WorldWideScience

Sample records for ceramic green substrate

  1. Micro Embossing of Ceramic Green Substrates for Micro Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Shan, X -C; Maw, H P; Lu, C W; Lam, Y C

    2008-01-01

    Multilayered ceramic substrates with embedded micro patterns are becoming increasingly important, for example, in harsh environment electronics and microfluidic devices. Fabrication of these embedded micro patterns, such as micro channels, cavities and vias, is a challenge. This study focuses on the process of patterning micro features on ceramic green substrates using micro embossing. A ceramic green tape that possessed near-zero shrinkage in the x-y plane was used, six layers of which were laminated as the embossing substrate. The process parameters that impact on the pattern fidelity were investigated and optimized in this study. Micro features with line-width as small as several micrometers were formed on the ceramic green substrates. The dynamic thermo-mechanical analysis indicated that extending the holding time at certain temperature range would harden the green substrates with little effect on improving the embossing fidelity. Ceramic substrates with embossed micro patterns were obtain d after co-firi...

  2. Self-supported ceramic substrates with directional porosity by mold freeze casting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurauskis, Jonas; Graves, Christopher R.; Moreno, R.;

    2016-01-01

    Manufacture of thin-film ceramic substrates with high permeability and robustness is of high technological interest. In this work thin (green state thickness ∼500 μm) porous yttria-stabilized zirconia self-supported substrates were fabricated by pouring stable colloidal aqueous suspensions in a m...

  3. Effect of colouring green stage zirconia on the adhesion of veneering ceramics with different thermal expansion coefficients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guliz Aktas; Erdal Sahin; Pekka Vallittu; Mutlu Ozcan; Lippo Lassila

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the adhesion of zirconia core ceramics with their corresponding veneering ceramics, having different thermal expansion coefficients (TECs), when zirconia ceramics were coloured at green stage. Zirconia blocks (N5240;6 mm37 mm37 mm) were manufactured from two materials namely, ICE Zirconia (Group 1) and Prettau Zirconia (Group 2). In their green stage, they were randomly divided into two groups. Half of the specimens were coloured with colouring liquid (shade A2). Three different veneering ceramics with different TEC (ICE Ceramic, GC Initial Zr and IPS e.max Ceram) were fired on both coloured and non-coloured zirconia cores. Specimens of high noble alloys (Esteticor Plus) veneered with ceramic (VM 13) (n516) acted as the control group. Core-veneer interface of the specimens were subjected to shear force in the Universal Testing Machine (0.5 mm?min21). Neither the zirconia core material (P50.318) nor colouring (P50.188) significantly affected the results (three-way analysis of variance, Tukey’s test). But the results were significantly affected by the veneering ceramic (P50.000). Control group exhibited significantly higher mean bond strength values (45.768) MPa than all other tested groups ((27.164.1)2(39.764.7) and (27.465.6)2(35.964.7) MPa with and without colouring, respectively) (P,0.001). While in zirconia-veneer test groups, predominantly mixed type of failures were observed with the veneering ceramic covering ,1/3 of the substrate surface, in the metal-ceramic group, veneering ceramic was left adhered .1/3 of the metal surface. Colouring zirconia did not impair adhesion of veneering ceramic, but veneering ceramic had a significant influence on the core-veneer adhesion. Metal-ceramic adhesion was more reliable than all zirconia-veneer ceramics tested.

  4. Application of NDE methods to green ceramics: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Karplus, H.B.; Poeppel, R.B.; Ellingson, W.A.; Berger, H.; Robbins, C.; Fuller, E.

    1984-03-01

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation to assess the effectiveness of microradiography, ultrasonic methods, nuclear magnetic resonance, and neutron radiography for the nondestructive evaluation of green (unfired), ceramics. Objective is to obtain useful information on defects, cracking, delaminations, agglomerates, inclusions, regions of high porosity, and anisotropy.

  5. Application of NDE methods to green ceramics: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation to assess the effectiveness of microradiography, ultrasonic methods, nuclear magnetic resonance, and neutron radiography for the nondestructive evaluation of green (unfired), ceramics. Objective is to obtain useful information on defects, cracking, delaminations, agglomerates, inclusions, regions of high porosity, and anisotropy

  6. Sol-gel derived ceramic electrolyte films on porous substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueper, T.W.

    1992-05-01

    A process for the deposition of sol-gel derived thin films on porous substrates has been developed; such films should be useful for solid oxide fuel cells and related applications. Yttria-stabilized zirconia films have been formed from metal alkoxide starting solutions. Dense films have been deposited on metal substrates and ceramic substrates, both dense and porous, through dip-coating and spin-coating techniques, followed by a heat treatment in air. X-ray diffraction has been used to determine the crystalline phases formed and the extent of reactions with various substrates which may be encountered in gas/gas devices. Surface coatings have been successfully applied to porous substrates through the control of substrate pore size and deposition parameters. Wetting of the substrate pores by the coating solution is discussed, and conditions are defined for which films can be deposited over the pores without filling the interiors of the pores. Shrinkage cracking was encountered in films thicker than a critical value, which depended on the sol-gel process parameters and on the substrate characteristics. Local discontinuities were also observed in films which were thinner than a critical value which depended on the substrate pore size. A theoretical discussion of cracking mechanisms is presented for both types of cracking, and the conditions necessary for successful thin formation are defined. The applicability of these film gas/gas devices is discussed.

  7. Experimental analysis of green roof substrate detention characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yio, Marcus H N; Stovin, Virginia; Werdin, Jörg; Vesuviano, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs may make an important contribution to urban stormwater management. Rainfall-runoff models are required to evaluate green roof responses to specific rainfall inputs. The roof's hydrological response is a function of its configuration, with the substrate - or growing media - providing both retention and detention of rainfall. The objective of the research described here is to quantify the detention effects due to green roof substrates, and to propose a suitable hydrological modelling approach. Laboratory results from experimental detention tests on green roof substrates are presented. It is shown that detention increases with substrate depth and as a result of increasing substrate organic content. Model structures based on reservoir routing are evaluated, and it is found that a one-parameter reservoir routing model coupled with a parameter that describes the delay to start of runoff best fits the observed data. Preliminary findings support the hypothesis that the reservoir routing parameter values can be defined from the substrate's physical characteristics.

  8. Experimental analysis of green roof substrate detention characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yio, Marcus H N; Stovin, Virginia; Werdin, Jörg; Vesuviano, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs may make an important contribution to urban stormwater management. Rainfall-runoff models are required to evaluate green roof responses to specific rainfall inputs. The roof's hydrological response is a function of its configuration, with the substrate - or growing media - providing both retention and detention of rainfall. The objective of the research described here is to quantify the detention effects due to green roof substrates, and to propose a suitable hydrological modelling approach. Laboratory results from experimental detention tests on green roof substrates are presented. It is shown that detention increases with substrate depth and as a result of increasing substrate organic content. Model structures based on reservoir routing are evaluated, and it is found that a one-parameter reservoir routing model coupled with a parameter that describes the delay to start of runoff best fits the observed data. Preliminary findings support the hypothesis that the reservoir routing parameter values can be defined from the substrate's physical characteristics. PMID:24135095

  9. Laser Welding of Alumina Ceramic Substrates with Two Fixed Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedore, Blake William Clark

    Laser welding was investigated as a potential joining technology for alumina ceramic substrates. The objective of this study was to develop a method to preheat the ceramic using a single defocused laser beam prior to welding. Engineering ceramics are employed in a variety of systems and environments due to their unique properties. Joining technologies must be developed to facilitate the manufacture of complex or large ceramic components. Laser welding is advantageous as it forms joints rapidly, and does not introduce intermediate materials to form the bond, which can have deleterious effects. The Laser Machining System (LMS) at Queen's University was adapted for this study. A defocused far-infrared (FIR) laser beam was positioned to overlay a focused near-infrared (NIR) laser beam; the defocused FIR beam preheated the ceramic substrate and the focused NIR beam formed the weld. A finite element model was developed in COMSOL MultiPhysics to simulate the preheating processes and to develop a preheating protocol. The protocol was implemented using the FIR beam and adjusted to achieve preheating temperatures of 1450, 1525, and 1600°C. Welds were performed on 1 mm thick alumina plates using the preheating protocols and NIR beam powers of 25, 50, and 75 W. Weld speed was held constant throughout the study at 0.5 mm/s. The preheating protocols were successful at achieving near-constant preheating temperatures, with standard deviations below 32 degrees. Partially penetrating welds were formed with the NIR beam at 25 W, and fully penetrating welds at 50 and 75 W. Large pores were present in the 25 W and 50 W welds. Minimal porosity was observed in the welds formed at 75 W. All of the welded plates experienced a transverse fracture that extended perpendicular to weld, and a longitudinal fracture extending parallel to the weld. This study shows that a fixed defocused laser beam can successfully preheat alumina substrates to the high temperatures required for welding; however

  10. Alumina-based Ceramic Material for High-voltage Ceramic Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Sangawar

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the study of the particle size distribution, surface area and their effecton sintering of alumina (Al2O3 using additives such as magnesium oxide (MgO and silica (SiO2,so that the samples could be sintered to high relative density (~ 97.43 % with controlled graingrowth. However, the use of MgO along with SiO2 on Al2O3 produced the powder compactshaving high Green density, sintered density with minimum porosity to achieve high dielectricstrength ceramic material, so that material can be used for high-voltage insulator applications.

  11. Manipulating soil microbial communities in extensive green roof substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineux, Chloe J; Connop, Stuart P; Gange, Alan C

    2014-09-15

    There has been very little investigation into the soil microbial community on green roofs, yet this below ground habitat is vital for ecosystem functioning. Green roofs are often harsh environments that would greatly benefit from having a healthy microbial system, allowing efficient nutrient cycling and a degree of drought tolerance in dry summer months. To test if green roof microbial communities could be manipulated, we added mycorrhizal fungi and a microbial mixture ('compost tea') to green roof rootzones, composed mainly of crushed brick or crushed concrete. The study revealed that growing media type and depth play a vital role in the microbial ecology of green roofs. There are complex relationships between depth and type of substrate and the biomass of different microbial groups, with no clear pattern being observed. Following the addition of inoculants, bacterial groups tended to increase in biomass in shallower substrates, whereas fungal biomass change was dependent on depth and type of substrate. Increased fungal biomass was found in shallow plots containing more crushed concrete and deeper plots containing more crushed brick where compost tea (a live mixture of beneficial bacteria) was added, perhaps due to the presence of helper bacteria for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Often there was not an additive affect of the microbial inoculations but instead an antagonistic interaction between the added AM fungi and the compost tea. This suggests that some species of microbes may not be compatible with others, as competition for limited resources occurs within the various substrates. The overall results suggest that microbial inoculations of green roof habitats are sustainable. They need only be done once for increased biomass to be found in subsequent years, indicating that this is a novel and viable method of enhancing roof community composition.

  12. Manipulating soil microbial communities in extensive green roof substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineux, Chloe J; Connop, Stuart P; Gange, Alan C

    2014-09-15

    There has been very little investigation into the soil microbial community on green roofs, yet this below ground habitat is vital for ecosystem functioning. Green roofs are often harsh environments that would greatly benefit from having a healthy microbial system, allowing efficient nutrient cycling and a degree of drought tolerance in dry summer months. To test if green roof microbial communities could be manipulated, we added mycorrhizal fungi and a microbial mixture ('compost tea') to green roof rootzones, composed mainly of crushed brick or crushed concrete. The study revealed that growing media type and depth play a vital role in the microbial ecology of green roofs. There are complex relationships between depth and type of substrate and the biomass of different microbial groups, with no clear pattern being observed. Following the addition of inoculants, bacterial groups tended to increase in biomass in shallower substrates, whereas fungal biomass change was dependent on depth and type of substrate. Increased fungal biomass was found in shallow plots containing more crushed concrete and deeper plots containing more crushed brick where compost tea (a live mixture of beneficial bacteria) was added, perhaps due to the presence of helper bacteria for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Often there was not an additive affect of the microbial inoculations but instead an antagonistic interaction between the added AM fungi and the compost tea. This suggests that some species of microbes may not be compatible with others, as competition for limited resources occurs within the various substrates. The overall results suggest that microbial inoculations of green roof habitats are sustainable. They need only be done once for increased biomass to be found in subsequent years, indicating that this is a novel and viable method of enhancing roof community composition. PMID:24992459

  13. Study of water infiltration in a lightweight green roof substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomankova, Klara; Holeckova, Martina; Jelinkova, Vladimira; Snehota, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Green roofs have a positive impact on the environment (e.g. improving microclimate and air quality in cities, reducing solar absorbance and storm water). A laboratory infiltration experiment was conducted on the narrow flume serving as 2D vertical model of a green roof. The lightweight Optigreen substrate Type M was used (depth of 20 cm). The front wall of the flume was transparent and inspected by digital camera. The experiment was designed to measure pressure head, volumetric water content and calculate water retention in the substrate. Experiment comprised three artificial rainfall intensities with different values of initial water content of the substrate. The experimental results confirmed that green roofs have the ability to retain rainwater and thus have a beneficial effect on reducing runoff. In the experiment with the artificial 10 minutes rainfall event (total precipitation of 29 mm), the air dry substrate retained 95.9 % of precipitation. On the other hand for moist initial condition 4.2 % of precipitations amount was captured in the substrate. Additionally, the analysis of images taken during the experiment confirmed preferential flow and uneven advancement of the wetting front. The research was realized as a part of the University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings supported by the EU and with financial support from the Czech Science Foundation under project number 14-10455P.

  14. Thin-film solar cells on perlite glass-ceramic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Stepan G.; Babayan, Virab H.; Musayelyan, Ashot S.; Harutyunyan, Levon A.; Zalesski, Valery B.; Kravchenko, Vladimir M.; Leonova, Tatyana R.; Polikanin, Alexander M.; Khodin, Alexander A.

    2013-06-01

    For the first time, thin-film CIGS solar cells have been fabricated by co-evaporation on specially developed non-conducting perlite (an aluminum potassium sodium silicate natural mineral of volcanic origin) glass-ceramic substrates to develop a fully integrated photovoltaic and building element. Such glass-ceramic material can meet the physical requirements to solar cells substrates as well as the cost goals. The preliminary data presented show that CIGS solar cells deposited on ceramic substrates can exhibit efficiency higher than 10%.

  15. Adhesion of ceramic coating on thin and smooth metal substrate: A novel approach with a nano-structured ceramic interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adhesion of plasma-sprayed coating is, to a large extent, controlled by the cleanness and roughness of the surface on which the coating is deposited. So, most of the plasma spray procedures involve surface pretreatment by grit-blasting to adapt the roughness of the surface to the size of the impacting particles. This preparation process brings about compressive stresses that make it inappropriate for thin substrates. The present works aim to elaborate a thick ceramic coating (about 0.5 mm thick) on a thin metal substrate (1 mm thick) with a smooth surface (Ra of about 0.4 μm). The coating system is intended for use in a Generation-IV nuclear energy system. It must exhibit a good adhesion between the ceramic topcoat and the smooth metal substrate to meet the specifications of the application. Our approach consisted of depositing the ceramic topcoat by air plasma spraying on a few micrometers thick ceramic layer made by suspension plasma spraying. This nano-structured layer played the role of a bond coat for the topcoat and made it possible to deposit it on the as-received substrate. The adhesion of the nano-structured layer was measured by the Vickers indentation cracking technique and that of the ceramic duplex coating system by tensile test. (authors)

  16. Plasma-Spraying Ceramics Onto Smooth Metallic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Rouge, Carl J.; Leissler, George

    1992-01-01

    In fabrication process, plasma-sprayed ceramic coats bonded strongly to smooth metallic surfaces. Principal use of such coats in protecting metal parts in hot-gas paths of advanced gas turbine engines. Process consists of application of initial thin layer of ceramic on smooth surface by low-pressure-plasma spraying followed by application of layer of conventional, low-thermal-conductivity atmospheric-pressure plasma-sprayed ceramic.

  17. Modelling unsaturated flow patterns in green roof substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Anna; Gnecco, Ilaria; Lanza, Luca G.

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this research is to examine the unsaturated flow within the green roof substrates realized with high conductivity and coarse grained porous media. In order to base our research on experimental evidences, a monitoring program was carried out at University of Genova (Italy). The green roof experimental site was obtained by retrofitting an existing single-layer vegetated roof built in the sixties into a modern technological system fully equipped with sensors for on-site meteorological, hygrometric and flow rate measurements. The drainage and growing substrates are volcanic material mined, blended and graded by Europomice Srl (Grosseto, Italy). These graded porous media are employed in green roof systems for their low bulk density, high porosity and high hydraulic conductivity. The site is equipped with a meteorological station (for rain data, air temperature and humidity, solar radiation and air pressure), four TDR probes for continuous water content monitoring along a vertical profile and a suitable hydraulic device for continuous outflow monitoring. The SWMS - 2D model that solves the Richards' equation for two-dimensional saturated -unsaturated water flow was used to simulate the hydrologic response of the experimental green roof. The model was calibrated and validated using rain events recorded at the experimental site in a one-year monitoring campaign. The calibration and validation events are selected in order to include events representative of the four seasonal conditions characterized by different antecedent dry weather periods and consequently different initial soil water content distributions. The calibration and validation strategy involved comparing predicted and measured outflow hydrographs. The mechanistic model, here employed to describe the variably saturated flow within the thin stratigraphy of a green roof, is based on a single porosity approach and is demonstrated to suitably describe both the outflow hydrograph and the water content

  18. CVD of solid oxides in porous substrates for ceramic membrane modification

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Y. S.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of yttria-doped zirconia has been experimented systematically in various types of porous ceramic substrates by a modified chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process operating in an opposing reactant geometry using water vapor and corresponding metal chloride vapors as reactants. The effects of substrate pore dimension and structure, bulk-phase reactant concentration, reactant diffusivity in substrate pores and deposition temperature are experimentally studied and explained qualita...

  19. Preparation of High Performance Green Alumina Ceramic Balls by Roller Production Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Lianyun; WU Bolin; ZHANG Lianmeng; ZHANG Guifang

    2008-01-01

    To reuse roller waste as a raw material of high performance green ceramic balls,three kinds of white alumina ceramic balls whose wear resistance were 2-3 times of the best high alumina ceramic ball with90% Al2O3 were prepared,and the Al2O3 content of the prepared balls was 75%.It is found that the effect of calcia and magnesia on the wear resistance of ceramic balls is contrast to the accepted one: the wear rate of the ceramic balls prepared in CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system is the lowest and the wear rate of the ceramic balls prepared in MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 is the highest.The main crystal phase of the ceramic ball is mullite and corundum.The ceramic ball granular is uniform and fine with 4-5 um average size.The pore diameter is about 2 um.The wear way of the ceramic balls is mainly transcrystalline fracture.

  20. Corrosion Resistance of Plasma Sprayed Ceramic CompositeCoatings on Q235 Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of SiO2/Al2O3, TiO2/Al2O3 and (SiO2+TiO2)/Al2O3 ceramic composite coatings on Q235 substrate fabricated by means of plasma spraying was investigated. The results show that Al2O3+13 wt pct TiO2 ceramic coating has the highest density, the lowest connected porosity and the best corrosion resistance. The corrosion mechanism of Q235 with ceramic coating has also been studied.

  1. Automatic quality control in the production of ceramic substrates by pulsed laser cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morace, Renate Erica; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo;

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the use of optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) in the quality control of ceramic substrates produced by a CO2 pulsed laser. A procedure of automatic measurements on a CMM equipped with a CCD camera was developed. In particular, the number and the distribution...... of cavities on the cut face of thin ceramic substrates were investigated and different strategies to assess the depth and the pitch of cavities were compared. Then, the measurement uncertainty for these two critical parameters was evaluated using the method described in ISO/TS 15530-3....

  2. Nanopore fabrication by heating au particles on ceramic substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreede, de Lennart J.; Berg, van den Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2015-01-01

    We found that gold nanoparticles, when heated to close to their melting point on substrates of amorphous SiO2 or amorphous Si3N4, move perpendicularly into the substrate. Dependent on applied temperatures, particles can become buried or leave nanopores of extreme aspect ratio (diameter congruent to

  3. Dynamic Characteristics of Drop-substrate Interactions in Direct Ceramic Ink-jet Printing using High Speed Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramshankar Somasundaram

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Solid freeform fabrication has the potential to construct ceramic parts, directly from computer aided design (CAD data, without a mould or a die by the addition of material. Direct ceramic ink-jet printing is one of the techniques used in freeform fabrication. Ceramic tiles used in space vehicles can be produced by this method wherein a porous ceramic substrate (Al2O3/SiC can be filled with a ceramic ink and processed subsequently. The success of this process depends on the systematic preparation of ceramic inks and the deposition of the ceramic ink on the substrate. In this paper, photographic studies were made on the characteristics of ceramic ink droplets when these are deposited on a porous ceramic substrate from a burette under gravity. For this investigation, ceramic inks were prepared using different amounts (0.25–3.0 vol. % of an organic dispersant (oleic acid added to a ceramic composition containing different amounts: (a (7.5– 17.5 vol. % of alumina and (b (7.5–15.0 vol. % of zirconia with ethyl alcohol as a carrier. From this study, the drop formation, sedimentation in the drop, spread of drop on the substrate, splashing of drop impinging a previous ceramic ink layer on the substrate, and merging of droplets after deposition, are observed. This method is useful for manufacturing of parts with ceramic fibres filled with ceramic particles and this study can provide inner details on the behaviour of ink drops.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(6, pp.675-682, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1575

  4. Wave Concept Iterative Procedure Analysis of Patch Antennas on Nanostructured Ceramic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdemir Silva Neto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The wave concept iterative procedure (WCIP is proposed to analyze rectangular and circular patch antennas on nanostructured ceramic substrates. Principles of WCIP are described and advantages are emphasized. The analysis of microstrip antennas on double layered substrates is performed in space and spectral domains. In addition, Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT is used to improve the efficiency of the method. WCIP simulated results are compared to HFSS software ones. A good agreement is observed.

  5. CVD of solid oxides in porous substrates for ceramic membrane modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y.S.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of yttria-doped zirconia has been experimented systematically in various types of porous ceramic substrates by a modified chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process operating in an opposing reactant geometry using water vapor and corresponding metal chloride vapors as reactants. The effe

  6. A New Ceramic Substrate Glaze with High Resistance to Molten Aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming ZHOU; Ke LI; Da SHU; Jiao ZHANG; Baode SUN; Jun WANG

    2003-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of ceramic substrate glazes to molten aluminum was studied in this paper. The glazes can spreadslightly in aluminum alloy according to SEM examination of solidified interface between the glazes and aluminumalloy. The components of B2O3-P2O5 glazes were not detected with electron probe at the side of aluminum alloynear the interface, but the components of boron-free glaze were detected. It is shown that borophosphate glazes canresist the corrosion of molten aluminum.

  7. Chemical Stripping of ceramic films of titanium aluminum nitride from hard metal substrates

    OpenAIRE

    U. Bardi; D. Bonacchi; Rizzi, G.; Scrivani, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report here the result of a study of different chemical stripping methodologies for ceramic coatings deposited by PVD on hard metal substrates. We show that an approach based on the study of the system by surface science techniques leads to the possibility of developing effective stripping methods as well as guidelines for improving the process. We will report about two methods tested for the stripping of layers of titanium aluminum nitride (TINALOX) deposited by Physical Vapor De...

  8. Effect of colouring green stage zirconia on the adhesion of veneering ceramics with different thermal expansion coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Guliz; Sahin, Erdal; Vallittu, Pekka; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated the adhesion of zirconia core ceramics with their corresponding veneering ceramics, having different thermal expansion coefficients (TECs), when zirconia ceramics were coloured at green stage. Zirconia blocks (N=240; 6 mm×7 mm×7 mm) were manufactured from two materials namely, ICE Zirconia (Group 1) and Prettau Zirconia (Group 2). In their green stage, they were randomly divided into two groups. Half of the specimens were coloured with colouring liquid (shade A2). Three different veneering ceramics with different TEC (ICE Ceramic, GC Initial Zr and IPS e.max Ceram) were fired on both coloured and non-coloured zirconia cores. Specimens of high noble alloys (Esteticor Plus) veneered with ceramic (VM 13) (n=16) acted as the control group. Core-veneer interface of the specimens were subjected to shear force in the Universal Testing Machine (0.5 mm⋅min(-1)). Neither the zirconia core material (P=0.318) nor colouring (P=0.188) significantly affected the results (three-way analysis of variance, Tukey's test). But the results were significantly affected by the veneering ceramic (P=0.000). Control group exhibited significantly higher mean bond strength values (45.7±8) MPa than all other tested groups ((27.1±4.1)-(39.7±4.7) and (27.4±5.6)-(35.9±4.7) MPa with and without colouring, respectively) (Pceramic covering ceramic group, veneering ceramic was left adhered >1/3 of the metal surface. Colouring zirconia did not impair adhesion of veneering ceramic, but veneering ceramic had a significant influence on the core-veneer adhesion. Metal-ceramic adhesion was more reliable than all zirconia-veneer ceramics tested.

  9. Green roofs for a drier world: effects of hydrogel amendment on substrate and plant water status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savi, Tadeja; Marin, Maria; Boldrin, David; Incerti, Guido; Andri, Sergio; Nardini, Andrea

    2014-08-15

    Climate features of the Mediterranean area make plant survival over green roofs challenging, thus calling for research work to improve water holding capacities of green roof systems. We assessed the effects of polymer hydrogel amendment on the water holding capacity of a green roof substrate, as well as on water status and growth of Salvia officinalis. Plants were grown in green roof experimental modules containing 8 cm or 12 cm deep substrate (control) or substrate mixed with hydrogel at two different concentrations: 0.3 or 0.6%. Hydrogel significantly increased the substrate's water content at saturation, as well as water available to vegetation. Plants grown in 8 cm deep substrate mixed with 0.6% of hydrogel showed the best performance in terms of water status and membrane integrity under drought stress, associated to the lowest above-ground biomass. Our results provide experimental evidence that polymer hydrogel amendments enhance water supply to vegetation at the establishment phase of a green roof. In particular, the water status of plants is most effectively improved when reduced substrate depths are used to limit the biomass accumulation during early growth stages. A significant loss of water holding capacity of substrate-hydrogel blends was observed after 5 months from establishment of the experimental modules. We suggest that cross-optimization of physical-chemical characteristics of hydrogels and green roof substrates is needed to improve long term effectiveness of polymer-hydrogel blends.

  10. Green roofs for a drier world: effects of hydrogel amendment on substrate and plant water status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savi, Tadeja; Marin, Maria; Boldrin, David; Incerti, Guido; Andri, Sergio; Nardini, Andrea

    2014-08-15

    Climate features of the Mediterranean area make plant survival over green roofs challenging, thus calling for research work to improve water holding capacities of green roof systems. We assessed the effects of polymer hydrogel amendment on the water holding capacity of a green roof substrate, as well as on water status and growth of Salvia officinalis. Plants were grown in green roof experimental modules containing 8 cm or 12 cm deep substrate (control) or substrate mixed with hydrogel at two different concentrations: 0.3 or 0.6%. Hydrogel significantly increased the substrate's water content at saturation, as well as water available to vegetation. Plants grown in 8 cm deep substrate mixed with 0.6% of hydrogel showed the best performance in terms of water status and membrane integrity under drought stress, associated to the lowest above-ground biomass. Our results provide experimental evidence that polymer hydrogel amendments enhance water supply to vegetation at the establishment phase of a green roof. In particular, the water status of plants is most effectively improved when reduced substrate depths are used to limit the biomass accumulation during early growth stages. A significant loss of water holding capacity of substrate-hydrogel blends was observed after 5 months from establishment of the experimental modules. We suggest that cross-optimization of physical-chemical characteristics of hydrogels and green roof substrates is needed to improve long term effectiveness of polymer-hydrogel blends. PMID:24867709

  11. Cladonia lichens on extensive green roofs: evapotranspiration, substrate temperature, and albedo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs are constructed ecosystems that provide ecosystem services in urban environments. Shallow substrate green roofs subject the vegetation layer to desiccation and other environmental extremes, so researchers have evaluated a variety of stress-tolerant vegetation types for green roof applications. Lichens can be found in most terrestrial habitats.  They are able to survive extremely harsh conditions, including frequent cycles of desiccation and rehydration, nutrient-poor soil, fluctuating temperatures, and high UV intensities. Extensive green roofs (substrate depth green roofs.  In a modular green roof system, we tested the effect of Cladonia lichens on substrate temperature, water loss, and albedo compared to a substrate-only control. Overall, the Cladonia modules had significantly cooler substrate temperatures during the summer and significantly warmer temperatures during the fall.  Additionally, the Cladonia modules lost significantly less water than the substrate-only control. This implies that they may be able to benefit neighboring vascular plant species by reducing water loss and maintaining favorable substrate temperatures.

  12. Cladonia lichens on extensive green roofs: evapotranspiration, substrate temperature, and albedo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs are constructed ecosystems that provide ecosystem services in urban environments. Shallow substrate green roofs subject the vegetation layer to desiccation and other environmental extremes, so researchers have evaluated a variety of stress-tolerant vegetation types for green roof applications. Lichens can be found in most terrestrial habitats.  They are able to survive extremely harsh conditions, including frequent cycles of desiccation and rehydration, nutrient-poor soil, fluctuating temperatures, and high UV intensities. Extensive green roofs (substrate depth green roofs.  In a modular green roof system, we tested the effect of Cladonia lichens on substrate temperature, water loss, and albedo compared to a substrate-only control. Overall, the Cladonia modules had significantly cooler substrate temperatures during the summer and significantly warmer temperatures during the fall.  Additionally, the Cladonia modules lost significantly less water than the substrate-only control. This implies that they may be able to benefit neighboring vascular plant species by reducing water loss and maintaining favorable substrate temperatures. PMID:24555115

  13. Migration of elements in colour layers deposited on a ceramic substrate under the influence of laser treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, Danuta; Synowiec, Barbara; Olszyna, Andrzej; Marczak, Jan; Sarzyński, Antoni; Strzelec, Marek

    This paper summarizes the experimental results in the laser firing of colour agents on ceramic substrates. White glazed and fired ceramic plates were used as the substrate, while the deposited powders were mixtures containing ceramic colours and other colour agents. Various geometric patterns were deposited by a cw fiber Yb:YAG laser with speed controlled by a set of galvanometric scanners. The results, analyzed by means of optical microscopy, SEM EDS and laser profilometry explained the visually observed changes in pattern colours caused by the migration of pigment particles (characteristic elements) and allowed development of proper laser process.

  14. Characterization of Green-Emitting Translucent Zinc Oxide Ceramics Prepared Via Spark Plasma Sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Mei [University of California; DeVito, David M [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Yang, Xiaocheng [West Virginia University; Giles, Nancy C. [Air Force Institute of Technology; Neal, John S [ORNL; Munir, Zuhair [University of California

    2011-01-01

    Translucent, green-emitting zinc oxide (ZnO) bodies, 19 mm in diameter and 0.72 mm in thickness, have been prepared via spark plasma sintering method. The consolidation of ZnO powders was investigated over the temperature range of 550-1050 C and the pressure range of 55-530 MPa. Samples sintered at temperatures >850 C and pressures of {approx}120 MPa were translucent and had densities of {approx}100%. Samples sintered at 950 C and 130 MPa showed a higher maximum transmittance than the samples sintered at higher or lower temperatures or pressures, with an excellent in-line transmission of 70% in the IR region around 2330 nm. The dense ZnO ceramics exhibited a strong green emission and a weak ultraviolet emission, and the relative intensity of the green emission increased with increasing sintering temperature.

  15. Deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an element, carbon is rather unique and offers a range of rare opportunities for the design and fabrication of zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional nanostructured novel materials and coatings such as fullerenes, nanotubes, thin films, and free-standing nano-to-macroscale structures. Among these, carbon-based two-dimensional thin films (such as diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC)) have attracted an overwhelming interest in recent years, mainly because of their exceptional physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, and tribological properties. In particular, certain DLC films were found to provide extremely low friction and wear coefficients to sliding metallic and ceramic surfaces. Since the early 1990s, carbon has been used at Argonne National Laboratory to synthesize a class of novel DLC films that now provide friction and wear coefficients as low as 0.001 and 10-11-10-10 mm3 N-1 m-1, respectively, when tested in inert or vacuum test environments. Over the years, we have optimized these films and applied them successfully to all kinds of metallic and ceramic substrates and evaluated their friction and wear properties under a wide range of sliding conditions. In this paper, we will provide details of our recent work on the deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates. We will also provide chemical and structural information about these films and describe the fundamental tribological mechanisms that control their unusual friction and wear behaviour

  16. The Effect of Plasma Surface Treatment on a Porous Green Ceramic Film with Polymeric Binder Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To reduce time and energy during thermal binder removal in the ceramic process, plasma surface treatment was applied before the lamination process. The adhesion strength in the lamination films was enhanced by oxidative plasma treatment of the porous green ceramic film with polymeric binding materials. The oxygen plasma characteristics were investigated through experimental parameters and weight loss analysis. The experimental results revealed the need for parameter analysis, including gas material, process time, flow rate, and discharge power, and supported a mechanism consisting of competing ablation and deposition processes. The weight loss analysis was conducted for cyclic plasma treatment rather than continuous plasma treatment for the purpose of improving the film's permeability by suppressing deposition of the ablated species. The cyclic plasma treatment improved the permeability compared to the continuous plasma treatment.

  17. The Effect of Plasma Surface Treatment on a Porous Green Ceramic Film with Polymeric Binder Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Yun

    2013-06-01

    To reduce time and energy during thermal binder removal in the ceramic process, plasma surface treatment was applied before the lamination process. The adhesion strength in the lamination films was enhanced by oxidative plasma treatment of the porous green ceramic film with polymeric binding materials. The oxygen plasma characteristics were investigated through experimental parameters and weight loss analysis. The experimental results revealed the need for parameter analysis, including gas material, process time, flow rate, and discharge power, and supported a mechanism consisting of competing ablation and deposition processes. The weight loss analysis was conducted for cyclic plasma treatment rather than continuous plasma treatment for the purpose of improving the film's permeability by suppressing deposition of the ablated species. The cyclic plasma treatment improved the permeability compared to the continuous plasma treatment.

  18. Population sampling of the golden mussel, Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857, based on artificial ceramic substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Eduardo Aydos Bergonci

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The ceramic substrate (21cm in length, 6cm in width and 1.3cm in depth was tested for the Limnoperna fortunei population, sampling at two localities in the Jacuí delta (Jacuí Canal (Canal do Jacuí – CJ and Port Docks (Cais do Porto – PO in Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. The individuals were quantified through the superimposition of a squared (1cm2 and segmented (sI, sII e sIII sheet on the substrate. Using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitnney, the recruit and adult average densities were compared in each segment, surface (smooth and pipe-shaped and sampling locality (α = 0.05. In CJ, the extreme and intermediate (adult segments differed statistically (p < 0.0001, as well as the ceramic substrate surfaces (recruits (p = 0.04. The recruit and adult densities between the CJ and PO localities also differed between themselves (p < 0.0001. The method was efficient for the invasive population sampling.

  19. Glass-(nAg, nCu biocide coatings on ceramic oxide substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Esteban-Tejeda

    Full Text Available The present work was focused on obtaining biocide coatings constituted by a glassy soda-lime matrix containing silver or copper nanoparticles on ceramic (alumina and zirconia based substrates. Both glassy coatings showed a high biocide activity against Gram-, Gram+ bacteria and yeast, reducing cell numbers more than three logarithms. Silver nanoparticles had a significantly higher biocide activity than copper nanoparticles, since the lixiviation levels required to reduce cell numbers more than 3 logarithms was of almost 1-2 µg/cm(2 in the case of silver nanoparticles, and 10-15 µg/cm(2 for the copper nanoparticles.

  20. Glass-(nAg, nCu) Biocide Coatings on Ceramic Oxide Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Malpartida, Francisco; Díaz, Luis Antonio; Torrecillas, Ramón; Rojo, Fernando; Moya, José Serafín

    2012-01-01

    The present work was focused on obtaining biocide coatings constituted by a glassy soda-lime matrix containing silver or copper nanoparticles on ceramic (alumina and zirconia based) substrates. Both glassy coatings showed a high biocide activity against Gram−, Gram+ bacteria and yeast, reducing cell numbers more than three logarithms. Silver nanoparticles had a significantly higher biocide activity than copper nanoparticles, since the lixiviation levels required to reduce cell numbers more than 3 logarithms was of almost 1–2 µg/cm2 in the case of silver nanoparticles, and 10–15 µg/cm2 for the copper nanoparticles. PMID:22427967

  1. Nd3+,Yb3+ and Ho3+ Codoped Oxyfluoride Glass Ceramics with High Efficient Green Upconversion Luminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-Jie; KAWAMOTO Yoji; DAI Shi-Xun; ZHANG Li-Yan; HU Li-Li

    2004-01-01

    @@ New oxyfluoride glasses and glass ceramic codoped with Nd3+, Yb3+ and Ho3+ were prepared. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the heat treatments of the oxyfluoride glasses could cause the precipitation of (Nd3+, Yb3+, Ho3+)-doped fluorite-type crystals. Very strong green up-conversion luminescence due to the Ho3+: (5F4, 5S2) → 5I8 transition under 800-nm excitation was observed in these transparent glass ceramics.The intensity of the green up-conversion luminescence in a 1-mo1% YbF3-containing glass ceramic was found to be about 120 times stronger than that in the precursor oxyfluoride glass. The reason for the highly efficient Ho3+up-conversion luminescence in the oxyfluoride glass ceramics is discussed.

  2. ANALYSIS OF WATER RELATIONS OF SUBSTRATES USED IN GREEN ROOF SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Baryła

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs, as the restoration of biologically active area, are fairly common and effective method of storm water management in urban areas. Depend on the design of the green roof and the type of substrate, they are able to retain 50–90% of rainwater. The aim of the study was to determine the physicochemical properties of two substrates used in the construction of green roofs (intensive and extensive. Water retention of substrates was compared to water retention of substrates undelined with the drainage layer made from crushed autoclaved aerated concrete. In the experiment, which uses drainage layer, higher drying the top layer of the substrate was observed, which may be related to high water absorption drainage material. The effluent from the substrate using aerated concrete as a drainage layer amounted to an average of 22–51% of the volume of water supplied to the extensive substrate, whereas 19–46% of the volume of water supplied to the intensive substrate. The effluent from the substrate without the drainage layer amounted 40-48% of the volume of water supplied.

  3. Recycling of Malaysia's electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste into heavy-duty green ceramic tile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Pao-Ter; Anasyida, Abu Seman; Basu, Projjal; Nurulakmal, Mohd Sharif

    2014-12-01

    flexural strength, lowest apparent porosity and water absorption of EAF slag based tile was attained at the composition of 40 wt.% EAF slag--30 wt.% ball clay--10 wt.% feldspar--20 wt.% silica. The properties of ceramic tile made with EAF slag waste (up to 40 wt.%), especially flexural strength are comparable to those of commercial ceramic tile and are, therefore, suitable as high flexural strength and heavy-duty green ceramic floor tile. Continuous development is currently underway to improve the properties of tile so that this recycling approach could be one of the potential effective, efficient and sustainable solutions in sustaining our nature. PMID:25242607

  4. Recycling of Malaysia's electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste into heavy-duty green ceramic tile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Pao-Ter; Anasyida, Abu Seman; Basu, Projjal; Nurulakmal, Mohd Sharif

    2014-12-01

    flexural strength, lowest apparent porosity and water absorption of EAF slag based tile was attained at the composition of 40 wt.% EAF slag--30 wt.% ball clay--10 wt.% feldspar--20 wt.% silica. The properties of ceramic tile made with EAF slag waste (up to 40 wt.%), especially flexural strength are comparable to those of commercial ceramic tile and are, therefore, suitable as high flexural strength and heavy-duty green ceramic floor tile. Continuous development is currently underway to improve the properties of tile so that this recycling approach could be one of the potential effective, efficient and sustainable solutions in sustaining our nature.

  5. Effects of substrate properties on the hydraulic and thermal behavior of a green roof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, V. P.; Suarez, F. I.; Victorero, F.; Bonilla, C.; Gironas, J. A.; Vera, S.; Bustamante, W.; Rojas, V.; Pasten, P.

    2014-12-01

    Green roofs are a sustainable urban development solution that incorporates a growing media (also known as substrate) and vegetation into infrastructures to reach additional benefits such as the reduction of: rooftop runoff peak flows, roof surface temperatures, energy utilized for cooling/heating buildings, and the heat island effect. The substrate is a key component of the green roof that allows achieving these benefits. It is an artificial soil that has an improved behavior compared to natural soils, facilitating vegetation growth, water storage and typically with smaller densities to reduce the loads over the structures. Therefore, it is important to study the effects of substrate properties on green roof performance. The objective of this study is to investigate the physical properties of four substrates designed to improve the behavior of a green roof, and to study their impact on the efficiency of a green roof. The substrates that were investigated are: organic soil; crushed bricks; a mixture of mineral soil with perlite; and a mixture of crushed bricks and organic soil. The thermal properties (thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and thermal diffusivity) were measured using a dual needle probe (Decagon Devices, Inc.) at different saturation levels, and the hydraulic properties were measured with a constant head permeameter (hydraulic conductivity) and a pressure plate extractor (water retention curve). This characterization, combined with numerical models, allows understanding the effect of these properties on the hydraulic and thermal behavior of a green roof. Results show that substrates composed by crushed bricks improve the thermal insulation of infrastructures and at the same time, retain more water in their pores. Simulation results also show that the hydraulic and thermal behavior of a green roof strongly depends on the moisture content prior to a rainstorm.

  6. Interfacial Bonding Strength of TiN Film Coated on Si3N4 Ceramic Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The fraction of TiN/Si3N4 in the cross section was observed with scanning electric microscope (SEM), and residual stresses of TiN coated on the surface of Si3N4 ceramic were measured with X-ray diffraction (XRD).The hardness of TiN film was measured, and bonding strength of TiN film coated on Si3N4 substrate was measured by scratching method. The formed mechanism of residual stress and the failure mechanism of the bonding interface in the film were analyzed, and the adhesion mechanism of TiN film was investigated preliminarily. The results show that residual stresses of TiN film are all behaved as compressive stress, and TiN film is represented smoothly with brittle fracture, which is closely bonded with Si3N4 substrate. TiN film has high hardness and bonding strength of about 500 MPa, which could satisfy usage requests of the surface of cutting Si3N4 ceramic.

  7. Physical properties and hydrological response of green roof substrates based on recycled construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwalleghem, Tom; Hayas, Antonio; Jiménez-Quiñones, Daniel; Peña, Adolfo; Giráldez, Juan Vicente

    2015-04-01

    Green roofs in urban areas improve the building's energy efficiency and provide a wide array of additional environmental benefits. Characterizing and predicting the physical properties and hydrological response of green roofs is necessary to understand the roof's heat balance, which is controlled to a large extent by the substrate's water content, to predict the runoff response and functioning as a part of sustainable urban drainage systems and to plan irrigation of the plants in drier climates. This study examines 10 different extensive green roof substrates, based on recycled construction materials. Green roof simulation decks were installed in boxes of 0,6 m x 0,4 m to a depth of 70 mm, 10 with and 10 without plants. Total water holding capacity of the substrates varied between 10,4 - 23,9 %, with an additional 19 % retained by the drainage layer and geotextiles used in the simulation deck. An important compaction of 30 % on average was observed after 1,5 months. Final bulk densities are between 1457 - 1993 kg m-3. In an evaporation experiment, it was shown that the water evaporated from the green roofs is controlled mainly by the relative moisture content. Substrate properties exerted only a secondary control, with the lowest evaporation rates from the substrates with highest coarse crushed aggregate content and with the highest clay content. The evaporation model proposed here was shown to work well to simulate the evolution of the water balance and therefore the specific unit weight over longer time periods in all substrates, with a Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency of 0.989. Finally, plants were found to grow satisfactorily in all substrates. Therefore, when regular irrigation is provided, it was concluded that green roofs based on recycled construction materials are a viable option. Future research will have to explore the long-term plant dynamics under water-limited conditions.

  8. Cumulative Effect of Pressing and Drying on Stress Generation within a Green Ceramic Compact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vidal-Sallé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The internal stress field induced by uniaxial pressing and subsequent convective drying of a green ceramic powder was simulated by the finite element method. A density dependent elastoplastic constitutive law was used for the mechanical modeling of the compaction. A diffusive water transfer equation and a purely elastic behavior with imposed hydrostrain involving shrinkage were applied for the modeling of the drying process. The key material properties (hydrodiffusivity, hydrocontraction coefficient, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio, and yield surface parameters had been experimentally measured and introduced as functions of material density and water content. If residual stresses due to the compaction operation were taken into account, the maximum value of the tensile stress at the top external edge of the wheel and at the beginning of the drying process was two times higher than for a stress free green ceramic compact. Beyond the residual stress onset, the compaction operation induced density heterogeneities which had important consequences on the mechanical behavior of the compact.

  9. Effect of substrate depth and rain-event history on the pollutant abatement of green roofs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study compares the effectiveness of two different thickness of green roof substrate with respect to nutrient and heavy metal retention and release. To understand and evaluate the long term behaviour of green roofs, substrate columns with the same structure and composition as the green roofs, were exposed in laboratory to artificial rain. The roofs act as a sink for C, N, P, zinc and copper for small rain events if the previous period was principally dry. Otherwise the roofs may behave as a source of pollutants, principally for carbon and phosphorus. Both field and column studies showed an important retention for Zn and Cu. The column showed, however, lower SS, DOC and metal concentrations in the percolate than could be observed in the field even if corrected for run-off. This is most probably due to the difference in exposition history and weathering processes. Highlights: • Extensive roof greening can lead to increased DOC and nutrients runoff. • Studied green roofs retained over 80% of atmospheric heavy metal loads (Zn, Cu, Pb). • Substrate layer thickness had no significant impact on metal retention. • Column experiments showed no decrease in the long term heavy metal retention. -- The green roofs tested, showed variable retention capacity for the common pollutants, but were especially efficient in heavy metals retention, which long-term evolution was evaluated in simultaneous column experiments

  10. Investigating the Traits of Green Pepper in the Three Substrates in Hydroponic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Ebrahimi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the properties of pepper fruit at different substrates as a factorial experiment in completely randomized design with four replications. The experiment was carried out in the Islamic Azad University, Jiroft branch, Iran, in 2011. Treatments included three green pepper cultivars (Sereno, LiricaRZ and Figaro and three substrates of vermiculite + sand, peat + perlite and rock wool. Result showed that the most yield and average of fruit weight was 2003.91 and 129.14 g, respectively and number of fruit with average of 15.5, fruit length with 10.85 cm were obtained from substrate of peat + perlite. LiricaRZ had the most yield and average of fruit weight 1498.97 and 122.41 g, respectively than two other green peppers. There was significant interaction effect between green pepper and substrate in fruit's weight at 5% and fruit's length at 1%. It was known that the best substrate was peat + perlite and the best green pepper cultivar was LiricaRZ in hydroponic cultivation.

  11. Microstructural and Wear Behavior Characterization of Porous Layers Produced by Pulsed Laser Irradiation in Glass-Ceramics Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose I. Peña

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, wear behavior and microstructural characterization of porous layers produced in glass-ceramic substrates by pulsed laser irradiation in the nanosecond range are studied under unidirectional sliding conditions against AISI316 and corundum counterbodies. Depending on the optical configuration of the laser beam and on the working parameters, the local temperature and pressure applied over the interaction zone can generate a porous glass-ceramic layer. Material transference from the ball to the porous glass-ceramic layer was observed in the wear tests carried out against the AISI316 ball counterface whereas, in the case of the corundum ball, the wear volume loss was concentrated in the porous layer. Wear rate and friction coefficient presented higher values than expected for dense glass-ceramics.

  12. a-Si/c-Si heterojunction solar cells on SiSiC ceramic substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xudong; XU Ying; CHE Xiaoqi

    2006-01-01

    Silicon thin-film solar cells are considered to be one of the most promising cells in the future for their potential advantages, such as low cost, high efficiency, great stability, simple processing, and none-pollution. In this paper, latest progress on poly-crystalline silicon solar cells on ceramic substrates achieved by our group was reported. Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) was used to deposited poly-crystalline silicon thin films, and the grains of as-grown film were enlarged by Zone-melting Recrystallization (ZMR). As a great changein cell's structure, traditional diffused pn homojunction was replaced by a-Si/c-Si heterojunction, which lead is to distinct improvement in cell's efficiency.A conversion efficiency of 3.42% has been achieved on 1cm2 a-Si/c-Si heterojunction solar cell ( Isc =16.93 mA, Voc =310.9 mV, FF =06493, AM =1.5 G,24 ℃), while the cell with diffused homojunction only gotan efficiency of 0.6%. It indicates that a-Si emitter formed at low temperature might be more suitable for thin film cell on ceramics.

  13. Binder extraction from green multilayer ceramics using a weight loss rate-controlled thermogravimetric analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Jason; Speyer, Robert F.; Murali, Lakshman

    1997-06-01

    A weight loss rate-controlled organic extraction furnace was built and demonstrated using a multilayer green ceramic. Multirate weight loss schedules as well as automated atmosphere control and detection were demonstrated. The low thermal mass furnace showed good tracking with 300 °C heating and cooling rates. This furnace, coupled with appropriate PID control constants, facilitated feedback control which could extract organics rapidly without self-ignition to uncontrolled combustion. Controlled organic burnout was demonstrated at weight loss rates up to 0.5%/min in air. Damage-free multilayers were observed using a burnout rate requiring 150 min for extraction, rather than the days commonly associated with this task when using conventional furnaces.

  14. Effect of substrate depth and rain-event history on the pollutant abatement of green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Martin; Gromaire, Marie-Christine; Saad, Mohamed; De Gouvello, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of two different thickness of green roof substrate with respect to nutrient and heavy metal retention and release. To understand and evaluate the long term behaviour of green roofs, substrate columns with the same structure and composition as the green roofs, were exposed in laboratory to artificial rain. The roofs act as a sink for C, N, P, zinc and copper for small rain events if the previous period was principally dry. Otherwise the roofs may behave as a source of pollutants, principally for carbon and phosphorus. Both field and column studies showed an important retention for Zn and Cu. The column showed, however, lower SS, DOC and metal concentrations in the percolate than could be observed in the field even if corrected for run-off. This is most probably due to the difference in exposition history and weathering processes.

  15. Effect of substrate depth and rain-event history on the pollutant abatement of green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Martin; Gromaire, Marie-Christine; Saad, Mohamed; De Gouvello, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of two different thickness of green roof substrate with respect to nutrient and heavy metal retention and release. To understand and evaluate the long term behaviour of green roofs, substrate columns with the same structure and composition as the green roofs, were exposed in laboratory to artificial rain. The roofs act as a sink for C, N, P, zinc and copper for small rain events if the previous period was principally dry. Otherwise the roofs may behave as a source of pollutants, principally for carbon and phosphorus. Both field and column studies showed an important retention for Zn and Cu. The column showed, however, lower SS, DOC and metal concentrations in the percolate than could be observed in the field even if corrected for run-off. This is most probably due to the difference in exposition history and weathering processes. PMID:23773321

  16. Intense Green Upconversion Luminescence in Er3+:Yb3+ Codoped Fluorophosphate Glass Ceramic Containing SrTe5O11 Nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-Yan; XU Shi-Qing; HU Li-Li

    2007-01-01

    Er3+ :Yb3+ codoped tellurite-fluorophosphate (TFP) glass ceramic exhibits much stronger upconversion luminescence. The intensity of the 540nm green light and 651 nm red light of the TFP glass ceramic is 120 times and 44 times stronger than that of the fluorophospahte (FP) glass, respectively. XRD analysis shows that the nanocrystal in TFP glass ceramic is SrTesO11. TFP glass ceramic alsc displays much higher upconversion fluorescence lifetime and crystallization stability. The narrow and strong peak at 540 nm is very ideal for practical upconversion luminescence realization. This work is a new trial for exploring non-PbF2 involved nanocrystal upconversion glass ceramics.

  17. Plant performance on Mediterranean green roofs: interaction of species-specific hydraulic strategies and substrate water relations

    OpenAIRE

    Raimondo, Fabio; Trifilò, Patrizia; Lo Gullo, Maria A.; Andri, Sergio; Savi, Tadeja; Nardini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the ecological, economic and social benefits assured by green roof technology to urban areas. However, green roofs are very hostile environments for plant growth because of shallow substrate depths, high temperatures and irradiance and wind exposure. This study provides experimental evidence for the importance of accurate selection of plant species and substrates for implementing green roofs in hot and arid regions, like the Mediterranean area. Experiments were...

  18. Infrared-to-green upconversion luminescence and mechanism of Ho3+, Nd3+ and Yb3+ ions in oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jun-Jie; Kawamoto Yoji; Dai Shi-Xun

    2004-01-01

    New oxyfluoride glasses and glass ceramics co-doped with Nd3+, Yb3+ and Ho3+ were prepared. The upconversion of infrared radiation into green fluorescence has been studied for Nd3+, Yb3+ and Ho3+ in the transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics. At room temperature very strong green upconversion luminescence due to the Ho3+: (5F4, 5S2) →5I8transition under 800 nm excitation was observed in the glass ceramics. The intensity of the green upconversion luminescence in a 1mol% YbF3-containing glass ceramic was found to be about 120 times stronger than that in the precursor oxyfluoride glass. The reason for the highly efficient Ho3+ upconversion luminescence in the oxyfluoride glass ceramics is discussed. The upconversion mechanism is also investigated.

  19. Design and development of green roof substrate to improve runoff water quality: plant growth experiments and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Raja, Franklin D

    2014-10-15

    Many studies worldwide have investigated the potential benefits achievable by transforming brown roofs of buildings to green roofs. However, little literature examined the runoff quality/sorption ability of green roofs. As the green roof substrate is the main component to alter the quality of runoff, this investigation raises the possibility of using a mixture of low-cost inorganic materials to develop a green roof substrate. The tested materials include exfoliated vermiculite, expanded perlite, crushed brick and sand along with organic component (coco-peat). Detailed physical and chemical analyses revealed that each of these materials possesses different characteristics and hence a mix of these materials was desirable to develop an optimal green roof substrate. Using factorial design, 18 different substrate mixes were prepared and detailed examination indicated that mix-12 exhibited desirable characteristics of green roof substrate with low bulk density (431 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (39.4%), air filled porosity (19.5%), and hydraulic conductivity (4570 mm/h). The substrate mix also provided maximum support to Portulaca grandiflora (380% total biomass increment) over one month of growth. To explore the leaching characteristics and sorption capacity of developed green roof substrate, a down-flow packed column arrangement was employed. High conductivity and total dissolved solids along with light metal ions (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were observed in the leachates during initial stages of column operation; however the concentration of ions ceased during the final stages of operation (600 min). Experiments with metal-spiked deionized water revealed that green roof substrate possess high sorption capacity towards various heavy metal ions (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cd). Thus the developed growth substrate possesses desirable characteristics for green roofs along with high sorption capacity.

  20. Design and development of green roof substrate to improve runoff water quality: plant growth experiments and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Raja, Franklin D

    2014-10-15

    Many studies worldwide have investigated the potential benefits achievable by transforming brown roofs of buildings to green roofs. However, little literature examined the runoff quality/sorption ability of green roofs. As the green roof substrate is the main component to alter the quality of runoff, this investigation raises the possibility of using a mixture of low-cost inorganic materials to develop a green roof substrate. The tested materials include exfoliated vermiculite, expanded perlite, crushed brick and sand along with organic component (coco-peat). Detailed physical and chemical analyses revealed that each of these materials possesses different characteristics and hence a mix of these materials was desirable to develop an optimal green roof substrate. Using factorial design, 18 different substrate mixes were prepared and detailed examination indicated that mix-12 exhibited desirable characteristics of green roof substrate with low bulk density (431 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (39.4%), air filled porosity (19.5%), and hydraulic conductivity (4570 mm/h). The substrate mix also provided maximum support to Portulaca grandiflora (380% total biomass increment) over one month of growth. To explore the leaching characteristics and sorption capacity of developed green roof substrate, a down-flow packed column arrangement was employed. High conductivity and total dissolved solids along with light metal ions (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were observed in the leachates during initial stages of column operation; however the concentration of ions ceased during the final stages of operation (600 min). Experiments with metal-spiked deionized water revealed that green roof substrate possess high sorption capacity towards various heavy metal ions (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cd). Thus the developed growth substrate possesses desirable characteristics for green roofs along with high sorption capacity. PMID:24981747

  1. [Influence of the substrate composition in extensive green roof on the effluent quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Lin; Li, Tian; Gu, Jun-Qing

    2014-11-01

    By monitoring the effluent quality from different green roof assemblies during several artificial rain events, the main pollutant characteristics and the influence of substrate composition in extensive green roof on the effluent quality were studied. Results showed that the main pollutants in the effluent were N, P and COD; with the increase of cumulative rain, the concentrations of pollutants in the effluent decreased, which had obvious leaching effect; The average concentrations of heavy metals in the early effluent from all assemblies reached drinking water standard, including the assemblies using crushed bricks; When garden soil and compost were used as organic matter, the assemblies had serious leaching of nutrient substance. After the accumulated rainfall reached 150 mm, the TN, TP and COD concentrations of effluent were 2.93, 0.73 and 78 mg x L(-1), respectively, which exceeded the Surface water V class limit. By means of application of the Water Treatment Residual, the leaching of TP from green planting soil was decreased by about 60%. The inorganic compound soil had better effluent quality, however we also need to judge whether the substrate could be applied in extensive green roof or not, by analyzing its ability of water quantity reduction and the plant growth situation.

  2. [Influence of the substrate composition in extensive green roof on the effluent quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Lin; Li, Tian; Gu, Jun-Qing

    2014-11-01

    By monitoring the effluent quality from different green roof assemblies during several artificial rain events, the main pollutant characteristics and the influence of substrate composition in extensive green roof on the effluent quality were studied. Results showed that the main pollutants in the effluent were N, P and COD; with the increase of cumulative rain, the concentrations of pollutants in the effluent decreased, which had obvious leaching effect; The average concentrations of heavy metals in the early effluent from all assemblies reached drinking water standard, including the assemblies using crushed bricks; When garden soil and compost were used as organic matter, the assemblies had serious leaching of nutrient substance. After the accumulated rainfall reached 150 mm, the TN, TP and COD concentrations of effluent were 2.93, 0.73 and 78 mg x L(-1), respectively, which exceeded the Surface water V class limit. By means of application of the Water Treatment Residual, the leaching of TP from green planting soil was decreased by about 60%. The inorganic compound soil had better effluent quality, however we also need to judge whether the substrate could be applied in extensive green roof or not, by analyzing its ability of water quantity reduction and the plant growth situation. PMID:25639089

  3. The use of reactive material for limiting P-leaching from green roof substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Agnieszka; Karczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Baryła, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the influence of drainage layer made of reactive material Polonite(®) on the water retention and P-PO(4) concentration in runoff. A column experiment was performed for extensive substrate underlined by 2 cm of Polonite(®) layer (SP) and the same substrate without supporting layer as a reference (S). The leakage phosphorus concentration ranged from 0.001 to 0.082 mg P-PO(4)·L(-1), with average value 0.025 P-PO(4)·L(-1) of S experiment and 0.000-0.004 P-PO(4)·L(-1) and 0.001 P-PO(4)·L(-1) of SP experiment, respectively. The 2 cm layer of Polonite(®) was efficient in reducing P outflow from green roof substrate by 96%. The average effluent volumes from S and SP experiments amounted 61.1 mL (5.8-543.3 mL) and 46.4 mL (3.3-473.3 mL) with the average irrigation rate of 175.5 mL (6.3-758.0 mL). The substrate retention ability of S and SP experiments was 65% and 74%, respectively. Provided with reactive materials, green roof layers implemented in urban areas for rain water retention and delaying runoff also work for protection of water quality.

  4. The use of reactive material for limiting P-leaching from green roof substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Agnieszka; Karczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Baryła, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the influence of drainage layer made of reactive material Polonite(®) on the water retention and P-PO(4) concentration in runoff. A column experiment was performed for extensive substrate underlined by 2 cm of Polonite(®) layer (SP) and the same substrate without supporting layer as a reference (S). The leakage phosphorus concentration ranged from 0.001 to 0.082 mg P-PO(4)·L(-1), with average value 0.025 P-PO(4)·L(-1) of S experiment and 0.000-0.004 P-PO(4)·L(-1) and 0.001 P-PO(4)·L(-1) of SP experiment, respectively. The 2 cm layer of Polonite(®) was efficient in reducing P outflow from green roof substrate by 96%. The average effluent volumes from S and SP experiments amounted 61.1 mL (5.8-543.3 mL) and 46.4 mL (3.3-473.3 mL) with the average irrigation rate of 175.5 mL (6.3-758.0 mL). The substrate retention ability of S and SP experiments was 65% and 74%, respectively. Provided with reactive materials, green roof layers implemented in urban areas for rain water retention and delaying runoff also work for protection of water quality. PMID:27332849

  5. Use of green coconut shells as an alternative substrate for the production of xanthan gum on different scales of fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Barreto Rocha Nery; Antonio José Gonçalves da Cruz; Janice Izabel Druzian

    2013-01-01

    Xanthan, a biopolymer with extensive industrial applications, is commercially produced by fermenting glucose or sucrose using the bacteria Xanthomonas. Green coconut shells, rich in nutrients, could be an alternative substrate to obtain xanthan. This study aimed to evaluate the production and rheological properties of xanthan obtained on different fermentation scales using green coconut shells as the substrate, using its production from sucrose for comparison. Media containing minimal nutriti...

  6. Bonding polycarbonate brackets to ceramic : Effects of substrate treatment on bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Peltomäki, Timo; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Kalk, Warner

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 5 different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of polycarbonate brackets bonded to ceramic surfaces with resin based cement. Six disc-shaped ceramic specimens (feldspathic porcelain) with glazed surfaces were used for each group. The specimens were

  7. Moisture content behaviour in extensive green roofs during dry periods: the influence of vegetation and substrate characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Berretta, C; Poe, S.; Stovin, V.

    2014-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a key parameter that influences the stormwater retention capacity, and thus the hydrological performance, of green roofs. This paper investigates how the moisture content in extensive green roofs varies during dry periods due to evapotranspiration. The study is supported by 29 months continuous field monitoring of the moisture content within four green roof test beds. The beds incorporated three different substrates, with three being vegetated with sedum and one lef...

  8. Biodegradation of Green HE4B: Co-substrate effect, biotransformation enzymes and metabolite toxicity analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kalme, S. D.; Jadhav, S. U.; Parshetti, G. K.; Govindwar, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    A high exhaust reactive dye, Green HE4B (GHE4B) was 98% degraded in nutrient medium by Pseudomonas desmolyticum NCIM 2112 (pd2112) within 72 h at static condition. Decolorization time in synthetic 10 g/l molasses. Addition of 5 g/l peptone to NaCl medium had reduced decolorization time from 108 to 72 h. Beef extract do not contribute more to the inducing effect of peptone, however it is a good co-substrate in sucrose or urea containing NaCl medium. Intracellular lignin peroxidase (Lip), lacca...

  9. Plant performance on Mediterranean green roofs: interaction of species-specific hydraulic strategies and substrate water relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Fabio; Trifilò, Patrizia; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Andri, Sergio; Savi, Tadeja; Nardini, Andrea

    2015-01-20

    Recent studies have highlighted the ecological, economic and social benefits assured by green roof technology to urban areas. However, green roofs are very hostile environments for plant growth because of shallow substrate depths, high temperatures and irradiance and wind exposure. This study provides experimental evidence for the importance of accurate selection of plant species and substrates for implementing green roofs in hot and arid regions, like the Mediterranean area. Experiments were performed on two shrub species (Arbutus unedo L. and Salvia officinalis L.) grown in green roof experimental modules with two substrates slightly differing in their water retention properties, as derived from moisture release curves. Physiological measurements were performed on both well-watered and drought-stressed plants. Gas exchange, leaf and xylem water potential and also plant hydraulic conductance were measured at different time intervals following the last irrigation. The substrate type significantly affected water status. Arbutus unedo and S. officinalis showed different hydraulic responses to drought stress, with the former species being substantially isohydric and the latter one anisohydric. Both A. unedo and S. officinalis were found to be suitable species for green roofs in the Mediterranean area. However, our data suggest that appropriate choice of substrate is key to the success of green roof installations in arid environments, especially if anisohydric species are employed.

  10. Plant performance on Mediterranean green roofs: interaction of species-specific hydraulic strategies and substrate water relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Fabio; Trifilò, Patrizia; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Andri, Sergio; Savi, Tadeja; Nardini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the ecological, economic and social benefits assured by green roof technology to urban areas. However, green roofs are very hostile environments for plant growth because of shallow substrate depths, high temperatures and irradiance and wind exposure. This study provides experimental evidence for the importance of accurate selection of plant species and substrates for implementing green roofs in hot and arid regions, like the Mediterranean area. Experiments were performed on two shrub species (Arbutus unedo L. and Salvia officinalis L.) grown in green roof experimental modules with two substrates slightly differing in their water retention properties, as derived from moisture release curves. Physiological measurements were performed on both well-watered and drought-stressed plants. Gas exchange, leaf and xylem water potential and also plant hydraulic conductance were measured at different time intervals following the last irrigation. The substrate type significantly affected water status. Arbutus unedo and S. officinalis showed different hydraulic responses to drought stress, with the former species being substantially isohydric and the latter one anisohydric. Both A. unedo and S. officinalis were found to be suitable species for green roofs in the Mediterranean area. However, our data suggest that appropriate choice of substrate is key to the success of green roof installations in arid environments, especially if anisohydric species are employed. PMID:25603968

  11. Microstructure and wear behavior of laser cladding VC–Cr7C3 ceramic coating on steel substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The VC–Cr7C3 coating on steel substrate was in situ produced by laser cladding. ► The distribution of VC–Cr7C3 phase decreased gradually from the top of the coating. ► The laser cladding achieved a high hardness of the order of 1000 HV. ► The wear resistance of the coating was 4 times that of the steel substrate. - Abstract: To enhance the wear resistance of mechanical components, laser cladding has been applied to deposit in situ VC–Cr7C3 ceramic coating on steel substrate using a pre-placed powder consisting of vanadium, carbon and high-carbon ferrochrome. The laser cladding samples were subjected to various microstructure examinations, microhardness and wear tests. The results showed that defect-free coating with metallurgical joint to the steel substrate was obtained. The quantity of VC–Cr7C3 particles gradually increased from the bottom to the top of the coating. The VC particles in nanometer were observed within the coating. Average hardness of the coating up to 1050 HV was significantly higher than that of the substrate 150 HV. Wear tests indicated the wear resistance of the clad coating was 4 times that of the steel substrate

  12. Effects of coronal substrates and water storage on the microhardness of a resin cement used for luting ceramic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Menezes de MENDONÇA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Composite resin and metallic posts are the materials most employed for reconstruction of teeth presenting partial or total destruction of crowns. Resin-based cements have been widely used for cementation of ceramic crowns. The success of cementation depends on the achievement of adequate cement curing. Objectives: To evaluate the microhardness of Variolink® II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein, used for cementing ceramic crowns onto three different coronal substrate preparations (dentin, metal, and composite resin, after 7 days and 3 months of water storage. The evaluation was performed along the cement line in the cervical, medium and occlusal thirds on the buccal and lingual aspects, and on the occlusal surface. Material and Methods: Thirty molars were distributed in three groups (N=10 according to the type of coronal substrate: Group D- the prepared surfaces were kept in dentin; Groups M (metal and R (resin- the crowns were sectioned at the level of the cementoenamel junction and restored with metallic cast posts or resin build-up cores, respectively. The crowns were fabricated in ceramic IPS e.max® Press (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein and luted with Variolink II. After 7 days of water storage, 5 specimens of each group were sectioned in buccolingual direction for microhardness measurements. The other specimens (N=5 were kept stored in deionized water at 37ºC for three months, followed by sectioning and microhardness measurements. Results: Data were first analyzed by three-way ANOVA that did not reveal significant differences between thirds and occlusal surface (p=0.231. Two-way ANOVA showed significant effect of substrates (p<0.001 and the Tukey test revealed that microhardness was significantly lower when crowns were cemented on resin cores and tested after 7 days of water storage (p=0.007. Conclusion: The type of material employed for coronal reconstruction of preparations for prosthetic purposes may influence the

  13. Study on deposition technique and properties of Pd/Ag alloy film sensor supported on ceramic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Z. T.; He, Q.; Jin, C. G.

    2016-07-01

    Developing high-quality hydrogen sensitive material is the core part of hydrogen sensor, whose performance is determined by the sensitive response, reproducibility and recovery of hydrogen material etc. In order to overcome the defects of hydrogen embrittlement in previous hydrogen sensor which were based on the pure palladium, sliver as the second component added to the palladium was studied. Using photochemical etching technology to produce a bent metal mask, the mask is put on the ceramic substrate. Firstly, the thin film of Ta2O5 as a transition layer grew on the ceramic substrate. Then, a series of Pd/Ag alloy film sensors were prepared, and each performance characterization of Pd/Ag alloy film was studied. Testing results indicated that the thin film had a good linear output performance at 0∼⃒30% hydrogen concentration range, and demonstrates a high responsiveness and good repeatability. With temperature increasing, the strength of the responsive signal of the Pd/Ag alloy film decreases and its responsive time was also shortened.

  14. Quality and seasonal variation of rainwater harvested from concrete, asphalt, ceramic tile and green roofs in Chongqing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianqian; Wang, Xiaoke; Hou, Peiqiang; Wan, Wuxing; Li, Ruida; Ren, Yufen; Ouyang, Zhiyun

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent requirement to examine the quality of harvested rainwater for potable and non-potable purposes, based on the type of roofing material. In this study, we examined the effect on the quality of harvested rainwater of conventional roofing materials (concrete, asphalt and ceramic tile roofs) compared with alternative roofing materials (green roof). The results showed that the ceramic tile roof was the most suitable for rainwater-harvesting applications because of the lower concentrations of leachable pollutants. However, in this study, the green roof was not suitable for rainwater harvesting applications. In addition, seasonal trends in water quality parameters showed that pollutants in roof runoff in summer and autumn were lower than those in winter and spring. This study revealed that the quality of harvested rainwater was significantly affected by the roofing material; therefore, local government and urban planners should develop stricter testing programs and produce more weathering resistant roofing materials to allow the harvesting of rainwater for domestic and public uses.

  15. Quality and seasonal variation of rainwater harvested from concrete, asphalt, ceramic tile and green roofs in Chongqing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianqian; Wang, Xiaoke; Hou, Peiqiang; Wan, Wuxing; Li, Ruida; Ren, Yufen; Ouyang, Zhiyun

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent requirement to examine the quality of harvested rainwater for potable and non-potable purposes, based on the type of roofing material. In this study, we examined the effect on the quality of harvested rainwater of conventional roofing materials (concrete, asphalt and ceramic tile roofs) compared with alternative roofing materials (green roof). The results showed that the ceramic tile roof was the most suitable for rainwater-harvesting applications because of the lower concentrations of leachable pollutants. However, in this study, the green roof was not suitable for rainwater harvesting applications. In addition, seasonal trends in water quality parameters showed that pollutants in roof runoff in summer and autumn were lower than those in winter and spring. This study revealed that the quality of harvested rainwater was significantly affected by the roofing material; therefore, local government and urban planners should develop stricter testing programs and produce more weathering resistant roofing materials to allow the harvesting of rainwater for domestic and public uses. PMID:24316751

  16. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid and silane. Maxillary incisor metal brackets were bonded to half of the disks in each group by conventional orthodontic bonding resin and the other half bonded with a nano-filled composite. The samples then were thermocycled for 2000 cycle between 5-55° C. Shear bond strength was measured and the mode of failure was examined. Randomly selected samples were also evaluated by SEM.The lowest bond strength value was found infeldespathic ceramic bonded by nano-filled composite (p<0.05. There was not any statistically significant difference between other groups regarding bond strength. The mode of failure in the all groups except group 1 was cohesive and porcelain damages were detected.Since less damages to feldspathic porcelain was observed when the nano-filled composite was used to bond brackets, the use of nano-filled composite resins can be suggested for bonding brackets to feldspathic porcelain restorations.

  17. Preparation of Zeolite X Membranes on Porous Ceramic Substrates with Zeolite Seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongqiang Xu; Qingling Chen; Guanzhong Lu

    2002-01-01

    Zeolite X membranes were investigated by in-situ hydrothermal synthesis on porous ceramic tubes precoated with zeolite X seeds or precursor amorphous aluminosilicate, and porous α-Al2O3 ceramic tubes with a pore size of 50 200 nm were employed as supports. Zeolite X crystals were synthesized by the classic method and mixed into deionized water as a slurry with a concentration of 0.2 0.5wt%, having a range of crystal sizes from 0.2 to 2μm. Crystal seeds were pressed into the pores near the inner surface of the ceramic tubes, and crystallization took place at 95℃ for 24-96 h. It was also investigated that Boehmite sol added with zeolite X seeds was precoated on ceramic supports to form a layer of γ-Al2O3 by heating, and hydrothermal crystallization could then take place to prepare the zeolite membranes on the composite ceramic tubes. The crystal species were characterized by XRD, and the morphology of the supports subjected to crystallization was characterized by SEM. The composite zeolite membranes have zeolitic top-layers with a thickness of 10-25 μm, and zeolite crystals can be intruded into pores of the supports as deeply as 100μm. The experimental results indicate that the precoating of zeolitic seeds on supports is beneficial to crystallization by shortening the synthesis time and improving the membrane strength. The resulting zeolite X membrane shows permselectivity to tri-n-butylamine((C4H9)3N) over perfluro-tributyl-amine ((C4Fg)3N), and a permeance ratio of 57 for ((C4Hg)3N to (C4F9)3N could be reached at 350℃. Permeances of BZ, EB and TIPB through the zeolite membrane were also measured and were found to slightly increase with temperature.

  18. Super Smooth Modification of Al2O3 Ceramic Substrate by High Temperature Glaze of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jihua; Zhen, Shanxue; Yang, Lijun; Lou, Feizhi; Chen, Hongwei; Yang, Chuanren

    2011-01-01

    The rough surface of ceramic substrate is an obstacle for the scale down of line-width for thin film passive integrated devices (PID). In this paper, a modification method for Al2O3 ceramic substrate with super smooth in surface was proposed. Coating a layer of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CAS) glass was performed to flat the rough surface of alumina substrate by sol-gel method. It was found that addition of 0.06% V2O5 can inhibit the recrystallization of the glaze. The root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the glazed substrates reached a surprising flatness as small as 0.5 nm, and its melting temperature is higher than 1300 °C. This substrate with super flatness and high temperature endurance may be promising for high performance thin film devices.

  19. Control of substrate oxidation in MOD ceramic coating on low-activation ferritic steel with reduced-pressure atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Teruya, E-mail: teru@nifs.ac.jp; Muroga, Takeo

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was produced on a ferritic steel substrate with a reduced-pressure. • The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer prevents further substrate oxidation in following coating process. • The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer has a function as a hydrogen permeation barrier. • A smooth MOD Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was successfully made on the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer by dip coating. • The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer would enhance flexibility in MOD coating process and performances. - Abstract: An Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic coating fabricated using the metal–organic decomposition (MOD) method on a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-covered low-activation ferritic steel JLF-1 substrate was examined to improve hydrogen permeation barrier performance of the coating. The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was obtained before coating by heat treating the substrate at 700 °C under reduced pressures of <5 × 10{sup −3} Pa and 5 Pa. The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was significantly stable even with heat treatment at 700 °C in air. This layer prevented further production of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which has been considered to degrade coating performance. An MOD Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating with a smooth surface was successfully obtained on a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-covered JLF-1 substrate by dip coating followed by drying and baking. Preprocessing to obtain a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer would provide flexibility in the coating process for blanket components and ducts. Moreover, the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer suppressed hydrogen permeation through the JLF-1 substrate. While further optimization of the coating fabrication process is required, it would be possible to suppress hydrogen permeation significantly by multilayers of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MOD oxide ceramic.

  20. Using porous ceramics as a substrate or filter media during the cleaning of sewage

    OpenAIRE

    Drev, Darko; Vrhovšek, Danijel; Panjan, Jože

    2015-01-01

    Our research has shown that porous ceramics are good holders of biomass in biological water-treatment plants. They can also be used as an air-blowing system or as the filter media on a membrane filter in combination with a biological water-treatment plant. Individual tests have shown very positive results, and for this reason we are convinced such materials have good possibilities for more frequent use in biological water-treatment plants.

  1. Using porous ceramics as a substrate or filter media during the cleaning of sewage

    OpenAIRE

    Drev, Darko; Vrhovšek, Danijel; Panjan, Jože

    2006-01-01

    Our research has shown that porous ceramics are good holders of biomass in biological water-treatment plants. They can also be used as an air-blowing system or as the filter media on a membrane filter in combination with a biological water-treatment plant. Individual tests have shown very positive results, and for this reason we are convinced such materials have good possibilities for more frequent use in biological water-treatment plants.

  2. A high-power high-stability Q-switched green laser with intracavity frequency doubling using a diode-pumped composite ceramic Nd:YAG laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yu-Ye; Xu De-Gang; Liu Chang-Ming; Wang Wei-Peng; Yao Jian-Quan

    2012-01-01

    We successfully obtain a high-average-power high-stability Q-switched green laser based on diode-side-pumped composite ceramic Nd:YAG in a straight plano-concave cavity. The temperature distribution in composite ceramic Nd:YAG crystal is numerically analyzed and compared with that of conventional Nd:YAG crystal.By using a composite ceramic Nd:YAG rod and a type-Ⅱ high gray track resistance KTP (HGTR-KTP) crystal,a green laser with an average output power of 165 W is obtained at a repetition rate of 25 kHz,with a diode-to-green optical conversion of 14.68%,and a pulse width of 162 ns.To the best of our knowledge,both the output power and optical-to-optical efficiency are the highest values for green laser systems with intracavity frequency doubling of this novel composite ceramic Nd:YAG laser to date.The power fluctuation at around 160 W is lower than 0.3% in 2.5 hours.

  3. On the use, characterization and performance of silane coupling agents between organic coatings and metallic or ceramic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ooij, W. J.; Zhang, B. C.; Conners, K. D.; Hörnström, S.-E.

    1996-01-01

    Examples are given of the use of organofunctional silane coupling agents for promoting bonding between organic coatings and metallic or ceramic (i.e. oxide) substrates. The orientation of the silane molecules and the type of bonding with the metal oxide can be determined successfully by Time-of-Flight SIMS. Oriented films of aminosilanes are demonstrated to be unstable in air. A prerinse with an inorganic silicate is introduced as a suitable method for masking the ubiquitous carbonaceous contamination at the metal surface, thus promoting the proper orientation and covalent bonding. Some practical applications are described, such as the pretreatment of Galvalume■ surfaces as a replacement of existing chromate treatments in coil coating applications. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is shown to be a powerful tool for studying the performance of the silane treatment under a paint.

  4. Optical design of 200-lm/W phosphorescent green light emitting devices based on the high refractive index substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikami, Akiyoshi [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Nonoichimachi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Light extraction efficiency has been successfully enhanced by using high refractive index substrate coupled with micro-lens array and weak micro-cavity structure. Optical energy intensity including waveguide, substrate and external modes was analyzed based on wave optics. It was shown that most of the waveguide mode is turned to the substrate mode by the effect of high index refraction substrate. About a half of the light can be extracted from the substrate by the assistance of surface textured structure. An external quantum efficiency of 57% and a power efficiency of over 200-lm/W were obtained in a green phosphorescent device. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Formulation and screen printing of water based conductive flake silver pastes onto green ceramic tapes for electronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Formulation of water-based pastes. ► Viscosity, yield stress, elastic and viscous modulus determination. ► Screen printing onto green ceramic tapes. ► Rheology effect on line dimensions and electrical properties. ► Resistivity ∼18–33 nΩ m. Minimum width ∼60 μm after sintering. - Abstract: Environmentally friendly, water-based silver pastes, adapted for screen printing, were formulated with different silver contents (67–75%). These pastes allowed screen printing onto low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) of narrow conductive tracks with a 60 μm line width and a 3 × 10−8 Ω m electrical resistivity. Inks were formulated with a mixture of spherical and flake shape silver particles with 2–4 μm mean diameter. Rheological behaviour of pastes was studied in order to determine its effect on printed lines properties. Prepared inks were then screen printed and sintered under normal atmosphere at 875 °C. As expected, electrical properties depended on silver content. Resistivity values varying from 1.6 × 10−8 to 3.3 × 10−8 Ω m were calculated over 36.3 cm line length. These values are very close to bulk silver resistivity (1.6 × 10−8 Ω m). Compared to previous research and commercial pastes, the newly formulated pastes reached equivalent or even better conductivities with lower silver content (70% by weight).

  6. Pressure slip casting and cold isostatic pressing of aluminum titanate green ceramics: A comparative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Papitha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum titanate (Al2TiO5 green bodies were prepared from mixture of titania and alumina powders with different particle sizes by conventional slip casting (CSC, pressure slip casting (PSC and cold isostatic pressing (CIP. Precursor-powder mixtures were evaluated with respect to the powder properties, flow behaviours and shaping parameters. Green densities were measured and correlated with the fractographs. A substantial increase in green densities up to 60 %TD (theoretical density of 4.02 g/cm3, calculated based on rule of mixtures is observed with the application of 2–3 MPa pressure with PSC. While particle size distribution and solid loading are the most influential parameters in the case of CSC, with PSC pressure also plays a key role in achieving the higher green densities. Being a dry process, high pressure of > 100 MPa for CIP is essential to achieve densities in the range of 60–65 %TD. Slip pressurization under PSC conditions facilitate the rearrangement of particles through rolling, twisting and interlocking unlike CIP processing where pressure is needed to overcome the inter-particle friction.

  7. Moisture content behaviour in extensive green roofs during dry periods: The influence of vegetation and substrate characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Christian; Poë, Simon; Stovin, Virginia

    2014-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a key parameter that influences the stormwater retention capacity, and thus the hydrological performance, of green roofs. This paper investigates how the moisture content in extensive green roofs varies during dry periods due to evapotranspiration. The study is supported by 29 months continuous field monitoring of the moisture content within four green roof test beds. The beds incorporated three different substrates, with three being vegetated with sedum and one left unvegetated. Water content reflectometers were located at three different soil depths to measure the soil moisture profile and to record temporal changes in moisture content at a five-minute resolution. The moisture content vertical profiles varied consistently, with slightly elevated moisture content levels being recorded at the deepest substrate layer in the vegetated systems. Daily moisture loss rates were influenced by both temperature and moisture content, with reduced moisture loss/evapotranspiration when the soil moisture was restricted. The presence of vegetation resulted in higher daily moisture loss. Finally, it is demonstrated that the observed moisture content data can be accurately simulated using a hydrologic model based on water balance and two conventional Potential ET models (Hargreaves and FAO56 Penman-Monteith) combined with a soil moisture extraction function. Configuration-specific correction factors have been proposed to account for differences between green roof systems and standard reference crops.

  8. Materials design considerations involved in the fabrication of implantable bionics by metallization of ceramic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunil; Guenther, Thomas; Dodds, Christopher W D; Kolke, Sergej; Privat, Karen L; Matteucci, Paul B; Suaning, Gregg J

    2013-01-01

    The Pt metallization of co-fired Al2O3/SiO2 substrates containing Pt feedthroughs was shown to be a suitable means to construct implantable bionics. The use of forge welding to join an electrode to such a metallized feedthrough was demonstrated and subsequently evaluated through the use of metallography and electron microscopy. Metallurgical phenomena involved in forge welding relevant to the fabrication of all types of biomedical implants are discussed within this paper. The affect of thermal profiles used in brazing or welding to build implantable devices from metal components is analysed and the case for considered selection of alloys in implant design is put forward.

  9. Simulation of heat exchange phenomena and water regime in green roof substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Charpentier, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    Installation of intensive or extensive green roofs increases in Western European and North American cities. It is estimated that 12% of all flat roofs are green in Germany and the roof industry is growing at a rate of 10% per year in the EU. Apart from the aesthetic point of view, the main objective is to reduce heating (by increasing thermal resistance value) during winter and cooling (by evaporation) during summer. Most researches are conducted on specific plant species for green roof estab...

  10. Cladonia lichens on extensive green roofs: evapotranspiration, substrate temperature, and albedo [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2v4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Heim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs are constructed ecosystems that provide ecosystem services in urban environments. Shallow substrate green roofs subject the vegetation layer to desiccation and other environmental extremes, so researchers have evaluated a variety of stress-tolerant vegetation types for green roof applications. Lichens can be found in most terrestrial habitats.  They are able to survive extremely harsh conditions, including frequent cycles of desiccation and rehydration, nutrient-poor soil, fluctuating temperatures, and high UV intensities. Extensive green roofs (substrate depth <20cm exhibit these harsh conditions, making lichens possible candidates for incorporation into the vegetation layer on extensive green roofs.  In a modular green roof system, we tested the effect of Cladonia lichens on substrate temperature, water loss, and albedo compared to a substrate-only control. Overall, the Cladonia modules had significantly cooler substrate temperatures during the summer and significantly warmer temperatures during the fall.  Additionally, the Cladonia modules lost significantly less water than the substrate-only control. This implies that they may be able to benefit neighboring vascular plant species by reducing water loss and maintaining favorable substrate temperatures.

  11. Cladonia lichens on extensive green roofs: evapotranspiration, substrate temperature, and albedo [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2ha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Heim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs are constructed ecosystems that provide ecosystem services in urban environments. Shallow substrate green roofs subject the vegetation layer to desiccation and other environmental extremes, so researchers have evaluated a variety of stress-tolerant vegetation types for green roof applications. Lichens can be found in most terrestrial habitats.  They are able to survive extremely harsh conditions, including frequent cycles of desiccation and rehydration, nutrient-poor soil, fluctuating temperatures, and high UV intensities. Extensive green roofs (substrate depth <20cm exhibit these harsh conditions, making lichens possible candidates for incorporation into the vegetation layer on extensive green roofs.  In a modular green roof system, we tested the effect of Cladonia lichens on substrate temperature, water loss, and albedo compared to a substrate-only control. Overall, the Cladonia modules had significantly cooler substrate temperatures during the summer and significantly warmer temperatures during the fall.  Additionally, the Cladonia modules lost significantly less water than the substrate-only control. This implies that they may be able to benefit neighboring vascular plant species by reducing water loss and maintaining favorable substrate temperatures.

  12. Pb-Free Glass Paste: A Metallization-Free Die-Attachment Solution for High-Temperature Application on Ceramic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Ahmed; Lim, Jun zhang; Made, Riko I.; Lau, Fu Long; Phua, Eric Jian Rong; Lim, Ju Dy; Wong, Chee Cheong; Gan, Chee Lip; Chen, Zhong

    2013-08-01

    A lead-free glass frit paste as a die-attach material for high-temperature microelectronic application is proposed in this study. The glass paste containing Bi-based powder with a moderate amount of solvent was used for joining Si dice on ceramic substrates without any metallization preparation for either of the bonding surfaces. The die was bonded to a ceramic substrate at 430°C for 10 min. The study focuses on the mechanical and microstructural characterization of the joints with Si dice on two different types of ceramic substrate. Shear strength measurements were carried out at both ambient and 250°C to evaluate room- and high-temperature performance. Furthermore, the effect of aging at 300°C for 500 h on the mechanical properties is presented. The results of the mechanical and microstructural characterization demonstrate that low-temperature glass frit bonding is an effective die-attach method for harsh-environment electronic packaging.

  13. Effects of varying oxygen partial pressure on molten silicon-ceramic substrate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownby, D. P.; Barsoum, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    The silicon sessile drop contact angle was measured on hot pressed silicon nitride, silicon nitride coated on hot pressed silicon nitride, silicon carbon coated on graphite, and on Sialon to determine the degree to which silicon wets these substances. The post-sessile drop experiment samples were sectioned and photomicrographs were taken of the silicon-substrate interface to observe the degree of surface dissolution and degradation. Of these materials, silicon did not form a true sessile drop on the SiC on graphite due to infiltration of the silicon through the SiC coating, nor on the Sialon due to the formation of a more-or-less rigid coating on the liquid silicon. The most wetting was obtained on the coated Si3N4 with a value of 42 deg. The oxygen concentrations in a silicon ribbon furnace and in a sessile drop furnace were measured using the protable thoria-yttria solid solution electrolyte oxygen sensor. Oxygen partial pressures of 10 to the minus 7 power atm and 10 to the minus 8 power atm were obtained at the two facilities. These measurements are believed to represent nonequilibrium conditions.

  14. Development of Energy-Efficient Cryogenic Leads with High Temperature Superconducting Films on Ceramic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, A. V.; Fedoseev, S. A.; Shcherbakova, O. V.; Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Zhou, S.; Dou, S. X.; Webber, R. J.; Mukhanov, O. A.; Yamashita, T.; Taylor, R.

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) material can be used for the implementation of high-speed low-heat conduction data links to transport digital data from 4 K superconductor integrated circuits to higher-temperature parts of computing systems. In this work, we present a conceptual design of energy efficient interface and results in fabricating such HTS leads. Initial calculations have shown that the microstrip line cable geometry for typical materials employed in production of HTS thin films can be a two-layered film for which the two layers of about 10 cm long are separated by an insulation layer with as low permittivity as possible. With this architecture in mind, the pulsed laser deposition process has been designed in a 45 cm diameter vacuum chamber to incorporate an oscillating sample holder with homogeneous substrate heating up to 900°C, while the laser plume is fixed. This design has allowed us to produce 200 nm to 500 nm thick, 7 cm to 10 cm long YBa2Cu3O7 thin films with the homogeneous critical temperature (Tc) of about 90 K. The critical current density (Jc) of the short samples obtained from the long sample is of (2 ± 1) × 1010 A/m2. Lines of 3-100 μm wide have been successfully patterned along the length of the samples in order to directly measure the Tc and Jc values over the entire length of the samples, as well as to attempt the structuring of multichannel data lead prototype.

  15. Enhanced green upconversion by controlled ceramization of Er3+–Yb3+ co-doped sodium niobium tellurite glass–ceramics for low temperature sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Upconversion luminescence improved in glass–ceramics compared to host glass. • Judd–Ofelt and radiative parameters calculated. • NIR decay curve results concur the results of improved luminescence. • Temperature dependent upconversion support the use of materials for sensors. - Abstract: Tellurite based glasses are well-known for their upconversion properties besides having a disadvantage of low mechanical strength dragging them away from practical applications. The present work deals with preparation of sodium niobium tellurite (SNT) glasses using melt quenching method, in which small quantities of boron and silicon in the form of oxides are added to improve their mechanical properties. Controlled heat treatment is performed to ceramize the prepared glasses based on the thermal data given by DTA. XRD and SEM profiles of the glass–ceramics which confirmed the formation of crystalline monoclinic Sodium Tellurium Niobium Oxide (Na1.4Nb3Te4.9O18) phase (JCPDS card No. 04–011-7556). Upconversion measurements in the visible region were made for the prepared Er3+–Yb3+ co-doped glasses and glass–ceramics with 980 nm laser excitation varying the laser power and concentration of Er3+ ions. Results showed that the upconversion luminescence intensity was enhanced by ten times in SNT glass–ceramics compared to that in the SNT glasses. Decay curves give evidence of high performance of glass–ceramics compared to glasses due to ceramization and structural changes. Temperature dependent visible upconversion was performed to test the ability of efficient SNT glass–ceramic at low temperatures and variation of upconversion intensities was studied

  16. Green

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙继山

    2005-01-01

    The Green Games-this is a Chinese promise to the world. Green it has to be when the Olympic Games are opened at a spectacular venue in the north of Beijing in 2008. However, those who live in the capital still worry whether it will be possible to turn the rather polluted city. into a green or even half-green city. But time and again, China has proved that this kind of huge challenge can be met. Nevertheless,this time around it is a tough call indeed and a little over three years are left to execute and complete an audacious task.

  17. Substrate Integrated Waveguide Based Phase Shifter and Phased Array in a Ferrite Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic Package

    KAUST Repository

    Nafe, Ahmed A.

    2014-03-01

    Phased array antennas, capable of controlling the direction of their radiated beam, are demanded by many conventional as well as modern systems. Applications such as automotive collision avoidance radar, inter-satellite communication links and future man-portable satellite communication on move services require reconfigurable beam systems with stress on mobility and cost effectiveness. Microwave phase shifters are key components of phased antenna arrays. A phase shifter is a device that controls the phase of the signal passing through it. Among the technologies used to realize this device, traditional ferrite waveguide phase shifters offer the best performance. However, they are bulky and difficult to integrate with other system components. Recently, ferrite material has been introduced in Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) multilayer packaging technology. This enables the integration of ferrite based components with other microwave circuitry in a compact, light-weight and mass producible package. Additionally, the recent concept of Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) allowed realization of synthesized rectangular waveguide-like structures in planar and multilayer substrates. These SIW structures have been shown to maintain the merits of conventional rectangular waveguides such as low loss and high power handling capabilities while being planar and easily integrable with other components. Implementing SIW structures inside a multilayer ferrite LTCC package enables monolithic integration of phase shifters and phased arrays representing a true System on Package (SoP) solution. It is the objective of this thesis to pursue realizing efficient integrated phase shifters and phased arrays combining the above mentioned technologies, namely Ferrite LTCC and SIW. In this work, a novel SIW phase shifter in ferrite LTCC package is designed, fabricated and tested. The device is able to operate reciprocally as well as non-reciprocally. Demonstrating a measured maximum

  18. Chemical deposition of La0.7Ca0.3MnO3±δ films on ceramic substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Morilla-Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is reported the growth of La0.7Ca0.3MnO3±δ films using a chemical solution deposition method (CSD by the spin-coating technique. Such solution was prepared through a route based on modified polymeric precursor method. Spin-coating deposition on different ceramic substrates was performed and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The magnetic response of the prepared specimens was studied using a SQUID magnetometer. The obtained results indicated uniform deposition on SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 substrates with similar characteristics. Furthermore, significant differences were detected in the Mn3+/Mn4+ valence ratio and a corresponding diverse magnetic response was observed. The sample prepared on SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 presented a critical temperature around 270 K as expected.

  19. Comparison of the substrate enzymatic digestibility and lignin structure of wheat straw stems and leaves pretreated by green liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Wangxia; Gu, Feng; Cao, Tingyue; Jin, Yongcan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the substrate enzymatic digestibility (SED) and the lignin structure of green liquor (GL) pretreated wheat straw stems and leaves were investigated. Compared with wheat straw stems, leaves showed higher delignification selectivity in GL pretreatment and higher SED in enzymatic hydrolysis. Wet chemical analysis indicated that, characterized with lower content of syringyl units and less β-O-4 linkages, leaf lignin is structurally different from stem lignin. After GL pretreatment, the drops of both nitrobenzene oxidation and ozonation products yield of leaves were obviously higher than those of stems, which means that more β-O-4 linkages of leaf lignin were broken than that of stem lignin. The SED of total sugar in GL-pretreated leaves was about 50% higher than that in GL-pretreated stems. The less content and lower S/G ratio of lignin are suggested to be the important factors for the better SED of GL-pretreated leaves. PMID:26342786

  20. Metal-assisted exfoliation (MAE): green, roll-to-roll compatible method for transferring graphene to flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretski, Aliaksandr V.; Moetazedi, Herad; Kong, Casey; Sawyer, Eric J.; Savagatrup, Suchol; Valle, Eduardo; O'Connor, Timothy F.; Printz, Adam D.; Lipomi, Darren J.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is expected to play a significant role in future technologies that span a range from consumer electronics, to devices for the conversion and storage of energy, to conformable biomedical devices for healthcare. To realize these applications, however, a low-cost method of synthesizing large areas of high-quality graphene is required. Currently, the only method to generate large-area single-layer graphene that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing destroys approximately 300 kg of copper foil (thickness = 25 μm) for every 1 g of graphene produced. This paper describes a new environmentally benign and scalable process of transferring graphene to flexible substrates. The process is based on the preferential adhesion of certain thin metallic films to graphene; separation of the graphene from the catalytic copper foil is followed by lamination to a flexible target substrate in a process that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing. The copper substrate is indefinitely reusable and the method is substantially greener than the current process that uses relatively large amounts of corrosive etchants to remove the copper. The sheet resistance of the graphene produced by this new process is unoptimized but should be comparable in principle to that produced by the standard method, given the defects observable by Raman spectroscopy and the presence of process-induced cracks. With further improvements, this green, inexpensive synthesis of single-layer graphene could enable applications in flexible, stretchable, and disposable electronics, low-profile and lightweight barrier materials, and in large-area displays and photovoltaic modules.

  1. Metal-assisted exfoliation (MAE): green, roll-to-roll compatible method for transferring graphene to flexible substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphene is expected to play a significant role in future technologies that span a range from consumer electronics, to devices for the conversion and storage of energy, to conformable biomedical devices for healthcare. To realize these applications, however, a low-cost method of synthesizing large areas of high-quality graphene is required. Currently, the only method to generate large-area single-layer graphene that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing destroys approximately 300 kg of copper foil (thickness = 25 μm) for every 1 g of graphene produced. This paper describes a new environmentally benign and scalable process of transferring graphene to flexible substrates. The process is based on the preferential adhesion of certain thin metallic films to graphene; separation of the graphene from the catalytic copper foil is followed by lamination to a flexible target substrate in a process that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing. The copper substrate is indefinitely reusable and the method is substantially greener than the current process that uses relatively large amounts of corrosive etchants to remove the copper. The sheet resistance of the graphene produced by this new process is unoptimized but should be comparable in principle to that produced by the standard method, given the defects observable by Raman spectroscopy and the presence of process-induced cracks. With further improvements, this green, inexpensive synthesis of single-layer graphene could enable applications in flexible, stretchable, and disposable electronics, low-profile and lightweight barrier materials, and in large-area displays and photovoltaic modules. (paper)

  2. green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The “green” topic follows the “youngsters”, which is quite natural for the Russian language.Traditionally these words put together sound slightly derogatory. However, “green” also means fresh, new and healthy.For Russia, and for Siberia in particular, “green” architecture does sound new and fresh. Forced by the anxious reality, we are addressing this topic intentionally. The ecological crisis, growing energy prices, water, air and food deficits… Alexander Rappaport, our regular author, writes: “ It has been tolerable until a certain time, but under transition to the global civilization, as the nature is destroyed, and swellings of megapolises expand incredibly fast, the size and the significance of all these problems may grow a hundredfold”.However, for this very severe Siberian reality the newness of “green” architecture may turn out to be well-forgotten old. A traditional Siberian house used to be built on principles of saving and environmental friendliness– one could not survive in Siberia otherwise.Probably, in our turbulent times, it is high time to fasten “green belts”. But we should keep from enthusiastic sticking of popular green labels or repainting of signboards into green color. We should avoid being drowned in paper formalities under “green” slogans. And we should prevent the Earth from turning into the planet “Kin-dza-dza”.

  3. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2007-08-28

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  4. Ceramic barrier layers for flexible thin film solar cells on metallic substrates: a laboratory scale study for process optimization and barrier layer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Sanchez, Jose-Maria; Guilera, Nuria; Francesch, Laia; Alba, Maria D; Lopez, Laura; Sanchez, Emilio

    2014-11-12

    Flexible thin film solar cells are an alternative to both utility-scale and building integrated photovoltaic installations. The fabrication of these devices over electrically conducting low-cost foils requires the deposition of dielectric barrier layers to flatten the substrate surface, provide electrical isolation between the substrate and the device, and avoid the diffusion of metal impurities during the relatively high temperatures required to deposit the rest of the solar cell device layers. The typical roughness of low-cost stainless-steel foils is in the hundred-nanometer range, which is comparable or larger than the thin film layers comprising the device and this may result in electrical shunts that decrease solar cell performance. This manuscript assesses the properties of different single-layer and bilayer structures containing ceramics inks formulations based on Al2O3, AlN, or Si3N4 nanoparticles and deposited over stainless-steel foils using a rotogravure printing process. The best control of the substrate roughness was achieved for bilayers of Al2O3 or AlN with mixed particle size, which reduced the roughness and prevented the diffusion of metals impurities but AlN bilayers exhibited as well the best electrical insulation properties.

  5. Development and characterization of GdBa2NbO6, a new ceramic substrate for YBCO thick films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and characterization of a new substrate material GdBa2NbO6, having moderately low dielectric constant and loss factor at MHz frequencies are reported. It has been found that superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-δ does not react with GdBa2NbO6 even after a 1:1 volume mixture was heated at 950oC for 15 h. The suitability of GdBa2NbO6 as a substrate for YBa2Cu3O7-δ thick films was confirmed by fabricating a thick film of YBa2Cu3O7-δ on this substrate by screen printing which gave a zero-resistivity superconducting transition at Tc(0)=92 K with a transition width of 2 K

  6. Green analytical methodology using Indian almond (Terminalia catappa L.) leaf extract for determination of aluminum ion in waste water from ceramic factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insain, Pimporn; Khonyoung, Supada; Sooksamiti, Ponlayuth; Lapanantnoppakhun, Somchai; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Grudpan, Kate; Zajicek, Katja; Kradtap Hartwell, Supaporn

    2013-01-01

    The use of natural reagents from plant extracts for chemical analysis is one of the approaches in the development of low cost and environmentally friendly green analytical chemistry methodology. Here, crude extract from Indian Almond (Terminalia Catappa L.) leaves was used for colorimetric determination of aluminum by monitoring the absorbance of the Al(3+)-extract complex at 435 nm. Dry leaves and freeze-dried fresh leaf extract can be kept for extended use. A simple flow injection analysis (FIA) system was also employed for rapid analysis (approximately 180 injections/h). The linear working range up to 100 mg L(-1) was established with a detection limit (blank + 3SD) of 0.8 mg L(-1), a limit of quantitation (blank + 10SD) of 2.4 mg L(-1), and a relative standard deviation of 3-5%. This simple green analytical chemistry methodology was applied for the determination of Al(3+) in waste water samples from ceramic factories. The results agreed well with the results obtained from the ICP-OES technique. PMID:23749133

  7. YBa2SnO5.5, a novel ceramic substrate for YBCO and BiSCCO superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YBa2SnO5.5 has been synthesized and sintered as single phase material for its use as substrate for both YBCO and BiSCCO superconductors. YBa2SnO5.5 has a complex cubic perovskite (A2BB'O-6) structure with lattice constant a=8.430 A. The dielectric constant and loss factor of YBa2SnO5.5 are in a range suitable for its use as substrate for microwave applications. YBa2SnO5.5 is found to be chemically compatible with both YBCO and BiSCCO superconductors. The thin film of YBCO screen printed on polycrystalline YBa2SnO5.5 substrate gave a Tc(0) of 92 K and a critical current density (Jc) of 4x104 A/cm2 at 77K. A screen printed BiSCCO thick film on YBa2SnO5.5 substrate gave Tc(0)=110K and current density 3x103 A/cm2 at 77 K. (author). 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Reprint of “Moisture content behaviour in extensive green roofs during dry periods: The influence of vegetation and substrate characteristics”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Christian; Poë, Simon; Stovin, Virginia

    2014-08-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a key parameter that influences the stormwater retention capacity, and thus the hydrological performance, of green roofs. This paper investigates how the moisture content in extensive green roofs varies during dry periods due to evapotranspiration. The study is supported by 29 months continuous field monitoring of the moisture content within four green roof test beds. The beds incorporated three different substrates, with three being vegetated with sedum and one left unvegetated. Water content reflectometers were located at three different soil depths to measure the soil moisture profile and to record temporal changes in moisture content at a five-minute resolution. The moisture content vertical profiles varied consistently, with slightly elevated moisture content levels being recorded at the deepest substrate layer in the vegetated systems. Daily moisture loss rates were influenced by both temperature and moisture content, with reduced moisture loss/evapotranspiration when the soil moisture was restricted. The presence of vegetation resulted in higher daily moisture loss. Finally, it is demonstrated that the observed moisture content data can be accurately simulated using a hydrologic model based on water balance and two conventional Potential ET models (Hargreaves and FAO56 Penman-Monteith) combined with a soil moisture extraction function. Configuration-specific correction factors have been proposed to account for differences between green roof systems and standard reference crops.

  9. Characterization of micro-arc ceramic coatings on Ti-2Al-2.5Zr alloy substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Titanium oxide coatings were synthesized on Ti-2Al-2.5Zr alloy substrates by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) technique. The surface features of the coatings were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The micro-arc discharge channels of the Ti-2Al-2.5Zr alloy decrease while the discharge channel size increases clearly with an increase in treating time. With an increase of the coating thickness the porous layer thickness increases apparently. Phase composition of the surface layers of the coatings was evaluated by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results of XRD and XPS analysis show that the MAO coating mainly consists of anatase and rutile TiO2.

  10. The Technology of Pumping Light-weight Substrate for Roof Greening%泵送轻质屋顶绿化基材技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶建军; 韦书勇

    2009-01-01

    Rooof greening is the key measure to improve urban environment. Firstly,this paper analyzes the mommonly used technology solutions in roof greeing, and introduces some details on material selection for each layers and the existing problems in the technology of extensive green roofs.Then ,based on the above, this paper presents a new patented technology--the technology of pumping light-weight substrate for roof greening, fo-cusing on the substrate compositions and construction techniques.%屋顶绿化是改善城市环境的关键举措,本文分析了屋顶绿化的常见形式,介绍了简单屋顶绿化形式各层的材料特点、现有的简单屋顶绿化技术方案及存在的问题.在此基础上,论文介绍了一种新发明技术-泵送轻质屋顶绿化基材技术的材料组成和施工.

  11. Microstructure and dielectric properties of (Ba 0.6Sr 0.4)TiO 3 thin films grown on super smooth glazed-Al 2O 3 ceramics substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongwei; Yang, Chuanren; Zheng, Shanxue; Zhang, Jihua; Zhang, Qiaozhen; Lei, Guanhuan; Lou, Feizhi; Yang, Lijun

    2011-12-01

    Modified substrates with nanometer scale smooth surface were obtained via coating a layer of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CaAlSi) high temperature glaze with proper additives on the rough-95% Al2O3 ceramics substrates. (Ba0.6Sr0.4)TiO3 (BST) thin films were deposited on modified Al2O3 substrates by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The microstructure, dielectric, and insulating properties of BST thin films grown on glazed-Al2O3 substrates were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM), and dielectric properties measurement. These results showed that microstructure and dielectric properties of BST thin films grown on glazed-Al2O3 substrates were almost consistent with that of BST thin films grown on LaAlO3 (1 0 0) single-crystal substrates. Thus, the expensive single-crystal substrates may be substituted by extremely cheap glazed-Al2O3 substrates.

  12. Hybrid method for the precise calculation of the general dyadic Greens functions for SAW and leaky wave substrates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, Darren W.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, the generalized method for calculation of the 16-element Green's function for analysis of surface acoustic waves has proven crucial to develop more sophisticated transducers. The generalized Green's function provides a precise relationship between the acoustic stresses and electric displacement on the three mechanical displacements and electric potential. This generalized method is able to account for mass loading effects which is absent in the effective permittivity approach. However, the calculation is numerically intensive and may lead to numerical instabilities when solving for both the eigenvalues and eigenvectors simultaneously. In this work, the general eigenvalue problem was modified to eliminate the numerical instabilities in the solving procedure. An algorithm is also presented to select the proper eigenvalues rapidly to facilitate analysis for all types of acoustic propagation. The 4 x 4 Green's functions and effective permittivities were calculated for materials supporting Rayleigh, leaky, and leaky longitudinal waves as demonstration of the method.

  13. Deep green emission at 570nm from InGaN/GaN MQW active region grown on bulk AlN substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.; Grandusky, J. R.; Jamil, M.; Jindal, V.; Schujman, S. B.; Schowalter, L. J.; Liu, R.; Ponce, F. A.; Cheung, M.; Cartwright, A.

    2005-09-01

    Relatively intense deep-green/yellow photoluminescence emission at ~600 nm is observed for InGaN/GaN multi quantum well (MQW) structures grown on bulk AlN substrates, demonstrating the potential to extend commercial III-Nitride LED technology to longer wavelengths. Optical spectroscopy has been performed on InGaN MQWs with an estimated In concentration of greater than 50% grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy at 750oC. Temperature- and power-dependence, time-resolved photoluminescence as well as spatially resolved cathodoluminescence measurements and transmission electron microscopy have been applied to understand and elucidate the nature of the mechanism responsible for radiative recombination at 600nm as well as higher energy emission band observed in the samples. A comparison between samples grown on bulk AlN and sapphire substrates indicate a lower degree of compositional and/or thickness fluctuation in the latter case. Our results indicate the presence of alloy compositional fluctuation in the active region despite the lower strain expected in the structure contrary to that of low In composition active regions deposited on bulk GaN substrates. Transient photoluminescence measurements signify a stretched exponential followed by a power decay to best fit the luminescence decay indicative of carrier hopping in the active region. Our results point to the fact that at such high In composition (>30%) InGaN compositional fluctuation is still a dominant effect despite lower strain at the substrate-epi interface.

  14. Quaternary AlInGaN/InGaN quantum well on vicinal c-plane substrate for high emission intensity of green wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seoung-Hwan [Department of Electronics Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Hayang, Kyeongbuk 712-702 (Korea, Republic of); Pak, Y. Eugene; Park, Chang Young [Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Mishra, Dhaneshwar; Yoo, Seung-Hyun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yong-Hee, E-mail: yonghee2.cho@samsung.com; Shim, Mun-Bo; Kim, Sungjin [CAE Group, Platform Technology Lab, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Street 130, Suwon, Kyeonggi-Do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-14

    Electronic and optical properties of non-trivial semipolar AlInGaN/InGaN quantum well (QW) structures are investigated by using the multiband effective-mass theory and non-Markovian optical model. On vicinal c-plane GaN substrate miscut by a small angle (θ < 40°) from c-plane, the AlInGaN/InGaN system is shown to have ∼3 times larger spontaneous emission peak intensity than the conventional InGaN/GaN system at green wavelength. It is attributed to much larger optical matrix element of the quaternary AlInGaN/InGaN system, derived from the reduction of internal electric field induced by polarizations. This effect exceeds the performance-degrading factor of smaller quasi-Fermi-level separation for the quaternary AlInGaN/InGaN system than that for the conventional InGaN/GaN system. Results indicate that the use of quaternary III-nitride QWs on vicinal substrates may be beneficial in improving the performance of optical devices emitting green light.

  15. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  16. The composition and depth of green roof substrates affect the growth of Silene vulgaris and Lagurus ovatus species and the C and N sequestration under two irrigation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondoño, S; Martínez-Sánchez, J J; Moreno, J L

    2016-01-15

    Extensive green roofs are used to increase the surface area covered by vegetation in big cities, thereby reducing the urban heat-island effect, promoting CO2 sequestration, and increasing biodiversity and urban-wildlife habitats. In Mediterranean semi-arid regions, the deficiency of water necessitates the use in these roofs of overall native plants which are more adapted to drought than other species. However, such endemic plants have been used scarcely in green roofs. For this purpose, we tested two different substrates with two depths (5 and 10 cm), in order to study their suitability with regard to adequate plant development under Mediterranean conditions. A compost-soil-bricks (CSB) (1:1:3; v:v:v) mixture and another made up of compost and bricks (CB) (1:4; v:v) were arranged in two depths (5 and 10 cm), in cultivation tables. Silene vulgaris (Moench) Garcke and Lagurus ovatus L. seeds were sown in each substrate. These experimental units were subjected, on the one hand, to irrigation at 40% of the registered evapotranspiration values (ET0) and, on the other, to drought conditions, during a nine-month trial. Physichochemical and microbiological substrate characteristics were studied, along with the physiological and nutritional status of the plants. We obtained significantly greater plant coverage in CSB at 10 cm, especially for L. ovatus (80-90%), as well as a better physiological status, especially in S. vulgaris (SPAD values of 50-60), under irrigation, whereas neither species could grow in the absence of water. The carbon and nitrogen fixation by the substrate and the aboveground biomass were also higher in CSB at 10 cm, especially under L. ovatus - in which 1.32 kg C m(-2) and 209 g N m(-2) were fixed throughout the experiment. Besides, the enzymatic and biochemical parameters assayed showed that microbial activity and nutrient cycling, which fulfill a key role for plant development, were higher in CSB. Therefore, irrigation of 40% can

  17. The composition and depth of green roof substrates affect the growth of Silene vulgaris and Lagurus ovatus species and the C and N sequestration under two irrigation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondoño, S; Martínez-Sánchez, J J; Moreno, J L

    2016-01-15

    Extensive green roofs are used to increase the surface area covered by vegetation in big cities, thereby reducing the urban heat-island effect, promoting CO2 sequestration, and increasing biodiversity and urban-wildlife habitats. In Mediterranean semi-arid regions, the deficiency of water necessitates the use in these roofs of overall native plants which are more adapted to drought than other species. However, such endemic plants have been used scarcely in green roofs. For this purpose, we tested two different substrates with two depths (5 and 10 cm), in order to study their suitability with regard to adequate plant development under Mediterranean conditions. A compost-soil-bricks (CSB) (1:1:3; v:v:v) mixture and another made up of compost and bricks (CB) (1:4; v:v) were arranged in two depths (5 and 10 cm), in cultivation tables. Silene vulgaris (Moench) Garcke and Lagurus ovatus L. seeds were sown in each substrate. These experimental units were subjected, on the one hand, to irrigation at 40% of the registered evapotranspiration values (ET0) and, on the other, to drought conditions, during a nine-month trial. Physichochemical and microbiological substrate characteristics were studied, along with the physiological and nutritional status of the plants. We obtained significantly greater plant coverage in CSB at 10 cm, especially for L. ovatus (80-90%), as well as a better physiological status, especially in S. vulgaris (SPAD values of 50-60), under irrigation, whereas neither species could grow in the absence of water. The carbon and nitrogen fixation by the substrate and the aboveground biomass were also higher in CSB at 10 cm, especially under L. ovatus - in which 1.32 kg C m(-2) and 209 g N m(-2) were fixed throughout the experiment. Besides, the enzymatic and biochemical parameters assayed showed that microbial activity and nutrient cycling, which fulfill a key role for plant development, were higher in CSB. Therefore, irrigation of 40% can

  18. Enhanced green upconversion by controlled ceramization of Er{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} co-doped sodium niobium tellurite glass–ceramics for low temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh Kumar, J., E-mail: suresh@ua.pt; Pavani, K.; Graça, M.P.F.; Soares, M.J.

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • Upconversion luminescence improved in glass–ceramics compared to host glass. • Judd–Ofelt and radiative parameters calculated. • NIR decay curve results concur the results of improved luminescence. • Temperature dependent upconversion support the use of materials for sensors. - Abstract: Tellurite based glasses are well-known for their upconversion properties besides having a disadvantage of low mechanical strength dragging them away from practical applications. The present work deals with preparation of sodium niobium tellurite (SNT) glasses using melt quenching method, in which small quantities of boron and silicon in the form of oxides are added to improve their mechanical properties. Controlled heat treatment is performed to ceramize the prepared glasses based on the thermal data given by DTA. XRD and SEM profiles of the glass–ceramics which confirmed the formation of crystalline monoclinic Sodium Tellurium Niobium Oxide (Na{sub 1.4}Nb{sub 3}Te{sub 4.9}O{sub 18}) phase (JCPDS card No. 04–011-7556). Upconversion measurements in the visible region were made for the prepared Er{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} co-doped glasses and glass–ceramics with 980 nm laser excitation varying the laser power and concentration of Er{sup 3+} ions. Results showed that the upconversion luminescence intensity was enhanced by ten times in SNT glass–ceramics compared to that in the SNT glasses. Decay curves give evidence of high performance of glass–ceramics compared to glasses due to ceramization and structural changes. Temperature dependent visible upconversion was performed to test the ability of efficient SNT glass–ceramic at low temperatures and variation of upconversion intensities was studied.

  19. Remediation and reclamation of soils heavily contaminated with toxic metals as a substrate for greening with ornamental plants and grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelusic, Masa; Lestan, Domen

    2015-11-01

    Soils highly contaminated with toxic metals are currently treated as waste despite their potential inherent fertility. We applied EDTA washing technology featuring chelant and process water recovery for remediation of soil with 4037, 2527, and 26 mg kg(-1) of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively in a pilot scale. A high EDTA dose (120 mmol kg(-1) of soil) removed 70%, 15%, and 58% of Pb, Zn, and Cd, respectively, and reduced human oral bioaccessibility of Pb below the limit of quantification and that of Zn and Cd 3.4 and 3.2 times. In a lysimeters experiment, the contaminated and remediated soils were laid into two garden beds (4×1×0.15 m) equipped with lysimeters, and subjected to cultivation of ornamental plants: Impatiens walleriana, Tagetes erecta, Pelargonium×peltatum, and Verbena×hybrida and grasses: Dactylis glomerata, Lolium multiflorum, and Festuca pratensis. Plants grown on remediated soil demonstrated the same or greater biomass yield and reduced the uptake of Pb, Zn and Cd up to 10, 2.5 and 9.5 times, respectively, compared to plants cultivated on the original soil. The results suggest that EDTA remediation produced soil suitable for greening.

  20. Remediation and reclamation of soils heavily contaminated with toxic metals as a substrate for greening with ornamental plants and grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelusic, Masa; Lestan, Domen

    2015-11-01

    Soils highly contaminated with toxic metals are currently treated as waste despite their potential inherent fertility. We applied EDTA washing technology featuring chelant and process water recovery for remediation of soil with 4037, 2527, and 26 mg kg(-1) of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively in a pilot scale. A high EDTA dose (120 mmol kg(-1) of soil) removed 70%, 15%, and 58% of Pb, Zn, and Cd, respectively, and reduced human oral bioaccessibility of Pb below the limit of quantification and that of Zn and Cd 3.4 and 3.2 times. In a lysimeters experiment, the contaminated and remediated soils were laid into two garden beds (4×1×0.15 m) equipped with lysimeters, and subjected to cultivation of ornamental plants: Impatiens walleriana, Tagetes erecta, Pelargonium×peltatum, and Verbena×hybrida and grasses: Dactylis glomerata, Lolium multiflorum, and Festuca pratensis. Plants grown on remediated soil demonstrated the same or greater biomass yield and reduced the uptake of Pb, Zn and Cd up to 10, 2.5 and 9.5 times, respectively, compared to plants cultivated on the original soil. The results suggest that EDTA remediation produced soil suitable for greening. PMID:25577699

  1. Superconducting YBCO and YBCO-Ag thick films (Tc(0)=92 K) by dip coating on GdBa2HfO5.5, a new perovskite ceramic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new ceramic perovskite, GdBa2HfO5.5, has been synthesized and developed for use as substrate for the YBa2Cu3O7-δ superconductor. The dielectric constant and loss factor of this material are in a range suitable for its use as substrate for microwave applications. No detectable chemical reaction between YBa2Cu3O7-δ and GdBa2HfO5.5 was observed even under severe heat treatment. YBa2Cu2O7-δ and YBa2Cu3O7-δ-Ag thick films dip coated on GdBa2HfO5.5 substrate gave a zero-resistivity superconducting transition of 92 K. The critical current density (Jc) of YBa2Cu3O7-δ thick film was 3*103 A cm-2 whereas a current density of 2*104 A cm-2 was obtained for YBa2Cu3O7-δ-Ag thick film. The YBa2Cu3O7-δ-Ag thick film showed preferred (001) orientation on polycrystalline GdBa2HfO5.5 substrate. (author)

  2. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  3. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  4. Lost Mold Rapid Infiltration Forming of Mesoscale Ceramics: Part 1, Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolino, Nicholas E; Hayes, Gregory; Kirkpatrick, Rebecca; Muhlstein, Christopher L; Frecker, Mary I; Mockensturm, Eric M; Adair, James H

    2009-01-01

    Free-standing mesoscale (340 mum x 30 mum x 20 mum) bend bars with an aspect ratio over 15:1 and an edge resolution as fine as a single grain diameter ( approximately 400 nm) have been fabricated in large numbers on refractory ceramic substrates by combining a novel powder processing approach with photoresist molds and an innovative lost-mold thermal process. The colloid and interfacial chemistry of the nanoscale zirconia particulates has been modeled and used to prepare highly concentrated suspensions. Engineering solutions to challenges in mold fabrication and casting have yielded free-standing, crack-free parts. Molds are fabricated using high-aspect-ratio photoresist on ceramic substrates. Green parts are formed using a rapid infiltration method that exploits the shear thinning behavior of the highly concentrated ceramic suspension in combination with gelcasting. The mold is thermally decomposed and the parts are sintered in place on the ceramic substrate. Chemically aided attrition milling disperses and concentrates the as-received 3Y-TZP powder to produce a dense, fine-grained sintered microstructure. Initial three-point bend strength data are comparable to that of conventional zirconia; however, geometric irregularities (e.g., trapezoidal cross sections) are present in this first generation and are discussed with respect to the distribution of bend strength. PMID:19809595

  5. On Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  6. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.)

  7. THE THICKNESS DEPENDENCE OF OXYGEN PERMEABILITY IN SOL-GEL DERIVED CGO-COFE2O4 THIN FILMS ON POROUS CERAMIC SUBSTRATES: A SPUTTERED BLOCKING LAYER FOR THICKNESS CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K

    2009-01-08

    Mixed conductive oxides are a topic of interest for applications in oxygen separation membranes as well as use in producing hydrogen fuel through the partial oxidation of methane. The oxygen flux through the membrane is governed both by the oxygen ionic conductivity as well as the material's electronic conductivity; composite membranes like Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-{delta}} (CGO)-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CFO) use gadolinium doped ceria oxides as the ionic conducting material combined with cobalt iron spinel which serves as the electronic conductor. In this study we employ {approx} 50 nm sputtered CeO{sub 2} layers on the surface of porous CGO ceramic substrates which serve as solution 'blocking' layers during the thin film fabrication process facilitating the control of film thickness. Films with thickness of {approx} 2 and 4 microns were prepared by depositing 40 and 95 separate sol-gel layers respectively. Oxygen flux measurements indicated that the permeation increased with decreasing membrane thickness; thin film membrane with thickness on the micron level showed flux values an order of magnitude greater (0.03 {micro}mol/cm{sup 2} s) at 800 C as compared to 1mm thick bulk ceramic membranes (0.003 {micro}mol/cm{sup 2}).

  8. Growth of Epitaxial gamma-Al2O3 Films on Rigid Single-Crystal Ceramic Substrates and Flexible, Single-Crystal-Like Metallic Substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Junsoo [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Epitaxial -Al2O3 thin films were grown on diverse substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The high quality of epitaxial growth and cubic structure of -Al2O3 films was confirmed by x-ray diffraction. SrTiO3 and MgO single crystal substrates were used to optimize the growth conditions for epitaxial -Al2O3 film. Under the optimized conditions, epitaxial -Al2O3 thin films were grown on flexible, single-crystal-like, metallic templates. These included untextured Hastelloy substrates with a biaxially textured MgO layer deposited using ion-beam-assisted-deposition and biaxially textured Ni-W metallic tapes with epitaxially grown and a biaxially textured, MgO buffer layer. These biaxially textured, -Al2O3 films on flexible, single-crystal-like substrates are promising for subsequent epitaxial growth of various complex oxide films used for electrical, magnetic and electronic device applications.

  9. 多层低温流延法制备片状氧化铝多孔陶瓷%Fabrication of Alumina Porous Ceramics Substrate by Multilayer Freeze-tape-casting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩沈丹; 赵康; 汤玉斐; 徐雷

    2013-01-01

    为了避免金属/陶瓷复合散热片两相共烧,并减小因两相热膨胀系数不同而造成在使用过程中的开裂失效问题,采用水基Al2O3陶瓷浆料在低温下进行多层流延,经定向冷冻、低温干燥及烧结工艺,制备出具有小孔径、直通孔结构的片状Al2O3多孔陶瓷.研究了浆料固体含量和冷冻温度对多孔陶瓷片孔隙率和孔尺寸的影响,观察了孔的微观形貌并测试了其热疲劳性能.结果表明:随着浆料固体含量从30%(质量分数)增加到40%,多孔陶瓷片的孔隙率(体积分数)从62.1%减小至51.4%,随着冷冻温度从-15℃降低至-45℃,多孔陶瓷片孔道尺寸逐渐减小;固体含量为40%、冷冻温度为-45℃的多孔陶瓷片在热疲劳实验中裂纹出现最晚,达到695次,其热疲劳性能最好;多层低温流延法制备的多孔陶瓷片层间孔道相互连通.%In order to avoid co-firing and reduce the cracking failure caused by different expansion rates of metal/ceramic composite heat sink, a method for the production of highly aligned porous ceramics substrate by multilayer freeze-tape-casting process with aqueous alumina slurry was proposed The effects of solid content and freezing temperature on the porosity and pore size were investigated, and the pore morphology (e.g., degree of pore alignment, pore size and interconnection between the pores) of the fabricated samples was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, the thermal fatigue properties of porous ceramic substrate were also examined. The results show that the porosity (volume fraction) gradually decreases from 62.1% to 51.4% with the increase of solid content (mass fraction) from 30% to 40%, and the pore size decreases gradually with the decrease of freezing temperature from -15 ℃ to -45℃. The optimum thermal fatigue properties were obtained at the solid content of 40% and the freezing temperature of -45℃. Also, the pore channels

  10. High-dose green tea polyphenol intake decreases CYP3A expression in a liver-specific manner with increases in blood substrate drug concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Ogawa, Sosuke; Hirobe, Ryuta; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Kon, Risako; Ochiai, Wataru; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2016-06-30

    In recent years, the intake of functional foods containing high-doses of green tea polyphenols (GP) has been increasing. In this study, the long-term safety of high-dose GP was assessed from a pharmacokinetic point of view by focusing on the drug-metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P450 (CYP). Mice were fed a diet containing 3% GP for 4weeks, and the CYP expression levels and activity were determined. The GP-treated group showed a significant decrease in the hepatic CYP3A and an increase in the hepatic CYP2C expression compared with the control group. CYP1A, CYP2D, and CYP2E expression were not different between the GP-treated and the control groups. In the small intestine, there were no differences in the CYP3A protein levels between the groups. The increase in the plasma triazolam concentration in the GP-treated group was observed. Although no changes were found in the hepatic CYP3A levels in mice receiving a diet containing 0.1% GP for 4weeks, a significant decrease was seen in the hepatic CYP3A level in mice receiving a diet containing 3% GP for only 1week. This study revealed that the intake of a high-dose GP results in a liver-specific decrease in the CYP3A expression level. The results also indicated that the effects of GP on CYP3A were not observed following the intake of a low-dose GP. In the future, caution should be taken in cases when functional foods containing a high-dose GP are concomitantly consumed with a CYP3A substrate drug. PMID:27130545

  11. Ba2ErNbO6: A new perovskite ceramic substrate for Bi(2223) superconducting thick films (c(0) = 110 K)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S U K Nair; P R S Warriar; J Koshy

    2005-02-01

    Barium erbium niobate (Ba2ErNbO6) has been developed as a new substrate for (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O [Bi(2223)] superconductor film. Ba2ErNbO6 (BENO) has a cubic perovskite structure with lattice constant, = 8.318 Å. The Bi(2223) superconductor does not show any detectable chemical reaction with BENO even under extreme processing conditions. Dip coated Bi (2223) thick film, Ba2ErNbO6 substrate, gave a c (0) of 110 K and current density of ∼ 4 × 103 A cm-2 at 77 K and zero magnetic field.

  12. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  13. Study on the substrate-induced crystallisation of amorphous SiC-precursor ceramics. TIB/A; Untersuchungen zur substratinduzierten Kristallisation amorpher SiC-Precursorkeramiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, C.

    2000-12-01

    In the present thesis the crystallization behaviour of amorphous silicon-carbon materials (SiC{sub x}) was studied. The main topic of the experimental studies formed thereby the epitactical crystallization of thin silicon carbide layers on monocrystalline substrates of silicon carbides or silicon. Furthermore by thermolysis of the polymer amorphous SiC{sub x}-powder was obtained.

  14. Methods of repairing a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium boride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  15. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  16. Ceramic Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  17. Growth of epitaxial {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on rigid single-crystal ceramic substrates and flexible, single-crystal-like metallic substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Junsoo, E-mail: jshin@ornl.go [Materials Sciences and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Goyal, Amit [Materials Sciences and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wee, Sung-Hun [Materials Sciences and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2009-08-03

    Epitaxial {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films were grown on diverse substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The high quality of epitaxial growth and cubic structure of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. SrTiO{sub 3} and MgO single crystal substrates were used to optimize the growth conditions for epitaxial {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film. Under the optimized conditions, epitaxial {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films were grown on flexible, single-crystal-like, metallic templates. These included untextured Hastelloy substrates with a biaxially textured MgO layer deposited using ion-beam-assisted-deposition and biaxially textured Ni-W metallic tapes with epitaxially grown and a biaxially textured, MgO buffer layer. These biaxially textured, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on flexible, single-crystal-like substrates are promising for subsequent epitaxial growth of various complex oxide films used for electrical, magnetic and electronic device applications.

  18. Tantalum-Based Ceramics for Refractory Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Leiser, Daniel; DiFiore, Robert; Kalvala, Victor

    2006-01-01

    A family of tantalum-based ceramics has been invented as ingredients of high-temperature composite insulating tiles. These materials are suitable for coating and/or permeating the outer layers of rigid porous (foam-like or fibrous) ceramic substrates to (1) render the resulting composite ceramic tiles impervious to hot gases and (2) enable the tiles to survive high heat fluxes at temperatures that can exceed 3,000 F ( 1,600 C).

  19. Strong bonding between sputtered bioglass–ceramic films and Ti-substrate implants induced by atomic inter-diffusion post-deposition heat-treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stan, G.E., E-mail: george_stan@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Popa, A.C. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Army Centre for Medical Research, Bucharest 020012 (Romania); Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest 050474 (Romania); Galca, A.C.; Aldica, G. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Ferreira, J.M.F. [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, Aveiro 3810-193 (Portugal)

    2013-09-01

    Bioglasses (BG) are the inorganic materials exhibiting the highest indices of bioactivity. Their appliance as films for bio-functionalization of metallic implant surfaces has been regarded as an optimal solution for surpassing their limited bulk mechanical properties. This study reports on magnetron sputtering of alkali-free BG thin films by varying the target-to-substrate working distance, which proved to play an important role in determining the films’ properties. Post deposition heat-treatments at temperatures slightly above the glass transformation temperature were then applied to induce inter-diffusion processes at the BG/titanium substrate interface and strengthening the bonding as determined by pull-out adherence measurements. The morphological and structural features assessed by SEM–EDS, XRD, and FTIR revealed a good correlation between the formations of inter-metallic titanium silicide phases and the films’ bonding strength. The highest mean value of pull-out adherence (60.3 ± 4.6 MPa), which is adequate even for load-bearing biomedical applications, was recorded for films deposited at a working distance of 35 mm followed by a heat-treatment at 750 °C for 2 h in air. The experimental findings are explained on the basis of structural, compositional and thermodynamic considerations.

  20. 陶瓷单晶(100)基底上外延生长Pt薄膜%Formation of Epitaxial Platinum Films on Ceramics-(100) Single Crystal Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵昆; 黄康权; 张丽

    2004-01-01

    用对靶溅射技术在MgAl2O4 (100) (MAO) 和SrTiO3 (100) (STO)单晶基底上制备Pt薄膜.基底温度为700℃时,Pt薄膜外延生长为(200)取向,Pt/STO 薄膜的电阻率很低,而Pt/MAO 薄膜表现出高电阻特征.此外,Pt (50nm)/La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 (50nm)/STO的制备和研究表明,在包括庞磁电阻材料的器件设计中,Pt是一种较好的电极材料.%Thin platinum (Pt) films were prepared on single-crystal substrates MgAl2O4 (100) (MAO) and SrTiO3 (100) (STO) by a facing-target sputtering technique. The films prepared at higher substrate temperature (Ts= 700℃) were grown epitaxially with (200) orientation on SrTiO3 (100) and MgAl2O4 (100). Different from the lower resistivity of Pt/STO film, Pt/MAO film shows a very higher resistivity and the temperature dependence of the resistance exhibits insulator behavior because of the pinhole formation. We also grew epitaxial Pt (50 nm)/La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 (50nm)/STO structure, indicating that Pt is a good electrode for devices involving colossal magnetoresistance materials.

  1. Preparation of Lanthanum-Doped Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 Ceramics Sheets by Tape Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The physical and electrical properties of lanthanum doped Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 ceramic sheets (PLZT) which were prepared by tape casting method were carried out. Tape casting of lanthanum modified PZT was performed using commercial cellulose acetate binders and poly(ethylene glycol) plasticizers in ethanol solvent. Tapes from these slips were casted on a polymer substrate. The PLZT green tapes were stacked for 5 units and sintered in air at 1050℃ for 1 h with heating rate 5℃/min. SEM micrographs show that the tape is dense (90.26% of theoretical density) and rather uniform with grain size of approximately 1.1 ? m. The dielectric permittivity and loss tangent of PLZT ceramics as a function of temperature at 1 kHz suggest that the compounds exhibit a phase transition of diffuse type. The transition temperature (Tm) and piezoelectric coefficient (d33) were 110℃ and 117 pC/N, respectively.

  2. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  3. Engineering ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bengisu, Murat

    2001-01-01

    This is a comprehensive book applying especially to junior and senior engineering students pursuing Materials Science/ Engineering, Ceramic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering degrees. It is also a reference book for other disciplines such as Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Engineering. Important properties of most engineering ceramics are given in detailed tables. Many current and possible applications of engineering ceramics are described, which can be used as a guide for materials selection and for potential future research. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials, processing properties, characterization and applications of engineering ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  4. Tailored ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In polyphase tailored ceramic forms two distinct modes of radionuclide immobilization occur. At high waste loadings the radionuclides are distributed through most of the ceramic phases in dilute solid solution, as indicated schematically in this paper. However, in the case of low waste loadings, or a high loading of a waste with low radionuclide content, the ceramic can be designed with only selected phases containing the radionuclides. The remaining material forms nonradioactive phases which provide a degree of physical microstructural isolation. The research and development work with polyphase ceramic nuclear waste forms over the past ten years is discussed. It has demonstrated the critical attributes which suggest them as a waste form for future HLW disposal. From a safety standpoint, the crystalline phases in the ceramic waste forms offer the potential for demonstrable chemical durability in immobilizing the long-lived radionuclides in a geologic environment. With continued experimental research on pure phases, analysis of mineral analogue behavior in geochemical environments, and the study of radiation effects, realistic predictive models for waste form behavior over geologic time scales are feasible. The ceramic forms extend the degree of freedom for the economic optimization of the waste disposal system

  5. Structural Ceramics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  6. Nondestructive evaluation of structural ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klima, S.J.; Baaklini, G.Y.; Abel, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented on research and development of techniques for nondestructive evaluation and characterization of advanced ceramics for heat engine applications. Highlighted in this review are Lewis Research Center efforts in microfocus radiography, scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM), scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM), and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). The techniques were evaluated by applying them to research samples of green and sintered silicon nitride and silicon carbide in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars containing seeded voids. Probabilities of detection of voids were determined for diameters as small as 20 microns for microfucus radiography, SLAM, and SAM. Strengths and limitations of the techniques for ceramic applications are identified. Application of ultrasonics for characterizing ceramic microstructures is also discussed.

  7. Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Knitter; W Bauer

    2003-02-01

    Fabrication of micropatterned ceramics or ceramic microparts make high demands on the precision and resolution of the moulding process. As finishing of miniaturised or micropatterned ceramic components is nearly impossible, shaping has to be done by a replication step in the green, unfired state. To avoid high tooling costs in product development, a rapid prototyping process chain has been established that enables rapid manufacturing of ceramic microcomponents from functional models to small lot series within a short time. This process chain combines the fast and inexpensive supply of master models by rapid prototyping with accurate and flexible ceramic manufacturing by low-pressure injection moulding. Besides proper feedstock preparation and sufficient small grain size, the quality of the final components is mainly influenced by the quality of the master model. Hence, the rapid prototyping method must be carefully selected to meet the requirements of the component to be fabricated.

  8. Eco friendly green and yellow ceramic pigments based on calcium-doped Pr{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} obtained by addition of mineralizers and chemical coprecipitation.; Ecopigmentos ceramicos verdes y amarillos de Pr{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} dopados con calcio obtenidos en presencia de mineralizadores y por coprecipitacion quimica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, R.; Garcori, C.; Llusar, M.; Garcia, A.; Badenes, J.; Monros, G.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper the synthesis of (Pr{sub 2}-xCa{sub x})Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} solid solutions by ceramic route is presented. Crystallography and colour evolution from green to yellow described on literature have been checked. When enamelled in a lead free double firing ceramic glaze, pigments produces light yellow colours not better than b*=19. Using NH{sub 4}Cl, NaF and Na{sub 2}SiF{sub 6} as mineralizers in the (Pr{sub 2}-xCa{sub x})Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} x=0,1 composition with the same molar addition of halogens (0.84 mols per formula weight), a structural effect of fluoride ion is observed but the yellow colour on enamelled samples do not improve. Finally, using an ammonia coprecipitation method in the x=0.6 sample, a similar crystallization to the homologous ceramic sample is detected, but x ray diffraction peaks are more intense and less wide, pointing to a more regular and higher crystal size crystallization which is checked by electronic scanning microscopy. This microstructure give more intense yellow coloured powders and improve their resistance against glaze, producing significantly best yellow colours than ceramic samples. (Author) 14 refs.

  9. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  10. Rheological Behaviour of Ceramic Inks for Direct Ceramic Inkjet Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ponnambalam

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, studies were made on the preparation of ceramic inks with: (i alumina powderin ethyl alcohol and (ii zirconia powder in ethyl alcohol at different volume fractions of ceramic.Different amounts (0.75-3.00 vol % of an organic dispersant (oleic acid were added to ceramicink containing 5 per cent of ceramic by volume in ethyl alcohol. The viscosities of the suspensionswere determined with Brookefield viscometer (model: DV-E, which is suitable for measuringthe viscosities of suspensions accurately. These inks were deposited on a substrate to see theirspread. The sediment packing densities ( m of the resulting suspensions were calculated usingtheoretical models which can be related to the density that can be achieved in the final product.The highest sediment packing density was arrived at low viscosity values of the ink and occurredwhen 1 per cent of dispersant by volume was used for 5 per cent alumina content. For 5 percent zirconia content, 2 per cent of dispersant by volume gave a similar result. Experimentswere also conducted to find the value of m for different solid loadings (5-25 vol % of ceramicwith 1 per cent dispersant. It was observed that the sediment packing density and the apparentviscosities were increasing when solid loading concentrations were increased for both aluminaand zirconia-based inks. The optimum value of m and viscosity have been determined from thisstudy. The results of this preliminary study will be useful for further investigations on therheological behaviour of ceramic inks for direct ceramic inkjet printing.

  11. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  12. The effects of addition of poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) as a green corrosion inhibitor to the phosphate conversion coating on the anticorrosion and adhesion properties of the epoxy coating on the steel substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramezanzadeh, B., E-mail: ramezanzadeh-bh@icrc.ac.ir; Vakili, H.; Amini, R.

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Room temperature zinc phosphate coating was applied on the surface of steel sample. • Poly(vinyl) alcohol was added to the phosphating bath as a green corrosion inhibitor. • The adhesion and anticorrosion properties of the epoxy coating were investigated. • PVA decreased the phosphate crystal size and porosity. • PVA enhanced the corrosion protection and adhesion properties of the epoxy coating. - Abstract: Steel substrates were chemically treated by room temperature zinc phosphate conversion coating. Poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) was added to the phosphate solution as a green corrosion inhibitor. Finally, the epoxy/polyamide coating was applied on the untreated and surface treated steel samples. The effects of PVA on the morphological properties of the phosphate coating were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measuring device. The adhesion properties of the epoxy coatings applied on the surface treated samples were investigated by pull-off and cathodic delamination tests. Also, the anticorrosion properties of the epoxy coatings were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results showed that addition of PVA to the phosphate coating increased the population density of the phosphate crystals and decreased the phosphate grain size. The contact angle of the steel surface treated by Zn-PVA was lower than Zn treated one. The corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating was considerably increased on the steel substrate treated by zinc phosphate conversion coating containing PVA. PVA also enhanced the adhesion properties of the epoxy coating to the steel surface and decreased the cathodic delamination significantly.

  13. The effects of addition of poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) as a green corrosion inhibitor to the phosphate conversion coating on the anticorrosion and adhesion properties of the epoxy coating on the steel substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Room temperature zinc phosphate coating was applied on the surface of steel sample. • Poly(vinyl) alcohol was added to the phosphating bath as a green corrosion inhibitor. • The adhesion and anticorrosion properties of the epoxy coating were investigated. • PVA decreased the phosphate crystal size and porosity. • PVA enhanced the corrosion protection and adhesion properties of the epoxy coating. - Abstract: Steel substrates were chemically treated by room temperature zinc phosphate conversion coating. Poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) was added to the phosphate solution as a green corrosion inhibitor. Finally, the epoxy/polyamide coating was applied on the untreated and surface treated steel samples. The effects of PVA on the morphological properties of the phosphate coating were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measuring device. The adhesion properties of the epoxy coatings applied on the surface treated samples were investigated by pull-off and cathodic delamination tests. Also, the anticorrosion properties of the epoxy coatings were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results showed that addition of PVA to the phosphate coating increased the population density of the phosphate crystals and decreased the phosphate grain size. The contact angle of the steel surface treated by Zn-PVA was lower than Zn treated one. The corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating was considerably increased on the steel substrate treated by zinc phosphate conversion coating containing PVA. PVA also enhanced the adhesion properties of the epoxy coating to the steel surface and decreased the cathodic delamination significantly

  14. DC-magnetron sputtering of ZnO:Al films on (00.1)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates from slip-casting sintered ceramic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miccoli, I., E-mail: ilio.miccoli@unisalento.it [Photovoltaics R and D Lab, Alfa Impianti S.r.l., Via Baden Powell, I-73044 Galatone, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Innovazione, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Spampinato, R.; Marzo, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Innovazione, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Prete, P. [Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi del CNR, Unità di Lecce, Via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Lovergine, N. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Innovazione, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • ZnO:Al was DC-sputtered on sapphire >350 °C by slip-casting sintered AZO target. • Films are highly (00.1)-oriented, smooth and transparent in the NIR–visible range. • Films growth rate decreases with temperature, while their grain size increases. • A high temperature reduction for sticking coefficients of impinging species is proved. • We prove that Thornton model does not apply to high-temperature DC-sputtered ZnO. - Abstract: High (>350 °C) temperature DC-sputtering deposition of ZnO:Al thin films onto single-crystal (00.1) oriented Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sapphire) substrates is reported, using a ultrahigh-density, low-resistivity and low-cost composite ceramic target produced by slip-casting (pressureless) sintering of ZnO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (AZO) powders. The original combination of high-angle θ–2θ (Bragg–Brentano geometry) X-ray diffraction with low angle θ–2θ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) techniques allows us to define the AZO target composition and investigate the structural properties and surface/interface roughness of as-sputtered ZnO:Al films; besides, the growth dynamics of ZnO:Al is unambiguously determined. The target turned out composed of the sole wurtzite ZnO and spinel ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed highly (00.1)-oriented (epitaxial) ZnO:Al films, the material mean crystallite size being in the 13–20 nm range and increasing with temperature between 350 °C and 450 °C, while the film growth rate (determined via XRR measurements) decreases appreciably. XRR spectra also allowed to determine rms surface roughness <1 nm for present films and showed ZnO:Al density changes by only a few percent between 350 °C and 450 °C. The latter result disproves the often-adopted Thornton model for the description of the sputter-grown ZnO films and instead points out toward a reduction of the sticking coefficients of impinging species, as the main origin of film growth rate and grain size dependence

  15. An analysis of the pull strength behaviors of fine-pitch, flip chip solder interconnections using a Au-Pt-Pd thick film conductor on Low-Temperature, Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) substrates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe, Fernando R.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grazier, John Mark; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Zender, Gary L.; Hlava, Paul Frank; Rejent, Jerome Andrew

    2008-09-01

    The assembly of the BDYE detector requires the attachment of sixteen silicon (Si) processor dice (eight on the top side; eight on the bottom side) onto a low-temperature, co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate using 63Sn-37Pb (wt.%, Sn-Pb) in a double-reflow soldering process (nitrogen). There are 132 solder joints per die. The bond pads were gold-platinum-palladium (71Au-26Pt-3Pd, wt.%) thick film layers fired onto the LTCC in a post-process sequence. The pull strength and failure modes provided the quality metrics for the Sn-Pb solder joints. Pull strengths were measured in both the as-fabricated condition and after exposure to thermal cycling (-55/125 C; 15 min hold times; 20 cycles). Extremely low pull strengths--referred to as the low pull strength phenomenon--were observed intermittently throughout the product build, resulting in added program costs, schedule delays, and a long-term reliability concern for the detector. There was no statistically significant correlation between the low pull strength phenomenon and (1) the LTCC 'sub-floor' lot; (2) grit blasting the LTCC surfaces prior to the post-process steps; (3) the post-process parameters; (4) the conductor pad height (thickness); (5) the dice soldering assembly sequence; or (5) the dice pull test sequence. Formation of an intermetallic compound (IMC)/LTCC interface caused by thick film consumption during either the soldering process or by solid-state IMC formation was not directly responsible for the low-strength phenomenon. Metallographic cross sections of solder joints from dice that exhibited the low pull strength behavior, revealed the presence of a reaction layer resulting from an interaction between Sn from the molten Sn-Pb and the glassy phase at the TKN/LTCC interface. The thick film porosity did not contribute, explicitly, to the occurrence of reaction layer. Rather, the process of printing the very thin conductor pads was too sensitive to minor thixotropic changes to ink, which resulted in

  16. Method for improving the performance of oxidizable ceramic materials in oxidizing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improved adhesion of thermal barrier coatings to nonmetallic substrates using a dense layer of ceramic on an underlying nonmetallic substrate that includes at least one oxidizable component. The improved adhesion occurs because the application of the dense ceramic layer forms a diffusion barrier for oxygen. This diffusion barrier prevents the oxidizable component of the substrate from decomposing. The present invention applies ceramic by a process that deposits a relatively thick and dense ceramic layer on the underlying substrate. The formation of the dense layer of ceramic avoids the problem of void formation associated with ceramic formation by most prior art thermal decomposition processes. The formation of voids has been associated with premature spalling of thermal barrier layers and other protective layers applied to substrates.

  17. Injection molding ceramics to high green densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangels, J. A.; Williams, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The injection molding behavior of a concentrated suspension of Si powder in wax was studied. It was found that the injection molding behavior was a function of the processing techniques used to generate the powder. Dry ball-milled powders had the best molding behavior, while air classified and impact-milled powders demonstrated poorer injection moldability. The relative viscosity of these molding batches was studied as a function of powder properties: distribution shape, surface area, packing density, and particle morphology. The experimental behavior, in all cases, followed existing theories. The relative viscosity of an injection molding composition composed of dry ball-milled powders could be expressed using Farris' relation.

  18. Sintering kinetics of YAG ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄毅华; 江东亮; 张景贤; 陈忠明; 林庆玲; 黄政仁

    2014-01-01

    Solid state reactive (SSR) sintering kinetics was observed for YAG ceramics. There were two densification stages in sin-tering process due to its reaction. After the first stage, samples began to expand, then, the second densification stage began. At a heat-ing rate of 10 ºC/min, the sample warped down and warped back to straight. The apparent activation energy of the first densification process was about 522 kJ/mol for the initial shrinkage of Al2O3 and Y2O3 mixed powder green-body, which increased in the follow-ing process due to the solid state reaction. In the second densification stage, synthesis reaction of YAG still worked. Green-bodies processed with higher heating rate got more shrinkage at the same temperature than lower heating rate green bodies. And its kinetic field diagram was abnormal, compared with that of other reported ceramics, such as Al2O3. It was found that the reaction of YAG provided positive effect to the sintering driving force. The apparent activation energy for densification of SSR YAG sintered in ArH5 atmosphere was 855 kJ/mol at temperature holding sintering. And the apparent activation energy for grain growth was 1053 kJ/mol.

  19. Metal-assisted exfoliation (MAE): green process for transferring graphene to flexible substrates and templating of sub-nanometer plasmonic gaps (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretski, Aliaksandr V.; Marin, Brandon C.; Moetazedi, Herad; Dill, Tyler J.; Jibril, Liban; Kong, Casey; Tao, Andrea R.; Lipomi, Darren J.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes a new technique, termed "metal-assisted exfoliation," for the scalable transfer of graphene from catalytic copper foils to flexible polymeric supports. The process is amenable to roll-to-roll manufacturing, and the copper substrate can be recycled. We then demonstrate the use of single-layer graphene as a template for the formation of sub-nanometer plasmonic gaps using a scalable fabrication process called "nanoskiving." These gaps are formed between parallel gold nanowires in a process that first produces three-layer thin films with the architecture gold/single-layer graphene/gold, and then sections the composite films with an ultramicrotome. The structures produced can be treated as two gold nanowires separated along their entire lengths by an atomically thin graphene nanoribbon. Oxygen plasma etches the sandwiched graphene to a finite depth; this action produces a sub-nanometer gap near the top surface of the junction between the wires that is capable of supporting highly confined optical fields. The confinement of light is confirmed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy measurements, which indicate that the enhancement of the electric field arises from the junction between the gold nanowires. These experiments demonstrate nanoskiving as a unique and easy-to-implement fabrication technique that is capable of forming sub-nanometer plasmonic gaps between parallel metallic nanostructures over long, macroscopic distances. These structures could be valuable for fundamental investigations as well as applications in plasmonics and molecular electronics.

  20. Influence of the Substrate Composition in Extensive Green Roof on the Effluent Quality%粗放型绿色屋面填料的介质组成对出水水质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈昱霖; 李田; 顾俊青

    2014-01-01

    通过模拟降雨实验监测填料组成不同的绿色屋面模拟设施出水水质,研究粗放型绿色屋面设施填料组成对出水污染物特征的影响.结果表明,设施出水中主要的污染物包括不同形态的 N、P 以及 COD;除 COD 外,出水中污染物浓度随累积降雨量增加而下降,具有明显的淋失效应;所有设施出水中重金属含量均较低,初期出水的平均浓度均达到饮用水标准.含有田园土、醋糟的绿化种植土出水营养物质淋失严重,在累计降雨150 mm 情况下,设施出水 TN、TP、COD 平均浓度分别为2.93、0.73和78 mg·L -1,均超过地表水水质标准V类的限值,添加水厂污泥可以有效地减少绿化种植土中 TP 的淋出且不影响植物对 P 的吸收;使用无机复合种植土的设施出水水质较好,但仍需要结合设施对水量削减能力和植物生长状况判断填料是否能够应用于粗放型绿色屋面.%By monitoring the effluent quality from different green roof assemblies during several artificial rain events, the main pollutant characteristics and the influence of substrate composition in extensive green roof on the effluent quality were studied. Results showed that the main pollutants in the effluent were N, P and COD; with the increase of cumulative rain, the concentrations of pollutants in the effluent decreased, which had obvious leaching effect; The average concentrations of heavy metals in the early effluent from all assemblies reached drinking water standard, including the assemblies using crushed bricks; When garden soil and compost were used as organic matter, the assemblies had serious leaching of nutrient substance. After the accumulated rainfall reached 150 mm, the TN, TP and COD concentrations of effluent were 2. 93, 0. 73 and 78 mg·L - 1 , respectively, which exceeded the Surface water V class limit. By means of application of the Water Treatment Residual, the leaching of TP from green planting soil was

  1. Effect of LASER Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramic Surface to Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Sima Shahabi; Poya Aslani; Mohamad Ehsan Khalil; Abbase Azari; Sakine Nikzad

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: Reliable bonding between tooth substrate and zirconia-based ceramic restorations is always of great importance. The laser might be useful for treatment of ceramic surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic surface to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 40 Cercon zirconia ceramic blocks were fabricated. The surface treatment was performed using sand...

  2. Functionally Graded Materials using Plasma Spray with Nano Structured Ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, nano structured FGM was fabricated using DC plasma spray technique. Nano structured and micro structured powder were used as the feeding powder with steel substrate. The spray parameters was optimized and characterisation of nano-ceramic FGM and micro-ceramic FGM were done using bending test and micro-hardness test. Experimental results have shown that the nano-structured FGM exhibit 20% improvement flexure strength and 10% in hardness. A comparison was made between sintered micro ceramic tile and nano ceramic FGM using simple drop test method.

  3. Dental ceramics: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Shenoy Arvind; Shenoy Nina

    2010-01-01

    In the last few decades, there have been tremendous advances in the mechanical properties and methods of fabrication of ceramic materials. While porcelain-based materials are still a major component of the market, there have been moves to replace metal ceramics systems with all ceramic systems. Advances in bonding techniques have increased the range and scope for use of ceramics in dentistry. In this brief review, we will discuss advances in ceramic materials and fabrication techniques. Examp...

  4. Ceramic catalyst materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  5. Characterization of the mechanical properties of LTCC ``Green Tape``{trademark} for the MC4352 MET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe, F.; Garrett, S.; Monroe, S.; Burchett, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-03-01

    During the qualification of Low Temperature Cofire Ceramic (LTCC) as an enabling WR packaging technology for manufacturing the MC4352 (MET), issues pertaining to the mechanical performance of the DuPont 951 ``Green Tape{trademark}`` tape were investigated. Understanding the fundamental mechanical performance of the DuPont 951 substrate material, including the effect of surface metallization in STS environments, is required to determine MC4352 survivability. Both fast fracture and slow crack growth behavior were characterized for the MET configuration. A minimum stress threshold of 6.5 Kpsi for slow crack growth was established for substrates containing surface conductors, resistors, and resistor glaze. Finite element analysis was used to optimize the MET substrate thickness and to design the supporting structures to limit mechanical loading of the populated substrate below the slow crack growth threshold. Additionally, test coupons that failed during environmental testing are discussed. The root cause of electrical failures was attributed to solder leaching of the thick film metallization. Changes to solder pad configuration were incorporated to reduce the solder-metallization intermetallic from reaching the substrate interface. Finally, four-point bend tests revealed that the YAG laser approach for sizing LTCC substrates induced flaws, which substantially reduced the overall strength of the test samples as compared to samples sized using a diamond saw.

  6. Performance study of the ceramic THGEM

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Jia-Qing; Hu, Tao; Lu, Jun-Guang; Zhou, Li; Qu, Guo-Pu; Cai, Xiao; Niu, Shun-Li; Chen, Hai-Tao

    2014-01-01

    The THGEMs based on ceramic substrate were developed successfully for neutron and single photon detection. The influences on thermal neutron scattering and the internal radioactivity of both ceramic and FR-4 substrates were studied and compared. The ceramic THGEMs are homemade of 200 um hole diameter, 600 um pitch, 200 um thickness, 80 um rim, and 50 mm*50 mm sensitive area. The FR-4 THGEMs with the same geometry were used for the reference. The gas gain, energy resolution and gain stability were measured in different gas mixtures by using the 5.9 keV X-rays. The maximum gain of single layer ceramic THGEM reaches 6*104 and 1.5*104 at Ne+CH4 = 95:5 and Ar+i-C4H10 = 97:3, respectively. The energy resolution is better than 24%. The good gain stability was obtained during more than 100 hour continuous test at Ar+CO2 = 80:20. By using the 239Pu source, the alpha deposited energy spectrum and gain curve of ceramic THGEM were measured.

  7. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  8. Fatigue of dental ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; lawn, brian

    2013-01-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics

  9. Ceramic art in sculpture

    OpenAIRE

    Rokavec, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Diploma seminar speaks of ceramics as a field of artistic expression and not just as pottery craft. I presented short overview of developing ceramic sculpture and its changing role. Clay inspires design and touch more than other sculpture media. It starts as early as in prehistory. Although it sometimes seems that was sculptural ceramics neglected in art history overview, it was not so in actual praxis. There is a rich tradition of ceramics in the East and also in Europe during the renaissanc...

  10. Ceramic Laser Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Villalobos; Jasbinder Sanghera; Ishwar Aggarwal; Bryan Sadowski; Jesse Frantz; Colin Baker; Brandon Shaw; Woohong Kim

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers,...

  11. High efficiency tantalum-based ceramic composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A. (Inventor); Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); DiFiore, Robert R. (Inventor); Katvala, Victor W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Tantalum-based ceramics are suitable for use in thermal protection systems. These composite structures have high efficiency surfaces (low catalytic efficiency and high emittance), thereby reducing heat flux to a spacecraft during planetary re-entry. These ceramics contain tantalum disilicide, molybdenum disilicide and borosilicate glass. The components are milled, along with a processing aid, then applied to a surface of a porous substrate, such as a fibrous silica or carbon substrate. Following application, the coating is then sintered on the substrate. The composite structure is substantially impervious to hot gas penetration and capable of surviving high heat fluxes at temperatures approaching 3000.degree. F. and above.

  12. Implantable devices having ceramic coating applied via an atomic layer deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xinhua; Weimer, Alan W.; Bryant, Stephanie J.

    2016-03-08

    Substrates coated with films of a ceramic material such as aluminum oxides and titanium oxides are biocompatible, and can be used in a variety of applications in which they are implanted in a living body. The substrate is preferably a porous polymer, and may be biodegradable. An important application for the ceramic-coated substrates is as a tissue engineering scaffold for forming artificial tissue.

  13. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  14. Comparison of solvent and sacrificial volume-material-based lamination processes of low-temperature co-fired ceramics tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecha, Karol; Jurków, Dominik; Golonka, Leszek J.

    2009-06-01

    The lamination process determines the quality of low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) based spatial structures. This paper compares two methods of the microchannel fabrication process in zero-shrinkage LTCC substrates. The first one is based on a two-step lamination process and uses various sacrificial volume materials (SVM). The second one is based on the cold chemical lamination (CCL) process. On the one hand, the SVM gives the possibility of decreasing the deformation of the three-dimensional (3D) structures during the lamination process. The channel volume is filled with a special fugitive material. It protects the spatial structure from deformation during lamination, and evaporates completely during the co-firing process. The bonding quality and strength depend strongly on the fugitive phase type. On the other hand, the CCL is a solvent-based method. It is another alternative for bonding of green ceramic tapes. A special liquid agent is screen printed on the green tape, which melts the tape surface. Then the tapes are stacked and compressed at room temperature by a printing roll. The influence of each method on the microchannel geometry is analyzed in this paper. The resulting structures' bonding quality and mechanical properties are examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  15. Metaphysical green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    of Sensation of Green is created by a physical interaction between the language of space and the language of nature” The notion of Sensation of Green was developed through a previous study ‘Learning from the Summer House’ investigating the unique architectural characteristics of the Danish summer houses...... the Sensation of Green? Three existing examples are agents to this discussion. The first example is a Danish summer house. The other two are international urban examples. While the summer house articulates the original meaning of Sensation of Green, the urban examples illustrate its urban context. The first...... example is a tiny Danish summer house from 1918 . The second example is ‘House before House’ , in Tokyo. The third example is a prefabricated house ‘CHU’ . The analysis evaluates the characteristics of diverse tones of green – from green image to green sensation. The analysis is based on the original...

  16. Thickness dependence of magnetoelectric response for composites of Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 films on CoFe2O4 ceramic substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Using chemical solution spin-coating we grew Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 films of different thicknesses on highly dense CoFe2O4 ceramics. X-ray diffraction revealed no other phases except Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 and CoFe2O4. In many of these samples we observed typical ferroelectric hysteresis loops, butterfly-shaped piezoelectric strains, and the magnetic-field-dependent magnetostriction. These behaviors caused appreciable magnetoelectric responses based on magnetic-mechanical-electric coupling. Our results indicated that the thickness of the Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 film was important in obtaining strong magnetoelectric coupling.

  17. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  18. Ceramic films produced by a gel-dipping process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santacruz, I.; Ferrari, B.; Nieto, M.I.; Moreno, R. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, Camino de Valdelatas s/n, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2003-09-01

    A novel method for manufacturing self-supporting ceramic films is based on the use of aqueous suspensions containing low concentrations of a biopolymer (carrageenan) and the formation of the film by immersion of a graphite substrate into the ceramic suspension heated at 60 C. A film is obtained by dipping after cooling at RT; burning out graphite during sintering leaves homogeneous, dense, and self-supported films (see Figure for an SEM image). (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Low cost silicon-on-ceramic photovoltaic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, B. G.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Zook, J. D.; Sibold, J. D.; Leipold, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    A technique has been developed for coating low-cost mullite-based refractory substrates with thin layers of solar cell quality silicon. The technique involves first carbonizing one surface of the ceramic and then contacting it with molten silicon. The silicon wets the carbonized surface and, under the proper thermal conditions, solidifies as a large-grained sheet. Solar cells produced from this composite silicon-on-ceramic material have exhibited total area conversion efficiencies of ten percent.

  20. Ceramic tamper-revealing seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupperman, David S.; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Sheen, Shuh-Haw

    1992-01-01

    A flexible metal or ceramic cable with composite ceramic ends, or a u-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting.

  1. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  2. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  3. Method for removing volatile components from a ceramic article, and related processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Frederic Joseph; DeCarr, Sylvia Marie

    2002-01-01

    A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

  4. Method For Removing Volatile Components From A Gel-Cast Ceramic Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Frederic Joseph; DeCarr, Sylvia Marie

    2004-09-07

    A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

  5. Green Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, Melanie

    2011-05-15

    Green chemistry is the science of chemistry used in a way that will not use or create hazardous substances. Dr. Rui Resendes is working in this field at GreenCentre Canada, an offshoot of PARTEQ Innovations in Kingston, Ontario. GreenCentre's preliminary findings suggest their licensed product {sup S}witchable Solutions{sup ,} featuring 3 classes of solvents and a surfactant, may be useful in bitumen oil sands extraction.

  6. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  7. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  8. Development of mica glass-ceramic glazes

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Maximina; Rincón López, Jesús María; Acosta, Anselmo

    2004-01-01

    The effect of iron content on crystallization of a mica glaze as coating for fast firing stoneware substrates has been investi¬gated. Measurements by differential thermal analysis (DTA) combined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have shown the development of preferential crystal orientation in the mica glass-ceramic glaze. By com¬parison with amorphous and partly crystalline glazes, an enhancement of the mechanical properties of coatings with aligned and inte...

  9. Literature Review of Polymer Derived Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Reuben James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs), also known as preceramic polymers, are valuable coating agents that are used to produce surface barriers on substrates such as stainless steel. These barriers protect against a multitude of environmental threats, and have been used since their research and development in 19772. This paper seeks to review and demonstrate the remarkable properties and versatility that PDCs have to offer, while also giving a brief overview of the processing techniques used today.

  10. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  11. 绿化废弃物好氧堆肥和蚯蚓堆肥作为蔬菜育苗基质研究%Compost and vermicompost from green wastes as substrates for vegetable seedlings cultivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚小强; 李素艳; 李燕; 孙向阳

    2016-01-01

    To reduce the overuse of peat and to increase t h e recycling rate of green wastes for vegetable seedling cultivation, the feasibility of using green waste compost and vermicompost to replace peat as a growth media was evaluated. Six media were prepared by mixing green waste compost and vermicompost with peat at different rates by volume including ck (peat), T1 (compost), T2 (vermicompost), T3 (compost + peat at 1∶1 V/V), T4 (vermicompost + peat at 1∶1 V/V), T5 (compost + vermicompost + peat at 1∶1∶1 V/V). Thereafter, three vegetable species with different salt tolerance: cabbage (most salt tolerance), lettuce (moderate salt tolerance), and zucchini (less salt tolerance) were germinated and grown in the six media. The physical and chemical properties of the different growing media were determined, and the growth of seedlings was also measured. The analysis method of subordinate function was used to evaluate the pros and cons of different growing media. All treatments were replicated ten times, in a completely randomized design. Results indicated that the physical and chemical properties of T4 were all within adequate range for use as a containerized substrate in horticul-ture. The comprehensive evaluation index for seedlings of T4 versus the control were higher with T4: cabbage (0.52 and 0.33), lettuce (0.52 and 0.49), and zucchini (0.54 and 0.49). Additionally, the cost with T4 was 41.56% less. Therefore, this treatment could be used successfully as a medium replacing peat for production of cabbage, lettuce, and zucchini seedlings.%为减少泥炭的开采和提高绿化废弃物的再利用率,探讨绿化废弃物好氧堆肥和蚯蚓堆肥替代泥炭作为蔬菜育苗基质的可行性,将好氧堆肥、蚯蚓堆肥、泥炭按不同体积混配制成6种基质:对照(泥炭), T1(好氧堆肥), T2(蚯蚓堆肥), T3[V(好氧堆肥)∶V(泥炭)=1∶1], T4[V(蚯蚓堆肥)∶V(泥炭)=1∶1], T5[V(好氧堆肥

  12. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, D.A.; Bacchi, D.P.; Connors, T.F.; Collins, E.L. III

    1998-02-10

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by a novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken. 2 figs.

  13. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, David A. (Clifton Park, NY); Bacchi, David P. (Schenectady, NY); Connors, Timothy F. (Watervliet, NY); Collins, III, Edwin L. (Albany, NY)

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  14. Capacitive pressure sensor in post-processing on LTCC substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, M.G.H.; Nieuwkoop, E.; Veninga, E.P.; Meuwissen, M.H.H.; Tijdink, M.W.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    A capacitive pressure sensor was realized by means of a post-processing step on a low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) substrate. The new sensor fabrication technology allows for integration of the sensor with interface circuitry and possibly also wireless transmission circuits on LTCC substrate

  15. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  16. Green consumerism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, Judith I.M.; Schuitema, Geertje; Garson, Carrie Lee

    and the brand was familiar. Green product characteristics did not influence purchase intentions at all when these proself product characteristics were not fulfilled (i.e., high prices and unfamiliar brands). The importance of proself and green product characteristics on purchasing intentions was also...

  17. Automatically Green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunstein, Cass R.; Reisch, Lucia

    to consumers. In deciding whether to establish green defaults, choice architects should consider both consumer welfare and a wide range of other costs and benefits. Sometimes that assessment will argue strongly in favor of green defaults, particularly when both economic and environmental considerations point...

  18. Offshore Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This shapefile displays the distribution of substrate types from Pt. Arena to Pt. Sal in central/northern California. Originally this data consisted of seven paper...

  19. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue;

    2004-01-01

    will be spherical due to the fast coalescence at the high temperatures in the flame. The primary product from the flame pyrolysis is an aerosol of metal oxide nanoparticles. The aerosol gas from the flame can be utilized for several different purposes, depending on the precursors fed to the flame. With the present...... technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...... tube, where a part of the gas is sucked through the wall of the substrate, thereby creating a thin filter cake on the inner surface of the substrate tube. The top-layer can be deposited directly on a coarse pore structure. Since the Brownian motion of the aerosol particles is fast compared to the fluid...

  20. Scratch and wear behaviour of plasma sprayed nano ceramics bilayer Al2O3-13 wt%TiO2/hydroxyapatite coated on medical grade titanium substrates in SBF environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite was synthesized by sol–gel route. • Bilayer (AT13/HAP) coating improves wear resistance of CP-Ti implant surface. • The microhardness values of bilayer coating surface were increased 4 times compared to uncoated sample surface. - Abstract: Among the various coating techniques, plasma spray coating is an efficient technique to protect the metal surface from the various surface problems like wear and corrosion. The aim of this present work is to design and produce a bilayer coating on the non- toxic commercially pure titanium (denoted as CP-Ti) implant substrate in order to improve the biocompatibility and surface properties. To achieve that, Al2O3-13 wt%TiO2 (AT13) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) were coated on CP-Ti implant substrate using plasma spray coating technique. Further, the coated substrates were subjected to various characterization techniques. The crystallite size of coated HAP and its morphological studies were carried out using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively. The wear test on the bilayer (AT13/HAP) coated CP-Ti implant surface was conducted using ball-on-disc tester under SBF environment at 37 °C, in order to determine the wear rate and the coefficient of friction. The adhesion strength of the bilayer coated surface was evaluated by micro scratch tester under the ramp load conditions with load range of 14–20 N. The above said studies were repeated on the single layer coated HAP and AT13 implant surfaces. The results reveal that the bilayer (AT13/HAP) coated CP-Ti surface has the improved wear rate, coefficient of friction in compared to single layer coated HAP and AT13 surfaces

  1. Interfacial adhesion of dental ceramic-resin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro

    The clinical success of resin bonding procedures for indirect ceramic restorations and ceramic repairs depends on the quality and durability of the bond between the ceramic and the resin. The quality of this bond will depend upon the bonding mechanisms that are controlled in part by the surface treatment that promotes micromechanical and/or chemical bonding to the substrate. The objective of this study is to correlate interfacial toughness (K A) with fracture surface morphological parameters of the dental ceramic-resin systems as a function of ceramic surface treatment. The analytical procedures focused on characterizing the microstructure and fracture properties of EmpressRTM ceramics (a leucite-based core ceramic, two lithia disilicate-based core ceramics, and a glass veneer) and determining the ceramic-resin adhesion zone bond strength characteristics. Microstructure and composition are controlling factors in the development of micromechanical retention produced by etching. Silane treated ceramics negated the effect of surface roughening produced by etching, inducing lower surface energy of the ceramic and, reduced bonding effectiveness. There was a positive correlation between WA, tensile bond strength (a), and KA, i.e., higher mean WA value, and higher mean sigma and KA values. This study suggests that (1) the sigma and KA values for ceramic bonded to resin are affected by the ceramic microstructure and the ceramic surface treatments; (2) the definition of the adhesion zone is essential to classify the modes of failure, which should be an integral component of all failure analyses; (3) the microtensile test may be preferable to conventional shear or flexural tests as an indicator of composite-ceramic bond quality; and (4) careful microscopic analysis of fracture surfaces and an x-ray dot map can produce a more consistent and complete description of the fracture process and interpretation of the modes of failure. The mode of failure and fractographic analyses

  2. Verification of ceramic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behar-Lafenetre, S.; Cornillon, L.; Rancurel, M.; Graaf, D. de; Hartmann, P.; Coe, G.; Laine, B.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the "Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures" contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instr

  3. Efficient photoemission from robust ferroelectric ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscolo, I. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan, (Italy); Castellano, M.; Catani, L.; Ferrario, M.; Tazzioli, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy); Giannessi, L. [ENEA, Frascati, Rome (Italy). Centro Ricerche Elettronica

    1999-07-01

    Experimental results on photoemission by ferroelectric ceramic disks, with a possible interpretation, are presented. Two types of lead zirconate titanate lanthanum doped, PLZT, ceramics have been used for tests. 25 ps light pulses of 532 and 355 nm were used for excitation. The intensity ranged within the interval 0.1-3 GW/cm{sup 2}. The upper limit of the intensity was established by the damage threshold tested by the onset of ion emission. At low value of the intensity the yield was comparable at the two wavelengths. At the highest intensity of green light the emitted charge was 1 nC per 10 mm{sup 2}, but it was limited by the space charge effect. In fact, the applied field was only 20 kV/cm, allowed both by the mechanical design of the apparatus and the poor vacuum, 10{sup -4} mbar. No surface processing was required. The measurement of the electron pulse length under way.

  4. Ceramics As Materials Of Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, A.; Eteiba, M. B.; Abdelmonem, N.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper attempts to review the limitations for using the important ceramics in contact with corrosive media. Different types of ceramics are included. Corrosion properties of ceramics and their electrical properties are mentioned. Recommendations are suggested for using ceramics in different media.

  5. Fabrication of porous silicon nitride ceramics using binder jetting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinskiy, L.; Ripetsky, A.; Sitnikov, S.; Solyaev, Y.; Kahramanov, R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the results of the binder jetting technology application for the processing of the Si3N4-based ceramics. The difference of the developed technology from analogues used for additive manufacturing of silicon nitride ceramics is a method of the separate deposition of the mineral powder and binder without direct injection of suspensions/slurries. It is assumed that such approach allows reducing the technology complexity and simplifying the process of the feedstock preparation, including the simplification of the composite materials production. The binders based on methyl ester of acrylic acid with polyurethane and modified starch were studied. At this stage of the investigations, the technology of green body's fabrication is implemented using a standard HP cartridge mounted on the robotic arm. For the coordinated operation of the cartridge and robot the specially developed software was used. Obtained green bodies of silicon powder were used to produce the ceramic samples via reaction sintering. The results of study of ceramics samples microstructure and composition are presented. Sintered ceramics are characterized by fibrous α-Si3N4 structure and porosity up to 70%.

  6. Green Roofs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-08-01

    A New Technology Demonstration Publication Green roofs can improve the energy performance of federal buildings, help manage stormwater, reduce airborne emissions, and mitigate the effects of urban heat islands.

  7. Green Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of it. Alcohol can decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking green coffee along with alcohol might cause too much caffeine in the bloodstream and caffeine side effects including jitteriness, headache, and fast heartbeat.ModerateBe cautious ...

  8. Green Kidz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porto, Melina; Daryai-Hansen, Petra; Arcuri, Maria Emilia;

    2016-01-01

    Projektet "Green Kidz. Intercultural environmental citizenship in the English language classroom in Argentina and Denmark" er en del af et internationalt udviklingsprojekt, der er ledet af Michael Byram, Durham University. Projektet belyser, hvordan interkulturelt medborgerskab kan styrkes i folk...

  9. Green towers and green walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture and Planning, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    North American cities face many major environmental and health issues such as urban heat island effect, the intensity of storms, microclimate around buildings, imperviousness of sites, poor air quality and increases in respiratory disease. Several new technologies are starting to address global impacts and community level issues as well as the personal health and comfort of building occupants. These include green towers, living walls, vegetated rooftops and ecological site developments. This paper examined these forms of eco-development and presented their benefits. It discussed green walls in Japan; green towers in Malaysia, Singapore and Great Britain; green facades of climbing plants; active living walls in Canada; and passive living walls in France and Canada. It also discussed thermal walls; thematic walls; vertical gardens and structured wildlife habitat. Last, it presented testing, monitoring, research and conclusions. The Centre for the Advancement of Green Roof Technology is setting up a program to test thermal performance, to assess plant survival and to monitor green walls at the British Columbia Institute of Technology in Vancouver, Canada as much of the research out of Japan is only available in Japanese script. It was concluded that green architecture can provide shade, food, rainwater, shelter for wildlife and mimic natural systems. 15 refs.

  10. High pressure ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  11. Green Economics

    OpenAIRE

    David Pearce

    1992-01-01

    Economists assume that people are fundamentally greedy, though not exclusively so. If environmental improvement is to be achieved, it will require policies that use selfishness rather than opposing it. Such policies are to be found in the basics of green economics in which market signals are modified by environmental taxes and tradeable pollution certificates to 'decouple' the economic growth process from its environmental impact. Green economic policies avoid the infringements of human liber...

  12. Green lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2010-01-01

    Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range......Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range...

  13. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  14. Incipient flocculation molding: A new ceramic-forming technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrasmith, Steven Reade

    Incipient Flocculation Molding (IFM) was conceived as a new near-net-shape forming technique for ceramic components. It was hypothesized that the development of a temperature-dependent deflocculant would result in a forming technique that is flexible, efficient, and capable of producing a superior microstructure with improved mechanical properties from highly reactive, submicron ceramic powders. IFM utilizes a concentrated, nonaqueous, sterically stabilized ceramic powder and/or colloidal suspension which is injected into a non-porous mold. The suspension is then flocculated by destabilizing the suspension by lowering the temperature. Flocculation is both rapid and reversible. Cooling to -20°C produces a green body with sufficient strength for removal from the mold. The solvent is removed from the green body by evaporation. The dried green body is subsequently sintered to form a dense ceramic monolith. This is the first ceramic forming method based upon the manipulation of a sterically-stabilized suspension. To demonstrate IFM, the process of grafting polyethylene glycol (PEG), with molecular weights from 600 to 8000, to alumina powders was investigated. The maximum grafted amounts were achieved by the technique of dispersing the alumina powders in molten polymer at 195°C. The ungrafted PEG was then removed by repeated centrifuging and redispersion in fresh distilled water. The rheological behavior of suspensions of the PEG-grafted powders in water, 2-propanol and 2-butanol were characterized. All of the aqueous suspensions were shear thinning. The PEG 4600-grafted alumina powder aqueous suspensions were the most fluid. Sample rods and bars were molded from 52 vol% PEG-grafted alumina suspensions in 2-butanol. The best results were obtained with a preheated aluminum mold lubricated with a fluorinated oil mold-release. The samples were dried, sintered, and their microstructure and density were compared with sintered samples dry pressed from the same alumina powder

  15. The Influence of Material Type, Preparation Design, and Tooth Substrate on Fracture Resistance of Molar Onlays

    OpenAIRE

    Al Khalifah, Shahed Ali M.

    2016-01-01

    Tooth colored all ceramic restorations have been the treatment preference of many patients for esthetics and biocompatibility. This study aimed to test the fracture resistance of posterior ceramic onlays milled with computer-aided design and computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) machines.The effects of material type, preparation design, and tooth substrate were evaluated using a full-block design. Ninety teeth were tested. Three different CAD/CAM ceramic onlay material types were included: a...

  16. The Green of Green Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challis, Lawrie; Sheard, Fred

    2003-12-01

    In 1828, an English miller from Nottingham published a mathematical essay that generated little response. George Green's analysis, however, has since found applications in areas ranging from classical electrostatics to modern quantum field theory.

  17. Stormwater Attenuation by Green Roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, A.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Robinson, C. E.; Smart, C. C.

    2014-12-01

    Innovative municipal stormwater management technologies are urgently required in urban centers. Inadequate stormwater management can lead to excessive flooding, channel erosion, decreased stream baseflows, and degraded water quality. A major source of urban stormwater is unused roof space. Green roofs can be used as a stormwater management tool to reduce roof generated stormwater and generally improve the quality of runoff. With recent legislation in some North American cities, including Toronto, requiring the installation of green roofs on large buildings, research on the effectiveness of green roofs for stormwater management is important. This study aims to assess the hydrologic response of an extensive sedum green roof in London, Ontario, with emphasis on the response to large precipitation events that stress municipal stormwater infrastructure. A green roof rapidly reaches field capacity during large storm events and can show significantly different behavior before and after field capacity. At field capacity a green roof has no capillary storage left for retention of stormwater, but may still be an effective tool to attenuate peak runoff rates by transport through the green roof substrate. The attenuation of green roofs after field capacity is linked to gravity storage, where gravity storage is the water that is temporarily stored and can drain freely over time after field capacity has been established. Stormwater attenuation of a modular experimental green roof is determined from water balance calculations at 1-minute intervals. Data is used to evaluate green roof attenuation and the impact of field capacity on peak flow rates and gravity storage. In addition, a numerical model is used to simulate event based stormwater attenuation. This model is based off of the Richards equation and supporting theory of multiphase flow through porous media.

  18. Large area ceramic thin films on plastics: A versatile route via solution processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuka, H.; Yamano, A.; Fukui, T.; Uchiyama, H.; Takahashi, M.; Yoki, M.; Akase, T.

    2012-01-01

    A new general route for large area, submicron thick ceramic thin films (crystalline metal oxide thin films) on plastic substrates is presented, where the crystallization of films is guaranteed by a firing process. Gel films are deposited on silicon substrates with a release layer and fired to be ceramic films, followed by transferring onto plastic substrates using adhesives. The ceramic films thus fabricated on plastics exhibit a certain degree of flexibility, implying the possibility of the technique to be applied to high-throughput roll-to-roll processes. Using this technique, we successfully realized transparent anatase thin films that provide high optical reflectance and transparent indium tin oxide thin films that exhibit electrical conductivity on polycarbonate and acrylic resin substrates, respectively. Crystallographically oriented zinc oxide films and patterned zinc oxide films are also demonstrated to be realized on acrylic resin substrates.

  19. Large area ceramic thin films on plastics: A versatile route via solution processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new general route for large area, submicron thick ceramic thin films (crystalline metal oxide thin films) on plastic substrates is presented, where the crystallization of films is guaranteed by a firing process. Gel films are deposited on silicon substrates with a release layer and fired to be ceramic films, followed by transferring onto plastic substrates using adhesives. The ceramic films thus fabricated on plastics exhibit a certain degree of flexibility, implying the possibility of the technique to be applied to high-throughput roll-to-roll processes. Using this technique, we successfully realized transparent anatase thin films that provide high optical reflectance and transparent indium tin oxide thin films that exhibit electrical conductivity on polycarbonate and acrylic resin substrates, respectively. Crystallographically oriented zinc oxide films and patterned zinc oxide films are also demonstrated to be realized on acrylic resin substrates.

  20. Ceramic Solar Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Solar receiver uses ceramic honeycomb matrix to absorb heat from Sun and transfer it to working fluid at temperatures of 1,095 degrees and 1,650 degrees C. Drives gas turbine engine or provides heat for industrial processes.

  1. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  2. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  3. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  4. An optical coherence tomography investigation of materials defects in ceramic fixed partial dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Todea, Carmen; Rominu, Mihai; Laissue, Philippe L.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-04-01

    Metal ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial prostheses are mainly used in the frontal part of the dental arch because for esthetics reasons. The masticatory stress may induce fractures of the bridges. There are several factors that are associated with the stress state created in ceramic restorations, including: thickness of ceramic layers, mechanical properties of the materials, elastic modulus of the supporting substrate material, direction, magnitude and frequency of applied load, size and location of occlusal contact areas, residual stresses induced by processing or pores, restoration-cement interfacial defects and environmental defects. The fractures of these bridges lead to functional, esthetic and phonetic disturbances which finally render the prosthetic treatment inefficient. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detection and analysis of possible material defects in metal-ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  5. Selecting Ceramics - Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIM OF PRESENTATION: To compare a number of materials for extracoronal restoration of teeth with particular reference to CAD-CAM ceramics. CASE DESCRIPTION AND TREATMENT CARRIED OUT: This paper will be illustrated using clinical examples of patients treated using different ceramic restorations to present the advantages and disadvantages and each technique. The different requirements of tooth preparation, impression taking and technical procedures of each system will be presented and compar...

  6. Improving green roofs and rail road greening systems using Bacillus subtilis and Lactobacillus ssp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüneberg, H; Oschmann, C; Dunya, S; Ulrichs, C

    2006-01-01

    Aim of the present study was the improvement of existing methods for green roof and rail road greening systems using soil borne bacteria. Bacillus subtilis and Lactobacillus ssp. alone and in combination with vinasse applied to different growing substrates were tested. The substrates were brick chips, textile mats, mineral wool mats, and a commercial available substrate for the Swedish company VegTech. All four substrates were tested along an artificial rail track on the experimental station at Humboldt University Berlin, and partly on an existing rail track in Munich, Germany. Plants selected for the experiments belong to the genus Sedum, which is relatively tolerant to dry conditions. Inoculation of plants with bacteria had no effect on plant growth parameters and on coverage of different mobile bedding systems with Sedum plants. There was no significant difference between the various treatments in Munich. In both experiments, the addition of vinasse alone improved plant growth. Plant growth was significantly different on all substrates, whereas brick chips and the commercial roof soil was the best substrate. Brick chips are a cheap substrate which can be used for rail track greening. The results indicate that the quality of the substrate is the most important factor for remediation and greening of rail tracks and roof tops. The rapid growth of plants can be influenced by the application of vinasse as additional nutrient solution (potash (K) source) or nutrient enriched substrate.

  7. Green banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Drobnjaković

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to march towards “low - carbon economy”. Global challenges of diminishing fossil fuel reserves, climate change, environmental management and finite natural resources serving an expanding world population - these reasons mean that urgent action is required to transition to solutions which minimize environmental impact and are sustainable. We are at the start of the low - carbon revolution and those that have started on their low - carbon journey already are seeing benefits such as new markets and customers, improved economic, social and environmental performance, and reduced bills and risks. Green investment banks offer alternative financial services: green car loans, energy efficiency mortgages, alternative energy venture capital, eco - savings deposits and green credit cards. These items represent innovative financial products.

  8. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  9. FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS microstructural analysis of metal-ceramic and zirconia-ceramic interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Sebastiani, M; Battaini, P; Menghini, P; Bemporad, E

    2011-01-01

    Recently introduced FIB/SEM analysis in microscopy seems to provide a high-resolution characterization of the samples by 3D (FIB) cross-sectioning and (SEM) high resolution imaging. The aim of this study was to apply the FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS analysis to the interfaces of a metal-ceramic vs. two zirconia-ceramic systems. Plate samples of three different prosthetic systems were prepared in the dental lab following the manufacturers' instructions, where metal-ceramic was the result of a ceramic veneering (porcelain-fused-to-metal) and the two zirconia-ceramic systems were produced by the dedicated CAD-CAM procedures of the zirconia cores (both with final sintering) and then veneered by layered or heat pressed ceramics. In a FIB/SEM equipment (also called DualBeam), a thin layer of platinum (1 μm) was deposited on samples surface crossing the interfaces, in order to protect them during milling. Then, increasingly deeper trenches were milled by a focused ion beam, first using a relatively higher and later using a lower ion current (from 9 nA to 0.28 nA, 30KV). Finally, FEG-SEM (5KV) micrographs (1000-50,000X) were acquired. In a SEM the analysis of the morphology and internal microstructure was performed by 13KV secondary and backscattered electrons signals (in all the samples). The compositional maps were then performed by EDS probe only in the metal-ceramic system (20kV). Despite the presence of many voids in all the ceramic layers, it was possible to identify: (1) the grain structures of the metallic and zirconia substrates, (2) the thin oxide layer at the metal-ceramic interface and its interactions with the first ceramic layer (wash technique), (3) the roughness of the two different zirconia cores and their interactions with the ceramic interface, where the presence of zirconia grains in the ceramic layer was reported in two system possibly due to sandblasting before ceramic firing. PMID:22709611

  10. FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS microstructural analysis of metal-ceramic and zirconia-ceramic interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Sebastiani, M; Battaini, P; Menghini, P; Bemporad, E

    2012-01-10

    Recently introduced FIB/SEM analysis in microscopy seems to provide a high-resolution characterization of the samples by 3D (FIB) cross-sectioning and (SEM) high resolution imaging. The aim of this study was to apply the FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS analysis to the interfaces of a metal-ceramic vs. two zirconia-ceramic systems. Plate samples of three different prosthetic systems were prepared in the dental lab following the manufacturers' instructions, where metal-ceramic was the result of a ceramic veneering (porcelain-fused-to-metal) and the two zirconia-ceramic systems were produced by the dedicated CAD-CAM procedures of the zirconia cores (both with final sintering) and then veneered by layered or heat pressed ceramics. In a FIB/SEM equipment (also called DualBeam), a thin layer of platinum (1 μm) was deposited on samples surface crossing the interfaces, in order to protect them during milling. Then, increasingly deeper trenches were milled by a focused ion beam, first using a relatively higher and later using a lower ion current (from 9 nA to 0.28 nA, 30KV). Finally, FEG-SEM (5KV) micrographs (1000-50,000X) were acquired. In a SEM the analysis of the morphology and internal microstructure was performed by 13KV secondary and backscattered electrons signals (in all the samples). The compositional maps were then performed by EDS probe only in the metal-ceramic system (20kV). Despite the presence of many voids in all the ceramic layers, it was possible to identify: (1) the grain structures of the metallic and zirconia substrates, (2) the thin oxide layer at the metal-ceramic interface and its interactions with the first ceramic layer (wash technique), (3) the roughness of the two different zirconia cores and their interactions with the ceramic interface, where the presence of zirconia grains in the ceramic layer was reported in two system possibly due to sandblasting before ceramic firing.

  11. Green networking

    CERN Document Server

    Krief, Francine

    2012-01-01

    This book focuses on green networking, which is an important topic for the scientific community composed of engineers, academics, researchers and industrialists working in the networking field. Reducing the environmental impact of the communications infrastructure has become essential with the ever increasing cost of energy and the need for reducing global CO2 emissions to protect our environment.Recent advances and future directions in green networking are presented in this book, including energy efficient networks (wired networks, wireless networks, mobile networks), adaptive networ

  12. Green times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors, founding members of the ''Green Party'' have in mind to make a very personal contribution to a better understanding of the present political situation which, although it seems to have reached a deadlock, still offers positive chances and prospects. New approaches in policy are mentioned which may help to overcome the present state of resignation of many adolescents and adults. Among other things, they describe themselves setting out for new pathways, the ''Greens'' in Parliament, prospect for the future, opportunities of the ecologically oriented economic policy. Finally, they call upon the reader to think and develop further under the motto ''What we all can do''. (HSCH)

  13. Multifunctional Electronics Core Substrate Configurable Electronics Functionality with Stacked Silicon and Multi-Chip Modules Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A custom multifunctional core substrate scheme comprised of next generation polyimide, ceramic and/or silicon materials will be designed to integrate new 2.5D and...

  14. Liquid phase sintering of SiC ceramics with rare earth sesquioxides

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Koushik

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop SiC ceramics using high refractory sintering additives which posses good high temperature as well as room temperature properties. Silicon carbide ceramics were produced by pressureless sintering of a mixture of alpha- and beta-SiC powders along with different combinations of rare earth sesquioxides and aluminium nitride as sintering additives. In order to understand the densification behaviour, the green bodies were sintered in Ar or N2 atmosphere in t...

  15. A view on organic binder effects on technical properties of ceramic Raschig rings

    OpenAIRE

    Beygi Khosrowshahi, Y.; Salem, A.

    2010-01-01

    Organic binders such as polyvinyl alcohol, carboxymethyl cellulose and Arabic gum are widely used to control the technological parameters required for green and sintered ceramic bodies. An industrial ceramic Raschig ring composed of kaolinite, illite, pyrophillite and quartz minerals was separately mixed with different content of above binders and formed by extrusion process in the shape of Raschig ring. The dried specimens were sintered at 1270°C and the physicalmechanical charac...

  16. Not everything green has green

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last week (March 2009) Slovak government extended the preferential treatment of renewable energy. Companies that will produce electricity from biomass, water, wind, solar and underground thermal springs, have guaranteed that they will receive a decently paid at least the next 15 years. It promises them a new government bill on the promotion of renewable energy. So far, the State guaranteed the purchase of green power for only one year in advance. And because it is more expensive than electricity from coal or uranium, green investment firms feared. Fifteen guarantees give assurance. The government will guarantee only purchase green electricity, but also biomethane to produce heat. So, who wants an ordinary agrarian biogas from waste and adjust to such a gas. Slovak gas industry will have to buy it into its network. Biomethane is not in domestic terms only on paper.

  17. Green lights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Peter Kielberg

    This study investigates the effect of drought on economic activity globally using remote sensing data. In particular, predicted variation in greenness is correlated with changes in the density of artificial light observed at night on a grid of 0.25 degree latitude-longitude pixels. I define drought...

  18. Green Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, David, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses "going green" concept in school-building design, its cost-savings benefits through more efficient energy use, and its use by the State University of New York at Buffalo as solution to an energy retrofit program. Examples are provided of how this concept can be used, even for small colleges without large capital budgets, and how it can…

  19. Going Green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the benefits that schools and universities can gain by adopting environmentally sensitive practices in their design and operations. Includes resources for locating additional information about green schools and a list of 11 features that represent a comprehensive, sustainable school. (GR)

  20. Going Green

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-18

    This podcast is for a general audience and provides information on how to recycle, re-use, and restore. It also covers the benefits of “Going Green" on the environment, health, and social interaction.  Created: 4/18/2008 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), ATSDR.   Date Released: 5/8/2008.

  1. Green Olympics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ It seems all happened in a moment.White clouds float in blue sky,green trees are decorated by colorful flags with warm smiling images,and the building are taking a brand new appearance...Some magic must has been done to Beijing:it turns to a cleaner,healthier and more beautiful city.

  2. Green Victory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Award-winning solar energy project benefits millions of people in underdeveloped areas The world’s leading green en- ergy prize, Ashden Award for Sustainable Energy, announced on June 19 that China’s Renewable Energy Development Project (REDP) was among its latest recipients. The REDP

  3. Shape forming of ceramics via gelcasting of aqueous particulate slurries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Dhara; R K Kamboj; M Pradhan; P Bhargava

    2002-11-01

    Gelcasting is a promising technique for shape forming of bulk dense or porous ceramic, metal structures. The process offers a number of advantages over processes such as slip casting, injection molding in forming complex ceramic shapes. It is shown here that the optimization of slurry rheology, choice of mold material, mold design and the drying conditions have a significant role in the overall success of the process. In this process, components of simple or complex shapes can be produced to near net shape by direct casting. If required complex shapes can also be produced by machining the green gelcast bodies. The process of gelcasting also has a lot of potential in forming highly porous ceramic shapes.

  4. [Raman and EDXRF Study on Overglaze Decorations of Jingdezhen Ceramics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Zhang, Mao-lin; Wu, Jun-ming; Li, Qi-jiang; Cao, Jian-wen; Li, Qing-hui; Zhao, Hong-xia

    2015-05-01

    Overglaze decoration porcelain is an important category of ancient Chinese ceramics, which has significant artistic value and scientific value. Nondestructive analysis methods such as Raman spectroscopy and EDXRF were used to analyze the overglaze decorations on the Jingdezhen ceramic samples of Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasty. The recipe and color mechanism of the overglaze pigments were discussed according to the chemical composition and phase composition analysis. The study found that dark red overglaze decorations of ancient Honglvcai, Wucai and famille rose in Jingdezhen are colored by hematite, yellow color is lead tin yellow, carmine decoration is colored by gold less than 0. 1 % in concentration, and green decorations are colored by bivalent copper ion. The result also indicates that the effective combination of Raman spectroscopy and EDXRF can play an important role in the deep research on ceramic artifacts, especially for the overglaze decoration pigments which are interveined each other. PMID:26415441

  5. Evaluating the chemical compatibility of potential substrate materials for Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential substrate and buffer layer materials for Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (BSCCO) were surveyed using bulk ceramic processing techniques. Of the materials tested, only Ag was inert with respect to BSCCO. MgO slightly degrades the superconducting onset temperature and volume fraction. LaGaO3 may be a feasible ceramic substrate for BSCCO, although some reaction appears to occur

  6. Piezoelectric Ceramics and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, I.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the piezoelectric effect in ceramics and presents a quantitative representation of this effect. Explains the processes involved in the manufacture of piezoelectric ceramics, the materials used, and the situations in which they are applied. (GS)

  7. Cooled Ceramic Turbine Vane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — N&R Engineering will investigate the feasibility of cooled ceramics, such as ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade concepts that can decrease specific...

  8. Modeling binder removal in ceramic compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incledon, Matthew L.

    Binder is often added to ceramic systems to provide mechanical strength to the green bodies during processing. The binder removal sequence for an individual system is difficult to predict due to the thermal reaction and mass transport of the volatile products. The objective of this work is to use computational methods to predict the kinetics of binder removal as a function of composition, particle size, pore size and tortuosity, temperature, body size and shape, etc.. The model will be used to predict the composition, temperature, and pore pressure as a function of time, position within the body, and heating sequence parameters. This will provide the ability to predict optimum heating sequences that minimize processing time and energy input while avoiding harmful high internal pressures and temperatures. Since there are many binder systems in use, a few specific cases will be considered. TGA (thermogravimetric analysis) of binders will be used to measure kinetics parameters that are inputs for the computational model. A framework will be developed to assess the binder removal sequence for a binder and ceramic system. The input for the model, computed in COMSOL Multiphysics, will be determined through analysis of TGA weight loss data and green body characterization. A set of tools will be presented that assist in the fitting of the TGA data, including the binder degrading into multiple species, higher order reactions, parallel and series reactions, etc.. The use of these ideas and tools will allow the modeler to better predict the heating sequence required for a ceramic and binder system to successfully remove all binder material.

  9. Up-Conversion Properties of Er3+:PbF2-CONTAINING Nanophase Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoptsov, N. A.; Loiko, P. A.; Yumashev, K. V.; Rachkovskaya, G. E.; Zakharevich, G. B.

    2013-05-01

    Transparent Er3+:PbF2-containing nanophase glass-ceramics was synthesized by means of heat-treatment of as-cast erbium-doped oxyfluoride glass. Optical absorption of glass and glass-ceramics was investigated in details. Temporal characteristics of luminescence associated with 4I13/2→4I15/2 transition were studied under diode-pumping that results in the determination of decay times. Intense red and green up-conversion emission was obtained with glass-ceramic samples.

  10. Laser modification of ceramic surfaces with micro- and nano- particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Magnus

    2007-02-01

    Laser supported processes can be used to modify the electrical and thermal properties of ceramic substrates locally. These processes are characterised by a strong thermal interaction between the laser beam and the ceramic surface which leads to localised melting. During the dynamic melting process metal particles are introduced into the melt pool in order to modify the physical properties. Different alumina samples were treated with metal powders of tungsten, copper, and oxides of these metals. The interface between the metal and the ceramic can be designed by using selected combinations of metal- and metal-oxide-powders and also by a thermal post-processing. The application of nano-particles during the laser-dispersing process resulted in completely different characteristics of the micro-structure and the electrical properties compared to the conventional metal powders with an average grain size of 5 - 15 microns. The micron sized metal particles are embedded within the ceramic matrix as particle agglomerates or as distinct metal phase the nano-particle phase covers the grain boundaries of the ceramics leading to network of nano-scaled electrically conducting "wires". The resulting resistance of the laser tracks can be adjusted from semi-conducting to metallic behavior with a resistivity down to 2x10 -6W/m. The modified ceramic can be used for heating elements working at operation temperatures of up to 1000 °C, high current resistances which can be loaded with currents of up to 100 A.

  11. Thin Film Ceramic Strain Sensor Development for High Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Laster, Kimala L.

    2008-01-01

    The need for sensors to operate in harsh environments is illustrated by the need for measurements in the turbine engine hot section. The degradation and damage that develops over time in hot section components can lead to catastrophic failure. At present, the degradation processes that occur in the harsh hot section environment are poorly characterized, which hinders development of more durable components, and since it is so difficult to model turbine blade temperatures, strains, etc, actual measurements are needed. The need to consider ceramic sensing elements is brought about by the temperature limits of metal thin film sensors in harsh environments. The effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to develop high temperature thin film ceramic static strain gauges for application in turbine engines is described, first in the fan and compressor modules, and then in the hot section. The near-term goal of this research effort was to identify candidate thin film ceramic sensor materials and provide a list of possible thin film ceramic sensor materials and corresponding properties to test for viability. A thorough literature search was conducted for ceramics that have the potential for application as high temperature thin film strain gauges chemically and physically compatible with the NASA GRCs microfabrication procedures and substrate materials. Test results are given for tantalum, titanium and zirconium-based nitride and oxynitride ceramic films.

  12. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  13. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  14. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  15. Transparent ceramic photo-optical semiconductor high power switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werne, Roger W.; Sullivan, James S.; Landingham, Richard L.

    2016-01-19

    A photoconductive semiconductor switch according to one embodiment includes a structure of sintered nanoparticles of a high band gap material exhibiting a lower electrical resistance when excited by light relative to an electrical resistance thereof when not exposed to the light. A method according to one embodiment includes creating a mixture comprising particles, at least one dopant, and at least one solvent; adding the mixture to a mold; forming a green structure in the mold; and sintering the green structure to form a transparent ceramic. Additional system, methods and products are also presented.

  16. Laser ablative cutting of ceramics for electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, B. E., LLNL

    1996-03-01

    Pulsed, high-beam quality lasers offer unique materials processing characteristics. In processing metals, copper vapor and pulsed Nd:YAG lasers have produced micron-scale cuts and holes with submicron heat-affected zones. Since the cost of laser photons is high and average material removal rates can be slow with ablation, high value-added applications are necessary to justify processing costs. Ceramics present a special challenge for manufacturing because of their high hardness, relatively low thermal conductivity, and brittle nature. Surface damage typically limits the strength of a ceramic part to a small fraction of its bulk strength. This work investigates the use of copper vapor and pulsed diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers to cut precision features in ceramic substrates. Variations in laser wavelength and power, processing speed, ceramic type, and assist gas were investigated with the goal of producing <100-{mu}m wide by 600-{mu}m deep cuts through silicon-carbide and alumina/titanium-carbide substrates for potential use in electronics. Silicon-carbide bars 250-{mu}m wide by 600-{mu}m high by 2.5-cm long were laser cut from substrates without fracture.

  17. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.; Im, K.H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this project include the development of analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters, and to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  18. Periphyton biomass on artificial substrates during the summer and winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altevir Signor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the periphyton production on artificial substrates considering it as a source of low cost live food for fish. Blades of artificial substrates such as wood, black plastic, acrylic, fiberglass, ceramics and glass (all with 144cm2 blades, 24 for each substrate were submerged 20.0cm below the water column for 35 days in the winter and 42 days in the summer. The blades were randomly installed in 200m3 pond and evaluated for the biomass production at different phases during the summer and winter. Four blades of each substrate were collected weekly, and the periphytic community was carefully scraped with a spatula and fixed in 4% formaldehyde. The periphytic biomass productivity was evaluated by artificial substrate area and per day. The results evidenced the characteristic periodicity in periphyton biomass production and a significant variability in the collect period and season in the different artificial substrates used. Ceramic and wood showed the best results in the summer while wood showed the best results in the winter. The priphyton biomass productions differ among periods, substrates and seasons. Wood and ceramics could be indicated for periphyton biomass production in either winter or summer.

  19. High temperature interaction behavior at liquid metal-ceramic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2002-08-01

    Liquid metal/ceramic interaction experiments were undertaken at elevated temperatures with the purpose of developing reusable crucibles for melting reactive metals. The metals used in this work included zirconium (Zr), Zr-8 wt.% stainless steel, and stainless steel containing 15 wt.% Zr. The ceramic substrates include yttria, Zr carbide, and hafnium (Hf) carbide. The metal-ceramic samples were placed on top of a tungsten (W) dish. These experiments were conducted with the temperature increasing at a controlled rate until reaching set points above 2000 °C; the systems were held at the peak temperature for about five min and then cooled. The atmosphere in the furnace was argon (Ar). An outside video recording system was used to monitor the changes on heating up and cooling down. All samples underwent a post-test metallurgical examination. Pure Zr was found to react with yttria, resulting in oxygen (O) evolution at the liquid metal-ceramic interface. In addition, dissolved O was observed in the as-cooled Zr metal. Yttrium (Y) was also present in the Zr metal, but it had segregated to the grain boundaries on cooling. Despite the normal expectations for reactive wetting, no transition interface was developed, but the Zr metal was tightly bound to yttria ceramic. Similar reactions occurred between the yttria and the Zr-stainless steel alloys. Two other ceramic samples were Zr carbide and Hf carbide; both carbide substrates were wetted readily by the molten Zr, which flowed easily to the sides of the substrates. The molten Zr caused a very limited dissolution of the Zr carbide, and it reacted more strongly with the Hf carbide. These reactive wetting results are relevant to the design of interfaces and the development of reactive filler metals for the fabrication of high temperature components through metal-ceramic joining. Parameters that have a marked impact on this interface reaction include the thermodynamic stability of the substrate, the properties of the modified

  20. Ceramic vane drive joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Charles H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  1. Green Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shalini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Green computing is all about using computers in a smarter and eco-friendly way. It is the environmentally responsible use of computers and related resources which includes the implementation of energy-efficient central processing units, servers and peripherals as well as reduced resource consumption and proper disposal of electronic waste .Computers certainly make up a large part of many people lives and traditionally are extremely damaging to the environment. Manufacturers of computer and its parts have been espousing the green cause to help protect environment from computers and electronic waste in any way.Research continues into key areas such as making the use of computers as energy-efficient as Possible, and designing algorithms and systems for efficiency-related computer technologies.

  2. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, E.; Anderson, M.

    1993-12-14

    A method for the formation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms. 4 figures.

  3. Greening Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Sihombing, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    For hundreds years, most of farmers in Indonesia have their own system of farming and they were so closed to the nature. Even farmers co-exist with nature by mutual need. The natural farming principal is done by a very stick ritual religious in every moment of their life. Farming is a part of faith. Unfortunately, this natural farming principal dramatically decreasead and even disappeared with the appereance of the green revolution policy which supported by the regime of Government.

  4. Green Gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this work is to offer a general panoramic of the processes or experiences pilot that are carried out in the Project Green Gold, as strategy of environmental sustainability and organizational invigoration in Choco, especially in the 12 communities of the municipalities of Tado and Condoto. It is also sought to offer a minimum of information on the techniques of handmade production and to show the possibilities to carry out in a rational way the use and use of the natural resources. The Project Green Gold is carried out by the Corporation Green Gold (COV) and co-financed with resources of international and national character, the intervention of the financial resources it achievement mainly for the use of clean processes in the extraction stages and metals benefit. The project is centered primarily in the absence of use of products or toxic substances as the mercury, fair trade, organizational invigoration, execution of 11 approaches and certification of the metals Gold and Platinum. The COV, it has come executing the proposal from the year 2001 with the premise of contributing to the balance between the rational exploitation of the natural resources and the conservation of the environment in the Choco. In the project they are used technical handmade characteristic of the region framed inside the mining activity and production activities are diversified in the productive family units. Those producing with the support of entities of juridical character, specify the necessary game rules for the extraction and products commercialization

  5. From green architecture to architectural green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates the topic of green architecture from an architectural point of view and not an energy point of view. The purpose of the paper is to establish a debate about the architectural language and spatial characteristics of green architecture. In this light, green becomes an adjective...... that describes the architectural exclusivity of this particular architecture genre. The adjective green expresses architectural qualities differentiating green architecture from none-green architecture. Currently, adding trees and vegetation to the building’s facade is the main architectural characteristics...... of green architecture. The paper argues that this greenification of facades is insufficient. The green is only a skin cladding the exterior envelope without having a spatial significance. Through the paper it is proposed to flip the order of words from green architecture to architectural green...

  6. Structural, thermal, and optical properties of Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped oxyhalide tellurite glasses, glass-ceramics and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass-ceramics and ceramics containing nano-crystals of different phases doped with Er3+/Yb3+ ions have been successfully prepared by heat treatment of the precursor oxyhalide glasses synthesized by the melt-quench method. X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images verify the precipitation of nano-crystals. Emission of Er3+ enhances several times when Yb3+ ion is added with the matrix. The Stark splitting and the intensity of different emission bands increase to a great extent when we approach to ceramics from glasses via glass-ceramics. The intensity of the blue and green emission bands increases much faster than the red and NIR emission bands. Intense upconversion emission observed by the naked eye has been quantified in terms of standard chromaticity diagram (CIE). Power dependence study shows that the upconversion of NIR radiation to visible radiation takes place mainly via photon avalanche (PA) process.

  7. Statistic><Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2008-01-01

    Co-organizer for and participant at the exhibition: Statistic><Ceramics The Röhsska Museum of Design and Decorative Arts; Gothenborg 5/2-16/3 2008 Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg 3/4-27/4 2008...

  8. Preparation of Metallurgical Ceramic Coatings on Steel Using a Combined Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN De-jiu; WANG Yu-lin; GU Wei-chao; XING Guang-zhong

    2004-01-01

    Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) is a novel surface technique for producing ceramic coatings on valve metals and their alloys. But this promising technique can not be used to steel directly. In this paper metallurgically wedded ceramic coatings was prepared on steel surface with a combined method of arc spraying and microarc oxidation for the first time. The results show that, adhesive strength of the arc spraying aluminum coatings to steel substrate was enhanced after induction remelting, and a metallurgically wedded region was formed between arc spraying coatings and steel substrate. After MAO, ceramic coatings was formed on aluminum coatings, and the ceramic coatings is mainly composed of α-Al2 O3 ,γ-Al2 O3 , θ-Al2 O3 and a little amorphous phase.

  9. Broadband dielectric response of AlN ceramic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna V. Brodnikovska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium nitride (AlN is considered as a substrate material for microelectronic applications. AlN ceramic composites with different amount of TiO2 (up to 4 vol.% were obtained using hot pressing at different sintering temperature from 1700 to 1900 °C. It was shown that milling of the raw AlN powder has strongly influence on sintering and improves densification. Broadband dielectric spectroscopy was used as a nondestructive method for monitoring of the ceramic microstructures. TiO2 additive affects the key properties of AlN ceramics. Thus, porosity of 0.1 %, dielectric permeability of σ = 9.7 and dielectric loss tangent of tanδ = 1.3·10-3 can be achieved if up to 2 vol.% TiO2 is added.

  10. Ceramic tubesheet design analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    A transport combustor is being commissioned at the Southern Services facility in Wilsonville, Alabama to provide a gaseous product for the assessment of hot-gas filtering systems. One of the barrier filters incorporates a ceramic tubesheet to support candle filters. The ceramic tubesheet, designed and manufactured by Industrial Filter and Pump Manufacturing Company (EF&PM), is unique and offers distinct advantages over metallic systems in terms of density, resistance to corrosion, and resistance to creep at operating temperatures above 815{degrees}C (1500{degrees}F). Nevertheless, the operational requirements of the ceramic tubesheet are severe. The tubesheet is almost 1.5 m in (55 in.) in diameter, has many penetrations, and must support the weight of the ceramic filters, coal ash accumulation, and a pressure drop (one atmosphere). Further, thermal stresses related to steady state and transient conditions will occur. To gain a better understanding of the structural performance limitations, a contract was placed with Mallett Technology, Inc. to perform a thermal and structural analysis of the tubesheet design. The design analysis specification and a preliminary design analysis were completed in the early part of 1995. The analyses indicated that modifications to the design were necessary to reduce thermal stress, and it was necessary to complete the redesign before the final thermal/mechanical analysis could be undertaken. The preliminary analysis identified the need to confirm that the physical and mechanical properties data used in the design were representative of the material in the tubesheet. Subsequently, few exploratory tests were performed at ORNL to evaluate the ceramic structural material.

  11. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  12. Fluorinated precursors of superconducting ceramics, and methods of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, Harold; Solovyov, Vyacheslav

    2008-04-22

    This invention provides a method of making a fluorinated precursor of a superconducting ceramic. The method comprises providing a solution comprising a rare earth salt, an alkaline earth metal salt and a copper salt; spraying the solution onto a substrate to provide a film-covered substrate; and heating the film-covered substrate in an atmosphere containing fluorinated gas to provide the fluorinated precursor.

  13. Application of laser radiation in decoration and marking of ceramic products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, D.; Gebel, R.; Szamałek, K.; Olszyna, A.; Marczak, J.; Sarzyński, A.; Strzelec, M.

    2013-01-01

    In cooperation with the Institute of Optoelectronics MUT, the Institute of Ceramics and Building Materials conducts work on laser decoration of ceramic products. Two methods are under development: laser activation and laser sintering. The activation method is based on change of color of specially prepared ceramic material due only to illumination by laser beam. Laser sintering is a deposition welding process in which a layer of ceramic powder is deposited on the substrate material, and the two ceramic materials are fused through the application of laser beam, in turn creating any desired color pattern. The paper describes the influence of some physical phenomena on the progress of the laser process as well as sample experimental results.

  14. Green shopping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    2011-01-01

    Findings suggesting that consumers buy “green” products, such as organic foods, for selfish reasons are usually accepted at face value. In this article, the author argues that the evidence backing this claim is questionable and that it reflects post hoc rationalizations and self-presentation biases......’s beliefs about intangible private benefits in a way that justifies (bolsters) one’s purchasing decision. A survey study among a representative sample of approximately 4,000 respondents from four European countries (Denmark, Germany, United Kingdom, and Italy) confirmed that this is exactly what “green...

  15. Synthesis, deposition and crystal growth of CZTS nanoparticles onto ceramic tiles

    OpenAIRE

    Calvet Roures, Iván; Barrachina Albert, Ester; Martí Valls, Rafael Francisco; Fraga Chiva, Diego; Stoyanova Lyubenova, Teodora; Carda Castelló, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    The work presents a simple solvothermal method for CZTS nanoparticles preparation using hexadecylamine (HDA) as a capping agent. The as-prepared CZTS powder was deposited as ink using Doctor Blade technique onto ceramic tile, as a substrate substituting the typical soda-lime glass. The as-prepared film was thermal treated at different temperatures in order to enhance the thin film crystallinity. CZTS crystal growth onto ceramic tile was obtained successfully for the first time. En el traba...

  16. GREEN TEA FESTIVAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ What is the green tea? The green tea belongs to the type of non-fermenting tea, with a quality feature of "clear tea infusion with green leaves"; this type of tea has the biggest output in China, and the basic processing procedure of the green tea is divided into three steps: heating, rubbing and drying. According to the different processing technologies, the green tea is divided into fried green tea, baked green tea, steamed green tea and dried green tea. The steamed green tea is to heat the tea by steaming; to heat the tea by pan-frying can be divided into frying, baking and drying, which is called heating by frying, heating by baking and heating by drying. West LakeLongjing, Xinyang Maojian, Bi Luochun, and Sanbeixiang belong to fried green tea; Mount Huang Maofeng, Youjiyuluo, and Luhai pekoe belong to baked green tea;Enshiyulu belongs to steamed green tea.

  17. Green shipping management

    CERN Document Server

    Lun, Y H Venus; Wong, Christina W Y; Cheng, T C E

    2016-01-01

    This book presents theory-driven discussion on the link between implementing green shipping practices (GSP) and shipping firm performance. It examines the shipping industry’s challenge of supporting economic growth while enhancing environmental performance. Consisting of nine chapters, the book covers topics such as the conceptualization of green shipping practices (GSPs), measurement scales for evaluating GSP implementation, greening capability, greening and performance relativity (GPR), green management practice, green shipping network, greening capacity, and greening propensity. In view of the increasing quest for environment protection in the shipping sector, this book provides a good reference for firms to understand and evaluate their capability in carrying out green operations on their shipping activities.

  18. Green Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patten, John

    2013-12-31

    Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

  19. Green urbanity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Fikfak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism and other culture-based types of small business, which are the leitmotif in the planning of the Europark Ruardi, are becoming the guiding motif in the spatial development of urban centres that are influenced by dynamic transformation processes. The system should build upon the exploitation of both local and regional environmental features. This would encourage the quest for special environmental features, with an emphasis on their conservation, i.e. sustainable development, and connections in a wider context.The Europark is seen as a new strategic point of the Zasavje Region (the region of the central Sava Valley, which is linked to other important points in a region relevant for tourism. Due to the "smallness" of the region and/or the proximity of such points, development can be fast and effective. The interaction of different activities in space yields endless opportunities for users, who choose their own goals and priorities in the use of space. Four theme areas of the Europark area planning are envisaged. The organisation of activities is based on the composition of the mosaic field patterns, where green fields intertwine with areas of different, existing and new, urban functions. The fields of urban and recreation programmes are connected with a network of green areas and walking trails, along which theme park settings are arranged.

  20. Microstructural properties of BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fundora C, A.; Portelles, J.J.; Siqueiros, J.M. [Posgrado en Fisica de Materiales, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada. Apartado Postal 2861, 22800 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    A microstructural study of BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics obtained by the conventional ceramic method is presented. Targets were produced to grow BaTiO{sub 3} thin films by pulsed laser deposition on Pt/Ti/Si (100) substrates. X-ray diffraction, Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-ray Photon Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to study the properties of the BaTiO{sub 3} ceramic samples and thin films, as deposited and after an annealing process. (Author)

  1. Grain boundaries in ceramics and ceramic-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, D.R.; Wolf, D.

    1986-01-01

    Three interfaces exist: the crystal-crystal grain boundary in very pure single-phase ceramics, the crystal-glass-crystal grain boundary in most single-phase and polyphase ceramics, and the ceramic-metal interface. It is needed to correlate their structure and adhesion/failure. Methods for studying the bonding, interfacial structure, and fracture and adhesion are discussed, and recommendations are given. 42 refs. (DLC)

  2. Ceramic Stereolithography: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics by Photopolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic stereolithography and related additive manufacturing methods involving photopolymerization of ceramic powder suspensions are reviewed in terms of the capabilities of current devices. The practical fundamentals of the cure depth, cure width, and cure profile are related to the optical properties of the monomer, ceramic, and photo-active components. Postpolymerization steps, including harvesting and cleaning the objects, binder burnout, and sintering, are discussed and compared with conventional methods. The prospects for practical manufacturing are discussed.

  3. An Innovative Approach for Improving the Reliability of Reticulated Porous Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An innovative approach has been developed to fabricate reticulated porous ceramics (RPCs) with uniform macrostruc-ture by using the polymeric sponge as the templates. In this approach, the coating process comprises of two stages,In the first stage, the thicker slurry was used to coat uniformly the sponge substrate. The green body was preheatedto produce a reticulated preform with enough handling strength after the sponge was burned out. In the second stage,the thinner slurry was used to coat uniformly the preform. The population of the microscopic and macroscopic flawsin the structure is reduced significantly by recoating process. A few filled cells and cell faces occur in the fabricationand the struts were thickened. A statistical evaluation by means of Weibull statistics was carried out on the bendstrength data of RPCs, which were prepared by the traditional approach and innovative approach, respectively. Theresult shows that the mechanical reliability of RPCs is improved by the innovative approach. This innovative approachis very simple and controlled easily, and will open up new technological applications for RPCs.

  4. New gelling systems to fabricate complex-shaped transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Wu, Yiquan

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare transparent ceramics with large size and complex-shapes by a new water-soluble gelling agent poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic anhydride). Alumina was used as an example of the application of the new gelling system. A stable suspension with 38vol% was prepared by ball milling. Trapped bubbles were removed before casting to obtain homogenous green bodies. The microstructure and particle distribution of alumina raw material were tested. The thermal behavior of the alumina green body was investigated, which exhibited low weight loss when compared with other gelling processes. The influence of solid loading and gelling agent addition were studied on the basis of rheological behavior of the suspension. The microstructures of alumina powders, green bodies before and after de-bindering process, were compared to understand the gelling condition between alumina particles and gelling agent.

  5. Processing of Homogeneous Zirconia-Toughened Alumina Ceramics with High Dry-Sliding Wear Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkwijk, Bas; Winnubst, Louis; Mulder, Elmer J.; Verweij, Henk

    1999-01-01

    The preparation of dense homogeneous zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) with high dry-sliding wear resistance is described. These ZTA ceramics are obtained by sintering green compacts, made by colloidal filtration of well-defined ZrO2-Al2O3 particle suspensions, for 2 h at 1400°C. The optimum solid an

  6. Green Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Rao, J. L.; Dhoble, S. J.; Kim, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    Manganese-doped LaMgAl11O19 powder has been prepared by an easy combustion method. Powder x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize the as-prepared phosphor. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of LaMgAl11O19:Mn2+ phosphor exhibits six-line hyperfine structure centered at g ≈ 1.973. The number of spins participating in resonance ( N) and the paramagnetic susceptibility ( χ) for the resonance signal at g ≈ 1.973 have been calculated as a function of temperature. The photoluminescence spectrum exhibits green emission at 516 nm, which is attributed to 4T1 → 6A1 transition of Mn2+ ions. From EPR and luminescence studies, it is observed that Mn2+ ions occupy Mg2+ sites and Mn2+ ions are located at tetrahedral sites in the prepared phosphors.

  7. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Joel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-12-10

    Transparent ceramics match or exceed the performance of single-crystal materials in laser applications, with a more-robust fabrication process. Controlling the distribution of optical dopants in transparent ceramics would allow qualitative improvements in amplifier slab design by allowing gain and loss to be varied within the material. My work aims to achieve a controlled pattern or gradient of dopant prior to sintering, in order to produce tailored ceramics.

  8. Ceramic cooling tower packings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honekamp, H.; Katzmann, A.

    1986-05-01

    No material for cooling tower packings demonstrates all the characteristics desired by the designer. The choice of a specific material must therefore always be oriented towards the limiting conditions of a specific project. Resistance to frost, combustibility and resistance to ageing may, for example, be determining requirements. Ceramic stones will find further possibilities of application in the near future due to their almost unlimited durability.

  9. Rheology of Superplastic Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Constitutive equation of rheglogy describing a phenomenological level of superplastic deformation as functional correlation between tensor components of stress and strain rate has been analyzed for the case of superplastic ceramic flow. Rheological properties of material are taken into account by means of scalar rheological coefficients of shear and volume viscosity, which are functions of temperature, effective stress (or strain rate) and density of material.

  10. Laser Micromachining of Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Sciti, Diletta; Bellosi, Alida

    2011-01-01

    Laser surface processing of ceramics is an area of considerable technological importance for several structural, tribological, optical and electronic applications. The laser beam behaves as a heat source that induces a temperature rise on the surface and within the bulk of the material. Depending on laser parameters and material characteristics, lasers can be used for fabricating microholes at designated locations, for cutting, scribing, for surface modifications In this work different types ...

  11. Self-Assembling, Flexible, Pre-Ceramic Composite Preforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Eckel, Andrew J.; Gorican, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In this innovation, light weight, high temperature, compact aerospace structures with increased design options are made possible by using self-assembling, flexible, pre-ceramic composite materials. These materials are comprised of either ceramic or carbon fiber performs, which are infiltrated with polymer precursors that convert to ceramics upon thermal exposure. The preform architecture can vary from chopped fibers formed into blankets or felt, to continuous fibers formed into a variety of 2D or 3D weaves or braids. The matrix material can also vary considerably. For demonstration purposes, a 2D carbon weave was infiltrated with a SiC polymer precursor. The green or unfired material is fabricated into its final shape while it is still pliable. It is then folded or rolled into a much more compact shape, which will occupy a smaller space. With this approach, the part remains as one continuous piece, rather than being fabricated as multiple sections, which would require numerous seals for eventual component use. The infiltrated preform can then be deployed in-situ. The component can be assembled into its final shape by taking advantage of the elasticity of the material, which permits the structure to unfold and spring into its final form under its own stored energy. The pre-ceramic composites are converted to ceramics and rigidized immediately after deployment. The final ceramic composite yields a high-temperature, high-strength material suitable for a variety of aerospace structures. The flexibility of the material, combined with its high-temperature structural capacity after rigidization, leads to a less complex component design with an increased temperature range. The collapsibility of these structures allows for larger components to be designed and used, and also offers the potential for increased vehicle performance. For the case of collapsible nozzle extensions, a larger nozzle, and thus a larger nozzle exit plane, is possible because interference with

  12. Preparation and characteristics of porous ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei SHAO; Peiping ZHANG; Liyan MA; Juanjuan LIU

    2007-01-01

    Pyrophyllite is always used for making porous ceramics. In order to design the preparation technics of porous ceramics with pyrophyllite reasonably we must know the classifications, characteristics, properties and applications of porous ceramics. The classification and characteristics of porous ceramics are reviewed in this article; and several common preparations with their advantages and disadvantages are also introduced. The authors discussed the problems existing in researching and developing process for porous ceramics, and forecasted the development prospect of porous ceramics.

  13. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roode, M. van [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  14. Green Roofs and Green Building Rating Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liaw

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental benefits for green building from the Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED and Ecology, Energy, Waste, and Health (EEWH rating systems have been extensively investigated; however, the effect of green roofs on the credit-earning mechanisms is relatively unexplored. This study is concerned with the environmental benefits of green roofs with respect to sustainability, stormwater control, energy savings, and water resources. We focused on the relationship between green coverage and the credits of the rating systems, evaluated the credits efficiency, and performed cost analysis. As an example, we used a university building in Keelung, Northern Taiwan. The findings suggest that with EEWH, the proposed green coverage is 50–75%, whereas with LEED, the proposed green coverage is 100%. These findings have implications for the application of green roofs in green building.

  15. The green building envelope: vertical greening

    OpenAIRE

    Ottelé, M.

    2011-01-01

    Planting on roofs and façades is one of the most innovative and fastest developing fields of green technologies with respect to the built environment and horticulture. This thesis is focused on vertical greening of structures and to the multi-scale benefits of vegetation. Vertical green can improve the environment in urban areas and is becoming a key design consideration in modern building developments. Vertical greening of structures offers large surfaces with vegetation and at the same time...

  16. Central Region Green Infrastructure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This Green Infrastructure data is comprised of 3 similar ecological corridor data layers ? Metro Conservation Corridors, green infrastructure analysis in counties...

  17. Process Development of Porcelain Ceramic Material with Binder Jetting Process for Dental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaji, Hadi; Zhang, Shanshan; Lassell, Austin; Zandinejad, Amirali; Yang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Custom ceramic structures possess significant potentials in many applications such as dentistry and aerospace where extreme environments are present. Specifically, highly customized geometries with adequate performance are needed for various dental prostheses applications. This paper demonstrates the development of process and post-process parameters for a dental porcelain ceramic material using binder jetting additive manufacturing (AM). Various process parameters such as binder amount, drying power level, drying time and powder spread speed were studied experimentally for their effect on geometrical and mechanical characteristics of green parts. In addition, the effects of sintering and printing parameters on the qualities of the densified ceramic structures were also investigated experimentally. The results provide insights into the process-property relationships for the binder jetting AM process, and some of the challenges of the process that need to be further characterized for the successful adoption of the binder jetting technology in high quality ceramic fabrications are discussed.

  18. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Khiet; Ward, Terence G.; Mann, Brooks S.; Yankoski, Edward P.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  19. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana, E-mail: a.zuzuarregui@nanogune.eu; Gregorczyk, Keith E. [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Coto, Borja; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier [IK4-Tekniker, Iñaki Goenaga 5, 20600 Eibar (Spain); Rodríguez, Jorge [Torresol Energy (SENER Group), Avda. de Zugazarte 61, 48930 Las Arenas (Spain); Knez, Mato [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); IKERBASQUE Basque Foundation for Science, Maria Diaz de Haro 3, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-08-10

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  20. The green building envelope: vertical greening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottelé, M.

    2011-01-01

    Planting on roofs and façades is one of the most innovative and fastest developing fields of green technologies with respect to the built environment and horticulture. This thesis is focused on vertical greening of structures and to the multi-scale benefits of vegetation. Vertical green can improve

  1. Carbon sequestration potential of extensive green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getter, Kristin L; Rowe, D Bradley; Robertson, G Philip; Cregg, Bert M; Andresen, Jeffrey A

    2009-10-01

    Two studies were conducted with the objective of quantifying the carbon storage potential of extensive green roofs. The first was performed on eight roofs in Michigan and four roofs in Maryland, ranging from 1 to 6 years in age. All 12 green roofs were composed primarily of Sedum species, and substrate depths ranged from 2.5 to 12.7 cm. Aboveground plant material was harvested in the fall of 2006. On average, these roofs stored 162 g C x m(-2) in aboveground biomass. The second study was conducted on a roof in East Lansing, MI. Twenty plots were established on 21 April 2007 with a substrate depth of 6.0 cm. In addition to a substrate only control, the other plots were sown with a single species of Sedum (S. acre, S. album, S. kamtshaticum, or S. spurium). Species and substrate depth represent typical extensive green roofs in the United States. Plant material and substrate were harvested seven times across two growing seasons. Results at the end of the second year showed that aboveground plant material storage varied by species, ranging from 64 g C x m(-2) (S. acre) to 239 g C x m(-2) (S. album), with an average of 168 g C x m(-2). Belowground biomass ranged from 37 g C x m(-2) (S. acre) to 185 g C x m(-2) (S. kamtschaticum) and averaged 107 g C x m(-2). Substrate carbon content averaged 913 g C x m(-2), with no species effect, which represents a sequestration rate of 100 g C x m(-2) over the 2 years of this study. The entire extensive green roof system sequestered 375 g C x m(-2) in above- and belowground biomass and substrate organic matter.

  2. Green nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoff B.

    2011-10-01

    Nanotechnology, in particular nanophotonics, is proving essential to achieving green outcomes of sustainability and renewable energy at the scales needed. Coatings, composites and polymeric structures used in windows, roof and wall coatings, energy storage, insulation and other components in energy efficient buildings will increasingly involve nanostructure, as will solar cells. Nanostructures have the potential to revolutionize thermoelectric power and may one day provide efficient refrigerant free cooling. Nanomaterials enable optimization of optical, opto-electrical and thermal responses to this urgent task. Optical harmonization of material responses to environmental energy flows involves (i) large changes in spectral response over limited wavelength bands (ii) tailoring to environmental dynamics. The latter includes engineering angle of incidence dependencies and switchable (or chromogenic) responses. Nanomaterials can be made at sufficient scale and low enough cost to be both economic and to have a high impact on a short time scale. Issues to be addressed include human safety and property changes induced during manufacture, handling and outdoor use. Unexpected bonuses have arisen in this work, for example the savings and environmental benefits of cool roofs extend beyond the more obvious benefit of reduced heat flows from the roof into the building.

  3. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  4. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  5. Lightweight high performance ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Stephen D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-02

    A sintered ceramic composition includes at least 50 wt. % boron carbide and at least 0.01 wt. % of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu, the sintered ceramic composition being characterized by a density of at least 90% of theoretical density.

  6. Ceramic thin films on plastics: a versatile transfer process for large area as well as patterned coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuka, Hiromitsu; Fukui, Takafumi; Takahashi, Mitsuru; Uchiyama, Hiroaki; Tsuboi, Shohei

    2012-12-01

    A versatile technique for fabricating ceramic thin films on plastics has been proposed. The technique comprises (i) the deposition of a gel film by spin- or dip-coating on a silicon substrate coated beforehand with a release layer, (ii) the firing of the gel film into a ceramic film, and (iii) its transfer onto plastics by melting or softening the plastics surface. Reflective anatase and electrically conductive indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films were prepared on acrylic resin and polycarbonate substrates. Patterned ITO thin films could also be fabricated on plastics by using a mother silicon substrate with periodic grooves. PMID:23211312

  7. Development of metal-coated ceramic anodes for molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khandkar, A.C.; Elangovan, S.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1990-03-01

    This report documents the developmental efforts on metal coating of various ceramic substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and LiFeO{sub 2}) and the critical issues associated with fabricating anodes using metal-coated LiAlO{sub 2} substrates. Electroless Ni and Cu coating technology was developed to achieve complete metal coverage on LiAlO{sub 2} powder substrates. Metal coated SrTiO{sub 3} powders were fabricated into anodes by a process identical to that reported in the GE literature. Microstructural examination revealed that the grains of the ceramic had fused together, with the metal having dewetted from the surface of the ceramic. Alternate substrates that might allow for better wetting of the metal on the ceramic such as LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} were identified. Cu/Ni-coated (50:50 mol ratio, 50 w/o metal loading) LiFeO{sub 2} anodes were optimized to meet the MCFC anode specifications. Metal-coated gamma-LiAlO{sub 2} substrates were also developed. By using suitable chemical surface modification methods, the gamma-UAlO{sub 2} substrate surface may be modified to allow a stable metal coated anode to be fabricated. Creep testing of the metal coated ceramic anodes were conducted at IGT. It was determined that the predominant creep mechanism is due to particle rearrangement. The anode porosity, and mean pore size had significant effect on the creep of the anode. Lower porosity and pore size consistent with performance criteria are desired to reduce creep. Lower metal loading with uniformity of coverage will result in lower creep behavior of the anode. Of the two substrates evaluated, LiFeO{sub 2} in general exhibited lower creep which was attributed to superior metal adhesion.

  8. Development of metal-coated ceramic anodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khandkar, A.C.; Elangovan, S.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1990-03-01

    This report documents the developmental efforts on metal coating of various ceramic substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and LiFeO{sub 2}) and the critical issues associated with fabricating anodes using metal-coated LiAlO{sub 2} substrates. Electroless Ni and Cu coating technology was developed to achieve complete metal coverage on LiAlO{sub 2} powder substrates. Metal coated SrTiO{sub 3} powders were fabricated into anodes by a process identical to that reported in the GE literature. Microstructural examination revealed that the grains of the ceramic had fused together, with the metal having dewetted from the surface of the ceramic. Alternate substrates that might allow for better wetting of the metal on the ceramic such as LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} were identified. Cu/Ni-coated (50:50 mol ratio, 50 w/o metal loading) LiFeO{sub 2} anodes were optimized to meet the MCFC anode specifications. Metal-coated gamma-LiAlO{sub 2} substrates were also developed. By using suitable chemical surface modification methods, the gamma-UAlO{sub 2} substrate surface may be modified to allow a stable metal coated anode to be fabricated. Creep testing of the metal coated ceramic anodes were conducted at IGT. It was determined that the predominant creep mechanism is due to particle rearrangement. The anode porosity, and mean pore size had significant effect on the creep of the anode. Lower porosity and pore size consistent with performance criteria are desired to reduce creep. Lower metal loading with uniformity of coverage will result in lower creep behavior of the anode. Of the two substrates evaluated, LiFeO{sub 2} in general exhibited lower creep which was attributed to superior metal adhesion.

  9. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  10. A field study to evaluate the impact of different factors on the nutrient pollutant concentrations in green roof runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Chenrui; Zhang, Xinbo; Wang, Jianghai

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of different factors on the nutrient pollutant concentrations in green roof runoff and to provide reference data for the engineering design of dual substrate layer green roofs. The data were collected from eight different trays under three kinds of artificial rains. The results showed that except for total phosphorus, dual substrate layer green roofs behaved as a sink for most of the nutrient pollutants (significant at p green roof and the depth of the adsorption substrates. Compared with the influence of the substrates, the influence of the plant density and drainage systems was small.

  11. A field study to evaluate the impact of different factors on the nutrient pollutant concentrations in green roof runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Chenrui; Zhang, Xinbo; Wang, Jianghai

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of different factors on the nutrient pollutant concentrations in green roof runoff and to provide reference data for the engineering design of dual substrate layer green roofs. The data were collected from eight different trays under three kinds of artificial rains. The results showed that except for total phosphorus, dual substrate layer green roofs behaved as a sink for most of the nutrient pollutants (significant at p green roof and the depth of the adsorption substrates. Compared with the influence of the substrates, the influence of the plant density and drainage systems was small. PMID:24355859

  12. Glass, Ceramics, and Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies of plutonium in glass and ceramics have taken place in the thirty years covered by this book. These studies have led to a substantial understanding, arising from fundamental research of actinides in solids and research and development in three technical fields: immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex and, most recently, the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities

  13. Modified-starch Consolidation of Alumina Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Chenhui; WANG Yanmin; YE Jiandong; HUANG Yun

    2008-01-01

    The alumina ceramics with the homogeneous microstructure and the higher density were fabricated via the modified-starch consolidation process by 1.0 wt%of a modified starch as a consolidator/binder.The swelling behavior of the modified oxidized tapioca starch was analyzed by optical microscope,and two other corn starches(common corn starch and high amylose COrn starch)were also analyzed for comparison.The modified starch used as a binder for the consolidation swelled at about 55℃.began to gelatinize at 65℃ and then was completely gelatinized at 75℃.But the corn starches could not be completely gelatinized even at 80℃for 1 h.The high-strength green bodies(10.6 MPa)with the complex shapes were produced.The green bodies were sintered without any binder burnout procedure at 1700℃and a relative density of 95.3% was obtained for the sintered bodies,which is similar to that of the sintered sample formed by conventional slip casting.In addition,the effect of temperature on the apparent viscosity of the starch/alumina slurry in the process was investigated,and the corresponding mechanism for the starch consolidation was discussed.

  14. Mechanical behavior of porous ceramic disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical behavior of green and sintered porous ceramic materials, obtained by processing control, in relation to the microstructure developed was studied. Disks in green state were prepared by direct thermal consolidation of aqueous suspensions of kaolin, talc and alumina (preliminary mixture of cordierite) with the addition of different starches as consolidating/binding agents and as formers of pores at high temperature. Commercial kaolin (C-80 washed kaolin, Piedra Grande S.A., Argentina), micronized talc (Talc 40, China), calcinated alumina (A2G ALCOA, USA) and commercial potato, manioc, modified potato and corn starches were used as raw materials. The preliminary ceramic mixture was prepared based on the composition in oxides of the ceramic raw materials, in a relationship that was as close as possible to stoichiometric cordierite. Aqueous suspensions of the powders (65% solids; 0.5% sodium naphtolenosulfonate; 1% Dolapix with 17% of each kind of starch were prepared by intensive mechanical mixing, homogenization (ball mills, 2h) and extracting the air with vacuum 20 min. Disks were prepared (diameter=20-30 mm; thickness=3-4 mm) by thermal consolidation of the suspensions in steel molds at the maximum swelling factor temperature (Tms) for each starch (75- 85oC) for 4h and, later drying at 50oC, 12h. The porous materials of cordierite were obtained by calcination and reaction-sintering using a controlled thermal cycle: 1oC/min up to 650oC, 2h; 3oC/min up to 1330oC, 4h and 5oC/min to room temperature. The characterization of the porous materials in green and sintered state was done by measuring density and apparent porosity, distribution of pore sizes and SEM. The mechanical resistance of the materials in green and sintered state was evaluated in diametrical compression (Instron universal testing machine servo hydraulic model 8501), in position control (0.1-0.2 mm/min) with a statistical number of test pieces, at room air temperature. The mechanical

  15. Green piezoelectric for autonomous smart textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, E.; Borsa, C. J.; Briand, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the fabrication of Rochelle salt based piezoelectric textiles are shown. Structures composed of fibers and Rochelle salt are easily produced using green processes. Both manufacturing and the material itself are really efficient in terms of environmental impact, considering the fabrication processes and the material resources involved. Additionally Rochelle salt is biocompatible. In this green paradigm, active sensing or actuating textiles are developed. Thus processing method and piezoelectric properties have been studied: (1) pure crystals are used as acoustic actuator, (2) fabrication of the textile-based composite is detailed, (3) converse effective d33 is evaluated and compared to lead zirconate titanate ceramic. The utility of textile-based piezoelectric merits its use in a wide array of applications.

  16. Plasma synthesis of high temperature ceramic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I.G.; Monteiro, O.R.

    1998-11-01

    Thin films of alumina, chromia, mullite, yttria and zirconia have been synthesized using a plasma-based method called metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (Mepiiid)--a highly versatile plasma deposition technique with ion energy control. Monolithic films (a single ceramic component) and multilayer films (individual layers of different ceramic materials) were formed. The films were characterized for their composition and structure in a number of different ways, and the high temperature performance of the films was explored, particularly for their ability to maintain their integrity and adhesion when subjected to repetitive high temperature thermal cycling up 1100 C. We found that the films retain their adhesion and quality without any apparent degradation with time, even after a large number of cycles; (the tests were extended out to a total of 40 cycles each of 24 hours duration). After repetitive high temperature thermal cycling, the film-substrate adhesion was greater than {approx}70 Mpa, the instrumental limit of measurement, and the interface toughness was approximately 0.8 MPa m{sup 1/2}.

  17. Fast Measurements Of Thermal Diffusivities Of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marnell; Goldstein, Howard E.

    1988-01-01

    Temperature rises of samples compared with reference sample. Apparatus quickly measures thermal diffusivities of ceramics at high temperatures. Produces data on relative thermal diffusivities of as many as six ceramic specimens per hour. Thermal-diffusivity tester makes it easy to determine thermal diffusivities of ceramics. Pronounced effects of processing parameters on thermal properties of ceramics evaluated quickly.

  18. Entwicklung und Charakterisierung eines metallischen Substrats für eine nanostrukturierte, keramische Gastrennmembran

    OpenAIRE

    Brands, K.

    2010-01-01

    In order to minimize the further increase of CO2-content in the atmosphere, efforts are made to separate and store CO2 from exhaust gases of fossil power plants. Beside well-established separation techniques like chemical scrubber, the application of membrane technology is intensively investigated. One focus of this thesis is the development of metal supported substrates for microporous ceramic gas separation membranes, which are expected to have a higher mechanical stability than ceram...

  19. Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Nuclear Waste Container Evaluated in Simulated Ground Water at 90?C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C

    2004-03-31

    Ceramic materials have been considered as corrosion resistant coatings for nuclear waste containers. Their suitability can be derived from the fully oxidized state for selected metal oxides. Several types of ceramic coatings applied to plain carbon steel substrates by thermal spray techniques have been exposed to 90 C simulated ground water for nearly 6 years. In some cases no apparent macroscopic damage such as coating spallation was observed in coatings. Thermal spray processes examined in this work included plasma spray, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF), and Detonation Gun. Some thermal spray coatings have demonstrated superior corrosion protection for the plain carbon steel substrate. In particular the HVOF and Detonation Gun thermal spray processes produced coatings with low connected porosity, which limited the growth rate of corrosion products. It was also demonstrated that these coatings resisted spallation of the coating even when an intentional flaw (which allowed for corrosion of the carbon steel substrate underneath the ceramic coating) was placed in the coating. A model for prediction of the corrosion protection provided by ceramic coatings is presented. The model includes the effect of the morphology and amount of the porosity within the thermal spray coating and provides a prediction of the exposure time needed to produce a crack in the ceramic coating.

  20. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1998-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  1. Structure and Properties Characterization of Ceramic Coatings Produced on Steel Using a Combined Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN De-jiu; WANG Yu-lin; GU Wei-chao; XING Guang-zhong

    2004-01-01

    Metallurgically bonded ceramic coatings were prepared on a steel surface with a combined method of arc spraying and micro-arc oxidation for the first time. Coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Point and line distribution of elements of the ceramic coatings were determined using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Coatings abrasive wear resistance, corrosion resistance and hot impact property were assessed respectively. The property test results show that metallurgically bonded ceramic coatings were formed on aluminum coatings and the ceramic coatings is mainly composed of α-Al2O3、γ-Al2O3、θ-Al2O3 and a little amorphous. The coatings possess excellent abrasive wear, corrosion and hot shock resistance, which can in part be attributed to the gradual distribution of different phases from surface to the substrate.

  2. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Ceramic/Metal Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jin-sheng; JIANG Bing; LIU Jie; HUANG Shi-yong

    2003-01-01

    The ceramic/metal gradient thermal barrier coatings (CMGTBCs) which combined the conceptions of thermal barrier coatings ( TBG ) and functional gradient materials ( FGMs ) are investigated. The structure model studied in this paper is a general model which includes four different layers: pure ceramic layer , ceramic/metal gradient layer, pure metal layer, and substrate layer. The microstructures of gradient layer have different ceramics and metal volume fraction profile along with the direction of thickness. The profile function used to describe the gradient microstructures can be expressed in power-law or polynomial expression. The mechanical properties of CMGTBCs are obtained by means of microscopic mechanics. As special cases, the interactive solutions are given by Mori- Tanaka method, and the non- interactive solutions by dilute solution. The Young's modulus calculated by these methods are compared with those by other methods , e g, the rule of mixtures.

  3. Structure and Properties Characterization of Ceramic Coatings Produced on Steel Using a Combined Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENDe-jiu; WANGYu-lin; GUWei-chao; XINGGuang-zhong

    2004-01-01

    Metallurgically bonded ceramic coatings were prepared on a steel surface with a combined method of arc spraying and micro-arc oxidation for the first time. Coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Point and line distribution of elements of the ceramic coatings were determined using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Coatings abrasive wear resistance, corrosion resistance and hot impact property were assessed respectively. The property test results show that metallurgically bonded ceramic coatings were formed on aluminum coatings and the ceramic coatings is mainly composed of α-Al2O3, γ-Al2O3, θ-Al2O3 and a little amorphous. The coatings possess excellent abrasive wear, corrosion and hot shock resistance, which can in part be attributed to the gradual distribution of different phases from surface to the substrate.

  4. Study of Direct Bonding Ceramics with Metal Using Sn2La Solder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Koleňák

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the direct bonding of ceramic materials, mainly Al2O3 and selected metals, with primary attention given to Cu substrate. Soldering was performed with Sn-based solder alloyed with 2% La. We found that the bond formation between Sn2La solder and Al2O3 occurs at the activation of lanthanum phases in solder by ultrasound. Lanthanum in the solder becomes oxidised in air during the soldering process. However, due to ultrasonic activation, the lanthanum particles are distributed to the boundary with ceramic material. A uniformly thin layer containing La, 1.5 µm in thickness, is formed on the boundary with Al2O3 material, ensuring both wetting and joint formation. The shear strength with Al2O3 ceramics is 7.5 MPa. Increased strength to 13.5 MPa was observed with SiC ceramics.

  5. PVD and CVD gradient coatings on sintered carbides and sialon tool ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main objective of the work is to investigate the structure and properties of multilayer gradient coatings produced in PVD and CVD processes on sintered carbides and on sialon ceramics, and to define the influence of the properties of the coatings such as microhardness, adhesion, thickness and size of grains on the applicable properties of cutting edges covered by such coatings.Design/methodology/approach: The investigation studies pertaining to the following have been carried out: the structures of the substrates and coatings with the application of transmission electron microscopy; the structure and topography of coating surfaces with the use of electron scanning microscopy; chemical composition of the coatings using the GDOES and EDS methods; phase composition of the coatings using X-ray diffraction and grazing incident X-ray diffraction technique (GIXRD; grain size of the investigated coatings using Scherrer’s method; properties of the coatings including thickness, microhardness, adhesion and roughness; properties of the operating coatings in cutting trials. The models of artificial neural networks have been worked out which involve the dependencies between the durability of the cutting edge and properties of the coatings.Findings: Good adhesion of the coatings to the substrate from sintered carbides is connected with the diffusive mixing of the components of the coating and substrate. In the case of PVD coatings obtained on sialon ceramics, the highest adhesion to the substrate (Lc=53-112 N has been demonstrated by the coatings containing the AlN phase of the hexagonal lattice having the same type of atomic (covalence bond in the coating as in the ceramic substrate. The damage mechanism of the investigated coatings depends to a high degree on their adhesion to the substrate. The durability of cutting edges covered by the investigated coatings depends principally on the adhesion of the coatings to the substrate, and to a lesser

  6. Aluminium surface treatment with ceramic phases using diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labisz, K.; Tański, T.; Brytan, Z.; Pakieła, W.; Wiśniowski, M.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic particles powder feeding into surface layer of engineering metal alloy is a well-known and widely used technique. New approach into the topic is to obtain finely distributed nano-sized particles involved in the aluminium matrix using the traditional laser technology. In this paper are presented results of microstructure investigation of cast aluminium-silicon-copper alloys surface layer after heat treatment and alloying with ceramic carbides of WC and ZrO2 using high-power diode laser. The surface layer was specially prepared for the reason of reducing the reflectivity, which is the main problem in the up-to-date metal matrix composites production. With scanning electron microscopy, it was possible to determine the deformation process and distribution of WC and ZrO2 ceramic powder phase. Structure of the surface after laser treatment changes, revealing three zones—remelting zone, heat-affected zone and transition zone placed over the Al substrate. The structural changes of ceramic powder, its distribution and morphology as well as microstructure of the matrix material influence on functional properties, especially wear resistance and hardness of the achieved layer, were investigated.

  7. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop trademark, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research

  8. Needs assessment for manufacturing ceramic gas turbine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.; McSpadden, S.B.; Morris, T.O.; Pasto, A.E.

    1995-11-01

    An assessment of needs for the manufacturing of ceramic gas turbine components was undertaken to provide a technical basis for planning R&D activities to support DOE`s gas turbine programs. The manufacturing processes for ceramic turbine engine components were examined from design through final inspection and testing. The following technology needs were identified: Concurrent engineering early in the design phase to develop ceramic components that are more readily manufacturable. Additional effort in determining the boundaries of acceptable design dimensions and tolerances through experimental and/or analytical means. Provision, by the designer, of a CAD based model of the component early in the design cycle. Standardization in the way turbine components are dimensioned and toleranced, and in the way component datum features are defined. Rapid means of fabricating hard tooling, including intelligent systems for design of tooling and rapid prototyping of tooling. Determination of process capabilities by manufacturing significant numbers of parts. Development of more robust ceramic manufacturing processes which are tolerant of process variations. Development of intelligent processing as a means of controlling yield and quality of components. Development of computer models of key manufacturing steps, such as green forming to reduce the number of iterations required to manufacture intolerance components. Development of creep feed or other low-damage precision grinding for finish machining of components. Improved means of fixturing components for finish machining. Fewer and lower-cost final inspection requirements. Standard procedures, including consistent terminology and analytical software for dimensional inspection of components. Uniform data requirements from the US turbine engine companies. An agreed-upon system of naming ceramic materials and updating the name when changes have been made.

  9. Dynamically compacted all-ceramic lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jak, Michiel J. G.; Ooms, Frans G. B.; Kelder, Erik M.; Legerstee, Waiter J.; Schoonman, Joop; Weisenburger, Alfons

    This paper deals with a cell design and a unique manufacturing process for all solid-state lithium-ion batteries. Detailed analyses of the manufacturing of the components for such a battery and the compaction of the green battery are presented. The electrodes were made of coatings of LiMn 2O 4 on metal foils. The electrolyte was a free-standing foil of the ceramic electrolyte Li-doped BPO 4 in a polymer matrix. The different layers were wound and compacted by using magnetic pulse compaction. Several characteristics of the compacted batteries are presented.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Gel-cast Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckman, S. L.; Balss, K. M.; Waterfield, L. G.; Jendrzejczyk, J. A.; Raptis, A. C.

    1997-01-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are being employed to aid in the development of advanced near-net-shape gel-cast ceramic composites. MRI is a unique nondestructive evaluation tool that provides information on both the chemical and physical properties of materials. In this effort, MRI imaging was performed to monitor the drying of porous green-state alumina - methacrylamide-N.N`-methylene bisacrylamide (MAM-MBAM) polymerized composite specimens. Studies were performed on several specimens as a function of humidity and time. The mass and shrinkage of the specimens were also monitored and correlated with the water content.

  11. Fundamental studies of ceramic/metal interfacial reactions at elevated temperatures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2000-12-14

    This work characterizes the interfaces resulting from exposing oxide and non-oxide ceramic substrates to zirconium metal and stainless steel-zirconium containing alloys. The ceramic/metal systems together were preheated at about 600 C and then the temperatures were increased to the test maximum temperature, which exceeded 1800 C, in an atmosphere of high purity argon. Metal samples were placed onto ceramic substrates, and the system was heated to elevated temperatures past the melting point of the metallic specimen. After a short stay at the peak temperature, the system was cooled to room temperature and examined. The chemical changes across the interface and other microstructural developments were analyzed with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). This paper reports on the condition of the interfaces in the different systems studied and describes possible mechanisms influencing the microstructure.

  12. Wear prediction of ceramic-on-ceramic hip artificial joints

    OpenAIRE

    Askari, E; Flores, Paulo; Dabirrahmani, D.; Appleyard, R.

    2015-01-01

    Wear can influence the lifetime and performance of implants and has been found to be a key factor in primary failure of artificial hip joints. The present study aims to present a spatial multibody dynamic model to predict wear in ceramic-on-ceramic hip implants. The problem was formulated by developing a spatial multibody dynamic model of a hip prosthesis taking three-dimensional physiological loading and motion of the human body into account. Then, the Archard wear model was inte...

  13. Ceramic material suitable for repair of a space vehicle component in a microgravity and vacuum environment, method of making same, and method of repairing a space vehicle component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium diboride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  14. Provenance studies of Sgraffiato and Late Green Glazed wares from Siraf, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of neutron activation analyses of 23 elements in ceramic archaeological specimens are given. Various wares are divided into the following categories: early Sgraffiato, late Sgraffiato, late Green A, late Green B, and Samarra ware. Results are given on the following elements: Al, Ca, Dy, Mn, Na, K, U, Sm, La, Ti, Lu, Co, Sc, Fe, Cs, Cr, Ni, Eu, Ce, Hf, Ta, Th, and Yb. (JGB)

  15. Influence of the PVD and CVD technologies on the residual macro- stresses and functional properties of the coated tool ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; S. Skrzypek; D. Pakuła; J. Mikuła; A. Křiž

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this work is to compare the macro-stresses as well as mechanical and functional properties of the PVD and CVD coatings deposited on oxide and nitride ceramics tool.Design/methodology/approach: In the paper the residual macro-stresses of PVD and CVD coatings deposited on tool ceramics substrates, measured with the application of the grazing angle X-ray diffraction geometry are compared in relation to the fundamental mechanical properties like hardness and adhesion.Findings...

  16. A High Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor Based on Alumina Ceramic for in Situ Measurement at 600 °C

    OpenAIRE

    Qiulin Tan; Chen Li; Jijun Xiong; Pinggang Jia; Wendong Zhang; Jun Liu; Chenyang Xue; Yingping Hong; Zhong Ren; Tao Luo

    2014-01-01

    In response to the growing demand for in situ measurement of pressure in high-temperature environments, a high temperature capacitive pressure sensor is presented in this paper. A high-temperature ceramic material-alumina is used for the fabrication of the sensor, and the prototype sensor consists of an inductance, a variable capacitance, and a sealed cavity integrated in the alumina ceramic substrate using a thick-film integrated technology. The experimental results show that the proposed s...

  17. Selected Properties Of Thermally Sprayed Oxide Ceramic Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czupryński A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study on exploitation properties of flame sprayed ceramic coatings produced by oxide ceramic material in the form of powder on the aluminum oxide Al2O3 matrix with 3% titanium oxide TiO2 addition and also on the zirconium oxide (ZrO2 matrix with 30% calcium oxide (CaO on the substrate of unalloyed structural steel of S235JR grade. As a primer powder, metallic powder on the base of Ni-Al-Mo has been applied. Plates with dimensions of 5×200×300 mm and also front surfaces of ∅40×50 mm cylinders have been flame sprayed. Spraying of primer coating has been done using RotoTec 80 torch and external specific coating has been done with CastoDyn DS 8000 torch. Investigations of coating properties are based on metallography tests, phase composition research, measurement of microhardness, coating adhesion to the ground research (acc. to EN 582:1996 standard, abrasive wear resistance (acc. to ASTM G65 standard and erosion wear resistance (acc. to ASTM G76-95 standard and thermal stroke study. Performed tests have shown that the flame spraying with 97%Al2O3 powder containing 3% TiO2 and also by the powder based on zirconium oxide (ZrO2 containing 30% calcium oxide (CaO performed in a wide range of technological parameters allow to obtain high quality ceramic coatings with thickness up to ca. 500 μm on a steel substrate. The primer coating sprayed with the Ni-Al-Mo powder to the steel substrate and external coatings sprayed has the of mechanical bonding character. The coatings are characterized by high adhesion to the substrate and also high erosion and abrasive wear resistance and the resistance for cyclic thermal stroke.

  18. Graded plasma spraying of premixed metalceramic powders on metallic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, C. R. C.; Trevisan, R.-E.

    1997-06-01

    The mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of ceramics and metals and the differential stresses it causes at the interface create problems in metal to ceramic joining. Research has been con-ducted to solve this problem in thermal barrier coating technology. Previous studies have considered met-al-ceramic multilayers or graded-coatings, which include a metallic bond coat. In this study, a graded plasma-sprayed metal-ceramic coating is developed using the deposition of premixed metal and ceramic powders without the conventional metallic bond coat. Influences of thickness variations, number, and composition of the layers are investigated. Coatings are prepared by atmospheric plasma-spraying on In-conel 718 superalloy substrates. Ni-Cr-Al and ZrO2 -8 % Y2O3 powders are used for plasma spraying. Ad-hesive and cohesive strength of the coatings are determined. The concentration profile of the elements is determined by x-ray energy-dispersive analysis. The microstructure and morphology of the coatings are investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results show that the mixed metal-ce-ramic coating obtained with the deposition of premixed powders is homogeneous. The morphology and microstructure of the coatings are considered satisfactory.

  19. Creep in electronic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  20. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  1. Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1997-04-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  2. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  3. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  4. The ceramic gas electron multiplier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosson, Amir; Fleck, Ivor [Siegen University, Siegen (Germany); Collaboration: LCTPC-Deutschland-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) has been proven to fulfill the demands of high energy physics experiments. Effective gain and resistance to the electrical sparks are significant issues to be investigated. A new type of GEM, made out of ceramic, has been produced and results from measurements with this type of GEM are presented. Advantages of ceramic material are its very good stability versus change in temperature and its electrical properties. Using Ar-CO{sub 2}(80-20 %) gas mixture and a X-ray source, the gain of the ceramic GEMs is measured and compared with the one for CERN GEMs. These results assure the possibility of using the ceramic GEMs for high-luminosity experiments.

  5. Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Lim, Hankwon; Drnevich, Raymond

    2010-08-05

    Phase I was a technoeconomic feasibility study that defined the process scheme for the integrated ceramic membrane system for hydrogen production and determined the plan for Phase II. The hydrogen production system is comprised of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). Two process options were evaluated: 1) Integrated OTM-HTM reactor – in this configuration, the HTM was a ceramic proton conductor operating at temperatures up to 900°C, and 2) Sequential OTM and HTM reactors – in this configuration, the HTM was assumed to be a Pd alloy operating at less than 600°C. The analysis suggested that there are no technical issues related to either system that cannot be managed. The process with the sequential reactors was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and more likely to be commercialized in a shorter time than the single reactor. Therefore, Phase II focused on the sequential reactor system, specifically, the second stage, or the HTM portion. Work on the OTM portion was conducted in a separate program. Phase IIA began in February 2003. Candidate substrate materials and alloys were identified and porous ceramic tubes were produced and coated with Pd. Much effort was made to develop porous substrates with reasonable pore sizes suitable for Pd alloy coating. The second generation of tubes showed some improvement in pore size control, but this was not enough to get a viable membrane. Further improvements were made to the porous ceramic tube manufacturing process. When a support tube was successfully coated, the membrane was tested to determine the hydrogen flux. The results from all these tests were used to update the technoeconomic analysis from Phase I to confirm that the sequential membrane reactor system can potentially be a low-cost hydrogen supply option when using an existing membrane on a larger scale. Phase IIB began in October 2004 and focused on demonstrating an integrated HTM/water gas shift (WGS) reactor to

  6. The physical chemistry of nucleation of sub-micrometer non-oxide ceramic powders via sub-oxide vapor-phase reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine ceramic powders (< 500 nm) exhibit exceptional physical and mechanical properties in engineered structural ceramics. The production of fine powders, in particular the non-oxide ceramics, via a cheaper route than the organic solvent route has been rather elusive. This paper examines the physical chemistry of sub-oxide vapor-phase reduction reaction for the nucleation of non-oxide ceramic phase. Well known vapor species eg SiO and BO in the production of technical ceramic powders (SiC, BN) are particularly discussed for understanding the nucleation process of SiC and BN ceramic phases respectively. The regimes of partial pressures and temperatures are particularly identified. The calculated nucleation rate as a function of the temperature is compared with the experimental results on powder morphology. The production of amorphous and nanocrystalline h-BN powders is discussed in the context of substrate structure and thermodynamic parameters

  7. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  8. Novel Synthesis of Ceramic Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.L.Choy

    2007-01-01

    1 Results There is an increasing demand for producing high performance ceramic films at a reduced cost. This paper describes an innovative and cost-effective method of producing nanostructured ceramic films based on Electrostatic Spray Assisted Vapour Deposition (ESAVD). ESAVD is a variant of chemical vapour deposition process which involves spraying atomised charged precursor droplets across an electric field where the precursor undergo decomposition and heterogeneous chemical reaction near the heat...

  9. LIGHTWEIGHT GREEN ROOF SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applying a Lightweight Green Roof System to a building can achieve in managing storm water runoff, decreasing heat gain, yielding energy savings, and mitigating the heat island effect. Currently, Most green roof systems are considerably heavy and require structural reinforceme...

  10. Green Connections Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    City of San Francisco — Green Connections aims to increase access to parks, open spaces, and the waterfront by envisioning a network of ���green connectors�۪ ��� city streets that will be...

  11. Ceramic materials and growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgushi, H.; Yoshikawa, T.; Okumura, M.; Nakajima, H.; Takakura, Y. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orhtopaedic Surgery; Dohi, Y. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Public Health; Noshi, T.; Ikeuchi, M. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Recently, many types of growth factors have been purified and used for promoting cell differentiation cascade. The activity of growth factors can be detected in vitro such as culture condition. However, the activity is difficult to detect when these factors are locally administered in vivo, because these dissipate soon after the administration. In order to retain growth factors in local milieu, these can be incorporated with biocompatible porous ceramic materials. Such ceramic/factors composites when implanted in vivo, can trigger certain types of cell differentiation cascade resulted in new tissue formation and tissue regeneration. The paper describes the ceramic / growth factors composites especially hydroxyapatite ceramic (HA) / bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) composite to induce osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. The HA/BMP composite supported the osteoblastic differentiation on the HA surface and finally resulted in bone bonding to the HA. When the marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were impregnated in pore areas of HA ceramics, the composites showed more and rapid bone formation than the HA/BMP and HA/MSCs composite, indicating the synergistic effect of BMP and MSCs. These findings indicate the importance of ceramic surface to evoke osteoblastic differentiation as well as to capture the molecules of growth factors for the cell differentiation. (orig.)

  12. EPA's Green Roof Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a presentation on the basics of green roof technology. The presentation highlights some of the recent ORD research projects on green roofs and provices insight for the end user as to the benefits for green roof technology. It provides links to currently available EPA re...

  13. Show Me the Green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Gone are the days when green campus initiatives were a balm to the soul and a drain on the wallet. Today's environmental initiatives are all about saving lots of green--in every sense of the word. The environmental benefits of green campus projects--whether wind turbines or better insulation--are pretty clear. Unfortunately, in today's…

  14. Green roof Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Gatt, Antoine; Duca, Edward

    2015-01-01

    In Malta, buildings cover one third of the Island, leaving greenery in the dirt track. Green roofs are one way to bring plants back to urban areas with loads of benefits. Antoine Gatt, who manages the LifeMedGreenRoof project at the University of Malta, tells us more. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/green-roof-malta/

  15. What Is Green?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrandt, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Green is a question with varying answers and sometimes no answer at all. It is a question of location, resources, people, environment, and money. As green really has no end point, a teacher's goal should be to teach students to question and consider green. In this article, the author provides several useful metrics to help technology teachers…

  16. The green agenda

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This business guide to Green IT was written to introduce, to a business audience, the opposing groups and the key climate change concepts, to provide an overview of a Green IT strategy and to set out a straightforward, bottom line-orientated Green IT action plan.

  17. Ferroelectric ceramics in a pyroelectric accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shchagin, A. V., E-mail: shchagin@kipt.kharkov.ua [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation); Miroshnik, V. S.; Volkov, V. I. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Oleinik, A. N. [Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    The applicability of polarized ferroelectric ceramics as a pyroelectric in a pyroelectric accelerator is shown by experiments. The spectra of X-ray radiation of energy up to tens of keV, generated by accelerated electrons, have been measured on heating and cooling of the ceramics in vacuum. It is suggested that curved layers of polarized ferroelectric ceramics be used as elements of ceramic pyroelectric accelerators. Besides, nanotubes and nanowires manufactured from ferroelectric ceramics are proposed for the use in nanometer-scale ceramic pyroelectric nanoaccelerators for future applications in nanotechnologies.

  18. Green Transformational Leadership and Green Performance: The Mediation Effects of Green Mindfulness and Green Self-Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Shan Chen; Ching-Hsun Chang; Yu-Hsien Lin

    2014-01-01

    No prior literature explores the influence of green transformational leadership on green performance, thus, this study develops a novel research framework to fill the research gap. This study investigates the influence of green transformational leadership on green performance and discusses the mediation effects of green mindfulness and green self-efficacy by means of structural equation modeling (SEM). The results indicate that green transformational leadership positively influences green min...

  19. Unfolding Green Defense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Knus

    2015-01-01

    consumption in military operations, defense expenditure, energy security, and global climate change. The report then proceeds to introduce the NATO Green Defence Framework before exploring specific current uses of green technologies and green strategies for defense. The report concludes that a number...... of political, military, organizational, and technological challenges and possibilities are related to the development of green solutions for defense. Based on this conclusion the report argues that it is essential to comprehensively describe how a green solution is linked to a security challenge to develop...

  20. Ensuring near-optimum homogeneity and densification levels in nano-reinforced ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Barkoula, Nektaria-Marianthi; Alafogianni, Panagiota; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Fantozzi, Gilbert; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of a new generation of high temperature ceramic materials for aerospace applications, reinforced at a scale closer to the molecular level and three orders of magnitude less than conventional fibrous reinforcements, by embedded carbon nanotubes, has recently emerged as a uniquely challenging scientific effort. The properties of such materials depend strongly on two main factors: i) the homogeneity of the dispersion of the hydrophobic medium throughout the ceramic volume and ii) the ultimate density of the resultant product after sintering of the green body at the high-temperatures and pressures required for ceramic consolidation. The present works reports the establishment of two independent experimental strategies which ensure achievement of near perfect levels of tube dispersion homogeneity and fully dense final products. The proposed methodologies are validated across non-destructive evaluation data of materials performance.

  1. Customers’ Intention to Use Green Products: the Impact of Green Brand Dimensions and Green Perceived Value

    OpenAIRE

    Doszhanov Aibek; Ahmad Zainal Ariffin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the relationships between green brand dimension (green brand awareness, green brand image, and green brand trust), green perceived value and customer’s intention to use green products. Data was collected through structured survey questionnaire from 384 customers of three hypermarkets in Kuala-Lumpur. Data was analyzed based on multiple regression analysis. The results indicate that there are significant relationships between green brand awareness, green brand trus...

  2. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  3. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  4. Ordered ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.A.; Hill, C.G. Jr.; Zeltner, W.A.

    1991-10-01

    Ceramic membranes have been formed from colloidal sols coated on porous clay supports. These supported membranes have been characterized in terms of their permeabilities and permselectivities to various aqueous test solutions. The thermal stabilities and pore structures of these membranes have been characterized by preparing unsupported membranes of the correpsonding material and performing N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and X-ray diffraction studies on these membranes. To date, membranes have been prepared from a variety of oxides, including TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as Zr-, Fe-, and Nb-doped TiO{sub 2}. In many of these membranes pore diameters are less than 2 nm, while in others the pore diameters are between 3 and 5 nm. Procedures for fabricating porous clay supports with reproducible permeabilities for pure water are also discussed. 30 refs., 59 figs., 22 tabs.

  5. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  6. Antiferroelectric Shape Memory Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Uchino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiferroelectrics (AFE can exhibit a “shape memory function controllable by electric field”, with huge isotropic volumetric expansion (0.26% associated with the AFE to Ferroelectric (FE phase transformation. Small inverse electric field application can realize the original AFE phase. The response speed is quick (2.5 ms. In the Pb0.99Nb0.02[(Zr0.6Sn0.41-yTiy]0.98O3 (PNZST system, the shape memory function is observed in the intermediate range between high temperature AFE and low temperature FE, or low Ti-concentration AFE and high Ti-concentration FE in the composition. In the AFE multilayer actuators (MLAs, the crack is initiated in the center of a pair of internal electrodes under cyclic electric field, rather than the edge area of the internal electrodes in normal piezoelectric MLAs. The two-sublattice polarization coupling model is proposed to explain: (1 isotropic volume expansion during the AFE-FE transformation; and (2 piezoelectric anisotropy. We introduce latching relays and mechanical clampers as possible unique applications of shape memory ceramics.

  7. III Advanced Ceramics and Applications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Rainer; Mitic, Vojislav; Obradovic, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This is the Proceedings of III Advanced Ceramics and Applications conference, held in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. It contains 25 papers on various subjects regarding preparation, characterization and application of advanced ceramic materials.

  8. Preparation of biomorphic silicon carbide–mullite ceramics using molten salt synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: wwchem@126.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Environment Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Subsurface Hydrology and Ecology in Arid Areas, Ministry of Education, Chang’an University, 126# Yanta Road, Xi' an 710054, Shaanxi (China); Hou, Guangya [College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Wang, Boya; Deng, Shunxi [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Environment Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Subsurface Hydrology and Ecology in Arid Areas, Ministry of Education, Chang’an University, 126# Yanta Road, Xi' an 710054, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-09-15

    Biomorphic silicon carbide–mullite ceramics were prepared from beech wood using liquid Si infiltration and molten salts synthesis. The resulting mullite whiskers coating, as well as the growth mechanism in molten Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} environment, have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The biomorphic SiC ceramics derived from the beech wood template have coarse pore walls consisting of β-SiC grains with diameters ranging from 5 μm to 20 μm. After the molten salts reactions between biomorphic SiC substrate and mixture molten salts (Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), porous Silicon carbide–mullite ceramics with cilia-like microstructure were obtained. This unique structure has potential application in hot gases filters. An oxidation–dissolution cycle was proposed to explain the mullite whiskers growth in molten salts environment. - Graphical abstract: Biomorphic silicon carbide–mullite ceramics with cilia-like microstructure prepared from beech wood using liquid Si infiltration (LSI) and molten salts reactions (MSR) processes. Mullite whiskers with nanometer-sized diameters and micrometer-sized lengths grow on the surface of SiC substrate, and the biomorphic silicon carbide–mullite ceramics inherit the porous microstructure originated from biomorphic SiC ceramics and beech wood. The mullite whiskers grow on the pores' surface of biomorphic SiC to form cilia-like surface, and this special structure can be used for hot gases filter. - Highlights: • Biomorphic silicon carbide–mullite ceramics were prepared. • An oxidation–dissolution mechanism was proposed to explain the coating formation. • The unique structure has potential application in hot gases filter.

  9. Stress and Reliability Analysis of a Metal-Ceramic Dental Crown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J; Sokolowski, Todd M.; Hojjatie, Barry; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of mechanical and thermal stresses with the flaws and microcracks within the ceramic region of metal-ceramic dental crowns can result in catastrophic or delayed failure of these restorations. The objective of this study was to determine the combined influence of induced functional stresses and pre-existing flaws and microcracks on the time-dependent probability of failure of a metal-ceramic molar crown. A three-dimensional finite element model of a porcelain fused-to-metal (PFM) molar crown was developed using the ANSYS finite element program. The crown consisted of a body porcelain, opaque porcelain, and a metal substrate. The model had a 300 Newton load applied perpendicular to one cusp, a load of 30ON applied at 30 degrees from the perpendicular load case, directed toward the center, and a 600 Newton vertical load. Ceramic specimens were subjected to a biaxial flexure test and the load-to-failure of each specimen was measured. The results of the finite element stress analysis and the flexure tests were incorporated in the NASA developed CARES/LIFE program to determine the Weibull and fatigue parameters and time-dependent fracture reliability of the PFM crown. CARES/LIFE calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/Or proof test loading. This program is an extension of the CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program.

  10. Synthesis and ceramic processing of alumina and zirconia based composites infiltrated with glass phase for dental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest for the use of ceramic materials for dental applications started due to the good aesthetic appearance promoted by the similarity to natural teeth. However, the fragility of traditional ceramics was a limitation for their use in stress conditions. The development of alumina and zirconia based materials, that associate aesthetic results, biocompatibility and good mechanical behaviour, makes possible the employment of ceramics for fabrication of dental restorations. The incorporation of vitreous phase in these ceramics is an alternative to minimize the ceramic retraction and to improve the adhesion to resin-based cements, necessary for the union of ceramic frameworks to the remaining dental structure. In the dentistry field, alumina and zirconia ceramic infiltrated with glassy phase are represented commercially by the In-Ceram systems. Considering that the improvement of powder's synthesis routes and of techniques of ceramic processing contributes for good performance of these materials, the goal of the present work is the study of processing conditions of alumina and/or 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics infiltrated with aluminum borosilicate lanthanum glass. The powders, synthesized by hydroxide coprecipitation route, were pressed by uniaxial compaction and pre-sintered at temperature range between 950 and 1650 degree C in order to obtain porous ceramics bodies. Vitreous phase incorporation was performed by impregnation of aluminum borosilicate lanthanum powder, also prepared in this work, followed by heat treatment between 1200 and 1400 degree C .Ceramic powders were characterized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, gaseous adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. Sinterability of alumina and /or stabilized zirconia green pellets was evaluated by dilatometry. Pre-sintered ceramics were characterized by apparent density measurements (Archimedes method), X-ray diffraction and scanning electron

  11. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appr...

  12. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  13. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuxuan; Coyle, Thomas W.; Azimi, Gisele; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces.

  14. Additive Manufacturing for Cost Efficient Production of Compact Ceramic Heat Exchangers and Recuperators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulman, Holly [Ceralink Incorporated, Troy, NY (United States); Ross, Nicole [Ceralink Incorporated, Troy, NY (United States)

    2015-10-30

    An additive manufacture technique known as laminated object manufacturing (LOM) was used to fabricate compact ceramic heat exchanger prototypes. LOM uses precision CO2 laser cutting of ceramic green tapes, which are then precision stacked to build a 3D object with fine internal features. Modeling was used to develop prototype designs and predict the thermal response, stress, and efficiency in the ceramic heat exchangers. Build testing and materials analyses were used to provide feedback for the design selection. During this development process, laminated object manufacturing protocols were established. This included laser optimization, strategies for fine feature integrity, lamination fluid control, green handling, and firing profile. Three full size prototypes were fabricated using two different designs. One prototype was selected for performance testing. During testing, cross talk leakage prevented the application of a high pressure differential, however, the prototype was successful at withstanding the high temperature operating conditions (1300 °F). In addition, analysis showed that the bulk of the part did not have cracks or leakage issues. This led to the development of a module method for next generation LOM heat exchangers. A scale-up cost analysis showed that given a purpose built LOM system, these ceramic heat exchangers would be affordable for the applications.

  15. Microstructural designs of spark-plasma sintered silicon carbide ceramic scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman-Manso, B.; Pablos, A. de; Belmonte, M.; Osendi, M. I.; Miranzo, P.

    2014-04-01

    Concentrated ceramic inks based on (SiC) powders, with different amounts of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as sintering aids, are developed for the adequate production of SiC scaffolds, with different patterned morphologies, by the Robocasting technique. The densification of the as-produced 3D structures, previously heat treated in air at 600 degree centigrade for the organics burn-out, is achieved with a Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) furnace. The effects of the amount of sintering additives (7 - 20 wt. %) and the size of the SiC powders (50 nm and 0.5 {mu}m) on the processing of the inks, microstructure, hardness and elastic modulus of the sintered scaffolds, are studied. The use of nano-sized (SiC) powders significantly restricts the attainable maximum solids volume fraction of the ink (0.32 compared to 0.44 of the submicron-sized powders-based ink), involving a much larger porosity of the green ceramic bodies. Furthermore, reduced amounts of additives improve the mechanical properties of the ceramic skeleton; particularly, the stiffness. The grain size and specific surface area of the starting powders, the ink solids content, green porosity, amount of sintering additives and SPS temperatures are the main parameters to be taken into account for the production of these SiC cellular ceramics. (Author)

  16. Microstructural designs of spark-plasma sintered silicon carbide ceramic scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrated ceramic inks based on (SiC) powders, with different amounts of Y2O3 and Al2O3 as sintering aids, are developed for the adequate production of SiC scaffolds, with different patterned morphologies, by the Robocasting technique. The densification of the as-produced 3D structures, previously heat treated in air at 600 degree centigrade for the organics burn-out, is achieved with a Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) furnace. The effects of the amount of sintering additives (7 - 20 wt. %) and the size of the SiC powders (50 nm and 0.5 μm) on the processing of the inks, microstructure, hardness and elastic modulus of the sintered scaffolds, are studied. The use of nano-sized (SiC) powders significantly restricts the attainable maximum solids volume fraction of the ink (0.32 compared to 0.44 of the submicron-sized powders-based ink), involving a much larger porosity of the green ceramic bodies. Furthermore, reduced amounts of additives improve the mechanical properties of the ceramic skeleton; particularly, the stiffness. The grain size and specific surface area of the starting powders, the ink solids content, green porosity, amount of sintering additives and SPS temperatures are the main parameters to be taken into account for the production of these SiC cellular ceramics. (Author)

  17. Preparation and Photocatalytic Property of TiO2/Diatomite-Based Porous Ceramics Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuilin Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diatomite-based porous ceramics was made by low-temperature sintering. Then the nano-TiO2/diatomite-based porous ceramics composite materials were prepared by hydrolysis deposition method with titanium tetrachloride as the precursor of TiO2 and diatomite-based porous as the supporting body of the nano-TiO2. The structure and microscopic appearance of nano-TiO2/diatomite-based porous ceramics composite materials was characterized by XRD and SEM. The photocatalytic property of the composite was investigated by the degradation of malachite green. Results showed that, after calcination at 550°C, TiO2 thin film loaded on the diatomite-based porous ceramics is anatase TiO2 and average grain size of TiO2 is about 10 nm. The degradation ratio of the composite for 5 mg/L malachite green solution reached 86.2% after irradiation for 6 h under ultraviolet.

  18. Insights on Ceramics as Dental Materials. Part I: Ceramic Material Types in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, GW; Matinlinna, JP

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics are widely used biomaterials in prosthetic dentistry due to their attractive clinical properties. They are aesthetically pleasing with their color, shade and luster, and they are chemically stable. The main constituents of dental ceramic are Si-based inorganic materials, such as feldspar, quartz, and silica. Traditional feldspar-based ceramics are also referred to as "Porcelain". The crucial difference between a regular ceramic and a dental ceramic is the proportion of feldspar, quar...

  19. The effect of porosity on the mechanical properties of cordierite diesel particulate filter substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shyam, Amit [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Diesel particulate filter (DPF) technology depends on porous ceramic structures that trap the particulate matter in the diesel engine exhaust gas stream. The design of DPFs requires balancing the functional requirement of soot filtration with the mechanical properties and both are influenced by the porosity of the substrate. In addition, increasing the porosity of the substrate can assist with the catalytic washcoating, engine back pressure and engine efficiency. The effect of porosity on the elastic and fracture mechanical properties of cordierite based ceramic particulate filters was examined and will be described. Elastic modulus of DPF substrates was determined using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy while fracture toughness was characterized using the double-torsion test method. The interrelationships among specimen thickness, wall orientation, porosity and mechanical properties of the filter substrates will be discussed. A materials selection procedure to obtain filters with high thermal shock resistance and optimal mechanical properties will be described.

  20. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process

  1. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  2. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  3. Effect of LASER Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramic Surface to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Reliable bonding between tooth substrate and zirconia-based ceramic restorations is always of great importance. The laser might be useful for treatment of ceramic surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic surface to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 40 Cercon zirconia ceramic blocks were fabricated. The surface treatment was performed using sandblasting with 50-micrometer Al2O3, CO2 laser, or Nd:YAG laser in each test groups. After that, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement. The shear bond strength of ceramics to dentin was determined and failure mode of each specimen was analyzed by stereo-microscope and SEM investigations. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparisons. The surface morphology of one specimen from each group was investigated under SEM. Results: The mean shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to dentin was 7.79±3.03, 9.85±4.69, 14.92±4.48 MPa for CO2 irradiated, Nd:YAG irradiated, and sandblasted specimens, respectively. Significant differences were noted between CO2 (P=0.001 and Nd:YAG laser (P=0.017 irradiated specimens with sandblasted specimens. No significant differences were observed between two laser methods (P=0.47. The mode of bond failure was predominantly adhesive in test groups (CO2 irradiated specimens: 75%, Nd:YAG irradiated: 66.7%, and sandblasting: 41.7%. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the present study, surface treatment of zirconia ceramics using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers was not able to produce adequate bond strength with dentin surfaces in comparison to sandblasting technique. Therefore, the use of lasers with the mentioned parameters may not be recommended for the surface treatment of Cercon ceramics.

  4. In situ fabrication of blue ceramic coatings on wrought Al Alloy 2024 by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhijiang; Nie Xueyuan; Hu, Henry; Hussein, Riyad O. [Department of Mechanical, Automotive and Materials Engineering, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4 (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    In situ formation of ceramic coatings on 2024 Al alloy with a blue color was successfully achieved using a plasma electrolytic oxidation process working at atmospheric pressure. This novel blue ceramic coating overcomes the shortcomings of surface treatments resulting from conventional dyeing processes by depositing organic dyes into the porous structure of anodic film, which has poor resistance to abrasion and rapid fading when exposed to sunlight. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy were employed to characterize the microstructure of the blue ceramic coating. The fabricated ceramic coating was composed of CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3.} By controlling the working parameters, the distribution of the CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase on the surface can be adjusted, and plays a key role in the appearance of the coating. Electrochemical testing, thermal cycling method, and pin-on-disk sliding wear testing were employed to evaluate corrosion, thermal cycling, and wear resistance of the ceramic coatings. The results indicate that the blue ceramic coating has a similar polarization resistance to that of conventional anodic film and can significantly enhance the corrosion resistance of aluminum alloy. There are no destructive horizontal cracks observed within the blue ceramic coating when subjected to 120 times of thermal cycling, which heats the samples up to 573 K and followed by submersion in water at room temperature for 10 min. Compared with the aluminum substrate as well as a conventional anodic film coated aluminum sample, the wear resistance of the blue ceramic coating coated sample was significantly increased while the coefficient of friction was decreased from 0.34 to 0.14.

  5. Chemical characterization of marajoara ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the elemental concentration of Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in 204 fragments of Marajoara archaeological ceramics, of which 156 were provided by the Archaeology and Ethnology Museum of Sao Paulo University (MAE) and 48 were provided by Dr. Denise Pahl Schaan, Marajo Museum curator. Also, 9 contemporary ceramics produced and marketed at Marajo Island were analyzed. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analyses were performed in 8 archaeological samples and 1 contemporary sample in order to identify the burning temperature of the samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed in 13 archaeological samples and 2 contemporary samples for the investigation of their mineralogical composition. Mahalanobis distance was used for the study of outlier while modified filter was used for the study of the temper added to the ceramic paste. Result interpretation was performed using cluster analysis, principal components analysis and discriminant analysis. Procrustes analysis was used for variable selection and it showed that the Ce, Fe, Eu, Hf, K and Th variables are adequate for the characterization of the analyzed samples. The comparative study among the archaeological and contemporary ceramics showed the arrangement of two well-defined and close groups for the archaeological samples and a third, distant group for the contemporary ones. This result indicates that the archaeological and contemporary ceramics differ in their composition. EPR and XRD analysis were inconclusive for the differentiation of archaeological and contemporary ceramics. (author)

  6. Nanomechanics of hard films on compliant substrates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, Earl David, Jr. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Emerson, John Allen (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Bahr, David F. (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Moody, Neville Reid; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Hales, Lucas (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN); Adams, David Price (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Yeager,John (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Nyugen, Thao D. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Corona, Edmundo (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kennedy, Marian S. (Clemson University, Clemson, SC); Cordill, Megan J. (Erich Schmid Institute, Leoben, Austria)

    2009-09-01

    Development of flexible thin film systems for biomedical, homeland security and environmental sensing applications has increased dramatically in recent years [1,2,3,4]. These systems typically combine traditional semiconductor technology with new flexible substrates, allowing for both the high electron mobility of semiconductors and the flexibility of polymers. The devices have the ability to be easily integrated into components and show promise for advanced design concepts, ranging from innovative microelectronics to MEMS and NEMS devices. These devices often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films where differing properties can lead to large residual stresses [5]. As long as the films remain substrate-bonded, they may deform far beyond their freestanding counterpart. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure where compressive stresses can lead to wrinkling, delamination, and buckling [6,7,8] while tensile stresses can lead to film fracture and decohesion [9,10,11]. In all cases, performance depends on film adhesion. Experimentally it is difficult to measure adhesion. It is often studied using tape [12], pull off [13,14,15], and peel tests [16,17]. More recent techniques for measuring adhesion include scratch testing [18,19,20,21], four point bending [22,23,24], indentation [25,26,27], spontaneous blisters [28,29] and stressed overlayers [7,26,30,31,32,33]. Nevertheless, sample design and test techniques must be tailored for each system. There is a large body of elastic thin film fracture and elastic contact mechanics solutions for elastic films on rigid substrates in the published literature [5,7,34,35,36]. More recent work has extended these solutions to films on compliant substrates and show that increasing compliance markedly changes fracture energies compared with rigid elastic solution results [37,38]. However, the introduction of inelastic substrate response significantly complicates the problem [10,39,40]. As

  7. Ceramic components for MHD electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, D.D.

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf/sub x/In/sub y/A/sub z/O/sub 2/ where x = 0.1 to 0.4, y = 0.3 to 0.6, z = 0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  8. Green Food in China

    OpenAIRE

    Paull, John

    2008-01-01

    "Green Food" is a Chinese food production innovation, and has been described as "one of the most successful eco-labelling programs in the world" (Giovannucci, 2005, p.12). Green Food provides a "middle way" between chemical and organic farming. China's development of the Green Food concept resolves issues with both chemical and organic agriculture - for the former by offering reduced pesticide use, and for the latter by providing a stepped pathway for conversion from chemical to organic agric...

  9. Green roofs as a means of pollution abatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, D Bradley

    2011-01-01

    Green roofs involve growing vegetation on rooftops and are one tool that can help mitigate the negative effects of pollution. This review encompasses published research to date on how green roofs can help mitigate pollution, how green roof materials influence the magnitude of these benefits, and suggests future research directions. The discussion concentrates on how green roofs influence air pollution, carbon dioxide emissions, carbon sequestration, longevity of roofing membranes that result in fewer roofing materials in landfills, water quality of stormwater runoff, and noise pollution. Suggestions for future directions for research include plant selection, development of improved growing substrates, urban rooftop agriculture, water quality of runoff, supplemental irrigation, the use of grey water, air pollution, carbon sequestration, effects on human health, combining green roofs with complementary related technologies, and economics and policy issues.

  10. Green roofs as a means of pollution abatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, D Bradley

    2011-01-01

    Green roofs involve growing vegetation on rooftops and are one tool that can help mitigate the negative effects of pollution. This review encompasses published research to date on how green roofs can help mitigate pollution, how green roof materials influence the magnitude of these benefits, and suggests future research directions. The discussion concentrates on how green roofs influence air pollution, carbon dioxide emissions, carbon sequestration, longevity of roofing membranes that result in fewer roofing materials in landfills, water quality of stormwater runoff, and noise pollution. Suggestions for future directions for research include plant selection, development of improved growing substrates, urban rooftop agriculture, water quality of runoff, supplemental irrigation, the use of grey water, air pollution, carbon sequestration, effects on human health, combining green roofs with complementary related technologies, and economics and policy issues. PMID:21074914

  11. Consolidated waste forms: glass marbles and ceramic pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass marbles and ceramic pellets have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the multibarrier concept for immobilizing high-level radioactive waste. These consolidated waste forms served as substrates for the application of various inert coatings and as ideal-sized particles for encapsulation in protective matrices. Marble and pellet formulations were based on existing defense wastes at Savannah River Plant and proposed commercial wastes. To produce marbles, glass is poured from a melter in a continuous stream into a marble-making device. Marbles were produced at PNL on a vibratory marble machine at rates as high as 60 kg/h. Other marble-making concepts were also investigated. The marble process, including a lead-encapsulation step, was judged as one of the more feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes. To produce ceramic pellets, a series of processing steps are required, which include: spray calcining - to dry liquid wastes to a powder; disc pelletizing - to convert waste powders to spherical pellets; sintering - to densify pellets and cause desired crystal formation. These processing steps are quite complex, and thereby render the ceramic pellet process as one of the least feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes

  12. Consolidated waste forms: glass marbles and ceramic pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treat, R.L.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Glass marbles and ceramic pellets have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the multibarrier concept for immobilizing high-level radioactive waste. These consolidated waste forms served as substrates for the application of various inert coatings and as ideal-sized particles for encapsulation in protective matrices. Marble and pellet formulations were based on existing defense wastes at Savannah River Plant and proposed commercial wastes. To produce marbles, glass is poured from a melter in a continuous stream into a marble-making device. Marbles were produced at PNL on a vibratory marble machine at rates as high as 60 kg/h. Other marble-making concepts were also investigated. The marble process, including a lead-encapsulation step, was judged as one of the more feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes. To produce ceramic pellets, a series of processing steps are required, which include: spray calcining - to dry liquid wastes to a powder; disc pelletizing - to convert waste powders to spherical pellets; sintering - to densify pellets and cause desired crystal formation. These processing steps are quite complex, and thereby render the ceramic pellet process as one of the least feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes.

  13. Development and sintering of alumina based mixed oxide ceramic products for sensor applications in petroleum industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadava, Y.P.; Muniz, L.B.; Aguiar, L.A.R.; Sanguinetti Ferreira, R.A. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, CEP 50741-530, Recife-PE (Brazil); Albino Aguiar, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, CEP 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    In petroleum production, different types of sensors are required to monitor temperature, pressure, leakage of inflammable gases, etc. These sensors work in very hostile environmental conditions and frequently suffer from abrasion and corrosion problems. Presently perovskite oxide based ceramic materials are increasingly being used for such purposes, due to their highly inert behavior in hostile environment. In the present work, we have developed and characterized alumina based complex perovskite oxide ceramics, Ba{sub 2}AlSnO{sub 5.5}. These ceramics were prepared by solid state reaction process and produced in the form of circular discs by uniaxial pressure compaction technique. Green ceramic bodies were sintered at different sintering temperatures (1200 to 1500 deg. C) in air atmosphere. Structural and microstructural characteristics of sintered Ba{sub 2}AlMO{sub 5.5} were studied by XRD and SEM techniques. Mechanical properties were tested by Vickers microhardness tests. Ceramics sintered in the temperature range 1300 deg. C 1400 deg. C presented best results in terms of microstructural characteristics and mechanical performance. (authors)

  14. Kinetics and morphology of electrochemical vapour deposited thin zirconia/yttria layers on porous substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, H.W.; Meijerink, J.; Vries, de K.J.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    By means of electrochemical vapour deposition (EVD), it is possible to grow thin (0.5-5 µm), dense zirconia/yttria layers on porous ceramic substrates. Kinetics of the EVD process, morphology and oxygen permeation properties of the grown layers are investigated. Very thin (~ 0.5 µm) layers are grown

  15. Improvement in collapsibility of ZrO2 ceramic mould for investment casting of TiAl alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yanfei

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Investment casting has been widely recognized as the best option in producing TiAl components with key benefits of accuracy, versatility and integrity. The collapsibility of ceramic moulds for investment casting is critical in the manufacturing process of TiAl components due to TiAl’s intrinsic brittleness at room temperature. The aim of the present research is to provide a method for production of TiAl components by investment casting in ZrO2 ceramic moulds with improved collapsibility. Slurries prepared with high polymer additions were utilized during the preparation of ceramic moulds. The stress/strain curves obtained from green and baked ceramic moulds demonstrate that the green strength was increased with the application of high polymer, while baked strength decreased, thus the collapsibility of ceramic moulds was improved. It is suggested that this result is related to the burn-out of high polymer which left a lot of cavities. The experimental findings were also verified by the investment casting of “I”- shaped TiAl components.

  16. Study of a new hybrid process combining slurry infiltration and Reactive Chemical Vapour Infiltration for the realisation of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic matrix composites were originally developed for aerospace,military aeronautics or energy applications thanks to their good properties at high temperature. They are generally made by Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI). A new short hybrid process combining fiber preform slurry impregnation of ceramic powders with an innovative Reactive CVI (RCVI) route is proposed to reduce the production time. This route is based on the combination of Reactive Chemical Vapour Deposition (RCVD), which is often used to deposit coatings on fibres, with the Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI).In RCVD, the absence of one element of the deposited carbide in the initial gas phase involves the consumption/conversion of the solid substrate. In this work, the RCVD growth and the associated consumption were studied with different parameters in the Ti-H-Cl-C chemical system. The study has been completed with the chemical products analysis, combining XRD, XPS and FTIR. Then, the partial conversion of sub-micrometer carbon powders into titanium carbide and the consolidation of green bodies by RCVI from H2/TiCl4 gaseous infiltration were studied. The residual porosity and the final TiC content were measured in the bulk of the infiltrated powders by image analysis from scanning electron microscopy. Depending on temperature, few hundred micrometers-depth infiltrations are obtained.Finally, the results have been transposed to the RCVI into CMC-type pre-forms. Despite a minimal TiC content of 25% in the overall preform, the results shown a bad homogeneity of the infiltration and a poor cohesion of fibres with RCVI consolidated powder of their environment. (author)

  17. Study of the focusing effect of silica microspheres on the upconversion of Er{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} codoped glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, C., E-mail: cjperez@ull.edu.es [Dpto. Física Fundamental y Experimental, Electrónica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna, Av. Astrofísico Francisco Sánchez, s/n E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Imanieh, M.H. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Department of Materials, Ceramic Division, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Martín, L.L [Dpto. Física Fundamental y Experimental, Electrónica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna, Av. Astrofísico Francisco Sánchez, s/n E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ríos, S. [Dpto. de Física Básica, Universidad de La Laguna, Av. Astrofísico Francisco Sánchez, s/n E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Martín, I.R. [Dpto. Física Fundamental y Experimental, Electrónica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna, Av. Astrofísico Francisco Sánchez, s/n E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); MALTA Consolider Team, Av. Astrofísico Francisco Sánchez, s/n E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari [Department of Materials, Ceramic Division, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-05

    Highlights: •Silica microspheres have been located on the surface of glass and glass ceramics samples codoped with Er and Yb. •Microspheres act as microlens of the 950 nm excitation light resulting in focalized excited regions in the samples with sizes under the micron. •Intense red upconversion is achieved in the focalized areas. •Microspheres collect the upconversion emission light, scoping with the together microlensing properties an enhancement of the detected signal in a 3x factor. •Performed Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulations predict the size of the focalized regions in good agreement with the experimental measurements. -- Abstract: The upconversion emission properties of Er{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} codoped glass and glass ceramic samples with different Si/Al ratios and thermal treatments were analyzed by covering their surfaces with silica microspheres (3.8 μm diameter). A 950 nm laser beam is focused by the microspheres producing a set of photonic nanojets near the surface of the samples. After the upconversion processes of the Er{sup 3+} ions located in each microsphere focus area, these ions emit light in the green and red regions. The red emission from each sample was measured, yielding an upconversion intensity in the focal areas three times higher than the emission from the bare substrate. To estimate the real size of the red emission area under a single microsphere, a deconvolution of the measured focal spots with the Point Spread Function of the experimental setup was performed, resulting in a Full Width at Half Maximum of 330 nm. The results obtained by Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulations are in good agreement with the experimental values.

  18. Study of the focusing effect of silica microspheres on the upconversion of Er3+–Yb3+ codoped glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Silica microspheres have been located on the surface of glass and glass ceramics samples codoped with Er and Yb. •Microspheres act as microlens of the 950 nm excitation light resulting in focalized excited regions in the samples with sizes under the micron. •Intense red upconversion is achieved in the focalized areas. •Microspheres collect the upconversion emission light, scoping with the together microlensing properties an enhancement of the detected signal in a 3x factor. •Performed Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulations predict the size of the focalized regions in good agreement with the experimental measurements. -- Abstract: The upconversion emission properties of Er3+–Yb3+ codoped glass and glass ceramic samples with different Si/Al ratios and thermal treatments were analyzed by covering their surfaces with silica microspheres (3.8 μm diameter). A 950 nm laser beam is focused by the microspheres producing a set of photonic nanojets near the surface of the samples. After the upconversion processes of the Er3+ ions located in each microsphere focus area, these ions emit light in the green and red regions. The red emission from each sample was measured, yielding an upconversion intensity in the focal areas three times higher than the emission from the bare substrate. To estimate the real size of the red emission area under a single microsphere, a deconvolution of the measured focal spots with the Point Spread Function of the experimental setup was performed, resulting in a Full Width at Half Maximum of 330 nm. The results obtained by Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulations are in good agreement with the experimental values

  19. An evaluation of wear of human enamel opposed by ceramics of different surface finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Gauri; Dugal, Ramandeep; Buhranpurwala, Murtuza

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Surface of porcelain restoration is a matter of clinical concern because of its abrasive action on the opposing enamel. Purpose: This study comparatively evaluated wear of enamel when opposed by three different surface finishes of ceramic. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 metal-ceramic discs (10 mm × 2 mm) with different surface finishes were fabricated. They were divided into four groups of autoglazed ceramic surface, over glazed ceramic surface, ceramic surface polished with Shofu polishing kit and ceramic surface polished with DFS polishing wheels and paste. Each group comprised of 15 discs. Sixty human teeth samples were prepared from freshly extracted, unrestored, caries free, nonattrited maxillary first premolars. Each tooth sample was weighed before wear testing using AT200 Mettler Toledo electronic analytical balance of 0.0001 g accuracy. Occlusal surfaces of these teeth were then abraded against the substrates in a wear machine for a total of 10,000 cycles. Each tooth sample was weighed after 5000 cycles and after the total of 10,000 cycles, respectively, using the same balance. Differences in weight of tooth samples before and after wear testing were evaluated statistically using one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's correction for multiple group comparisons. Results: The values obtained for percentage weight loss after 10,000 cycles for over glazed ceramic surface were marginally higher than values obtained for autoglazed surface. It was observed that values obtained for percentage weight loss by polished ceramic after 10,000 cycles were statistically less as compared to the values obtained with autoglazed and over glazed ceramic surface (P ceramic surfaces of two different groups. Conclusion: Enamel wear produced by polished porcelain is substantially less than autoglazed and over glazed porcelain. No significant difference was found in enamel wear when opposed by ceramic surfaces polished by two different methods

  20. Electrospinning of ceramic nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Benjamin M.

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) nanofibers of diameters as low as 20 nm are fabricated. The fibers were produced through the electrostatic spinning of the preceramic poly(carbomethylsilane) with pyrolysis to ceramic. A new technique was used where the preceramic was blended with polystyrene (PS) and, subsequent to electrospinning, was exposed to UV to crosslink the PS and prevent fibers flowing during pyrolysis. Electrospun SiC fibers were characterized by FTIR, TGA-DTA, SEM, TEM, XRD, and SAED. Fibers were shown to be polycrystalline and nanograined with alpha-SiC 15R polytype being dominant, where commercial fiber production methods form beta-SiC 3C. Pyrolysis of the bulk polymer blend to SiC produced alpha-SiC 15R as the dominant polytype with larger grains showing that electrospinning nanofibers affects resultant crystallinity. Fibers produced were shown to have a core-shell structure of an oxide scale that was variable by pyrolysis conditions. Metal oxide powders (chromium oxide, cobalt oxide, iron oxide, silicon oxide, tantalum oxide, titanium oxide, tungsten oxide, vanadium oxide, and zirconium oxide), were converted to metal carbide powders and metal nitride powders by the process of carbothermal reduction (CTR). Synthetic pitch was explored as an alternative to graphite which is a common carbon source for CTR. It was shown via characterization with XRD that pitch performs as well and in some cases better than graphite and is therefore a viable alternative in CTR. Conversion of metal oxide powders with pitch led to conversion of sol-gel based metal oxide nanofibers produced by electrospinning. Pitch was soluble in the solutions xv that were electrospun allowing for intimate contact between the sol-gel and the carbon source for CTR. This method became a two step processing method to produce metal carbide and nitride nanofibers: first electrospin sol-gel based metal oxide nanofibers and subsequently pyrolize them in the manner of CTR to transform them. Results indicate

  1. Can green roof act as a sink for contaminants? A methodological study to evaluate runoff quality from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Joshi, Umid Man

    2014-11-01

    The present study examines whether green roofs act as a sink or source of contaminants based on various physico-chemical parameters (pH, conductivity and total dissolved solids) and metals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb). The performance of green roof substrate prepared using perlite, vermiculite, sand, crushed brick, and coco-peat, was compared with local garden soil based on improvement of runoff quality. Portulaca grandiflora was used as green roof vegetation. Four different green roof configurations, with vegetated and non-vegetated systems, were examined for several artificial rain events (un-spiked and metal-spiked). In general, the vegetated green roof assemblies generated better-quality runoff with less conductivity and total metal ion concentration compared to un-vegetated assemblies. Of the different green roof configurations examined, P. grandiflora planted on green roof substrate acted as sink for various metals and showed the potential to generate better runoff.

  2. Can green roof act as a sink for contaminants? A methodological study to evaluate runoff quality from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Joshi, Umid Man

    2014-11-01

    The present study examines whether green roofs act as a sink or source of contaminants based on various physico-chemical parameters (pH, conductivity and total dissolved solids) and metals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb). The performance of green roof substrate prepared using perlite, vermiculite, sand, crushed brick, and coco-peat, was compared with local garden soil based on improvement of runoff quality. Portulaca grandiflora was used as green roof vegetation. Four different green roof configurations, with vegetated and non-vegetated systems, were examined for several artificial rain events (un-spiked and metal-spiked). In general, the vegetated green roof assemblies generated better-quality runoff with less conductivity and total metal ion concentration compared to un-vegetated assemblies. Of the different green roof configurations examined, P. grandiflora planted on green roof substrate acted as sink for various metals and showed the potential to generate better runoff. PMID:25106048

  3. Phosphors with long-persistent green phosphorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, William M (Inventor); Jia, Weiyi (Inventor); Lu, Lizhu (Inventor); Yuan, Huabiao (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to phosphors including long-persistence green phosphors. Phosphors of the invention are represented by the general formula: M.sub.k Al.sub.2 O.sub.4 :2xEu.sup.2+,2yR.sup.3+ wherein k-1-2x-2y, x is a number ranging from about 0.0001 to about 0.05, y is a number ranging from about x to about 3x, M is an alkaline earth metal, and R.sup.3+ is one or more trivalent metal ions. Phosphors of this invention include powders, ceramics, single crystals and single crystal fibers. A method of manufacturing improved phosphors and a method of manufacturing single crystal phosphors are also provided.

  4. Conformation of LSM/YSZ and LSM ceramic films obtained by the citrate and solid mixture techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the ceramic films of LSM/YSZ (strontium-doped lanthanum manganite/Yttria-stabilized zirconia) and LSM used as cathodes of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are conformed by the wet powder spraying technique. The composite LSM/YSZ was obtained by the solid mixture technique and LSM by the citrate technique. For the formation of the LSM/YSZ and LSM ceramic films was necessary the preparation of dispersed ceramic suspensions for the deposition in YSZ substrate, used as electrolyte of the CaCOS. These powders were conformed using an aerograph for the deposition of the LSM/YSZ and LSM thin films of approximately 40 microns. The half-cells had been characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), identifying the phases hexagonal (LSM) and cubica (YSZ). And electronic scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the adherence and porosity of the ceramic films according to the characteristics of the cathode. (author)

  5. Doubled-ended ceramic thyratron

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The double-ended ceramic thyratron CX 1171 B, with its coaxial voltage divider for the SPS. Such a switch, paralleled by three ignitrons in series forms the "thyragnitron" arrangement, and can switch 10 kA, 25 ms pulses, with very fast rise times.

  6. Optical scattering in glass ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattarelli, M.; Montagna, M.; Verrocchio, P.

    2008-01-01

    The transparency of glass ceramics with nanocrystals is generally higher than that expected from the theory of Rayleigh scattering. We attribute this ultra-transparency to the spatial correlation of the nanoparticles. The structure factor is calculated for a simple model system, the random sequentia

  7. Art Education: Creative Ceramic Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Nora; Marinaccio, Louis

    A course in forming, decorating, glazing, and firing pottery is presented. Upon completion of the course, the student will be expected to be familiar with all terms and characteristics connected with pottery and ceramics, and he will be expected to be able to properly handle and form clay. Course content includes the history of clay handling,…

  8. Properties Research of Ceramic Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Żółkiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the method of full mould the polystyrene model, which fills the mould cavity in the course of filling by the liquid metal is subjected tothe influence of high temperature and passes from the solid, through the liquid, to the gaseous state. During this process solid and gaseousproducts of thermal decomposition of polystyrene patterns occur. The kinetics of this process is significantly influenced by the gasificationtemperature, density and mass of the polystyrene patterns. One of the basic parameters is the amount and rate of gas from the polystyrenemodel during its thermal decomposition. Specific properties of ceramic layer used for lost foam castings are required. To ensure optimalprocess flow of metal in the form proper permeability of the ceramic layer is needed.To ensure optimal conditions for technological casting method EPS patterns are tested and determined are the technological parametersand physical-chemical process in: material properties of the pattern, properties of the ceramic layer applied to the pattern, pattern gasification kinetics pouring processIn the course of the research the characteristics of polystyrene and ceramic layer were determined.

  9. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  10. Development of adherent ceramic coatings to reduce contact stress damage of ceramics. Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne, S.F.; Selverian, J.H.; O`Neil, D. [GTE Labs., Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Strongly adherent coatings were deposited on reaction bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (RBSN), sintered SiC (SSC), and HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (HSN) and using a newly developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Performance of the coating was assessed by oxidation, strength and contact stress testing. A new method was developed to experimentally determine the strength and Weibull modulus of thin brittle films on ceramic substrates. A significant portion of the study was devoted to numerical modeling of the coatings in order to understand the contributions of residual stress as different coating materials and thicknesses were combined. Coating designs were further analyzed by simulating the crack growth behavior in multilayer films while accounting for the interface fracture mechanics. This work has shown that the Al{sub 2}0{sub 3+}ZrO{sub 2} composite coating developed in this program can provide resistance to oxidation and contact stress. Commercial application of the composite coating has been successfully demonstrated by useof the Al{sub 2}0{sub 3+}ZrO{sub 2} composite as a protective coating on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cutting tool.

  11. Customers’ Intention to Use Green Products: the Impact of Green Brand Dimensions and Green Perceived Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doszhanov Aibek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the relationships between green brand dimension (green brand awareness, green brand image, and green brand trust, green perceived value and customer’s intention to use green products. Data was collected through structured survey questionnaire from 384 customers of three hypermarkets in Kuala-Lumpur. Data was analyzed based on multiple regression analysis. The results indicate that there are significant relationships between green brand awareness, green brand trust, green perceived value, and customer’s intention to use green products. However, green brand image was not found to have significant relationship with customer’s intention to use green products. The discussion presented suggestions for marketers and researchers interested in green branding.

  12. From green architecture to architectural green:Facade versus space

    OpenAIRE

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates the topic of green architecture from an architectural point of view and not an energy point of view. The purpose of the paper is to establish a debate about the architectural language and spatial characteristics of green architecture. In this light, green becomes an adjective that describes the architectural exclusivity of this particular architecture genre. The adjective green expresses architectural qualities differentiating green architecture from none-green architec...

  13. 3D statistical failure analysis of monolithic dental ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrin, Sadia; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I

    2016-07-01

    For adhesively retained ceramic crown of various types, it has been clinically observed that the most catastrophic failures initiate from the cement interface as a result of radial crack formation as opposed to Hertzian contact stresses originating on the occlusal surface. In this work, a 3D failure prognosis model is developed for interface initiated failures of monolithic ceramic crowns. The surface flaw distribution parameters determined by biaxial flexural tests on ceramic plates and point-to-point variations of multi-axial stress state at the intaglio surface are obtained by finite element stress analysis. They are combined on the basis of fracture mechanics based statistical failure probability model to predict failure probability of a monolithic crown subjected to single-cycle indentation load. The proposed method is verified by prior 2D axisymmetric model and experimental data. Under conditions where the crowns are completely bonded to the tooth substrate, both high flexural stress and high interfacial shear stress are shown to occur in the wall region where the crown thickness is relatively thin while high interfacial normal tensile stress distribution is observed at the margin region. Significant impact of reduced cement modulus on these stress states is shown. While the analyses are limited to single-cycle load-to-failure tests, high interfacial normal tensile stress or high interfacial shear stress may contribute to degradation of the cement bond between ceramic and dentin. In addition, the crown failure probability is shown to be controlled by high flexural stress concentrations over a small area, and the proposed method might be of some value to detect initial crown design errors. PMID:27215334

  14. Non-thermal effect of a ceramics radiation on a yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-thermal effect of a ceramics radiation on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase has been investigated using the enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate and NADP+ separately irradiated at 10 degrees C by a ceracompo R plate and a ceramics un-sewed cloth (sheet). The Km for glucose-6-phosphate was increased 20% after 6 h of irradiation by the plate, but the Vmax/Km was decreased 24. After 3 h of irradiation by the sheet, the Km was increased 17%, but after 6 h of irradiation it was decreased 11%. The 3 h of irradiation by the sheet slightly increased both enthalpy and entropy changes of the reaction, but the 6 h of irradiation significantly decreased them. Both thermodynamic parameters in the activated state were increased by the sheet irradiation. The promotion energy for both formations of the enzyme-substrate and their activated complex depended on enthalpy. The different effects of two ceramics radiators on G6PDH activity were discussed

  15. Element Analysis of Ceramic Coatings under Spherical Indentation with Metallic Interlayer:Part Ⅱ Ring Crack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minh-Quy LE; Seock-Sam KIM

    2006-01-01

    Spherical indentation of ceramic coatings with metallic interlayer was performed by means of axisymmetric finite element analysis(FEA). Two typical ceramic coatings with relatively high and low elastic modulus deposited on aluminum alloy and carbon steel were considered. The fracture mechanics of the ceramic coatings mechanisms due to occurrence of surface ring cracks extending traverse the coating thickness under spherical indentation are investigated within the framework of linear fracture mechanics. The J-integral associated to such cracks was computed. The evolution of J-integral vs the crack length and the indentation depth was studied. The effects of the interlayer, the coating and the substrate on the J-integral evolution were discussed. The results show that a suitable metallic interlayer can improve the fracture resistance of the coating systems under the same indentation conditions through reducing the J-integral.

  16. Preparation and Corrosion Resistance of Rare Earth Ceramic Film on AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yue; Guo Yuandong; Li Yingjie

    2004-01-01

    With the purpose of improving corrosion resistance and solving environmental pollution caused by traditional protective technique, rare earth ceramic film on AZ91 magnesium alloy was prepared by dip coating process, and technical parameters of preparation were defmed. Microstructure and composition of the film were studied and corrosion resistance was evaluated as well. The results show that rare earth ceramic film is uniform,dense, with strong cohesion and intact coverage. The film is mainly made up of CeO2 and MgCeO3. The results of corrosion experiments approve that the film acts as a barrier to isolate the contact of the substrate with corrosion media and decreas corrosion rate. Polarization curve of the coated sample shiftes to positive potential obvito 2.7 × 104 Ω. These facts indicate that rare earth ceramic film could effectively improve corrosion resistance of AZ91 magnesium alloy.

  17. Wear resistance of ceramic coating on AZ91 magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hui; LIU Zheng; CHEN Li-jia; CHEN Ji; HAN Zhong

    2006-01-01

    The ceramic coating formed on AZ91 magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) was characterized. The results show that the ceramic coating(3.4-23 μm in thickness)on the surface of AZ91 alloy was attained under different micro-arc oxidation treatment conditions, which consist mainly of MgO, Mg2SiO4 and MgSiO3 phases. Nano-hardness in a cross-sectional specimen was determined by nano-indentation experiment. The MAO coatings exhibit higher hardness than the substrate. Dry sliding wear tests for the MAO coatings and AZ91 alloy were also carried out using an oscillating friction and wear tester in a ball-on-disc contact configuration. The wear resistance of the MAO coatings is improved respectively under different treatment time as a result of different structures of ceramic coatings formed on AZ91 alloy.

  18. Macro algae as substrate for biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik; Sarker, Shiplu; Gautam, Dhan Prasad;

    Algae as a substrate for biogas is superior to other crops since it has a much higher yield of biomass per unit area and since algae grows in the seawater there will be no competition with food production on agricultural lands. So far, the progress in treating different groups of algae as a source...... of energy is promising. In this study 5 different algae types were tested for biogas potential and two algae were subsequent used for co-digestion with manure. Green seaweed, Ulva lactuca and brown seaweed Laminaria digitata was co-digested with cattle manure at mesophilic and thermophilic condition...

  19. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  20. Green technology in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiwan is striving for leadership in the field of green Technologies. Solar cells and Light Emitting Diodes (LED) are the best examples of successful Taiwanese green technologies. Electronic vehicles and smart grids are giving new impetus to the Taiwanese export of high-quality technology.

  1. Measuring Our Greenness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUYONG

    2005-01-01

    Green GDP has become a buzzword of late. For two decades or more, China's rapid economic growth-and its equally rapid environmental destruction and resource depletion-has astonished the world. But now, China is on the fast track to developing a Green GDP.

  2. Green product innovation strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last decades, companies have started to incorporate green issues in product innovation strategies. This dissertation studies green product innovation strategy, its antecedents and its outcomes. A three-stage approach is followed. In the first stage, the topic is explored and a preliminary r

  3. Green Chemistry and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  4. Introduction: Experimental Green Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Terri

    2011-01-01

    Defining new ways in which archietcts are responding to the challenge of creating sustainable architecture , Experimental Green Strategies present a state of the art in applied ecological architectural research.......Defining new ways in which archietcts are responding to the challenge of creating sustainable architecture , Experimental Green Strategies present a state of the art in applied ecological architectural research....

  5. The Green Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huke, Robert E.

    1985-01-01

    Modern agriculture's green revolution refers to a complex package that includes improved seeds and a wide range of efficient management practices. The genetic history of and technological developments that led to the green revolution are described, and its impact discussed. (RM)

  6. Greening the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Norma Velia

    2011-01-01

    Because educators vicariously touch the future through their students, the author believes that they sometimes have the uncanny ability to see the future. One common future forecast is the phenomenal growth of green jobs in the emerging green economy, leading to the creation of the "Reach of the Sun" Solar Energy Academy at La Mirada High School…

  7. Custodial Operations: Green & Sustainable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. Kirk

    2008-01-01

    Custodial Operations can have a significant impact on institutional green and sustainable goals if given the proper support and challenge. This article describes the green and sustainable custodial operations in place at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. The article reviews the college's sustainable efforts on biodegradables, packaging,…

  8. Manufacturing Green Consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulsrud, Natalie Marie; Ooi, Can Seng

    2014-01-01

    In an increasingly global economy, being green, or having an environmentally sustainbale place brand, provides a competitive advantage. Singapore, long known as the ``garden city´´ has been a leader in green city imaging since the founding of the equatorial city-state, contributing, in large part...

  9. Winning green idea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The best idea to improve the environment in the last year comes from the Novaky Power Plant. Jozef Gajdusek participated in the Green Idea project and he won with his proposal for mazut collection during start up of the boilers into portable plastic containers. Sixteen employees with twenty-two proposals participated in the pilot year of the Green Idea project. (author)

  10. Green Marketing amp Consumerism

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Jalalkamali; Masood Forooghi; Nima Nazeri

    2015-01-01

    Green marketing is a progressive issue that most of its dimensions are unknown or intangible for consumers. In this review some of its aspects are surveyed considering its impact on consumers as a fundamental segment in economics. Also consumer behavior is defined and analyzed through its awareness of green marketing issue which causes purchasing decision.

  11. Green Marketing amp Consumerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jalalkamali

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Green marketing is a progressive issue that most of its dimensions are unknown or intangible for consumers. In this review some of its aspects are surveyed considering its impact on consumers as a fundamental segment in economics. Also consumer behavior is defined and analyzed through its awareness of green marketing issue which causes purchasing decision.

  12. Effect of substrate on surface morphology and photocatalysis of large-scale TiO2 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Lorena; Daoud, Walid A.; Dutta, Dushmanta; Panther, Barbara C.; Turney, Terence W.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 films were prepared on a variety of substrates, including acid frosted soda-lime glass, acid frosted soda-lime glass pre-coated with a SiO2 barrier layer, commercial glazed ceramic tile and 6061 aluminum alloy. For each substrate, the phase and microstructure of the films were determined to be exclusively anatase. However, the growth of the TiO2 crystallites, the film morphology and thickness varied substantially with substrate. Thermal stress, resulting from the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the substrates and the films, contributed to the formation and propagation of cracks. This was most clearly observed on the films deposited on SiO2 barrier layer and aluminum. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 films deposited on glass with and without SiO2 barrier layer, ceramic, and aluminum was studied via UV decolorization of methyl orange in aqueous solution. Complete degradation rapidly occurred on the TiO2/glass and TiO2/SiO2 barrier layer films, but not with the ceramic or metal substrates. It appears that the photocatalytic activity of the films deposited on aluminum and ceramic substrates was affected by the quantity and the size of the anatase crystallites. The aluminum substrate promoted the formation of TiO2 films with the largest anatase crystallite size, exhibiting a cracked morphology, where as the ceramic substrate resulted in the formation of TiO2 films with large crystallite size in an island morphology.

  13. Diffusion barrier properties of CVD thin tungsten and tantalum films, deposited on WC/Co metallo-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin Tungsten (W) and Tantalum (Ta) films were deposited by pyrolysis from W(CO)6, WCl6 and TaCl5 precursors on WC/Co metallo ceramics substrates, containing 7-8 % and 11 - 12 % Co. Their properties to preventing a Co diffusion from the substrate to the surface coating have been studied by X-ray microprobe analysis, Auger electron spectroscopy and Direct Layer by Layer Spectral Analyses in Hallow Cathode method. (author)

  14. Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Cr7C3/γ-Fe Ceramal Composite Coating Fabricated by Plasma Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Junbo

    2007-01-01

    A new type in situ Cr7C3/γ-Fe ceramal composite coating was fabricated on substrate of hardened and tempered grade C steel by plasma cladding with Fe-Cr-C alloy powders. The ceramal composite coating has a rapidly solidified microstructure consisting of primary Cr7C3 and the Cr7C3/γ-Fe eutectics, and is metallurgically bonded to the degree C steel substrate. The corrosion resistances of the coating in water solutions of 0.5 mol/L H2SO4 and 3.5% NaCl were evaluated utilizing the electrochemical polarization corrosion-test method. Because of the inherent excellent corrosion-resisting properties of the constituting phase and the rapidly solidified homogeneous microstructure, the plasma clad ceramal composite coating exhibits excellent corrosion resistance in the water solutions of 0.5 mol/L H2SO4 and 3.5% NaCl.

  15. Green growth in fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Max; Ravensbeck, Lars; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    harming the environment. Fishery is an environment-dependent sector and it has been argued that there is no potential for green growth in the sector owing to global overexploitation, leaving no scope for production growth. The purpose of this paper is to explain what green growth is and to develop...... a conceptual framework. Furthermore, the aim is to show that a large green growth potential actually exists in fisheries and to show how this potential can be achieved. The potential green growth appears as value-added instead of production growth. The potential can be achieved by reducing overcapacity......, investing in the rebuilding of fish stocks and a coordinated regulation of marine activities that interact with fisheries. Incentive-based regulation of fisheries that counterbalances services of the ecosystems is an important instrument to achieve green growth....

  16. Determining Thermal Specifications for Vegetated GREEN Roofs in Moderate Winter Climats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravesloot, Christoph Maria

    2015-01-01

    Because local weather conditions in moderate climates are changing constantly, heat transfer specifications of substrate and vegetation in vegetated green roofs also change accordingly. Nevertheless, it is assumed that vegetated green roofs can have a positive effect on the thermal performance of co

  17. Going Green: Greening Your Marketing Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Carol Anne

    2009-01-01

    There is no doubt that the "Going Green" movement is in full swing. With global warming and other ecological concerns, people are paying closer attention to environmental issues and striving to live in a more sustainable world. For libraries, this is a perfect opportunity to be active in a campus-wide program and simultaneously promote library…

  18. Green Informatics: ICT for Green and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharoula S. Andreopoulou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Green Informatics constitute a new term in the science of information that describes the utilization of informatics in the interest of the natural environment and the natural resources regarding sustainability and sustainable development. Nowadays, ICT has introduced the convergence of e-services with broadband network infrastructure, wireless technologies and mobile devices. The revolution of ICTs introduction in daily average life has also resulted in the increase of GHG, since the ’’carbon footprint’’ is continually increasing. The dimensions of Green Informatics contribution are: the reduction of energy consumption, the rise of environmental awareness, the effective communication for environmental issues and the environmental monitoring and surveillance systems, as a means to protect and restore natural ecosystems potential. EU has reinforced the environmental sector with focus on high level of protection and improvement of the quality of environment through the enacting of strategies, initiatives and measures. Future EU strategy aims to a low carbon European society by 2050 and to green/sustainable development, ICTs can play a key role in the environmental protection and sustainability, however, green behavior is still critical.

  19. Collection Development "Green Business": The Green Capitalist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagan, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The "greening" of corporate behemoths like Wal-Mart, DuPont, and Toyota has received much media attention in recent years. But consider small businesses: according to the U.S. Small Business Administration, of the estimated 27 million firms in the United States, 99.7 percent have fewer than 500 employees, 97.5 percent have fewer than 20, and more…

  20. Robust plasmonic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Tamulevicius, Tomas;

    2014-01-01

    substrates is presented, which relies on the coverage of gold nanostructures with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films of thicknesses 25, 55 and 105 nm. DLC thin films were grown by direct hydrocarbon ion beam deposition. In order to find the optimum balance between optical and mechanical properties...... and breaking. DLC coating with thicknesses between 25 and 105 nm is found to considerably increase the mechanical strength of the substrates while at the same time ensuring conservation of sufficient field enhancements of the gold plasmonic substrates....

  1. Preparation and Microstructure of Glass-ceramics and Ceramic Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Feng; XIE Junlin; HAN Da

    2008-01-01

    The technology and microstructure of glass-ceramics and ceramic composite materials were studied.A suitable ceramic body was chosen on the basis of the sintering temperature of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system glass-ceramics.According to the expansion coefficient of the ceramic body,that of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system glass-ceramics was adjusted.a-wollastonite was found present as the major crystalline phase in glass-ceramic.The CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system glass-ceramic layer and ceramic body could be sintered together by adjusting the sintering period.The compositions of glass-ceramic layer and ceramic body diffuse mutually at 1100℃.resulting in an interface between them.To achieve good sintered properties of glass-ceramics and the chosen ceramic body,at least a four-hour sintering time is used.

  2. Spectral Markers of Erythrocytes on Solid Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiziev, Adkhamjon A.; Krakhmalev, V. A.

    Proposed in previous paper [1,2] the new nondestructive method of optical microscopy allows to examine the structures of living cells (human erythrocytes) in their natural colors without its staining by using a specially designed substrate for deposition of biological sample and observing a native blood smears in reflected light. Color interference contrast image is achieved due to special condition of experiment is connected with chose of angle of incidental light, wave length of light of reflected ray, chemical composition of sample, thickness of sample, refractive index of sample, refractive index of substrate, chemical composition of substrate [1,2]. We can identify chemical compounds of erythrocytes after calibration color scale by alternative methods. For comparison we used Synchrotron Radiation based Fourier Transformed Infrared (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy. By focusing of infrared beam of FTIR microscope on cell surface we can screen and distinguish difference erythrocytes by its color. For example on Fig. 49.1 we can see two neighbored erythrocytes where one of them have red color (point 1) and other-green (point 5). To identify their spectral markers we measured IR absorption spectra of cells at different points (1,2,3,4 and 5). Intermediated area (points 3 and 4) correspond to substrate spectra (silicon substrate) and their spectra are same. The peaks at 2,850 and 2,920 cm-1 correspond mainly to the CH2 stretching modes of the methylene chains in membrane lipids. At 1,650 cm-1 the amide I band is observed, which results, principally, from the n(CO) stretching vibrations of the protein amide bonds; the amide II band, near 1,550 cm-1, is a combination of the d(N-H) bending and n(C-N) stretching vibrations of the amide bonds. The peaks at 2,850 and 2,920 cm-1 correspond mainly to the CH2 stretching modes of the methylene chains in membrane lipids [3. The intensities of the absorption bands at 2,920 and 2,850 cm-1 in green erythrocyte (point 5) were also

  3. Processing of porous zirconia ceramics by direct consolidation with starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous ceramics are used especially for those environments with high temperatures, heavy wear and in a corrosive medium. Zirconium-based materials are useful for such applications as sensors, filters, support for catalytic reactions, porous components for sofc and in biomedical applications. A conventional method for producing porous ceramics consists of the addition and later decomposition by calcination (pyrolisis) of different organic materials that act as pore formers. Several wet processing possibilities have been developed. Among these is a technique of direct consolidation with starch. This process begins with the preparation of an aqueous suspension of the ceramic with the dispersants needed to stabilize it, to which the starch is added. After casting in a waterproof mold, the suspension thermally hardens into the desired shape. The dry compacts undergo the sintering cycle to obtain pieces almost in their final form. This study aims to optimize the processing of porous zirconium ceramics using starch as a pore and binder forming agent. Zirconium with 3% yttrium molar stabilized in tetragonal phase was used. The aqueous suspensions (52-55% vol) of the zirconium-starch mixtures with different compositions were stabilized with a commercial solution of ammonium polyacrylate as a dispersant and were hardened in plastic molds at 90oC for 30 min. The influence of added volume of starch on the physical characteristics of the pieces in green state was established while maintaining the temperature, the gelling time and the conditions of constant drying. The sintering was carried out at 1000-1500oC-2h. The characteristics of the sintered product were evaluated by measuring density, volumetric contraction, intrusion of Hg and the evolution of the crystalline phases by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microstructural properties of ceramic (pore volume, the relation between open and closed porosity, size distribution, morphology of the

  4. Chitin Nanofiber Transparent Paper for Flexible Green Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jungho; Lee, Daewon; Im, Hyeon-Gyun; Han, Yun Cheol; Jeong, Eun Gyo; Rolandi, Marco; Choi, Kyung Cheol; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2016-07-01

    A transparent paper made of chitin nanofibers (ChNF) is introduced and its utilization as a substrate for flexible organic light-emitting diodes is demonstrated. Given its promising macroscopic properties, biofriendly characteristics, and availability of the raw material, the utilization of the ChNF transparent paper as a structural platform for flexible green electronics is envisaged.

  5. Rare-earth cuprates for ceramic colouring application-An investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible use of rare-earth cuprates R2BaCuO5 and R2Cu2O5 (R rare earth) type compounds for high temperature (above 1000 deg. C) ceramic pigment application is presented in this paper. The traditional ceramic powder mixing method was adopted for the manufacture of various samples (pigment powders) used in this study. Yellow-green coloured powders with a variation in the intensity were obtained with R2BaCuO5 (R = Sm) at different calcination temperatures (950-1050 deg. C) and soaking time up to 12 h. These powders were then optimized in terms of colour by altering the calcinations temperature. The products with the most attractive colour were obtained with the sample calcined at 1050 deg. C. The same yellow-green colour powders were observed when Sm was replaced by other rare earth oxides such as Ho, Yb, Er and calcined at the same temperature, except for Y. In the case of the Y addition, a dark green coloured powder was observed. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the samples indicated R2BaCuO5 (R = rare earth) to be the major phase present in each case, although traces of CuO and the respective rare earth oxides were still present. For R2Cu2O5 (R = Dy), a bluish-green coloured pigment powders with a variation in their intensity were observed when calcined between (950 and 1050 deg. C) with a 2 h soaking time. The best result (as far as intense colour is concerned) was noticed with the sample calcined at 950 deg. C. The same bluish-green colour powders were observed when Dy was replaced by other rare earths such as Yb, Ho, Er and Y. SEM micrographs of both types of compounds (R2BaCuO5 and R2Cu2O5) obtained at various calcination temperatures revealed the presence of agglomerates in the samples, with an average grain size in the range 1-3 μm. All the pigment powders of the type R2BaCuO5 with the exception of the Sm-doped materials were unstable at 1070 deg. C and produced a bubble rich surface (yttrium being the worst) when introduced into an unleaded commercial

  6. Application of a mixed metal oxide catalyst to a metallic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor); Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Wisner, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for applying a mixed metal oxide catalyst to a metallic substrate for the creation of a robust, high temperature catalyst system for use in decomposing propellants, particularly hydrogen peroxide propellants, for use in propulsion systems. The method begins by forming a prepared substrate material consisting of a metallic inner substrate and a bound layer of a noble metal intermediate. Alternatively, a bound ceramic coating, or frit, may be introduced between the metallic inner substrate and noble metal intermediate when the metallic substrate is oxidation resistant. A high-activity catalyst slurry is applied to the surface of the prepared substrate and dried to remove the organic solvent. The catalyst layer is then heat treated to bind the catalyst layer to the surface. The bound catalyst layer is then activated using an activation treatment and calcinations to form the high-activity catalyst system.

  7. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  8. Green space as classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Peter; Schipperijn, Jasper; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2013-01-01

    , who, when and where has thus far only been supported by anecdotal evidence, but seems fundamental to the decision-making of a range of green space providers. The present study aims to describe, characterise and discuss outdoor teachers’ use, preferences and ecostrategies in relation to green space....... A nationwide survey was conducted among Danish teachers practising outdoor teaching (107 respondents), and it showed that a majority used and preferred forest areas. The outdoor teachers used mainly school grounds and local green space for their outdoor teaching with a majority using the same place or mostly...

  9. Green Light Pulse Oximeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, John Edward (Oldsmar, FL)

    1998-11-03

    A reflectance pulse oximeter that determines oxygen saturation of hemoglobin using two sources of electromagnetic radiation in the green optical region, which provides the maximum reflectance pulsation spectrum. The use of green light allows placement of an oximetry probe at central body sites (e.g., wrist, thigh, abdomen, forehead, scalp, and back). Preferably, the two green light sources alternately emit light at 560 nm and 577 nm, respectively, which gives the biggest difference in hemoglobin extinction coefficients between deoxyhemoglobin, RHb, and oxyhemoglobin, HbO.sub.2.

  10. Green syntheses, v.1

    CERN Document Server

    Tundo, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction to the Green Syntheses SeriesPietro Tundo and John AndraosApplication of Material Efficiency Metrics to Assess Reaction Greenness-Illustrative Case Studies from Organic SynthesesJohn AndraosReaction 1: Synthesis of 3-Benzyl-5-Methyleneoxazolidin-2-one from N-Benzylprop-2-yn-1-Amine and CO2Qing-Wen Song and Liang-Nian HeReaction 2: Synthesis of the 5-Membered Cyclic Carbonates from Epoxides and CO2Qing-Wen Song, Liang-Nian HePart I: Green Methods for the Epoxidation of

  11. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia-ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal-ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis

  12. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Ceramic Coatings under Spherical Indentation with Metallic Interlayer: Part Ⅰ Uncracked Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minh-Quy LE; Seock-Sam KIM

    2006-01-01

    Spherical indentation of ceramic coatings with metallic interlayer was performed by means of axisymmetric finite element analysis (FEA). Two typical ceramic coatings with relatively high and low elastic modulus deposited on aluminum alloy and carbon steel were considered. Various combinations of indenter radius-coating thickness ratios and interlayer thickness-coating thickness ratios were used in the modeling. The effects of the interlayer, the coating and the substrate on the indentation behavior, such as the radial stress distribution along the coating surface as well as the coating interface, and the plastic deformation zone evolution in the substrate were investigated in connection with the above mentioned ratios. The coating cracking dominant modes were also discussed within the context of the peak tensile stresses on the coating surface and on the coating interface.

  14. A Spray Pyrolysis Method to Grow Carbon Nanotubes on Carbon Fibres, Steel and Ceramic Bricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilatela, Juan J; Rabanal, M E; Cervantes-Sodi, Felipe; García-Ruiz, Máximo; Jiménez-Rodríguez, José A; Reiband, Gerd; Terrones, Mauricio

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a spray pyrolysis method to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high degree of crystallinity, aspect ratio and degree of alignment on a variety of different substrates, such as conventional steel, carbon fibres (CF) and ceramics. The process consists in the chemical vapour deposition of both a thin SiO2 layer and CNTs that subsequently grow on this thin layer. After CNT growth, increases in specific surface by factors of 1000 and 30 for the steel and CF samples, respectively, are observed. CNTs growth on ceramic surfaces results in a surface resistance of 37.5 Ohm/sq. When using conventional steel as a rector tube, we observed CNTs growth rates of 0.6 g/min. Details of nanotube morphology and the growth mechanism are discussed. Since the method discussed here is highly versatile, it opens up a wide variety of applications in which specific substrates could be used in combination with CNTs.

  15. Fabrication and Life Prediction of SSiC Ceramic Joint Joined with Silicon Resin YR3370

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Xiao-kun; XU Bing-she

    2007-01-01

    Joints between sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) were produced using a polysiloxane silicon resin YR3370 (GE Toshiba Silicones) as joining material. Samples were heat treated in a 99.99% nitrogen flux at temperatures ranging from 1 100 ℃ to 1 300 ℃. Three point bending strength of the joint reached the maximum of 179 MPa as joined at 1 200 ℃. The joining layer is continuous, homogeneous and densified and has a thickness of 2 tm -5 μm. The joining mechanism is that the amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SixOyCz) ceramic pyrolyzed from silicon resin YR3370 acts as an inorganic adhesive to SSiC substrate, which means the formation of the continuous Si-C bond structure between SixOyCz structure and SSiC substrate. Life prediction of the ceramic joint can be realized through the measurement of the critical time of the joint after the cyclic loading test.

  16. A Spray Pyrolysis Method to Grow Carbon Nanotubes on Carbon Fibres, Steel and Ceramic Bricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilatela, Juan J; Rabanal, M E; Cervantes-Sodi, Felipe; García-Ruiz, Máximo; Jiménez-Rodríguez, José A; Reiband, Gerd; Terrones, Mauricio

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a spray pyrolysis method to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high degree of crystallinity, aspect ratio and degree of alignment on a variety of different substrates, such as conventional steel, carbon fibres (CF) and ceramics. The process consists in the chemical vapour deposition of both a thin SiO2 layer and CNTs that subsequently grow on this thin layer. After CNT growth, increases in specific surface by factors of 1000 and 30 for the steel and CF samples, respectively, are observed. CNTs growth on ceramic surfaces results in a surface resistance of 37.5 Ohm/sq. When using conventional steel as a rector tube, we observed CNTs growth rates of 0.6 g/min. Details of nanotube morphology and the growth mechanism are discussed. Since the method discussed here is highly versatile, it opens up a wide variety of applications in which specific substrates could be used in combination with CNTs. PMID:26353505

  17. Build up the Ceramics Platform, Enhance the Brand Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ To promote the export trade of China ceramics industry, to develop the overseas marking channel for domestic architecture sanitary ceramics industry ,China Ceramics City ,jointly with China's Foreign Trade magazine,start to publicize on the overseas market.

  18. Sustainable green urban planning: the Green Credit Tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cilliers, E.J.; Diemont, E.; Stobbelaar, D.J.; Timmermans, W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The Green Credit Tool is evaluated as a method to quantify the value of green-spaces and to determine how these green-space-values can be replaced or compensated for within urban spatial planning projects. Design/methodology/approach – Amersfoort Local Municipality created the Green Credit

  19. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  20. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  1. Experiences with Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....

  2. Experiences with voice to design ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....

  3. Using a ceramic chamber in kicker magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S.

    1993-05-01

    A ceramic chamber inside kicker magnets can provide the relevant field risetime. On the other hand, some metallic coating inside has to prevent static charge buildup and shield the beam from ceramic and ferrite at high frequencies to avoid possible resonances. The issues concerning the metallized ceramic chamber, such as coupling impedances and requirements on the coating, are studied to find a compromise solution for kickers of the Medium Energy Booster at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  4. Advanced ceramics: the present and the perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development in the Brazilian and international areas of advanced ceramics is described, emphasizing its economic perspectivas and industrial applications. Results obtained by national institutions are reviewed, mainly in the context of those that pioneered the required high technology in this ceramic field. The rapid growth of the interest for those special materials, made more evident by ample information related to the superconducting ceramics great pontential for important practical applications, is one of the most significant characteristics of the area. (author)

  5. Graded Structures for All-ceramic Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Y.; Chai, H.; Lawn, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    One failure mode of all-ceramic restorations is radial cracking at the cementation surface, from occlusally induced flexure of the stiffer ceramic layer(s) on the softer dentin underlayer. We hypothesize that such failure may be substantially mitigated by an appropriate grading of elastic modulus through the ceramic thickness. In this study, we fabricated graded structures by infiltrating glass into zirconia plates, with resulting diminished modulus in the outer surfaces. The plates were then...

  6. Ceramic Materials and Color in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Volpato, Claudia; Fredel, Márcio; Philippi, Analúcia; PETTER, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of metal ceramic crowns, clinicians and researchers have been looking for a restorative system that can associate beauty, strength and durability, but without the presence of a metallic infrastructure. Indeed, dental ceramics are materials that come aesthetically closest to natural teeth. With the improvement of ceramic systems, it has been possible to combine the excellent aesthetic characteristics of this material with a considerable resistance to fracture. It is impe...

  7. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  8. GRAIN BOUNDARIES IN POLYPHASE CERAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, D

    1985-01-01

    The majority of polyphase ceramics contain a residual glass phase at their grain boundaries. The stability of these phases, particularly at the two-grain boundaries, is of significance since they affect the properties of the material as a whole. Drawing analogies with soap films, the stability of a continuous intergranular phase is considered in terms of the balance between the capillarity and disjoining pressures. The individual components to the disjoining pressures are discussed. It is arg...

  9. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation

    OpenAIRE

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative t...

  10. Luminescent ceramics for LED conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raukas, M.; Wei, G.; Bergenek, K.; Kelso, J.; Zink, N.; Zheng, Y.; Hannah, M.; Stough, M.; Wirth, R.; Linkov, A.; Jermann, F.; Eisert, D.

    2011-03-01

    Many LED-based applications would benefit from more efficient and/or high lumen output devices that enable usage in both white and single color illumination schemes. In the present article we briefly review the materials research history leading to optical ceramic converters and discuss their typical characteristics. Recently demonstrated high performance values in terms of efficacy and external quantum efficiency in orange (amber) spectral region are described.

  11. Evaluation of bond strength of various margin ceramics to a zirconia ceramic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comlekoglu, M. Erhan; Dundar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gungor, M. Ali; Gokce, Bulent; Artunc, Celal

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the bond strengths of four different margin ceramics based on fluoroapatite and feldspath to a zirconia ceramic. Methods: Zirconia cores (Zirconzahn) (N = 28, n = 7/margin ceramic group) were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions (diameter: 4 mm; thi

  12. Chemical durability of glaze on Zsolnay architectural ceramics (Budapest, Hungary) in acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baricza, Ágnes; Bajnóczi, Bernadett; May, Zoltán; Tóth, Mária; Szabó, Csaba

    2015-04-01

    Zsolnay glazed architectural ceramics are among the most famous Hungarian ceramics, however, there is no profound knowledge about the deterioration of these building materials. The present study aims to reveal the influence of acidic solutions in the deterioration of Zsolnay ceramics. The studied ceramics are glazed roof tiles, which originate from two buildings in Budapest: one is located in the densely built-up city centre with high traffic rate and another one is in a city quarter with moderate traffic and more open space. The roof tiles represent the construction and the renovation periods of the buildings. The ceramics were mainly covered by lead glazes in the construction period and mainly alkali glazes in the renovation periods. The glaze of the tiles were coloured with iron (for yellow glaze) or chromium/copper/iron (for green glazes) in the case of the building located in the city centre, whereas cobalt was used as colorant and tin oxide as opacifier for the blue glaze of the ceramics of the other building. Six tiles were selected from each building. Sulphuric acid (H2SO4) solutions of pH2 and pH4 were used to measure the durability of the glazes up to 14 days at room temperature. The surfaces of the glazed ceramics after the treatment were measured by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDS techniques to determine the precipitated phases on the surface of the glaze. Electron microprobe analysis was used to quantitatively characterise phases found and to determine the chemical composition of the treated glaze. The recovered sulphuric acid solutions were measured with ICP-OES technique in order to quantify the extent of the ion exchange between the glaze and the solutions. There is a significant difference in the dissolution rates in the treatments with sulphuric acid solutions of pH2 and pH4, respectively. The solution of pH2 induced greater ion exchange (approx. 7-10 times) from the glaze compared to the solution of pH4. Alkali and alkali earth

  13. The effect of water-soluble polymers on the microstructure and properties of freeze-cast alumina ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekor, Christopher Michael

    Porous ceramics can be divided into three separate classes based on their pore size: microporous ceramics with pores less than 2 nm, mesoporous ceramics with pores in the range of 2--50 nm and macroporous ceramics with pores that are greater than 50 nm. In particular, macroporous ceramics are used in a variety of applications such as refractories, molten metal filtration, diesel particulate filters, heterogeneous catalyst supports and biomedical scaffolds. Freeze casting is a novel method used to create macroporous ceramics. In this method growing ice crystals act as a template for the pores and are solidified, often directionally, through a ceramic dispersion and removed from the green body through a freeze drying procedure. This method has attracted some attention over the past few years due to its relative simplicity, flexibility and environmental friendliness. On top of this freeze casting is capable of producing materials with high pore volume fractions, which is an advantage over processing by packing and necking of particles, where the pore volume fraction is typically less than 50%. Many of the basic processing variables that affect the freeze cast microstructure, such as the temperature gradient, interfacial velocity and solid loading of the dispersion have been well established in the literature. On the other hand, areas such as the effect of additives on the microstructure and mechanical properties have not been covered in great detail. In this study the concept of constitutional supercooling from basic solidification theory is used to explain the effects of two water-soluble polymers, polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl alcohol, on the microstructure of freeze cast alumina ceramics. In addition, changes in the observed microstructure will be related to experimentally determined values of permeability and compressive strength.

  14. Green Office 2015; Green Office 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubachs, H.J.G. [Imtech, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    The project Green Office 2015 is an integral, sustainable and multiple district development in which urban development, landscape, architecture, indoor and technology are integrated. The participants in this project show that integral design has an added value in comparison to a traditional design process. They want to enrich the building and building services sector with their shared knowledge and expertise on sustainable office buildings. [Dutch] Dit artikel beschrijft Het Green Office 2015 project: een integrale, duurzame en meervoudige gebiedsontwikkeling waarin stedenbouw, landschap, architectuur, interieur en technologie samengaan. Met dit project willen de participanten aantonen dat integraal ontwerpen meerwaarde oplevert ten opzichte van de traditionele manier van werken. Alle partijen willen ook, met hun gezamenlijke kennis en expertise, de bouw- en installatiesector verrijken met ideeen voor duurzame kantoorgebouwen.

  15. The future of bioactive ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hench, Larry L

    2015-02-01

    Two important worldwide needs must be satisfied in the future; (1) treatment of the deteriorating health of an aging population and, (2) decreasing healthcare costs to meet the needs of an increased population. The ethical and economic dilemma is how to achieve equality in quality of care while at the same time decreasing cost of care for an ever-expanding number of people. The limited lifetime of prosthetic devices made from first-generation nearly inert biomaterials requires new approaches to meet these two large needs. This paper advises an expanded emphasis on: (1) regeneration of tissues and (2) prevention of tissue deterioration to meet this growing need. Innovative use of bioactive ceramics with genetic control of in situ tissue responses offers the potential to achieve both tissue regeneration and prevention. Clinical success of use of bioactive glass for bone regeneration is evidence that this concept works. Likewise the use of micron sized bioactive glass powders in a dentifrice for re-mineralization of teeth provides evidence that prevention of tissue deterioration is also possible. This opinion paper outlines clinical needs that could be met by innovative use of bioactive glasses and ceramics in the near future; including: regeneration of skeletal tissues that is patient specific and genetic based, load-bearing bioactive glass-ceramics for skeletal and ligament and tendon repair, repair and regeneration of soft tissues, and rapid low-cost analysis of human cell-biomaterial interactions leading to patient specific diagnoses and treatments using molecularly tailored bioceramics.

  16. Spatial environmental heterogeneity affects plant growth and thermal performance on a green roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland-Nicks, Michael; Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy

    2016-05-15

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services, including stormwater retention and reductions in heat transfer through the roof. Microclimates, as well as designed features of green roofs, such as substrate and vegetation, affect the magnitude of these services. Many green roofs are partially shaded by surrounding buildings, but the effects of this within-roof spatial environmental heterogeneity on thermal performance and other ecosystem services have not been examined. We quantified the effects of spatial heterogeneity in solar radiation, substrate depth and other variables affected by these drivers on vegetation and ecosystem services in an extensive green roof. Spatial heterogeneity in substrate depth and insolation were correlated with differential growth, survival and flowering in two focal plant species. These effects were likely driven by the resulting spatial heterogeneity in substrate temperature and moisture content. Thermal performance (indicated by heat flux and substrate temperature) was influenced by spatial heterogeneity in vegetation cover and substrate depth. Areas with less insolation were cooler in summer and had greater substrate moisture, leading to more favorable conditions for plant growth and survival. Spatial variation in substrate moisture (7%-26% volumetric moisture content) and temperature (21°C-36°C) during hot sunny conditions in summer could cause large differences in stormwater retention and heat flux within a single green roof. Shaded areas promote smaller heat fluxes through the roof, leading to energy savings, but lower evapotranspiration in these areas should reduce stormwater retention capacity. Spatial heterogeneity can thus result in trade-offs between different ecosystem services. The effects of these spatial heterogeneities are likely widespread in green roofs. Structures that provide shelter from sun and wind may be productively utilized to design higher functioning green roofs and increase biodiversity by providing habitat

  17. Spatial environmental heterogeneity affects plant growth and thermal performance on a green roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland-Nicks, Michael; Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy

    2016-05-15

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services, including stormwater retention and reductions in heat transfer through the roof. Microclimates, as well as designed features of green roofs, such as substrate and vegetation, affect the magnitude of these services. Many green roofs are partially shaded by surrounding buildings, but the effects of this within-roof spatial environmental heterogeneity on thermal performance and other ecosystem services have not been examined. We quantified the effects of spatial heterogeneity in solar radiation, substrate depth and other variables affected by these drivers on vegetation and ecosystem services in an extensive green roof. Spatial heterogeneity in substrate depth and insolation were correlated with differential growth, survival and flowering in two focal plant species. These effects were likely driven by the resulting spatial heterogeneity in substrate temperature and moisture content. Thermal performance (indicated by heat flux and substrate temperature) was influenced by spatial heterogeneity in vegetation cover and substrate depth. Areas with less insolation were cooler in summer and had greater substrate moisture, leading to more favorable conditions for plant growth and survival. Spatial variation in substrate moisture (7%-26% volumetric moisture content) and temperature (21°C-36°C) during hot sunny conditions in summer could cause large differences in stormwater retention and heat flux within a single green roof. Shaded areas promote smaller heat fluxes through the roof, leading to energy savings, but lower evapotranspiration in these areas should reduce stormwater retention capacity. Spatial heterogeneity can thus result in trade-offs between different ecosystem services. The effects of these spatial heterogeneities are likely widespread in green roofs. Structures that provide shelter from sun and wind may be productively utilized to design higher functioning green roofs and increase biodiversity by providing habitat

  18. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, M.L.; Sarin, V.K. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Mfg. Engineering

    1997-12-01

    For the first time, crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited on SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion and oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments.

  19. Carbon nanofillers for machining insulating ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Malek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of ceramics in emerging applications is principally limited by the final machining process necessary for producing microcomponents with complex geometries. The addition of carbon nanotubes greatly enhances the electrical properties of insulating ceramics allowing electrical discharge machining to be used to manufacture intricate parts. Meanwhile other properties of the ceramic may be either preserved or even improved. For the first time, a silicon nitride/carbon nanotubes microgear is electrically discharge machined with a remarkably high material removal rate, low surface roughness, and low tool wear. This offers unprecedented opportunities for the manufacture of complicated ceramic parts by adding carbon nanotubes for new engineering and biomedical applications.

  20. Color analysis of different ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladag, Akin; Gungor, Mehmet Ali; Artunc, Celal

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the color properties of three different ceramic systems. Three groups of 10 specimens each were prepared: Dental porcelain alloy was used as a framework for conventional and ProBOND metal-ceramic systems, while glass-ceramic ingots were used as a framework for 10 samples using an all-ceramic system. For the former, dentin porcelain was applied and a ceramic veneering material was applied to the ingot frameworks. Using a dental spectrophotometer, the pre- and post-glaze color compatibility between disc specimens and A3 shade was evaluated. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare color differences among groups in this study, while the Mann-Whitney U test was used to make bilateral comparisons among the three different ceramic systems. The values obtained during the dentin stage revealed a significant difference in the all-ceramic group (p ceramic samples (p > 0.05). These results suggest that ProBOND can yield esthetically superior results in clinical applications compared to conventional ceramic systems. PMID:20478787

  1. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  2. Ceramic-Metal Interfaces in Multilayer Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell, John; Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Andersen, Bjørn;

    1996-01-01

    quality and strength of this interface. In the case of a weak ceramic-metal interface, delaminations will occur under severe working conditions.Work has been carried out on a commercial PZT type ceramic and various types of Pt electrode paste. The present study involves characterization of the interface......Multilayer actuators consist of a number of piezoelectric or electrostrictive ceramic layers, separated by thin metal electrodes. Thus, the ceramic-metal interface plays an even more important role than for bulk piezoceramics. The performance and durability of the actuator depends closely on the...

  3. Measurement of Emissivity of Porous Ceramic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    BÜYÜKALACA, Orhan

    1998-01-01

    In this study, measurements of spectral and total emissivities of seven different porous ceramic materials and one ceramic fibre material are reported. Measurements were made for wavelength range from 1.2 µm to 20 µm and temperature range from 200 °C to 700 °C. It was found that total emissivity increases with increase of pore size but decreases with increase of temperature. The results showed all the porous ceramic materials tested to be much better than ceramic fibre in terms of total em...

  4. Green Turtle Trophic Ecology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently conducting a study of green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) trophic ecology in the eastern Pacific. Tissue samples and stable carbon and stable...

  5. Expanding the Green Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, John W.; Riely, Frank Z.

    1989-01-01

    Described are some of the successes of the Green Revolution in third-world nations. Discussed are research priorities; misconceptions; and improvements in management skills, training and education, infrastructure, and international trade. (CW)

  6. The Green Revolution Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbridge, Stuart

    1985-01-01

    The Green Revolution game helps college students learn about agrarian change in which people use science to transform nature. The rational and basic objectives of the game are discussed, and the game's strengths and weaknesses are examined. (RM)

  7. Compliance for Green IT

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The growing range of Green IT regulations are challenging more and more organisations to take specific steps to ensure they are in compliance with sometimes complex regulations, ranging from cap & trade requirements through to regulations concerning IT equipment disposal.

  8. Hot Green Wheels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China hands out subsidies for purchases of new energy vehicles to spur green car interest After months of waiting, the Ministry of Finance announced on June 1a trial program to subsidize purchases of new energy vehicles in the

  9. Green Turtle Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for green turtle as designated by Federal Register Vol. 63, No. 46701, September 2, 1998, Rules and Regulations.

  10. Green Turtle Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data represent the critical habitat for green turtle as designated by Federal Register Vol. 63, No. 46701, September 2, 1998, Rules and Regulations.

  11. High Efficacy Green LEDs by Polarization Controlled MOVPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, Christian [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2013-03-31

    Amazing performance in GaInN/GaN based LEDs has become possible by advanced epitaxial growth on a wide variety of substrates over the last decade. An immediate push towards product development and worldwide competition for market share have effectively reduced production cost and generated substantial primary energy savings on a worldwide scale. At all times of the development, this economic pressure forced very fundamental decisions that would shape huge industrial investment. One of those major aspects is the choice of epitaxial growth substrate. The natural questions are to what extend a decision for a certain substrate will limit the ultimate performance and to what extent, the choice of a currently more expensive substrate such as native GaN could overcome any of the remaining performance limitations. Therefore, this project has set out to explore what performance characteristic could be achieved under the utilization of bulk GaN substrate. Our work was guided by the hypotheses that line defects such as threading dislocations in the active region should be avoided and the huge piezoelectric polarization needs to be attenuated – if not turned off – for higher performing LEDs, particularly in the longer wavelength green and deep green portions of the visible spectrum. At their relatively lower performance level, deep green LEDs are a stronger indicator of relative performance improvements and seem particular sensitive to the challenges at hand.

  12. Institutionalising Green Electricity

    OpenAIRE

    Hofman, P

    2004-01-01

    Both energy companies and consumers have embraced green electricity as a concept in which electricity produced by renewable energy sources is separately marketed and priced from conventionally generated electricity based on fossil or nuclear sources. After its introduction in 1995 by an energy distributor at the end of 2003 around 35 % (2.4 million) of Dutch households were buying green electricity, and more than twenty providers of varieties of the product had emerged. From the perspective o...

  13. Green's functions with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Duffy, Dean G

    2015-01-01

    This second edition systematically leads readers through the process of developing Green's functions for ordinary and partial differential equations. In addition to exploring the classical problems involving the wave, heat, and Helmholtz equations, the book includes special sections on leaky modes, water waves, and absolute/convective instability. The book helps readers develop an intuition about the behavior of Green's functions, and considers the questions of the computational efficiency and possible methods for accelerating the process.

  14. Between green and grey

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanet Kullberg

    2016-01-01

    Taking cuttings is cool. Growing vegetables is all the rage. Green oases can now be found scattered throughout Dutch towns and cities: community gardens and roof gardens where residents can go to relax and enjoy themselves, improve the appearance of their neighbourhood and meet their fellow residents. At the same time, private gardens in the Netherlands are increasingly losing their green appearance in favour of bricks, paving slabs and gravel, making the environment harder both literally and...

  15. 钙硼硅系玻璃陶瓷低温烧结研究%Research on Low-temperature Sintered of CaO-B2O3-SiO2 Glass-ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦鹏飞; 周洪庆; 朱海奎; 王杰; 曾凤; 吴路燕

    2011-01-01

    利用不同粒度的CaO-B2O3-SiO2(CBS)玻璃粉料,制备了低温烧结的CBS玻璃陶瓷.研究了粉料粒度对CBS系玻璃陶瓷低温烧结的影响.实验表明,粉料粒度对粉料的玻璃化温度Tg的影响不明显,玻璃致密化开始于玻璃化温度Tg≈680℃,随着烧成温度升高,收缩率迅速增大;随着粉料粒度的减小,试样的烧结温度和显气孔率降低,体积密度、收缩率、热膨胀系数和抗折强度都增大.将粉料粒径中位值D50=2.34 μm的粉料采用流延工艺制得127 μm的生料带,运用优化烧成工艺,与银电极浆料在850℃共烧,表面平整,匹配良好,能在一定程度上满足低温共烧陶瓷(LTCC)用基板材料的要求.%The CaO-B2O3-SiO2 (CBS) glass-ceramics were prepared by the powders of different grain sizes. The effect of the grain size of glass powder on the sintering behavior of the glass ceramics was investigated. The experimemtal results showed that the grain size of the glass powder had no significant effect on the glass transition temperature T8. The glass-ceramics started to densify at about Tg ≈680 ℃ , then shrinking enlarged rapidly with the sintering temperature increasing. By reducing the grain size of glass powders, the sintered temperature and the apparent porosity decreased, while the bulk density, the shrinkage ratio, the thermal expansivity and the fracture strength increased. By using the casting process, the green tape of 127 μm has been prepared with the powders of grain size D50 =2. 34 μm. Then it was co-fired with the Ag electrode paste at 850 ℃ by using the optimized firing technology. The obtained CBS glass-ceramics system had no camber and mismatch, which could satisfy With the requirements of the substrate materials used in LTCC.

  16. Properties and Clinical Application of Three Types of Dental Glass-Ceramics and Ceramics for CAD-CAM Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Ritzberger; Elke Apel; Wolfram Höland; Arnd Peschke; Volker M. Rheinberger

    2010-01-01

    The main properties (mechanical, thermal and chemical) and clinical application for dental restoration are demonstrated for three types of glass-ceramics and sintered polycrystalline ceramic produced by Ivoclar Vivadent AG. Two types of glass-ceramics are derived from the leucite-type and the lithium disilicate-type. The third type of dental materials represents a ZrO2 ceramic. CAD/CAM technology is a procedure to manufacture dental ceramic restoration. Leucite-type glass-ceramics demonstrate...

  17. Development of ceramic coatings for metallic components in supercritical water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of ceramic coatings have been prepared by spray pyrolysis processes on P91 substrates. Primary results show that coatings obtaining with different coating compositions and procedures can reduce the weight gain of P91 samples by factors of two to ten for exposure times up to 500 hours in deaerated supercritical water at 500oC and 25 MPa. Results also show that the weigh gain of a P91 sample with Al2O3 coating is about nine times less that that of uncoated P91 after exposures for 400 hours in thermally deaerated supercritical water at 650 oC and 25 MPa. These results indicate that the Al2O3 coating shows promise for preventing oxidation of P91 alloy under supercritical water conditions. Ceramic coatings on Zircaloy substrates have also been prepared using a plasma electrolytic oxidation process. After 400 hours of testing in SCW at 500 oC, the samples with ceramic coatings show improved corrosion resistance compared to the bare Zircaloy substrates. (author)

  18. Enhanced upconversion in Ho3+-doped transparent glass ceramics containing BaYbF5 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel Ho3+-doped transparent oxyfluoride SiO2–Al2O3–Na2CO3–CaO–BaF2–YbF3 glass ceramics (GC) containing BaYbF5 nanocrystals were fabricated via melt-quenching technique with subsequent heat treatment. The formation of crystalline fluoride phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compared to precursor glasses, the greatly enhanced green emission (40-fold), new emission band at ultraviolet-blue region and stark splittings of emission in GC, indicate that Ho3+ enters into BaYbF5 nanocrystals with low phonon energy. Besides, the origin of the previously unconfirmed emission band at 440–460 nm is clearly identified by measuring spectra from thermally coupled luminescent levels at various temperatures. The outstanding upconversion properties of Ho3+ in GC may present potential application in all-solid-state upconversion lasers operating in the visible and ultraviolet range. - Highlights: • Novel transparent glass ceramics containing BaYbF5 nanocrystals were fabricated. • The green upconversion intensity increases greatly (40-fold) in glass ceramics. • The origin of the previously unconfirmed emission is clearly identified in our work

  19. Effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting of molten multi-component oxides ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin, E-mail: wangjinustb@gmail.com [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Matsuda, Nozomu [Bar and Wire Product Unit, Nippon steel and Sumitomo Metal Corporation, Fukuoka, 802-8686 (Japan); Shinozaki, Nobuya [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Miyoshi, Noriko [The Center for Instrumental Analysis, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 804-8550 (Japan); Shiraishi, Takanobu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, 852-8588 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Multi-component oxides had a good wetting on stainless substrates with pretreatments. • Various substrates surface roughness caused the difference of final contact angles. • The wetting rate was slow on polished substrate due to the slow surface oxidation. - Abstract: A study on the effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting behavior of molten multi-component oxides ceramic was performed and aimed to contribute to the further understanding of the application of oxides ceramic in penetration treatment of stainless steel coatings and the deposition of stainless steel cermet coatings. The results show that at 1273 K, different surface pre-treatments (polishing and heating) had an important effect on the wetting behavior. The molten multi-component oxides showed good wettability on both stainless steel substrates, however, the wetting process on the polished substrate was significantly slower than that on the heated substrates. The mechanism of the interfacial reactions was discussed based on the microscopic and thermodynamic analysis, the substrates reacted with oxygen generated from the decomposition of the molten multi-component oxides and oxygen contained in the argon atmosphere, and the oxide film caused the molten multi-component oxides ceramic to spread on the substrates surfaces. For the polished substrate, more time was required for the surface oxidation to reach the surface composition of Heated-S, which resulted in relatively slow spreading and wetting rates. Moreover, the variance of the surface roughness drove the final contact angles to slightly different values following the sequence Polished-S > Heated-S.

  20. Green marketing as competitive advantage

    OpenAIRE

    Jelínková, Kristýna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of this thesis is to evaluate elements of green marketing v Prague‘s hotel Ramada Prague City Centre. First part of the thesis pursue understanding of fundamental concepts of green marketing like greenwashing, ecolabelling, CSR, history of green marketing an it’s basic principles. Second part focus on Ramada Worldwide hotel chain, specifically on Prague’s hotel Ramada Prague City Centre, a part of Wyndham Hotel Group company which follows its own green program – Wyndham Green s...