (up to 10 wt.% were investigated in the range 1000–1200 °C using thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry and filtration tests. Physical properties (density, water absorption and bending strength were correlated to the processing factors (pore-forming agent addition, firing temperature and soaking time. The results showed that cordierite together with spinel, diopside and clinoenstatite neoformed. SEM analysis revealed heterogeneous aspects. The results of the response surface methodology showed that the variations of physical properties versus processing parameters were well described by the used polynomial model. The addition of pore forming agent and temperature were the most influential factors. Filtration tests were performed on the best performing sample. The results allowed to testify that these membranes could be used in waste water treatment.

  19. Proton Content and Nature in Perovskite Ceramic Membranes for Medium Temperature Fuel Cells and Electrolysers

    Aneta Slodczyk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in environmentally friendly technology has promoted research on green house gas-free devices such as water steam electrolyzers, fuel cells and CO2/syngas converters. In such applications, proton conducting perovskite ceramics appear especially promising as electrolyte membranes. Prior to a successful industrial application, it is necessary to determine/understand their complex physical and chemical behavior, especially that related to proton incorporation mechanism, content and nature of bulk protonic species. Based on the results of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QNS, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Raman and IR measurements we will show the complexity of the protonation process and the importance of differentiation between the protonic species adsorbed on a membrane surface and the bulk protons. The bulk proton content is very low, with a doping limit (~1–5 × 10−3 mole/mole, but sufficient to guarantee proton conduction below 600 °C. The bulk protons posses an ionic, covalent bond free nature and may occupy an interstitial site in the host perovskite structure.

  20. Reaction-sintered porous mineral-based mullite ceramic membrane supports made from recycled materials.

    Dong, Yingchao; Zhou, Jian-Er; Lin, Bin; Wang, Yongqing; Wang, Songlin; Miao, Lifeng; Lang, Ying; Liu, Xingqin; Meng, Guangyao

    2009-12-15

    Bulk porous mullite supports for ceramic membranes were prepared directly using a mixture of industrial waste fly ash and bauxite by dry-pressing, followed by sintering between 1200 and 1550 degrees C. The effects of sintering temperature on the phase composition and shrinkage percent of porous mullite were studied. The XRD results indicate that secondary mullitization reaction took place above 1200 degrees C, and completed at 1450 degrees C. During sintering, the mixture samples first shrunk, then expanded abnormally between 1326 and 1477 degrees C, and finally shrunk again above 1477 degrees C. This unique volume self-expansion is ascribed to the secondary mullitization reaction between bauxite and fly ash. More especially, the micro-structural variations induced by this self-expansion sintering were verified by SEM, porosity, pore size distribution and nitrogen gas permeation flux. During self-expansion sintering, with increasing temperature, an abnormal increase in both open porosity and pore size is observed, which also results in the increase of nitrogen gas flux. The mineral-based mullite supports with increased open porosity were obtained. Furthermore, the sintered porous mullite membrane supports were characterized in terms of thermal expansion co-efficient and mechanical strength.

  1. Synthesis of ceramic powder of TiO_2 doped with Zr by the Pechini Method applied in ceramic membranes for water treatment

    Farias, R.F.V.; Fernandes, M.S.M.; Silva, R.S.; Franca, K.B.; Lira, H.L.; Bonifacio, M.A.R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of ceramic powder of TiO2 doped with Zr by the polymeric precursor method, also known as Pechini method applied in ceramic membranes for water treatment. Three compositions were synthesized according to the molar ratio Ti_x-1Zr_xO_2 (x = 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 moles), calcined at 700° C/1h. The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microbiological analysis. The presence of the doping element was not decisive in the average size of crystallite, which ranged from 5.5 to 11.3 nm. The SEM images showed clusters with uniform surface and granular aspect, it is still possible to see a clearly porous structure formed by clusters of uniform size for all samples. The microbiological analyses of powders have revealed that they have bactericidal properties. (author)

  2. Joining of SiC/SiCf ceramic matrix composites for fusion reactor blanket applications

    Colombo, P.; Riccardi, B.; Donato, A.; Scarinci, G.

    2000-01-01

    Using a preceramic polymer, joints between SiC/SiC f ceramic matrix composites were obtained. The polymer, upon pyrolysis at high temperature, transforms into a ceramic material and develops an adhesive bonding with the composite. The surface morphology of 2D and 3D SiC/SiC f composites did not allow satisfactory results to be obtained by a simple application of the method initially developed for monolithic SiC bodies, which employed the use of a pure silicone resin. Thus, active or inert fillers were mixed with the preceramic polymer, in order to reduce its volumetric shrinkage which occurs during pyrolysis. In particular, the joints realized using the silicone resin with Al-Si powder as reactive additive displayed remarkable shear strength (31.6 MPa maximum). Large standard deviation for the shear strength has nevertheless been measured. The proposed joining method is promising for the realization of fusion reactor blanket structures, even if presently the measured strength values are not fully satisfactory

  3. Immobilization of preconditioned spent fuel from nuclear research reactors in a ceramic matrix

    Russo, Diego O.; Rodriguez, Diego S.; Heredia, Arturo D.; Sanfilippo, Miguel; Sterba, Mario E.; Mateos, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The fuel elements from nuclear research reactors consist in a laminated sandwich of aluminum with a core of some uranium compound. To process this material its necessary to previously eliminate the aluminum covering the fuel, before the conditioning of the rest of the fuel in a stable matrix, in order to obtain an acceptable waste form for a subsequent disposition in a geological repository. Normally, mechanical and chemical methods are proposed for that purpose. One of the most developed techniques for immobilization of the radioactive elements above mentioned, is the vitrification. In this work we propose a method named CERUS (in Spanish Ceramizacion de Elementos Radiactivos con Uranio Sinterizado - Ceramization of radioactive elements with sintered uranium). This is a sinterization of the pre-treated fuel elements mixed with natural uranium oxide. The properties of the blocks obtained are adequate for final disposal in a deep geological reservoir. (author)

  4. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ceramic materials for nuclear fusion reactors. 1. Analysis of alumina

    Rucandio, M.I.; Roca, M.; Melon, A.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the aluminium oxide considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1-0.3 % for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Sc, Ta, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current arc excitation and photographic detection has been employed. For Hf, Mg, Ta, Ti, V and Zr the use of 40% of copper fluoride as a carrier and of Nb as internal standard provide suitable sensitivities and precissions, while for the rest of elements the best results are obtained with graphite powder in different proportions and Rb or Sn as internal standard. (Author). 7 refs

  5. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ceramic materials for nuclear fusion reactors III. Analysis of magnesium oxide

    Melon, A. M.; Roca, M.; Rucandio, M. I.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the magnesium oxide, considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors, has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3% for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mn, Na, Ni, Se, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current are excitation and photographic detection has been employed. In order to eliminate the effect due to the differences in density between standards and samples, which are a source of errors, a chemical treatment of both is carried out. Likewise, for attaining conditions more suitable for the volatilization of certain impurities, these are determined with the sample in fluoride form. (Author) 11 refs

  6. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ceramic materials for nuclear fusion reactors III. Analysis of magnesium oxide

    Melon, A.M.; Roca, M.; Rucandio, M.I.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the magnesium oxide, considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors, has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3 % for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mn, Na, Ni, Sc, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current arc excitation and photographic detection has been employed. In order to eliminated the effect due to the differences in density between standards and samples, which are a source of errors, a chemical treatment of both is carried out. Likewise, for attaining conditions more suitable for the volatilization of certain impurities, these are determined with the sample in fluoride form. (author)

  7. Development of ceramic humidity sensor for the Korean next generation reactor

    Lee, Na Young; Hwang, Il Soon; Yoo, Han Ill; Song, Chang Rock; Park, Sang Duk; Yang, Jun Seog

    1997-01-01

    For the Korean Next Generation Reactor(KNGR) development, LBB is considered for the Main Steam Line(MSL) piping inside its containment to achieve cost and safety improvement. To apply LBB concept to MSL, leak sensors highly sensitive to humidity is required. In this paper, a ceramic material, MgCr 2 O 4 -TiO 2 has been developed as a humidity sensor for MSL applications. Experiments performed to characterize the electrical conductivity shows that the conductivity of MgCr 2 O 4 -TiO 2 responds sensitively to both temperature and humidity changes. At a constant temperature below 100 .deg. C, the conductivity increases as the relative humidity increases, which makes the sensor favorable for application to the outside of MSL insulation layer. But as temperature increases beyond 100 .deg. C, the sensor composition should be adjusted for the application to KNGR is to be made at temperature above 100 .deg. C

  8. Spectrographic Determination of Impurities in Ceramic Materials for Nuclear Fusion Reactors. I. Analysis of Alumina

    Rucandio, M. I.; Roca, M.; Melon, A.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the aluminium oxide considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3 * for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Se, Ta, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current ore excitation and photographic detection has been employed. For Hf, Mg, Ta, Ti, V and Zr the use of 40% of copper fluoride as a carrier and of Nb as lnternal standard provide suitable sensitivities and precessions, while for the rest of elements the bent results are obtained with graphite powder in different proportions and Rb or Sn as internal standard. (Author) 7 refs

  9. Ceramic Membrane combined with Powdered Activated Carbon (PAC) or Coagulation for Treatment of Impaired Quality Waters

    Hamad, Juma Z.

    2013-08-29

    Ceramic membranes (CM) are robust membranes attributed with high production, long life span and stability against critical conditions. While capital costs are high, these are partially offset by lower operation and maintenance costs compared to polymeric membranes. Like any other low-pressure membrane (LPM), CM faces problems of fouling, low removal of organic matter and poor removal of trace organic compounds (TOrCs). Current pretreatment approaches that are mainly based on coagulation and adsorption can remove some organic matter but with a low removal of the biopolymers component which is responsible for fouling. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) accompanied with a LPM maintains good removal of TOrCs. However, enhanced removal of TOrCs to higher level is required. Submicron powdered activated carbon (SPAC), obtained after crushing commercial activated carbon into very fine particle, and novel activated carbon (KCU 6) which is characterized with larger pores and high surface area were employed. A pre-coating approach, which provides intimated contact between PAC and contaminants, was adopted for wastewater and (high DOC) surface water treatment. For seawater, in-line coagulation with iron III chloride was adopted. Both SPAC and KCU 6 showed good removal of biopolymers at a dose of 30 mg/L with > 85 % and 90 %, respectively. A dose of 40 mg/L of SPAC and 30 mg/L KCU 6 pre-coats were successful used in controlling membrane fouling. SPAC is suggested to remove biopolymers by physical means and adsorption while KCU 6 removed biopolymers through adsorption. Both KCU 6 and SPAC attained high removal of TOrCs whereas KCU 6 showed outstanding performance. Out of 29 TOrCs investigated, KCU 6 showed > 87 % TOrCs rejection for 28 compounds. In seawater pretreatment, transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) were found to be an important foulant. TEP promoted both reversible and irreversible fouling. TEP are highly electronegative while alumina CM is positively charged which

  10. Application of Pre-coated Microfiltration Ceramic Membrane with Powdered Activated Carbon for Natural Organic Matter Removal from Secondary Wastewater Effluent

    Kurniasari, Novita

    2012-12-01

    Ceramic membranes offer more advantageous performances than conventional polymeric membranes. However, membrane fouling caused by Natural Organic Matters (NOM) contained in the feed water is still become a major problem for operational efficiency. A new method of ceramic membrane pre-coating with Powdered Activated Carbon (PAC), which allows extremely contact time for adsorbing aquatic contaminants, has been studied as a pre-treatment prior to ceramic microfiltration membrane. This bench scale study evaluated five different types of PAC (SA Super, G 60, KCU 6, KCU 8 and KCU 12,). The results showed that KCU 6 with larger pore size was performed better compared to other PAC when pre-coated on membrane surface. PAC pre-coating on the ceramic membrane with KCU 6 was significantly enhance NOM removal, reduced membrane fouling and improved membrane performance. Increase of total membrane resistance was suppressed to 96%. The removal of NOM components up to 92%, 58% and 56% for biopolymers, humic substances and building blocks, respectively was achieved at pre-coating dose of 30 mg/l. Adsorption was found to be the major removal mechanism of NOM. Results obtained showed that biopolymers removal are potentially correlated with enhanced membrane performance.

  11. The effect of gas permeation through vertical membranes on chemical switching reforming (CSR) reactor performance

    Wassie, S.A.; Gallucci, F.; Cloete, S.; Zaabout, A.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Amini, S.

    2016-01-01

    A novel membrane assisted fluidized bed reactor concept has been proposed for ultra-pure hydrogen production with integrated CO2 capture from steam methane reforming. The so-called Chemical Switching Reactor (CSR) concept combines the use of an oxygen carrier for supplying heat and catalysing the

  12. A reverse flow catalytic membrane reactor for the production of syngas: an experimental study

    Smit, J.; Bekink, G.J.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper experimental results are presented for a demonstration unit of a recently proposed novel integrated reactor concept (Smit et. al., 2005) for the partial oxidation of natural gas to syngas (POM), namely a Reverse Flow Catalytic Membrane Reactor (RFCMR). Natural gas has great potential

  13. A dense Pd/Ag membrane reactor for methanol steam reforming: Experimental study

    Basile, A.; Gallucci, F.; Paturzo, L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on an experimental study of the methanol steam reforming (MSR) reaction. A dense Pd/Ag membrane reactor (MR) has been used, and its behaviour has been compared to the performance of a traditional reactor (TR) packed with the same catalyst type and amount. The parameters

  14. Development of a mixed-conductive ceramic membrane for syngas production; Developpement d'une membrane ceramique conductrice mixte pour la production de gaz de synthese

    Etchegoyen, G

    2005-10-15

    Natural gas conversion into syngas (H{sub 2}+CO) is very attractive for hydrogen and clean fuel production via GTL technology by providing an alternative to oil products and reducing greenhouse gas emission. Syngas production, using a mixed ionic-electronic conducting ceramic membrane, is thought to be particularly promising. The purpose of this PhD thesis was to develop this type of membrane. Mixed-conducting oxide was synthesized, characterized and then, shaped via tape casting and co-sintered in order to obtain multilayer membranes with controlled architectures and microstructures. Oxygen permeation fluxes were measured with a specific device to evaluate membrane performances. As a result, the optimisation of architecture and microstructure made it possible to increase oxygen permeation flux by a factor 30. Additional researches were focused on the oxide composition in order to achieve higher dimensional stability. (author)

  15. Hydrogen enrichment and separation from synthesis gas by the use of a membrane reactor

    Sanchez, J.M.; Barreiro, M.M.; Marono, M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the objectives of the CHRISGAS project was to study innovative gas separation and gas upgrading systems that have not been developed sufficiently yet to be tested at a demonstration scale within the time frame of the project, but which show some attractive merits and features for further development. In this framework CIEMAT studied, at bench scale, hydrogen enrichment and separation from syngas by the use of membranes and membrane catalytic reactors. In this paper results about hydrogen separation from synthesis gas by means of selective membranes are presented. Studies dealt with the evaluation of permeation and selectivity to hydrogen of prepared and pre-commercial Pd-based membranes. Whereas prepared membranes turned out to be non-selective, due to discontinuities of the palladium layer, studies conducted with the pre-commercial membrane showed that by means of a membrane reactor it is possible to completely separate hydrogen from the other gas components and produce pure hydrogen as a permeate stream, even in the case of complex reaction system (H 2 /CO/CO 2 /H 2 O) under WGS conditions gas mixtures. The advantages of using a water-gas shift membrane reactor (MR) over a traditional fixed bed reactor (TR) have also been studied. The experimental device included the pre-commercial Pd-based membrane and a commercial high temperature Fe-Cr-based, WGS catalyst, which was packed in the annulus between the membrane and the reactor outer shell. Results show that in the MR concept, removal of H 2 from the reaction side has a positive effect on WGS reaction, reaching higher CO conversion than in a traditional packed bed reactor at a given temperature. On increasing pressure on the reaction side permeation is enhanced and hence carbon monoxide conversion increases. -- Highlights: → H 2 enrichment and separation using a bench-scale membrane reactor MR is studied. → Permeation and selectivity to H 2 of Pd-based membranes was determined. → Complete separation

  16. Membrane assisted fluidized bed reactor: experimental demonstration for partial oxidation of methanol

    Deshmukh, S.A.R.K.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the reactor concept has been developed on the basis of an experimental study on the effect of fluidization conditions on the membrane permeation rate in a MAFBR, the extent of gas back mixing and the tube-to-bed heat transfer rates in the presence of membrane bundles with and without

  17. Ethanol steam reforming kinetics of a Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    Tosti, S.; Basile, A.; Borelli, R.; Borgognoni, F.; Castelli, S.; Fabbricino, M.; Gallucci, F.; Licusati, C.

    2009-01-01

    The ethanol steam reforming reaction carried out in a Pd-based tubular membrane reactor has been modelled via a finite element code. The model considers the membrane tube divided into finite volume elements where the mass balances for both lumen and shell sides are carried out accordingly to the

  18. Coupling of separation and reaction in zeolite membrane reactor for hydroisomerization of hydrocarbons

    Gora, L.; Maloncy, M.L.; Jansen, J.C. [Ceramic Membrane Centre, The Pore, DelftChemTech, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    A zeolite membrane reactor has been developed for the hydroisomerization of hydrocarbons, in which the linear molecules are separated from branch ones on the silicalite-1 membrane prior to conversion of the permeated linear hydrocarbons to equilibrium levels on the catalyst bed. A model studies using C6 components are conduct. Separated n-C6 from 2MP (selectivity 24) is converted for 72% with 36% selectivity towards di-branched isomers (at 393 K). The results indicate that platinum containing chlorinated alumina/silicalite-1 membrane reactor has a potential in upgrading octane values and offers advantages such as higher efficiency, better process control and lower consumption of energy. (orig.)

  19. Fabrication of palladium nanoparticles immobilized on an amine-functionalized ceramic membrane support using a nanoparticulate colloidal impregnation method with enhanced catalytic properties

    Du, Yan; Chen, Rizhi [Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing (China)

    2015-09-15

    An efficient and reusable catalyst was developed by depositing palladium nanoparticles on an amine-functionalized ceramic membrane support using a nanoparticulate colloidal impregnation method. The as-prepared Pdloaded ceramic membrane support was characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, TEM, XPS, ICP, and its catalytic properties were investigated in the liquid-phase p-nitrophenol hydrogenation. A comparative study was also made with the palladium nanoparticles deposited on an amine-functionalized ceramic membrane support by an impregnation-reduction method. The palladium nanoparticles could be homogeneously immobilized on the ceramic membrane support surface, and exhibited excellent catalytic performance in the p-nitrophenol hydrogenation. The catalytic activity of the Pdloaded ceramic membrane support prepared by the nanoparticulate colloidal impregnation method increased by 16.6% compared to that of impregnation-reduction method. In the nanoparticulate colloidal impregnation method, palladium nanoparticles were presynthesized, higher loading of Pd(0) could be obtained, resulting in better catalytic activity. The as-prepared Pd-loaded ceramic membrane support could be easily reused for several cycles without appreciable degradation of catalytic activity.

  20. Microbial activity catalyzes oxygen transfer in membrane-aerated nitritating biofilm reactors

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Domingo Felez, Carlos; Lackner, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable oxygen transfer efficiencies attainable in membrane-aerated biofilm reactors (MABRs) are expected to favor their prompt industrial implementation. However, tests in clean water, currently used for the estimation of their oxygen transfer potential, lead to wrong estimates once biofilm...... is present, significantly complicating reactor modelling and control. This study shows for the first time the factors affecting oxygen mass transfer across membranes during clean water tests and reactor operation via undisturbed microelectrode inspection and bulk measurements. The mass transfer resistance...... of the liquid boundary layer developed at the membrane-liquid interface during clean water tests accounted for two thirds of the total mass transfer resistance, suggesting a strong underestimation of the oxygen transfer rates when it is absent (e.g. after biofilm growth). Reactor operation to attain partial...

  1. Immobilization of glucoamylase on ceramic membrane surfaces modified with a new method of treatment utilizing SPCP-CVD.

    Ida; Matsuyama; Yamamoto

    2000-07-01

    Glucoamylase, as a model enzyme, was immobilized on a ceramic membrane modified by surface corona discharge induced plasma chemical process-chemical vapor deposition (SPCP-CVD). Characterizations of the immobilized enzyme were then discussed. Three kinds of ceramic membranes with different amounts of amino groups on the surface were prepared utilizing the SPCP-CVD method. Each with 1-time, 3-times and 5-times surface modification treatments and used for supports in glucoamylase immobilization. The amount of immobilized glucoamylase increased with the increase in the number of surface modification treatments and saturated to a certain maximum value estimated by a two-dimensional random packing. The operational stability of the immobilized glucoamylase also increased with the increase in the number of the surface treatment. It was almost the same as the conventional method, while the activity of immobilized enzyme was higher. The results indicated the possibility of designing the performance of the immobilized enzyme by controlling the amount of amino groups. The above results showed that the completely new surface modification method using SPCP was effective in modifying ceramic membranes for enzyme immobilization.

  2. Comparing the short and long term stability of biodegradable, ceramic and cation exchange membranes in microbial fuel cells.

    Winfield, Jonathan; Chambers, Lily D; Rossiter, Jonathan; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2013-11-01

    The long and short-term stability of two porous dependent ion exchange materials; starch-based compostable bags (BioBag) and ceramic, were compared to commercially available cation exchange membrane (CEM) in microbial fuel cells. Using bi-directional polarisation methods, CEM exhibited power overshoot during the forward sweep followed by significant power decline over the reverse sweep (38%). The porous membranes displayed no power overshoot with comparably smaller drops in power during the reverse sweep (ceramic 8%, BioBag 5.5%). The total internal resistance at maximum power increased by 64% for CEM compared to 4% (ceramic) and 6% (BioBag). Under fixed external resistive loads, CEM exhibited steeper pH reductions than the porous membranes. Despite its limited lifetime, the BioBag proved an efficient material for a stable microbial environment until failing after 8 months, due to natural degradation. These findings highlight porous separators as ideal candidates for advancing MFC technology in terms of cost and operation stability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Substrate Effect on Carbon/Ceramic Mixed Matrix Membrane Prepared by a Vacuum-Assisted Method for Desalination

    Yingjun Song

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the effect of various membrane substrates and coating conditions on the formation of carbon/ceramic mixed matrix membranes for desalination application. The substrates were impregnated with phenolic resin via a vacuum-assisted method followed by carbonization under an inert gas. Substrates with pore sizes of 100 nm required a single impregnation step only, where short vacuum times (<120 s resulted in low quality membranes with defects. For vacuum times of ≥120 s, high quality membranes with homogeneous impregnation were prepared leading to high salt rejection (>90% and high water fluxes (up to 25 L m−2 h−1. The increase in water flux as a function of the vacuum time confirms the vacuum etching effect resulting from the vacuum-assisted method. Substrates with pore sizes of 140 nm required two impregnation steps. These pores were too large for the ceramic inter-particle space to be filled with phenolic resin via a single step. In the second impregnation step, increasing the concentration of the phenolic resin resulted in membranes with lower water fluxes. These results indicate that thicker films were formed by increasing the phenolic resin concentration. In the case of substrates with pores of 600 nm, these pores were too large and inter-particle space filling with phenolic resin was not attained.

  4. On the study of catalytic membrane reactor for water detritiation: Modeling approach

    Liger, Karine, E-mail: karine.liger@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France); Mascarade, Jérémy [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France); Joulia, Xavier; Meyer, Xuan-Mi [Université de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, 4, Allée Emile Monso, Toulouse F-31030 (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, Toulouse F-31030 (France); Troulay, Michèle; Perrais, Christophe [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Experimental results for the conversion of tritiated water (using deuterium as a simulant of tritium) by means of a catalytic membrane reactor in view of tritium recovery. • Phenomenological 2D model to represent catalytic membrane reactor behavior including the determination of the compositions of gaseous effluents. • Good agreement between the simulation results and experimental measurements performed on the dedicated facility. • Explanation of the unexpected behavior of the catalytic membrane reactor by the modeling results and in particular the gas composition estimation. - Abstract: In the framework of tritium recovery from tritiated water, efficiency of packed bed membrane reactors have been successfully demonstrated. Thanks to protium isotope swamping, tritium bonded water can be recovered under the valuable Q{sub 2} form (Q = H, D or T) by means of isotope exchange reactions occurring on catalyst surface. The use of permselective Pd-based membrane allows withdrawal of reactions products all along the reactor, and thus limits reverse reaction rate to the benefit of the direct one (shift effect). The reactions kinetics, which are still little known or unknown, are generally assumed to be largely greater than the permeation ones so that thermodynamic equilibriums of isotope exchange reactions are generally assumed. This paper proposes a new phenomenological 2D model to represent catalytic membrane reactor behavior with the determination of gas effluents compositions. A good agreement was obtained between the simulation results and experimental measurements performed on a dedicated facility. Furthermore, the gas composition estimation permits to interpret unexpected behavior of the catalytic membrane reactor. In the next future, further sensitivity analysis will be performed to determine the limits of the model and a kinetics study will be conducted to assess the thermodynamic equilibrium of reactions.

  5. On the study of catalytic membrane reactor for water detritiation: Modeling approach

    Liger, Karine; Mascarade, Jérémy; Joulia, Xavier; Meyer, Xuan-Mi; Troulay, Michèle; Perrais, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Experimental results for the conversion of tritiated water (using deuterium as a simulant of tritium) by means of a catalytic membrane reactor in view of tritium recovery. • Phenomenological 2D model to represent catalytic membrane reactor behavior including the determination of the compositions of gaseous effluents. • Good agreement between the simulation results and experimental measurements performed on the dedicated facility. • Explanation of the unexpected behavior of the catalytic membrane reactor by the modeling results and in particular the gas composition estimation. - Abstract: In the framework of tritium recovery from tritiated water, efficiency of packed bed membrane reactors have been successfully demonstrated. Thanks to protium isotope swamping, tritium bonded water can be recovered under the valuable Q_2 form (Q = H, D or T) by means of isotope exchange reactions occurring on catalyst surface. The use of permselective Pd-based membrane allows withdrawal of reactions products all along the reactor, and thus limits reverse reaction rate to the benefit of the direct one (shift effect). The reactions kinetics, which are still little known or unknown, are generally assumed to be largely greater than the permeation ones so that thermodynamic equilibriums of isotope exchange reactions are generally assumed. This paper proposes a new phenomenological 2D model to represent catalytic membrane reactor behavior with the determination of gas effluents compositions. A good agreement was obtained between the simulation results and experimental measurements performed on a dedicated facility. Furthermore, the gas composition estimation permits to interpret unexpected behavior of the catalytic membrane reactor. In the next future, further sensitivity analysis will be performed to determine the limits of the model and a kinetics study will be conducted to assess the thermodynamic equilibrium of reactions.

  6. Molecular Grafting of Fluorinated and Nonfluorinated Alkylsiloxanes on Various Ceramic Membrane Surfaces for the Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds Applying Vacuum Membrane Distillation.

    Kujawa, Joanna; Al-Gharabli, Samer; Kujawski, Wojciech; Knozowska, Katarzyna

    2017-02-22

    Four main tasks were presented: (i) ceramic membrane functionalization (TiO 2 5 kDa and 300 kDa), (ii) extended material characterization (physicochemistry and tribology) of pristine and modified ceramic samples, (iii) evaluation of chemical and mechanical stability, and finally (iv) assessment of membrane efficiency in vacuum membrane distillation applied for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) removal from water. Highly efficient molecular grafting with four types of perfluoroalkylsilanes and one nonfluorinated agent was developed. Materials with controllable tribological and physicochemical properties were achieved. The most meaningful finding is associated with the applicability of fluorinated and nonfluorinated grafting agents. The results of contact angle, hysteresis of contact angle, sliding angle, and critical surface tension as well as Young's modulus, nanohardness, and adhesion force for grafting by these two modifiers are comparable. This provides insight into the potential applicability of environmental friendly hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces. The achieved hydrophobic membranes were very effective in the removal of VOCs (butanol, methyl-tert-butyl ether, and ethyl acetate) from binary aqueous solutions in vacuum membrane distillation. The correlation between membrane effectiveness and separated solvent polarity was compared in terms of material properties and resistance to the wetting (kinetics of wetting and in-depth liquid penetration). Material properties were interpreted considering Zisman theory and using Kao diagram. The significant influence of surface chemistry on the membrane performance was noticed (5 kDa, influence of hydrophobic nanolayer and separation controlled by solution-diffusion model; 300 kDa, no impact of surface chemistry and separation controlled by liquid-vapor equilibrium).

  7. Development of an Electrochemical Ceramic Membrane Filtration System for Efficient Contaminant Removal from Waters.

    Zheng, Junjian; Wang, Zhiwei; Ma, Jinxing; Xu, Shaoping; Wu, Zhichao

    2018-04-03

    Inability to remove low-molecular-weight anthropogenic contaminants is a critical issue in low-pressure membrane filtration processes for water treatment. In this work, a novel electrochemical ceramic membrane filtration (ECMF) system using TiO 2 @SnO 2 -Sb anode was developed for removing persistent p-chloroaniline (PCA). Results showed that the ECMF system achieved efficient removal of PCA from contaminated waters. At a charging voltage of 3 V, the PCA removal rate of TiO 2 @SnO 2 -Sb ECMF system under flow-through mode was 2.4 times that of flow-by mode. The energy consumption for 50% of PCA removal for TiO 2 @SnO 2 -Sb ECMF at 3 V under flow-through mode was 0.38 Wh/L, much lower than that of flow-by operation (1.5 Wh/L), which was attributed to the improved utilization of the surface adsorbed HO· and dissociated HO· driven by the enhanced mass transfer of PCA toward the anode surface. Benefiting from the increased production of reactive oxygen species such as O 2 •- , H 2 O 2 , and HO· arising from excitation of anatase TiO 2 , TiO 2 @SnO 2 -Sb ECMF exhibited a superior electrocatalytic activity to the SnO 2 -Sb ECMF system. The degradation pathways of PCA initiated by OH· attack were further proposed, with the biodegradable short-chain carboxylic acids (mainly formic, acetic, and oxalic acids) identified as the dominant oxidized products. These results highlight the potential of the ECMF system for cost-effective water purification.

  8. A novel auto-thermal reforming membrane reactor for high purity H2

    Tony Boyd; Grace, J.R.; Lim, C.J.; Adris, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    A novel hydrogen reactor based on steam reforming of natural gas has been developed and tested. The reactor produces high purity hydrogen using in-situ perm-selective membranes installed in a fluidized catalyst bed, thus shifting the thermodynamic equilibrium of the SMR reaction and eliminating the need for downstream hydrogen purification. The reactor is particularly suited to auto-thermal reforming, where air is added to the reformer to provide the endothermic reaction heat, thus eliminating the need to indirectly heat the reactor. The gas flow pattern within the fluidized bed induces an internal circulation of catalyst particles between the central SMR reaction (permeation) zone and an outer annulus. The circulating hot catalyst particles from the oxidation zone carry the required endothermic heat of reaction for the reforming, while ensuring that the palladium membranes are not exposed to excessive temperatures or to oxygen. Another beneficial characteristic of the reactor is that very little of the nitrogen present in the oxidation air reaches the reaction zone, thus maintaining the hydrogen driving force for the perm-selective membranes. Pilot plant results carried out in a semi-industrial scale reactor will be presented. The reactor was operated up to 650 C and 14 bar. Pure hydrogen (99.999+%) was initially obtained from the reactor and an equilibrium shift was demonstrated. (authors)

  9. Treatment of textile dyehouse effluent using ceramic membrane based process in combination with chemical pretreatment.

    Bhattacharya, Priyankari; Ghosh, Sourja; Majumdar, Swachchha; Bandyopadhyay, Sibdas

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of highly concentrated dyebath effluent and comparatively dilute composite effluent having mixture of various reactive dyes collected from a cotton fabric dyeing unit was undertaken in the present study. Ceramic microfiltration membrane prepared from a cost effective composition of alumina and clay was used. Prior to microfiltration, a chemical pretreatment was carried out with aluminium sulphate in combination with a polymeric retention aid. An optimum dose of 100 mg/L of aluminium sulphate and 1 ml/L of a commercial flocculant Afilan RAMF was found effective for dye removal (> 98%) from the synthetic solutions of reactive dyes with initial concentration of 150 mg/L in both the single component and two component systems. In the microfiltration study, effect of operating pressure in the permeate flux was observed for both the pretreated and untreated effluents and permeate samples were analyzed for dye concentration, COD, turbidity, TSS, etc. during constant pressure filtration. About 98-99% removal of dyes was obtained in the combined process with COD reduction of 54-64%.

  10. Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles for Highly Efficient Asphaltene Separation from Crude Oil Using Ceramic Membrane Technology

    Rezakazemi Mashallah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aluminum oxide nanoparticles on the removal of asphaltenes from an Iranian crude oil (Soroush using a ceramic membrane with pore size of 0.2 µm were investigated. In order to achieve superior asphaltene separation by ultrafiltration, it is essential to make some changes for destabilizing asphaltene in crude oil. The asphaltene destabilization was done using crude oil contact with an acid containing dissolved metal ions. Metal oxide nanoparticles adsorbed asphaltene molecules and increased their molecular size. The nanoparticle of aluminum oxide was applied to alter precipitation and peptization properties of asphaltenes. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS was used to measurement of the asphaltene molecular size dissolved in toluene. Raman spectroscopy and the Tuinstra equation were used to determine the aromatic sheet diameter (La via the integrated intensities of the G and D1 modes. This revealed that the asphaltene particles react with nano aluminum oxide and the average molecular size of asphaltene was raised from 512.754 to 2949.557 nm and La from 5.482 to 13.787. The obtained results showed that using nano aluminum oxides, asphaltene separation increased from 60–85 wt% to 90–97 wt% based on the asphaltene content of crude oil.

  11. Performance of ceramic ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis membranes in treating car wash wastewater for reuse.

    Moazzem, Shamima; Wills, Jamie; Fan, Linhua; Roddick, Felicity; Jegatheesan, Veeriah

    2018-03-01

    Reusing treated effluents in industries is a great option to conserve freshwater resources. For example, car wash centres all over Australia are estimated to use 17.5 billion litres of water and discharge it as wastewater and spend $75 million a year for both purchasing fresh water and for treating and/or discharging the wastewater. Therefore, it is important to develop simple but reliable systems that can help to treat and reuse car wash wastewater. Significant savings could also be associated with the implementation of such systems. This study evaluates the performance of granular and membrane filtration systems with coagulation/flocculation and sedimentation in treating car wash wastewater for the purpose of reuse. Overall, 99.9% of turbidity, 100% of suspended solids and 96% of COD were removed from the car wash wastewater after treating by coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, sand filtration, ceramic ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis and the treated water meets the standards required for class A recycled water in Australia and standards imposed in Belgium and China. The treated water can be reused. However, optimisation is required to reduce the sludge produced by this system.

  12. Catalytic combustion of propane in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants—II. Operation in presence of trans-membrane pressure gradients

    Saracco, Guido; Veldsink, Jan Willem; Versteeg, Geert F.; Swaaij, Wim P.M. van

    1995-01-01

    This is the second communication of a series dealing with an experimental and modelling study on propane catalytic combustion in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants. In paper I the behaviour of the reactor in the absence of trans-membrane pressure gradients was presented and

  13. Study of a dense metal membrane reactor for hydrogen separation from hydroiodic acid decomposition

    Tosti, Silvano; Borelli, Rodolfo; Borgognoni, Fabio [ENEA, Dipartimento FPN, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati, Roma I-00044 (Italy); Favuzza, Paolo; Tarquini, Pietro [ENEA, Dipartimento TER, C.R. ENEA Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, Roma (Italy); Rizzello, Claudio [Tesi Sas, Via Bolzano 28, Roma (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    A membrane reactor has been studied for separating the hydrogen produced by the dissociation of hydroiodic acid in the thermochemical-sulfur iodine process. A dense metal membrane tube of wall thickness 0.250 mm has been considered in this analysis for hosting a fixed-bed catalyst: the selective separation of hydrogen from an azeotropic H{sub 2}O-HI mixture has been studied in the temperature range of 700-800 K. The materials being considered for the construction of the membrane tube are niobium and tantalum; as a matter of fact, the most commonly used Pd-Ag membranes cannot withstand the corrosive environment generated by the hydroiodic acid. The Damkohler-Peclet analysis has been used for designing the membrane reactor, while a finite element method has simulated its behaviour: the effect of the temperature and pressure on the HI conversion and hydrogen yield has been evaluated. (author)

  14. Directing filtration to narrow molecular weight distribution of oligodextran in an enzymatic membrane reactor

    Su, Ziran; Luo, Jianquan; Pinelo, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    ) should be minimized to reduce accumulation of large oligodextran molecules on the membrane surface, which might diffuse through the membrane and thus broaden the Mw distribution of the products in the permeate. Both dextranase and dextran caused membrane irreversible fouling. The fouling caused...... product, hypersaline wastewater discharge and potential safety hazards. In this work, a novel enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR) system to produce oligodextran is proposed, whereby in-situ product recovery can be manipulated to control the Mw distribution of the resulting products. Results showed...... that the membrane material played an important role in the permeate flux and transmission of oligodextran. Among the tested membranes, a 20kDa polyethersulfone (PES) membrane was found to be optimal for building up the EMR, as it successfully controlled the oligodextran Mw within the desired range with a relatively...

  15. A study of the isobutane dehydrogenation in a porous membrane catalytic reactor: design, use and modelling

    Casanave, D

    1996-01-26

    The aim of this study was to set up and model a catalytic fixed-bed membrane reactor for the isobutane dehydrogenation. The catalyst, developed at Catalysis Research Institute (IRC), was a silicalite-supported Pt-based catalyst. Their catalytic performances (activity, selectivity, stability) where found better adapted to the membrane reactor, when compared with commercial Pt or Cr based catalysts. The kinetic study of the reaction has been performed in a differential reactor and led to the determination of a kinetic law, suitable when the catalyst is used near thermodynamic equilibrium. The mass transfer mechanisms were determined in meso-porous and microporous membranes through both permeability and gas mixtures (iC{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) separation measurements. For the meso-porous {gamma}-alumina, the mass transfer is ensured by a Knudsen diffusion mechanism which can compete with surface diffusion for condensable gas like isobutane. The resulting permselectivity H{sub 2}/iC4 of this membrane is low ({approx} 4). For the microporous zeolite membrane, molecular sieving occurs due to steric hindrance, leading to higher permselectivity {approx}14. Catalyst/membrane associations were compared in terms of isobutane dehydrogenation performances, for both types of membranes (meso-porous and microporous) and for two different reactor configurations (co-current and counter-current sweep gas flow). The best experimental results were obtained with the zeolite membrane, when sweeping the outer compartment in a co-current flow. The equilibrium displacement observed with the {gamma}-alumina membrane was lower and mainly due to a dilution effect of the reaction mixture by the sweep gas. A mathematical model was developed, which correctly describes all the experimental results obtained with the zeolite membrane, when the co-current mode is used. (Abstract Truncated)

  16. Adlayers of palladium particles and their aggregates on porous polypropylene hollow fiber membranes as hydrogenization contractors/reactors

    Volkov, V.V.; Lebedeva, V.I.; Petrova, I.V.; Bobyl, A.V.; Konnikov, S.G.; Roldughin, V.I.; Erkel, J. van; Tereshchenko, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    Principal approaches for the preparation of catalytic membrane reactors based on polymer membranes containing palladium nanoparticles and for the description of their characteristics are presented. The method for the development of adlayers composed of palladium nanoparticles and their aggregates on

  17. Catalytic reforming of methane to syngas in an oxygen-permeative membrane reactor

    Urano, Takeshi; Kubo, Keiko; Saito, Tomoyuki; Hitomi, Atsushi, E-mail: turano@jp.tdk.com [Materials and Process Development Center, TDK Corporation 570-2, Matsugashita, Minamihatori, Narita, Chiba 286-8588 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    For fuel cell applications, partial oxidative reforming of methane to syngas, hydrogen and carbon monoxide, was performed via a dense oxygen-permeative ceramic membrane composed by both ionic and electronic conductive materials. The modification of Ni-based catalyst by noble metals was investigated to increase oxygen permeation flux and decrease carbon deposition during reforming reaction. The role of each component in catalyst was also discussed.

  18. Effect of ultra high temperature ceramics as fuel cladding materials on the nuclear reactor performance by SERPENT Monte Carlo code

    Korkut, Turgay; Kara, Ayhan; Korkut, Hatun [Sinop Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Energy Engineering

    2016-12-15

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) have low density and high melting point. So they are useful materials in the nuclear industry especially reactor core design. Three UHTCs (silicon carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide) were evaluated as the nuclear fuel cladding materials. The SERPENT Monte Carlo code was used to model CANDU, PWR, and VVER type reactor core and to calculate burnup parameters. Some changes were observed at the same burnup and neutronic parameters (keff, neutron flux, absorption rate, and fission rate, depletion of U-238, U-238, Xe-135, Sm-149) with the use of these UHTCs. Results were compared to conventional cladding material zircalloy.

  19. Bipolar membranes in forward bias region for fuel cell reactors

    Lobyntseva, Elena; Kallio, Tanja; Kontturi, Kyoesti

    2006-01-01

    Three bipolar membranes, two home-made composed of commercial cation (DuPont) and anion (FuMA-Tech) exchange membranes (called Nafion/FT-FAA and Nafion/FT-FAS) and a commercial one, BP-1 from FuMA-Tech, were investigated in order to characterize their suitability to use in a H 2 /O 2 fuel cell intended to produce hydrogen peroxide on the cathode instead of water. The Nafion/FT-FAA and Nafion/FT-FAS membranes were prepared using a hot-pressing method. The optimal hot-pressing conditions were determined by measuring the ionic conductivity of the membranes. The latter was observed to depend on the relative humidity of the bipolar membrane. Of the studied bipolar membranes, Nafion/FT-FAA showed the best performance. The transport number of protons measured in a concentration cell was observed to depend on the direction of the proton diffusion flux through these membranes so that transport numbers of ca. unity were obtained when the cation exchange side faced the solution with higher proton concentration. In the opposite case, when the higher concentration faced anion exchange side, the transport number of proton was clearly lower, indicating the usefulness of the bipolar membranes for hydrogen peroxide production in the fuel cell

  20. Advanced design of fast reactor-membrane reformer (FR-MR)

    Tashimo, M.; Hori, I.; Yasuda, I.; Shirasaki, Y.; Kobayashi, K.

    2004-01-01

    A new plant concept of nuclear-produced hydrogen is being studied using a Fast Reactor-Membrane Reformer (FR-MR). The conventional steam methane reforming (SMR) system is a three-stage process. The first stage includes the reforming, the second contains a shift reaction and the third is the separation process. The reforming process requires high temperatures of 800 ∼ 900 deg C. The shift process generates heat and is performed at around 200 deg C. The membrane reforming has only one process stage under a nonequilibrium condition by removing H2 selectively through a membrane tube. The steam reforming temperature can be decreased from 800 deg C to 550 deg C, which is a remarkable benefit offered by the non-equilibrium condition. With this new technology, the reactor type can be changed from a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) to a Fast Reactor (FR). A Fast Reactor-Membrane Reformer (FR-MR) is composed of a nuclear plant and a hydrogen plant. The nuclear plant is a sodium-cooled Fast Reactor with mixed oxide fuel and with a power of 240 MWt. The heat transport system contains two circuits, the primary circuit and the secondary circuit. The membrane reformer units are set in the secondary circuit. The heat, supplied by the sodium, can produce 200 000 Nm 3 /h by 2 units. There are two types of membranes. One is made of Pd another one (advanced) is made of, for example V, or Nb. The technology for the Pd membrane is already established in a small scale. The non-Pd type is expected to improve the performance. (author)

  1. Improvement of Membrane Performances to Enhance the Yield of Vanillin in a Pervaporation Reactor

    Giovanni Camera-Roda

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In membrane reactors, the interaction of reaction and membrane separation can be exploited to achieve a “process intensification”, a key objective of sustainable development. In the present work, the properties that the membrane must have to obtain this result in a pervaporation reactor are analyzed and discussed. Then, the methods to enhance these properties are investigated for the photocatalytic synthesis of vanillin, which represents a case where the recovery from the reactor of vanillin by means of pervaporation while it is produced allows a substantial improvement of the yield, since its further oxidation is thus prevented. To this end, the phenomena that control the permeation of both vanillin and the reactant (ferulic acid are analyzed, since they ultimately affect the performances of the membrane reactor. The results show that diffusion of the aromatic compounds takes place in the presence of low concentration gradients, so that the process is controlled by other phenomena, in particular by the equilibrium with the vapor at the membrane-permeate interface. On this basis, it is demonstrated that the performances are enhanced by increasing the membrane thickness and/or the temperature, whereas the pH begins to limit the process only at values higher than 6.5.

  2. Microbial community stratification in Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors for Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Ruscalleda, Maël; Terada, Akihiko

    of bacterial granules or biofilms. In this sense, completely autotrophic nitrogen removal from high ammonium strength wastewater was achieved in a Membrane-Aereated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) in a single step. Here, a biofilm containing nitrifiers (Aerobic Ammonium and Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria, AOB and NOB......, respectively) and Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AnAOB) is grown on bubbleless aeration membranes to remove ammonium. Since oxygen permeates through the membrane-biofilm interface while ammonium diffuses into the biofilm from the biofilm-liquid interface, oxygen gradients can be established across...... the biofilm, allowing nitrogen removal in a single reactor by simultaneous activity of the mentioned biocatalysts. This work consists on the analysis of the microbial community existing in two laboratory-scale reactors operated for more than 300 days, which removed up to 5.5 g-N/m2/day. The system contained...

  3. Tight ceramic UF membrane as RO pre-treatment: the role of electrostatic interactions on phosphate rejection.

    Shang, Ran; Verliefde, Arne R D; Hu, Jingyi; Zeng, Zheyi; Lu, Jie; Kemperman, Antoine J B; Deng, Huiping; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Heijman, Sebastiaan G J; Rietveld, Luuk C

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate limitation has been reported as an effective approach to inhibit biofouling in reverse osmosis (RO) systems for water purification. The rejection of dissolved phosphate by negatively charged TiO2 tight ultrafiltration (UF) membranes (1 kDa and 3 kDa) was observed. These membranes can potentially be adopted as an effective process for RO pre-treatment in order to constrain biofouling by phosphate limitation. This paper focuses on electrostatic interactions during tight UF filtration. Despite the larger pore size, the 3 kDa ceramic membrane exhibited greater phosphate rejection than the 1 kDa membrane, because the 3 kDa membrane has a greater negative surface charge and thus greater electrostatic repulsion against phosphate. The increase of pH from 6 to 8.5 led to a substantial increase in phosphate rejection by both membranes due to increased electrostatic repulsion. At pH 8.5, the maximum phosphate rejections achieved by the 1 kDa and 3 kDa membrane were 75% and 86%, respectively. A Debye ratio (ratio of the Debye length to the pore radius) is introduced in order to evaluate double layer overlapping in tight UF membranes. Threshold Debye ratios were determined as 2 and 1 for the 1 kDa and 3 kDa membranes, respectively. A Debye ratio below the threshold Debye ratio leads to dramatically decreased phosphate rejection by tight UF membranes. The phosphate rejection by the tight UF, in combination with chemical phosphate removal by coagulation, might accomplish phosphate-limited conditions for biological growth and thus prevent biofouling in the RO systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Palladium based membranes and membrane reactors for hydrogen production and purification : An overview of research activities at Tecnalia and TU/e

    Fernandez, E.; Helmi Siasi Farimani, A.; Medrano Jimenez, J.A.; Coenen, K.T.; Arratibel Plazaola, A.; Melendez Rey, J.; de Nooijer, N.C.A.; Viviente, J.L.; Zuniga, J.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Gallucci, F.; Pacheco Tanaka, D.A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the main achievements of several European research projects on Pd based membranes and Pd membrane reactors for hydrogen production are reported. Pd-based membranes have received an increasing interest for separation and purification of hydrogen. In addition, the integration of such

  5. Improvement of thermal conductivity of ceramic matrix composites for 4. generation nuclear reactors

    Cabrero, J.

    2009-11-01

    This study deals with thermal conductivity improvement of SiCf/SiC ceramic matrix composites materials to be used as cladding material in 4. generation nuclear reactor. The purpose of the study is to develop a composite for which both the temperature and irradiation effect is less pronounced on thermal conductivity of material than for SiC. This material will be used as matrix in CMC with SiC fibers. Some TiC-SiC composites with different SiC volume contents were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The sintering process enables to fabricate specimens very fast, with a very fine microstructure and without any sintering aids. Neutron irradiation has been simulated using heavy ions, at room temperature and at 500 C. Evolution of the thermal properties of irradiated materials is measured using modulated photothermal IR radiometry experiment and was related to structural evolution as function of dose and temperature. It appears that such approach is reliable to evaluate TiC potentiality as matrix in CMC. Finally, CMC with TiC matrix and SiC fibers were fabricated and both mechanical and thermal properties were measured and compare to SiCf/SiC CMC. (author)

  6. Progress In Developing an Impermeable, High Temperature Ceramic Composite for Advanced Reactor Clad And Structural Applications

    Feinroth, Herbert; Hao, Bernard; Fehrenbacher, Larry; Patterson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Most Advanced Reactors for Energy and Space Applications require higher temperature materials for fuel cladding and core internal structures. For temperatures above 500 deg. C, metal alloys do not retain sufficient strength or long term corrosion resistance for use in either water, liquid metal or gas cooled systems. In the case of water cooled systems, such metals react exo-thermically with water during core overheating accidents, thus requiring extensive and expensive emergency systems to protect against major releases. Past efforts to apply ceramic composites (oxide, carbide or nitride based) having passive safety characteristics, good strength properties at high temperatures, and reasonable resistance to crack growth, have not been successful, either because of irradiation induced effects, or lack of impermeability to fission gases. Under a Phase 1 SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) project sponsored by DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, the authors have developed a new material system that may solve these problems. A hybrid tubular structure (0.6 inches in outside diameter) consisting of an inner layer of monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) and outer layers of SiC-SiC composite, bonded to the inner layer, has been fabricated in small lengths. Room temperature permeability tests demonstrate zero gas leakage at pressures up to 120 psig internal pressure. Four point flexural bending tests on these hybrid tubular specimens demonstrate a 'graceful' failure mode: i.e. - the outer composite structure sustains a failure mode under stress that is similar to the yield vs. stress characteristics of metal structures. (authors)

  7. Ceramics for fusion reactors: The role of the lithium orthosilicate as breeder

    Carella, Elisabetta, E-mail: elisabetta.carella@ciemat.es [National Laboratory for Magnetic Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Hernandez, Teresa [National Laboratory for Magnetic Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    Lithium-based oxide ceramics are studied as breeder blanket materials for the controlled thermonuclear reactors (CTR). Lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) is one of the most promising candidates because of its lithium concentration (0.54 g/cm{sup 3}), its high melting temperature (1523 K) and its excellent tritium release behavior. It is reported that the diffusion of tritium is closely related to that of lithium, so it is possible to find an indirect measure of the trend of tritium studying the diffusivity of Li{sup +}. In the present work, the synthesis of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} is carried out by Spray drying followed by pyrolysis. The study of the Li{sup +} ion diffusion on the sintered bodies, is investigated by means of electrical conductivity measurements. The effect of the {gamma}-ray irradiation is evaluated by the impedance spectroscopy method (EIS) from room temperature to 1173 K. The results indicate that the sintesis process employed can produce Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} in the form of pebbles, finally the best ion species for the electrical conduction is the Li{sup +} and is shown that the g-irradiation to a dose of 5MGy, facilitate its mobility through the creation of defects, without change in its conduction process.

  8. Waste Water treatment by membrane bioreactors; Tratamiento de aguas residuales urbanas mediante reactores biologicos de membranas

    Malfeito, J. J.; Palacios, E.

    2001-07-01

    Wastewater reuse plants can be simplified to a single step process with a membrane bioreactor developed by PRIDESA. The process consists on a biological reactor integrated with immersed membranes that combines clarification and filtration of an activated sludge process into a simplified single step process. Because of the design of the membranes and plate and frame module, the hydrostatic pressure difference is enough to ensure the design permeate flowrate. That means low energy requirements and reduced fouling, as contaminants are not forced into the membrane pores. A 90-days pilot scale operation for reclamation of urban wastewater was studied and the performance of the system was investigated with a sludge retention time (SRT) of 25 days and membrane flux between 50.90 l/h. with different membranes. Averaged 98% of BODS, a 95% of COD and a 99.49% of SS were removed. (Author) 5 refs.

  9. Micro-scale H2-CO2 dynamics in a hydrogenotrophic methanogenic membrane reactor

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Voigt, Niels Vinther

    2016-01-01

    Biogas production is a key factor in a sustainable energy supply. It is possible to get biogas with very high methane content if the biogas reactors are supplied with exogenous hydrogen, and one of the technologies for supplying hydrogen is through gas permeable membranes. In this study the activ......Biogas production is a key factor in a sustainable energy supply. It is possible to get biogas with very high methane content if the biogas reactors are supplied with exogenous hydrogen, and one of the technologies for supplying hydrogen is through gas permeable membranes. In this study...

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF MIEX® RESIN FOR WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCYIN A HYBRID MEMBRANE REACTOR

    Mariola Rajca

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies related to the effectiveness of removal of natural organic matter (NOM from water using hybrid membrane reactor in which ion exchange and ultrafiltration processes were performed. MIEX® resin by Orica Watercare and immersed ultrafiltration polyvinylidene fluoride capillary module ZeeWeed 1 (ZW 1 by GE Power&Water operated at negative pressure were used. The application of multifunctional reactor had a positive effect on the removal of contaminants and enabled the production of high quality water. Additionally, in refer to single stage ultrafiltration it minimalized the occurrence of membrane fouling.

  11. Experimental evaluation of methane dry reforming process on a membrane reactor to hydrogen production

    Silva, Fabiano S.A.; Benachour, Mohand; Abreu, Cesar A.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering], Email: f.aruda@yahoo.com.br

    2010-07-01

    In a fixed bed membrane reactor evaluations of methane-carbon dioxide reforming over a Ni/{gamma}- Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst were performed at 773 K, 823 K and 873 K. A to convert natural gas into syngas a fixed-bed reactor associate with a selective membrane was employed, where the operating procedures allowed to shift the chemical equilibrium of the reaction in the direction of the products of the process. Operations under hydrogen permeation, at 873 K, promoted the increase of methane conversion, circa 83%, and doubled the yield of hydrogen production, when compared with operations where no hydrogen permeation occurred. (author)

  12. Removal of some organic pollutants in water employing ceramic membranes impregnated with cross-linked silylated dendritic and cyclodextrin polymers.

    Allabashi, Roza; Arkas, Michael; Hörmann, Gerold; Tsiourvas, Dimitris

    2007-01-01

    Triethoxysilylated derivatives of poly(propylene imine) dendrimer, polyethylene imine and polyglycerol hyperbranched polymers and beta-cyclodextrin have been synthesized and characterized. These compounds impregnated ceramic membranes made from Al(2)O(3), SiC and TiO(2) and subsequently sol-gel reaction led to their polymerization and chemical bond formation with the ceramic substrates. The resulting organic-inorganic filters were tested for the removal of a variety of organic pollutants from water. They were found to remove of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (up to 99%), of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (up to 93%), trihalogen methanes (up to 81%), pesticides (up to 43%) and methyl-tert-butyl ether (up to 46%).

  13. The use of nanoparticles in polymeric and ceramic membrane structures: review of manufacturing procedures and performance improvement for water treatment.

    Kim, Jeonghwan; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2010-07-01

    Membrane separations are powerful tools for various applications, including wastewater treatment and the removal of contaminants from drinking water. The performance of membranes is mainly limited by material properties. Recently, successful attempts have been made to add nanoparticles or nanotubes to polymers in membrane synthesis, with particle sizes ranging from 4 nm up to 100 nm. Ceramic membranes have been fabricated with catalytic nanoparticles for synergistic effects on the membrane performance. Breakthrough effects that have been reported in the field of water and wastewater treatment include fouling mitigation, improvement of permeate quality and flux enhancement. Nanomaterials that have been used include titania, alumina, silica, silver and many others. This paper reviews the role of engineered nanomaterials in (pressure driven) membrane technology for water treatment, to be applied in drinking water production and wastewater recycling. Benefits and drawbacks are described, which should be taken into account in further studies on potential risks related to release of nanoparticles into the environment. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Computer-aided modeling framework – a generic modeling template for catalytic membrane fixed bed reactors

    Fedorova, Marina; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    and users to generate and test models systematically, efficiently and reliably. In this way, development of products and processes can be faster, cheaper and very efficient. In this contribution, as part of the framework a generic modeling template for the systematic derivation of problem specific catalytic...... membrane fixed bed models is developed. The application of the modeling template is highlighted with a case study related to the modeling of a catalytic membrane reactor coupling dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with hydrogenation of nitrobenzene....

  15. Ion transport membrane reactor systems and methods for producing synthesis gas

    Repasky, John Michael

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the present invention provide cost-effective systems and methods for producing a synthesis gas product using a steam reformer system and an ion transport membrane (ITM) reactor having multiple stages, without requiring inter-stage reactant injections. Embodiments of the present invention also provide techniques for compensating for membrane performance degradation and other changes in system operating conditions that negatively affect synthesis gas production.

  16. Simultaneous hydrogen and methanol enhancement through a recuperative two-zone thermally coupled membrane reactor

    Bayat, M. [Shiraz University, Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimpour, M.R. [Shiraz University, Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shiraz University, Gas Center of Excellence, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    In this work, a novel configuration with two zones instead of one single integrated catalytic bed in thermally coupled membrane reactor (TCMR) is developed for enhancement of simultaneous methanol, benzene and hydrogen production. In the first zone, the synthesis gas is partly converted to methanol in a conventional water-cooled reactor. In the second zone, the reaction heat is used to drive the endothermic dehydrogenation of cyclohexane reaction in second tube side. Selective permeation of hydrogen through the Pd-Ag membrane is achieved by co-current flow of sweep gas through the permeation side. The length of first zone is chosen equal 35 cm which the optimization procedure obtained this value. The proposed model has been used to compare the performance of a two-zone thermally coupled membrane reactor (TZTCMR) with conventional reactor (CR) and TCMR at identical process conditions. The simulation results represent 13.14 % enhancement in the production of pure hydrogen in comparison with TCMR. Moreover, 2.96 and 4.54 % enhancement of the methanol productivity relative to TCMR and CR were seen, respectively, owing to utilizing higher temperature at the first parts of reactor for higher reaction rate and then reducing temperature gradually at the end parts of reactor for increasing thermodynamics equilibrium conversion in TZTCMR. (orig.)

  17. A new combination of membranes and membrane reactors for improved tritium management in breeder blanket of fusion machines

    Demange, D.; Staemmler, S.; Kind, M.

    2011-01-01

    Tritium used as fuel in future fusion machines will be produced within the breeder blanket. The tritium extraction system recovers the tritium to be routed into the inner-fuel cycle of the machine. Accurate and precise tritium accountancy between both systems is mandatory to ensure a reliable operation. Handling in the blanket huge helium flow rates containing tritium as traces in molecular and oxide forms is challenging both for the process and the accountancy. Alternative tritium processes based on combinations of membranes and membrane reactors are proposed to facilitate the tritium management. The PERMCAT process is based on counter-current isotope swamping in a palladium membrane reactor. It allows recovering tritium efficiently from any chemical species. It produces a pure hydrogen stream enriched in tritium of advantage for integration upstream of the accountancy stage. A pre-separation and pre-concentration stage using new zeolite membranes has been studied to optimize the whole process. Such a combination could improve the tritium processes and facilitate accountancy in DEMO.

  18. Potentialities of a Membrane Reactor with Laccase Grafted Membranes for the Enzymatic Degradation of Phenolic Compounds in Water

    Vorleak Chea

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the degradation of phenolic compounds by laccases from Trametes versicolor in an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR. The enzymatic membranes were prepared by grafting laccase on a gelatine layer previously deposited onto α-alumina tubular membranes. The 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP was selected  from among the three different phenolic compounds tested (guaiacol, 4-chlorophenol and DMP to study the performance of the EMR in dead end configuration. At the lowest feed substrate concentration tested (100 mg·L−1, consumption increased with flux (up to 7.9 × 103 mg·h−1·m−2 at 128 L·h−1·m−2, whereas at the highest substrate concentration (500 mg·L−1, it was shown that the reaction was limited by the oxygen content.

  19. Membrane support of accelerated fuel capsules for inertial fusion energy reactors

    Petzoldt, R.W.; Moir, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a thin membrane to suspend an (inertial fusion energy) fuel capsule in a holder for injection into a reactor chamber is investigated. Capsule displacement and membrane deformation angle are calculated for an axisymmetric geometry for a range of membrane strain and capsule size. This information is used to calculate maximum target accelerations. Membranes must be thin (perhaps of order one micron) to minimize their effect on capsule implosion symmetry. For example, a 5 μm thick cryogenic mylar membrane is calculated to allow 1,000 m/s 2 acceleration of a 3 mm radius, 100 mg capsule. Vibration analysis (for a single membrane support) shows that if membrane vibration is not deliberately minimized, allowed acceleration may be reduced by a factor of four. A two membrane alternative geometry would allow several times greater acceleration. Therefore, alternative membrane geometry's should be used to provide greater target acceleration potential and reduce capsule displacement within the holder (for a given membrane thickness)

  20. Co-current and counter-current configurations for ethanol steam reforming in a dense Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    Gallucci, F.; de Falco, M.; Tosti, S.; Marrelli, L; Basile, A.

    2008-01-01

    The ethanol steam-reforming reaction to produce pure hydrogen has been studied theoretically. A mathematical model has been formulated for a traditional system and a palladium membrane reactor packed with a Co-based catalyst and the simulation results related to the membrane reactor for both

  1. Surface modification of polysulfone membranes applied for a membrane reactor with immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase

    Hoffmann, Christian; Silau, Harald; Pinelo, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    activated by lithiation followed by functionalization with acid chlorides at 0 °C, permitting modification of commercial PSf membranes without compromising the mechanical integrity of the membrane. Post-functionalization polymer grafting was illustrated through both, a “grafting from” approach by surface...... initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and by a “grafting to” approach exploiting Cu(I) catalyzed 1,3-cycloadditions of alkynes with azides (CuAAC) introducing hydrophilic polymers onto the membrane surface. Poly(1-vinyl imidazole) (pVim) grafted membranes were exploited as support...

  2. Methane-steam reforming by molten salt - membrane reactor using concentrated solar thermal energy

    Watanuki, K.; Nakajima, H.; Hasegawa, N.; Kaneko, H.; Tamaura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    By utilization of concentrated solar thermal energy for steam reforming of natural gas, which is an endothermic reaction, the chemical energy of natural gas can be up-graded. The chemical system for steam reforming of natural gas with concentrated solar thermal energy was studied to produce hydrogen by using the thermal storage with molten salt and the membrane reactor. The original steam reforming module with hydrogen permeable palladium membrane was developed and fabricated. Steam reforming of methane proceeded with the original module with palladium membrane below the decomposition temperature of molten salt (around 870 K). (authors)

  3. Optimization of O3 as Pre-Treatment and Chemical Enhanced Backwashing in UF and MF Ceramic Membranes for the Treatment of Secondary Wastewater Effluent and Red Sea Water

    Herrera, Catalina

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic membranes have proven to have many advantages over polymeric membranes. Some of these advantages are: resistance against extreme pH, higher permeate flux, less frequent chemical cleaning, excellent backwash efficiency and longer lifetime

  4. Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of liquid waste. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    Cohen, Y.

    1997-01-01

    'The project on ceramic-supported polymer membranes focuses on the development of a novel class of membranes for the separation of organics from both organic-aqueous and organic-organic mixtures, Theses membranes are fabricated by a graft polymerization process where polymer chains are grown onto the surface of a ceramic support membrane. The surface graft polymerization process, developed at UCLA, results in the formation of a thin polymer layer covalently bonded to the membrane pore surface as a layer of terminally anchored polymeric chains. Through the selection of the polymer most appropriate for the desired separation task, the graft polymerized surface layer can be synthesized to impart specific separation properties to the membrane. It is expected that this project will lead to the demonstration of a new technology for the tailor design of a new class of selective and robust ceramic-supported polymer membranes. This new approach will allow the rapid deployment of task-specific membranes for the separation of waste constituents for subsequent recovery, treatment or disposal. Progress to date includes the preparation of successful silica-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) membrane for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsions and a silica-polyvinylacetate (PVAc) pervaporation membrane for the separation of organics from water. Current work is ongoing to study the performance of the pervaporation membrane for the removal of chlorinated organics from water and to develop a pervaporation membrane for organic-organic separation. In another aspect of the study, the authors are studying the hydrophilic PVP CSP membrane for oil-in-water emulsion treatment with the goal of determining the optimal membrane polymer surface structure as a function of various operating conditions (e.g., tube-side Reynolds number and transmembrane pressure), Work is also in progress to characterize the polymer layer by AFM and internal reflection FTIR, and to model the conformation of the polymer

  5. Effects of bamboo charcoal on fouling and microbial diversity in a flat-sheet ceramic membrane bioreactor.

    Zhang, Wenjie; Liu, Xiaoning; Wang, Dunqiu; Jin, Yue

    2017-11-01

    Membrane fouling is a problem in full-scale membrane bioreactors. In this study, bamboo charcoal (BC) was evaluated for its efficacy in alleviating membrane fouling in flat-sheet membrane bioreactors treating municipal wastewater. The results showed that BC addition markedly improved treatment performance based on COD, NH 4 + -N, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus levels. Adding BC slowed the increase in the trans-membrane pressure rate and resulted in lower levels of soluble microbial products and extracellular polymeric substances detected in the flat-sheet membrane bioreactor. BC has a porous structure, and a large quantity of biomass was detected using scanning electron microscopy. The microbial community analysis results indicated that BC increased the microbial diversity and Aminomonas, Anaerofustis, uncultured Anaerolineaceae, Anaerolinea, and Anaerotruncus were found in higher abundances in the reactor with BC. BC addition is an effective method for reducing membrane fouling, and can be applied to full-scale flat-sheet membrane bioreactors to improve their function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Incorporation of zinc for fabrication of low-cost spinel-based composite ceramic membrane support to achieve its stabilization.

    Li, Lingling; Dong, Xinfa; Dong, Yingchao; Zhu, Li; You, Sheng-Jie; Wang, Ya-Fen

    2015-04-28

    In order to reduce environment risk of zinc, a spinel-based porous membrane support was prepared by the high-temperature reaction of zinc and bauxite mineral. The phase evolution process, shrinkage, porosity, mechanical property, pore size distribution, gas permeation flux and microstructure were systematically studied. The XRD results, based on a Zn/Al stoichiometric composition of 1/2, show a formation of ZnAl2O4 structure starting from 1000°C and then accomplished at 1300°C. For spinel-based composite membrane, shrinkage and porosity are mainly influenced by a combination of an expansion induced by ZnAl2O4 formation and a general densification due to amorphous liquid SiO2. The highest porosity, as high as 44%, is observed in ZnAl4 membrane support among all the investigated compositions. Compared with pure bauxite (Al), ZnAl4 composite membrane support is reinforced by ZnAl2O4 phase and inter-locked mullite crystals, which is proved by the empirical strength-porosity relationships. Also, an increase in average pore diameter and gas flux can be observed in ZnAl4. A prolonged leaching experiment reveals the zinc can be successfully incorporated into ceramic membrane support via formation of ZnAl2O4, which has substantially better resistance toward acidic attack. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Separation Properties of Wastewater Containing O/W Emulsion Using Ceramic Microfiltration/Ultrafiltration (MF/UF Membranes

    Kanji Matsumoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Washing systems using water soluble detergent are used in electrical and mechanical industries and the wastewater containing O/W emulsion are discharged from these systems. Membrane filtration has large potential for the efficient separation of O/W emulsion for reuses of treated water and detergent. The separation properties of O/W emulsions by cross-flow microfiltration and ultrafiltration were studied with ceramic MF and UF membranes. The effects of pore size; applied pressure; cross-flow velocity; and detergent concentration on rejection of O/W emulsion and flux were systematically studied. At the condition achieving complete separation of O/W emulsion the pressure-independent flux was observed and this flux behavior was explained by gel-polarization model. The O/W emulsion tended to permeate through the membrane at the conditions of larger pore size; higher emulsion concentration; and higher pressure. The O/W emulsion could permeate the membrane pore structure by destruction or deformation. These results imply the stability of O/W emulsion in the gel-layer formed on membrane surface play an important role in the separation properties. The O/W emulsion was concentrated by batch cross-flow concentration filtration and the flux decline during the concentration filtration was explained by the gel- polarization model.

  8. Separation Properties of Wastewater Containing O/W Emulsion Using Ceramic Microfiltration/Ultrafiltration (MF/UF) Membranes

    Nakamura, Kazuho; Matsumoto, Kanji

    2013-01-01

    Washing systems using water soluble detergent are used in electrical and mechanical industries and the wastewater containing O/W emulsion are discharged from these systems. Membrane filtration has large potential for the efficient separation of O/W emulsion for reuses of treated water and detergent. The separation properties of O/W emulsions by cross-flow microfiltration and ultrafiltration were studied with ceramic MF and UF membranes. The effects of pore size; applied pressure; cross-flow velocity; and detergent concentration on rejection of O/W emulsion and flux were systematically studied. At the condition achieving complete separation of O/W emulsion the pressure-independent flux was observed and this flux behavior was explained by gel-polarization model. The O/W emulsion tended to permeate through the membrane at the conditions of larger pore size; higher emulsion concentration; and higher pressure. The O/W emulsion could permeate the membrane pore structure by destruction or deformation. These results imply the stability of O/W emulsion in the gel-layer formed on membrane surface play an important role in the separation properties. The O/W emulsion was concentrated by batch cross-flow concentration filtration and the flux decline during the concentration filtration was explained by the gel- polarization model. PMID:24958621

  9. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stephanie; Gülay, Arda

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration...

  10. Influence of geometrical and operational parameters on the performance of porous catalytic membrane reactors

    Aran, H.C.; Klooster, H.J.G.; Jani, J.M.; Wessling, Matthias; Lefferts, Leonardus; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, porous membrane reactors with various characteristic length (inner diameter), controllable catalyst support thickness, active catalyst surface area and tunable wetting properties are described for heterogeneously catalyzed gas¿liquid¿solid (G¿L¿S) reactions. We developed porous

  11. Phospholipase C-catalyzed sphingomyelin hydrolysis in a membrane reactor for ceramide production

    Zhang, Long; Liang, Shanshan; Hellgren, Lars

    2008-01-01

    A membrane reactor for the production of ceramide through sphingomyelin hydrolysis with phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens was studied for the first time. Ceramide has raised a large interest as an active component in both pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. The enzymatic hydrolysis...

  12. Results of tritium experiments on ceramic electrolysis cells and palladium diffusers for application to fusion reactor fuel cleanup systems

    Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Konishi, S.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Tritium tests at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly have demonstrated that ceramic electrolysis cells and palladium alloy diffuser developed in Japan are possible components for a fusion reactor fuel cleanup system. Both components have been successfully operated with tritium for over a year. A failure of the first electrolysis cell was most likely the result of an over voltage on the ceramic. A simple circuit was developed to eliminate this mode of failure. The palladium diffusers tubes exhibited some degradation of mechanical properties as a result of the build up of helium from the tritium decay, after 450 days of operation with tritium, however the effects were not significant enough to affect the performance. New models of the diffuser and electrolysis cell, providing higher flow rates and more tritium compatible designs are currently being tested with tritium. 8 refs., 5 figs

  13. Porous ceramic membrane with superhydrophobic and superoleophilic surface for reclaiming oil from oily water

    Su, Changhong; Xu, Youqian; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    A porous ceramic tube with superhydrophobic and superoleophilic surface was fabricated by sol-gel and then surface modification with polyurethane-polydimethysiloxane, and an oil-water separator based on the porous ceramic tube was erected to characterize superhydrophobic and superoleophilic surface's separation efficiency and velocity when being used to reclaim oil from oily water and complex oily water containing clay particle. The separator is fit for reclaiming oil from oily water.

  14. Coupling of separation and reaction in zeolite membrane reactor for hydroisomerization of hydrocarbons

    Gora, L.; Jansen, J.C. [Ceramic Membrane Centre, The Pore, DelftChemTech, Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2005-03-01

    A zeolite membrane reactor has been developed for the hydroisomerization of hydrocarbons, in which the linear molecules are separated from branched ones on the silicalite-1 membrane prior to conversion of the permeated linear hydrocarbons to equilibrium levels on the catalyst bed. Model studies using C{sub 6} components are conducted. n-C{sub 6} separated from 2MP (selectivity 24) is converted for 72% with 36% selectivity towards di-branched isomers (at 393 K). The results indicate that platinum containing chlorinated alumina/silicalite-1 membrane reactor has a potential in upgrading octane values and offers advantages such as higher efficiency, better process control and lower consumption of energy. (orig.)

  15. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Nonthermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Morris Argyle; John Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Gui-Bing Zhao; Sanil John; Ji-Jun Zhang; Linna Wang

    2007-09-30

    The goal of this experimental project was to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a nonthermal plasma and to recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), but it was not achieved at the moderate pressure conditions used in this study. However, H{sub 2}S was successfully decomposed at energy efficiencies higher than any other reports for the high H{sub 2}S concentration and moderate pressures (corresponding to high reactor throughputs) used in this study.

  16. Reduction of DOM fractions and their trihalomethane formation potential in surface river water by in-line coagulation with ceramic membrane filtration.

    Rakruam, Pharkphum; Wattanachira, Suraphong

    2014-03-01

    This research was aimed at investigating the reduction of DOM fractions and their trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) by in-line coagulation with 0.1 μm ceramic membrane filtration. The combination of ceramic membrane filtration with a coagulation process is an alternative technology which can be applied to enhance conventional coagulation processes in the field of water treatment and drinking water production. The Ping River water (high turbidity water) was selected as the raw surface water because it is currently the main raw water source for water supply production in the urban and rural areas of Chiang Mai Province. From the investigation, the results showed that the highest percent reductions of DOC, UV-254, and THMFP (47.6%, 71.0%, and 67.4%, respectively) were achieved from in-line coagulation with ceramic membrane filtration at polyaluminum chloride dosage 40 mg/L. Resin adsorption techniques were employed to characterize the DOM in raw surface water and filtered water. The results showed that the use of a ceramic membrane with in-line coagulation was able to most efficiently reduce the hydrophobic fraction (HPOA) (68.5%), which was then followed by the hydrophilic fraction (HPIA) (49.3%). The greater mass DOC reduction of these two fractions provided the highest THMFP reductions (55.1% and 37.2%, respectively). Furthermore, the in-line coagulation with ceramic membrane filtration was able to reduce the hydrophobic (HPOB) fraction which is characterized by high reactivity toward THM formation. The percent reduction of mass DOC and THMFP of HPOB by in-line coagulation with ceramic membrane filtration was 45.9% and 48.0%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Preparation of ceramic-corrosion-cell fillers and application for cyclohexanone industry wastewater treatment in electrobath reactor

    Wu, Suqing; Qi, Yuanfeng; Gao, Yue; Xu, Yunyun; Gao, Fan; Yu, Huan; Lu, Yue; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Jinze

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dried sewage sludge and scrap iron used as raw materials for sintering ceramics. ► The new media ceramics used as fillers in electrobath of micro-electrolysis. ► Modified micro-electrolysis used in cyclohexanone industry wastewater treatment. ► This modified micro-electrolysis could avoid failure of the electrobath reactor. - Abstract: As new media, ceramic-corrosion-cell fillers (Cathode Ceramic-corrosion-cell Fillers – CCF, and Anode Ceramic-corrosion-cell Fillers – ACF) employed in electrobath were investigated for cyclohexanone industry wastewater treatment. 60.0 wt% of dried sewage sludge and 40.0 wt% of clay, 40.0 wt% of scrap iron and 60.0 wt% of clay were utilized as raw materials for the preparation of raw CCF and ACF, respectively. The raw CCF and ACF were respectively sintered at 400 °C for 20 min in anoxic conditions. The physical properties (bulk density, grain density and water absorption), structural and morphological characters and toxic metal leaching contents were tested. The influences of pH, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and the media height on removal of COD Cr and cyclohexanone were studied. The results showed that the bulk density and grain density of CCF and ACF were 869.0 kg m −3 and 936.3 kg m −3 , 1245.0 kg m −3 and 1420.0 kg m −3 , respectively. The contents of toxic metal (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Ba, Ni and As) were all below the detection limit. When pH of 3–4, HRT of 6 h and the media height of 60 cm were applied, about 90% of COD cr and cyclohexanone were removed.

  18. Preparation of ceramic-corrosion-cell fillers and application for cyclohexanone industry wastewater treatment in electrobath reactor

    Wu, Suqing; Qi, Yuanfeng; Gao, Yue; Xu, Yunyun; Gao, Fan; Yu, Huan; Lu, Yue [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250100 Jinan (China); Yue, Qinyan, E-mail: qyyue58@yahoo.com.cn [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250100 Jinan (China); Li, Jinze [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250100 Jinan (China)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dried sewage sludge and scrap iron used as raw materials for sintering ceramics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new media ceramics used as fillers in electrobath of micro-electrolysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified micro-electrolysis used in cyclohexanone industry wastewater treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This modified micro-electrolysis could avoid failure of the electrobath reactor. - Abstract: As new media, ceramic-corrosion-cell fillers (Cathode Ceramic-corrosion-cell Fillers - CCF, and Anode Ceramic-corrosion-cell Fillers - ACF) employed in electrobath were investigated for cyclohexanone industry wastewater treatment. 60.0 wt% of dried sewage sludge and 40.0 wt% of clay, 40.0 wt% of scrap iron and 60.0 wt% of clay were utilized as raw materials for the preparation of raw CCF and ACF, respectively. The raw CCF and ACF were respectively sintered at 400 Degree-Sign C for 20 min in anoxic conditions. The physical properties (bulk density, grain density and water absorption), structural and morphological characters and toxic metal leaching contents were tested. The influences of pH, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and the media height on removal of COD{sub Cr} and cyclohexanone were studied. The results showed that the bulk density and grain density of CCF and ACF were 869.0 kg m{sup -3} and 936.3 kg m{sup -3}, 1245.0 kg m{sup -3} and 1420.0 kg m{sup -3}, respectively. The contents of toxic metal (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Ba, Ni and As) were all below the detection limit. When pH of 3-4, HRT of 6 h and the media height of 60 cm were applied, about 90% of COD{sub cr} and cyclohexanone were removed.

  19. Mussel-inspired co-deposition to enhance bisphenol A removal in a bifacial enzymatic membrane reactor

    Cao, Xiaotong; Luo, Jianquan; Woodley, John M.

    2018-01-01

    were used as the matrix to further exploit the potential of the biocatalytic membranes. such prepared biocatalytic membranes were enzymatically active on both sides, making it possible to construct a bifacial enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR) for highly efficient micro-pollutants removal (taking...

  20. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye using anaerobic/aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) and photochemical membrane reactor

    You, Sheng-Jie; Damodar, Rahul A.; Hou, Sheng-Chon

    2010-01-01

    Three different types of advance treatment methods were evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5). The performance of two stage anaerobic SBR-aerobic MBR, anaerobic MBR with immobilized and suspended biocells and an integrated membrane photocatalytic reactor (MPR) using slurry UV/TiO 2 system were investigated. The results suggest that, nearly 99.9% color removal and 80-95% organic COD and TOC removal can be achieved using different reactor systems. Considering the Taiwan EPA effluent standard discharge criteria for COD/TOC, the degree of treatment achieved by combining the anaerobic-aerobic system was found to be acceptable. Anew, Bacilluscereus, high color removal bacterium was isolated from Anaerobic SBR. Furthermore, when this immobilized into PVA-calcium alginate pellets, and suspended in the anaerobic MBR was able to achieve high removal efficiencies, similar to the suspended biocells system. However, the immobilized cell Anaerobic MBR was found to be more advantageous, due to lower fouling rates in the membrane unit. Results from slurry type MPR system showed that this system was capable of mineralizing RB5 dyes with faster degradation rate as compared to other systems. The reactor was also able to separate the catalyst effectively and perform efficiently without much loss of catalyst activity.

  1. Performance and membrane fouling of a step-fed submerged membrane sequencing batch reactor treating swine biogas digestion slurry.

    Han, Zhiying; Chen, Shixia; Lin, Xiaochang; Yu, Hongjun; Duan, Li'an; Ye, Zhangying; Jia, Yanbo; Zhu, Songming; Liu, Dezhao

    2018-01-02

    To identify the performance of step-fed submerged membrane sequencing batch reactor (SMSBR) treating swine biogas digestion slurry and to explore the correlation between microbial metabolites and membrane fouling within this novel reactor, a lab-scale step-fed SMSBR was operated under nitrogen loading rate of 0.026, 0.052 and 0.062 g NH 4 + -N (gVSS·d) -1 . Results show that the total removal efficiencies for NH 4 + -N, total nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand in the reactor (>94%, >89% and >97%, respectively) were high during the whole experiment. However, the cycle removal efficiency of NH 4 + -N decreased significantly when the nitrogen loading rate was increased to 0.062 g NH 4 + -N (gVSS·d) -1 . The total removal efficiency of total phosphorus in the step-fed SMSBR was generally higher than 75%, though large fluctuations were observed during the experiments. In addition, the concentrations of microbial metabolites, i.e., soluble microbial products (SMP) and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from activated sludge increased as nitrogen loading rate increased, both showing quadratic equation correlations with viscosity of the mixed liquid in the step-fed SMSBR (both R 2 > 0.90). EPS content was higher than SMP content, while protein (PN) was detected as the main component in both SMP and EPS. EPS PN was found to be well correlated with transmembrane pressure, membrane flux and the total membrane fouling resistance. Furthermore, the three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy results suggested the tryptophan-like protein as one of the main contributors to the membrane fouling. Overall, this study showed that the step-fed SMSBR could be used to treat swine digestion slurry at nitrogen loading rate of 0.052 g NH 4 + -N (gVSS·d) -1 , and the control strategy of membrane fouling should be developed based on reducing the tryptophan-like PN in EPS.

  2. Survey report on high temperature irradiation experiment programs for new ceramic materials in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor). 2

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    A survey research on status of research activities on new ceramic materials in Japan was carried out under contract between Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The purpose of the survey is to provide information to prioritize prospective experiments and tests in the HTTR. The HTTR as a high temperature gas cooled reactor has a unique and superior capability to irradiate large-volumed specimen at high temperature up to approximately 800degC. The survey was focused on mainly the activities of functional ceramics and heat resisting ceramics as a kind of structural ceramics. As the result, the report recommends that the irradiation experiment of functional ceramics is feasible to date. (K. Itami)

  3. Impact of the Interaction between Aquatic Humic Substances and Algal Organic Matter on the Fouling of a Ceramic Microfiltration Membrane.

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Fan, Linhua; Roddick, Felicity A

    2018-02-01

    The influence of the interaction between aquatic humic substances and the algal organic matter (AOM) derived from Microcystis aeruginosa on the fouling of a ceramic microfiltration (MF) membrane was studied. AOM alone resulted in a significantly greater flux decline compared with Suwannee River humic acid (HA), and fulvic acid (FA). The mixture of AOM with HA and FA exhibited a similar flux pattern as the AOM alone in the single-cycle filtration tests, indicating the flux decline may be predominantly controlled by the AOM in the early filtration cycles. The mixtures resulted in a marked increase in irreversible fouling resistance compared with all individual feed solutions. An increase in zeta potential was observed for the mixtures (becoming more negatively charged), which was in accordance with the increased reversible fouling resistance resulting from enhanced electrostatic repulsion between the organic compounds and the negatively-charged ceramic membrane. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and size exclusion chromatography analyses showed an apparent increase in molecular size for the AOM-humics mixtures, and some UV-absorbing molecules in the humics appeared to participate in the formation of larger aggregates with the AOM, which led to greater extent of pore plugging and hence resulted in higher irreversible fouling resistance.

  4. Impact of the Interaction between Aquatic Humic Substances and Algal Organic Matter on the Fouling of a Ceramic Microfiltration Membrane

    Xiaolei Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the interaction between aquatic humic substances and the algal organic matter (AOM derived from Microcystis aeruginosa on the fouling of a ceramic microfiltration (MF membrane was studied. AOM alone resulted in a significantly greater flux decline compared with Suwannee River humic acid (HA, and fulvic acid (FA. The mixture of AOM with HA and FA exhibited a similar flux pattern as the AOM alone in the single-cycle filtration tests, indicating the flux decline may be predominantly controlled by the AOM in the early filtration cycles. The mixtures resulted in a marked increase in irreversible fouling resistance compared with all individual feed solutions. An increase in zeta potential was observed for the mixtures (becoming more negatively charged, which was in accordance with the increased reversible fouling resistance resulting from enhanced electrostatic repulsion between the organic compounds and the negatively-charged ceramic membrane. Dynamic light scattering (DLS and size exclusion chromatography analyses showed an apparent increase in molecular size for the AOM-humics mixtures, and some UV-absorbing molecules in the humics appeared to participate in the formation of larger aggregates with the AOM, which led to greater extent of pore plugging and hence resulted in higher irreversible fouling resistance.

  5. CO{sub 2} separation from biogas with ceramic membranes; CO{sub 2}-Abtrennung aus Biogas mit keramischen Membranen

    Fassauer, Burkhardt; Richter, Hannes; Schwarz, Bjoern; Reger-Wagner, Norman; Kaemnitz, Susanne [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Keramische Technologien und Systeme IKTS, Dresden (Germany); Lubenau, Udo; Mothes, Raimund [DBI Gas- und Umwelttechnik GmbH, Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Biogas contains after the production of up to 55% CO{sub 2}. In order to use biogas as a fuel or to feed it into the natural gas network, it must be purified before. Adsorption and scrubbing processes are primarily used technically. Membrane processes offer the advantage of continuous operation and a simple modular and flexible system design, which imply relatively low investment costs and low energy needs. Moreover, membrane systems can be started up and shut down quickly without any problems. Ceramic membranes are characterised by high stability (thermal, chemical, mechanical) and very high flows in comparison to polymeric membranes. [German] Biogas enthaelt nach der Erzeugung bis zu 55 % CO{sub 2}. Um Biogas als Kraftstoff zu nutzen oder in das Erdgasnetz einspeisen zu koennen, muss es zuvor gereinigt werden. Technisch genutzt werden vor allem Adsorptions- und Waschverfahren. Membranverfahren bieten den Vorteil eines kontinuierlichen Betriebes sowie einer einfachen, modularen und flexiblen Anlagenkonzeption, die vergleichsweise niedrige Investitionskosten und einen geringen Energiebedarf bedeuten. Darueber hinaus koennen Membrananlagen schnell an- und abgefahren werden und voellig ohne Probleme abgeschaltet werden. Keramische Membranen zeichnen sich gegenueber Polymermembranen durch hohe Stabilitaet (thermisch, chemisch, mechanisch) und sehr hohe Fluesse aus.

  6. A distributed dynamic model of a monolith hydrogen membrane reactor

    Michelsen, Finn Are; Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Zhao, Lei; Aasen, Knut Ingvar

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We model a rigorous distributed dynamic model for a HMR unit. ► The model includes enough complexity for steady-state and dynamic analysis. ► Simulations show that the model is non-linear within the normal operating range. ► The model is useful for studying and handling disturbances such as inlet changes and membrane leakage. - Abstract: This paper describes a distributed mechanistic dynamic model of a hydrogen membrane reformer unit (HMR) used for methane steam reforming. The model is based on a square channel monolith structure concept, where air flows adjacent to a mix of natural gas and water distributed in a chess pattern of channels. Combustion of hydrogen gives energy to the endothermic steam reforming reactions. The model is used for both steady state and dynamic analyses. It therefore needs to be computationally attractive, but still include enough complexity to study the important steady state and dynamic features of the process. Steady-state analysis of the model gives optimum for the steam to carbon and steam to oxygen ratios, where the conversion of methane is 92% and the hydrogen used as energy for the endothermic reactions is 28% at the nominal optimum. The dynamic analysis shows that non-linear control schemes may be necessary for satisfactory control performance

  7. Theoretical Study of Palladium Membrane Reactor Performance During Propane Dehydrogenation Using CFD Method

    Kamran Ghasemzadeh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a 2D-axisymmetric computational fluid dynamic (CFD model to investigate the performance Pd membrane reactor (MR during propane dehydrogenation process for hydrogen production. The proposed CFD model provided the local information of temperature and component concentration for the driving force analysis. After investigation of mesh independency of CFD model, the validation of CFD model results was carried out by other modeling data and a good agreement between CFD model results and theoretical data was achieved. Indeed, in the present model, a tubular reactor with length of 150 mm was considered, in which the Pt-Sn-K/Al2O3 as catalyst were filled in reaction zone. Hence, the effects of the important operating parameter (reaction temperature on the performances of membrane reactor (MR were studied in terms of propane conversion and hydrogen yield. The CFD results showed that the suggested MR system during propane dehydrogenation reaction presents higher performance with respect to once obtained in the conventional reactor (CR. In particular, by applying Pd membrane, was found that propane conversion can be increased from 41% to 49%. Moreover, the highest value of propane conversion (X = 91% was reached in case of Pd-Ag MR. It was also established that the feed flow rate of the MR is to be the one of the most important factors defining efficiency of the propane dehydrogenation process.

  8. Testing of a 7-tube palladium membrane reactor for potential use in TEP

    Carlson, Bryan J.; Trujillo, Stephen; Willms, R. Scott

    2010-01-01

    A Palladium Membrane Reactor (PMR) consists of a palladium/silver membrane permeator filled with catalyst (catalyst may be inside or outside the membrane tubes). The PMR is designed to recover tritium from the methane, water, and other impurities present in fusion reactor effluent. A key feature of a PMR is that the total hydrogen isotope content of a stream is significantly reduced as (1) methane-steam reforming and/or water-gas shift reactions proceed on the catalyst bed and (2) hydrogen isotopes are removed via permeation through the membrane. With a PMR design matched to processing requirements, nearly complete hydrogen isotope removals can be achieved. A 3-tube PMR study was recently completed. From the results presented in this study, it was possible to conclude that a PMR is appropriate for TEP, perforated metal tube protectors function well, platinum on aluminum (PtA) catalyst performs the best, conditioning with air is probably required to properly condition the Pd/Ag tubes, and that CO/CO 2 ratios maybe an indicator of coking. The 3-tube PMR had a permeator membrane area of 0.0247 m 2 and a catalyst volume to membrane area ratio of 4.63 cc/cm 2 (with the catalyst on the outside of the membrane tubes and the catalyst only covering the membrane tube length). A PMR for TEP will require a larger membrane area (perhaps 0.35 m 2 ). With this in mind, an intermediate sized PMR was constructed. This PMR has 7 permeator tubes and a total membrane area of 0.0851 m 2 . The catalyst volume to membrane area ratio for the 7-tube PMR was 5.18 cc/cm 2 . The total membrane area of the 7-tube PMR (0.0851 m 2 ) is 3.45 times larger than total membrane area of the 3-tube PMR (0.0247 m 2 ). The following objectives were identified for the 7-tube PMR tests: (1) Refine test measurements, especially humidity and flow; (2) Refine maintenance procedures for Pd/Ag tube conditioning; (3) Evaluate baseline PMR operating conditions; (4) Determine PMR scaling method; (5) Evaluate PMR

  9. Effect of Mass-Transport Limitations on the Performance of a Packed Bed Membrane Reactor for Partial Oxidations. Transport from the Membrane to the Packed Bed

    van Sint Annaland, M.; Kurten, U.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    With a packed bed membrane reactor, the product yield can be significantly enhanced for partial oxidation systems, via distributive addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture along the axial coordinate of the reactor, provided that the reaction order in oxygen of the formation rate of the target

  10. Effect of mass-transport limitations on the performance of a packed bed membrane reactor for partial oxidations. Transport from the membrane to the packed bed

    Sint Annaland, van M.; Kurten, U.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    With a packed bed membrane reactor, the product yield can be significantly enhanced for partial oxidation systems, via distributive addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture along the axial coordinate of the reactor, provided that the reaction order in oxygen of the formation rate of the target

  11. Catalysts with Cerium in a Membrane Reactor for the Removal of Formaldehyde Pollutant from Water Effluents

    Mirella Gutiérrez-Arzaluz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of cerium oxide, cobalt oxide, mixed cerium, and cobalt oxides and a Ce–Co/Al2O3 membrane, which are employed as catalysts for the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO reaction process and the removal of formaldehyde from industrial effluents. Formaldehyde is present in numerous waste streams from the chemical industry in a concentration low enough to make its recovery not economically justified but high enough to create an environmental hazard. Common biological degradation methods do not work for formaldehyde, a highly toxic but refractory, low biodegradability substance. The CWO reaction is a recent, promising alternative that also permits much lower temperature and pressure conditions than other oxidation processes, resulting in economic benefits. The CWO reaction employing Ce- and Co-containing catalysts was carried out inside a slurry batch reactor and a membrane reactor. Experimental results are reported. Next, a mixed Ce–Co oxide film was supported on an γ-alumina membrane used in a catalytic membrane reactor to compare formaldehyde removal between both types of systems. Catalytic materials with cerium and with a relatively large amount of cerium favored the transformation of formaldehyde. Cerium was present as cerianite in the catalytic materials, as indicated by X-ray diffraction patterns.

  12. Catalytic combustion of propane in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants—I. Operation in absence of trans-membrane pressure gradients

    Saracco, Guido; Veldsink, Jan Willem; Versteeg, Geert F.; Swaaij, Wim P.M. van

    1995-01-01

    A pilot plant study on propane catalytic combustion in a membrane reactor with separate reactant feeds is presented. The membrane consisted of a porous alumina tube activated by insertion into its pores of a Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. The role of reactants concentration and of the feed flow rates were

  13. Anaerobic acidogenic digestion of olive mill wastewaters in biofilm reactors packed with ceramic filters or granular activated carbon.

    Bertin, Lorenzo; Lampis, Silvia; Todaro, Daniela; Scoma, Alberto; Vallini, Giovanni; Marchetti, Leonardo; Majone, Mauro; Fava, Fabio

    2010-08-01

    Four identically configured anaerobic packed bed biofilm reactors were developed and employed in the continuous acidogenic digestion of olive mill wastewaters to produce volatile fatty acids (VFAs), which can be exploited in the biotechnological production of polyhydroxyalkanoates. Ceramic porous cubes or granular activated carbon were used as biofilm supports. Aside packing material, the role of temperature and organic loading rate (OLR) on VFA production yield and mixture composition were also studied. The process was monitored through a chemical, microbiological and molecular biology integrated procedure. The highest wastewater acidification yield was achieved with the ceramic-based technology at 25 degrees C, with an inlet COD and an OLR of about 17 g/L and 13 g/L/day, respectively. Under these conditions, about the 66% of the influent COD (not including its VFA content) was converted into VFAs, whose final amount represented more than 82% of the influent COD. In particular, acetic, propionic and butyric acids were the main VFAs by composing the 55.7, 21.5 and 14.4%, respectively, of the whole VFA mixture. Importantly, the relative concentrations of acetate and propionate were affected by the OLR parameter. The nature of the packing material remarkable influenced the process performances, by greatly affecting the biofilm bacterial community structure. In particular, ceramic cubes favoured the immobilization of Firmicutes of the genera Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Clostridium, which were probably involved in the VFA producing process. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cell-Culture Reactor Having a Porous Organic Polymer Membrane

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclosed. The substrate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphory1choline groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions, and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  15. Proceedings of the Office of Fusion Energy/DOE workshop on ceramic matrix composites for structural applications in fusion reactors

    Jones, R.H.; Lucas, G.E.

    1990-11-01

    A workshop to assess the potential application of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for structural applications in fusion reactors was held on May 21--22, 1990, at University of California, Santa Barbara. Participants included individuals familiar with materials and design requirements in fusion reactors, ceramic composite processing and properties and radiation effects. The primary focus was to list the feasibility issues that might limit the application of these materials in fusion reactors. Clear advantages for the use of CMCs are high-temperature operation, which would allow a high-efficiency Rankine cycle, and low activation. Limitations to their use are material costs, fabrication complexity and costs, lack of familiarity with these materials in design, and the lack of data on radiation stability at relevant temperatures and fluences. Fusion-relevant feasibility issues identified at this workshop include: hermetic and vacuum properties related to effects of matrix porosity and matrix microcracking; chemical compatibility with coolant, tritium, and breeder and multiplier materials, radiation effects on compatibility; radiation stability and integrity; and ability to join CMCs in the shop and at the reactor site, radiation stability and integrity of joints. A summary of ongoing CMC radiation programs is also given. It was suggested that a true feasibility assessment of CMCs for fusion structural applications could not be completed without evaluation of a material ''tailored'' to fusion conditions or at least to radiation stability. It was suggested that a follow-up workshop be held to design a tailored composite after the results of CMC radiation studies are available and the critical feasibility issues are addressed

  16. Integrated gasification gas combined cycle plant with membrane reactors: Technological and economical analysis

    Amelio, Mario; Morrone, Pietropaolo; Gallucci, Fausto; Basile, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the capture and storage of carbon dioxide from the fossil fuel power plant have been considered. The main objective was to analyze the thermodynamic performances and the technological aspects of two integrated gasification gas combined cycle plants (IGCC), as well as to give a forecast of the investment costs for the plants and the resulting energy consumptions. The first plant considered is an IGCC* plant (integrated gasification gas combined cycle plant with traditional shift reactors) characterized by the traditional water gas shift reactors and a CO 2 physical adsorption system followed by the power section. The second one is an IGCC M plant (integrated gasification gas combined cycle plant with membrane reactor) where the coal thermal input is the same as the first one, but the traditional shift reactors and the physical adsorption unit are replaced by catalytic palladium membrane reactors (CMR). In the present work, a mono-dimensional computational model of the membrane reactor was proposed to simulate and evaluate the capability of the IGCC M plant to capture carbon dioxide. The energetic performances, efficiency and net power of the IGCC* and IGCC M plants were, thus, compared, assuming as standard a traditional IGCC plant without carbon dioxide capture. The economical aspects of the three plants were compared through an economical analysis. Since the IGCC* and IGCC M plants have additional costs related to the capture and disposal of the carbon dioxide, a Carbon Tax (adopted in some countries like Sweden) proportional to the number of kilograms of carbon dioxide released in the environment was assumed. According to the economical analysis, the IGCC M plant proved to be more convenient than the IGCC* one

  17. Thermal modeling of the ceramic composite fuel for light water reactors

    Revankar, S.T.; Latta, R.; Solomon, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Composite fuel designs capable of providing improved thermal performance are of great interest in advanced reactor designs where high efficiency and long fuel cycles are desired. Thermal modeling of the composite fuel consisting of continuous second phase in a ceramic (uranium oxide) matrix has been carried out with detailed examination of the microstructure of the composite and the interface. Assuming that constituent phases are arranged as slabs, upper and lower bounds for the thermal conductivity of the composite are derived analytically. Bounding calculations on the thermal conductivity of the composite were performed for SiC dispersed in the UO 2 matrix. It is found that with 10% SiC, the thermal conductivity increases from 5.8 to 9.8 W/m.deg. K at 500 K, or an increase of 69% was observed in UO 2 matrix. The finite element analysis computer program ANSYS was used to create composite fuel geometries with set boundary conditions to produce accurate thermal conductivity predictions. A model developed also accounts for SiC-matrix interface resistance and the addition of coatings or interaction barriers. The first set of calculations using the code was to model simple series and parallel fuel slab geometries, and then advance to inter-connected parallel pathways. The analytical calculations were compared with the ANSYS results. The geometry of the model was set up as a 1 cm long by 400 micron wide rectangle. This rectangle was then divided into one hundred sections with the first ninety percent of a single section being UO 2 and the remaining ten percent consisting of SiC. The model was then meshed using triangular type elements. The boundary conditions were set with the sides of the rectangle being adiabatic and having an assigned temperature at the end of the rectangle. A heat flux was then applied to one end of the model producing a temperature gradient. The effective thermal conductivity was then calculated using the geometry

  18. CVD of solid oxides in porous substrates for ceramic membrane modification

    Lin, Y.S.; Lin, Y.S.; Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of yttria-doped zirconia has been experimented systematically in various types of porous ceramic substrates by a modified chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process operating in an opposing reactant geometry using water vapor and corresponding metal chloride vapors as reactants. The

  19. Recovery of biomolecules from marinated herring (Clupea harengus) brine using ultrafiltration through ceramic membranes

    Gringer, Nina; Hosseini, Seyed Vali; Svendsen, Tore

    2015-01-01

    Marinated herring processing brines, which are usually discarded, are rich in salt, protein, non-protein nitrogen, iron, fatty acids, antioxidant and even possess enzymatic activity. This study investigated the performance of ceramic ultrafiltration of two herring spice brines with a major focus...

  20. Stress relaxation and creep of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core support ceramic materials: a literature search

    Selle, J.E.; Tennery, V.J.

    1980-05-01

    Creep and stress relaxation in structural ceramics are important properties to the high-temperature design and safety analysis of the core support structure of the HTGR. The ability of the support structure to function for the lifetime of the reactor is directly related to the allowable creep strain and the ability of the structure to withstand thermal transients. The thermal-mechanical response of the core support pads to steady-state stresses and potential thermal transients depends on variables, including the ability of the ceramics to undergo some stress relaxation in relatively short times. Creep and stress relaxation phenomena in structural ceramics of interest were examined. Of the materials considered (fused silica, alumina, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide), alumina has been more extensively investigated in creep. Activation energies reported varied between 482 and 837 kJ/mole, and consequently, variations in the assigned mechanisms were noted. Nabarro-Herring creep is considered as the primary creep mechanism and no definite grain size dependence has been identified. Results for silicon nitride are in better agreement with reported activation energies. No creep data were found for fused silica or silicon carbide and no stress relaxation data were found for any of the candidate materials. While creep and stress relaxation are similar and it is theoretically possible to derive the value of one property when the other is known, no explicit demonstrated relationship exists between the two. For a given structural ceramic material, both properties must be experimentally determined to obtain the information necessary for use in high-temperature design and safety analyses

  1. Influence of surface properties of filtration-layer metal oxide on ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsion

    Lu, Dongwei

    2016-04-01

    In this work, ceramic ultrafiltration membranes deposited with different metal oxides (i.e., TiO2, Fe2O3, MnO2, CuO, and CeO2) of around 10 nm in thickness and similar roughness were tested for O/W emulsion treatment. Distinct membrane fouling tendency was observed, which closely correlated to the properties of the filtration-layer metal oxides (i.e. surface hydroxyl groups, hydrophilicity, surface charge, and adhesion energy for oil droplets). In consistent with the distinct bond strength of the surface hydroxyl groups, hydrophilicity of these common metal oxides are quite different. The differences in hydrophilicity consequently lead to different adhesion of these metal oxides towards oil droplets which consists very well with irreversible membrane fouling tendency. In addition, the surface charge of the metal oxide opposite to that of emulsion can help to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling in ultrafiltration. Highly hydrophilic Fe2O3 with lowest fouling tendency could be a potential filtration-layer material for the fabrication/modification of ceramic membranes for O/W emulsion treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study clearly showing the correlations between surface properties of filtration-layer metal oxides and ceramic membrane fouling tendency by O/W emulsion.

  2. Influence of Surface Properties of Filtration-Layer Metal Oxide on Ceramic Membrane Fouling during Ultrafiltration of Oil/Water Emulsion.

    Lu, Dongwei; Zhang, Tao; Gutierrez, Leo; Ma, Jun; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2016-05-03

    In this work, ceramic ultrafiltration membranes deposited with different metal oxides (i.e., TiO2, Fe2O3, MnO2, CuO, and CeO2) of around 10 nm in thickness and similar roughness were tested for O/W emulsion treatment. A distinct membrane fouling tendency was observed, which closely correlated to the properties of the filtration-layer metal oxides (i.e., surface hydroxyl groups, hydrophilicity, surface charge, and adhesion energy for oil droplets). Consistent with the distinct bond strength of the surface hydroxyl groups, hydrophilicity of these common metal oxides is quite different. The differences in hydrophilicity consequently lead to different adhesion of these metal oxides toward oil droplets, consistent with the irreversible membrane fouling tendency. In addition, the surface charge of the metal oxide opposite to that of emulsion can help to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling in ultrafiltration. Highly hydrophilic Fe2O3 with the lowest fouling tendency could be a potential filtration-layer material for the fabrication/modification of ceramic membranes for O/W emulsion treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study clearly showing the correlations between surface properties of filtration-layer metal oxides and ceramic membrane fouling tendency by O/W emulsion.

  3. Influence of surface properties of filtration-layer metal oxide on ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsion

    Lu, Dongwei; Zhang, Tao; Gutierrez, Leo; Ma, Jun; Croue, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In this work, ceramic ultrafiltration membranes deposited with different metal oxides (i.e., TiO2, Fe2O3, MnO2, CuO, and CeO2) of around 10 nm in thickness and similar roughness were tested for O/W emulsion treatment. Distinct membrane fouling tendency was observed, which closely correlated to the properties of the filtration-layer metal oxides (i.e. surface hydroxyl groups, hydrophilicity, surface charge, and adhesion energy for oil droplets). In consistent with the distinct bond strength of the surface hydroxyl groups, hydrophilicity of these common metal oxides are quite different. The differences in hydrophilicity consequently lead to different adhesion of these metal oxides towards oil droplets which consists very well with irreversible membrane fouling tendency. In addition, the surface charge of the metal oxide opposite to that of emulsion can help to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling in ultrafiltration. Highly hydrophilic Fe2O3 with lowest fouling tendency could be a potential filtration-layer material for the fabrication/modification of ceramic membranes for O/W emulsion treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study clearly showing the correlations between surface properties of filtration-layer metal oxides and ceramic membrane fouling tendency by O/W emulsion.

  4. Application of CO{sub 2} selective membrane reactors in pre-combustion decarbonisation systems for power production

    Steven C.A. Kluiters; Virginie C. Feuillade; Jan Wilco Dijkstra; Daniel Jansen; Wim G. Haije [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    For pre-combustion decarbonisation of fuels for large-scale power production or H{sub 2} generation both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} selective membranes are viable candidates for use in steam reforming and water gas shift membrane reactors. It will be shown that the choice between either option is not a matter of taste, but dictated by the fuel used and, to a lesser extent, the total system layout. Hydrotalcites, clay-like materials, are shown to be promising candidates as membrane material for low temperature, below 400{sup o}C, membrane shift reactors. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Separation of metallic cations by means of coupled filtration on a ceramic membrane. Use of a complexing heteropolyanion

    Brun, Stephane

    1999-01-01

    In the field of the high level nuclear waste reprocessing, the Nuclear French Agency is currently carrying out studies on several processes (including the SESAME process) which aim at separating radioactive elements in order to dispose them specifically or to transmute them. One of these processes concerns the selective extraction of americium at an upper oxidation state than Ill. This work deals with the separation of Am(IV) from Ln(Ill) by means of complexation-coupled tangential filtration on alumina-titanium ceramic membranes. The chosen selective complexing agent is a lacunar heteropolyanion from the tungstophosphate family α_2P_2W_1_7O_6_1"1"0"-, which synthesis and various properties in solution have been studied. The polyanion stability in 0.5 M nitric solution strongly depends on the quality of the synthesised product. Two analytical techniques were developed to check the quality of the synthesised sets: "3"1P NMR and arsenazo-lanthanum complexometric titration. The separation studies on the cerium (IV)-neodymium (Ill) system were carried out to simulate americium(IV)/lanthanides(Ill) system. For the two alumina-titanium membranes studied (ultrafiltration and nano-filtration), the solvent flow can be described through a capillary mechanism which is characteristic of porous membranes. The ion transfer through the membranes, mainly governed by electrostatic interactions, strongly depends on the ionic strength at the membrane-solution interface. The best separation results, using nano-filtration, still remain below the expected performances, with a Ce(IV)/Nd(Ill) separation factor of 35 on a single stage in 0,5 M nitric medium. (author) [fr

  6. On the potential of nickel catalysts for steam reforming in membrane reactors

    Pieterse, J.A.Z.; Boon, J.; Van Delft, Y.C.; Dijkstra, J.W.; Van den Brink, R.W. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    Hydrogen membrane reactors have been identified as a promising option for hydrogen production for power generation from natural gas with pre-combustion decarbonisation. While Pd or Pd-alloy membranes already provide good hydrogen permeances the most suitable catalyst design for steam reforming in membrane reactors (SRMR) is yet to be identified. This contribution aims to provide insight in the suitability of nickel based catalysts in SRMR. The use of nickel (Ni) catalysts would benefit the cost-effectiveness of membrane reactors and therefore its feasibility. For this, the activity of nickel catalysts in SRMR was assessed with kinetics reported in literature. A 1D model was composed in order to compare the hydrogen production rates derived from the kinetics with the rate of hydrogen withdrawal by permeation. Catalyst stability was studied by exposing the catalysts to reformate gas with two different H/C ratios to mimic the hydrogen lean reformate gas in the membrane reactor. For both the activity (modeling) and stability study the Ni-based catalysts were compared to relevant catalyst compositions based on rhodium (Rh). Using the high pressure kinetics reported for Al2O3 supported Rh and MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 supported Ni catalyst it showed that Ni and Rh catalysts may very well provide similar hydrogen production rates. Interestingly, the stability of Ni-based catalysts proved to be superior to precious metal based catalysts under exposure to simulated reformate feed gas with low H/C molar ratio. A commercial (pre-)reforming Ni-based catalyst was selected for further testing in an experimental membrane reactor for steam reforming at high pressure. During the test period 98% conversion at 873 K could be achieved. The conversion was adjusted to approximately 90% and stable conversion was obtained during the test period of another 3 weeks. Nonetheless, carbon quantification tests of the Ni catalyst indicated that a small amount of carbon had deposited onto the catalyst

  7. Environment-oriented low-cost porous mullite ceramic membrane supports fabricated from coal gangue and bauxite

    Lü, Qikai [Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Ningbo Urban Environment Observation and Research Station-NUEORS, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Dong, Xinfa [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Zhu, Zhiwen [Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Ningbo Urban Environment Observation and Research Station-NUEORS, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo (China); Dong, Yingchao, E-mail: ycdong@iue.ac.cn [Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Ningbo Urban Environment Observation and Research Station-NUEORS, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo (China)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Coal gangue was recycled to fabricate low-cost porous mullite membrane supports. • A unique volume-expansion occurred due to a mullitization-crystal-growth process. • A porous structure consists of glassy particles and embedded mullite crystals. - Abstract: Porous mullite ceramic supports for filtration membrane were successfully fabricated via recycling of coal gangue and bauxite at sintering temperatures from 1100 to 1500 °C with corn starch as pore-forming agent. The dynamic sintering behaviors, phase evolution, shrinkage, porosity and pore size, gas permeation flux, microstructure and mechanical property were systematically studied. A unique volume-expansion stage was observed at increased temperatures from 1276 to 1481 °C caused by a mullitization-crystal-growth process. During this stage, open porosity increases and pore size distributions broaden, which result in a maximum of nitrogen gas flux at 1400 °C. The X-ray diffraction results reveal that secondary mullitization took place from 1100 °C and the major phase is mullite with a content of ∼84.7 wt.% at 1400 °C. SEM images show that the as-fabricated mullite supports have a porous microstructure composed of sintered glassy particles embedded with inter-locked mullite crystals, which grew gradually with increasing temperature from rod-like into blocky-like morphologies. To obtain mullite membrane supports with sufficient porosity and acceptable mechanical strength, the relationship between porosity and mechanical strength was investigated, which was fitted using a parabolic equation.

  8. CO-free hydrogen production by ethanol steam reforming in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    Basile, A.; Gallucci, F.; Iulianelli, A.; Tosti, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction has been studied by using a dense Pd-Ag membrane reactor (MR) by varying the water/ethanol molar ratio between 3:1 and 9:1 in a temperature range of 300-400°C and at 1.3 bar as reaction pressure. The MR was packed with a commercial Ru-based

  9. Optimization of protein fractionation by skim milk microfiltration: Choice of ceramic membrane pore size and filtration temperature.

    Jørgensen, Camilla Elise; Abrahamsen, Roger K; Rukke, Elling-Olav; Johansen, Anne-Grethe; Schüller, Reidar B; Skeie, Siv B

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how ceramic membrane pore size and filtration temperature influence the protein fractionation of skim milk by cross flow microfiltration (MF). Microfiltration was performed at a uniform transmembrane pressure with constant permeate flux to a volume concentration factor of 2.5. Three different membrane pore sizes, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20µm, were used at a filtration temperature of 50°C. Furthermore, at pore size 0.10µm, 2 different filtration temperatures were investigated: 50 and 60°C. The transmission of proteins increased with increasing pore size, giving the permeate from MF with the 0.20-µm membrane a significantly higher concentration of native whey proteins compared with the permeates from the 0.05- and 0.10-µm membranes (0.50, 0.24, and 0.39%, respectively). Significant amounts of caseins permeated the 0.20-µm membrane (1.4%), giving a permeate with a whitish appearance and a casein distribution (αS2-CN: αS1-CN: κ-CN: β-CN) similar to that of skim milk. The 0.05- and 0.10-µm membranes were able to retain all caseins (only negligible amounts were detected). A permeate free from casein is beneficial in the production of native whey protein concentrates and in applications where transparency is an important functional characteristic. Microfiltration of skim milk at 50°C with the 0.10-µm membrane resulted in a permeate containing significantly more native whey proteins than the permeate from MF at 60°C. The more rapid increase in transmembrane pressure and the significantly lower concentration of caseins in the retentate at 60°C indicated that a higher concentration of caseins deposited on the membrane, and consequently reduced the native whey protein transmission. Optimal protein fractionation of skim milk into a casein-rich retentate and a permeate with native whey proteins were obtained by 0.10-µm MF at 50°C. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  10. Application of Forward Osmosis Membrane in a Sequential Batch Reactor for Water Reuse

    Li, Qingyu

    2011-07-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) is a novel membrane process that potentially can be used as an energy-saving alternative to conventional membrane processes. The objective of this study is to investigate the performance of a FO membrane to draw water from wastewater using seawater as draw solution. A study on a novel osmotic sequential batch reactor (OsSBR) was explored. In this system, a plate and frame FO cell including two flat-sheet FO membranes was submerged in a bioreactor treating the wastewater. We found it feasible to treat the wastewater by the OsSBR process. The DOC removal rate was 98.55%. Total nitrogen removal was 62.4% with nitrate, nitrite and ammonium removals of 58.4%, 96.2% and 88.4% respectively. Phosphate removal was almost 100%. In this OsSBR system, the 15-hour average flux for a virgin membrane with air scouring is 3.103 LMH. After operation of 3 months, the average flux of a fouled membrane is 2.390 LMH with air scouring (23% flux decline). Air scouring can help to remove the loose foulants on the active layer, thus helping to maintain the flux. Cleaning of the FO membrane fouled in the active layer was probably not effective under the conditions of immersing the membrane in the bioreactor. LC-OCD results show that the FO membrane has a very good performance in rejecting biopolymers, humics and building blocks, but a limited ability in rejecting low molecular weight neutrals.

  11. A novel ion transport membrane reactor for fundamental investigations of oxygen permeation and oxy-combustion under reactive flow conditions

    Kirchen, Patrick; Apo, Daniel J.; Hunt, Anton; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2013-01-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) reactors present an attractive technology for combined air separation and fuel conversion in applications such as syngas production, oxidative coupling or oxy-combustion, with the promise of lower capital and operating

  12. Study of loading/air back-pulse cleaning cycles on the performance of ceramic membrane filters

    Waggoner, Charles; Alderman, Steven; Parsons, Michael; Hogoncamp, Kristina; Alderman, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The most commonly identified threats to conventional glass fiber HEPA filter performance are moisture and rapid blinding of filters by smoke. Regenerable filter media composed of ceramics or sintered metal can be utilized as pre-filters to protect the more vulnerable glass fiber HEPA filters in the event of upset conditions. Additionally, used in a pre-filtering application, the use of these regenerable filters can potentially extend the lifetime of conventional units. A series of tests have been conducted using CeraMem ceramic membrane filters in an effort to evaluate their performance after repeated loading and air back pulse cleaning. This was done in an effort to access filter performance after repeated loading/cleaning cycles. The filters were loaded using a solid potassium chloride aerosol challenge. The filters were evaluated for pressure drop and filtering efficiency changes from one cleaning cycle to the next. Additionally, the particle size distribution of the aerosol penetrating the filters was measured. (authors)

  13. Oxygen transport membrane reactor based method and system for generating electric power

    Kelly, Sean M.; Chakravarti, Shrikar; Li, Juan

    2017-02-07

    A carbon capture enabled system and method for generating electric power and/or fuel from methane containing sources using oxygen transport membranes by first converting the methane containing feed gas into a high pressure synthesis gas. Then, in one configuration the synthesis gas is combusted in oxy-combustion mode in oxygen transport membranes based boiler reactor operating at a pressure at least twice that of ambient pressure and the heat generated heats steam in thermally coupled steam generation tubes within the boiler reactor; the steam is expanded in steam turbine to generate power; and the carbon dioxide rich effluent leaving the boiler reactor is processed to isolate carbon. In another configuration the synthesis gas is further treated in a gas conditioning system configured for carbon capture in a pre-combustion mode using water gas shift reactors and acid gas removal units to produce hydrogen or hydrogen-rich fuel gas that fuels an integrated gas turbine and steam turbine system to generate power. The disclosed method and system can also be adapted to integrate with coal gasification systems to produce power from both coal and methane containing sources with greater than 90% carbon isolation.

  14. Hydrodynamic effects of air sparging on hollow fiber membranes in a bubble column reactor.

    Xia, Lijun; Law, Adrian Wing-Keung; Fane, Anthony G

    2013-07-01

    Air sparging is now a standard approach to reduce concentration polarization and fouling of membrane modules in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). The hydrodynamic shear stresses, bubble-induced turbulence and cross flows scour the membrane surfaces and help reduce the deposit of foulants onto the membrane surface. However, the detailed quantitative knowledge on the effect of air sparging remains lacking in the literature due to the complex hydrodynamics generated by the gas-liquid flows. To date, there is no valid model that describes the relationship between the membrane fouling performance and the flow hydrodynamics. The present study aims to examine the impact of hydrodynamics induced by air sparging on the membrane fouling mitigation in a quantitative manner. A modelled hollow fiber module was placed in a cylindrical bubble column reactor at different axial heights with the trans-membrane pressure (TMP) monitored under constant flux conditions. The configuration of bubble column without the membrane module immersed was identical to that studied by Gan et al. (2011) using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA), to ensure a good quantitative understanding of turbulent flow conditions along the column height. The experimental results showed that the meandering flow regime which exhibits high flow instability at the 0.3 m is more beneficial to fouling alleviation compared with the steady flow circulation regime at the 0.6 m. The filtration tests also confirmed the existence of an optimal superficial air velocity beyond which a further increase is of no significant benefit on the membrane fouling reduction. In addition, the alternate aeration provided by two air stones mounted at the opposite end of the diameter of the bubble column was also studied to investigate the associated flow dynamics and its influence on the membrane filtration performance. It was found that with a proper switching interval and membrane module orientation, the membrane fouling can be effectively

  15. Analysis and theory of gas transport in microporous sol-gel derived ceramic membranes

    de Lange, R.S.A.; de Lange, Rob; Keizer, Klaas; Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Sol-gel modification of mesoporous alumina membranes is a very successful technique to improve gas separation performance. Due to the formed microporous top layer, the membranes show activated transport and molecular sieve-like separation factors. This paper concentrates on the mechanism of

  16. EFFECTS OF OZONATION ON THE PERMEATE FLUX OF NANOCRYSTALLINE CERAMIC MEMBRANES. (R830908)

    Titania membranes, with a molecular weight cut-off of 15 kD were used in an ozonation/membrane system that was fed with water from Lake Lansing, which had been pre-filtered through a 0.45 �m glass fiber filter. The application of ozone gas prior to filtration resulted in signi...

  17. Ethanol steam reforming kinetics of a Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    Tosti, Silvano; Borelli, Rodolfo; Borgognoni, Fabio [ENEA, Dipartimento FPN, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati (RM) I-00044 (Italy); Basile, Angelo [Institute on Membrane Technology, ITM-CNR, c/o Univ. of Calabria, via P. Bucci, Cubo 17/C, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Castelli, Stefano [ENEA, Dipartimento ACS, C.R. ENEA Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, Roma I-00123 (Italy); Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Licusati, Celeste [Dept. of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Naples Federico II, Via Claudio 21, Naples 80125 (Italy); Gallucci, Fausto [Fundamentals of Chemical Reaction Engineering Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    The ethanol steam reforming reaction carried out in a Pd-based tubular membrane reactor has been modelled via a finite element code. The model considers the membrane tube divided into finite volume elements where the mass balances for both lumen and shell sides are carried out accordingly to the reaction and permeation kinetics. Especially, a simplified ''power law'' has been applied for the reaction kinetics: the comparison with experimental data obtained by using three different kinds of catalyst (Ru, Pt and Ni based) permitted defining the coefficients of the kinetics expression as well as to validate the model. Based on the Damkohler-Peclet analysis, the optimization of the membrane reformer has been also approached. (author)

  18. Electrical properties and flux performance of composite ceramic hydrogen separation membranes

    Fish, J.S.; Ricote, Sandrine; O'Hayre, R.

    2015-01-01

    The electrical properties and hydrogen permeation flux behavior of the all-ceramic protonic/electronic conductor composite BaCe0.2Zr0.7Y0.1O3-δ/Sr0.95Ti0.9Nb0.1O3-δ (BCZY27/STN95: BS27) are evaluated. Conductivity and hydrogen permeability are examined as a function of phase volume ratios. Total ...

  19. Preparation of a surface-grafted imprinted ceramic membrane for selective separation of molybdate anion from water solutions.

    Zeng, Jianxian; Dong, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Yuan

    2017-07-05

    A surface-grafted imprinted ceramic membrane (IIP-PVI/CM) for recognizing molybdate (Mo(VI)) anion was prepared by surface-initiated graft-polymerization. Firstly, raw alumina ceramic membrane (CM) was deposited with SiO 2 active layer by situ hydrolysis deposition method. Subsequently, γ-methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane (MPS) was used as a coupling agent to introduce double bonds onto the SiO 2 layer (MPS-CM). Then, 1-vinylimidazole (VI) was employed as a functional monomer to graft-polymerization onto the MPS-CM (PVI-CM). During the graft-polymerization, the influence factors of grafting degree of PVI were investigated in detail. Under optimum conditions (monomer concentration 20wt%, temperature 70°C, initiator amount 1.1wt% and reaction time 8h), the grafting degree of 20.39g/100g was obtained. Further, Mo(VI) anion was used as a template to imprint in the PVI-CM by employing 1,6-dibromohexane as a cross-linking agent, and then Mo(VI) was removed, obtaining the IIP-PVI/CM with many imprinted cavities for Mo(VI). Thereafter, static adsorption and dynamic separation properties of IIP-PVI/CM for Mo(VI) were studied. Results indicate that IIP-PVI/CM shows a specific selectivity for Mo(VI) with the adsorption capacity of 0.69mmol/100g, and the selectivity coefficient of IIP-PVI/CM is 7.48 for molybdate to tungstate anions. During the dynamic separation, IIP-PVI/CM has also good selectivity for separation of Mo(VI) and W(VI) anions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent research activities on functional ceramics for insulator, breeder and optical sensing systems in fusion reactors

    Nagata, S., E-mail: nagata@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Katsui, H.; Hoshi, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Tsuchiya, B. [Meijo University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Toh, K. [J-PARC Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai (Japan); Zhao, M.; Shikama, T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Hodgson, E.R. [Euratom/CIEMAT Fusion Association, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    The paper presents a brief overview of current research activities on functional ceramic materials for insulating components, tritium breeder and optical sensing systems, mainly carried out at Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University. Topics include recent experimental results related to the electrical degradation and optical changes in typical oxide ceramics (e.g. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}) concerning radiolytic effects. Hydrogen effects on the electrical conductivity in the Perovskite-type oxide ceramics and the interaction between hydrogen and irradiation induced defects in ternary Li oxides used as breeder materials, were dynamically observed under the irradiation environment. Further attention is focused on several challenging qualifications required for an advanced sensing system using optical characteristics (e.g., thermoluminescence in SiO{sub 2} core fiber, neutron-induced long lasting emission from oxides doped with rare-earth elements, and gasochromic coloration phenomenon of WO{sub 3})

  1. Modeling and simulation of ammonia removal from purge gases of ammonia plants using a catalytic Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    Rahimpour, M.R.; Asgari, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the removal of ammonia from synthesis purge gas of an ammonia plant has been investigated. Since the ammonia decomposition is thermodynamically limited, a membrane reactor is used for complete decomposition. A double pipe catalytic membrane reactor is used to remove ammonia from purge gas. The purge gas is flowing in the reaction side and is converted to hydrogen and nitrogen over nickel-alumina catalyst. The hydrogen is transferred through the Pd-Ag membrane of tube side to the shell side. A mathematical model including conservation of mass in the tube and shell side of reactor is proposed. The proposed model was solved numerically and the effects of different parameters on the rector performance were investigated. The effects of pressure, temperature, flow rate (sweep ratio), membrane thickness and reactor diameter have been investigated in the present study. Increasing ammonia conversion was observed by raising the temperature, sweep ratio and reducing membrane thickness. When the pressure increases, the decomposition is gone toward completion but, at low pressure the ammonia conversion in the outset of reactor is higher than other pressures, but complete destruction of the ammonia cannot be achieved. The proposed model can be used for design of an industrial catalytic membrane reactor for removal of ammonia from ammonia plant and reducing NO x emissions

  2. Elaboration of new ceramic microfiltration membranes from mineral coal fly ash applied to waste water treatment.

    Jedidi, Ilyes; Saïdi, Sami; Khemakhem, Sabeur; Larbot, André; Elloumi-Ammar, Najwa; Fourati, Amine; Charfi, Aboulhassan; Salah, Abdelhamid Ben; Amar, Raja Ben

    2009-12-15

    This work aims to develop a new mineral porous tubular membrane based on mineral coal fly ash. Finely ground mineral coal powder was calcinated at 700 degrees C for about 3 h. The elaboration of the mesoporous layer was performed by the slip-casting method using a suspension made of the mixture of fly-ash powder, water and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The obtained membrane was submitted to a thermal treatment which consists in drying at room temperature for 24 h then a sintering at 800 degrees C. SEM photographs indicated that the membrane surface was homogeneous and did not present any macrodefects (cracks, etc...). The average pore diameter of the active layer was 0.25 microm and the thickness was around 20 microm. The membrane permeability was 475 l/h m(2) bar. This membrane was applied to the treatment of the dying effluents generated by the washing baths in the textile industry. The performances in term of permeate flux and efficiency were determined and compared to those obtained using a commercial alumina microfiltration membrane. Almost the same stabilised permeate flux was obtained (about 100 l h(-1)m(-2)). The quality of permeate was almost the same with the two membranes: the COD and color removal was 75% and 90% respectively.

  3. Development of a membrane-assisted fluidized bed reactor - 2 - Experimental demonstration and modeling for the partial oxidation of methanol

    Deshmukh, S.A.R.K.; Laverman, J.A.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A small laboratory-scale membrane-assisted fluidized bed reactor (MAFBR) was constructed in order to experimentally demonstrate the reactor concept for the partial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. Methanol conversion and product selectivities were measured at various overall fluidization

  4. Stress analysis and fail-safe design of bilayered tubular supported ceramic membranes

    Kwok, Kawai; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Søgaard, Martin

    2014-01-01

    . Stress distributions in two membrane systems have been analyzed and routes to minimize stress are proposed. For a Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3−δBa0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3−δ membrane supported on a porous substrate of the same material under pressure-vacuum operation, the optimal configuration in terms...... for both membrane systems at operating conditions in the range of practical interest....

  5. Performance and economics of a Pd-based planar WGS membrane reactor for coal gasification

    Dolan, M.D. [CSIRO Energy Technology, Pullenvale QLD 4069 (Australia); Donelson, R. [CSIRO Process Science and Engineering, Clayton VIC 3168 (Australia); Dave, N.C. [CSIRO Energy Technology, North Ryde NSW 2113 (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    Conceptual 300 tonne per day (tpd) H{sub 2}-from-coal plants have been the subject of several major costing exercises in the past decade. Incorporating conventional high- and low-temperature water-gas-shift (WGS) reactors, amine-based CO{sub 2} removal and PSA-based H{sub 2} purification systems, these studies provide a benchmark against which alternative H{sub 2}-from-coal technologies can be compared. The catalytic membrane reactor (CMR), combining a WGS catalyst and hydrogen-selective metal membrane, can potentially replace the multiple shift and separation stages of a plant based on conventional technology. CMR-based shift and separation offers several major advantages over the conventional approach, including greater-than-equilibrium WGS conversion, the containment of the CO{sub 2} at high-pressure and a reduction in the number of unit processes. To determine capital costs of a WGS CMR-based H{sub 2}-from-coal plant, a prototype planar CMR was constructed and tested with varying catalyst bed depth, residence time and membrane type (commercially-sourced 50 {mu}m Pd or 40 {mu}m Pd-25Ag wt%). Experiments to measure CO conversion, and H{sub 2} flux and yield were conducted at 400 C with a feed pressure of 20 bar H{sub 2}O:C ratio of 3 and a H{sub 2} product pressure of 1 bar. Under the optimum conditions examined (with a 40 {mu}m-thick Pd-25Ag membrane and <3 mm-thick catalyst bed), a membrane surface area of {proportional_to}25,000 m{sup 2} would be required to provide a throughput of 300 tpd with 85% H{sub 2} yield. The capital cost of the CMR component of the plant would be around $US 180 million (based on current metal prices), of which 73% can be attributed to the cost of the Pd-Ag alloy membranes. Incorporation of a membrane that meets the 2015 US DOE cost and flux targets would offer

  6. Membrane-aerated biofilm reactor for the removal of 1,2-dichloroethane by Pseudomonas sp strain DCA1

    Hage, J.C.; Houten, R.T.; Tramper, J.; Hartmans, S.

    2004-01-01

    A membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MBR) with a biofilm of Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1 was studied for the removal of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) from water. A hydrophobic membrane was used to create a barrier between the liquid and the gas phase. Inoculation of the MBR with cells of strain DCA1 grown

  7. Experimental demonstration of the reverse flow catalytic membrane reactor concept for energy efficient syngas production. Part 2: Model development

    Smit, J.; Bekink, G.J.; Sint Annaland, van M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution the technical feasibility of the reverse flow catalytic membrane reactor (RFCMR) concept with porous membranes for energy efficient syngas production is investigated. In earlier work an experimental proof of principle was already provided [Smit, J., Bekink, G.J., van Sint

  8. Lipase kinetics: hydrolysis of triacetin by lipase from Candida cylindracea in a hollow-fiber membrane reactor

    Guit, R.P.M.; Kloosterman, M.; Meindersma, G.W.; Mayer, M.; Meijer, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    The aptitude of a hollow-fiber membrane reactor to det. lipase kinetics was investigated using the hydrolysis of triacetin catalyzed by lipase from C. cylindracea as a model system. The binding of the lipase to the membrane appears not to be very specific (surface adsorption), and probably its

  9. WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS; A

    Carl R.F. Lund

    2001-01-01

    This report covers the second year of a project investigating water-gas shift catalysts for use in membrane reactors. It has been established that a simple iron high temperature shift catalyst becomes ineffective in a membrane reactor because the reaction rate is severely inhibited by the build-up of the product CO(sub 2). During the past year, an improved microkinetic model for water-gas shift over iron oxide was developed. Its principal advantage over prior models is that it displays the correct asymptotic behavior at all temperatures and pressures as the composition approaches equilibrium. This model has been used to explore whether it might be possible to improve the performance of iron high temperature shift catalysts under conditions of high CO(sub 2) partial pressure. The model predicts that weakening the surface oxygen bond strength by less than 5% should lead to higher catalytic activity as well as resistance to rate inhibition at higher CO(sub 2) partial pressures. Two promoted iron high temperature shift catalysts were studied. Ceria and copper were each studied as promoters since there were indications in the literature that they might weaken the surface oxygen bond strength. Ceria was found to be ineffective as a promoter, but preliminary results with copper promoted FeCr high temperature shift catalyst show it to be much more resistant to rate inhibition by high levels of CO(sub 2). Finally, the performance of sulfided CoMo/Al(sub 2)O(sub 3) catalysts under conditions of high CO(sub 2) partial pressure was simulated using an available microkinetic model for water-gas shift over this catalyst. The model suggests that this catalyst might be quite effective in a medium temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor, provided that the membrane was resistant to the H(sub 2)S that is required in the feed

  10. Surface Modification of Ceramic Membranes with Thin-film Deposition Methods for Wastewater Treatment

    Jahangir, Daniyal

    2017-01-01

    water permeability (CWP) tests and fouling behavior by bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption tests. The study showed better fouling inhibition performance of all modified membranes; however the effect varied due to different surface characteristics

  11. Deposition of Pd–Ag thin film membranes on ceramic supports for hydrogen purification/separation

    Pereira, A.I. [Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus Azurém, 4800-058 (Portugal); Pérez, P.; Rodrigues, S.C.; Mendes, A.; Madeira, L.M. [LEPAE, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Tavares, C.J., E-mail: ctavares@fisica.uminho.pt [Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus Azurém, 4800-058 (Portugal)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Thin film Pd–Ag membranes have been produced for hydrogen selectivity. • Magnetron sputtering yields Pd–Ag compact films for atomic H diffusion. • The thin film Pd–Ag membranes yielded a selectivity of α (H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) = 10. - Abstract: Pd–Ag based membranes supported on porous α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (doped with yttria-stabilized zirconia) were studied for hydrogen selective separation. Magnetron sputtering technique was employed for the synthesis of thin film membranes. The hydrogen permeation flux is affected by the membrane columnar structure, which is formed during deposition. From scanning electron microscopy analysis, it was observed that different sputtering deposition pressures lead to distinct columnar structure growth. X-ray diffraction patterns provided evidence of a Pd–Ag solid solution with an average crystallite domain size of 21 nm, whose preferential growth can be altered by the deposition pressure. The gas-permeation results have shown that the Pd–Ag membrane supported on porous α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is selective toward H{sub 2}. For optimized membrane synthesis conditions, the permeance toward N{sub 2} is 0.076 × 10{sup −6} mol m{sup −2} s{sup −1} Pa{sup −1} at room temperature, whereas for a pressure difference of 300 kPa the H{sub 2}-flux is of the order of ca. 0.21 mol m{sup −2} s{sup −1}, which corresponds to a permeance of 0.71 × 10{sup −6} mol m{sup −2} s{sup −1} Pa{sup −1}, yielding a selectivity of α (H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) = 10. These findings suggest that the membrane has a reasonable capacity to selectively permeate this gas.

  12. Environment-oriented low-cost porous mullite ceramic membrane supports fabricated from coal gangue and bauxite.

    Lü, Qikai; Dong, Xinfa; Zhu, Zhiwen; Dong, Yingchao

    2014-05-30

    Porous mullite ceramic supports for filtration membrane were successfully fabricated via recycling of coal gangue and bauxite at sintering temperatures from 1100 to 1500°C with corn starch as pore-forming agent. The dynamic sintering behaviors, phase evolution, shrinkage, porosity and pore size, gas permeation flux, microstructure and mechanical property were systematically studied. A unique volume-expansion stage was observed at increased temperatures from 1276 to 1481°C caused by a mullitization-crystal-growth process. During this stage, open porosity increases and pore size distributions broaden, which result in a maximum of nitrogen gas flux at 1400°C. The X-ray diffraction results reveal that secondary mullitization took place from 1100°C and the major phase is mullite with a content of ∼84.7wt.% at 1400°C. SEM images show that the as-fabricated mullite supports have a porous microstructure composed of sintered glassy particles embedded with inter-locked mullite crystals, which grew gradually with increasing temperature from rod-like into blocky-like morphologies. To obtain mullite membrane supports with sufficient porosity and acceptable mechanical strength, the relationship between porosity and mechanical strength was investigated, which was fitted using a parabolic equation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. ITER TASK T26/28 (1995): Solubility, diffusion and absorption of hydrogen isotopes in potential fusion reactor ceramics

    Thompson, D.A.; Macauley-Newcombe, R.G.

    1996-04-01

    Ceramic insulators are integral parts of numerous components essential for the heating control and diagnostic measurement of fusion plasmas. For safe and reliable reactor operations it is necessary to be able to predict the resultant tritium inventories and permeation fluxes through these materials. Some materials being considered are Al 2 O 3 (both as single crystal sapphire and polycrystalline alumina) and BeO. This report contains results of ion-implantation, thermal absorption (diffusion loading) and ion-beam analysis experiments performed in 1994 and 1995 for ITER task T26/28. The combination of implantation and thermal absorption capabilities enable us to load samples with hydrogen isotopes under differing conditions. 13 figs., 1 tab., 11 refs

  14. Electrochemical membrane reactor: In situ separation and recovery of chromic acid and metal ions

    Khan, Jeeshan; Tripathi, Bijay P.; Saxena, Arunima; Shahi, Vinod K.

    2007-01-01

    An electrochemical membrane reactor with three compartments (anolyte, catholyte and central compartment) based on in-house-prepared cation- and anion-exchange membrane was developed to achieve in situ separation and recovery of chromic acid and metal ions. The physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the ion-exchange membrane under standard operating conditions reveal its suitability for the proposed reactor. Experiments using synthetic solutions of chromate and dichromate of different concentrations were carried out to study the feasibility of the process. Electrochemical reactions occurring at the cathode and anode under operating conditions are proposed. It was observed that metal ion migrated through the cation-exchange membrane from central compartment to catholyte and OH - formation at the cathode leads to the formation of metal hydroxide. Simultaneously, chromate ion migrated through the anion-exchange membrane from central compartment to the anolyte and formed chromic acid by combining H + produced their by oxidative water splitting. Thus a continuous decay in the concentration of chromate and metal ion was observed in the central compartment, which was recovered separately in the anolyte and catholyte, respectively, from their mixed solution. This process was completely optimized in terms of operating conditions such as initial concentration of chromate and metal ions in the central compartment, the applied cell voltage, chromate and metal ion flux, recovery percentage, energy consumption, and current efficiency. It was concluded that chromic acid and metal ions can be recovered efficiently from their mixed solution leaving behind the uncharged organics and can be reused as their corresponding acid and base apart from the purifying water for further applications

  15. Investigation of a novel protonic/electronic ceramic composite material as a candidate for hydrogen separation membranes

    Fish, Jason S.

    A novel ceramic protonic/electronic conductor composite BaCe 0.2Zr0.7Y0.1O3-delta / Sr0.95 Ti0.9Nb0.1O3-delta (BCZY27/STN95: BS27) has been synthesized, and its electrical properties and hydrogen permeability have been investigated. The volume ratio of the STN95 phase was varied from 50 - 70 % to test the effects on conductivity and hydrogen permeability. BCZY27 and STN95 powders were prepared by solid-state reaction, and membrane samples were fabricated through conventional and spark plasma sintering techniques. The phase composition, density, and microstructure were compared between the sintering methodologies. Total conductivities of 0.01 - 0.06 S·cm -1 were obtained in wet (+1 % H2O) dilute H2/(N 2, He, Ar) from 600 - 800 °C for 50 volume % STN95. With increasing STN content (60 and 70 volume %), conductivity generally increased, though remained lower than predicted by standard effective medium models, even at 70 volume % STN95. A new effective medium model was proposed, which accounted for an interfacial resistance term associated with the heterojunctions formed between the BCZY27 and STN95 phases. Better fits for the measured data were achieved with this new method, although some effects remain unexplained. Discrepancies between the model and experiment were attributed to space charge effects, grain boundary resistances, and insulating impurity phase formation during synthesis. Dense BS27 samples were tested for high-temperature hydrogen permeation and a measured flux of 0.006 mumol·cm-2·s -1 was recorded for a 50 volume % STN95 sample at 700 °C, using dry argon as a sweep gas. This value represents a modest improvement on other ceramic composite membranes, but remains short of targets for commercialization. Persistent leaks in the flux experiments generated a shallower hydrogen gradient across the samples, although this p(H2) on the sweep side simultaneously decreased the oxygen partial pressure gradient across the sample and preserved the reduced state

  16. Treatment of food waste recycling wastewater using anaerobic ceramic membrane bioreactor for biogas production in mainstream treatment process of domestic wastewater.

    Jeong, Yeongmi; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W; Park, Chanhyuk

    2017-10-15

    A bench-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) equipped with submerged flat-sheet ceramic membranes was operated at mesophilic conditions (30-35 °C) treating domestic wastewater (DWW) supplemented with food wasterecycling wastewater (FRW) to increase the organic loading rate (OLR) for better biogas production. Coupling ceramic membrane filtration with AnMBR treatment provides an alternative strategy for high organic wastewater treatment at short hydraulic retention times (HRTs) with the potential benefits of membrane fouling because they have a high hydrophilicity and more robust at extreme conditions. The anaerobic ceramic MBR (AnCMBR) treating mixture of actual FRW with DWW (with an influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 2,115 mg/L) was studied to evaluate the treatment performance in terms of organic matter removal and methane production. COD removal during actual FRW with DWW operation averaged 98.3 ± 1.0% corresponding to an average methane production of 0.21 ± 0.1 L CH 4 /g COD removed . Biogas sparging, relaxation and permeate back-flushing were concurrently employed to manage membrane fouling. A flux greater than 9.2 L m -2  h -1 (LMH) was maintained at 13 h HRT for approximately 200 days without chemical cleaning at an OLR of 2.95 kg COD m -3  d -1 . On day 100, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-gel beads were added into the AnCMBR to alleviate the membrane fouling, suggesting that their mechanical scouring effect contributed positively in reducing the fouling index (FI). Although these bio-carriers might accelerate the breaking up of bio-flocs, which released a higher amount of soluble microbial products (SMP), a 95.4% SMP rejection was achieved. Although the retention efficiency of dissolved organic carbons (DOC) was 91.4% across the ceramic membrane, a meaningful interpretation of organic carbon detection (OCD) fingerprints was conducted to better understand the ceramic membrane performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  17. Drinking water treatment using a submerged internal-circulation membrane coagulation reactor coupled with permanganate oxidation.

    Zhang, Zhongguo; Liu, Dan; Qian, Yu; Wu, Yue; He, Peiran; Liang, Shuang; Fu, Xiaozheng; Li, Jiding; Ye, Changqing

    2017-06-01

    A submerged internal circulating membrane coagulation reactor (MCR) was used to treat surface water to produce drinking water. Polyaluminum chloride (PACl) was used as coagulant, and a hydrophilic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) submerged hollow fiber microfiltration membrane was employed. The influences of trans-membrane pressure (TMP), zeta potential (ZP) of the suspended particles in raw water, and KMnO 4 dosing on water flux and the removal of turbidity and organic matter were systematically investigated. Continuous bench-scale experiments showed that the permeate quality of the MCR satisfied the requirement for a centralized water supply, according to the Standards for Drinking Water Quality of China (GB 5749-2006), as evaluated by turbidity (<1 NTU) and total organic carbon (TOC) (<5mg/L) measurements. Besides water flux, the removal of turbidity, TOC and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the raw water also increased with increasing TMP in the range of 0.01-0.05MPa. High ZP induced by PACl, such as 5-9mV, led to an increase in the number of fine and total particles in the MCR, and consequently caused serious membrane fouling and high permeate turbidity. However, the removal of TOC and DOC increased with increasing ZP. A slightly positive ZP, such as 1-2mV, corresponding to charge neutralization coagulation, was favorable for membrane fouling control. Moreover, dosing with KMnO 4 could further improve the removal of turbidity and DOC, thereby mitigating membrane fouling. The results are helpful for the application of the MCR in producing drinking water and also beneficial to the research and application of other coagulation and membrane separation hybrid processes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Performance and economics of a Pd-based planar WGS membrane reactor for coal gasification

    Dolan, M.D.; Donelson, R.; Dave, N.C.

    2010-01-01

    Conceptual 300 tonne per day (tpd) H 2 -from-coal plants have been the subject of several major costing exercises in the past decade. Incorporating conventional high- and low-temperature water-gas-shift (WGS) reactors, amine-based CO 2 removal and PSA-based H 2 purification systems, these studies provide a benchmark against which alternative H 2 -from-coal technologies can be compared. The catalytic membrane reactor (CMR), combining a WGS catalyst and hydrogen-selective metal membrane, can potentially replace the multiple shift and separation stages of a plant based on conventional technology. CMR-based shift and separation offers several major advantages over the conventional approach, including greater-than-equilibrium WGS conversion, the containment of the CO 2 at high-pressure and a reduction in the number of unit processes. To determine capital costs of a WGS CMR-based H 2 -from-coal plant, a prototype planar CMR was constructed and tested with varying catalyst bed depth, residence time and membrane type (commercially-sourced 50 μm Pd or 40 μm Pd-25Ag wt%). Experiments to measure CO conversion, and H 2 flux and yield were conducted at 400 C with a feed pressure of 20 bar H 2 O:C ratio of 3 and a H 2 product pressure of 1 bar. Under the optimum conditions examined (with a 40 μm-thick Pd-25Ag membrane and 2 would be required to provide a throughput of 300 tpd with 85% H 2 yield. The capital cost of the CMR component of the plant would be around $US 180 million (based on current metal prices), of which 73% can be attributed to the cost of the Pd-Ag alloy membranes. Incorporation of a membrane that meets the 2015 US DOE cost and flux targets would offer cost parity, with a plant cost of $US 44 million and a total membrane area of ∝13,000 m 2 . Meeting these performance and cost targets would likely require a shift to very thin Pd-alloy membranes or highly-permeable Group IV, V body-centred-cubic alloys. (author)

  19. Sol-gel route to synthesis of microporous ceramic membranes: Thermal stability of TiO2-ZrO2 mixed oxides

    Qunyin Xu; Anderson, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper concerning the synthesis of microporous ceramic membranes, the authors focus on the preparation and thermal stability of unsupported microporous TiO 2 -ZrO 2 mixed-oxide membranes. It has been observed that, by adding up to 20% ZrO 2 into TiO 2 or up to 10% TiO 2 into ZrO 2 , these microporous membranes display improved thermal stability. They can be fired up to 500 C for 0.5 h without closing micropores. However, membranes containing almost equal percentages of each component have lost microporous features and have low surface areas and low porosities. A phase diagram of a two-component TiO 2 -ZrO 2 mixed-oxide membrane has been prepared based on DTA and X-ray diffraction data in order to better understand the microstructure changes upon firing

  20. A novel ion transport membrane reactor for fundamental investigations of oxygen permeation and oxy-combustion under reactive flow conditions

    Kirchen, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) reactors present an attractive technology for combined air separation and fuel conversion in applications such as syngas production, oxidative coupling or oxy-combustion, with the promise of lower capital and operating costs, as well higher product selectivities than traditional technologies. The oxygen permeation rate through a given ITM is defined by the membrane temperature and oxygen chemical potential difference across it. Both of these parameters can be strongly influenced by thermochemical reactions occurring in the vicinity of the membrane, though in the literature they are often characterized in terms of the well mixed product stream at the reactor exit. This work presents the development of a novel ITM reactor for the fundamental investigation of the coupling between fuel conversion and oxygen permeation under well defined fluid dynamic and thermodynamic conditions, including provisions for spatially resolved, in-situ investigations. A planar, finite gap stagnation flow reactor with optical and probe access to the reaction zone is used to facilitate in-situ measurements and cross-validation with detailed numerical simulations. Using this novel reactor, baseline measurements are presented to elucidate the impact of the sweep gas fuel (CH4) fraction on the oxygen permeation and fuel conversion. In addition, the difference between well-mixed gas compositions measured at the reactor outlet and those measured in the vicinity of the membrane surface are discussed, demonstrating the unique utility of the reactor. © 2012 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. N-Doped TiO₂-Coated Ceramic Membrane for Carbamazepine Degradation in Different Water Qualities.

    Luster, Enbal; Avisar, Dror; Horovitz, Inna; Lozzi, Luca; Baker, Mark A; Grilli, Rossana; Mamane, Hadas

    2017-07-31

    The photocatalytic degradation of the model pollutant carbamazepine (CBZ) was investigated under simulated solar irradiation with an N-doped TiO₂-coated Al₂O₃ photocatalytic membrane, using different water types. The photocatalytic membrane combines photocatalysis and membrane filtration in a single step. The impact of each individual constituent such as acidity, alkalinity, dissolved organic matter (DOM), divalent cations (Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ), and Cl - on the degradation of CBZ was examined. CBZ in water was efficiently degraded by an N-doped TiO₂-coated Al₂O₃ membrane. However, elements added to the water, which simulate the constituents of natural water, had an impact on the CBZ degradation. Water alkalinity inhibited CBZ degradation mostly due to increase in pH while radical scavenging by carbonate was more dominant at higher values (>200 mg/L as CaCO₃). A negative effect of Ca 2+ addition on photocatalytic degradation was found only in combination with phosphate buffer, probably caused by deposition of CaHPO₄ or CaHPO₄·2H₂O on the catalyst surface. The presence of Cl - and Mg 2+ ions had no effect on CBZ degradation. DOM significantly inhibited CBZ degradation for all tested background organic compounds. The photocatalytic activity of N-doped TiO₂-coated Al₂O₃ membranes gradually decreased after continuous use; however, it was successfully regenerated by 0.1% HCl chemical cleaning. Nevertheless, dissolution of metals like Al and Ti should be monitored following acid cleaning.

  2. Coupling membrane pervaporation with a fixed-bed reactor for enhanced esterification of oleic acid with ethanol

    Han, Ying; Lv, Enmin; Ma, Lingling; Lu, Jie; Chen, Kexun; Ding, Jincheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The reactor coupling membrane pervaporation with a fixed-bed reactor was studied. • The factors effecting the esterification of oleic acid were investigated. • NaA zeolite membrane was used for dehydration in the coupled reactor. - Abstract: Process intensification through membrane pervaporation (PV) integrated with a fixed-bed reactor could be successfully applied to the esterification of oleic acid and ethanol, which is a crucial step in the biodiesel synthesis using waste oil and grease as resource. The properties of the NaA zeolite membrane such as structure, formulation and separation were investigated by scanning electronic microscopy–energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM–EDS), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and PV dehydration. Results showed that the NaA zeolite membrane had good separating property for removing water from the organics mixture. The operating conditions were optimized as the ethanol to oleic acid molar ratio of 15:1, feedstock flow rate of 1.0 ml/min, reaction temperature of 80.0 °C and catalyst bed height of 132 mm. The final conversion of oleic acid increased from 84.23% to 87.18% by PV using the NaA zeolite membrane at 24.0 h of operation. The membrane showed good PV performance after used for eight successive runs in the PV-assisted esterification. The resin exhibited a much high catalytic activity and operation stability after used for 100 h in the consecutive single pass fixed-bed esterification.

  3. Ultrasonic control of ceramic membrane fouling by particles: effect of ultrasonic factors.

    Chen, Dong; Weavers, Linda K; Walker, Harold W

    2006-07-01

    Ultrasound at 20 kHz was applied to a cross-flow ultrafiltration system with gamma-alumina membranes in the presence of colloidal silica particles to systematically investigate how ultrasonic factors affect membrane cleaning. Based on imaging of the ultrasonic cavitation region, optimal cleaning occurred when the membrane was outside but close to the cavitation region. Increasing the filtration pressure increased the compressive forces driving cavitation collapse and resulted in fewer cavitation bubbles absorbing and scattering sound waves and increasing sound wave penetration. However, an increased filtration pressure also resulted in greater permeation drag, and subsequently less improvement in permeate flux compared to low filtration pressure. Finally, pulsed ultrasound with short pulse intervals resulted in permeate flux improvement close to that of continuous sonication.

  4. Industrial ceramics - Properties, forming and applications

    Fantozzi, Gilbert; Niepce, Jean-Claude; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Alary, J.A.; Allard, B.; Ayral, A.; Bassat, J.M.; Elissalde, C.; Maglione, M.; Beauvy, M.; Bertrand, G.; Bignon, A.; Billieres, D.; Blanc, J.J.; Blumenfeld, P.; Bonnet, J.P.; Bougoin, M.; Bourgeon, M.; Boussuge, M.; Thorel, A.; Bruzek, C.E.; Cambier, F.; Carrerot, H.; Casabonne, J.M.; Chaix, J.M.; Chevalier, J.; Chopinet, M.H.; Couque, H.; Courtois, C.; Leriche, A.; Dhaler, D.; Denape, J.; Euzen, P.; Ganne, J.P.; Gauffinet, S.; Girard, A.; Gonon, M.; Guizard, C.; Hampshire, S.; Joulin, J.P.; Julbe, A.; Ferrato, M.; Fontaine, M.L.; Lebourgeois, R.; Lopez, J.; Maquet, M.; Marinel, S.; Marrony, M.; Martin, J.F.; Mougin, J.; Pailler, R.; Pate, M.; Petitpas, E.; Pijolat, C.; Pires-Franco, P.; Poirier, C.; Poirier, J.; Pourcel, F.; Potier, A.; Tulliani, J.M.; Viricelle, J.P.; Beauger, A.

    2013-01-01

    After a general introduction to ceramics (definition, general properties, elaboration, applications, market data), this book address conventional ceramics (elaboration, material types), thermo-structural ceramics (oxide based ceramics, non-oxide ceramics, fields of application, functional coatings), refractory ceramics, long fibre and ceramic matrix composites, carbonaceous materials, ceramics used for filtration, catalysis and the environment, ceramics for biomedical applications, ceramics for electronics and electrical engineering (for capacitors, magnetic, piezoelectric, dielectric ceramics, ceramics for hyper-frequency resonators), electrochemical ceramics, transparent ceramics (forming and sintering), glasses, mineral binders. The last chapter addresses ceramics used in the nuclear energy sector: in nuclear fuels and fissile material, absorbing ceramics and shields, in the management of nuclear wastes, new ceramics for reactors under construction or for future nuclear energy

  5. Presence of Fe-Al binary oxide adsorbent cake layer in ceramic membrane filtration and their impact for removal of HA and BSA.

    Kim, Kyung-Jo; Jang, Am

    2018-04-01

    To enhance the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) in ceramic (Ce) membrane filtration, an iron-aluminum binary oxide (FAO) was applied to the ceramic membrane surface as the adsorbent cake layer, and it was compared with heated aluminum oxide (HAO) for the evaluation of the control of NOM. Both the HAO and FAO adsorbent cake layers efficiently removed the NOM regardless of NOM's hydrophobic/hydrophilic characteristics, and the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal in NOM for FAO was 1-1.12 times greater than that for HAO, which means FAO was more efficient in the removal of DOC in NOM. FAO (0.03 μm), which is smaller in size than HAO (0.4 μm), had greater flux reduction than HAO. The flux reduction increased as the filtration proceeded because most of the organic foulants (colloid/particles and soluble NOM) were captured by the adsorbent cake layer, which caused fouling between the membrane surface and the adsorbent cake layer. However, no chemically irreversible fouling was observed on the Ce membrane at the end of the FAO adsorbent cake layer filtration. This means that a stable adsorbent cake layer by FAO formed on the Ce membrane, and that the reduced pure water flux of the Ce membrane, resulting from the NOM fouling, can easily be recovered through physicochemical cleaning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of clayey masses compositions starting from the residue incorporation of the red ceramic industry to obtain tubular ceramic membranes; Avaliacao das composicoes de massas argilosas a partir da incorporacao de residuo da industria de ceramica vermelha na obtencao de membranas ceramicas tubulares

    Silva, Adriano Lima da; Chaves, Alexsandra Cristina; Luna, Carlos Bruno Barreto; Neves, Gelmires de Araujo; Lira, Helio de Lucena, E-mail: adrianolimadasilva@hotmail.com, E-mail: alexsandra.chaves@ifap.edu.br, E-mail: brunobarretodemaufcg@hotmail.com, E-mail: gelmires@ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: helio@ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais

    2017-01-15

    The inappropriate residue disposal of red ceramic industry is very high. Nowadays, one of the major challenges is the investigation of processes to obtain alternative materials, enabling the use of these residues to manufacture new materials. This work's objective is to study clayey masses' compositions starting from the residue incorporation of the red ceramic industry to be used in tubular ceramic membranes. Two compositions of ceramic masses were established, composition A (50% of residue) and composition B (70% of residue). Granulometric analysis of the ceramic masses presented an average size of particles, what indicates membranes in the microfiltration scale. Another observed factor is related to the increase of residue amount, what favored a decrease in the ceramic mass' plasticity. A rise in the apparent porosity was also observed, probably because of a possible growing in the bigger pores numbers, due to the sintering high temperature and the elevation of residue quantity itself. (author)

  7. Techno-economic prospects of small-scale membrane reactors in a future hydrogen-fuelled transportation sector

    Sjardin, M.; Damen, K.J.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2006-01-01

    The membrane reactor is a novel technology for the production of hydrogen from natural gas. It promises economic small-scale hydrogen production, e.g. at refuelling stations and has the potential of inexpensive CO 2 separation. Four configurations of the membrane reactor have been modelled with Aspen plus to determine its thermodynamic and economic prospects. Overall energy efficiency is 84% HHV without H 2 compression (78% with compression up to 482bar). The modelling results also indicate that by using a sweep gas, the membrane reactor can produce a reformer exit stream consisting mainly of CO 2 and H 2 O (>90% mol ) suited for CO 2 sequestration after water removal with an efficiency loss of only 1% pt . Reforming with a 2MW membrane reactor (250 unit production volume) costs 14$/GJ H 2 including compression, which is more expensive than conventional steam reforming+compression (12$/GJ). It does, however, promise a cheap method of CO 2 separation, 14$/t CO 2 captured, due to the high purity of the exit stream. The well-to-wheel chain of the membrane reactor has been compared to centralised steam reforming to assess the trade-off between production scale and the construction of a hydrogen and a CO 2 distribution infrastructure. If the scale of centralised hydrogen production is below 40MW, the trade-off could be favourable for the membrane reactor with small-scale CO 2 capture (18$/GJ including H 2 storage, dispensing and CO 2 sequestration for 40MW SMR versus 19$/GJ for MR). The membrane reactor might become competitive with conventional steam reforming provided that thin membranes can be combined with high stability and a cheap manufacturing method for the membrane tubes. Thin membranes, industrial utility prices and larger production volumes (i.e. technological learning) might reduce the levelised hydrogen cost of the membrane reactor at the refuelling station to less than 14$/GJ including CO 2 sequestration cost, below that of large-scale H 2 production with

  8. Impact of the fouling mechanism on enzymatic depolymerization of xylan in different configurations of membrane reactors

    Mohd Sueb, Mohd Shafiq Bin; Luo, Jianquan; Meyer, Anne S.

    2017-01-01

    In order to maximize enzymatic xylan depolymerization while simultaneously purifying the resulting monosaccharide (xylose), different ultrafiltration (UF) membrane reactor configurations were evaluated. Initial results showed that the two hydrolytic enzymes required for complete depolymerization...... which hindered enzymatic attack in addition to fouling. Reaction with both enzymes followed by UF was found to be the optimal configuration, providing at least 40% higher xylan hydrolysis than the cascade configuration (involving sequential reaction with each of the enzymes separately......) and the simultaneous reaction-filtration with both enzymes, respectively. This study thus confirmed that the reactor configuration has a crucial impact on the performance of both the reaction and the separation process of xylose during enzymatic xylan degradation, and that the type of fouling mechanism varies...

  9. Effect of inlet conditions on the performance of a palladium membrane reactor

    Birdsell, S.A.; Willms, R.S.; Arzu, P.; Costello, A.

    1997-10-01

    Palladium membrane reactors (PMR) will be used to remove tritium and other hydrogen isotopes from impurities, such as tritiated methane and tritiated water, in the exhaust of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. In addition to fusion-fuel processing, the PMR system can be used to recover tritium from tritiated waste water. This paper investigates the effect of inlet conditions on the performance of a PMR. A set of experiments were run to determine, independently, the effect of inlet compositions and residence time on performance. Also, the experiments were designed to determine if the injected form of hydrogen (CH 4 or H 2 O) effects performance. Results show that the PMR operates at optimal hydrogen recovery with a broad range of inlet compositions and performance is shown to increase with increased residence time. PMR performance is shown to be independent of whether hydrogen is injected in the form of CH 4 or H 2 O

  10. Membrane chemical reactor (MCR) combining photocatalysis and microfiltration for grey water treatment.

    Rivero, M J; Parsons, S A; Jeffrey, P; Pidou, M; Jefferson, B

    2006-01-01

    Urban water recycling is now becoming an important issue where water resources are becoming scarce. This paper looks at reusing grey water; the preference is treatment processes based on biological systems to remove the dissolved organic content. Here, an alternative process, photocatalysis is discussed as it is an attractive technology that could be well-suited for treating the recalcitrant organic compounds found in grey water. The photocatalytic process oxidises organic reactants at a catalyst surface in the presence of ultraviolet light. Given enough exposure time, organic compounds will be oxidized into CO2 and water. The best contact is achieved in a slurry reactor but a second step to separate and recover the catalyst is need. This paper discusses a new membrane chemical reactor (MCR) combining photocatalysis and microfiltration for grey water treatment.

  11. Membrane reactor for water detritiation: a parametric study on operating parameters

    Mascarade, J.; Liger, K.; Troulay, M.; Perrais, C. [CEA, DEN, DTN/STPA/LIPC, Centre de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Joulia, X.; Meyer, X.M. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Toulouse (France)

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents the results of a parametric study done on a single stage finger-type packed-bed membrane reactor (PBMR) used for heavy water vapor de-deuteration. Parametric studies have been done on 3 operating parameters which are: the membrane temperature, the total feed flow rate and the feed composition through D{sub 2}O content variations. Thanks to mass spectrometer analysis of streams leaving the PBMR, speciation of deuterated species was achieved. Measurement of the amounts of each molecular component allowed the calculation of reaction quotient at the packed-bed outlet. While temperature variation mainly influences permeation efficiency, feed flow rate perturbation reveals dependence of conversion and permeation properties to contact time between catalyst and reacting mixture. The study shows that isotopic exchange reactions occurring on the catalyst particles surface are not thermodynamically balanced. Moreover, the variation of the heavy water content in the feed exhibits competition between permeation and conversion kinetics.

  12. A fluidized bed membrane bioelectrochemical reactor for energy-efficient wastewater treatment.

    Li, Jian; Ge, Zheng; He, Zhen

    2014-09-01

    A fluidized bed membrane bioelectrochemical reactor (MBER) was investigated using fluidized granular activated carbon (GAC) as a mean of membrane fouling control. During the 150-day operation, the MBER generated electricity with contaminant removal from either synthetic solution or actual wastewater, as a standalone or a coupled system. It was found that fluidized GAC could significantly reduce transmembrane pressure (TMP), although its function as a part of the anode electrode was minor. When the MBER was linked to a regular microbial fuel cell (MFC) for treating a wastewater from a cheese factory, the MFC acted as a major process for energy recovery and contaminant removal, and the coupled system removed more than 90% of chemical oxygen demand and >80% of suspended solids. The analysis showed that the ratio of energy recovery and consumption was slightly larger than one, indicating that the coupled system could be theoretically energy neutral. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of ceramic membranes for seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) pre-treatment

    Hamad, Juma; Ha, Changwon; Kennedy, Maria Dolores; Amy, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    and particulate fouling materials (algae, suspended and colloidal particles). Also, a pre-treatment barrier reduces organics and provides better feed water quality for RO membranes. MF and UF pre-treatment prior to SWRO provides Low Silt Density Index (SDI) values

  14. Optimisation of oxygen ion transport in materials for ceramic membrane devices.

    Kilner, J A

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen transport in ceramic oxide materials has received much attention over the past few decades. Much of this interest has stemmed from the desire to construct high temperature electrochemical devices for energy conversion, an example being the solid oxide fuel cell. In order to achieve high performance for these devices, insights are needed in how to achieve optimum performance from the functional components such as the electrolytes and electrodes. This includes the optimisation of oxygen transport through the crystal lattice of electrode and electrolyte materials and across the homogeneous (grain boundary) and heterogeneous interfaces that exist in real devices. Strategies are discussed for the optimisation of these quantities and current problems in the characterisation of interfacial transport are explored.

  15. A Miniature Membrane Reactor for Evaluation of Process Design Options on the Enzymatic Degradation of Pectin

    Zainal Alam, Muhd Nazrul Hisham; Pinelo, Manuel; Arnous, Anis

    2011-01-01

    was fabricated from poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with a working volume of ∼190 μL. The prototype also contained the necessary sensors and actuators, i.e., pressure transducer, mixing via magnetic stirrer bar and a temperature controller. The functionality of the prototype...... was demonstrated by performing a continuous enzymatic degradation of pectin experiment for a range of reactor conditions: different membrane molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) values, enzyme-to-substrate ratios (E/S), and substrate feeding rates (F) were assessed. Based on the experimental data, it was found...

  16. Preliminary design of fusion reactor fuel cleanup system by palladium alloy membrane method

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Konishi, Satoshi; Naruse, Yuji

    1981-10-01

    A design of palladium diffuser and Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) for D-T fusion reactor is proposed. Feasibility of palladium alloy membrane method is discussed based on the early studies by the authors. Operating conditions of the palladium diffuser are determined experimentally. Dimensions of the diffuser are estimated from computer simulation. FCU system is designed under the feed conditions of Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The system is composed of Pd-diffusers, catalytic oxidizer, freezer and zink beds, and has some advantages in system layout and operation. This design can readily be extended to other conditions of plasma exhaust gases. (author)

  17. Engineering a self-driven PVDF/PDA hybrid membranes based on membrane micro-reactor effect to achieve super-hydrophilicity, excellent antifouling properties and hemocompatibility

    Li, Jian-Hua; Ni, Xing-Xing; Zhang, De-Bin; Zheng, Hui; Wang, Jia-Bin; Zhang, Qi-Qing

    2018-06-01

    A facile and versatile approach for the preparation of super-hydrophilic, excellent antifouling and hemocompatibility membranes had been developed through the generation in situ of bio-inspired polydopamine (PDA) microspheres on PVDF membranes. SEM images showed that the PDA microspheres were uniformly dispersed on the upper surface and the lower surface of the modified membranes. And there were a great number of PDA microspheres immobilized on the cross-section, but the interconnected pores structure was not destroyed. These facts indicated the existence of membrane micro-reactor effect for the whole membrane structure. Considering the remarkable improvement of hydrophilicity, antifouling properties, and permeation fluxes, we also proposed the cluster phenolic hydroxyl effect for the PVDF/PDA hybrid membranes. And the cluster phenolic hydroxyl effect can be ascribed to the all directions distributed phenolic hydroxyl groups on the whole membrane structure. Besides, the self-driven filtration experiments showed the great wetting ability and permeability of the PVDF/PDA hybrid membranes in filtration process without any external pressure. This implied the existence of accelerating self-driven force after the water flow flowed into the internal of membranes, which contributed to the increase of water flow velocity. All the three aspects were in favor of the enhancement of hydrophilicity, antifouling properties and permeability of the modified membranes. Moreover, the conventional filtration tests, oil/water emulsion filtration tests and protein adsorption tests were also carried out to discuss the practical applications of PVDF/PDA hybrid membranes. And the hemocompatibility of the modified membranes was also proved to enhance greatly through the hemolysis tests and platelet adhesion tests, indicating that the membranes were greatly promising in biomedical applications. The strategy of material modification reported here is substrate-independent and can be extended

  18. Numerical simulation of ion transport membrane reactors: Oxygen permeation and transport and fuel conversion

    Hong, Jongsup

    2012-07-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) based reactors have been suggested as a novel technology for several applications including fuel reforming and oxy-fuel combustion, which integrates air separation and fuel conversion while reducing complexity and the associated energy penalty. To utilize this technology more effectively, it is necessary to develop a better understanding of the fundamental processes of oxygen transport and fuel conversion in the immediate vicinity of the membrane. In this paper, a numerical model that spatially resolves the gas flow, transport and reactions is presented. The model incorporates detailed gas phase chemistry and transport. The model is used to express the oxygen permeation flux in terms of the oxygen concentrations at the membrane surface given data on the bulk concentration, which is necessary for cases when mass transfer limitations on the permeate side are important and for reactive flow modeling. The simulation results show the dependence of oxygen transport and fuel conversion on the geometry and flow parameters including the membrane temperature, feed and sweep gas flow, oxygen concentration in the feed and fuel concentration in the sweep gas. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Production of hydrogen from bio-ethanol in catalytic membrane reactor

    Gernot, E.; Aupretre, F.; Deschamps, A.; Etievant, C.; Epron, F.; Marecot, P.; Duprez, D.

    2006-01-01

    Production of hydrogen from renewable energy sources offers a great potential for CO 2 emission reduction, responsible for global warming. Among renewable energies, liquid biofuels are very convenient hydrogen carriers for decentralized applications such as micro-cogeneration and transports. Ethanol, produced from sugar plants and cereals, allows a reduction of more than 60% of CO 2 emissions in comparison to gasoline. BIOSTAR is an R and D project, co-funded by the French Agency for Environment and Energy Management (ADEME) which aims at developing an efficient source of hydrogen from bio-ethanol, suitable for proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems. The objectives are to obtain, through catalytic process at medium temperature range, an efficient conversion of bio-ethanol into pure hydrogen directly usable for PEMFC. CETH has developed a catalytic membrane reformer (CMR), based on a patented technology, integrating a steam reforming catalyst as well as a combustion catalyst. Both catalysts have been developed and optimized for membrane reactor in partnership with the University of Poitiers. The composite metallic membrane developed by CETH allows hydrogen extraction near the hydrogen production sites, which enhances both efficiency and compactness. (authors)

  20. Nuclear Track-Etched Pore Membrane Production Using OAEP's Research Reactor

    Chittrakarn, Thawat; Bhongsuwan, Tripob; Wanichapichart, Pikul; Nuanuin, Paiboon; Chongkum, Somporn; Khonduangkaew, Areerat; Bordeepong, Sunaree

    2003-10-01

    Result of this study shows that the OAEP's nuclear research reactor is a good source of both fast and thermal neutrons for pore piercing process on polycarbonate thin film. With our experimental design, the fast neutron provides better results in pore piercing comparing with thermal neutron bombardment. This can be explained that most of the latent tracks that occur by thermal neutron bombardment do not piercing through the thin film. Chemical etching process using NaOH solution with an appropriated time, concentration and temperature was employed to enlarge the latent tracks in the bombarded film by fast neutrons. Fast neutron bombardment with 5, 10 and 20 minutes bombarding time successfully produces the nuclear track membrane. Pore size and pore density of the produced membranes examined by SEM were 0.24-1.01 μm and 4.67 - 245 x 10 6 pore/cm 2 , respectively. Bubble point test showed the maximum pore diameter of the produced membrane ranged between 1.18 - 3.25 μm. Water permeability was studied and compared between the produced and commercial membranes