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Sample records for ceramic fibres scientific

  1. Health effects of refractory ceramic fibres: scientific issues and policy considerations.

    OpenAIRE

    Glass, L R; Brown, R. C.; Hoskins, J A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To review the scientific literature on the health effects of refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs). The adverse effects of exposure to asbestos has led to concern about the potential for other fibrous materials to cause diseases. For this reason the human populations most heavily exposed to synthetic mineral fibres have been examined for any adverse effects and many types of fibre have been studied in animal experiments. One type of man made vitreous fibres (MMVFs), refractory ceramic ...

  2. Occupational ceramic fibres dermatitis in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, M; Wojtczak, J

    2000-07-01

    Recently, the use of asbestos has been considerably limited in Poland, with the simultaneous increase in the manufacture, processing and application of man-made mineral fibres, which includes ceramic fibres. The aims of this study were (1) to assess the type and frequency of dermal changes caused by the irritant activity of ceramic fibres among workers at the plants that manufacture packing and insulation products; and (2) to compare the irritant activity of Polish-made L-2 and L-3 ceramic fibres with that of the Thermowool ceramic fibres made in England. Workers (n = 226) who were exposed to ceramic fibres underwent dermatological examination. Patch tests with the standard allergen set, together with samples of the fibres L-2, L-3, and Thermowool fibres, were applied to all the workers. It has been shown that the Polish-made L-2 and L-3 fibres differed from Thermowool fibres in that the L-2 and L-3 fibres contained zirconium and were coarser. The proportion of filaments with diameters above 3 microns was 11.1% in the L-3 fibre and 6.3% in the L-2 fibre samples. The Thermowool fibre did not contain filaments thicker than 3 microns. Evident dermal changes, resulting from strong irritant activity of the fibres, were detected in 109 (48.2%) of the workers examined. Irritant contact dermatitis acuta (maculae, sometimes papulae and small crusts on the upper extremities, trunk, and lower extremities), disappearing after 2-3 days, was found in 50 (22.1%) workers. Irritant contact dermatitis chronica (diffuse permanent erythema with numerous telangiectasiae on the lateral portions of the face and neck, on the trunk, behind the auricles) was detected in 40 (17.7%) workers. The remaining 19 (8.4%) workers had both types of dermal change. All examined workers complained of very strong itching. The results of the patch tests confirmed the irritant activity of the ceramic fibres. Erythema without oedema, persisting for up to 96 h, appeared at the places where the fibres had

  3. THERMAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON CERAMIC FIBRES

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, S.; Lundberg, R.; Carlsson, R.

    1986-01-01

    Fibre insulations in kilns in the ceramic industry were investigated. Cristobalite and mullite are the main crystalline phases found in Al2O3-SiO2 fibres. The amount of the crystalline phases formed depends on the chemical composition and firing temperature. Condensation of ZnO-vapours from the glaze and formation of ZnAl2O4 were found in a Saffil fibre at a temperature of 930°C.

  4. Ceramic fibres for the automotive industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryatt, J.

    1985-01-01

    The outstanding thermal, physical and chemical properties of ceramic fibres make them a noticeable contender for inclusion in engineered systems to satisfy such performance demands. A wide range of fibres and fibre-based products are available which exhibit such characteristics as high temperature continuous service ability (1600/sup 0/C if required), low thermal conductivity, excellent resistance to chemical attack (including reducing conditions), good acoustic performance at all temperatures and good resistance to vibration. They are also lightweight, fireproof and incombustible. Ceramic fibres should really be referred to as refractory fibres as they are based on combinations of high purity alumina and silica. Two groups of products exist. The most common have a continuous-use temperature of 1260/sup 0/C. These fibres are characterized by an alumina content of 40-50% but refractoriness and temperature use limit can be increased to about 1400/sup 0/C by modifying the basic chemistry. This generally involves increasing the alumina content to as much as 62% or adding chromia or zirconia to the basic mix. The second and less common group of fibres is characterized by both chemistry and crystal morphology. Chemistry is biased towards a high alumina content (over 70%), while production routes are designed to yield as high a crystal phase (and so enhanced high temperature stability) as possible.

  5. Microanalytical investigation of fibre-reinforced ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, B.; Grathwohl, G.

    1989-03-01

    Microanalytical investigations have been made on samples of ceramic fibres (SiC fibres, (Nicalon) C fibre coated with TiN) and fibre-reinforced ceramics (SiC-and glass-matrices). High resolution Auger electron spectroscopy (HRAES), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy were employed for these examinations. Analysis was best performed with HRAES on account of its lateral and depth resolution. Some of the problems involved in this technique are discussed e.g. electron beam effects. AES depth profiles of ceramic fibres are reported and compared with the surface analysis of fibres in the composites after being broken in situ.

  6. Co-extrusion of piezoelectric ceramic fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Michen, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The present work successfully developed a methodology for fabricating lead zirconate titanate [PZT] thin solid- and hollow-fibres by the thermoplastic co-extrusion process. The whole process chain, that includes: a) compounding, involving the mixing of ceramic powder with a thermoplastic binder, b) rheological characterizations, c) preform composite fabrication followed by co-extrusion, d) debinding and, finally, e) sintering of the body to near full density, is systematical...

  7. The in vivo biological activity of ceramic fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R C; Hoskins, J A; Glass, L R

    1995-10-01

    The well-known health effects following exposure to amphibole asbestos have led to some concern about the potential for other fibrous materials to cause similar diseases. This paper presents a summary of some of the inhalation experiments conducted with ceramic fibres in both rats and hamsters at the Research and Consulting Company, Geneva. One ceramic fibre (designated RCF1) was tested in rats at four exposure levels, this fibre was also tested in hamsters. Three other fibres were only tested in rats at the highest level--30 mg m-3. The increased incidence of tumours in these experiments has been contrasted with the negative results obtained with glass or mineral wools. However, there is evidence that the ceramic fibres were longer than the glass fibres and that long ceramic fibres were retained in lung tissue to a greater extent. This is sufficient to explain the results without recourse to explanations based on chemical differences between fibres.

  8. Silsesquioxane-derived ceramic fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, F. I.; Farmer, S. C.; Terepka, F. M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Fibers formed from blends of silsesquioxane polymers were characterized to study the pyrolytic conversion of these precursors to ceramics. The morphology of fibers pyrolyzed to 1400 C revealed primarily amorphous glasses whose conversion to beta-SiC is a function of both blend composition and pyrolysis conditions. Formation of beta-SiC crystallites within the glassy phase is favored by higher than stoichiometric C/Si ratios, while carbothermal reduction of Si-O bonds to form SiC with loss of SiO and CO occurs at higher methyl/phenylpropyl silsesquioxane (lower C/Si) ratios. As the carbothermal reduction is assumed to be diffusion controlled, the fibers can serve as model systems to gain understanding of the silsesquioxane pyrolysis behavior, and therefore are useful in the development of polysilsesquioxane-derived ceramic matrices and coatings as well.

  9. Exposure to ceramic man-made mineral fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friar, J J; Phillips, A M

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic fibres (also known as refractory fibres) are regarded here as man-made mineral fibres (MMMF) capable of withstanding temperatures of 1000-1600 degrees C without appreciable distortion or softening. Ceramic fibres are manufactured largely from the aluminosilicate group of minerals but some contain only alumina, zirconia or silica. Simultaneous personal gravimetric and optical fibre count samples were taken throughout the industry. It has not been possible to correlate gravimetric results with fibre counts in any meaningful way. The general conclusions are as follows: (a) gravimetrically, exposures ranged from less than 1 mg/m3 for light tasks to over 10 mg/m3 for some insulation workers. Exposures above 10 mg/m3 were not necessarily associated with correspondingly high fibre counts; (b) fibre counts rarely exceeded 1 f/ml, and it appears that ceramic fibre materials, in company with other MMMF, do not readily produce high airborne fibre counts; (c) control of dust from mineral wools to 5 mg/m3 achieves control to below 1 f/ml. This relationship does not hold for superfine MMMF and does not always hold for ceramic fibres.

  10. Emissivities of ceramic fibre linings for high-temperature furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, J.D.; Williams, A.

    1984-09-01

    Measurements have been made of the emissivities of ceramic fibre linings of the type used for low thermal mass high-temperature furnaces. The apparatus used consisted of a circular ceramic fibre lined combustion chamber heated by a natural gas burner. The surface temperature of the rear wall was monitored by a number of thermocouples mounted near the surface. The radiant flux from this wall was measured over the temperature range of 700-1400 K and by comparison with emission from a black body, the emissivities of the surface were determined. It was found that the emissivity varied with the type of surface and with temperature. The stack-bonded Kaowool ceramic fibres had a higher emissivity than parallel-bonded fibres, the values at 1400 K being 0.66 and 0.5 respectively; 'damaged' stack-bonded fibres had an intermediate value.

  11. [The fibrogenic effect of artificial ceramic fibres in experimental rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, I; Wojtczak, J; Krajnow, A

    2000-01-01

    The fibrogenic effect of aluminosilicate ceramic fibres in rats administered intratracheally with a single dose of 25 mg was assessed on the basis of the lung hydroxyproline concentration and morphological changes in the lung parenchyma and mediastinum lymphatic nodes. Control groups were composed of rats administered with NaCl saline and crocidolite UICC. The rats were exposed for 6 and 9 months. It was found that after 6 and 9 months, aluminosilicate ceramic fibres (L-1, Langfaser, Thermowool and Kaowool) showed weak fibrogenic properties. The range of changes in reactivity, and the presence of fibres of fibrous connective tissue in granulomas, induced by ceramic fibres were lower than the range of changes and the contribution of connective tissue produced by asbestos and crocidolite UICC.

  12. Determinant factor for clearance of ceramic fibres from rat lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, H; Tanaka, I; Higashi, T; Kido, M

    1992-03-01

    Deposition, clearance, retention, and durability of inhaled particles from lungs are known to be important factors for induction of pulmonary fibrosis or lung cancer. To study the deposition and clearance of alumina silicate ceramic fibres from the lung, male Wistar rats were exposed to ceramic fibre particles with a mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 4.2 micron, for six hours a day, five days a week for two weeks. The average exposure concentration was 20.7 (standard deviation (SD) 4.5) mg/m3. The rats were killed at one day, three months, and six months after the end of exposure, and the fibre numbers and dimensions were measured with a scanning electron microscope. No significant differences in number and geometric mean length of residual ceramic fibres in the lungs were found between the groups. The geometric mean diameter, however, decreased according to the duration of the clearance period. These findings suggest that solubility of fibre contributes most in the clearance of the inhaled ceramic fibres from the lungs.

  13. Exposure to refractory ceramic fibres in the metal industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnainmaa, Markku; Kangas, Juhani; Mäkinen, Milja; Metsärinne, Sirpa; Tossavainen, Antti; Säntti, Jaakko; Veteli, Marika; Savolainen, Heikki; Kalliokoski, Pentti

    2007-08-01

    Refractory ceramic fibres (RCF) are used in thermal isolation in the metal industry where high temperatures are regularly employed. Asbestos materials were earlier commonly used for these purposes. In this work, two Finnish steel plants, three foundries and a repair shop were studied for the ceramic fibre exposure of their workers under normal production and during the replacement of oven insulation. Personal and stationary sampling was used together with a novel nasal lavage sampling for the evaluation of personal exposure. Fibres were counted with optical and electron microscopy and they were identified using an energy-dispersive X-ray analyser. Ceramic fibres were found in most production phases [range <0.01-0.29 fibres per cubic centimetre (f cm(-3))]. Considerably higher fibre counts were obtained during the maintenance work (range <0.01-14.2 f cm(-3)). Nasal sampling was found to correlate with the airborne fibre concentrations at the group level. The mean fibre concentrations varied from 34 to 6680 f ml(-1) of lavage liquid. Use of personal respiratory protectors diminished the exposure on the average as analysed in the lavage specimens, but the effect of respirator use did not appear clearly in the results. Because of the heat conditions, the workers used the respirators for a strict minimum period. A considerable exposure to RCF occurs in the studied plants. Its risk should be evaluated and managed more closely in view that the material is carcinogenic. Use of personal respiratory protectors should be encouraged. Their effective use could be verified by the nasal sampling for fibres after the work shift.

  14. Ceramic fibres for high temperature insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padgett, G.C.

    1986-03-01

    Traditionally, refractory linings for high temperature plant and furnaces have comprised either brick or some form of concrete. In recent years, energy conservation has encouraged the greater use of high temperature insulation which is also available in either brick or a lightweight concrete. As an alternative, insulation can also be achieved using fibrous products or fibres combining low heat transfer with low heat capacity.

  15. Intrapleural administration of vitreous high duty ceramic fibres and heated devitrified ceramic fibres does not give rise to pleural mesothelioma in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carthew, P; Edwards, R E; Dorman, B M; Brown, R C; Young, J; Laskowski, J J; Wagner, J C

    1995-08-01

    In order to determine whether they are potentially carcinogenic to the pleural mesothelium, three samples of ceramic fibre have been administered to rats by the intrapleural route. These samples were a high-duty grade refractory ceramic fibre (manufactured by Thermal Ceramics Ltd) in the as-manufactured vitreous state and two devitrified samples produced by heating the same fibre for 2 weeks at 1200 degrees C and for two weeks at 1400 degrees C. The mean lifespans of the groups of rats treated with vitrified and devitrified ceramic fibres were not significantly different from that of the control rats. In these studies none of the treated or control rats developed pleural mesothelioma, making it unlikely that ceramic fibres of this type, whether vitreous or devitrified, are potentially carcinogenic to the pleural mesothelium.

  16. Study of the respiratory health of employees in seven European plants that manufacture ceramic fibres.

    OpenAIRE

    Trethowan, W N; Burge, P S; Rossiter, C E; Harrington, J M; Calvert, I A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To study the relation between occupational exposure to ceramic fibres during manufacture and respiratory health. METHODS--The respiratory health of 628 current employees in the manufacture of ceramic fibres in seven European plants in three countries was studied with a respiratory questionnaire, lung function tests, and chest radiography. Simultaneous plant hygiene surveys measured subjects' current exposure to airborne ceramic fibres from personal samples with optical microscopy ...

  17. Properties of amorphous SiBNC-ceramic fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldus, H.-P. [Bayer AG, Leverkusen (Germany); Passing, G. [Bayer AG, Leverkusen (Germany); Scholz, H. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Silicatforschung (ISC), Wuerzburg (Germany); Sporn, D. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Silicatforschung (ISC), Wuerzburg (Germany); Jansen, M. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie; Goering, J. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Koeln (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoff-Forschung

    1997-06-01

    A new amorphous ceramic material consisting of Si, N, C, and B can be synthesized by pyrolysis of a preceramic polyborosilazane (PBS-Me) made of the ``single source`` precursor Cl{sub 3}Si-NH-BCl{sub 2} (TADB). Novel ceramic fibers consisting of borosilicon carbonitride (SiBN{sub 3}C) can be synthesized from this polymer by using a simple melt spinning process, followed by an intermediate curing step and successive pyrolysis of the obtained infusible green fibers. In the present paper we report on the preparation of the ceramic fibres, as well as their thermal stability, and their mechanical behaviour, including high temperature creep data. The reported mechanical data will be correlated to the microstructure of the fibers. (orig.)

  18. Mechanical Property Analysis on Sandwich Structured Hybrid Composite Made from Natural Fibre, Glass Fibre and Ceramic Fibre Wool Reinforced with Epoxy Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, K. R.; Abhishek, S.; Palanikumar, K.

    2017-06-01

    Natural fibre composites find wide range of applications and usage in the automobile and manufacturing industries. They find lack in desired properties, which are required for present applications. In current scenario, many developments in composite materials involve the synthesis of Hybrid composite materials to overcome some of the lacking properties. In this present investigation, two sandwich structured hybrid composite materials have been made by reinforcing Aloe Vera-Ceramic Fibre Wool-Glass fibre with Epoxy resin matrix and Sisal fibre-Ceramic Fibre Wool-Glass fibre with Epoxy resin matrix and its mechanical properties such as Tensile, Flexural and Impact are tested and analyzed. The test results from the two samples are compared and the results show that sisal fibre reinforced hybrid composite has better mechanical properties than aloe vera reinforced hybrid composite.

  19. Retention and clearance of inhaled ceramic fibres in rat lungs and development of a dissolution model.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamato, H; Hori, H.; Tanaka, I; Higashi, T; Morimoto, Y.; Kido, M

    1994-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to aluminium silicate ceramic fibres by inhalation to study pulmonary deposition, clearance, and dissolution of the fibres. Rats were killed at one day, one month, three months, and six months after the termination of exposure. After exposure, fibres greater than 50 microns in length were seen with a scanning electron microscope in the alveolar region of the lung. Fibres were recovered from the lungs with a low temperature ashing technique and their number, diame...

  20. Cytotoxicity of refractory ceramic fibres to Chinese hamster ovary cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, G A; Newman, M M; Bunn, W B; Hesterberg, T W

    1992-07-01

    The toxicity/oncogenicity of refractory ceramic fibres have been tested in chronic inhalation studies in rodents. Because these studies are time consuming and expensive, there is a need to develop and validate short-term models to screen fibres for their toxicological potential. In the present study, the toxic effects of four different compositions of refractory ceramic fibres were determined using Chinese hamster ovary cells grown in culture. These refractory ceramic fibres were the same size-selected fibres that had been used in animal inhalation studies, thus facilitating a direct comparison of findings in the two systems. Chinese hamster ovary cells were treated with refractory ceramic fibres 24 hr after seeding into 60-mm culture dishes in Ham's F12 medium with 10% serum. Inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation were determined after 3-5 days of fibre exposure. Crocidolite and chrysotile asbestos were used as positive controls. Concentration-dependent inhibition of both cell proliferation and colony formation was observed after treatment with refractory ceramic fibres. The LC(50) for the different refractory ceramic fibres ranged from 10 to 30 mug/cm(2). The LC(50)s for crocidolite and chrysotile were 5 mug/cm(2) and 1 mug/cm(2), respectively. To assess the genotoxic potential of these fibres, fibre-exposed Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures were stained with acridine orange and scored for the incidence of micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities. The incidence of nuclear abnormalities for refractory ceramic fibres at 20 mug/cm(2) ranged from 20 to 40%. Toxic endpoints of the in vitro studies were compared with those of the chronic animal inhalation studies. The latter included induction of lung fibrosis and pleural and airway tumours. A correlation was observed between the in vitro and in vivo toxicological potencies of the respective four refractory ceramic fibres: the fibres that were most toxic in vitro were also the most toxic in the

  1. Survey of the biological effects of refractory ceramic fibres: overload and its possible consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R C; Bellmann, B; Muhle, H; Davis, J M G; Maxim, L D

    2005-06-01

    This paper summarizes the biological effects of refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs). RCFs are aluminosilicate glass insulation wools with similar chemical properties to other synthetic vitreous fibres (SVFs) or 'man-made vitreous fibres' (MMVFs). There is concern that RCFs could be significantly more pathogenic than other SVFs. This paper critically reviews the data on which this perception is based. Morbidity studies on workers in RCF manufacturing indicated that, in the United states, RCF exposure was associated with an increased incidence of pleural plaques and in both the united states and Europe with statistically significant changes in some measures of lung function (though not at present exposure levels). No interstitial fibrosis was found. An ongoing mortality study of limited statistical power has failed to indicate any increased incidence of lung cancer or mesothelioma. Findings in several early animal studies led to a large series of inhalation studies where rats exposed to high levels of RCF developed fibrosis and tumours but not those exposed to other SVFs. Similarly hamsters exposed to one sample (RCF1) developed mesothelioma. Subsequent analyses of the data indicated that the RCF used in these experiments had a significantly greater proportion of non-fibrous particles than those present in the other types of SVFs tested or in workplace air. Short-term studies indicated that pulmonary overload occurred at the same as RCF tissue burdens as those in the long-term animal bioassay. When RCFs were prepared in the same way as the other SVFs, a sample resulted with a more representative ratio of particles to fibres; this sample did not produce overload in short-term tests. SVFs have various abilities to persist in the lung tissue and thus accumulate to varying degrees. It is suggested that biopersistence is a key property. While RCFs are among the more persistent they are similar to many other fibre types. The scientific and regulatory implications of these

  2. Retention and clearance of inhaled ceramic fibres in rat lungs and development of a dissolution model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, H; Hori, H; Tanaka, I; Higashi, T; Morimoto, Y; Kido, M

    1994-04-01

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to aluminium silicate ceramic fibres by inhalation to study pulmonary deposition, clearance, and dissolution of the fibres. Rats were killed at one day, one month, three months, and six months after the termination of exposure. After exposure, fibres greater than 50 microns in length were seen with a scanning electron microscope in the alveolar region of the lung. Fibres were recovered from the lungs with a low temperature ashing technique and their number, diameter, and length were measured by scanning electron microscopy. The number of fibres remaining in the lungs declined exponentially with time after exposure and their silicon content also fell. The geometric median diameter of fibres decreased linearly with time. By six months after exposure, the surface of fibres recovered from the lungs had an eroded appearance. The results suggest that ceramic fibres are physically cleared from the lung and that they show signs of dissolution. Finally, the results were used to develop a theoretical model of fibre dissolution that gives a satisfactory fit to the experimental data.

  3. Elaboration of new ceramic composites containing glass fibre production wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozenstrauha, I.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two main by-products or waste from the production of glass fibre are following: sewage sludge containing montmorillonite clay as sorbent material and ca 50% of organic matter as well as waste glass from aluminiumborosilicate glass fibre with relatively high softening temperature (> 600 ºC. In order to elaborate different new ceramic products (porous or dense composites the mentioned by-products and illitic clay from two different layers of Apriki deposit (Latvia with illite content in clay fraction up to 80-90% was used as a matrix. The raw materials were investigated by differential-thermal (DTA and XRD analysis. Ternary compositions were prepared from mixtures of 15–35 wt % of sludge, 20 wt % of waste glass and 45–65 wt % of clay and the pressed green bodies were thermally treated in sintering temperature range from 1080 to 1120 ºC in different treatment conditions. Materials produced in temperature range 1090–1100 ºC with the most optimal properties - porosity 38-52%, water absorption 39–47% and bulk density 1.35–1.67 g/cm3 were selected for production of porous ceramics and materials showing porosity 0.35–1.1%, water absorption 0.7–2.6 % and bulk density 2.1–2.3 g/cm3 - for dense ceramic composites. Obtained results indicated that incorporation up to 25 wt % of sewage sludge is beneficial for production of both ceramic products and glass-ceramic composites according to the technological properties. Structural analysis of elaborated composite materials was performed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM. By X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD the quartz, diopside and anorthite crystalline phases were detected.Durante la obtención de ciertas fibras de vidrio se generan dos subproductos o residuos principalmente: Lodo de arcilla montmorillonítica capaz de adsorber el 50 % de materia orgánica y un vidrio silicato alumínico con temperatura de reblandecimiento relativamente alta (> 600 ºC. Con el fin de elaborar nuevos

  4. Classification of refractory ceramic fibres and repercussions on high temperature insulation; La classification des fibres ceramiques refractaires et ses consequences sur l'isolation haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Class, Ph. [Thermal Ceramics de France (France)

    2000-09-01

    1999 saw the implementation of the European directive 97/69/CE on the classification of man made vitreous (silicate) fibres. This major change and its extent may be difficult to understand but is of great importance to all industries using such materials. The author, expert in Health, Safety and Environment at Thermal Ceramics Europe and representative of the European Ceramic Fibre Industry Association (ECFIA), develops this classification here, giving emphasis to the repercussions it will have on refractory ceramic fibres and high temperature insulating wools. (author)

  5. The influence of ceramic fibre on thermal expansion of moulding materials for investment casting technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadolski M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of dilatometric measurements presented in the paper are a supplement to the investigations concerning broadening thecomposition of ceramic slurry intended for investment casting technology with ceramic fibre matrix. An applying of fibre material and a change of rheologic characteristics of ceramic slurry have impelled to develop the method of applying the material to the pattern sets. The technology of multi-layer spraying has been found to be the most favourable method. Partial replacing of the grain silica materials with aluminosilicate materials in the fibrous form has affected the magnitude of dimensional changes taking place during the heating process. In order to determine the magnitude of these changes, there have been prepared slurries of various fibre fraction in the matrix and their thermal expansion has been examined within the temperature range of 273-1273 K

  6. Effects of inhaled ceramic fibres on macrophage function of rat lungs.

    OpenAIRE

    Morimoto, Y.; Yamato, H; Kido, M; Tanaka, I; Higashi, T; Fujino, A; Yokosaki, Y

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the biological effect of ceramic fibres on the clearance function of alveolar macrophages (AMs) morphological changes and phagocytic activity of AMs were assessed. Rats were exposed to respirable ceramic fibres with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 4.4 microns and a concentration of 20.1 mg/m3 in an exposure chamber. They were killed after one week (group A) and two weeks (group B) of exposure, and four weeks (group C) and 12 weeks (group D) after exposure for two weeks. The ...

  7. INTERACTION OF REDUCING AND CORROSIVE ENVIRONMENTS WITH CERAMIC FIBRES IN THE SYSTEM Al2O3-SiO2

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrichs, P.; Dhupia, G.; KrÖnert, W.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramic fibres from the system Al2O3-SiO2 are being increasingly employed in environments containing corrosive and reducing components such as alkalies, phosphates, water vapour metals etc. The reactions of these components with fibres of various compositions, that take place here via the gaseous phase, are only partly known. Due to the specific microstructure of the ceramic fibres as compared to dense materials large differences in reactions are observed.

  8. Thermal shock resistance of ceramic fibre composites characterized by non-destructive methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dimitrijević

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Alumina based ceramic fibres and alumina based ceramic were used to produce composite material. Behaviour of composite ceramics after thermal shock treatments was investigated. Thermal shock of the samples was evaluated using water quench test. Surface deterioration level of samples was monitored by image analysis before and after a number of quenching cycles. Ultrasonic measurements were done on samples after quench tests. Dynamic Young modulus of elasticity and strength degradation were calculated using measured values of ultrasonic velocities. Strengths deterioration was calculated using the non-destructive measurements and correlated to degradation of surface area and number of quenches. The addition of small amount of ceramic fibres improves the strengths and diminishes the loss of mechanical properties of samples during thermal shock experiments.

  9. Mullite-zirconium composites reinforced with ceramic fibres resistant to 1450 C; obtaining and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerchez, L.; Constantinescu, S. [PROCEMA S.A. Bucharest - Research, Design and Experimental Production, Bucharest (Romania). Inst. for Construction and Construction Materials; Muntean, M. [Universitatea Politehnica, Bucharest (Romania). Faculty of Industrial Chemistry

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this paper was the obtaining of some mullite-zirconium matrix composites, reinforced with ceramic fibres resistant to 1450 C. In order to establish the compositions, the raw materials were ground, depending on their nature, in many ways, and there were established the characteristics of ground resulted powders. On the obtained materials it was followed the evolution of the ceramic, mechanical and structural characteristics, depending on the heat treatment temperature, for various reinforcing coefficients. (orig.)

  10. Modelling of the measured longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient of single ceramic fibres with annular electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pientschke, Christoph; Steinhausen, Ralf; Kern, Sabine; Beige, Horst

    2011-05-01

    A method for the measurement of the longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient d33 of single ceramic fibres with diameters 100-500 µm was recently developed. The voltage was applied using annular electrodes and the resulting displacement was measured by a capacitive method. In this paper, a number of calculations regarding the field distribution and the resulting piezoelectric displacement are presented for a typical lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic. Provided that the fibres are ideally poled in the longitudinal direction, they can be modelled using the finite element method taking into account linear constitutive equations. The deviation of the measured and the actual d33 was modelled for a broad range of heights and diameters of the fibres and different electrode dimensions. The electric field distribution was analysed for typical examples and the influence of the mechanical stress on the measured d33 was studied. For sufficiently long and thin fibres the field distribution of the electric field is quite uniform and the d33 can be measured with high accuracy. Moreover, it was shown that for such fibres the measured piezoelectric coefficient d33 is determined by no other material parameter of the ceramics. The found trends of preferable geometries for the measurement can apparently be transferred to other piezoceramics.

  11. Effects of inhaled ceramic fibres on macrophage function of rat lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Y; Yamato, H; Kido, M; Tanaka, I; Higashi, T; Fujino, A; Yokosaki, Y

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the biological effect of ceramic fibres on the clearance function of alveolar macrophages (AMs) morphological changes and phagocytic activity of AMs were assessed. Rats were exposed to respirable ceramic fibres with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 4.4 microns and a concentration of 20.1 mg/m3 in an exposure chamber. They were killed after one week (group A) and two weeks (group B) of exposure, and four weeks (group C) and 12 weeks (group D) after exposure for two weeks. The AMs recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from each test group were incubated with yeast and phagocytic activity was determined by counting the number of yeast cells in AMs. Morphological features of AMs were assessed by scanning electron microscopy and quantified according to morphological changes. Total cell counts in BAL fluid from exposed rats in group A were higher than in control rats. Phagocytic activity of exposed AMs in group B and C exceeded that of control AMs. Morphological changes of the exposed AMs in groups A, B, and C were greater than those of control AMs. These findings suggest that ceramic fibres induced the phagocytic activity and morphological changes in AMs, and that the clearance function of AMs was stimulated by the inhaled ceramic fibres.

  12. Static And Dynamic Characteristics Of Waste Ceramic Aggregate Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cichocki Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There are multiple obstacles associated both with technology and properties of waste ceramic aggregate concrete preventing its wide production and application. In the research programme these limitations were addressed through utilizing steel fibre reinforcement and the phenomenon of internal curing. After laboratory tests of mechanical properties a numerical analysis of composites in question was conducted.

  13. Asbestos: scientific basis for environmental control of fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheson, E D; Gardner, M J

    1980-01-01

    Any review of the scientific evidence on which public policy is based must commence with a cautionary statement about the quality of the available data both about dust and about asbestos-related disease. Attention is drawn to some of the main problems. It is concluded that, in spite of their shortcomings, the data are sufficiently consistent to be useful in relation to some aspects of the problem of environmental control of the asbestos hazard. The question whether or not there is a threshold dose of fibre below which no biological effect occurs is of considerable importance in framing public policy. The evidence concerning the existence or otherwise of a threshold in relation to the different asbestos-related diseases is summarized. A summary is also given of the evidence about the shape of the dose-response curves for asbestos-related diseases in man. The paper concludes with a note on how scientific data may be summarized in a manner which may be helpful in formulating public policy with regard to a control limit.

  14. Metallic-fibre-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevost, F.; Schnedecker, G.; Boncoeur, M.

    1994-12-31

    A refractory metal wire cloth is embedded in an oxide ceramic matrix, using a plasma spraying technology, in order to elaborate composite plates. When mechanically tested, the composite fails with a pseudo-ductile fracture mode whereas the ceramic alone is originally brittle. It exhibits a higher fracture strength, and remains in the form of a single piece even when straining is important. No further heat treatment is needed after the original processing to reach these characteristics. (authors). 2 figs., 2 refs.

  15. The influence of Cerafiber 10 ceramic fibre on strength properties of moulding material for investment casting technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nadolski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The presented investigations have been aimed to determine strength properties of shell ceramic moulds produced on the basis of silica sol with the matrix composed of MK75 silica flour and Cerafiber 10 aluminosilicate ceramic fibre, the chemical composition of the latter being 56% SiO2 and 44% Al2O3. The sample material has been obtained by multi-layer spraying of ceramic slurry onto the pattern sets. The achieved results, concerning strength properties revealed during the controlled bending test performed by means of the four-point deflectometer, have been compared with the presented elsewhere results [16-19] for moulding material with grain or grain-fibre matrix, where TC E08 fibre produced by Thermal Ceramics (i.e. Kaowool HP-50-E-08 fibre has been applied as a matrix component.

  16. Fibre-reinforced ceramics for industrial applications; Faserverstaerkte Keramik in industriellen Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuchs, M.; Spoerer, J.; Zechmeister, H. [MAN Technologie AG, Karlsfeld (Germany)

    1998-05-01

    High-performance composites now include also materials with a ceramic matrix. By means of the long-fibre reinforcement of ceramics, using carbon (C) or silicium carbide (SiC) fibres embedded in SiC matrix material, a breakthrough has been achieved regarding enhanced embrittlement behaviour of ceramics. The basic mechanism of the reinforcement, as well as different fabrication methods which are now ready for transfer to market, are described. Exemplary results of applications are reported, which demonstrate the high fracture toughness, thermo-shock resistance and tribological stress tolerance of the ceramic composite. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zu den Hochleistungsverbundwerkstoffen gehoeren inzwischen auch die Werkstoffe mit keramischer Matrix. Mit der Langfaserverstaerkung von Keramik ist unter Verwendung von Kohlenstoff (C)- oder Siliciumcarbid (SiC)-Fasern, die in SiC-Matrixmaterial eingebettet werden, ein Durchbruch bei der Verbesserung des Sproedbruchverhaltens keramischer Werkstoffe gelungen. Der Grundmechanismus der Verstaerkung und verschiedene, inzwischen anwendungsreife Herstellverfahren werden beschrieben. Beispielhafte Ergebnisse von Anwendungsentwicklungen werden vorgestellt, in denen die hohe Bruchzaehigkeit, Thermoschockbestaendigkeit und tribologische Belastbarkeit von Verbundkeramik demonstriert wird. (orig.)

  17. A comparison of exposures to refractory ceramic fibres over multiple work shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G S; Rice, C H; Lockey, J E; Lemasters, G K; Gartside, P S

    1997-10-01

    As part of an ongoing, industry-wide study in the manufacture of refractory ceramic fibres (RCF), time weighted average (TWA) exposures have been collected at five facilities according to a standardised protocol. Work activities were grouped into dust zones (DZs). Persons to be sampled were randomly selected according to a protocol designed to assure that at least one sample was collected annually from each DZ; each work shift is also sampled at least annually. TWA exposures calculated over a sampling period of at least 360 min were included in the data set. DZs were combined into one of three groups (DZGs): fibre production; vacuum processes; other. The data were analysed to identify any differences by DZG between airborne fibre exposures, by the shift worked at each facility, and across all facilities. There were no statistically significant shift-related differences detected between airborne fibre exposures across the five RCF facilities when analysed as a group. Within four of the facilities, no shift-related differences were detected between airborne fibre exposures; however, at one facility, first and third shift exposures were statistically different. No documentation related to job activities was found to account for the observation. The data generally support the use of a single exposure estimate for each DZG in each of these facilities, regardless of shift worked. Researchers reconstructing exposure and not able to determine the shift worked by study subjects may find these results useful, but are cautioned that substantial differences in exposure across shifts may exist in other types of manufacturing.

  18. Synthesis and surface characterization of alumina-silica-zirconia nanocomposite ceramic fibres on aluminium at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarak Ali, M., E-mail: masterscience2003@yahoo.co.in [Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Omalur Main Road, Salem 636 011, Tamil Nadu (India); Raj, V., E-mail: alaguraj2@rediffmail.com [Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Omalur Main Road, Salem 636 011, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2010-04-01

    Alumina-silica-zirconia nanocomposite (ASZNC) ceramic fibres were synthesized by conventional anodization route. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force microscopy (AFM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDAX) were used to characterize the morphology and crystalloid structure of ASZNC fibres. Current density (DC) is one of the important parameters to get the alumina-silica-zirconia nanocomposite (ASZNC) ceramic fibres by this route. Annealing of the films exhibited a drastic change in the properties due to improved crystallinity. The root mean square roughness of the sample observed from atomic force microscopic analysis is about 71.5 nm which is comparable to the average grain size of the coatings which is about 72 nm obtained from X-Ray diffraction. The results indicate that, the ASZNC fibres are arranged well in the nanostructure. The thickness of the coating increased with the anodizing time, but the coatings turned rougher and more porous. At the initial stage the growth of ceramic coating increases inwards to the metal substrate and outwards to the coating surface simultaneously. Subsequently, it mainly grows towards the metal substrate and the density of the ceramic coating increases gradually, which results in the decrease of the total thickness as anodizing time increases. This new approach of preparing ASZNC ceramic fibres may be important in applications ranging from gas sensors to various engineering materials.

  19. Dustiness of different high-temperature insulation wools and refractory ceramic fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, P; Deghilage, P; Brown, R C

    2001-07-01

    Recent regulations are encouraging the replacement of older types of man-made mineral fibre by more soluble and, thus, less biopersistent compositions. In order for there to be any health benefits from this policy and to gain maximum benefit from such substitutions, the use of the new materials should not increase exposure. The work reported here was undertaken to investigate the use of new high-temperature glass insulation wools in place of refractory ceramic fibres (RCF). Airborne fibre levels occurring during the manufacture of both RCF and calcium magnesium silicate wools (CMS) were compared using measurements of genuine workplace exposure from a routine monitoring operation on the same plant. Exposures during use were compared in one customer facility where RCF and CMS blankets were used for the same task. Further comparisons were made in a laboratory test of dustiness using a "shaking box test". For some manufacturing tasks there are only a few workplace samples and there are few opportunities for genuine comparisons with both RCF and CMS in identical uses. However, both materials produced very similar exposure levels during manufacture, use and in the laboratory test. The novel magnesium silicate fibre was significantly dustier in the laboratory test.

  20. Effects of temperature and plasma treatment on mechanical properties of ceramic fibres

    OpenAIRE

    N.T. Xiem*, D. Kroisová, P. Louda, T.D. Hung, Z. Rozek; D. Kroisová; P. Louda; T.D. Hung; Z. Rozek

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is an investigation and comparison of mechanical properties of ceramic fibres after they were influenced by temperature and plasma treatment.Design/methodology/approach: Single filament after being processed at different temperatures (200oC, 400oC, 700oC and 1000oC) and methane plasma treatment was separated with a magnifier, prepared on a punched mounting tab, and was evaluated in accordance with Japanese Industrial Standard.Findings: Preliminary results of the...

  1. A Spray Pyrolysis Method to Grow Carbon Nanotubes on Carbon Fibres, Steel and Ceramic Bricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilatela, Juan J; Rabanal, M E; Cervantes-Sodi, Felipe; García-Ruiz, Máximo; Jiménez-Rodríguez, José A; Reiband, Gerd; Terrones, Mauricio

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a spray pyrolysis method to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high degree of crystallinity, aspect ratio and degree of alignment on a variety of different substrates, such as conventional steel, carbon fibres (CF) and ceramics. The process consists in the chemical vapour deposition of both a thin SiO2 layer and CNTs that subsequently grow on this thin layer. After CNT growth, increases in specific surface by factors of 1000 and 30 for the steel and CF samples, respectively, are observed. CNTs growth on ceramic surfaces results in a surface resistance of 37.5 Ohm/sq. When using conventional steel as a rector tube, we observed CNTs growth rates of 0.6 g/min. Details of nanotube morphology and the growth mechanism are discussed. Since the method discussed here is highly versatile, it opens up a wide variety of applications in which specific substrates could be used in combination with CNTs.

  2. The effects of heating and devitrification on the structure and biological activity of aluminosilicate refractory ceramic fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R C; Sara, E A; Hoskins, J A; Evans, C E; Young, J; Laskowski, J J; Acheson, R; Forder, S D; Rood, A P

    1992-04-01

    Three grades of ceramic fibre have been examined for their composition, structures and biological effect in several in vitro assay systems. The fibres were examined in the 'as-manufactured' state and after heating at 1200 and 1400 degrees C. Devitrification of the fibres at 1200 degrees C probably gave mullite crystals on the surface and caused the formation of the high-temperature form of cristobalite and, in zirconia grade fibres, the high-temperature, tetragonal form of zirconia as well. Further heating changed surface structure and led to zircon production in the zirconia fibres. Heating reduced the affinity of the fibres for the surface of V79-4 cells and lowered fibre toxicity toward these cells and towards macrophage-like cells. These changes in toxicity were not due to a reduction in the fibrous nature of the materials although they did become more brittle and powders prepared from them contained more isometric particles than those from as-manufactured materials. This suggests that the devitrification occurring during the use of these materials in high-temperature environments will not necessarily enhance their adverse biological activities despite the production of one phase of crystalline silica.

  3. Co-exposure to refractory ceramic fibres and asbestos and risk of pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourt, Aude; Rinaldo, Mickael; Gramond, Céline; Ducamp, Stéphane; Gilg Soit Ilg, Annabelle; Goldberg, Marcel; Pairon, Jean Claude; Brochard, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis of an increased risk of pleural mesothelioma due to co-exposure to asbestos and refractory ceramic fibres (RCF) compared to asbestos exposure alone. Males were selected from a French case-control study conducted in 1987-1993 and from the French National Mesothelioma Surveillance Program in 1998-2006. Two population controls were frequency matched to each case by year of birth. Complete job histories were collected and occupational asbestos and RCF exposures were assessed using job exposure matrices. The dose-response relationships for asbestos exposure were estimated from an unconditional logistic regression model in subjects exposed to asbestos only (group 1) and subjects exposed to both asbestos and RCF (group 2). A total of 988 cases and 1125 controls ever-exposed to asbestos were included. A dose-response relationship was observed in both groups but it was stronger in group 2. In comparison with subjects exposed at the minimum value of the cumulative index of exposure, the odds ratio was 2.6 (95% CI 1.9-3.4) for subjects exposed to 75 fibres · mL(-1) · year(-1) in group 1 increasing to 12.4 (95% CI 4.6-33.7) in group 2. Our results suggest that the pleural carcinogenic effect of occupational asbestos exposure may be modified by additional exposure to RCF.

  4. The influence of refractory ceramic fibres on pulmonary morphology, redox and immune system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tátrai, Erzsébet; Kováciková, Z; Brózik, M; Six, E; Csík, M; Tulinska, J; Drahos, Agnes; Dám, Annamária

    2006-01-01

    Refractory ceramic fibres (RCF) were studied in male SPRD rats by both in vivo long term sequential and in vitro methods. RCF was administered by single intratracheal instillation and the lungs were examined at the end of months 1, 3 and 6 after exposure. In addition, the direct toxicity of the fibres was examined in a primary culture of alveolar macrophages (AM) and in pneumocytes type II (T2). Pulmonary morphological changes, a number of parameters of the redox system, such as activity of extracellular Cu,Zn/superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD), total glutathione content of the lungs (GSH) and immunoglobulins in bronchoalveolar lavage (IgA, IgG, IgM) and in the blood were measured. The composition of the original RCF and the elemental content of the lung tissue were compared by energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) before and after exposure. Macrophage alveolitis became confluent and moderate fibrosis developed by the end of month 3, and after 6 months of exposure the intensity decreased to the level of the first month. The RCF did not significantly influence the activity of EC-SOD or the total glutathione content of the lungs. Although aluminium and silicon could be demonstrated by EDXA in the lung tissue at the end of month 3, these elements were no longer detectable by the end of month 6. The RCF decreased IgA significantly in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). The main components of RCF induced pulmonary alterations, whereas no significant change could be detected in EC-SOD and GSH. Injuries caused by direct toxicity could be observed in the cell membranes only at the highest concentration. On the basis of these results RCF can be determined as moderately toxic fibres.

  5. Fracture characteristics of carbon fibre, ceramic and non-palladium endodontic post systems at monotonously increasing loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottl, P; Hahn, L; Lauer, H Ch; Fay, M

    2002-02-01

    A carbon fibre post system, three non-palladium and one palladium metal post systems, two ceramic post systems, and a metal post system with a ceramic core were studied in vitro. The control group consisted of root-filled test teeth without posts. The test teeth were identical artificial roots of an upper central incisor made from a posterior composite whose module of elasticity was similar to that of natural dentine. All posts were cemented in the roots using Panavia 21 TC. Subsequently, standardized full crowns were cemented onto all roots. On a universal testing machine, the test teeth were loaded palatally at monotonously increasing loads until root fracture. The highest mean fracture loads were found for the carbon fibre post system (312.5 +/- 58.8 N). The fracture load of non-palladium metal posts (242.3-300.4 N) did not differ significantly from that of the Perma-dor post (265.9 N), which does contain palladium. Values of 300.3 +/- 89.3 N (aluminium oxide ceramics) and 193.5 +/-57.0 N (zirconia ceramics) were found for the ceramic posts. The control group exhibited a fracture load of 228.8 +/- 35.7 N. The mean distance between the vestibular end of the fracture gap and the point of force application was between 10.1 +/- 2.3 and 14.7 +/- 1.2 mm.

  6. Clinico-pathological features and somatic gene alterations in refractory ceramic fibre-induced murine mesothelioma reveal mineral fibre-induced mesothelioma identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andujar, Pascal; Lecomte, Céline; Renier, Annie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Kheuang, Laurence; Daubriac, Julien; Janin, Anne; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2007-07-01

    Although human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) is mainly caused by asbestos exposure, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans on the basis of their biological effects in rodents' lung and pleura and in cultured cells. Hence, further investigations are needed to clarify the mechanism of fibre-induced carcinogenicity and to prevent use of harmful particles. In a previous study, mesotheliomas were found in hemizygous Nf2 (Nf2(+/-)) mice exposed to asbestos fibres, and showed similar alterations in genes at the Ink4 locus and in Trp53 as described in HMM. Here we found that Nf2(+/-) mice developed mesotheliomas after intra-peritoneal inoculation of a RCF sample (RCF1). Clinical features in exposed mice were similar to those observed in HMM, showing association between ascite and mesothelioma. Early passages of 12 mesothelioma cell cultures from ascites developed in RCF1-exposed Nf2(+/-) mice demonstrated frequent inactivation by deletion of genes at the Ink4 locus, and low rate of Trp53 point and insertion mutations. Nf2 gene was inactivated in all cultures. In most cases, co-inactivation of genes at the Ink4 locus and Nf2 was found and, at a lower rate, of Trp53 and Nf2. These results are the first to identify mutations in RCF-induced mesothelioma. They suggest that nf2 mutation is complementary of p15(Ink4b), p16(Ink4a) and p19(Arf) or p53 mutations and show similar profile of gene alterations resulting from exposure to ceramic or asbestos fibres in Nf2(+/-) mice, also consistent with the one found in HMM. These somatic genetic changes define different pathways of mesothelial cell transformation.

  7. Computational and experimental study of atmospheric moisture in ceramic blocks filled with waste fibres in winter season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stastnik, S.

    2016-06-01

    Development of materials for vertical outer building structures tends to application of hollow clay blocks filled with some appropriate insulation material. Ceramic fittings provide high thermal resistance, but the walls built from them suffer from condensation of air humidity in winter season frequently. The paper presents the computational simulation and experimental laboratory validation of moisture behaviour of such masonry with insulation prepared from waste fibres under the Central European climatic conditions.

  8. The production of silicon carbon nitride ceramic fibres from poly-silazane polymers. Herstellung von Siliciumcarbonitrid-Keramikfasern aus Polysilazan-Polymeren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzinger, R.

    1994-07-14

    The investigations carried out in this work can be divided into two main points. One, the process technique branch, goes along the polymer precursor route. This includes the melt spinning of the poly-silazane polymers, the stabilisation of the green fibres and finally pyrolysis to silicon-carbon nitride ceramic fibres. Starting from the polymers, all the reactions and structural changes during the individual steps are examined. These experiments represent the second main part of the work. The optimisation criterion is always the tensile strength of the resulting ceramic fibres. (orig.)

  9. Lung cytotoxicity of combined exposure to refractory ceramic fibres and cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerná, Silvia; Hurbánková, Marta; Kováciková, Zuzana; Beno, Milan; Wimmerová, Sona

    2005-12-01

    Changes in some lung cytotoxic parameters after exposure to refractory ceramic fibres (RCF) or to cigarette smoke (S) and after combined exposure to RCF+S were studied in male Wistar rats in order to evaluate their potential adverse health effects. Four groups of rats were treated as follows : 1) intratracheally instilled by saline solution (0.4 ml); 2) intratracheally instilled by 4 mg of RCF; 3) exposed only to S (85 mg of total particulate matter/m(3) air ) for two hours daily; 4) exposed to RCF+S. After 6 months the animals were exsanguinated and the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was perfomed. Viability and phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages (AM), activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in cell-free BAL fluid (cf-BALF), acid phosphatase (ACP) and cathepsin D (CATD) in cfBALF, in BALF cells and in the lung tissue were estimated. Viability of AM was depressed by every type of exposure with RCF+S effect being at least additive. Phagocytic activity of AM increased in the presence of RCF. No significant changes in LDH activity were found. Activities of lysosomal enzymes measured in the lung tissue homogenates were not significantly changed, but those in the cfBALF increased especially after exposure to S with most expressive increase in BALF cells after exposure to S and RCF+S. In the case of CATD the effect of RCF+S was more than additive. The results point out to the persistence of the RCF exposure cytotoxic effects and their amplification by cigarette smoke.

  10. Silicon ceramic reinforced by endless fibres on liquid matrix precursor (with commercial C and SiC fibres); Endlosfaser-verstaerkte Siliciumkeramik aus fluessigem Matrixprecursor (mit kommerziellen C- und SiC-Fasern)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, D.

    1991-12-13

    In this work, the possibilities of manufacture of very strong or non-brittle fracturing silicon carbide/nitride compound bodies were examined using endless ceramic fibres and liquid silazane as matrix precursor. The experiments for the selection of the different reinforcement fibres showed the good suitability of high strength C fibres HT-7 (Toho). The high module fibres HM-12 (Sigri) and the intermediate fibre T800 (Toray) were used for comparison, without reaching the same values for the compound body properties as with the high strength fibre HT-7. However, typical differences were clearly shown in the reinforcement behaviour of the high strength and high module fibres, althoug the individual types of fibres originated from different manufacturing firms. (orig.) [Deutsch] In der Arbeit wurden Herstellungsmoeglichkeiten fuer hochfeste, bzw. nicht sproedbrechende Siliciumcarbid/-nitrid-Verbundkoerper unter Verwendung keramischer Endlos-Fasern sowie fluessiger Silazane als Matrix-Precursor untersucht. Die Versuche zur Auswahl der verschiedenen Verstaerkungsfasern ergaben eine gute Eignung der Hochfest-C-Faser HT-7 (Toho). Die Hochmodulfaser HM-12 (Sigri) und die Intermediatefaser T800 (Toray) wurden fuer Vergleichszwecke eingesetzt, ohne dass mit diesen die Werte fuer die Verbundkoerpereigenschaften wie mit der Hochfestfaser HT-7 erreicht wurden. Es kamen jedoch die typischen Unterschiede im Verstaerkungsverhalten der Hochfest- und Hochmodul-Fasern deutlich zum Ausdruck, obwohl die einzelnen Fasertypen von unterschiedlichen Herstellerfirmen stammten. (orig.)

  11. Effect of Aggressive Environments on Mechanical Performance of Fibre Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    First, a carbon fibre reinforced plastic is produced. Second, the green composite is pyrolysed and the shrinkage of the polymeric matrix is hindered by...carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite is prepared using standard industrial process of resin transfer moulding (RTM). The CFRP is then

  12. SiC-based ceramic fibres : thermal stability and oxidation behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greck, O.; Viricelle, J.P.; Bahloul-Hourlier, D.; Goursat, P. [Limoges Univ. (France). LMCTS/LCN; Dalbin, M.; Thomin, S. [CEAT, Toulouse (France); Flank, A.M. [LURE, Centre Univ., Orsay (France)

    1997-12-31

    The thermal stability of three commercial SiC-based fibres (Tyranno Lox M and Lox E, Hi-Nicalon) has been studied through their gaseous release and density changes followed by mass spectrometry and thermal expansion experiments. An axial shrinkage of about 0.8% has been measured in neutral and oxidizing atmosphere, at temperatures corresponding to the final pyrolysis treatment during the fibre processing (1200 C for Lox M and Lox E, 1400 C for Hi-Nicalon). This shrinkage is concommited with residual hydrogen removal for Tyranno fibres. In oxidizing conditions, the release of hydrogen results in water vapour formation which enhances the oxidation kinetics. (orig.) 5 refs.

  13. Effects of Ceramic Fibre Insulation Thickness on Skin Formation and Nodule Characteristics of Thin Wall Ductile Iron Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaneswara, D.; Suharno, B.; Nugraha, N. D.; Ariobimo, R. D. S.; Sofyan, N.

    2017-02-01

    Skin formation has become one of the problems in the thin wall ductile iron casting because it will reduce the mechanical properties of the materials. One of the solutions to reduce this skin formation is by using heat insulator to control the cooling rate. One of the insulators used for this purpose is ceramic fibre. In this research, the thickness of the ceramic fibre heat insulator used in the mould was varied, i.e. 50 mm on one side and 37.5 mm on the other side (A), no heat insulator (B), and 37.5 mm on both sides (C). After the casting process, the results were characterized in terms of metallography by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and tensile test for mechanical properties. The results showed that the skin thickness formed in A is 34.21 μm, 23.38 μm in B, and 27.78 μm in C. The nodule count in A is 541.98 nodule/mm2 (84.7%) with an average diameter of 15.14 μm, 590 nodule/mm2 (86.7%) with an average diameter of 13.18 μm in B, and 549.73 nodule/mm2 (87.2%) with an average diameter of 13.95 μm in C. The average ultimate tensile strength for A was 399 MPa, B was 314 MPa, and C was 415 MPa. Microstructural examination under SEM showed that the materials have a ductile fracture with matrix full of ferrite.

  14. Damage to ceramic fibre lining in thermal plants caused by flow forces and particles; Schaedigung von keramischen Faserauskleidungen in waermetechnischen Anlagen durch Stroemungskraefte und Partikeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, G.; Loogk, M.; Heuer, V. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Lehrstuhl Hochtemperaturanlagen

    1999-07-01

    The internal wall layers of thermal plants are often packed with components of ceramic fibres. In these cases, fibre particles can be released when process gases pass with a high speed over the surfaces of components. The erosion resistivity of ceramic fibre components is being investigated with the aid of a flow channel to determine the basic conditions under which no damage to the material occurs. In some cases, fibre erosion rates capable of causing critical damage to fibre components will be encountered at low process gas temperatures and wall shearing stresses. Taking selected cases as an example, calculations are being made for components determining whether wall shearing stresses exist that are capable of causing damage to the material. (orig.) [German] Die inneren Wandschichten von waermetechnischen Anlagen werden haeufig mit Bauteilen aus Keramikfasern zugestellt. In diesen Faellen kann es zu einem Abtrag von Faserpartikeln kommen, wenn Prozessgase hoher Geschwindigkeit an der Oberflaeche der Bauteile entlangstroemen. Zur Ermittlung der Randbedingungen, bei denen keine kritische Schaedigung des Materials auftritt, wird mit Hilfe eines Stroemungskanals die Erosionsbestaendigkeit von Faserbauteilen untersucht. Es ergeben sich in einigen Faellen bei niedrigen Temperaturen der Prozessgase und Wandschubspannungen Faserabtragsraten, die eine kritische Schaedigung der Faserbauteile hervorrufen. Fuer ausgewaehlte Beispiele wird berechnet, ob an der Bauteiloberflaeche Wandschubspannungen auftreten, die eine kritische Schaedigung der Materialien bewirken koennen. (orig.)

  15. Recent advances in Nicalon ceramic fibres including Hi-Nicalon types; Recentes decouvertes sur les fibres SiC Nicalon, en particulier la fibre Hi-Nicalon type S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, H. [Nippon Carbon Co., Ltd., Chuo-kue, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    Polymer-derived Nicalon SiC fiber produced commercially has been widely applied in high temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). Recently, SiC fiber with a low oxygen content (Hi-Nicalon) was developed and produced commercially using an electron beam curing. This fiber has a higher elastic modulus and creep resistance, and much higher thermal stability up to 1600 deg. C than that of Nicalon fiber. High temperature mechanical properties of CMCs with Hi-Nicalon have much improved. However, creep and oxidation resistance of Hi-Nicalon CMCs are not satisfactory for high temperature structural materials, because Hi-Nicalon mainly consists of SiC micro-crystals and excess carbon. Therefore, we have developed an SiC fiber (Hi--Nicalon type S) with stoichiometric SiC composition and high crystallinity. Hi-Nicalon S fiber has high elastic modulus (420 GPa), good oxidation resistance at 1400 deg. C, and excellent creep resistance. In this paper, the recent development of these oxygen free SiC fibres including physical and mechanical properties, thermal stability and an environmental resistance are reported. (author)

  16. Development of high temperature resistant ceramic matrix composites based on SiC- and novel SiBNC-fibres; Entwicklung hochtemperaturbestaendiger keramischer Faserverbundwerkstoffe auf der Basis von SiC- und neuartigen SiBNC-Fasern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daenicke, Enrico

    2014-10-01

    Novel ceramic fibres in the quaternary system Si-B-C-N exhibit excellent high temperature stability and creep resistance. In th is work it was investigated, to what extent these outstanding properties of SiBNC-fibres can be transferred into ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in comparison to commercial silicon carbide (SiC) fibres. For the CMC development the liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) as well as the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis process (PIP) was applied. Extensive correlations between fibre properties, fibre coating (without, pyrolytic carbon, lanthanum phosphate), process parameters of the CMC manufacturing method and the mechanical and microstructural properties of the CMC before and after exposure to air could be established. Hence, the potential of novel CMCs can be assessed and application fields can be derived.

  17. Surface oxidation of porous ZrB{sub 2}-SiC ceramic composites by continuous-wave ytterbium fibre laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmod, Dayang Salyani Abang, E-mail: dygsalyani@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, 94300 Kota Samarahan, Sarawak (Malaysia); Glandut, Nicolas [SPCTS, UMR 7315, CNRS, University of Limoges, European Ceramic Center, 12 Rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges (France); Khan, Amir Azam [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, 94300 Kota Samarahan, Sarawak (Malaysia); Labbe, Jean-Claude [SPCTS, UMR 7315, CNRS, University of Limoges, European Ceramic Center, 12 Rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges (France)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Surface oxidation of ZrB{sub 2}-SiC ceramic composites by Yb-fibre laser. • Round spiral laser pattern created for the surface oxidation. • Presence of laser-formed oxide scale and unaffected beneath regions. • Crazed but uncracked surface oxide. • A dense glassy SiO{sub 2}-rich layer exhibited enhances oxidation resistance. - Abstract: Surface treatment of ceramic substrates by a laser beam can allow to incorporate interesting properties to these ceramics. In the present work, surface oxidation of ca. 30% porous ZrB{sub 2}-SiC ceramic composites by using an ytterbium fibre laser was conducted. Oxidation of ceramic substrates through this process under ambient conditions has certain advantages compared to the classical oxidation method. A particular spiral laser pattern was created in order to produce an oxidized structure on ZrB{sub 2}-SiC porous substrates. The laser parameters were as follows i.e., laser power of 50, 60 and 70 W, a beam diameter of 1.25 mm, velocity of 2 mm/s, acceleration and deceleration of 1 mm/s{sup 2}. The microstructural and morphological changes in the laser-treated region was examined using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. At laser power of 70 W, the sample exhibits uniform oxidation. It revealed that the very porous bulk beneath remained unaffected and unoxidized because this laser-formed oxide scale protects the substrate from oxidation. The presence of oxidized and unaffected regions indicated a high degree of heat localization. The dense glassy SiO{sub 2}-rich layer prevents the inward oxygen diffusion into the inner bulk hence enhances the oxidation resistance.

  18. Longtime resistant fibre reinforced ceramics for high temperature loaded components in power production technology. Final report; Langzeitbestaendige faserverstaerkte Keramiken fuer hochtemperaturbeanspruchte Komponenten der Energietechnik. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuchs, M.; Muehlratzer, A.

    2000-10-01

    1. Present status: Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs: C/SiC and SiC/SiC) do not have sufficient life time above 500 C in power production (turbines, heat exchangers) due to the oxygen sensible C- and SiC-fibres used in such ceramics. 2. Reasoning and goals: SiBNC-fibre have, produced on lab scale, shown excellent stability against oxygen up to temperatures of about 1400 C. The project had the goal to use these fibres for the manufacturing of high temperature resistant CMC and to develop, together with applicants, prototype components (turbine combustion chamber shindles, heat exchanger tubes). 3. Method: Phase 1: Proof of high temperature capabilities of CMC samples manufactured by CVI- and LPI-techniques (CVI=Chemical vapour infiltration, LPI=Liquid polymer infiltration). Phase 2: Development of prototype components together with applicants. 4. Results and Conclusions: The development of fibre manufacturing in technical quantities to be performed in a programme running parallel to this one did not succeed in the quality wanted and necessary. The CMC samples did not show sufficient improvements of high temperature properties. Further fundamental research is necessary before an application with long time high temperature loads can be considered. (orig.) [German] 1. Derzeitiger Stand von Wissenschaft und Technik: Verbundkeramik (C/SiC und SiC/SiC) hat wegen der Sauerstoffempfindlichkeit der verfuegbaren C- und SiC-Fasern bei Temperaturen ueber 500 C keine Lebensdauer wie sie fuer Anwendungen in der Energietechnik (Turbinen, Waermetauscher) gefordert werden. 2. Begruendung/Zielsetzung der Untersuchung: SiBNC-Fasern haben, im Labormassstab gefertigt, herausragende Bestaendigkeit gegen Sauerstoff bis zu Temperaturen von ca. 1400 C gezeigt. Das Vorhaben hatte das Ziel, diese Fasern fuer die Herstellung von hochtemperaturbestaendiger Verbundkeramik zu nutzen und gemeinsam mit Anwenderfirmen prototypische Komponenten (Turbinenbrennkammerauskleidung

  19. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to sugar beet fibre and increasing faecal bulk pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    based on newly developed scientific evidence related to sugar beet fibre and “increasing faecal bulk”. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim is sugar beet fibre. The Panel considers that sugar beet fibre is sufficiently characterised in relation to the claimed effect. The claimed......Following an application from Nordic Sugar A/S, submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Denmark, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim...... that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the consumption of sugar beet fibre and increasing faecal bulk. The following wording reflects the scientific evidence: “Sugar beet fibre increases faecal bulk”. In order to bear the claim a food should be at least “high in fibre” as per...

  20. Materials used for thermal insulation under special consideration of the use of ceramic fibres; Werkstoffe zur Waermedaemmung unter Beruecksichtigung des Einsatzes von Keramikfasern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnenschein, G. [Verwaltungsgemeinschaft Maschinenbau- und Metall-Berufsgenossenschaft und Huetten- und Walzwerks-Berufsgenossenschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    In the field of industrial thermal insulation, a range of construction materials is available. Aside from the classic refractory blocks and castables, fibre products are also often used for high-temperature applications today. Builders and planners must also assess whether the insulating materials can be used that pose the least possible risk to people and the environment alongside the considerations that have to be made about the technical, economic, and ecological conditions. TRGS (the technical rules for hazardous substances) 619 ''Substitute materials for ceramic fibres in the construction of kilns and furnaces'' (Ersatzstoffe fuer Keramikfasern im Ofen- und Feuerfestbau) helps planners make the appropriate choices for high-temperature thermal insulation under consideration of all conditions. (orig.) [German] Im Bereich der industriellen Waermedaemmung stehen den Anwendern eine Reihe von Baustoffen zur Verfuegung. Neben den klassischen Feuerfeststeinen und Stampfmassen werden heute auch Faserprodukte fuer die Hochtemperaturanwendung eingesetzt. Der Anwender hat neben den technischen, oekonomischen und oekologischen Bedingungen auch zu pruefen, ob Isolierstoffe mit einem moeglichst geringen Risiko fuer Mensch und Umwelt eingesetzt werden koennen. Die TRGS 619 ''Ersatzstoffe fuer Keramikfasern im Ofen- und Feuerfestbau'' ermoeglicht eine Entscheidungsfindung zur Hochtemperatur-Waermedaemmung unter Beachtung aller Bedingungen. (orig.)

  1. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for carbohydrates and dietary fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    but will depend on the amount of fat and protein ingested. The Panel proposes 45 to 60 E% as the reference Intake range for carbohydrates applicable to both adults and children older than one year of age. Although high frequency of intake of sugar-containing foods can increase the risk of dental caries......, there are insufficient data to set an upper limit for (added) sugar intake. Based on the available evidence on bowel function, the Panel considers dietary fibre intakes of 25 g/day to be adequate for normal laxation in adults. A fibre intake of 2 g/MJ is considered adequate for normal laxation in children from the age...

  2. Ceramic Matrix Composites .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mukerji

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available The present state of the knowledge of ceramic-matrix composites have been reviewed. The fracture toughness of present structural ceramics are not enough to permit design of high performance machines with ceramic parts. They also fail by catastrophic brittle fracture. It is generally believed that further improvement of fracture toughness is only possible by making composites of ceramics with ceramic fibre, particulate or platelets. Only ceramic-matrix composites capable of working above 1000 degree centigrade has been dealt with keeping reinforced plastics and metal-reinforced ceramics outside the purview. The author has discussed the basic mechanisms of toughening and fabrication of composites and the difficulties involved. Properties of available fibres and whiskers have been given. The best results obtained so far have been indicated. The limitations of improvement in properties of ceramic-matrix composites have been discussed.

  3. Regulatory risk assessment approaches for synthetic mineral fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Paul; Holmes, Philip; Bevan, Ruth; Kamps, Klaus; Levy, Leonard; Greim, Helmut

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to synthetic mineral fibres (SMF) may occur in a number of workplace scenarios. To protect worker health, a number of different organisations worldwide have assessed the health risk of these materials and established workplace exposure limits. This paper outlines the basic principles of risk assessment and the scientific methods used to derive valid (justifiable) occupational exposure limits (OELs) and goes on to show how, for SMF, and particularly for refractory ceramic fibre (otherwise known as aluminosilicate wool, RCF/ASW), the methods used and the associated outcomes differ widely. It is argued that the resulting differences in established OELs prevent consistent and appropriate risk management of SMF worldwide, and that development of a transparent and harmonised approach to fibre risk assessment and limit-setting is required.

  4. Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to sugar beet fibre and decreasing intestinal transit time pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Nordic Sugar A/S, submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Denmark, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim...... based on newly developed scientific evidence related to sugar beet fibre and “decreasing intestinal transit time”. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim is sugar beet fibre. This opinion applies to sugar beet fibre naturally present in foods and to those forms added to foods...... that decreasing intestinal (orofaecal) transit time may be a beneficial physiological effect. The applicant provided four human studies as pertinent to the health claim. The Panel considers that no conclusion can be drawn from three studies for the scientific substantiation of the claim owing to methodological...

  5. Characterisation of Flax Fibres and Flax Fibre Composites. Being cellulose based sources of materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslan, Mustafa

    that currently have the largest market share for composite applications. However, the most critical limitation in the use of cellulosic fibre composites for structural applications is the lack of well described fibre properties, in particular, the tensile strength. This is due to variations in fibre morphology...... of the internal cell wall structures. This is in contrast to the crack growth in brittle ceramic and glass fibres. Moreover, two typical stress-strain curves (linear and non-linear) measured for the flax fibres were found to be correlated with the amount of defected region in the fibres. The defects are induced...... a similar microstructure at low fibre weight fractions. However, when the fibre content is increased, a difference in porosity content can be observed from the composite cross sections. The nominal tensile strength of the unidirectional flax fibre/LPET composites is measured in the range 180 to 340 MPa...

  6. Structural and mechanical characterisation of some alumina and SiC based fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunsell, A.R.; Berger, M.H.; Hochet, N. [Centre des Materiaux de l`Ecole des Mines de Paris, Evry (France)

    1995-12-01

    Small diameter ceramic fibres are used to reinforce metals and ceramics for high temperature use. These fibres are limited by grain growth, chemical degradation and creep. In some fibres, but not all, a reduction in oxygen content leads to improved properties.

  7. On defining dietary fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Jonathan W

    2003-02-01

    Establishing a definition for dietary fibre has historically been a balance between nutrition knowledge and analytical method capabilities. While the most widely accepted physiologically-based definitions have generally been accurate in defining the dietary fibre in foods, scientists and regulators have tended, in practice, to rely on analytical procedures as the definitional basis in fact. As a result, incongruities between theory and practice have resulted in confusion regarding the components that make up dietary fibre. In November 1998 the president of the American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC) appointed an expert scientific review committee and charged it with the task of reviewing and, if necessary, updating the definition of dietary fibre. The committee was further charged with assessing the state of analytical methodology and making recommendations relevant to the updated definition. After due deliberation, an updated definition of dietary fibre was delivered to the AACC Board of Directors for consideration and adoption (Anon, 2000; Jones 2000b). The updated definition includes the same food components as the historical working definition used for approximately 30 years (a very important point, considering that the majority of the research of the past 30 years delineating the positive health effects of dietary fibre is based on that working definition). However, the updated definition more clearly delineates the make-up of dietary fibre and its physiological functionality. As a result, relatively few changes will be necessary in analytical methodology. Current methodologies, in particular AACC-approved method of analysis 32-05 (Grami, 2000), Association of Official Analytical Chemists' official method of analysis 985.29 (Horwitz, 2000a) or AACC 32-07 (Grami, 2000) Association of Official Analytical Chemists 991.43 (Horwitz, 2000a) will continue to be sufficient and used for most foods. A small number of additional methods will be necessary to

  8. A new method of making metal matrix fibre reinforced materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaupp, J. (Inst. fuer Werkzeugmaschinen und Betriebstechnik, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)); Pruemmer, R. (Inst. fuer Werkzeugmaschinen und Betriebstechnik, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany) Ernst-Mach-Inst., Freiburg (Germany))

    1993-11-01

    MMC (metal matrix composites) made of ceramic fibres and metal matrix are suitable for high strength and high temperature applications. New types of ceramic fibres usually are incorporated into a metal matrix by means of liquid infiltration or by hot pressing techniques. The disadvantage of these methods is the chemical reaction sometimes occurring between fibre and matrix, resulting in an interlayer which is degrading the mechanical properties of the MMC. A new method is described starting with an arrangement of metal powder or metal foils with ceramic fibres. Dynamic pressures, released by detonation of proper explosives, are used for consolidation. At very high strain rates during plastic deformation of the powder or metal foils hydrodynamic flow of the matrix around the ceramic fibres allows a complete consolidation and to prevent cracking. Fibres made of SiC are embedded into a metal matrix of aluminum. (orig.).

  9. Facile synthesis of ZnO hollow fibres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B T Su; K Wang; X W Zuo; H M Mu; N Dong; Y C Tong; J Bai; Z Q Lei

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, cotton fibres were used as bio-template to successfully synthesize new ceramic materials, ZnO hollow fibres and in an effort to explore the synthesis condition, and simplify the synthesis procedure. In this synthesis, a direct thermal decomposition of zinc acetate dihydrate coated on the surface of cotton fibres was explored. The wall porosity of the ZnO hollow fibres was controlled by changing the concentration of zinc acetate aqueous solution.

  10. Conventional and novel processing methods for cellular ceramics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paolo Colombo

    2006-01-01

    Cellular ceramics are a class of highly porous materials that covers a wide range of structures, such as foams, honeycombs, interconnected rods, interconnected fibres, interconnected hollow spheres...

  11. [Refractory ceramic fibers, kinds, health effects after exposure, TLVs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, H; Wiecek, E

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic fibres are amorphous or crystalline synthetic mineral fibres which are characterised by refractory properties (i.c. stability in temperature above 1000 degrees C). In general, ceramic fibres are produced from aluminium oxide, silicon oxide and other metal oxides and less frequently from non-oxide materials such as silicon carbide, silicon nitride and boron nitride. In Poland, the production of ceramic fibres was begun in the Refractory Materials Plant, Skawina, during mid-eighties. The production capacity accounts for about 600 tons annually. It is estimated that approximately 3000 persons are exposed to the effect of ceramic fibres in Poland. During the production of ceramic fibres, concentrations of respiral fibres in the air at work places range from 0.07 to 0.27 f/cm3; during the manufacture of ceramic fibre products from 0.23 to 0.71 f/cm3 and during the application of ceramic fibre products from 0.07 to 1.67 f/cm3. As published data depict, fibres longer than 5 microns are most common in the work environment, and the proportion of fibres with diameters below 1 micron accounts for 40-50%. Bearing in mind the present situation in Poland, namely combined exposure to asbestos (during removal of worn out heat-insulating materials) and ceramic fibres (during installation of new insulation), as well as in view of own investigations and literature data which evidence a strong carcinogenic effect of certain fibres, the following MAC values have been adopted: Dusts of refractory ceramic fibres: total dust-2 mg/m3; respirable fibres-1 f/cm3 (L > 5 microns; D fibres mixed with asbestos: total dust-1 mg/m3; respirable fibres-1 f/m3. Dusts of refractory ceramic fibres mixed with other man-made mineral fibres (MMMF): total dust-2 mg/m3; respirable fibres-1 f/m3. According to the IARC, ceramic fibres have been included into group 2B-suspected human carcinogen.

  12. [The evaluation of carcinogenic effect in rats and mice after intraperitoneal administration of refractory ceramic fibers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnow, A; Lao, I; Stetkiewicz, J; Wiecek, E

    1998-01-01

    The carcinogenic effect of Langfaser and Thermowool ceramic fibres was assessed in Wistar rats and BALB/C mice. Fibres were administered into the animal peritoneal cavity in doses of 25 and 5 mg, and the animals were left for survival. Langfaser and Thermowool ceramic fibres were found carcinogenic. The carcinogenic properties of Thermowool ceramic fibre can be compared to those of Krokidoit UICC asbestos.

  13. Lower energy costs in the ceramics industry - via ceramic fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zander, H.P.

    1983-04-01

    Ceramic fibres, due to their high thermal and chemical resistance, receive increasing attention as insulating material for industrial purposes. After a short characterisation, examples of furnace wall lining are given, and a tunnel-kiln car for baking of sanitation ceramics is investigated with a view to possibilities of supplementary insulation.

  14. Microanalytical investigations of fiber-reinforced ceramic materials. Mikroanalytische Untersuchungen faserverstaerkter keramischer Werkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, B.; Grathwohl, G. (Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde 2)

    1990-03-01

    Microanalytical investigations have been made on samples of ceramic fibres (SiC-fibres (Nicalon), C-fibre coated with TiN) and fibre-reinforced ceramics (SiC- and glass-matrices). High resolution Auger electron spectroscopy (HRAES), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy were employed for these examinations. Analysis was best performed with HRAES on account of its lateral and depth resolution. AES depth profiles of ceramic fibres are reported and compared with the surface analysis of fibres in the composites after being broken in situ. (orig.).

  15. Hydrogen peroxide release and hydroxyl radical formation in mixtures containing mineral fibres and human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanderson, P; Tagesson, C

    1992-11-01

    The ability of different mineral fibres (rock wool, glass wool, ceramic fibres, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite) to stimulate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) formation in mixtures containing human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) was investigated. In the presence of azide, all the fibres caused considerable H2O2 formation, and about twice as much H2O2 was found in mixtures with the natural fibres (asbestos, erionite, and wollastonite) than in mixtures with the manmade fibres (rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibres). In the presence of externally added iron, all the fibres were found to generate OH. and the natural fibres caused about three times more OH. formation than the manmade fibres. In the absence of external iron, there was less OH. formation; however, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite still generated considerable amounts of OH., also under circumstances in which only small amounts of OH. were produced in mixtures with the manmade fibres. These findings indicate that natural fibres generate more H2O2 and OH. than manmade fibres when incubated with PMNLs in the presence of external iron. They also suggest that the natural fibres, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite may act catalytically in the dissociation of H2O2 to OH. in the absence of external iron, whereas manmade fibres such as rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibres, do not seem to be able to generate OH. in the absence of external iron.

  16. Simulator trials to determine the wear of the combination aluminium oxide ceramic-carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) used as an insert in a hip socket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, G; Schwarz, M; Früh, H J; Jani, L

    1999-01-01

    Hip simulator trials were conducted to determine the initial wear between alumina femoral heads and carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP, CAPROMAN) insert in a titanium socket. A force of 2500 N and a frequency of 0.857 H were applied. Using surface and sphericity measurement techniques, the amount of wear was determined. After 500,000 cycles, the centre of the head had moved by 10 microm into the insert, and the average radius increased by 2 microm. After 1 million cycles, the additional changes were less than 1 microm. Based on an examination of retrieved implants (wear rate: 6.1 microm/year) and based on the simulator results, the combination alumina-CFRP inserts could be approved for total hip replacement.

  17. Application of fibre reinforced metals in internal combustion engines. Anwendung faserverstaerkter Metalle in Verbrennungsmotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, G.; Mielke, S.; Bloschies, G. (Kolbenschmidt AG, Neckarsulm (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-05-01

    Completely using the many advantages of aluminium silicon alloys presupposes technical pregnant methods to counteract the decrease in hot strength at temperatures above 300deg C. Reinforcing the metallic alloy by ceramic fibres presents itself for strength increase. Therefore the qualities of fibres and fibre preforms being used are of great importance. (orig.).

  18. Influence of refractory ceramic fibres - asbestos substitute - on the selected parameters of bronchoalveolar lavage 6 months after intratracheal instillation to W-rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurbánková, Marta; Cerná, Silvia; Gergelová, Petra; Wimmerová, Sona

    2005-12-01

    Industrial fibrous dusts are applied in many industrial branches and represent adverse factors in occupational and environmental area. Refractory ceramic fibers (RCFs) - amorphous alumina silicates - are used as one kind of asbestos substitutes. Because RCFs are relatively durable and some RCFs are respirable, they may present a potential health hazard by inhalation. The aim of present work was to find out the subchronic effect of RCFs on selected parameters of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in W-rats, confirm the biopersistence of RCFs after 6 month instillation and contribute to the understanding of the pathomechanism of lung injury after fibrous dust exposure. Wistar rats were intratracheally instilled with 4 mg/animal of RCFs - exposed group and with 0.4 ml saline solution/animal - control group. Animals were sacrificed after 6 month exposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and selected BAL parameters (mainly inflammatory and cytotoxic) were examined. After treatment with RCFs the following changes were observed: statistically significant increase in proportion of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclears as well as in % of immature alveolar macrophages (AM) and phagocytic activity of AM; statistically significant decrease in viability of AM and proportion of AM (from the differential cell count) in comparison with the control group. The results of this study indicated that RCFs even 6 months after intratracheal instillation very significantly changed the majority of examined BAL parameters. The presence of inflammatory and cytotoxic response in lung may signalize beginning or developing disease process.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide release and hydroxyl radical formation in mixtures containing mineral fibres and human neutrophils.

    OpenAIRE

    Leanderson, P; Tagesson, C

    1992-01-01

    The ability of different mineral fibres (rock wool, glass wool, ceramic fibres, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite) to stimulate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) formation in mixtures containing human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) was investigated. In the presence of azide, all the fibres caused considerable H2O2 formation, and about twice as much H2O2 was found in mixtures with the natural fibres (asbestos, eri...

  20. Airborne fibre levels associated with the use of MMMF brazing mats during welding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, L S; Purnell, C J; Anderson, P W

    1990-02-01

    In 1985 the Health and Safety Executive set a gravimetric Control Limit for airborne Man-Made Mineral Fibre and in 1987 a respirable fibre number Recommended Limit for Superfine MMMF. A limited investigation was carried out of the use of glass and ceramic fibre products used as protection against welding 'batter' and oxyacetylene welding flame. Airborne fibre levels are compared with the Occupational Exposure Limits.

  1. Study of 1-3 PZT fibre/epoxy composite force sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, S. H.; Chan, H. L. W.; Ng, M. W.; Liu, P. C. K.

    2005-09-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibres were prepared by a powder-based extrusion method. Pre-sintered PZT powder mixed with poly(acrylic acid) was spun in a spinnerette to produce fibres. The fibre of ˜400 μm diameter was used to fabricate 1-3 PZT fibre/epoxy composite discs with different volume fractions (ϕ) of PZT. Since the ceramic fibres are rather brittle, their elastic properties cannot be measured directly. In order to determine the properties of the ceramic fibres, effective properties of the fibres/epoxy 1-3 composite were measured. By using a modified series and parallel model, the properties of 1-3 composites can be calculated. Then, the elastic coefficient s33,fibreE, relative permittivity ɛ33,fibreT and piezoelectric strain coefficient d33,fibre of the ceramic fibre could be found. Ring-shaped PZT fibre/epoxy materials composites with different ϕ were fabricated to be used as the sensing material in force sensor applications. The ring-shape composite with ϕ=0.5 was installed into a housing and the sensor was calibrated by different methods and its sensitivity was found to be 144 pC/N within the frequency range of 0.5 6.4 kHz which is much higher than that of a quartz force sensor with a similar structure.

  2. [The biological effect of fireproof ceramic fibers--literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnow, A

    1996-01-01

    The work presents reports, selected from the world literature, on the studies of biological effect of refractory ceramic fibres, carried out on experimental animals. The discrepancy between the results of studies performed may originate from differences in the distribution of fibre sizes or the durability of fibres in the organism and their surface properties which, in turn, depend on the chemical composition of fibres. In all studies discussed, ceramic fibres generally activated macrophages and they were characterised by a moderate fibrotic activity. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of tumor (mesothelioma) observed in several very important experimental studies may suggest that some types of refractory ceramic fibres show a similar carcinogenic potential to that of natural asbestos: crocidolite or chrysotile.

  3. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to rye fibre and changes in bowel function (ID 825), reduction of post-prandial glycaemic responses (ID 826) and maintenance of normal blood LDL-cholesterol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to rye fibre and changes in bowel function, reduction of post-prandial glycaemic responses and maintenance of normal blood LDL-cholesterol concentrations. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States in the consolidated list of Article 13...

  4. International Workshop on Advances in Inorganic Fibre Technology Held in Melbourne, Australia on August 13 - 14, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-14

    1140- 1220 Creep-related limitations of current polycrystalline 67 ceramic fibres (J.A. DiCarlo, USA) 1220- 1330 Lunch Friday, 14 August (Contd.) Session...Mat6riaux P.M. Fourt B.P. 87 91003 EVRY CEDEX FRANCE Ceramic fibres of potential interest for reinforcement may be divided into four very ’different...have been produced on both tungsten and pitch based carbon fibre cores and can be used to reinforce metals. Small diameter ceramic fibres began to appear

  5. [Exposure to ceramic fibers in the work environment. III. occupational exposure to ceramic fibers in plants which produce and apply insulation materials made of ceramic fibers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczak, J; Kieć-Swierczyńska, M; Maciejewska, A

    1997-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the exposure to dust in the work environment of plants which produced and apply packing and insulation materials made of ceramic fibres. The study revealed that workers were exposed to dust containing respirable ceramic fibres and in some cases (production of packing cord, insulating tape and paperboard) respirable asbestos fibres. The mean concentration of respirable fibres ranged from 0.05 to 0.62 f/l cm3, and concentrations of total dust fell between 0.6 and 23.2 mg/m3. The mean concentrations of respirable fibres were usually below (0.5 f/l cm3 for respirable ceramic fibres with asbestos mixture; 1 f/cm3 for respirable ceramic fibres), and of total dust much higher (1 mg/m3 and 2 mg/m3, respectively) than MAC values proposed. The initial dermatological examinations (25 workers) allow the conclusion that contact with ceramic fibres induces in some workers acute dermatitis and dermal papilla.

  6. Biological durability and oxidative potential of man-made vitreous fibres as compared to crocidolite asbestos fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hippeli, S.; Dornisch, K.; Elstner, E.F. [Lehrstuhl fuer Phytopathologie, Technische Univ. Muenchen-Weihenstephan, Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Wiethege, T.; Mueller, K.M. [Berufsgenossenschaftliche Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Universitaetsklinik, Inst. fuer Pathologie, Bochum (Germany); Gillissen, A. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik II, Kardiologie, Pneumologie, Bonn (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    In this study we investigated relationships between redox properties and biodurability of crocidolite asbestos fibres and three different man-made vitreous fibres (MMVF): traditional stone wool fibres (MMVF 21), glass fibres (MMVF 11) and refractory ceramic fibres (RCF). Each fibre type was incubated up to 22 weeks in four different incubation media: gamble solution (GS) pH 5.0 and pH 7.4, representing blood plasma without proteins, and surfactant-like solution (SLS) pH 5.0 and pH 7.4. During incubation time aliquots of incubation mixtures were removed and analysed in a biochemical model reaction, mimicking activated phagocytes. In addition, changes of fibre morphology and chemical composition were examined using SEM- and EDX-technology. In the presence of crocidolite asbestos fibres and MMVF 21 the formation of OH-radicals according to the Haber-Weiss sequence could be demonstrated, whereas MMVF 11 and RCF showed no reactivity. Crocidolite asbestos fibres exhibited a significant higher activity compared with the stone wool fibres at the onset of incubation. The oxidative capacities of these fibre types were shown to depend on both specific surface area and iron content. The oxidative potentials of crocidolite asbestos fibres as well as MMVF 21 were not constant during incubation over several weeks in each incubation medium. The reactivities showed sinoidal curves including reactivities much higher than those at the onset of incubation time. These irregular changes of oxidative capacity may be explained by changes of the redox state of fibre surface-complexed iron. Furthermore our results showed clear differences between incubation of fibres in GS and SLS, respectively, indicating that phospholipids play an important part in fibre dissolution behaviour and oxidative reactivity. (orig.)

  7. Sonogels in the Preparation of Advanced Glass and Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-20

    1 In0 f 7;ra Products) ceramic fibres . -using other yreinforcing phases in the. form of 7’T02 (7YF- 100 ,Zircar Products) and A1203 (MAFTEC) ceramic...usd we -r, made friom ceramic fibres . In both cases t ,- fi bris were I anrgel y continuous and random], oriented in p1lanes parallel Io tahe layers...gives the relative densities for the CT15 ’ A1203 composites . They are designated as CT15Av , where y is the volume fract ion of alt]mina ceramic

  8. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  9. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  10. Angiogenic effect induced by mineral fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonari, Damiano; Campopiano, Antonella; Ramires, Deborah; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Tomasetti, Marco; Curini, Roberta; Valentino, Matteo; Santarelli, Lory; Amati, Monica

    2011-10-09

    Due to the toxic effect of asbestos, other materials with similar chemical-physical characteristics have been introduced to substitute it. We evaluate the angiogenic effect of certain asbestos substitute fibres such as glass fibres (GFs), ceramic fibres (CFs) and wollastonite fibres (WFs) and then compare angiogenic responses to those induced by crocidolite asbestos fibres (AFs). An in vitro model using human endothelial cells in small islands within a culture matrix of fibroblasts (Angio-Kit) was used to evaluate vessel formation. The release of IL-6, sIL-R6, IL-8, VEGF-A and their soluble receptors, sVEGFR-1, sVEGFR-2, was determined in the conditioning medium of Angio-Kit system after fibre treatment. ROS formation and cell viability were evaluated in cultured endothelial cells (HUVEC). To evaluate the involvement of intracellular mechanisms, EGFR signalling, ROS formation and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) pathway were then inhibited by incubating HUVEC cells with AG1478, NAC and PDTC respectively, and the cytokine and growth factor release was analyzed in the culture medium after 7 days of fibre incubation. Among the mineral fibres tested, WFs markedly induced blood vessel formation which was associated with release of IL-6 and IL-8, VEGF-A and their soluble receptors. ROS production was observed in HUVEC after WFs treatment which was associated with cell cytotoxicity. The EGFR-induced ERK phosphorylation and ROS-mediated NFκB activation were involved in the cytokine and angiogenic factor release. However, only the EGFR activation was able to induce angiogenesis. The WFs are potential angiogenic agents that can induce regenerative cytokine and angiogenic factor production resulting in the formation of new blood vessels.

  11. Comparison of cytotoxicity of man-made vitreous fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoto, K; Holopainen, M; Sarataho, M; Savolainen, K

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the cytotoxicity of man-made vitreous fibres (MMVFs): four refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs 1-4), two glasswool fibres (MMVF 10 and 11), a rockwool fibre (MMVF 21) and a slagwool fibre (MMVF 22). The ability of the fibres to induce haemolysis in sheep erythrocytes, to release lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from rat alveolar macrophages (AM) and to increase the production of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PML) was studied. To assess the relative cytotoxicity of MMVFs, their toxicity was compared with that induced by quartz, chrysotile or titanium dioxide. MMVFs induced a modest, but dose-dependent, increase of haemolysis at doses of 0.5, 2.5 and 5.0 mg ml-1. The amount of haemolysis and LDH release induced by MMVFs was generally similar to that induced by titanium dioxide. Glasswool fibre MMVF 10 induced less LDH release from rat AM than rockwool MMVF 21 or slagwool MMVF 22 fibres, whereas glasswool fibre MMVF 11 induced less LDH release than slagwool fibre MMVF 22 (P < 0.05). All fibres also dose-dependently increased the production of ROMs at doses between 25 and 500 micrograms ml-1. The shapes of the time-courses of MMVF-induced production of ROMs suggest that the mechanisms whereby the different fibres induce ROM production may exhibit similar features. There are clear-cut differences in the potency of various MMVFs to induce cytotoxicity and oxidative burst. The present results also emphasize the importance of using several measures of toxicity when assessing the biological activity of various fibres in vitro.

  12. An Overview on the Improvement of Mechanical Properties of Ceramics Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestre, J.; Silvestre, N; de Brito, J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their prominent properties (mechanical, stiffness, strength, thermal stability), ceramic composite materials (CMC) have been widely applied in automotive, industrial and aerospace engineering, as well as in biomedical and electronic devices. Because monolithic ceramics exhibit brittle behaviour and low electrical conductivity, CMCs have been greatly improved in the last decade. CMCs are produced from ceramic fibres embedded in a ceramic matrix, for which several ceramic materials (oxid...

  13. Studies on the heat shield structure of ceramic gas turbine components, first report: heat shield properties of the ceramic combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, K.; Hisamatsu, T.; Yuri, I. (CRIEPI, Yokosuka-shi (Japan). Yokosuka Research Lab.)

    1993-04-01

    The ceramic gas turbine for power generation consists of ceramic parts and metal parts. In order to improve the performance and reliability of the ceramic gas turbine, it is important to develop a heat shield structure between ceramics and metal. CRIEPI proposed a heat shield structure for the ceramic combustor wall in which a small amount of air is introduced in a ceramic fibre layer in the ceramic combustor wall. It was confirmed that the heat shield structure has excellent performance in a high pressure combustion test. This report describes the heat transfer property of the heat shield structure in the ceramic combustor wall by numerical analysis. As a result of analysis, it was clarified that the ceramic fibre temperature changes rapidly near the ceramic tiles, and that the heat transfer property of the heat shield structure is as follows: heat shield performance is maintained by introducing a small amount of air; metal wall temperature is little affected by combustion gas temperature, thermophysical property of ceramic fibres and so on. 9 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Induction of nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB in epithelial cells by respirable mineral fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D M; Beswick, P H; Donaldson, K

    1999-10-01

    A panel of mineral fibres has been studied for their ability to cause translocation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB to the nucleus in A549 lung epithelial cells. On the basis of inhalation studies, three fibres were designated as being carcinogenic-amosite asbestos, silicon carbide and refractory ceramic fibre 1 (RCF1)-or non-carcinogenic-man-made vitreous fibre (MMVF10), Code 100/475 glass fibre, and RCF4. The experiments were carried out at equal fibre number. It was hypothesized that carcinogenic fibres have greater free radical activity than non-carcinogenic fibres and that an oxidative stress produced in the lung after inhalation of fibres could cause translocation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB to the nucleus, where transcription of pro-inflammatory genes such as cytokines could occur. It was demonstrated that a simple oxidant, hydrogen peroxide, caused translocation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The three carcinogenic fibres produced a significant dose-dependent translocation of NF-kappaB to the nucleus, whereas the non-carcinogenic fibres did not. Silicon carbide fibres were the most potent of the pathogenic fibres. MMVF10 was the most potent of the non-pathogenic fibres, causing significant nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB at high fibre number. Using three antioxidants, curcumin, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and Nacystelin, translocation caused by carcinogenic fibres could be significantly reduced. The present study shows that a short-term in vitro assay can discriminate between pathogenic and non-pathogenic fibres in terms of a key pro-inflammatory event in epithelial cells. The mechanism of the activation of NF-kappaB by pathogenic fibres and its general applicability to other fibre types remain to be determined.

  15. Biological durability and oxidative potential of man-made vitreous fibres as compared to crocidolite asbestos fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippeli, S; Dornisch, K; Wiethege, T; Gillissen, A; Müller, K M; Elstner, E F

    2001-01-01

    In this study we investigated relationships between redox properties and biodurability of crocidolite asbestos fibres and three different man-made vitreous fibres (MMVF): traditional stone wool fibres (MMVF 21), glass fibres (MMVF 11) and refractory ceramic fibres (RCF). Each fibre type was incubated up to 22 weeks in four different incubation media: gamble solution (GS) pH 5.0 and pH 7.4, representing blood plasma without proteins, and surfactant-like solution (SLS) pH 5.0 and pH 7.4. During incubation time aliquots of incubation mixtures were removed and analysed in a biochemical model reaction, mimicking activated phagocytes. In addition, changes of fibre morphology and chemical composition were examined using SEM- and EDX-technology. In the presence of crocidolite asbestos fibres and MMVF 21 the formation of OH*-radicals according to the Haber-Weiss sequence could be demonstrated, whereas MMVF 11 and RCF showed no reactivity. Crocidolite asbestos fibres exhibited a significant higher activity compared with the stone wool fibres at the onset of incubation. The oxidative capacities of these fibre types were shown to depend on both specific surface area and iron content. The oxidative potentials of crocidolite asbestos fibres as well as MMVF 21 were not constant during incubation over several weeks in each incubation medium. The reactivities showed sinoidal curves including reactivities much higher than those at the onset of incubation time. These irregular changes of oxidative capacity may be explained by changes of the redox state of fibre surface-complexed iron. Furthermore our results showed clear differences between incubation of fibres in GS and SLS, respectively, indicating that phospholipids play an important part in fibre dissolution behaviour and oxidative reactivity. In conclusion we suggest, that biodurability testing procedures should not exclusively concentrate on dissolution rates of fibres. They should include fibre characteristics concerning known

  16. Clearance of man made mineral fibres from the lungs of sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Dufresne, A.; Perrault, G.; Yamato, H.; Masse, S.; Begin, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the clearance rate, the related pathology, and the chemical and morphological changes of three man made mineral fibres (MMMFs) in the sheep model of pneumoconiosis. METHODS: Fibrous particles were extracted from lung parenchyma and analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). RESULTS: The concentration of MMMF11, MMMF21, refractory ceramic fibre (RCF-1), and crocidolite asbestos fibres decreased with time according t...

  17. Chronic inhalation studies of man-made vitreous fibres: characterization of fibres in the exposure aerosol and lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesterberg, T W; Miiller, W C; Thevenaz, P; Anderson, R

    1995-10-01

    Inhalation studies were conducted to determine the chronic biological effects in rodents of respirable fractions of different man-made vitreous fibres (MMVFs), including refractory ceramic fibre (RCF), fibrous glass, rock (stone) wool and slag wool. Animals were exposed nose-only, 6 h per day, 5 days per week, for 18 months (hamsters) or 24 months (rats). Exposure to 10 mg m-3 of crocidolite or chrysotile asbestos induced pulmonary fibrosis, lung tumours and mesothelioma in rats, thus validating the inhalation model with known human carcinogenic fibres. Exposure of rats to 30 mg m-3 of refractory ceramic fibres (RCF) also resulted in pulmonary fibrosis as well as significant increases in lung tumours and mesothelioma. In hamsters, 30 mg m-3 of RCF induced a 41% incidence of mesotheliomas. Exposure of rats to 30 mg m-3 of fibre glasses (MMVF 10 or 11) or of slag wool (MMVF 22) was associated with an inflammatory response, but no mesotheliomas or significant increase in the lung tumours were observed. Rock wool (stone wool: MMVF 21) at the same exposure level resulted in minimal lung fibrosis, but no mesotheliomas or significant increase in the lung tumours were observed. Fibre numbers (WHO fibres) and dimensions in the aerosols and lungs of exposed animals were comparable in this series of inhalation studies. Differences in lung fibre burdens and lung clearance rates could not explain the differences observed in the toxicologic effects of the MMVFs. These findings indicate that dose, dimension and durability may not be the only determinants of fibre toxicity. Chemical composition and the surface physico-chemical properties of the fibres may also play an important role.

  18. Fibre-Optic Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Saxena

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparative study of mechanical, ring-laser and fibre-optic gyroscopes has been made. The single mode fibre-optic gyroscope having a large number of turns of the optical fibre in the spool, replacing He-Ne gas laser by a GaAs laser diode, there by reducing the noise level, and using fully integrated fibre-optics, works out to be the best in the final analysis, for safe navigation and homing of the guided missiles.

  19. Microstructured polymer optical fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Large, Maryanne; Barton, Geoff; van Eijkelenborg, Martijn A

    2008-01-01

    Microstructured Polymer Optical Fibres describes the optical properties of microstructured fibres, how they are made and modelled, and outlines some potential applications. These applications include areas where polymer fibres are already used, such as high-data rate transmission for Fibre-to-the Home or within cars, as well as completely new areas such as the photonic bandgap transmission of ""difficult"" wavelengths. Emphasising a conceptual understanding of the underlying physics, Microstructured Polymer Optical Fibres is clearly written, and includes numerous illustrations. It provides an

  20. Fibre illumination system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Source: EP2426402A The invention relates to a fibre illumination module and system for the collection and delivery of daylight for illumination purposes. The fibre illumination module comprises a plurality of collector elements, each collector element comprising an input fibre having a first end......-directional arrangement. The fibre illumination system comprises a fibre illumination module of the above-mentioned type. By the invention, daylight may be exploited for the illumination of remote interior spaces of buildings in order to save energy, and improve the well-being of users in both housing and working...

  1. Cavitation instabilities between fibres in a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    Short fibre reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are studied here to investigate the possibility that a cavitation instability can develop in the metal matrix. The high stress levels needed for a cavitation instability may occur in metal–ceramic systems due to the constraint on plastic flow...... of transversely staggered fibres is here modelled by using an axisymmetric cell model analysis. First the critical stress level is determined for a cavitation instability in an infinite solid made of the Al matrix material. By studying composites with different distributions and aspect ratios of the fibres...... induced by bonding to the ceramics that only show elastic deformation. In an MMC the stress state in the metal matrix is highly non-uniform, varying between regions where shear stresses are dominant and regions where hydrostatic tension is strong. An Al–SiC whisker composite with a periodic pattern...

  2. INFLUENCE OF FIBRE VOLUME REINFORCEMENT IN DRILLING GFRP LAMINATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. ABDUL BUDAN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on the influence of fiber volume reinforcement on various aspects of machining. Drilling experiments were conducted to study the tool wear, surface finish, delamination factor and hole quality on GFRP composites. The work reports the variation of tool wear, surface roughness, hole quality, chip characteristics, delamination factor with the variation of fibre volume reinforcement. Results revealed that the increase in fiber percentage increased the tool wear, delamination factor, surface roughness value and decreased hole quality. Minimum surface roughness, tool wear and better hole quality was obtained for 30% fibre content composites. 70% Fibre content composites produced hazardous surface roughness. Pull out of fibres and fibril formation are significant in decreasing the hole quality and increased surface roughness. Increased tool – fibre interaction and thermal softening of the tool causes increased tool wear. In higher fibre content composites, extensive plasticity was absent consequently brittle ceramic fibres were fractured easily. Hence small segment type chips were obtained. The fibre pull out and fibrils present near the hole exit forms the remainder of the laminate causes increased damage zone near the hole exit. Hence high delamination factor was obtained.

  3. Inhibition of cytokinesis by asbestos and synthetic fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, C G; Watson, M

    1999-01-01

    Using high-resolution timelapse microscopy, we have followed individual phagocytized fibres through the later stages of division in MeT-5A human mesothelial cells and LLC-MK(2)monkey epithelial cells. The fibres used were crocidolite and chrysotile asbestos, fibrous glass (MMVF), and refractory ceramic fibres (RCF). Long fibres (15-80 microm) trapped within the cleavage furrow can partially or completely block cytokinesis. Cells proceed in one of three ways: (1) eventual completion of cytokinesis; (2) incomplete cytokinesis, resulting in two cells joined by a fibre-containing intercellular channel; or (3) failure of cytokinesis, resulting in a binucleate or trinucleate cell. Two factors associated with fibre-induced bi/trinucleation are: (1) an initial association between the fibre and the forming daughter nuclei, which is sometimes lost over time, and (2) disintegration of the midbody. The studies suggest that delay of cytokinesis by interzonal fibres can result in bi/trinucleation through the loss of midbody/intercellular bridge proteins that are required for completion of cytokinesis.

  4. [Exposure to ceramic fibers in the occupational environment. I. Production, kinds of ceramic fibers, changes in structure of these fibers, preliminary studies in the working environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczak, J

    1994-01-01

    The production of fireproof SiO2/Al2O3 ceramic fibres started in the late forties. Primarily, the production was designed entirely for the aircraft industry. In the sixties the application of ceramic fibres became more wider. The first ceramic fibrous materials were characterised by thermal resistance reaching 1200 degrees C. Certain kinds of materials produced currently can be used in the temperature accounting for 1600 degrees C. Aluminosiliceous ceramic fibres recrystallise at high temperature (above 1000 degrees C) and produce mullite and crostobalite. Ceramic fibrous material may become hazardous to workers as a source of respirable fibres. Studies, carried out in plants which manufacture products from aluminosiliceous ceramic fibres, indicated that mean concentrations of respirable fibres ranged from 0.14 to 1.13 f/cm3 while the levels of mean concentrations of total dust accounted for 0.4-13.6 mg/m3. At working posts of plants producing china, where heat-insulating materials were changed mean level of respirable fibre concentration was 0.28-1.65 f/cm3 and concentration of total dust ranged from 7.0 to 17.7 mg/m3.

  5. Influence of fibre length, dissolution and biopersistence on the production of mesothelioma in the rat peritoneal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B G; Searl, A; Davis, J M; Donaldson, K; Cullen, R T; Bolton, R E; Buchanan, D; Soutar, C A

    1999-04-01

    A range of respirable man-made mineral fibres were tested for evidence of carcinogenicity by injection into the peritoneal cavity of male SPF Wistar rats; and differences in carcinogenicity were related to the dimensions and biopersistence of the injected fibres. The fibres tested included an amosite asbestos, a silicon carbide whisker, a special purpose glass microfibre, and a range of other man-made vitreous fibres (MMVFs) and refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) from the TIMA fibre repository. The injected dose of each was designed as the estimated mass required to contain 10(9) fibres > 5 microns in length, as determined by optical microscopy. The numbers of long fibres (> 15 microns) contained in these doses ranged across fibres from 0.1 x 10(9) to 0.8 x 10(9) fibres; the number of long fibres thinner than 0.95 micron ranged from 0.015 x 10(9) to 0.4 x 10(9). The treatment groups contained between 18 and 24 animals. Animals were killed when they showed signs of debilitation. At autopsy, the diagnosis of mesothelioma was usually obvious macroscopically. Otherwise, histological examination of peritoneal organs was used to search for early tumour development. Judged by median survival time, four of the fibre types, in the doses administered, presented higher mesothelioma activity than amosite asbestos. The other fibres tested were less carcinogenic than the amosite. Only a ceramic material derived by extreme heating to simulate the effect of furnace or oven conditions, produced no mesotheliomas. Attempts were made, using regression models, to relate these differences to fibre dimensions and to measures of durability from separate experiments. The results pointed principally to a link with the injected numbers of fibres > 20 microns in length and with biopersistence in the rat lung of fibres longer than 5 microns. Improved quantification of the relative importance of fibre dimensions and biopersistence indices requires experimentation with a range of doses.

  6. Preparation of continuous alumina gel fibres by aqueous sol–gel process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hongbin Tan; Xiaoling Ma; Mingxing Fu

    2013-02-01

    Continuous alumina gel fibres were prepared by sol–gel method. The spinning sol was prepared by mixing aluminum nitrate, lactic acid and polyvinylpyrrolidone with a mass ratio of 10:3:1.5. Thermogravimetry–differential scanning calorimetry (TG–DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the properties of the gel and ceramic fibres. The Al2O3 fibres with a uniform diameter can be obtained by sintering gel fibres at 1200 °C.

  7. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to oat and barley grain fibre and increase in faecal bulk (ID 819, 822) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to provide a scientific opinion on a list of health claims pursuant to Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. This opinion addresses the scientific substantiation of health...... claims in relation to oat and barley grain fibre and increase in faecal bulk. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA has received from Member States or directly from stakeholders....... In the context of the clarifications provided by Member States and the references provided, the Panel assumes that the claimed effect refers to the improvement of bowel function by increasing faecal bulk. The Panel considers that an increase in faecal bulk may be a beneficial physiological effect. In weighing...

  8. Fibres For Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, D. N.

    1984-11-01

    Sensors which rely on the external modulation of the properties of an optical fibre (intrinsic sensors) are receiving much attention since they can be made extremely sensitive, and can be used for distributed measurements. Distributed sensing provides some particularly exciting prospects for acoustic, magnetic and electric field monitoring. To date, however, the great majority of experimental and commercial fibre sensors employ telecommunications-grade fibres, largely as a result of their ready availability. Not only does this policy frequently lead to a design compromise, but in some cases makes the performance marginal or untenable as a result of excessive environmental sensitivity. Despite this, little attention has been given to the design of special sensor fibres with enhanced (or depressed) sensitivity to specific measurands. The position is somewhat better with respect to fibres designed to eliminate sensor polarisation problems (e.g. polar isation-maintaining fibres), but even here further work is required to provide the performance demanded.

  9. On Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  10. Evaluation of the oncogenic potential of man-made vitreous fibres: the inhalation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, D M; Thevenaz, P; Fleissner, H; Anderson, R; Hesterberg, T W; Mast, R

    1995-10-01

    A rodent inhalation model has been developed for the evaluation of the eoncogenic potential of man-made vitreous fibres. It is successful in delivering a quantified dose of well-characterized fibres to the lungs of rodents, and with it sufficiently high fibre aerosol concentrations were lofted to enable a maximum tolerated dose to be achieved. Fischer 344 male rats were exposed to a well-defined rat-respirable aerosol at concentrations for MMVF of 30, 16 or 3 mg m-3, 6 h per day, 5 days per week for 104 weeks with final sacrifice at 20% survival. A control group was exposed to filtered air. The high dose was chosen based upon a 28-day maximum tolerated dose study with refractory ceramic fibres (RCF). The fibre aerosol generation system lofted fibres without breaking, grinding or contaminating the bulk material. Exposure was by flow-past nose-only systems which provided fresh fibre in a laminar stream to each animal individually. The study was performed according to the Good Laboratory Practice regulations. Fibre count, fibre diameter and length distribution, aerosol mass and chemical composition were determined throughout the study. Interim sacrifices were performed at 3 or 6 month intervals for 24 months. At each sacrifice, full necropsy was performed, the accessory lobe removed for subsequent digestion to determine the fibre lung burden and the remaining lobes inflated with fixative for histopathological evaluation. The lungs were evaluated by a pathologist and graded for the degree of macrophage infiltration, bronchiolization, fibrosis and pleural thickening, and were also scored according to the Wagner scale. Lesions were evaluated according to the number of adenomas, carcinomas and mesotheliomas. The accessory lobe was digested by low-temperature plasma ashing and the number, size distribution and chemical composition of the fibres determined. This model provides a sensitive and reproducible method for evaluating existing and new fibres. A variety of different

  11. Mineral fibres and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J C

    1984-04-01

    A synthesis is presented of the salient findings to date from laboratory and epidemiological research, on the health effects of asbestos and other natural and man-made mineral fibres. Experimental evidence suggests that all mineral fibres are capable of causing fibrosis and malignancy, with chrysotile at least as pathogenic as other fibres. However, penetration, retention and phagocytosis are affected by size and shape and reactivity and durability by physico-chemical properties. Thus it is not surprising that in man the results of exposure vary considerably with fibre type and industrial process. A considerable body of evidence suggests that chrysotile has seldom, if ever, caused peritoneal mesothelioma and that the great majority of pleural mesotheliomas are also attributable to crocidolite or amosite. Without more reliable information on intensity and duration of exposure by fibre type, the epidemiological evidence on this point cannot be wholly conclusive. There are stronger grounds from a limited number of cohort studies for believing that in relation to estimated exposure, the risk of lung cancer has been much higher in textile plants than in fibre production or in the manufacture of friction products, with asbestos-cement plants somewhere in between. The data on man-made fibre production remains equivocal. It is concluded that attempts to regulate asbestos without regard for fibre type, although perhaps adequate for lung cancer and fibrosis, may do little to reduce the risk of mesothelioma. The search for safe fibre substitutes for asbestos will remain difficult until the parameters of pathogenicity are better understood.

  12. Fibre illumination system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Source: EP2426402A The invention relates to a fibre illumination module and system for the collection and delivery of daylight for illumination purposes. The fibre illumination module comprises a plurality of collector elements, each collector element comprising an input fibre having a first end...... the proximal end of the collection optics into the first end of the input fibre, each collector element having a principal axis for the collection of light defining an optical axis of the collector element. The optical axes of the collector elements are arranged in a radially outward pointing multi...

  13. SALIENT FEATURES OF BAMBOO FIBRE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subrata; Das

    2007-01-01

    Bamboo fibre is a regenerated cellulosic fibre produced from bamboo.Starchy pulp is produced from bamboo stems and leaves through a process of alkaline hydrolysis and multi- phase bleaching.Further chemical processes produce bamboo fibre.

  14. SALIENT FEATURES OF BAMBOO FIBRE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subrata Das

    2007-01-01

    @@ Bamboo fibre is a regenerated cellulosic fibre produced from bamboo. Starchy pulp is produced from bamboo stems and leaves through a process of alkaline hydrolysis and multiphase bleaching. Further chemical processes produce bamboo fibre.

  15. Properties of drawn W wire used as high performance fibre in tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Fuhr, M.; Gietl, H.; Han, Y.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Travitzky, N.; Zhao, P.; Neu, R.

    2016-07-01

    High strength and creep resistance also at high temperature, combined with a high thermal conductivity and high melting point make tungsten (W) an ideal material for highly loaded areas in future fusion reactors. However, as a typical bcc metal tungsten features an intrinsic brittleness up to very high temperature and is prone to operational embrittlement. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite (Wf/W) utilizes extrinsic toughening mechanisms similar to ceramic fibre-reinforced ceramics and therefore overcomes the brittleness problem. The properties of the composite are to a large extend determined by the properties of the drawn tungsten wire used as reinforcement fibres. W wire exhibits a superior strength and shows ductile behaviour with exceptional local plasticity. Beside the typical mechanisms observed for ceramic composites the ductile deformation of the fibres is therefore an additional very effective toughening mechanism. Tension tests were used to investigate this phenomenon in more detail. Results show that there is a region of enhanced localized plastic deformation. The specific energy consumption in this region was estimated and used to suggest optimisation options for Wf/W composites.

  16. Fibre reinforced polymer nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlasveld, D.P.N.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis the results are described of the research on a combination of two types of composites: thermoplastic nanocomposites and continuous fibre composites. In this three-phase composite the main reinforcing phase are continuous glass or carbon fibres, and the matrix consists of a polyamide 6

  17. POLARISATION PRESERVING OPTICAL FIBRE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    . This cladding structure provides polarisation preserving properties to the optical fibre. Optical fibres using this technology may have claddings with elements placed non-periodically as well as in a two-dimensional periodic lattice - such as cladding providing Photonic Band Gap (PBG) effects....

  18. Chalcogenide Fibre Displacement Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Fibre optic technology offers the possibility for developing of a variety of physical sensors for a wide range of physical parameters. The main...integrating sphere. The use of chalcogenide rather quartz fibre optic highly increases the Sensitivity of the sensor. Experimental set-up, transmission characteristics and technical parameters are presented.

  19. Energy saving by optimization of wall construction of industrial furnaces using ceramics and mullite fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zander, H.

    1984-01-01

    A change to better insulation, using ceramic fibre, not only reduces energy consumption but can raise productivity to levels higher than ever before. To design ceramic fibre into a furnace, calculations are made based on VDI standard 2055, in unsteady and constant conditions for different refractory materials. The results show the difference in wall to wall temperature drop and energy requirements, depending on the process conditions. A newly developed mullite fibre has recently been introduced. This material has all the well-known ceramic fibre advantages of light weight, good insulating properties and excellent thermal shock resistance. As a mullite fibre it also has higher refractoriness, negligible shrinkage and much improved resistance to chemical attack.

  20. Photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Sanchez Bjarklev, Araceli

    Photonic crystal fibres represent one of the most active research areas today in the field of optics. The diversity of applications that may be addressed by these fibres and their fundamental appeal, by opening up the possibility of guiding light in a radically new way compared to conventional...... optical fibres, have spun an interest from almost all areas of optics and photonics. The aim of this book is to provide an understanding of the different types of photonic crystal fibres and to outline some of the many new and exciting applications that these fibres offer. The book is intended for both...... readers with a general interest in photonic crystals, as well as for scientists who are entering the field and desire a broad overview as well as a solid starting point for further specialized stuides. Teh book, therefore, covers bothe general aspects such as the link from classical optics to photonic...

  1. Photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Sanchez Bjarklev, Araceli

    Photonic crystal fibres represent one of the most active research areas today in the field of optics. The diversity of applications that may be addressed by these fibres and their fundamental appeal, by opening up the possibility of guiding light in a radically new way compared to conventional...... optical fibres, have spun an interest from almost all areas of optics and photonics. The aim of this book is to provide an understanding of the different types of photonic crystal fibres and to outline some of the many new and exciting applications that these fibres offer. The book is intended for both...... readers with a general interest in photonic crystals, as well as for scientists who are entering the field and desire a broad overview as well as a solid starting point for further specialized stuides. Teh book, therefore, covers bothe general aspects such as the link from classical optics to photonic...

  2. [Exposure to ceramic fibers in the work environment. II. Occupational exposure to dust in plants producing ceramic fiber; fibrogenic effect of the fibers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczak, J; Lao, I; Krajnow, A

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the work was to assess the exposure to dust containing ceramic fibres among workers employed in the plant producing aluminosilicate fibres, and to investigate fibrogenic properties of produced ceramic aluminosilicate fibres (L-1). The studies carried out in the work environment revealed that workers were exposed to dust containing respirable fibres from materials produced (fibres, mats). Mean concentrations of these fibres ranged from 0.07 to 0.37 f/cm3 and they were considerably lower than MAC value (1 f/cm3) proposed for respirable ceramic fibres. Mean total dust concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 2.9 mg/m3, and at two working posts they exceeded the proposed MAC value (2 mg/m3). In animal experiments (Wistar female rats) a single dose (25 mg) of L-1 fibres administered intratracheally induced pathological symptoms in lungs, limited to reactive changes in the form of granuloma with weakly pronounced cytolysis, and mean levels of hydroxyproline in the lungs did not differ significantly from the physiological level. The L-1 fibre was classified in the group of dusts with insignificant fibrogenic effects.

  3. Moiré Fibre Bragg Grating Written on Strained Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙磊; 冯新焕; 刘艳格; 张伟刚; 袁树忠; 开桂云; 董孝义

    2004-01-01

    Moiré fibre Bragg gratings are made in a single mode fibre and a polarization-maintaining fibre respectively, using an excimer KrF laser and a phase mask. Two gratings are written at the same location of the optical fibre. The wavelength spacing can be finely tuned from 0 to 1.86nm by straining the optical fibre during UV illumination.

  4. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  5. Ceramic Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  6. Fibre illumination system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    the proximal end of the collection optics into the first end of the input fibre, each collector element having a principal axis for the collection of light defining an optical axis of the collector element. The optical axes of the collector elements are arranged in a radially outward pointing multi......Source: EP2426402A The invention relates to a fibre illumination module and system for the collection and delivery of daylight for illumination purposes. The fibre illumination module comprises a plurality of collector elements, each collector element comprising an input fibre having a first end...... and a second end, and a collection optics, the collection optics being configured to receive light incident on a distal end of the collection optics, to transfer at least partially the incident light to a proximal end of the collection optics, and to couple at least partially the transferred light from...

  7. Ceramic design concepts based on stress distribution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, J F; Anusavice, K J

    2000-08-01

    This article discusses general design concepts involved in fabricating ceramic and metal-ceramic restorations based on scientific stress distribution data. These include the effects of ceramic layer thickness, modulus of elasticity of supporting substrates, direction of applied loads, intraoral stress, and crown geometry on the susceptibility of certain restoration designs to fracture.

  8. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  9. Ceramic Methyltrioxorhenium

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, R; Eickerling, G; Helbig, C; Hauf, C; Miller, R; Mayr, F; Krug von Nidda, H A; Scheidt, E W; Scherer, W; Herrmann, Rudolf; Troester, Klaus; Eickerling, Georg; Helbig, Christian; Hauf, Christoph; Miller, Robert; Mayr, Franz; Nidda, Hans-Albrecht Krug von; Scheidt, Ernst-Wilhelm; Scherer, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The metal oxide polymeric methyltrioxorhenium [(CH3)xReO3] is an unique epresentative of a layered inherent conducting organometallic polymer which adopts the structural motifs of classical perovskites in two dimensions (2D) in form of methyl-deficient, corner-sharing ReO5(CH3) octahedra. In order to improve the characteristics of polymeric methyltrioxorhenium with respect to its physical properties and potential usage as an inherentconducting polymer we tried to optimise the synthetic routes of polymeric modifications of 1 to obtain a sintered ceramic material, denoted ceramic MTO. Ceramic MTO formed in a solvent-free synthesis via auto-polymerisation and subsequent sintering processing displays clearly different mechanical and physical properties from polymeric MTO synthesised in aqueous solution. Ceramic MTO is shown to display activated Re-C and Re=O bonds relative to MTO. These electronic and structural characteristics of ceramic MTO are also reflected by a different chemical reactivity compared with its...

  10. Activation energy for mullitization of gel fibres obtained from aluminum isopropoxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hongbin Tan; Yaping Ding; Haihong Zhang; Jianfeng Yang; Guanjun Qiao

    2012-10-01

    Gel fibres of mullite precursor were prepared from an aqueous solution of aluminum nitrate (AN), aluminum isopropoxide (AIP) and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). A 4:1 molar ratio of aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum nitrate was optimized to obtain spinnable precursor sol for synthesis of fibres. Thermogravimetry–differential scanning calorimetry (TG–DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to characterize properties of the gel and ceramic fibres. The precursor gel completely transformed to mullite at 1200 °C. The activation energy of mullite crystallization was 993.5 kJ/mol by the Kissinger equation.

  11. Manufacturing of superconductive silver/ceramic composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifi, Behrouz; Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Eriksen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    Manufacturing of superconducting metal/ceramic composites is a rather new discipline within materials forming processes. High Temperature SuperConductors, HTSC, are manufactured applying the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube process, OPIT. A ceramic powder containing lead, calcium, bismuth, strontium...... and current leading properties of the final superconducting fibres. The present work describes studies on alternative packing geometries and process parameters in the flat rolling operations. The aim is to obtain homogenous filaments with advantageous geometry and good texture while avoiding potential defects...

  12. Crystalline silica in heated man-made vitreous fibres: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Terry P; Harrison, Paul T C

    2014-02-01

    Refractory ceramic fibres (RCF) and alkaline earth silicate (AES) wools are types of man-made vitreous fibre (MMVF) that are used in demanding high-temperature industrial applications, generally above 900 °C and up to 1400 °C. When exposed to prolonged high temperatures, MMVF can devitrify with the formation of cristobalite and other crystalline silica species, which is of potential concern because crystalline silica (CS) is classified as carcinogenic. This article reviews the chemico-physical processes and morphological consequences of fibre devitrification, the forms and micro-location of CS produced, and the toxicity of devitrified fibres and the CS species formed in this way. It also examines scenarios for worker exposure to the products of fibre devitrification in industries using RCF and/or AES wools. We identify gaps in knowledge and make recommendations for future research.

  13. Creep behaviour at high temperatures of fine SiC and alumina based fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, M.H.; Bunsell, A.R. (Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 91 - Evry (France). Centre des Materiaux)

    1999-01-01

    The creep behaviours of fine ceramic fibres based on silicon carbide and alpha-alumina have been compared. Fibres based on alpha-alumina and composed of isotropic faceted submicronic grains show superplastic behaviour from 1300 C. A mullite/alpha-alumina fibre with curved and elongated grains exhibits lower creep rates but large grains which grow on the surface of the fibre from 1200 C considerably reduce the time to failure in creep. The microstructures and creep strengths of SiC based fibres are strongly dependent on the oxygen content and carbon to silicon ratio. An oxygen content of 5 wt% induces an intergranular oxygen rich phase to be formed which facilitates creep. The creep strength of a fibre containing 0.5 wt% of oxygen can be improved by a heat treatment which increases the crystallinity of the fibre. The structure of a stoichiometric SiC fibre is shown to be composed of larger and faceted grains, to have a higher elastic modulus and an improved resistance to creep. However SiC based fibre are limited in air at high temperatures by the oxidation of the surface. (orig.) 13 refs.

  14. Multibeam Fibre Laser Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove

    The appearance of the high power high brilliance fibre laser has opened for new possibilities in laser materials processing. In laser cutting this laser has demonstrated high cutting performance compared to the dominating cutting laser, the CO2-laser. However, quality problems in fibre-laser...... cutting have until now limited its application in metal cutting. In this paper the first results of proof-of-principle studies applying a new approach (patent pending) for laser cutting with high brightness short wavelength lasers will be presented. In the approach, multi beam patterns are applied...... to control the melt flow out of the cut kerf resulting in improved cut quality in metal cutting. The beam patterns in this study are created by splitting up beams from 2 single mode fibre lasers and combining these beams into a pattern in the cut kerf. The results are obtained with a total of 550 W of single...

  15. Raw Materials in Fibre Enriched Biscuits Production as Source of Total Phenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaženka Šebečić

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to scientifically well documented health beneficial effects of dietary fibres and recommendations for an every day intake on an average of 30 g by food (DRI 2005, the confectionery industry has been increasingly engaged in the production of fibre enriched biscuits with the aim to offer such a product as a valuable constituent of proper nutrition and dietetic functional food intended for risky populations. Thereby, commercially available pure fibres or fibre-rich raw materials have been used for the enrichment of biscuits, prevalently pure fibres. To evaluate such products as functional food it is of interest to know how the choice of raw material for biscuit fibre enrichment influences the content of other health protecting compounds which commonly accompany fibres in plant material. With the aim of evaluating fibre rich biscuits as a source of total phenols depending on the origin of fibres, total phenols were determined spectrophotometrically by a modified Folin-Ciocalteau method (Gao et al. 2002 in ten experimentally baked biscuits based on wheat flour type 500 and type 1700 with or without different dietary fibres or fibre rich raw materials added instead of definite amount of white fl our. Results show that shares of total phenols and fibres in biscuits based on the wheat fl our depend on the type of the fl our. Biscuits with pure wheat and oats fibres added were the lowest in phenol content regardless on the highest amount of fibres (0.96 g kg-1 and 1.09 g kg-1, respectively; inulin and amaranth do not changeessentially phenol content; apple fibres, soya fl our, and carob fl our enhance phenol content thereby carob fl our being the most effective giving biscuits 5.53 g total phenols kg-1.

  16. Raw Materials in Fibre Enriched Biscuits Production as Source of Total Phenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaženka Šebečić

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to scientifically well documented health beneficial effects of dietary fibres and recommendations for an every day intake on an average of 30 g by food (DRI 2005, the confectionery industry has been increasingly engaged in the production of fibre enriched biscuits with the aim to offer such a product as a valuable constituent of proper nutrition and dietetic functional food intended for risky populations. Thereby, commercially available pure fibres or fibre-rich raw materials have been used for the enrichment of biscuits, prevalently pure fibres. To evaluate such products as functional food it is of interest to know how the choice of raw material for biscuit fibre enrichment influences the content of other health protecting compounds which commonly accompany fibres in plant material. With the aim of evaluating fibre rich biscuits as a source of total phenols depending on the origin of fibres, total phenols were determined spectrophotometrically by a modified Folin-Ciocalteau method (Gao et al. 2002 in ten experimentally baked biscuits based on wheat flour type 500 and type 1700 with or without different dietary fibres or fibre rich raw materials added instead of definite amount of white fl our. Results show that shares of total phenols and fibres in biscuits based on the wheat fl our depend on the type of the fl our. Biscuits with pure wheat and oats fibres added were the lowest in phenol content regardless on the highest amount of fibres (0.96 g kg-1 and 1.09 g kg-1, respectively; inulin and amaranth do not change essentially phenol content; apple fibres, soya fl our, and carob fl our enhance phenol content thereby carob fl our being the most effective giving biscuits 5.53 g total phenols kg-1.

  17. Engineering ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bengisu, Murat

    2001-01-01

    This is a comprehensive book applying especially to junior and senior engineering students pursuing Materials Science/ Engineering, Ceramic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering degrees. It is also a reference book for other disciplines such as Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Engineering. Important properties of most engineering ceramics are given in detailed tables. Many current and possible applications of engineering ceramics are described, which can be used as a guide for materials selection and for potential future research. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials, processing properties, characterization and applications of engineering ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  18. Optical fibre line failure detecting

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Feng

    2013-01-01

    With the development of modern communications, in order to meet the needs of social development and technological progress the optical fibre communications has become the main communication medium for its high reliability and security. Fibre-optic cable is the channel for signal transmission. It is an important component in the entire fibre-optic network. Once the fibre-optic cable fault happened, the entire communication system would be impacted seriously. When fault occurs, it is important ...

  19. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Liang; Habibovic, Pamela; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens A [Department of Tissue Regeneration, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Hedhammar, My; Johansson, Jan [Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, the Biomedical Centre, Box 575, 751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Blom, Tobias; Leifer, Klaus [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-08-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramic coatings, applied on surfaces of metallic and polymeric biomaterials, can improve their performance in bone repair and regeneration. Spider silk is biocompatible, strong and elastic, and hence an attractive biomaterial for applications in connective tissue repair. Recently, artificial spider silk, with mechanical and structural characteristics similar to those of native spider silk, has been produced from recombinant minispidroins. In the present study, supersaturated simulated body fluid was used to deposit calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres. The mineralization process was followed in time using scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) detector and Raman spectroscope. Focused ion beam technology was used to produce a cross section of a coated fibre, which was further analysed by EDX. Preliminary in vitro experiments using a culture of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on coated fibres were also performed. This study showed that recombinant spider silk fibres were successfully coated with a homogeneous and thick crystalline calcium phosphate layer. In the course of the mineralization process from modified simulated body fluid, sodium chloride crystals were first deposited on the silk surface, followed by the deposition of a calcium phosphate layer. The coated silk fibres supported the attachment and growth of hMSCs.

  20. Fibre Optics in Undersea Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Talwar

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Role of optical fibres for underwater communication cables and hydrophones is discussed. The fibre optics cables provide an excellent solution to the historical bandwidth-diameter problems of conventional coaxial cables.Fibre optic hydrophones are found to have many more advantages apart from high sensitivity and large dynamic range, over the classical sound sensors used in underwater work.

  1. Single-mode optical fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Cancellieri, G

    1991-01-01

    This book describes signal propagation in single-mode optical fibres for telecommunication applications. Such description is based on the analysis of field propagation, considering waveguide properties and also some of the particular characteristics of the material fibre. The book covers such recent advances as, coherent transmissions; optical amplification; MIR fibres; polarization maintaining; polarization diversity and photon counting.

  2. Orientational Distribution of Fibres in Sheared Fibre Suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KU Xiao-Ke; LIN Jian-Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Motion of fibres in sheared fibre suspensions is simulated numerically by using the lattice Boltzmann method. The orientational distributions of the fibres are presented for different Reynolds numbers, Stokes numbers, shear rate and fibre aspect ratio. Some computational results are compared with the experimental data of pipe Bow, and the qualitative agreement is achieved. The results show that the orientational distributions are greatly affected by the Reynolds numbers, while relatively insensitive to the fibre aspect ratio. The Stokes number and shear rate have obvious influence on the orientation distribution.

  3. Structural Ceramics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  4. Detection of surface free radical activity of respirable industrial fibres using supercoiled phi X174 RF1 plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, P S; Beswick, P H; Brown, D M; Donaldson, K

    1995-12-01

    The ability of a number of respirable industrial fibres, amosite and crocidolite asbestos, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) and man-made vitreous fibres (MMVFs) to cause free radical injury to plasmid phi X174 RFI DNA was assessed. The oxidative DNA damage was observed as depletion of supercoiled DNA after fibre treatment was quantified by scanning laser densitometry. The mechanism of fibre-mediated damage was determined by the use of the specific hydroxyl radical scavenger mannitol and the iron chelator desferrioxamine-B. The amosite and crocidolite asbestos caused substantial damage to DNA that was dose-related. The free radicals responsible for the asbestos-mediated DNA damage were hydroxyl radicals, as determined by inhibition with mannitol. Asbestos fibre-mediated damage to DNA was completely ameliorated by the chelation of fibre-associated iron with desferrioxamine-B. The amount of Fe(II) and Fe(III) released by equal numbers of the different fibre types at equal fibre number was determined. The fibres released very small amounts of Fe(II) and there were no significant differences between the fibre types. The fibres released substantial amounts of Fe(III); MMVF 21 released significantly more Fe(III) than any of the other fibres and short fibre amosite also released more Fe(III) than three of the MMVFs and two of the RCFs. When ability to release Fe(II) and Fe(III) was compared with ability to cause DNA damage there was not a good correlation, because only the long amosite and crocidolite caused substantial free radical injury to DNA; this contrasts with MMVF 21 and short amosite being the two fibres that released the greatest amounts of iron. The loss of ability to damage DNA in DSF-B-treated asbestos fibres shows that iron at the surface of asbestos fibres definitely has a role in generating hydroxyl radicals. However, it is clear that some fibres, such as short amosite and MMVF 21, release large quantities of iron without causing free radical damage, whilst

  5. Hollow fibre microporous silica membranes for gas separation and pervaporation: synthesis, performance and stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest-Vercammen, E.L.J. van; Peters, T.A.; Fontalvo, J.; Vorstman, M.A.G.; Benes, N.E.; Dam, R.A. van; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2005-01-01

    Thin microporous silica membranes were prepared on the outer surface of hollow fibre ceramic substrates. In principle this enables relatively fast and inexpensive production of large membrane surface area, combined with a low support resistance and a high membrane surface area/module volume ratio (>

  6. Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolaou, N.; Karagianni, L.; Sarakiniatti, M.V.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0533 Innovation & Sustainability. Fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) have been used in many applications over the years, from new construction to retrofitting. They are lightweight, no-corrosive, exhibit high specific strength and specific

  7. Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolaou, N.; Karagianni, L.; Sarakiniatti, M.V.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0533 Innovation & Sustainability. Fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) have been used in many applications over the years, from new construction to retrofitting. They are lightweight, no-corrosive, exhibit high specific strength and specific sti

  8. Assessment of the fracture strength distribution and the Weibull parameters of fibres from a bundle test. Ermittlung der Festigkeitsverteilung und der Weibullparameter von Fasern aus einem Buendelzugversuch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienkamp, M. (Technische Hochschule Darmstadt, Fachgebiet Physikalische Metallkunde, Fachbereich Materialwissenschaft (Germany)); Exner, H.E. (Technische Hochschule Darmstadt, Fachgebiet Physikalische Metallkunde, Fachbereich Materialwissenschaft (Germany))

    1993-04-01

    Present test methods used to determine the strength distribution of high performance fibres are either time consuming or not very reliable. A method is used which enables the derivation of the strength distribution function from one single tensile test. The load/elongation diagram of a bundle of fibres is taken from an elongation-controlled tensile test. From the ratio of the measured load to a fictive load, necessary to obtain an identical elongation in the bundle assuming all fibres are intact, the fraction of broken fibres for each point of the load/elongation diagram is determined. From this the strength distribution function and the Weibull parametes of the fibres can be calculated. Application of this simple, but very effective method, is demonstrated for a schematic example and for three fibre materials (carbon, aramid and ceramic fibres). (orig.)

  9. Modelling of photonic crystal fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    In the presenta ph.d. work a theoretical study of aspects of modelling photonic crystal fibres was carried out. Photonic crystal fibres form a class of optical waveguides where guidance is no longer provided by a difference in refractive index between core and cladding. Instead, guidance...... is provided by an arrangement of air-holes running along the length of the fibre. Depending on the geometry of the fibre, the guiding mechanism may be either arising from the formation of a photonic bandgap in the cladding structure (photonic bandgap fibre), or by an effect resembling total internal...... modes in contiguous fibre segments curved at different radii. Overall microbend loss is expressed as a statistical mean of mismatch losses. Extending a well proven, established formula for macrobending losses in stop index fibres, we provide an estimate of macrobend losses in an air-guiding photonic...

  10. Optical Fibre Sensors Using Graphene-Based Materials: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernaez, Miguel; Zamarreño, Carlos R.; Melendi-Espina, Sonia; Bird, Liam R.; Mayes, Andrew G.; Arregui, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene and its derivatives have become the most explored materials since Novoselov and Geim (Nobel Prize winners for Physics in 2010) achieved its isolation in 2004. The exceptional properties of graphene have attracted the attention of the scientific community from different research fields, generating high impact not only in scientific journals, but also in general-interest newspapers. Optical fibre sensing is one of the many fields that can benefit from the use of these new materials, combining the amazing morphological, chemical, optical and electrical features of graphene with the advantages that optical fibre offers over other sensing strategies. In this document, a review of the current state of the art for optical fibre sensors based on graphene materials is presented. PMID:28098825

  11. Optical Fibre Sensors Using Graphene-Based Materials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Hernaez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene and its derivatives have become the most explored materials since Novoselov and Geim (Nobel Prize winners for Physics in 2010 achieved its isolation in 2004. The exceptional properties of graphene have attracted the attention of the scientific community from different research fields, generating high impact not only in scientific journals, but also in general-interest newspapers. Optical fibre sensing is one of the many fields that can benefit from the use of these new materials, combining the amazing morphological, chemical, optical and electrical features of graphene with the advantages that optical fibre offers over other sensing strategies. In this document, a review of the current state of the art for optical fibre sensors based on graphene materials is presented.

  12. Occupational exposure to mineral fibres: analysis of results stored on colchic database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffer, Edmond; Vincent, Raymond

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present fibre exposure data recorded on the COLCHIC database. This database consolidates all occupational exposure data collected in French companies by the Caisses Régionales d'Assurance Maladie (regional health insurance funds, CRAM) and the Institut National de Recherche et de Sécurité (national institute for research and safety, INRS). A total of 8029 concentration results, expressed in number of fibres measured by phase-contrast optical microscopy, are available for exposure to asbestos fibres, ceramic fibres and man-made mineral fibres other than ceramic fibres. Presentation of base data by activity branch, activity sector or workplace permits identification of situations, for which prevention efforts are most essential. Analysis of exposure levels during the 1986-2004 period show that these are broadly influenced by changes in the exposure limit values. Wearing of respiratory protection equipment by employees is also discussed. The data may be helpful to occupational physicians performing occupational screening of exposed workers and to epidemiologists seeking information for building job-exposures matrices. In this respect, a database (FIBREX) will be available on the INRS web site (www.inrs.fr) at the beginning of 2007. This database will provide a higher level of detail in activity and workplace description than that which was possible for practical reasons in this paper.

  13. Non-Linear Fibres for Widely Tunable Femtosecond Fibre Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard

    This Ph.D. thesis investigates how intramodal and intermodal nonlinear processes in few-moded fibres can be used to generate light sources at wavelengths outside the spectral gain-bands of rare-earth-doped opticalfibres. The design of two specialty few-moded fibres for use in a widely tunable...... femtosecond fibre laser is presented. The two fibres are used to facilitate the shifting of a soliton in a cascade configuration from the ytterbium gain-band and to a wavelength of 1280 nm. The temporal pulse duration is on a femtosecond scale with a pulse energy of 5 nJ. The experimentally observed soliton...... self-frequency shift and thereby the outcome of the experimental demonstration of the widely tunable femtosecond fibre laser is shown to depend highly on the chirped of the input pulse into the first few-moded fibre in the cascade setup. Furthermore, an alternative splicing process, with a combination...

  14. Fibre composite in driveline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, W.

    1989-03-01

    Apart from the geometric degrees of freedom of classical material, fibre composites as material for cardan shafts offer two further free parameters to the design engineer: The fiberment winding angle and the ratio of carbon and glass fibres. This results in a large scope of characteristics in terms of flexibility and torsion. In many cases it is therefore possible to use a one-piece shaft instead of a two-piece shaft, and a specific harmonization of the vibration characteristics of the driveline can be realized. In comparison with shafts made out of steel, mass is reduced by 40-50%, the moment of inertia of the mass by 35-40%. The Composite shaft fulfils the requirements of the performance specifications typical of the components concerned both in terms of engineering and efficiency.

  15. A simplified immunohistochemical classification of skeletal muscle fibres in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kammoun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The classification of muscle fibres is of particular interest for the study of the skeletal muscle properties in a wide range of scientific fields, especially animal phenotyping. It is therefore important to define a reliable method for classifying fibre types. The aim of this study was to establish a simplified method for the immunohistochemical classification of fibres in mouse. To carry it out, we first tested a combination of several anti myosin heavy chain (MyHC antibodies in order to choose a minimum number of antibodies to implement a semi-automatic classification. Then, we compared the classification of fibres to the MyHC electrophoretic pattern on the same samples. Only two anti MyHC antibodies on serial sections with the fluorescent labeling of the Laminin were necessary to classify properly fibre types in Tibialis Anterior and Soleus mouse muscles in normal physiological conditions. This classification was virtually identical to the classification realized by the electrophoretic separation of MyHC. This immunohistochemical classification can be applied to the total area of Tibialis Anterior and Soleus mouse muscles. Thus, we provide here a useful, simple and time-efficient method for immunohistochemical classification of fibres, applicable for research in mouse

  16. Optical Fibre Bundle

    CERN Multimedia

    These are sample fibre optic cables which are used for networking. Optical fibers are widely used in fiber-optic communications, where they permit transmission over longer distances and at higher bandwidths (data rates) than wire cables. Fibers are used instead of metal wires because signals travel along them with less loss and are also immune to electromagnetic interference. This is useful for somewhere like CERN where magnets with their highly powerful magnetic fields could pose a problem.

  17. Fibre-optical microendoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, M; Bao, H; Kang, H

    2014-04-01

    Microendoscopy has been an essential tool in exploring micro/nano mechanisms in vivo due to high-quality imaging performance, compact size and flexible movement. The investigations into optical fibres, micro-scanners and miniature lens have boosted efficiencies of remote light delivery to sample site and signal collection. Given the light interaction with materials in the fluorescence imaging regime, this paper reviews two classes of compact microendoscopy based on a single fibre: linear optical microendoscopy and nonlinear optical microendoscopy. Due to the fact that fluorescence occurs only in the focal volume, nonlinear optical microendoscopy can provide stronger optical sectioning ability than linear optical microendoscopy, and is a good candidate for deep tissue imaging. Moreover, one-photon excited fluorescence microendoscopy as the linear optical microendoscopy suffers from severe photobleaching owing to the linear dependence of photobleaching rate on excitation laser power. On the contrary, nonlinear optical microendoscopy, including two-photon excited fluorescence microendoscopy and second harmonic generation microendoscopy, has the capability to minimize or avoid the photobleaching effect at a high excitation power and generate high image contrast. The combination of various nonlinear signals gained by the nonlinear optical microendoscopy provides a comprehensive insight into biophenomena in internal organs. Fibre-optical microendoscopy overcomes physical limitations of traditional microscopy and opens up a new path to achieve early cancer diagnosis and microsurgery in a minimally invasive and localized manner.

  18. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  19. Mineral fibres: correlation between oxidising surface activity and DNA base hydroxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejjari, A; Fournier, J; Pezerat, H; Leanderson, P

    1993-06-01

    In relation to their potential genotoxic properties, the ability of inorganic particles to induce activated species of oxygen with strong oxidative properties can be studied by various methods. In this study the oxidative surface properties of 10 different natural and synthetic mineral fibres were investigated by: (1) an electron paramagnetic resonance technique in which formate was used to trap oxidative species; and (2) a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based method in which deoxyguanosine was used as a trapping agent and the formation of 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8 OHdG) was analysed. Ground iron-containing fibres such as crocidolite and amosite were the most reactive, whereas fibres without iron--for example, ceramic fibres, xonotlite, and Tismo L--were completely inactive. A good correlation was found when the results from the two methods were compared (r = 0.86).

  20. Respiratory health effects of man-made vitreous (mineral) fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuyst, P; Dumortier, P; Swaen, G M; Pairon, J C; Brochard, P

    1995-12-01

    The group of man-made mineral or vitreous fibres (MMMFs or MMVFs) includes glass wool, rock wool, slag wool, glass filaments and microfibres, and refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs). Experimental observations have provided evidence that some types of MMVF are bioactive under certain conditions. The critical role of size parameters has been demonstrated in cellular and animal experiments, when intact fibres are in direct contact with the target cells. It is, however, difficult to extrapolate the results from these studies to humans since they bypass inhalation, deposition, clearance and translocation mechanisms. Inhalation studies are more realistic, but show differences between animal species regarding their sensibility to tumour induction by fibres. Fibre biopersistence is an important factor, as suggested by recent inhalation studies, which demonstrate positive results with RCF for fibrosis, lung tumours and mesothelioma. There is no firm evidence that exposure to glass-, rock- and slag wool is associated with lung fibrosis, pleural lesions, or nonspecific respiratory disease in humans. Exposure to RCF could enhance the effects of smoking in causing airways obstruction. An elevated standard mortality ratio for lung cancer has been demonstrated in cohorts of workers exposed to MMVF, especially in the early technological phase of mineral (rock slag) wool production. During that period, several carcinogenic agents (arsenic, asbestos, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)) were also present at the workplace and quantitative data about smoking and fibre levels are lacking. It is not possible from these data to determine whether the risk of lung cancer is due to the MMVFs themselves. No increased risk of mesothelioma has been demonstrated in the cohorts of workers exposed to glass-, slag- or rock wool. There are in fact insufficient epidemiological data available concerning neoplastic diseases in RCF production workers because of the small size of the workforce and the

  1. Analysis of glass fibre sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2014-01-01

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer composites are widely used for industrial and engineering applications which include construction, aerospace, automotive and wind energy industry. During the manufacturing glass fibres, they are surface-treated with an aqueous solution. This process and the treated...... surfaces are called sizing. The sizing influences the properties of the interface between fibres and a matrix, and subsequently affects mechanical properties of composites. In this work the sizing of commercially available glass fibres was analysed so as to study the composition and chemical structures....... Soxhlet extraction was used to extract components of the sizing from the glass fibres. The glass fibres, their extracts and coated glass plates were analysed by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis combined with a mass spectrometer (TGA-MS), and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR...

  2. An Overview on the Improvement of Mechanical Properties of Ceramics Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Silvestre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their prominent properties (mechanical, stiffness, strength, thermal stability, ceramic composite materials (CMC have been widely applied in automotive, industrial and aerospace engineering, as well as in biomedical and electronic devices. Because monolithic ceramics exhibit brittle behaviour and low electrical conductivity, CMCs have been greatly improved in the last decade. CMCs are produced from ceramic fibres embedded in a ceramic matrix, for which several ceramic materials (oxide or non-oxide are used for the fibres and the matrix. Due to the large diversity of available fibres, the properties of CMCs can be adapted to achieve structural targets. They are especially valuable for structural components with demanding mechanical and thermal requirements. However, with the advent of nanoparticles in this century, the research interests in CMCs are now changing from classical reinforcement (e.g., microscale fibres to new types of reinforcement at nanoscale. This review paper presents the current state of knowledge on processing and mechanical properties of a new generation of CMCs: Ceramics Nanocomposites (CNCs.

  3. Characterization of fibre-reinforced light metals; Charakterisierung faserverstaerker Leichtmetalle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietz, H.-D. [Hochschule fuer Technik und Wirtschaft Zwickau (Germany); Behrends, A. [Hochschule fuer Technik und Wirtschaft Zwickau (Germany); Palm, T. [Hochschule fuer Technik und Wirtschaft Zwickau (Germany)

    1996-10-01

    Metal-matrix composites combine the properties of metals with those of ceramic fibres. Pistons of highly stressed Diesel engines are reinforced in their bottom zones by the implantation of a preform of fibres. Investigations concentrate on the nondestructive detection of inclusions and defects of fibre distribution. Due to the very small dimensions of the defects test methods capable of responding sensitively to such small defect dimensions have to be applied. Good prerequisites to solve the task of defect detection are provided in first line by ultrasonic inspection within the high-frequency range in connection with scanning methods. Natural defects up to a size of 120 {mu}m could be detected by ultrasonics. With artificial test defects, the limit was reached at 100 {mu}m. Eddy-current inspection, another test procedure, was applied for the detection of fibreless zones, as there exist differences of conductivity between fibreless and fibre-reinforced zones. The use of scanning methods with special probes allows to depict fibreless zones up to a size of 100 {mu}m on the specimen surface. (orig.)

  4. Supercoiled plasmid DNA as a model target for assessing the generation of free radicals at the surface of fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, K; Gilmour, P S; Beswick, P H

    1995-09-01

    The ability of respirable amosite and crocidolite asbestos, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) and man made vitreous fibres (MMVFs) to cause free radical injury to plasmid, phiX174 RFI DNA was assessed. The amosite and crocidolite asbestos caused substantial damage to the DNA and, in the main, the free radicals responsible for the asbestos-mediated DNA damage were hydroxyl radicals as determined by inhibition with mannitol. Asbestos fibre-mediated damage to the DNA was completely ameliorated by the chelation of fibre-associated iron by pre-treatment of fibres with desferrioxamine-B, confirming the importance of iron in the production of free radicals. MMVFs and RCFs produced modest free radical damage to the DNA, which was prevented by mannitol but not by iron chelation.

  5. Fibre-reinforced calcium phosphate cements: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, C; Ginebra, M P

    2011-11-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPC) consist of one or more calcium orthophosphate powders, which upon mixing with water or an aqueous solution, form a paste that is able to set and harden after being implanted within the body. Different issues remain still to be improved in CPC, such as their mechanical properties to more closely mimic those of natural bone, or their macroporosity to favour osteointegration of the artificial grafts. To this end, blends of CPC with polymer and ceramic fibres in different forms have been investigated. The present work aims at providing an overview of the different approaches taken and identifying the most significant achievements in the field of fibre-reinforced calcium phosphate cements for clinical applications, with special focus on their mechanical properties.

  6. Comparing modal noise and FRD of circular and non-circular cross-section fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablowski, D. P.; Plüschke, D.; Weber, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Järvinen, A.

    2016-03-01

    Modal noise is a common source of noise introduced to the measurements by optical fibres and is particularly important for fibre-fed spectroscopic instruments, especially for high-resolution measurements. This noise source can limit the signal-to-noise ratio and jeopardize photon-noise limited data. The subject of the present work is to compare measurements of modal noise and focal-ratio degradation (FRD) for several commonly used fibres. We study the influence of a simple mechanical scrambling method (excenter) on both FRD and modal noise. Measurements are performed with circular and octagonal fibres from Polymicro Technology (FBP-Series) with diameters of 100, 200, and 300 μm and for square and rectangular fibres from CeramOptec, among others. FRD measurements for the same sample of fibres are performed as a function of wavelength. Furthermore, we replaced the circular fibre of the STELLA-échelle-spectrograph (SES) in Tenerife with an octagonal and found a SNR increase by a factor of 1.6 at 678 nm. It is shown in the laboratory that an excenter with a large amplitude and low frequency will not influence the FRD but will reduce modal noise rather effectively by up to 180%.

  7. Comparing modal noise and FRD of circular and non-circular cross- section fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Sablowski, D P; Weber, M; Strassmeier, K G; Järvinen, A

    2015-01-01

    Modal noise is a common source of noise introduced to the measurements by optical fibres and is particularly important for fibre-fed spectroscopic instruments, especially for high-resolution measurements. This noise source can limit the signal-to-noise ratio and jeopardize photon-noise limited data. The subject of the present work is to compare measurements of modal noise and focal-ratio degradation (FRD) for several commonly-used fibres. We study the influence of a simple mechanical scrambling method (excenter) on both FRD and modal noise. Measurements are performed with circular and octagonal fibres from Polymicro Technology (FBP-Series) with diameters of 100, 200 and 300 {\\mu}m and for square and rectangular fibres from CeramOptec, among others. FRD measurements for the same sample of fibres are performed as a function of wavelength. Furthermore, we replaced the circular fibre of the STELLA-echelle-spectrograph (SES) in Tenerife with an octagonal and found a SNR increase by a factor of 1.6 at 678 nm. It is...

  8. Non-destructive mechanical characterization of (nano-sized) ceramic fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colomban, P.; Gouadec, G. [CNRS, Thiais (France). LADIR

    2002-07-01

    SiC and C fibres are produced from polymeric precursor. This synthesis route leads to a nano-sized materials with very smooth surface, the lack of defects explaining tensile strengths as high as 3 GPa. A high correlation is expected between short-range-ordering, nanostructure and macroscopic properties, like in any nano-sized ceramic issued from liquid routes (sol-gel, polymer precursors). The paper provides a comprehensive study on Raman spectroscopy versatility as a fast and non-destructive tool for the study of ceramic fibres nano/micro-structures and the prediction of their mechanical properties. We show how the results of very simple spectra fitting are correlated with E and {sigma}{sub r} in NLM, Hi, Hi-S, SA, SCS-6 and Sylramic (trademarks) SiC fibres. The reason why such a correlation exists, the common dependency of Raman signal and mechanical behaviour to the nano/microstructure of ceramics, is discussed. (orig.)

  9. Applications for carbon fibre recovered from composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering; Liu, Z.; Turner, TA; Wong, KH

    2016-07-01

    Commercial operations to recover carbon fibre from waste composites are now developing and as more recovered fibre becomes available new applications for recovered fibre are required. Opportunities to use recovered carbon fibre as a structural reinforcement are considered involving the use of wet lay processes to produce nonwoven mats. Mats with random in-plane fibre orientation can readily be produced using existing commercial processes. However, the fibre volume fraction, and hence the mechanical properties that can be achieved, result in composites with limited mechanical properties. Fibre volume fractions of 40% can be achieved with high moulding pressures of over 100 bar, however, moulding at these pressures results in substantial fibre breakage which reduces the mean fibre length and the properties of the composite manufactured. Nonwoven mats made from aligned, short carbon fibres can achieve higher fibre volume fractions with lower fibre breakage even at high moulding pressure. A process for aligning short fibres is described and a composite of over 60% fibre volume fraction has been manufactured at a pressures up to 100 bar with low fibre breakage. Further developments of the alignment process have been undertaken and a composite of 46% fibre volume fraction has been produced moulded at a pressure of 7 bar in an autoclave, exhibiting good mechanical properties that compete with higher grade materials. This demonstrates the potential for high value applications for recovered carbon fibre by fibre alignment.

  10. Properties of hemp fibre polymer composites - An optimisation of fibre properties using novel defibration methods and fibre characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Characterization of hemp fibres was carried out with fibres obtained with low handling damage and defibration damage to get an indication of how strong cellulose based fibres that can be produced from hemp. Comparison was made with hemp yarn producedunder traditional conditions where damage...... obtained by steam explosion of hemp fibres prior defibrated with pectin degrading enzymes. The S2 layer in the fibre wall of the hemp fibres consisted of1-4 cellulose rich and lignin poor concentric layers constructed of ca. 100 nm thick lamellae. The microfibril angle showed values in the range 0......-10° for the main part of the S2-layer and 70-90° for the S1-layer. The microfibrils that are mainly parallelwith the fibre axis explain the high fibre stiffness, which in defibrated hemp fibres reached 94 GPa. The defibrated hemp fibres had higher fibre stiffness (88-94 GPa) than hemp yarn (60 GPa), which...

  11. Microstructured Optical Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    complete PBGs, which reflects light incident from air or vacuum. Such structures may be used as cladding structures in optical fibres, where light is confined and thereby guided in a hollow core region. In addition, the present invention relates to designs for ultra low-loss PBG waveguiding structures......The present invention relates to a new class of optical waveguides, in which waveguiding along one or more core regions is obtained through the application of the Photonic Bandgap (PBG) effect. The invention further relates to optimised two-dimensional lattice structures capable of providing...

  12. Efficient delivery of 60 J pulse energy of long pulse Nd:YAG laser through 200 m core diameter optical fibre

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravindra Singh; Ambar Choubey; R K Jain; S C Vishwakarma; D K Agrawal; Sabir Ali; B N Upadhyaya; S M Oak

    2014-02-01

    Most of today’s industrial Nd:YAG lasers use fibre-optic beam delivery. In such lasers, fibre core diameter is an important consideration in deploying a beam delivery system. Using a smaller core diameter fibre allows higher irradiances at focus position, less degradation of beam quality, and a larger stand-off distance. In this work, we have put efforts to efficiently deliver the laser output of ‘ceramic reflector’-based long pulse Nd:YAG laser through a 200 m core diameter optical fibre and successfully delivered up to 60 J of pulse energy with 90% transmission efficiency, using a GRADIUM (axial gradient) plano-convex lens to sharply focus down the beam on the end face of the optical fibre and fibre end faces have been cleaved to achieve higher surface damage thresholds.

  13. Design of DFB fibre lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Vibeke Claudia; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard; Varming, Poul

    1998-01-01

    A numerical model for erbium distributed feedback (DFB) fibre lasers is presented. The model is used to optimise the location of a discrete phase-shift to obtain maximum output power. For DFB fibre lasers of up to 10cm in length it is shown that the influence of Kerr nonlinearity with respect...

  14. Man-made mineral (vitreous) fibres: evaluations of cancer hazards by the IARC Monographs Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baan, Robert A; Grosse, Yann

    2004-09-03

    Man-made vitreous (glass-like) fibres are non-crystalline, fibrous inorganic substances (silicates) made primarily from rock, slag, glass or other processed minerals. These materials, also called man-made mineral fibres, include glass fibres (used in glass wool and continuous glass filament), rock or stone wool, slag wool and refractory ceramic fibres. They are widely used for thermal and acoustical insulation and to a lesser extent for other purposes. These products are potentially hazardous to human health because they release airborne respirable fibres during their production, use and removal. Man-made mineral fibres and man-made vitreous fibres have been the subject of reviews by IARC Monographs Working Groups in 1987 and 2001, respectively, which resulted in evaluations of the carcinogenic hazard to humans from exposure to these materials. These reviews and evaluations have been published as Volumes 43 and 81 of the IARC Monographs series [IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans, vol. 43, Man-made Mineral Fibres and Radon (1988); IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans, vol. 81, Man-made Vitreous Fibres (2002)]. The re-evaluation in 2001 was undertaken because there have been substantial improvements in the quality of the epidemiological information available on the carcinogenicity to humans of glass fibres, continuous glass filament and rock/slag wool. The new evaluations have addressed the limitations of earlier cohort studies, particularly concerning the lack of adjustment with respect to concomitant risk factors such as smoking and other sources of occupational exposure. In addition, the evaluation of the evidence for carcinogenicity of glass fibres to experimental animals has been refined, by making a distinction between insulation glass wool and special-purpose glass fibres. The results of the evaluations in 1987 and 2001 are thus different in several aspects. In this paper, the reviews and evaluations

  15. Reticulation des fibres lignocellulosiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrevy, Christel

    Pour faire face à la crise économique la conception de papier à valeur ajoutée est développée par les industries papetières. Le but de se projet est l'amélioration des techniques actuelles de réticulation des fibres lignocellulosiques de la pâte à papier visant à produire un papier plus résistant. En effet, lors des réactions de réticulation traditionnelles, de nombreuses liaisons intra-fibres se forment ce qui affecte négativement l'amélioration anticipée des propriétés physiques du papier ou du matériau produit. Pour éviter la formation de ces liaisons intra-fibres, un greffage sur les fibres de groupements ne pouvant pas réagir entre eux est nécessaire. La réticulation des fibres par une réaction de « click chemistry » appelée cycloaddition de Huisgen entre un azide et un alcyne vrai, catalysée par du cuivre (CuAAC) a été l'une des solutions trouvée pour remédier à ce problème. De plus, une adaptation de cette réaction en milieux aqueux pourrait favoriser son utilisation en milieu industriel. L'étude que nous désirons entreprendre lors de ce projet vise à optimiser la réaction de CuAAC et les réactions intermédiaires (propargylation, tosylation et azidation) sur la pâte kraft, en milieu aqueux. Pour cela, les réactions ont été adaptées en milieu aqueux sur la cellulose microcristalline afin de vérifier sa faisabilité, puis transférée à la pâte kraft et l'influence de différents paramètres comme le temps de réaction ou la quantité de réactifs utilisée a été étudiée. Dans un second temps, une étude des différentes propriétés conférées au papier par les réactions a été réalisée à partir d'une série de tests papetiers optiques et physiques. Mots Clés Click chemistry, Huisgen, CuAAC, propargylation, tosylation, azidation, cellulose, pâte kraft, milieu aqueux, papier.

  16. Standardisation of ceramic matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The standardisation on ceramic matrix composite (CMCs test methods occurred in the 1980's as these materials began to display interesting properties for aeronautical applications. Since the French Office of standardisation B43C has participated in establishing more than 40 standards and guides dealing with their thermal mechanical properties, their reinforcement and their fibre/matrix interface. As their maturity has been demonstrated through several technological development programmes (plugs, flaps, blades …, the air framers and engine manufacturers are now thinking of develop industrial parts which require a certification from airworthiness authorities. Now the standardisation of CMCs has to turn toward documents completing the certification requirement for civil and military applications. The news standards will allow being more confident with CMCs in taking into account their specificity.

  17. Random distributed feedback fibre lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.; Babin, Sergey A.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Vatnik, Ilya D.; Nikulin, Maxim; Podivilov, Evgenii V.

    2014-09-01

    The concept of random lasers exploiting multiple scattering of photons in an amplifying disordered medium in order to generate coherent light without a traditional laser resonator has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. This research area lies at the interface of the fundamental theory of disordered systems and laser science. The idea was originally proposed in the context of astrophysics in the 1960s by V.S. Letokhov, who studied scattering with “negative absorption” of the interstellar molecular clouds. Research on random lasers has since developed into a mature experimental and theoretical field. A simple design of such lasers would be promising for potential applications. However, in traditional random lasers the properties of the output radiation are typically characterized by complex features in the spatial, spectral and time domains, making them less attractive than standard laser systems in terms of practical applications. Recently, an interesting and novel type of one-dimensional random laser that operates in a conventional telecommunication fibre without any pre-designed resonator mirrors-random distributed feedback fibre laser-was demonstrated. The positive feedback required for laser generation in random fibre lasers is provided by the Rayleigh scattering from the inhomogeneities of the refractive index that are naturally present in silica glass. In the proposed laser concept, the randomly backscattered light is amplified through the Raman effect, providing distributed gain over distances up to 100 km. Although an effective reflection due to the Rayleigh scattering is extremely small (˜0.1%), the lasing threshold may be exceeded when a sufficiently large distributed Raman gain is provided. Such a random distributed feedback fibre laser has a number of interesting and attractive features. The fibre waveguide geometry provides transverse confinement, and effectively one-dimensional random distributed feedback leads to the generation

  18. Random distributed feedback fibre lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turitsyn, Sergei K., E-mail: s.k.turitsyn@aston.ac.uk [Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Babin, Sergey A. [Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Electrometry SB RAS, 1 Ac. Koptug. ave., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Churkin, Dmitry V. [Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Electrometry SB RAS, 1 Ac. Koptug. ave., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Vatnik, Ilya D.; Nikulin, Maxim [Institute of Automation and Electrometry SB RAS, 1 Ac. Koptug. ave., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Podivilov, Evgenii V. [Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Electrometry SB RAS, 1 Ac. Koptug. ave., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-10

    The concept of random lasers exploiting multiple scattering of photons in an amplifying disordered medium in order to generate coherent light without a traditional laser resonator has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. This research area lies at the interface of the fundamental theory of disordered systems and laser science. The idea was originally proposed in the context of astrophysics in the 1960s by V.S. Letokhov, who studied scattering with “negative absorption” of the interstellar molecular clouds. Research on random lasers has since developed into a mature experimental and theoretical field. A simple design of such lasers would be promising for potential applications. However, in traditional random lasers the properties of the output radiation are typically characterized by complex features in the spatial, spectral and time domains, making them less attractive than standard laser systems in terms of practical applications. Recently, an interesting and novel type of one-dimensional random laser that operates in a conventional telecommunication fibre without any pre-designed resonator mirrors–random distributed feedback fibre laser–was demonstrated. The positive feedback required for laser generation in random fibre lasers is provided by the Rayleigh scattering from the inhomogeneities of the refractive index that are naturally present in silica glass. In the proposed laser concept, the randomly backscattered light is amplified through the Raman effect, providing distributed gain over distances up to 100 km. Although an effective reflection due to the Rayleigh scattering is extremely small (∼0.1%), the lasing threshold may be exceeded when a sufficiently large distributed Raman gain is provided. Such a random distributed feedback fibre laser has a number of interesting and attractive features. The fibre waveguide geometry provides transverse confinement, and effectively one-dimensional random distributed feedback leads to the

  19. Tapered optical fibres for sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martan, Tomas; Kanka, Jiri; Kasik, Ivan; Matejec, Vlastimil

    2008-11-01

    Recently, optical fibre tapers have intensively been investigated for many applications e.g. in telecommunications, medicine and (bio-) chemical sensing. The paper deals with enhancement of evanescent-field sensitivity of the solid-core microstructured fibre with steering-wheel air-cladding. Enhancement of a performance of the microstructured fibre is based on reduction of fibre core diameter down to narrow filament by tapering thereby defined part of light power is guided by an evanescent wave traveling in axial cladding air holes. The original fibre structure with outer diameter of 125 µm was reduced 2×, 2.5×, 3.33×, and 4× for increasing relatively small intensity overlap of guided core mode at wavelength of 1.55 μm with axial air holes. The inner structures of tapered microstructured fibre with steering-wheel aircladding were numerically analyzed and mode intensity distributions were calculated using the FDTD technique. Analyzed fiber tapers were prepared by constructed fibre puller employing 'flame brush technique'.

  20. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P St J; Beravat, R; Wong, G K L

    2017-02-28

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic 'space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of 'numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Authors.

  1. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. St. J.; Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic `space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of `numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  2. Wetting of flexible fibre arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprat, C; Protière, S; Beebe, A Y; Stone, H A

    2012-02-23

    Fibrous media are functional and versatile materials, as demonstrated by their ubiquity both in natural systems such as feathers and adhesive pads and in engineered systems from nanotextured surfaces to textile products, where they offer benefits in filtration, insulation, wetting and colouring. The elasticity and high aspect ratios of the fibres allow deformation under capillary forces, which cause mechanical damage, matting self-assembly or colour changes, with many industrial and ecological consequences. Attempts to understand these systems have mostly focused on the wetting of rigid fibres or on elastocapillary effects in planar geometries and on a fibre brush withdrawn from an infinite bath. Here we consider the frequently encountered case of a liquid drop deposited on a flexible fibre array and show that flexibility, fibre geometry and drop volume are the crucial parameters that are necessary to understand the various observations referred to above. We identify the conditions required for a drop to remain compact with minimal spreading or to cause a pair of elastic fibres to coalesce. We find that there is a critical volume of liquid, and, hence, a critical drop size, above which this coalescence does not occur. We also identify a drop size that maximizes liquid capture. For both wetting and deformation of the substrates, we present rules that are deduced from the geometric and material properties of the fibres and the volume of the drop. These ideas are applicable to a wide range of fibrous materials, as we illustrate with examples for feathers, beetle tarsi, sprays and microfabricated systems.

  3. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic ‘space’, cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of ‘numerical experiments’ based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069771

  4. [Small fibre neuropathy: knowledge is power].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeijmakers, J.G.; Bakkers, M.; Blom, E.W.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Merkies, I.S.; Faber, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Small fibre neuropathy is a neuropathy of the small non-myelinated C-fibres and myelinated Adelta-fibres. Clinically, an isolated small fibre neuropathy is distinguished by sensory and autonomic symptoms, with practically no abnormalities on neurological examination other than possible distorted pai

  5. Dispersion properties of photonic crystal fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Dridi, Kim;

    1998-01-01

    Approximate dispersion and bending properties of all-silica two-dimensional photonic crystal fibres are characterised by the combination of an effective-index model and classical analysis tools for optical fibres. We believe for the first time to have predicted the dispersion properties of photonic...... crystal fibres. The results strongly indicate that these fibres have potential applications as dispersion managing components...

  6. Properties of hemp fibre polymer composites - An optimisation of fibre properties using novel defibration methods and fibre characterisation

    OpenAIRE

    Thygesen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Characterization of hemp fibres was carried out with fibres obtained with low handling damage and defibration damage to get an indication of how strong cellulose based fibres that can be produced from hemp. Comparison was made with hemp yarn producedunder traditional conditions where damage is unavoidable. The mild defibration was performed by degradation of the pectin and lignin rich middle lamellae around the fibres by cultivation of the mutated white rot fungus Phlebia radiata Cel 26. Fibr...

  7. Periodic Structures in Optical Fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Duncan Paul

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The work presented in this thesis concerns techniques for the formation of periodic structures in optical fibres. Two different methods of producing such structures are studied in detail. The first of these involves a breakdown mechanism (known as the 'fibre fuse') that permanently damages the core glass in a periodic manner leaving it unable to guide light. The dynamics of this mechanism are studied, with a view to controlling it for the production of interactive grating structures. It is determined that, due to a sharp rise in fibre absorption with temperature, a thermal shock -wave, with a typical thermal gradient of several hundred degrees Kelvin per micron, forms and travels along the fibre, heating the core glass to such an extent that damage occurs. The periodicity of the resultant damage arises from thermal focusing and defocusing of light in the region of this shock-wave. The second method makes use of the photorefractivity observed in certain germanosilicate fibres on exposure to moderate intensity blue light of wavelength ~480nm or UV light ~240nm. A single-mode fibre transmission filter is demonstrated for the first time, produced by exposing a fibre Sagnac loop mirror to 488nm holographic fringes. Average index changes are shown to occur if such fibres are exposed to spatially uniform blue or UV light, indicating that grating formation is by a different mechanism to the local charge separation which occurs in photorefractive crystals. The various characteristics of these average index changes are measured and analysed, with the conclusion that they result from defect centre formation, driven by two photon absorption with blue light, or single photon absorption with UV light. Associated birefringence changes are also measured and are exploited in a hi-bi fibre to periodically perturb the birefringence axes, producing a narrow-line transmission filter.

  8. Ceramic kilns with improved environmental protection. Umwelttechnische Verbesserungen bei Keramik-Brennoefen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sladek, R. (Riedhammer GmbH und Co. KG, Nuernberg (Germany))

    1994-09-01

    Modern materials have made a decisive contribution to energy saving during firing processes. This paper surveys the different types of kiln linings currently available. The contaminants - in particular fluorine and hydrocarbons - can be neutralized with dry sorption plants and purpose-built post-combustion systems. These systems are also presented. A further section deals comprehensively with the subject of ceramic fibres and their effect on the human body. Their advantage is that they do not split and fan out like asbestos fibres, but break up into sections, so that only small fractions can become harmful. The legally permissible fibre exposure limits are also given. (orig.)

  9. Resonance modes in optical fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余寿绵; 余恬

    2002-01-01

    The weakly nonlinear boundary value problem of wave propagation in an optical fibre (for the transverse electric mode, for example) is formulated and a modified linear solution is obtained. It is shown that a self-consistent theory of fibre optics should be weakly nonlinear. The mode of critical refraction that does not exist in the linear theory is obtained, showing that it is a mode consisting of resonance modes. It is shown that the signal carriers in a long fibre are of resonance modes, not normal modes. Some experimental data are given for comparison with the theoretical predictions, and the agreement seems satisfactory.

  10. Synergistic effects of mineral fibres and cigarette smoke on the production of tumour necrosis factor by alveolar macrophages of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Y; Kido, M; Tanaka, I; Fujino, A; Higashi, T; Yokosaki, Y

    1993-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of mineral fibres and cigarette smoke on the production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) by alveolar macrophages. Rats were exposed to cigarette smoke in vivo, and production of TNF by alveolar macrophages was measured in the presence of mineral fibres in vitro. For smoke exposure, rats were divided into two groups. Five were exposed to a daily concentration of 10 mg/m3 of cigarette smoke for an eight hour period, and five rats (controls) were not exposed to smoke. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed after exposure to smoke and the recovered alveolar macrophages were incubated with either chrysotile or ceramic fibres on a microplate for 24 hours. Activity of TNF in the supernatant was determined by the L-929 fibroblast cell bioassay. When alveolar macrophages were not stimulated by mineral fibres, production of TNF by rats exposed to smoke and unexposed rats was essentially the same. When alveolar macrophages were stimulated in vitro by chrysotile or ceramic fibres, production of TNF by alveolar macrophages from rats exposed to smoke was higher than that by alveolar macrophages from unexposed rats. The findings suggest that cigarette smoke and mineral fibres have a synergistic effect on TNF production by alveolar macrophages.

  11. Fracture toughness and reliability in high-temperature structural ceramics and composites: Prospects and challenges for the 21st Century

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil Dutta

    2001-04-01

    The importance of high fracture toughness and reliability in Si3N4, and SiC-based structural ceramics and ceramic matrix composites is reviewed. The potential of these ceramics and ceramic matrix composites for high temperature applications in defence and aerospace applications such as gas turbine engines, radomes, and other energy conversion hardware have been well recognized. Numerous investigations were pursued to improve fracture toughness and reliability by incorporating various reinforcements such as particulate-, whisker-, and continuous fibre into Si3N4 and SiC matrices. All toughening mechanisms, e.g. crack deflection, crack branching, crack bridging, etc essentially redistribute stresses at the crack tip and increase the energy needed to propagate a crack through the composite material, thereby resulting in improved fracture toughness and reliability. Because of flaw insensitivity, continuous fibre reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) was found to have the highest potential for higher operating temperature and longer service conditions. However, the ceramic fibres should display sufficient high temperature strength and creep resistance at service temperatures above 1000°C. The greatest challenge to date is the development of high quality ceramic fibres with associate coatings able to maintain their high strength in oxidizing environment at high temperature. In the area of processing, critical issues are preparation of optimum matrix precursors, precursor infiltration into fibre array, and matrix densification at a temperature, where grain crystallization and fibre degradation do not occur. A broad scope of effort is required for improved processing and properties with a better understanding of all candidate composite systems.

  12. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-04-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres in mammalian muscle spindles.

  13. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    OpenAIRE

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-01-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres...

  14. Mullite fibres preparation by aqueous sol-gel process and activation energy of mullitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan Hongbin, E-mail: hb-t@163.co [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University Xi' an 710049 (China) and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi University of Technology, Hanzhong, Shaanxi 723003 (China); Ding Yaping; Yang Jianfeng [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2010-03-04

    Mullite fibres were prepared by sol-gel process using aluminum carboxylates (ACs) and silica sol. ACs was synthesized from dissolving aluminum powder in a mixture of formic acid and oxalic acid using aluminum chloride hexahydrate as catalyst. A molar ratio of 1:2:1 for aluminum, formic acid and oxalic acid was optimized to obtain clear solution and viscous ACs sol for fibres synthesis. Thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis were used to characterize the properties of the gel and ceramic fibres. The gel fibres completely transformed to mullite at 1200 {sup o}C, with a smooth surface and uniform diameter. The activation energy for mullite formation in precursor gel fibres was determined by means of differential thermal analysis. The value obtained, E{sub a} = 741.4 kJ/mol, was lower than most data reported in the literatures, which was attributed to the silica-alumina micro-phase separation when organic acids decomposed during gel fibres heating.

  15. Carcinogenicity studies on natural and man-made fibres with the intraperitoneal test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, F; Roller, M; Ziem, U; Reiffer, F J; Bellmann, B; Rosenbruch, M; Huth, F

    1989-01-01

    Female Wistar rats were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with a suspension of 11 fibrous and 3 granular dusts. A dose of 0.25 mg actinolite or UICC chrysotile induced tumours of the peritoneum in more than 50% of the animals. Even 0.05 and 0.01 mg proved to be carcinogenic, although no adhesions of the abdominal organs could be observed. The findings are in conflict with the hypothesis that a scar is always the morphological precondition for the development of an asbestos-induced tumour. Actinolite injected i.p. in a solution of polyvinylpyridine-N-oxide gave a lower tumour incidence than when suspended only in saline, possibly due to inactivation of the fibre surface. Persistent glass fibres were less effective than actinolite having a similar fibre size distribution. On the other hand, relatively thick basalt fibres and ceramic fibres gave higher tumour incidences than expected. Wollastonite fibres were not carcinogenic, probably because of their low durability. Large amounts of polyvinylchloride, alpha-ferric oxide hydrate and wood dust also led only to adhesions of the abdominal organs and fibrosis; a definite carcinogenic effect was not detected.

  16. Vibration strength of squeeze cast aluminium components with and without fibre reinforcement. Pt. 1. Schwingfestigkeit von fluessiggepressten Aluminiumbauteilen mit und ohne Faserverstaerkung. T. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuler, P. (Industrieanlagen-Betriebsgesellschaft mbH (IABG), Ottobrunn (Germany))

    1992-05-01

    The essentials of squeeze casting and spects of light metal reinforcement with ceramic fibres are described. A vehicle chassis component and disks cast separately for material sampling are used to discuss strength properties of squeeze cast components with and without fibre reinforcement. It was shown that for technological reasons it is not possible to assume that strength properties of a material sample apply to the component as well. (orig.).

  17. Extreme Silica Optical Fibre Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Cook

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A regenerated optical fibre Bragg grating that survives temperature cycling up to 1,295°C is demonstrated. A model based on seeded crystallisation or amorphisation is proposed.

  18. Current status of natural fibres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anandjiwala, RD

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available , automotive, aerospace, marine, electronic, leisure and household uses. This paper will provide an overview of the current status of research and development. It will also deal with future drivers for the growth and competitiveness of natural fibres...

  19. Natural Fibre-Reinforced Biofoams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bergeret

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Starches and polylactic acids (PLAs represent the main biobased and biodegradable polymers with potential industrial availability in the next decades for “bio” foams applications. This paper investigates the improvement of their morphology and properties through processing and materials parameters. Starch foams were obtained by melt extrusion in which water is used as blowing agent. The incorporation of natural fibres (hemp, cellulose, cotton linter, sugarcane, coconut in the starch foam induced a density reduction up to 33%, a decrease in water absorption, and an increase in mechanical properties according to the fibre content and nature. PLA foams were obtained through single-screw extrusion using of a chemical blowing agent that decomposed at the PLA melting temperature. A void content of 48% for PLA and 25% for cellulose fibre-reinforced PLA foams and an improvement in mechanical properties were achieved. The influence of a fibre surface treatment was investigated for both foams.

  20. Modeling of photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Barkou, Stig Eigil

    1999-01-01

    Diferent theoretical models for analysis of photonic crystal fibres are reviewed and compaired. The methods span from simple scalar approaches to full-vectorial models using different mode-field decompositions. The specific advantages of the methods are evaluated.......Diferent theoretical models for analysis of photonic crystal fibres are reviewed and compaired. The methods span from simple scalar approaches to full-vectorial models using different mode-field decompositions. The specific advantages of the methods are evaluated....

  1. Connectorization of fibre Bragg grating sensors recorded in microstructured polymer optical fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang, A.; Saez-Rodriguez, D.; Nielsen, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    We describe te production and characterization of FC/PC connectorised fibre Bragg grating sensors in polymer fibre. Sensors were recorded in few-moded and single mode microstructured fibre composed of poly (methyl methacrylate).......We describe te production and characterization of FC/PC connectorised fibre Bragg grating sensors in polymer fibre. Sensors were recorded in few-moded and single mode microstructured fibre composed of poly (methyl methacrylate)....

  2. Molecular mechanistic origin of the toughness of natural adhesives, fibres and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bettye L.; Schäffer, Tilman E.; Viani, Mario; Thompson, James B.; Frederick, Neil A.; Kindt, Johannes; Belcher, Angela; Stucky, Galen D.; Morse, Daniel E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1999-06-01

    Natural materials are renowned for their strength and toughness,,,,. Spider dragline silk has a breakage energy per unit weight two orders of magnitude greater than high tensile steel,, and is representative of many other strong natural fibres,,. The abalone shell, a composite of calcium carbonate plates sandwiched between organic material, is 3,000 times more fracture resistant than a single crystal of the pure mineral,. The organic component, comprising just a few per cent of the composite by weight, is thought to hold the key to nacre's fracture toughness,. Ceramics laminated with organic material are more fracture resistant than non-laminated ceramics,, but synthetic materials made of interlocking ceramic tablets bound by a few weight per cent of ordinary adhesives do not have a toughness comparable to nacre. We believe that the key to nacre's fracture resistance resides in the polymer adhesive, and here we reveal the properties of this adhesive by using the atomic force microscope to stretch the organic molecules exposed on the surface of freshly cleaved nacre. The adhesive fibres elongate in a stepwise manner as folded domains or loops are pulled open. The elongation events occur for forces of a few hundred piconewtons, which are smaller than the forces of over a nanonewton required to break the polymer backbone in the threads. We suggest that this `modular' elongation mechanism might prove to be quite general for conveying toughness to natural fibres and adhesives, and we predict that it might be found also in dragline silk.

  3. Strength of Concrete Containing Basalt Fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvez Imraan Ansari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comparative study of effect of basalt fibre on compressive and split tensile strength of M40 grade concrete. The basalt fibre was mixed in concrete by (0.5%, 1%, and 1.5% of its total weight of cement in concrete. Results indicated that the strength increases with increase of basalt fibre content up to 1.0% beyond that there is a reduction in strength on increasing basalt fibre. The results show that the concrete specimen with 1.0% of basalt fibre gives better performance when it compared with 0.5%and 1.5% basalt fibre mix in concrete specimens.

  4. Practical Hydrogen Loading of Air Silica Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Jensen, Jesper Bo Damm

    2005-01-01

    A method for hydrogen-loading air-silica optical fibres has been developed allowing out-diffusion times comparable to standard step-index fibres. Examples of the first grating written in Ge-doped air-silica fibres using a 266nm UV-laser are shown.......A method for hydrogen-loading air-silica optical fibres has been developed allowing out-diffusion times comparable to standard step-index fibres. Examples of the first grating written in Ge-doped air-silica fibres using a 266nm UV-laser are shown....

  5. Carbon nanotubes for ultrafast fibre lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernysheva Maria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs possess both remarkable optical properties and high potential for integration in various photonic devices. We overview, here, recent progress in CNT applications in fibre optics putting particular emphasis on fibre lasers. We discuss fabrication and characterisation of different CNTs, development of CNT-based saturable absorbers (CNT-SA, their integration and operation in fibre laser cavities putting emphasis on state-of-the-art fibre lasers, mode locked using CNT-SA. We discuss new design concepts of high-performance ultrafast operation fibre lasers covering ytterbium (Yb, bismuth (Bi, erbium (Er, thulium (Tm and holmium (Ho-doped fibre lasers.

  6. Carbon nanotubes for ultrafast fibre lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernysheva, Maria; Rozhin, Aleksey; Fedotov, Yuri; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; Kobtsev, Sergey M.; Dianov, Evgeny M.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess both remarkable optical properties and high potential for integration in various photonic devices. We overview, here, recent progress in CNT applications in fibre optics putting particular emphasis on fibre lasers. We discuss fabrication and characterisation of different CNTs, development of CNT-based saturable absorbers (CNT-SA), their integration and operation in fibre laser cavities putting emphasis on state-of-the-art fibre lasers, mode locked using CNT-SA. We discuss new design concepts of high-performance ultrafast operation fibre lasers covering ytterbium (Yb), bismuth (Bi), erbium (Er), thulium (Tm) and holmium (Ho)-doped fibre lasers.

  7. Fibre-reinforced glasses and SiC matrices. Analysis and properties; Faserverstaerkte Glaeser und SiC-Matrices. Analyse und Eigenschaften

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, B.

    1992-08-01

    The dissertation investigates ceramic fibres, from single-fibre model composites to multi-fibre materials on a glass or SiC matrix. The glass matrices used were `Duran` and `Supremax`, the reinforcing materials SiC fibres (Niacalon, SCS-6) and carbon fibres (T300). The mechanical properties and the structure of the composite materials were investigated by different methods. (MM) [Deutsch] Der Bogen dieser Doktorarbeit spannt sich von der Untersuchung keramischer Fasern ueber Einzelfaserverbundmodellproben bis hin zu den Vielfaserverbundwerkstoffen mit Glas- und SiC-Matrix. Als Glasmatrizes wurden `Duran` und `Supremax` und als Verstaerkungsmaterialien SiC-Fasern (Niacalon, SCS-6) und Kohlenstoffasern (T300) eingesetzt. Mit Hilfe verschiedener Methoden wurden die mechanischen Eigenschaften und das Gefuege dieser Verbundwerkstoffe untersucht. (MM)

  8. [Evaluation of the carcinogenic effect of ceramic fibers in experiments on rats and mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnow, A; Lao, I; Stetkiewicz, J

    1997-01-01

    The carcinogenic effect of Kaowoll raw and thermally used ceramic fibres was assessed in experiments on rats and mice. The fibers were applied intraperitoneally in doses by 25 and 5 mg, and the animals were observed over their life-span. It was found that Kaowoll fibers were carcinogenic and that high temperature did not change these properties.

  9. Comparison of two direct-reading instruments (FM-7400 and Fibrecheck FC-2) with phase contrast optical microscopy to measure the airborne fibre number concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffer, E; Martin, P; Grzebyk, M; Villa, M; Vigneron, J C

    2003-07-01

    The use of direct-reading instruments to measure the airborne fibre number concentration is on the increase. The response of two of these instruments (FM-7400 and Fibrecheck FC-2) was compared with the conventional method of sampling on filters and counting by phase contrast microscopy. Four types of fibres were studied at different concentrations and relative humidity levels. The FM-7400 can be calibrated by the manufacturer for two different levels of sensitivity (standard and high). For the tests where it was set to the sensitivity level with which it had been calibrated, the ratio of the concentration measured by the instrument to the concentration obtained by the conventional method varied in the range 0.5-1 for the different types of fibres studied (chrysotile, glass wool and ceramic fibres). The Fibrecheck FC-2 is a much less versatile instrument. On the basis of a calibration allowing correct detection of asbestos fibres, it greatly overestimated the concentration of man-made mineral fibres. In its normal calibration state a fine chrysotile aerosol was poorly detected. For man-made mineral fibres, the response was highly dependent on the nature of the fibres. These instruments require calibration with the type of fibres to be studied. Unfortunately, this operation is not always accessible to the user and may require the services of a specialized laboratory, as the manufacturer is not always in a position to carry this out.

  10. Fibre concentrations and size distributions of airborne fibres in several European man-made mineral fibre plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgson, J; Ottery, J; Cherrie, J W; Harrison, G E

    1980-01-01

    Although the nominal diameters of fibres produced in the glass and rock wool industries are usually 6-15 micrometers, these products contain a small proportion of respirable fibres (less than 3 micrometers diameter). Particular significance has been attached to the biological risk arising from the long (greater than 10 micrometers), fine (less than 1 micrometers) fibres. Therefore, the medical research sponsored by the Joint European Medical Research Board into the effects of man-made fibres on health has included detailed environmental studies on both the exposure levels to respirable fibres and the fibre size distributions at the European plants selected for epidemiological work. This paper summarizes the results obtained so far. The size distributions (length and diameter) of the airborne man-made mineral fibres are compared with similar data previously reported for airborne asbestos fibres.

  11. Fibre-induced lipid peroxidation leads to DNA adduct formation in Salmonella typhimurium TA104 and rat lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, P J; Faux, S P

    1996-03-01

    Certain end-products of lipid peroxidation bind to DNA forming a fluorescent chromophore. Incubation of both Salmonella typhimurium TA104 and a rat lung fibroblast cell line, RFL-6, with various types of mineral fibre resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in DNA fluorescence. The increase in DNA fluorescence was shown to be directly related to the amount of iron that could be mobilized from the fibre surface using in vitro studies in the absence of cells or bacteria. Crocidolite and man-made vitreous fibre-21 (MMVF-21) mobilized significant quantities of iron and were significantly more active than chrysotile and refactory ceramic fibre-1 (RCF-1). Fibre-induced malondialdehyde-DNA adduct formation, the fluorescent product, was increased by incubating cells with buthionine sulfoximine and ameliorated by co-treatment with N-acetylcysteine, indicating a protective role for glutathione. Similarly, vitamin E was also shown to inhibit DNA adduct formation. These results suggest that mineral fibre-induced lipid peroxidation produced genotoxic products which can diffuse into nucleus and interact with cellular DNA. In conclusion, fibre-induced lipid peroxidation may be a possible mechanism in the genotoxic action of fibrous materials.

  12. Thermal analysis of bicomponent fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, J.I. [Room I-320-D, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Malaga, Plaza El Ejido, s/n, 29013-Malaga (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    A one-dimensional model of amorphous bicomponent spun fibres derived from the use of perturbation methods based on the slenderness ratio is presented. The model accounts for gravitational, surface tension, axial heat conduction, viscous dissipation and the nonlinear dependence of the dynamic viscosity law on temperature, but does not consider latent heat effects and the radial gradients of temperature and assumes Newtonian rheology. Studies on the effects of the thermal parameters on the compound fibre's geometry and solidification have been performed, and show that the activation energy of the dynamic viscosity laws have a paramount effect on the fibre's cooling, shape, and axial stresses on the core and sheath. In particular, it is shown that, when the activation energy of the viscosity law for the core is higher than that for the sheath, the axial stresses on the core are monotonic functions of the distance along the fibre and higher than those on the sheath, whereas those in the latter may exhibit a nonmonotonic behavior as functions of the thermal conductivity, heat losses and thermal inertia. Despite its limitations, the model presented here represents an improvement over available one-dimensional models for non-isothermal compound or bicomponent fibres. (author)

  13. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  14. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  15. Scientific publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getulio Teixeira Batista

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The necessary work for developing a scientific publication is sometimes underestimated and requires the effective participation of many players to obtain a result in good standard. Initially it depends upon the determination of the authors that decide to write the scientific article. Scientific writing is a very challenging and time consuming task, but at the same time essential for any scientist. A published scientific article is unquestionably one of the main indicators of scientific production, especially if published in a qualified scientific journal with highly qualified editorial committee and strict peer review procedure. By looking at evaluation criteria for scientific production of the several Thematic Scientific Committees of the Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq it becomes clear publications in scientific journals that has certified quality is the most important item in the evaluation of a scientist production.

  16. [Assessment of carcinogenic effect of aluminosilicate ceramic fibers produced in Poland. Animal experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnow, A; Lao, I

    2000-01-01

    The effect of aluminosilicate ceramic fibres produced in Poland was assessed. The experiment was performed on two animal species: Wistar rats and BALB/C mice. The animals were administered intraperitoneally the studied fibres and krokidolit UICC--in doses of 25 and 5 mg and left for survival. All dead and sacrificed animals were examined histopathologically. Carcinogenic properties of ceramic aluminosilicate fibres were found to be rather weak. Only in 1 (2.5%) of 39 rats under study benign mesothelioma of tunica vagiualis testis was diagnosed. Peritoneal mesothelioma was found in none of 50 mice studied. For comparison the effect of krokidolit UICC was assessed. Krokidolit UICC is characterised by strong carcinogenic properties. It induced peritoneal mesothelioma in 43 mice (44.2%) and in 29 (80.5%) of 36 rats under study.

  17. Ceramic art in sculpture

    OpenAIRE

    Rokavec, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Diploma seminar speaks of ceramics as a field of artistic expression and not just as pottery craft. I presented short overview of developing ceramic sculpture and its changing role. Clay inspires design and touch more than other sculpture media. It starts as early as in prehistory. Although it sometimes seems that was sculptural ceramics neglected in art history overview, it was not so in actual praxis. There is a rich tradition of ceramics in the East and also in Europe during the renaissanc...

  18. Ceramic to metal seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Gary S. (Albuquerque, NM); Wilcox, Paul D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1976-01-01

    Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

  19. Light element ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, KJ; Varma, KBR; Raju, AR

    1988-01-01

    An overview of a few structually important light element ceramics is presented. Included in the overview are silicon nitide, sialon, aluminium nitride, boron carbide and silicon carbide. Methods of preparation, characterization and industrial applications of these ceramics are summarized. Mechanical properties, industrial production techniques and principal uses of these ceramics are emphasized.

  20. Biopersistence of man-made vitreous fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhle, H; Bellmann, B

    1995-10-01

    Methods for the determination of biodurability of man-made vitreous fibres are reviewed. For mineral wools the first step was the preparation of respirable fibre fractions. Fibres were administered to rats by inhalation or by intratracheal instillation. After serial sacrifice their lungs were digested by low-temperature ashing or by hypochlorite. The total number of fibres per lung and the distributions of length and diameter were analysed by electron microscopy. This resulted in a bivariate distribution of fibres at the various sacrifice dates. If the logarithm of the number of fibres decreased approximately linearly with time after exposure then the elimination kinetics of fibres can be characterized by a half-time. The half-times were compared between various experiments with rats exposed to mineral wool samples. In summary good agreement was found for the elimination of fibres after long-term inhalation and intratracheal instillation whereas shorter half-times were found after short-term inhalation.

  1. Underwater Acoustic Sensing with Optical Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Rampal

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of optical fibres for the detection of acoustic pressure underwater has been discussed with particular reference to the recent literature on the development of fibre optic hydrophones.

  2. Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fibre Comprising a Fibre Grating in the Cladding and its Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    An optical fibre is provided having a fibre cladding around a longitudinally extending optical propagation core. The cladding has a reflection region of a varying refractive index in the longitudinal direction.......An optical fibre is provided having a fibre cladding around a longitudinally extending optical propagation core. The cladding has a reflection region of a varying refractive index in the longitudinal direction....

  3. Exposure assessment for airborne man-made mineral fibres: the role of fibre dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, F S

    1993-08-01

    Environmental exposures to man-made mineral fibres (MMMF) typically contain fibres which are polydisperse with respect to fibre dimensions. Fibre dimensions may influence their biological action through effects on: the efficiency of transport to target tissues; the residence time in target tissues; and the biological activity of fibres in contact with target cells. This variability of biological activity vs fibre dimensions should be accounted for when assessing exposure for epidemiological studies of the risk of cancer in subjects exposed to MMMF. In order to provide insight into the influence of fibre dimensions on the potential carcinogenicity of MMMF, this paper reviews literature concerning the sites of lung tumours, regional fibre deposition, biological effects of fibres in in vivo and in vitro systems, dissolution rates of fibres and rates of physiological clearance of inhaled particles. Tumorigenicity of fibres in contact with target tissue appears to be primarily a function of fibre length, whereas both fibre diameter and fibre length may affect the penetration of fibres through the respiratory tract as well as their residence time in target tissues. A methodology is presented to use this information to compute estimates of biologically effective exposure from the joint distribution of fibre lengths and diameters found in an environmental exposure.

  4. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  5. Fibre Optics In Coal Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Paul

    1984-08-01

    Coal mines have a number of unique problems which affect the use of fibre optic technology. These include a potentially explosive atmosphere due to the evolution of methane from coal, and a dirty environment with no cleaning facilities readily available. Equipment being developed by MRDE to allow the exploitation of optical fibres underground includes: A hybrid electrical/fibre optic connector for the flexible power trailing cable of the coal-face shearer; An Intrinsically Safe (IS) pulsed laser transmitter using Frequency Shift Key (FSK) data modulation; An IS Avalanche Photo Diode Receiver suitable for pulsed & continuous wave optical signals; A mine shaft and roadway cable/ connector system incorporating low loss butt-splices and preterminated demountable connectors.

  6. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, Mark, E-mail: Mark.Tobin@epfl.ch

    2016-07-11

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  7. Wavelength Filters in Fibre Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Venghaus, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    Wavelength filters constitute an essential element of fibre-optic networks. This book gives a comprehensive account of the principles and applications of such filters, including their technological realisation. After an introductory chapter on wavelength division multiplexing in current and future fibre optic networks follows a detailed treatment of the phase characteristics of wavelength filters, a factor frequently neglected but of significant importance at high bit rates. Subsequent chapters cover three-dimensional reflection of gratings, arrayed waveguide gratings, fibre Bragg gratings, Fabry-Perot filters, dielectric multilayer filters, ring filters, and interleavers. The book explains the relevant performance parameters, the particular advantages and shortcomings of the various concepts and components, and the preferred applications. It also includes in-depth information on the characteristics of both commercially available devices and those still at the R&D stage. All chapters are authored by inter...

  8. Ductility Performance of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    S. Eswari; P.N. Raghunath; Suguna, K

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a study on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete. The influence of fibre content on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete specimens having different fibre volume fractions was investigated. The parameters of investigation included modulus of rupture, ultimate load, service load, ultimate and service load deflection, crack width, energy ductility and deflection ductility. A total of 27 specimens, 100×100×500 mm, were tested to...

  9. Photonic crystal fibres and effective index approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riishede, Jesper; Libori, Stig E. Barkou; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2001-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibres are investigated with an effective index approach. The effective index of both core and cladding is found to be wavelength dependent. Accurate modelling must respect the rich topology of these fibres.......Photonic crystal fibres are investigated with an effective index approach. The effective index of both core and cladding is found to be wavelength dependent. Accurate modelling must respect the rich topology of these fibres....

  10. Photonic-crystal fibre: Mapping the structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    The demonstration of real-time and non-destructive Doppler-assisted tomography of the internal structure of photonic-crystal fibres could aid the fabrication of high-quality fibres with enhanced performance.......The demonstration of real-time and non-destructive Doppler-assisted tomography of the internal structure of photonic-crystal fibres could aid the fabrication of high-quality fibres with enhanced performance....

  11. Local fibred right adjoints are polynomial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Anders; Kock, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    For any locally cartesian closed category E, we prove that a local fibred right adjoint between slices of E is given by a polynomial. The slices in question are taken in a well known fibred sense......For any locally cartesian closed category E, we prove that a local fibred right adjoint between slices of E is given by a polynomial. The slices in question are taken in a well known fibred sense...

  12. Optical Fibre Based Frequency Shifters Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-28

    A fibre optic frequency shifter can be used to replace the Bragg cell acousto-optic modulator, currently used to generate low frequency optical...carriers, in fibre optic communications and sensor systems. This new form of frequency shifter, being an all fibre device, in which the propagating optical...large number of workers in recent years, (for example references [2-81 and those contained therein). The main elements of a fibre - optic frequency

  13. Optimal Extraction of Fibre Optic Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sharp, R

    2009-01-01

    We report an optimal extraction methodology, for the reduction of multi-object fibre spectroscopy data, operating in the regime of tightly packed (and hence significantly overlapping) fibre profiles. The routine minimises crosstalk between adjacent fibres and statistically weights the extraction to reduce noise. As an example of the process we use simulations of the numerous modes of operation of the AAOmega fibre spectrograph and observational data from the SPIRAL Integral Field Unit at the Anglo-Australian Telescope.

  14. Fibre Optic Communication Key Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Grote, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The book gives an in-depth description of the key devices of current and next generation fibre optic communication networks. In particular, the book covers devices such as semiconductor lasers, optical amplifiers, modulators, wavelength filters, and detectors but the relevant properties of optical fibres as well. The presentations include the physical principles underlying the various devices, the technologies used for the realization of the different devices, typical performance characteristics and limitations, and development trends towards more advanced components are also illustrated. Thus the scope of the book spans relevant principles, state-of-the-art implementations, the status of current research and expected future components.

  15. Portable smartphone optical fibre spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-09-01

    A low cost, optical fibre based spectrometer has been developed on a smartphone platform for field-portable spectral analysis. Light of visible wavelength is collected using a multimode optical fibre and diffracted by a low cost nanoimprinted diffraction grating. A measurement range over 300 nm span (λ = 400 to 700 nm) is obtained using the smartphone CMOS chip. The spectral resolution is Δλ ~ 0.42 nm/screen pixel. A customized Android application processed the spectra on the same platform and shares with other devices. The results compare well with commercially available spectrometer.

  16. Experimental and theoretical assessment of flexural properties of hybrid natural fibre composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raghavalu Thirumalai, Durai Prabhakaran; Toftegaard, Helmuth Langmaack; Markussen, Christen Malte

    2014-01-01

    The concept of hybridization of natural fibre composites with synthetic fibres is attracting increasing scientific attention. The present study addresses the flexural properties of hybrid flax/glass/epoxy composites to demonstrate the potential benefits of hybridization. The study covers both...... experimental and theoretical assessments. Composite laminates with different hybrid fibre mixing ratios and different layer configurations were manufactured, and their volumetric composition and flexural properties were measured. The relationship between volume fractions in the composites is shown to be well...... predicted as a function of the hybrid fibre mixing ratio. The flexural modulus of the composites is theoretically assessed by using micromechanical models and laminate theory. The model predictions are compared with the experimentally determined flexural properties. Both approaches show that the flexural...

  17. Friction and wear of human hair fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James; Johnson, Simon A.; Avery, Andrew R.; Adams, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental study of the tribological properties of hair fibres is reported, and the effect of surface treatment on the evolution of friction and wear during sliding. Specifically, orthogonally crossed fibre/fibre contacts under a compressive normal load over a series of 10 000 cycle studies are investigated. Reciprocating sliding at a velocity of 0.4 mm s-1, over a track length of 0.8 mm, was performed at 18 °C and 40%-50% relative humidity. Hair fibres retaining their natural sebum were studied, as well as those stripped of their sebum via hexane cleaning, and hair fibres conditioned using a commercially available product. Surface topography modifications resulting from wear were imaged using scanning electron microscopy and quantified using white light interferometry. Hair fibres that presented sebum or conditioned product at the fibre/fibre junction exhibited initial coefficients of friction at least 25% lower than those that were cleaned with hexane. Coefficients of friction were observed to depend on the directionality of sliding for hexane cleaned hair fibres after sufficient wear cycles that cuticle lifting was present, typically on the order 1000 cycles. Cuticle flattening was observed for fibre/fibre junctions exposed to 10 mN compressive normal loads, whereas loads of 100 mN introduced substantial cuticle wear and fibre damage.

  18. Mohair, cashmere and other animal hair fibres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hunter, L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available animal hair fibres L Hunter, CSIR and Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), South Africa Although luxury animal fibres, excluding silk, represent far less than 0.1% of global fibre production, they play a very significant role in the luxury...

  19. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  20. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  1. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  2. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  3. Production of reactive oxygen species by man-made vitreous fibres in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, M; Hirvonen, M R; Luoto, K; Savolainen, K M

    1999-06-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) or erythrocytes, isolated from human blood, were exposed to graded doses of asbestos (chrysotile), quartz, or man-made vitreous fibres (MMVF), i.e. refractory ceramic fibres (RCF), glasswool, or rockwool fibres. None of the MMVF affected either the viability of PMNL, as measured by trypan blue exclusion test, or induced haemolysis, whereas the positive controls, quartz and chrysotile, dose-dependently induced haemolysis in PMNL. MMVF did not increase the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the PMNL, whereas the positive controls, chrysotile and quartz, induced a marked and dose-dependent release of LDH. When PMNL were exposed to MMVF, some of the fibre types slightly increased the levels of free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) within the cells in a manner similar to that induced by chrysotile or quartz. All MMVF induced a dose-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PMNL, with RCF-induced production of ROS being the most marked. Production of ROS by MMVF seemed to depend on the availability of extracellular calcium because it could be attenuated with a Ca2+ channel blocker, verapamil, or a Ca2+ chelating agent, EGTA. Production of ROS may be a common pathway through which PMNL respond to MMVF-induced cell activation, but alterations of levels of free intracellular Ca2+ do not seem to be an absolute prerequisite for this effect. Fibre length seemed not to be an important factor in affecting the ability of MMVF to induce ROS production in PMNL. However, the balance between different elements in the fibre seemed importantly to affect the biological activity of a fibre.

  4. A PHOTONIC BAND GAP FIBRE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    An optical fibre having a periodicidal cladding structure provididing a photonic band gap structure with superior qualities. The periodical structure being one wherein high index areas are defined and wherein these are separated using a number of methods. One such method is the introduction...

  5. Cool application for Optical Fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    In a new first for CERN, optical fibres have been put on test to measure very low temperatures. If these tests prove successful, this new technology could lead to important cost-saving changes in the way the temperatures of superconducting magnets are measured. There was excitement in the air last March when the team led by Walter Scandale and Luc Thévenaz tested very low temperature measurement using optical fibres. This spring in CERN's Cryogenics lab an idea was put to the test as a new kind of low-temperature thermometry using optical fibres was tested down to 2 Kelvin (around 300 degrees below room temperature), and the first results are looking good. Optical fibres are well known for their ability to carry large amounts of data around the world, but it is less well known that they can be used for measuring temperatures. The intuition that they might be able to measure very low temperatures - such as those of the LHC magnets - came to the attention of CERN's Walter Scandale at the Optical Fi...

  6. Compressibility of hemp bast fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbroek, A.P.H.; Roekel, van G.J.; Jong, de E.; Weickert, G.; Westerterp, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    A force-based characterization of the extrusion pulping process is necessary to be able to predict the effects of extrusion on fibres. To determine which forces are beneficial and which only cause energy consumption, the nature and the origin of the forces have to be known. This paper discusses the

  7. Threshold temperature optical fibre sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiewicz, K. A.; Musial, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to manufacture a threshold temperature sensor based on a biconical optical fibre taper. The presented sensor employs the influence of variable state of concentration of some isotropic materials like wax or paraffin. Application of the above- mentioned materials is an attempt to prove that there is a possibility to obtain a low-cost, repeatable and smart sensor working as an in-line element. Optical fibre taper was obtained from a standard single mode fibre (SMF28®) by using a low pressure gas burner technique. The diameter of the manufactured tapers was 6.0 ± 0.5 μm with the length of elongation equal to 30.50 ± 0.16 mm. The applied technology allowed to produce tapers with the losses of 0.183 ± 0.015 dB. Application of materials with different temperature transition points made it possible to obtain the threshold work at the temperatures connected directly with their conversion temperature. External materials at the temperatures above their melting points do not influence the propagation losses. For each of them two types of the protection area and position of the optical fibre taper were applied.

  8. Nonlinear microstructured polymer optical fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frosz, Michael Henoch

    is potentially the case for microstructured polymer optical fibres (mPOFs). Another advantage is that polymer materials have a higher biocompatibility than silica, meaning that it is easier to bond certain types of biosensor materials to a polymer surface than to silica. As with silica PCFs, it is difficult...

  9. Mineral fibre persistence and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J C

    1998-10-01

    Epidemiological research during the past 40 years has demonstrated with increasing clarity that amphibole asbestos fibres--crocidolite, amosite and tremolite--are more carcinogenic than chrysotile. A smaller number of well-controlled studies using lung burden analyses, while adding to the specificity of this conclusion, have shown that amphibole fibres also differ from chrysotile in being far more durable and biopersistent in lung tissue. Analyses of mesothelioma and lung cancer in a large cohort of Canadian chrysotile miners and millers have recently shown that the low-level presence of fibrous tremolite in these mines, rather than the chrysotile, may well be responsible. The high risk of lung cancer, but not of mesothelioma, in the chrysotile textile industry remains anomalous and cannot be explained in this way. These various findings are directly relevant to the choice of the experimental methods which should be used for screening man-made fibres for industrial use. Although it is clear that biopersistence is a major determinant of cancer risk in animals, and perhaps also in man, other factors affecting the biological activity of mineral fibres may also be important.

  10. Dopant concentration and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of tailor-made Ge-doped SiO2 fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahaimi, Nurul Arina; Ooi Abdullah, Mohd Haris Ridzuan; Zin, Hafiz; Abdul Rahman, Ahmad Lutfi; Hashim, Suhairul; Saripan, Mohd Iqbal; Paul, Mukul Chandra; Bradley, D. A.; Abdul Rahman, Ahmad Taufek

    2014-11-01

    Study focuses on characterisation of diverse concentrations of Ge-doped SiO2 fibre as a potential thermoluminescence (TL) system for radiotherapy dosimetry. Irradiations were made using a linear accelerator providing 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams. Investigation has been done on various doped core diameter Ge-doped SiO2 glass fibres such as commercial telecommunication fibres of 8 μm and 9 μm (CorActive High Tech, Canada), tailor-made fibres of 23 and 50 μm produced by the Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute Kolkata, and tailor-made fibres of 11 μm produced by the University of Malaya Photonics Research Centre. The fibres have been characterised for TL sensitivity, reproducibility, dose- and energy-dependence. The area under the TL glow curve increases with increasing core diameter. For repeat irradiations at a fixed dose the dosimeter produces a flat response better than 4% (1SD) of the mean of the TL distribution. Minimal TL signal fading was found, less than 0.5% per day post irradiation. Linearity of TL has been observed with a correlation coefficient (r2) of better than 0.980 (at 95% confidence level). For particular dopant concentrations, the least square fits show the change in TL yield, in counts per second per unit mass, obtained from 50 μm core diameter fibres irradiated at 6 MV of photon to be 8 times greater than that of 8 μm core diameter fibre. With respect to energy response, the TL yield at 10 MV decreases by~5% compared to that at 6 MV, primarily due to the lower mass energy absorption coefficient at higher photon energy. These early results indicate that selectively screened fibres can be developed into a promising TL system, offering high spatial resolution capability and, with this, verification of complex radiotherapy dose distributions.

  11. EDITORIAL: The 20th International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors, OFS-20 The 20th International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors, OFS-20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culshaw, Brian; Ecke, Wolfgang; Jones, Julian; Tatam, Ralph; Willsch, Reinhardt

    2010-09-01

    communications, material science and data management along the way. This is, of course, the year commemorating half a century of the laser. Arguably, laser technology, most notably semiconductor lasers, has made the major contribution to fibre optic sensors, and precision-controlled laser sources are now effectively taken for granted within the fibre sensor community. We have also drawn on innovation in fibre communications: the fibre itself, the Bragg grating and the fibre amplifier—and more recently on material systems like photonic crystal fibres, biophotonics and nanostructures. In this issue you will find some examples of the intriguing research that exemplifies the best of current fibre sensor technology. The issue gives some impression of the many facets—scientific, technological and applications—that fibre sensors have on offer. It also exemplifies a truly international community which is brought together through the conference series. The next OFS meeting takes place in Ottawa, Canada on 15-19 May 2011 (see www.ofs21.org/), followed in the autumn of 2012 by an event in Beijing. We look forward to seeing you there.

  12. Strength of Concrete Containing Basalt Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the comparative study of effect of basalt fibre on compressive and split tensile strength of M40 grade concrete. The basalt fibre was mixed in concrete by (0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%) of its total weight of cement in concrete. Results indicated that the strength increases with increase of basalt fibre content up to 1.0% beyond that there is a reduction in strength on increasing basalt fibre. The results show that the concrete specimen with 1.0% of basalt fibre gives be...

  13. Characterisation of Natural Fibre Reinforcements and Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard K. Cullen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent EU directives (e.g., ELV and WEEE have caused some rethinking of the life cycle implications of fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites. Man-made reinforcement fibres have significant ecological implications. One alternative is the use of natural fibres as reinforcements. The principal candidates are bast (plant stem fibres with flax, hemp, and jute as the current front runners. The work presented here will consider the characterisation of jute fibres and their composites. A novel technique is proposed for the measurement of fibre density. The new rule of mixtures, extended for noncircular cross-section natural fibres, is shown to provide a sensible estimate for the experimentally measured elastic modulus of the composite.

  14. Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1999-01-01

    Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete with 2.5-4.2% air and 6-9% air (% by volume in fresh concrete) casted in the laboratory and in-situ is compared. Steel fibres with hooked ends (ZP, length 30 mm) and polypropylene fibres (PP, CS, length 12 mm) are applied. It is shown that· addition...... of 0.4-1% by volume of fibres cannot replace air entrainment in order to secure a frost resistant concrete; the minimum amount of air needed to make the concrete frost resistant is not changed when adding fibres· the amount of air entrainment must be increased when fibres are added to establish...... the same amount of air pores as in the corresponding concrete without fibres...

  15. Elastic fibres in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Andrew K; Simpson, Andreja; Steer, Ruth; Cain, Stuart A; Kielty, Cay M

    2013-08-20

    Elastic fibres are insoluble components of the extracellular matrix of dynamic connective tissues such as skin, arteries, lungs and ligaments. They are laid down during development, and comprise a cross-linked elastin core within a template of fibrillin-based microfibrils. Their function is to endow tissues with the property of elastic recoil, and they also regulate the bioavailability of transforming growth factor β. Severe heritable elastic fibre diseases are caused by mutations in elastic fibre components; for example, mutations in elastin cause supravalvular aortic stenosis and autosomal dominant cutis laxa, mutations in fibrillin-1 cause Marfan syndrome and Weill-Marchesani syndrome, and mutations in fibulins-4 and -5 cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa. Acquired elastic fibre defects include dermal elastosis, whereas inflammatory damage to fibres contributes to pathologies such as pulmonary emphysema and vascular disease. This review outlines the latest understanding of the composition and assembly of elastic fibres, and describes elastic fibre diseases and current therapeutic approaches.

  16. Retained laser fibre: insights and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekich, C; Hannah, P

    2014-06-01

    To describe a case of retained endovenous laser fibre. To review the literature and Food and Drug Administration device failure reports. To suggest protocols for avoiding this complication and a method of removal. A case of retained fibre removal is described. Fibre removal techniques in vivo and ex vivo in a bovine model on the laboratory bench are presented. Successful in vivo and ex vivo fibre removal was performed using duplex ultrasound scan guided phlebectomy techniques. Unexplained measured fibre-length discrepancies due to misleading manufacturer's packaging was discovered. Simple ultrasound-guided micro-phlebectomy techniques can be used to remove retained laser fibres in the office environment. Laser fibre length measurements before and after treatment are recommended. Some preventive guidelines are described to avoid, or at least diagnose immediately, this complication, such as the 'Laser Eclipse Sign'. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel-based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  18. Manufacturing and microstructure of MMC based on CuZn38Al2Mn1Fe brass strengthened with δ-alumina fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Kaczmar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composite materials were manufactured by squeeze casting with CuZn38Al2Mn1Fe brass of porous preforms made of δ-alumina SAFFIL fibres. The microstructure, Brinell hardness and Vickers microhardness of manufactured composite materials were characterized. Preforms with 10 and 20 vol. % of fibres were preheated and infiltrated applying the pressure of 80 MPa. Microscopic observations showed that alumina fibres are uniformly distributed in the MA58 matrix and there was not observed the destroying of ceramic fibres during squeeze casting process. Hardness of composite materials strengthened with 20 vol.% of SAFFIL fibres reached 265 HB. At the boundary of composite material/not strengthened MA58 alloy it was ascertained the filtration and retention of iron compound precipitates caused by the small dimensions of pores in the ceramic preform. The collection of iron phase precipitates at the boundary composite material/ not strengthened MA58 alloy effected in the increase of microhardness in this zone to 352 HV. On the base of SEM observations the conclusion on limited wettability of fibres by liquid MA58 brass was drawn.

  19. Role of fibre characteristics on cytotoxicity and induction of anaphase/telophase aberrations in rat pleural mesothelial cells in vitro: correlations with in vivo animal findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegles, M; Janson, X; Dong, H Y; Renier, A; Jaurand, M C

    1995-11-01

    Thirteen samples of natural fibres and five samples of man-made fibres (MMF) were tested to determine their cytotoxicity and ability to produce chromosome missegregation in cultures in rat pleural mesothelial cells (RPMC). The natural samples included attapulgite, two amphiboles (amosite and crocidolite); seven consisted of chrysotile from various origins and three were obtained after chemical treatment of chrysotile. MMF included three refractory ceramic fibres (RCF) and two vitreous fibres (MMVF). All fibre samples were characterized by electron microscopic measurement of the fibre dimensions. Cytotoxicity was assayed on the basis of determination of mitochondrial integrity and chromosome missegregation by light microscopy examination of anaphases/telophases. The carcinogenic potency of 10 natural samples has been previously investigated using intrapleural inoculation in rats. It was therefore possible to establish correlations between in vitro and in vivo data obtained with the same set of samples. The various samples of chrysotile produced different in vitro effects, in agreement with the dispersion of response also observed in vivo. Cytotoxicity appears to be dependent on both fibre length and fibre diameter, as the longest or thickest fibres were the most toxic. The production of abnormal anaphases/telophases appears to depend on the presence of fibres of selected size, such as those previously defined by Stanton et al. (L > 8 micrograms; D < or = 0.25 microns); a threshold values was determined below which no abnormal anaphases/telophases were detected. This non-observable effect level was estimated to be 2.5 x 10(5) 'Stanton' fibres per cm2. There was no correlation between cytotoxicity and mesothelioma induction; in contrast, a correlation was found between the ability of a sample to produce chromosome missegregation in vitro and mesothelioma in vivo.

  20. Long Fibre Composite Modelling Using Cohesive User's Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozák, Vladislav; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2010-09-01

    The development glass matrix composites reinforced by unidirectional long ceramic fibre has resulted in a family of very perspective structural materials. The only disadvantage of such materials is relatively high brittleness at room temperature. The main micromechanisms acting as toughening mechanism are the pull out, crack bridging, matrix cracking. There are other mechanisms as crack deflection etc. but the primer mechanism is mentioned pull out which is governed by interface between fibre and matrix. The contribution shows a way how to predict and/or optimise mechanical behaviour of composite by application of cohesive zone method and write user's cohesive element into the FEM numerical package Abaqus. The presented results from numerical calculations are compared with experimental data. Crack extension is simulated by means of element extinction algorithms. The principal effort is concentrated on the application of the cohesive zone model with the special traction separation (bridging) law and on the cohesive zone modelling. Determination of micro-mechanical parameters is based on the combination of static tests, microscopic observations and numerical calibration procedures.

  1. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  2. Ceramic laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin

    2008-12-01

    The word 'ceramics' is derived from the Greek keramos, meaning pottery and porcelain. The opaque and translucent cement and clay often used in tableware are not appropriate for optical applications because of the high content of optical scattering sources, that is, defects. Recently, scientists have shown that by eliminating the defects, a new, refined ceramic material - polycrystalline ceramic - can be produced. This advanced ceramic material offers practical laser generation and is anticipated to be a highly attractive alternative to conventional glass and single-crystal laser technologies in the future. Here we review the history of the development of ceramic lasers, the principle of laser generation based on this material, some typical results achieved with ceramic lasers so far, and discuss the potential future outlook for the field.

  3. Antibacterial ceramic for sandbox. Sunabayo kokin ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, K. (Ishizuka Glass Co. Ltd. Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-10-01

    Sands in sandboxes in parks have been called into question of being contaminated by colon bacilli and spawns from ascarides. This paper introduces an antibacterial ceramic for sandbox developed as a new material effective to help reduce the contamination. The ceramic uses natural sand as the main raw material, which is added with borax and silver to contain silver ions that have bacteria and fungus resistance and deodorizing effect. The ceramic has an average grain size ranging from 0.5 mm to 0.7 mm, and is so devised as to match specific gravity, grain size and shape of the sand, hence no separation and segregation can occur. The result of weatherability and antibacterial strength tests on sand for a sandbox mixed with the ceramic at 1% suggests that its efficacy lasts for about three years. Its actual use is under observation. Its efficacy has been verified in a test that measures a survival factor of spawns from dog ascardides contacted with aqueous solution containing the ceramic at 1%. Safety and sanitation tests have proved the ceramic a highly safe product that conforms to the food sanitation law. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Reducing chemical vapour infiltration time for ceramic matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, L. A.; Westby, W.; Prentice, C.; Jaglin, D.; Shatwell, R. A.; Binner, J. G. P.

    2001-02-01

    Conventional routes to producing ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require the use of high temperatures to sinter the individual ceramic particles of the matrix together. Sintering temperatures are typically much higher than the upper temperature limits of the fibres. This paper details preliminary work carried out on producing a CMC via chemical vapour infiltration (CVI), a process that involves lower processing temperatures, thus avoiding fibre degradation. The CVI process has been modified and supplemented in an attempt to reduce the CVI process time and to lower the cost of this typically expensive process. To this end microwave-enhanced CVI (MECVI) has been chosen, along with two alternative pre-infiltration steps: electrophoretic infiltration and vacuum bagging. The system under investigation is based on silicon carbide fibres within a silicon carbide matrix (SiCf/SiC). The results demonstrate that both approaches result in an enhanced initial density and a consequent significant reduction in the time required for the MECVI processing step. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used as a non-destructive, density evaluation technique. Initial results indicate that the presence of the SiC powder in the pre-form changes the deposition profile during the MECVI process.

  5. Fundamentals of fibre-reinforced soil engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Sanjay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This book is intended to serve as a one-stop reference on fibre-reinforced soils. Over the past 30-35 years, the engineering behaviour of randomly distributed/oriented fibre-reinforced soil, also called simply fibre-reinforced soil, has been investigated in detail by researchers and engineers worldwide. Waste fibres (plastic waste fibres, old tyre fibres, etc.) create disposal and environmental problems. Utilization of such fibres in construction can help resolve these concerns. Research studies and some field applications have shown that the fibres can be utilized in large quantities in geotechnical and civil engineering applications in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner. This book covers a complete description of fibres, their effects when included within a soil or other similar materials such as the fly ash, and their field applications. It gives a detailed view of fibre-reinforced soil engineering. The book will be useful to students, professional, and researchers alike, and can also ser...

  6. Structural investigation of Mimosa pudica Linn fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, S. R.; Pattojoshi, P.; Tiwari, T. N.; Mallick, B.

    2016-12-01

    Sensitive plant (Mimosa pudica Linn.) fibre is a natural fibre with electrically conductive property. Because of its electro-active sensing nature, it has been found very interesting among physicists, chemists, biologists, material scientists and technologists. So far as our knowledge is concerned; there is no report on the X-ray structure of M. pudica fibre using diffraction technique. In the present report, the M. pudica fibre has been extracted from the stem of the herb by sinking the stem in 10% NaOH solution for one week. The diffraction pattern of the fibre is found out to be cellulose-I. The effect of the fibre structure and its orientation due to different mounting have been investigated using X-ray diffraction technique. The I max of cellulose-I has been observed along (002) and (10overline{1)} for the perpendicular and parallel mounting of the native-fibre, respectively. Full width at half maxima of the diffraction profile turns out to be decreased with fibre orientation. Dimension of crystallite size D hkl estimated in the perpendicular mounting D_{hkl}^{ bot } is more as compared to that of the parallel mounting D_{hkl}^{{^{allel } }} . The smallest crystallite sizes observed in both parallel and perpendicular mounting are 18.78 and 30.78 Å respectively. It is expected that the present study may help to analyse the X-ray diffraction of fibre materials in general and natural fibres in particular.

  7. Structural investigation of Mimosa pudica Linn fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, S. R.; Pattojoshi, P.; Tiwari, T. N.; Mallick, B.

    2017-04-01

    Sensitive plant ( Mimosa pudica Linn.) fibre is a natural fibre with electrically conductive property. Because of its electro-active sensing nature, it has been found very interesting among physicists, chemists, biologists, material scientists and technologists. So far as our knowledge is concerned; there is no report on the X-ray structure of M. pudica fibre using diffraction technique. In the present report, the M. pudica fibre has been extracted from the stem of the herb by sinking the stem in 10% NaOH solution for one week. The diffraction pattern of the fibre is found out to be cellulose-I. The effect of the fibre structure and its orientation due to different mounting have been investigated using X-ray diffraction technique. The I max of cellulose-I has been observed along (002) and (10\\overline{1)} for the perpendicular and parallel mounting of the native-fibre, respectively. Full width at half maxima of the diffraction profile turns out to be decreased with fibre orientation. Dimension of crystallite size D hkl estimated in the perpendicular mounting D_{hkl}^{ \\bot } is more as compared to that of the parallel mounting D_{hkl}^{{^{allel } }}. The smallest crystallite sizes observed in both parallel and perpendicular mounting are 18.78 and 30.78 Å respectively. It is expected that the present study may help to analyse the X-ray diffraction of fibre materials in general and natural fibres in particular.

  8. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  9. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  10. Fibre optic communication key devices

    CERN Document Server

    Grote, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    The book gives an in-depth description of key devices of current and next generation fibre optic communication networks. Devices treated include semiconductor lasers, optical amplifiers, modulators, wavelength filters and other passives, detectors, all-optical switches, but relevant properties of optical fibres and network aspects are included as well. The presentations include the physical principles underlying the various devices, technologies used for their realization, typical performance characteristics and limitations, but development trends towards more advanced components are also illustrated. This new edition of a successful book was expanded and updated extensively. The new edition covers among others lasers for optical communication, optical switches, hybrid integration, monolithic integration and silicon photonics. The main focus is on Indium phosphide-based structures but silicon photonics is included as well. The book covers relevant principles, state-of-the-art implementations, status of curren...

  11. Electrospun cerium nitrate/polymer composite fibres:synthesis, characterization and fibre-division model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Meng-Meng; Long Yun-Ze; Yin Hong-Xing; Zhang Zhi-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Cerium (III)nitrate/poly(vinylpyrrolidone)(Ce(NO3)3/PVP)composite fibres have been prepared by electrospinning. After calcining the composite fibres in air at 500℃, CeO2 nanowires were obtained. The characterizations of the as-spun composite fibres and resultant nanowires have been carried out by a scanning electron microscope (SEM),an infrared spectrometer, an x-ray diffractometer and a fluorescence spectrophotometer. Interestingly, some unusual ribbon-like or twin fibres were observed besides the common fibres with circular or elliptic cross sections. We developed a fibre-division model resulting from Coulomb repulsion and solvent vaporization to interpret the formation of the ribbona or twin fibres, which has been confirmed by the SEM studies. Our results also indicate that the formation of the ribbons or twin fibres is less dependent on operation voltage and work distance.

  12. Orientation distribution of fibres in a channel flow of fibre suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Jian-Zhong; Li Jun; Zhang Wei-Feng

    2005-01-01

    The orientation and concentration distributions of fibres in laminar and turbulent channel flows are investigated numerically. The obtained results are in good agreement with the experimental data. In the laminar flow regime, more fibres orient to the flow direction as the Reynolds number increases. The shear rate of fluid around a fibre plays an important role in determining the orientation distribution of fibres, while the fibre density and the fibre aspect-ratio have marginal influence on the orientation distribution. In the turbulent regime, the orientation distribution of fibres becomes more homogeneous with the increase of Reynolds number, and the concentration profile is flatter than that in the laminar regime. The fluctuating intensity of fibre velocity in the downstream direction is larger than that in the lateral directions.

  13. Interfacial Adhesion Characteristics of Kenaf Fibres Subjected to Different Polymer Matrices and Fibre Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Nirmal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at determining the interfacial adhesion strength (IAS of kenaf fibres using different chemical treatments in hydrochloric (HCl and sodium hydroxide (NaOH with different concentrations. Single fibre pullout tests (SFPT were carried out for both untreated and treated fibres partially embedded into three different polymer matrices; polyester, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU as reinforcement blocks and tested under dry loading conditions. The study revealed that kenaf fibres treated with 6% NaOH subjected to polyester, epoxy, and PU matrices exhibits excellent IAS while poor in acidic treatment. The effect of SFPT results was mainly attributed to chemical composition of the fibres, types of fibre treatments, and variation in resin viscosities. By scanning electron microscopy examination of the material failure morphology, the fibres experienced brittle and ductile fibre breakage mechanisms after treatment with acidic and alkaline solutions.

  14. Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1999-01-01

    of 0.4-1% by volume of fibres cannot replace air entrainment in order to secure a frost resistant concrete; the minimum amount of air needed to make the concrete frost resistant is not changed when adding fibres· the amount of air entrainment must be increased when fibres are added to establish......Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete with 2.5-4.2% air and 6-9% air (% by volume in fresh concrete) casted in the laboratory and in-situ is compared. Steel fibres with hooked ends (ZP, length 30 mm) and polypropylene fibres (PP, CS, length 12 mm) are applied. It is shown that· addition...

  15. Muscle fibre type and aetiology of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, A J; Marbut, M M; Round, J M

    1990-04-07

    Proportions of slow (type 1) muscle fibres of the vastus lateralis and percentage body fat were measured in 11 healthy sedentary men. The proportion of slow muscle fibres was inversely related to fatness; at least 40% of the variability in fatness may be related to variation in muscle fibre type. Metabolic evidence in 50 men, provided by the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during cycle ergometry, indicated that fatter men (or, in the subset of 11 men, those with a low proportion of slow muscle fibres) combusted less fat during work at 100 W than did lean men (or those with a high proportion of slow fibres). The effects of fitness and of body size were excluded in the analysis. The evidence supports the hypothesis that muscle fibre type is an aetiological factor for obesity.

  16. Scientific news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1994-01-01

    The Rijksherbarium/Hortus Botanicus acquired funds through NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) to participate in a 7-year interdisciplinary cooperative programme of Indonesian and Dutch scientific institutions aiming at research in Irian Jaya, Cenderawasih province (the Bird’s Hea

  17. Dynamic Characteristics of Drop-substrate Interactions in Direct Ceramic Ink-jet Printing using High Speed Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramshankar Somasundaram

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Solid freeform fabrication has the potential to construct ceramic parts, directly from computer aided design (CAD data, without a mould or a die by the addition of material. Direct ceramic ink-jet printing is one of the techniques used in freeform fabrication. Ceramic tiles used in space vehicles can be produced by this method wherein a porous ceramic substrate (Al2O3/SiC can be filled with a ceramic ink and processed subsequently. The success of this process depends on the systematic preparation of ceramic inks and the deposition of the ceramic ink on the substrate. In this paper, photographic studies were made on the characteristics of ceramic ink droplets when these are deposited on a porous ceramic substrate from a burette under gravity. For this investigation, ceramic inks were prepared using different amounts (0.25–3.0 vol. % of an organic dispersant (oleic acid added to a ceramic composition containing different amounts: (a (7.5– 17.5 vol. % of alumina and (b (7.5–15.0 vol. % of zirconia with ethyl alcohol as a carrier. From this study, the drop formation, sedimentation in the drop, spread of drop on the substrate, splashing of drop impinging a previous ceramic ink layer on the substrate, and merging of droplets after deposition, are observed. This method is useful for manufacturing of parts with ceramic fibres filled with ceramic particles and this study can provide inner details on the behaviour of ink drops.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(6, pp.675-682, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1575

  18. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  19. Continuous jute fibre reinforced laminated paper composite and reinforcement-fibre free paper laminate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B B Verma

    2009-12-01

    Plastic bags create a serious environmental problem. The proposed jute fibre reinforced laminated paper composite and reinforcement-fibre free paper laminate may help to combat the war against this pollutant to certain extent. The paper laminate, without reinforcement fibre, exhibited a few fold superiority in tensile properties than single paper strip. The studies further show that an appreciable improvement in tensile properties can be achieved by introducing continuous jute fibre in paper laminates.

  20. Polymeric Optical Fibres for Biomedical Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Krehel, M P

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we focus on the integration of optical fibres in textiles to create wearable sensing systems. In the introduction (Chapter 3) we describe the basics of light guiding in optical fibres and methods of lateral light coupling. Subsequently, a literature review and motivation are presented. Afterwards two main parts can be differentiated. In the first one (Chapters 4, 5) a new method of continuous extrusion of optical fibres and their medical sensing application using photoplethysmo...

  1. Tribological properties of Al 7075 alloy based composites strengthened with Al2O3 fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Naplocha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Wear resistance of 7075 aluminium alloy based composite materials reinforced with Al2O3 Saffil fibres was investigated. The measurementsof wear were performed applying the pin-on-disc method at dry friction conditions with the gray iron counterpart. The effects ofpressure of composite samples on the counterpart made of gray iron and the orientation of fibers in relation to the friction surface on wear rate were determined. The materials were produced by squeeze casting method where 80-90% porous ceramic preform were infiltrated.After T6 heat treatment hardness increased about 50-60% both for unreinforced alloy and composites containing strengthening Saffilfibres. Wear resistance of composite materials in relation to the unreinforced 7075 alloy was slightly worse at lower pressure of 0.8 MPa. Under higher pressure of 1.2 MPa wear resistance of unreinforced 7075 alloy was even better whereas no effect of orientation of fibers on wear in composite materials was observed. Additionally, significant wear of counterface in the presence of debris with fragmented Al2O3 fibres as abrasives was observed. Wear resistance improvement of composite materials was obtained when with alumina Saffil fibres Carbon C fibres in the preforms were applied.

  2. Creep deformation of grain boundary in a highly crystalline SiC fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Tamaki; Yoshida, Yutaka; Yano, Yasuhide; Takahashi, Heishichiro

    2003-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) matrix composites reinforced by SiC fibres (SiC/SiC composites) are currently being considered as alternative materials in high Ni alloys for high-temperature applications, such as aerospace components, gas-turbine energy-conversion systems and nuclear fusion reactors, because of their high specific strength and fracture toughness at elevated temperatures compared with monolithic SiC ceramics. It is important to evaluate the creep properties of SiC fibres under tensile loading in order to determine their usefulness as structural components. However, it would be hard to evaluate creep properties by monoaxial tensile properties when we have little knowledge on the microstructure of crept specimens, especially at the grain boundary. Recently, a simple fibre bend stress relaxation (BSR) test was introduced by Morscher and DiCarlo to address this problem. Interpretation of the fracture mechanism at the grain boundary is also essential to allow improvement of the mechanical properties. In this paper, effects of stress applied by BSR test on microstructural evolution in advanced SiC fibres, such as Tyranno-SA including small amounts of Al, are described and discussed along with the results of microstructure analysis on an atomic scale by using advanced microscopy.

  3. Occupational irritant contact dermatitis from synthetic mineral fibres according to Finnish statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolanki, Riitta; Mäkinen, Ilpo; Suuronen, Katri; Alanko, Kristiina; Estlander, Tuula

    2002-12-01

    Synthetic mineral fibres (i.e. man-made vitreous fibres, MMVF) are classified into glass filament, mineral wool (glass wool, rock wool and slag wool), refractory ceramic fibres, and fibres for special purposes. This paper analyses the data on occupational irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) caused by MMVF during 1990-99 in Finland according to the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases (FROD). A total of 63 cases from MMVF were reported. 56 were diagnosed as ICD, and 2 as allergic contact dermatitis, both from rock wool. 53 out of 63 cases were due to mineral wool or glass filaments; half of the cases, according to a rough estimate, were due to mineral wool and a half due to glass filaments used in lamination work. Carpenters, building workers and insulation workers have the highest risk of ICD from mineral wool. 4 cases in carpenters, 4 in building workers and 2 in insulation workers were reported from MMVF. For every 100 000 employed workers, only 1.6 cases of ICD in carpenters, 2.7 in building workers and 9.1 in insulation workers were annually due to MMVF, respectively. Mineral wool used in construction work, insulation, etc., cannot be considered to be a common cause of occupationally induced ICD. However, information on harmful skin effects of MMVF is useful to exposed persons in the prevention of the effects.

  4. A novel photonic crystal fibre switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Hermann, D.S.; Broeng, Jes

    2003-01-01

    A new thermo-optic fibre switch is demonstrated, which utilizes the phase transitions of a thermochromic liquid crystal inside a photonic crystal fibre. We report an extinction ratio of 60 dB and an insertion loss of 1 dB.......A new thermo-optic fibre switch is demonstrated, which utilizes the phase transitions of a thermochromic liquid crystal inside a photonic crystal fibre. We report an extinction ratio of 60 dB and an insertion loss of 1 dB....

  5. PREFACE: Symposium 13: Ceramics for Medicine, Biotechnology and Biomimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2011-10-01

    Preface to Symposium 13 (Ceramics for Medicine, Biotechnology and Biomimetics) of the International Congress on Ceramics III, 14-18 November 2010, Osaka, Japan Ceramic materials are now widely used in biomedical fields, such as applications of artificial bones, joints and teeth. The high potential of ceramics to exhibit biological functionality is expected to produce novel materials supporting biotechnology. These applications are governed by the interactions of materials and biological molecules. So far, 'bioceramics' is a type of biomaterial used for repairing damaged tissues. The orthopaedic application of bioceramics has advanced rapidly since the invention of Bioglass® that was found to encourage direct bonding with living bone. Hydroxyapatite and calcium phosphate ceramics are now popular bioceramics for use in artificial bones. While the bone-bonding behavior of materials was understood phenomenologically, very little has been known about the mechanism of either hard or soft tissue attachment or tissue growth on ceramic-based materials, such as glasses, glass-ceramics, ceramic composites and organic-inorganic hybrids. This symposium discussed the scientific understanding of the interface between biomedical materials and soft/hard tissues, and the design and construction of nanoscopic interfaces. It also involved establishment of biomimetic structures, characterization of natural life-related hard and soft tissues, and their formation mechanisms for a wide range of applications in biotechnology through 45 oral presentations including 5 invited lectures and 45 posters. I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the organizers of this symposium in the ICC3 conference. I am also grateful to the invited speakers, all the participants and organizing committee of the ICC3. It is my great pleasure that this proceedings could be published as the fruit of this symposium's achievement, which includes the contributions in all aspect of scientific understanding and

  6. Abaca fibre reinforced PP composites and comparison with jute and flax fibre PP composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abaca fibre reinforced PP composites were fabricated with different fibre loadings (20, 30, 40, 50wt% and in some cases 35 and 45 wt%. Flax and jute fibre reinforced PP composites were also fabricated with 30 wt% fibre loading. The mechanical properties, odour emission and structure properties were investigated for those composites. Tensile, flexural and Charpy impact strengths were found to increase for fibre loadings up to 40 wt% and then decreased. Falling weight impact tests were also carried out and the same tendency was observed. Owing to the addition of coupling agent (maleated polypropylene -MAH-PP, the tensile, flexural and falling weight impact properties were found to increase in between 30 to 80% for different fibre loadings. When comparing jute and flax fibre composites with abaca fibre composites, jute fibre composites provided best tensile properties but abaca fibre polypropylene composites were shown to provide best notch Charpy and falling weight impact properties. Odours released by flax fibre composites were smaller than jute and abaca fibre composites.

  7. A validation of the fibre orientation and fibre length attrition prediction for long fibre-reinforced thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; van Haag, J.; Schöngart, M.

    2015-05-01

    To improve the mechanical performance of polymeric parts, fibre reinforcement has established in industrial applications during the last decades. Next to the widely used Short Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (SFT) the use of Long Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (LFT) is increasingly growing. Especially for non-polar polymeric matrices like polypropylene (PP), longer fibres can significantly improve the mechanical performance. As with every kind of discontinuous fibre reinforcement the fibre orientations (FO) show a high impact on the mechanical properties. On the contrary to SFT where the local fibre length distribution (FLD) can be often neglected, for LFT the FLD show a high impact on the material's properties and has to be taken into account in equal measure to the FOD. Recently numerical models are available in commercial filling simulation software and allow predicting both the local FOD and FLD in LFT parts. The aim of this paper is to compare i.) the FOD results and ii) the FLD results from available orientation- and fibre length attrition-models to those obtained from experimental data. The investigations are conducted by the use of different injection moulded specimens made from long glass fibre reinforced PP. In order to determine the FOD, selected part sections are examined by means of Computed Tomographic (CT) analyses. The fully three dimensional measurement of the FOD is then performed by digital image processing using grey scale correlation. The FLD results are also obtained by using digital image processing after a thermal pyrolytic separation of the polymeric matrix from the fibres. Further the FOD and the FLD are predicted by using a reduced strain closure (RSC) as well as an anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure model (ARD-RSC) and Phelps-Tucker fibre length attrition model implemented in the commercial filling software Moldflow, Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA.

  8. A validation of the fibre orientation and fibre length attrition prediction for long fibre-reinforced thermoplastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; Haag, J. van; Schöngart, M. [Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) at RWTH Aachen University, Pontstr. 49, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    To improve the mechanical performance of polymeric parts, fibre reinforcement has established in industrial applications during the last decades. Next to the widely used Short Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (SFT) the use of Long Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (LFT) is increasingly growing. Especially for non-polar polymeric matrices like polypropylene (PP), longer fibres can significantly improve the mechanical performance. As with every kind of discontinuous fibre reinforcement the fibre orientations (FO) show a high impact on the mechanical properties. On the contrary to SFT where the local fibre length distribution (FLD) can be often neglected, for LFT the FLD show a high impact on the material’s properties and has to be taken into account in equal measure to the FOD. Recently numerical models are available in commercial filling simulation software and allow predicting both the local FOD and FLD in LFT parts. The aim of this paper is to compare i.) the FOD results and ii) the FLD results from available orientation- and fibre length attrition-models to those obtained from experimental data. The investigations are conducted by the use of different injection moulded specimens made from long glass fibre reinforced PP. In order to determine the FOD, selected part sections are examined by means of Computed Tomographic (CT) analyses. The fully three dimensional measurement of the FOD is then performed by digital image processing using grey scale correlation. The FLD results are also obtained by using digital image processing after a thermal pyrolytic separation of the polymeric matrix from the fibres. Further the FOD and the FLD are predicted by using a reduced strain closure (RSC) as well as an anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure model (ARD-RSC) and Phelps-Tucker fibre length attrition model implemented in the commercial filling software Moldflow, Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA.

  9. Industrial Ceramics: Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The expanding use of ceramic products in today's world can be seen in the areas of communications, construction, aerospace, textiles, metallurgy, atomic energy, and electronics. The demands of science have brought ceramics from an art to an industry using mass production and automated processes which requires the services of great numbers as the…

  10. Verification of ceramic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behar-Lafenetre, S.; Cornillon, L.; Rancurel, M.; Graaf, D. de; Hartmann, P.; Coe, G.; Laine, B.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the "Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures" contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instr

  11. Use of a Ceramic Membrane to Improve the Performance of Two-Separate-Phase Biocatalytic Membrane Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Giuseppe; Mazzei, Rosalinda; Wu, Zhentao; Li, Kang; Giorno, Lidietta

    2016-03-14

    Biocatalytic membrane reactors (BMR) combining reaction and separation within the same unit have many advantages over conventional reactor designs. Ceramic membranes are an attractive alternative to polymeric membranes in membrane biotechnology due to their high chemical, thermal and mechanical resistance. Another important use is their potential application in a biphasic membrane system, where support solvent resistance is highly needed. In this work, the preparation of asymmetric ceramic hollow fibre membranes and their use in a two-separate-phase biocatalytic membrane reactor will be described. The asymmetric ceramic hollow fibre membranes were prepared using a combined phase inversion and sintering technique. The prepared fibres were then used as support for lipase covalent immobilization in order to develop a two-separate-phase biocatalytic membrane reactor. A functionalization method was proposed in order to increase the density of the reactive hydroxyl groups on the surface of ceramic membranes, which were then amino-activated and treated with a crosslinker. The performance and the stability of the immobilized lipase were investigated as a function of the amount of the immobilized biocatalytst. Results showed that it is possible to immobilize lipase on a ceramic membrane without altering its catalytic performance (initial residual specific activity 93%), which remains constant after 6 reaction cycles.

  12. Use of a Ceramic Membrane to Improve the Performance of Two-Separate-Phase Biocatalytic Membrane Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Ranieri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biocatalytic membrane reactors (BMR combining reaction and separation within the same unit have many advantages over conventional reactor designs. Ceramic membranes are an attractive alternative to polymeric membranes in membrane biotechnology due to their high chemical, thermal and mechanical resistance. Another important use is their potential application in a biphasic membrane system, where support solvent resistance is highly needed. In this work, the preparation of asymmetric ceramic hollow fibre membranes and their use in a two-separate-phase biocatalytic membrane reactor will be described. The asymmetric ceramic hollow fibre membranes were prepared using a combined phase inversion and sintering technique. The prepared fibres were then used as support for lipase covalent immobilization in order to develop a two-separate-phase biocatalytic membrane reactor. A functionalization method was proposed in order to increase the density of the reactive hydroxyl groups on the surface of ceramic membranes, which were then amino-activated and treated with a crosslinker. The performance and the stability of the immobilized lipase were investigated as a function of the amount of the immobilized biocatalytst. Results showed that it is possible to immobilize lipase on a ceramic membrane without altering its catalytic performance (initial residual specific activity 93%, which remains constant after 6 reaction cycles.

  13. Surface treated polypropylene (PP) fibres for reinforced concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Buendía, Angel M., E-mail: buendia@uv.es [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Benjamin Franklin 17, 46380 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain); Climent, Verónica [Lafarge Cementos, Polígono Sepes, Isaac Newton s/n, 46500 Sagunto, Valencia (Spain); Guillem, Celia [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Surface treatments on a polypropylene (PP) fibre have contributed to the improvement of fibre/concrete adhesion in fibre-reinforced concrete. The treatments to the PP fibre were characterized by contact angle measurements, ATR-IR and XPS to analyse chemical alterations. The surface topography and fibre/concrete interaction were analysed by several microscopic techniques, namely optical petrographic, and scanning electron microscopy. Treatment modified the surface chemistry and topography of the fibre by introducing sodium moieties and created additional fibre surface roughness. Modifications in the fibre surface led to an increase in the adhesion properties between the treated fibres and concrete and an improvement in the mechanical properties of the fibre-reinforced concrete composite as compared to the concrete containing untreated PP fibres. Compatibility with the concrete and increased roughness and mineral surface was also improved by nucleated portlandite and ettringite mineral association anchored on the alkaline PP fibre surface, which is induced during treatment.

  14. The Dependance of Damage Accumulation in Carbon Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Composites on Matrix Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    Diguuibutiofl Unlimited 0- Contract U.S. AIR FORCE/ARMINES- Centre des Matdriaux No A.F.O.S.R. 84-0397 - Final Report December 1985 THE DEPENDANCE OF DAMAGE...61102F 2301 D1 185 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) THE DEPENDANCE OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN CARBON FIBRE REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES ON...ATN OF: LTS/Autovon 235-4299 26 March 1986 SUBJECT: EOARD-TR-86-04, Final Scientific Report, "The Dependance of Damage Accumu- lation in Carbon Fibre

  15. Electrical Characterization of Silicon Cores from Glass-Cladded Fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Lapointe, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor core fibres represent an emerging technology with potential applications in many areas, including photovoltaics and optical transmission. Recent advances in fibre manufacturing techniques has allowed long, continuous silicon core fibres to be produced in commercial draw towers. The effect of the molten core fibre fabrication method on the electrical properties of silicon cores from glass-clad fibres have been studied. Fibres with core diameters ranging from 60 to 300 µm wer...

  16. Postponed sowing does not alter the fibre/wood ratio or fibre extractability of fibre hemp (Cannabis sativa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhuis, W.; Struik, P.C.; Dam, van J.E.G.; Stomph, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    Because hemp is a short-day plant, postponing the sowing date might be a suitable strategy to obtain shorter and smaller plants around flowering, when primary fibres are 'ripe' enough to be harvested. Smaller plants can be processed on existing flax scutching and hackling lines and might have fibre

  17. Ceramics As Materials Of Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, A.; Eteiba, M. B.; Abdelmonem, N.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper attempts to review the limitations for using the important ceramics in contact with corrosive media. Different types of ceramics are included. Corrosion properties of ceramics and their electrical properties are mentioned. Recommendations are suggested for using ceramics in different media.

  18. Simulation of complex phenomena in optical fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington-Smith, Jeremy; Murray, Graham; Lemke, Ulrike

    2012-12-01

    Optical fibres are essential for many types of highly multiplexed and precision spectroscopy. The success of the new generation of multifibre instruments under construction to investigate fundamental problems in cosmology, such as the nature of dark energy, requires accurate modellization of the fibre system to achieve their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) goals. Despite their simple construction, fibres exhibit unexpected behaviour including non-conservation of etendue (focal ratio degradation, FRD) and modal noise. Furthermore, new fibre geometries (non-circular or tapered) have become available to improve the scrambling properties that, together with modal noise, limit the achievable SNR in precision spectroscopy. These issues have often been addressed by extensive tests on candidate fibres and their terminations, but these are difficult and time-consuming. Modelling by ray tracing and wave analysis is possible with commercial software packages, but these do not address the more complex features, in particular FRD. We use a phase-tracking ray-tracing method to provide a practical description of FRD derived from our previous experimental work on circular fibres and apply it to non-standard fibres. This allows the relationship between scrambling and FRD to be quantified for the first time. We find that scrambling primarily affects the shape of the near-field pattern but has negligible effect on the barycentre. FRD helps to homogenize the near-field pattern but does not make it completely uniform. Fibres with polygonal cross-section improve scrambling without amplifying the FRD. Elliptical fibres, in conjunction with tapering, may offer an efficient means of image slicing to improve the product of resolving power and throughput, but the result is sensitive to the details of illumination. We also investigated the performance of fibres close to the limiting numerical aperture since this may affect the uniformity of the SNR for some prime focus fibre instrumentation.

  19. MPS/CAS Partner Group on Interfacial and Amorphous Structures in Advanced Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gu Hui; Fritz Aldinger

    2004-01-01

    @@ The scientific work of the Partner Group is aiming to comprehend the fundamental properties of internal interfaces that play a key role in the microstructure development and in the thermal, mechanical, and functional properties of ceramics.

  20. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Metals and Ceramics Division, 1970--1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, M.R. (comp.)

    1977-07-01

    A bibliography of the scientific information originating in the Metals and Ceramics Division of ORNL during the period 1970 through 1974 is presented. The master listing contains 925 references, for which both subject and author indexes are provided.

  1. Multicore optical fibre and fibre-optic delay line based on it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, O. N.; Astapovich, M. S.; Belkin, M. E.; Semjonov, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The first switchable fibre-optic delay line based on a 1300-{\\text{m}}-long multicore optical fibre has been fabricated and investigated. We have obtained signal delay times of up to 45 \\unicode{956}{\\text{s}} at 6.43-\\unicode{956}{\\text{s}} intervals. Sequential signal propagation through the cores of the multicore optical fibre makes it possible to reduce the fibre length necessary for obtaining a predetermined delay time, which is important for reducing the weight and dimensions of devices based on the use of fibre-optic delay lines.

  2. Polarisation effects in twin-core fibre: Application for mode locking in a fibre laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobach, I A; Kablukov, S I; Podivilov, Evgenii V; Babin, Sergei A; Apolonski, A A

    2012-09-30

    We report the first measurements of the longitudinal power distribution in a twin-core optical fibre at different input light polarisations. Experimental evidence is presented that, because of the difference in birefringence between the cores, the power in them depends on which core the beam is launched into. Experimental data are interpreted in terms of a modified polarisation model for mode coupling in twin-core fibres which takes into account the birefringence of the cores. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time the use of the polarisation properties of a twincore fibre for mode locking in a fibre laser. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  3. Investigation on effect of fibre hybridization and orientation on mechanical behaviour of natural fibre epoxy composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P KALIAPPAN; R KESAVAN; B VIJAYA RAMNATH

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays bio fibre composites play a vital role by replacing conventional materials used in automotive andaerospace industries owing to their high strength to weight ratio, biodegradability and ease of production. This paper aimsto find the effect of fibre hybridization and orientation on mechanical behaviour of composite fabricated with neem, abacafibres and epoxy resin. Here, three varieties of composites are fabricated namely, composite 1 which consists of abaca fibreand glass fibre, composite 2, which consists of neem fibre and glass fibre, whereas composite 3 consists of abaca, neem fibresand glass fibres. In all the above three varieties, fibres are arranged in three types of orientations namely, horizontal (type I),vertical (type II) and 45$^{\\circ}$ inclination (type III). The result shows that composites made up of abaca and neem fibres withinclined orientation (45$^{\\circ}$) have better mechanical properties when compared with other types of composites. In addition, morphological analysis is carried out using scanning electron microscope to know the fibre distribution, fibre pull out, fibre breakage and crack propagation on tested composites.

  4. Influence of fibre volume fraction and temperature on fatigue life of glass fibre reinforced plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Wegener

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fibre volume fraction and temperature on fatigue life of continuous glass fibre reinforced plastics is investigated in detail. The physical causes of the two effects on the slope of the S-N-curve in fibre direction at R = 0.1 are researched and can be explained with help of micrographs. A new phenomenological approach is presented to model both effects in fibre dominated laminates with different stacking sequences using only the static ultimate strength as an input. Static and fatigue tests of different layups and fibre volume fractions are performed at different temperatures to validate the fatigue life predictions. Additionally it is derived that there is an optimal fibre volume fraction regarding a minimum damage sum. This fibre volume fraction is dependent on a given loading spectra and can be calculated using the phenomenological model.

  5. Mohair, cashmere and other animal hair fibres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hunter, L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Although luxury animal fibres, excluding silk, represent far less than 0.1% of global fibre production, they play a very significant role in the luxury, high value-added end of the market, notably the apparel market, being renowned for their special...

  6. low pump power photonic crystal fibre amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristian G.; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2003-01-01

    Designs of low pump power optical amplifiers, based on photonic crystal fibres are presented. The potential of these fibre amplifiers is investigated, and it is demonstrated that such amplifiers may deliver gains of more than 15 dB at 1550 nm with less than 1 mW of optical pump power....

  7. The development of fibre optic microbend sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsthuis, W.H.G.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Investigations concerning the development of a fibre optic pressure sensor are reported. The phenomenon of light power attenuation in a periodically deformed graded index fibre has been studied theoretically. It appears that available theories are not suited to describe this attenuation process in t

  8. Multifunctional Carbon Fibre Tapes for Automotive Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koncherry, V.; Potluri, P.; Fernando, A.

    2016-11-01

    Cabon fibre composites are used where mechanical performance such as strength, stiffness and impact properties at low density is a critical parameter for engineering applications. Carbon fibre flat tape is one material which is traditionally used to manufacture three-dimensional composites in this area. Modifying the carbon fibre tape to incorporate other functions such as stealth, electromagnetic interference, shielding, de-icing, self-repair, energy storage, allows us to create multi-functional carbon fibre tape. Researchers have been developing such material and the technology for their manufacture in order to produce multifunctional carbon fibre based components more economically and efficiently. This paper presents the manufacturing process of a metallised carbon fibre material for a chopped fibre preforming process that uses electromagnets for preforming instead of traditional suction airflow fibre deposition. In addition, the paper further presents mechanical and magneto-static modelling that is carried out to investigate the bending properties of the material produced and its suitability for creating 3D preforms.

  9. Dispersion properties of photonic Bandgap Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Barkou, Stig Eigil; Søndergaard, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Dispersion properties of new low-index core photonic crystal fibres are presented. Both wideband nearzero despersion and very large dispersion is shown possible in the 1550 nm wavelength range.......Dispersion properties of new low-index core photonic crystal fibres are presented. Both wideband nearzero despersion and very large dispersion is shown possible in the 1550 nm wavelength range....

  10. Selective filling of Photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian; Noordegraaf, Danny; Sørensen, Thorkild

    2005-01-01

    A model for calculating the time necessary for filling one or more specific holes in a photonic crystal fibre is made. This model is verified for water, and its enabling potential is illustrated by a polymer application. Selective filling of the core in an air-guide photonic crystal fibre...

  11. Strength variability of single flax fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslan, Mustafa; Chinga-Carrasco, G.; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2011-01-01

    (linear and nonlinear) of the fibres are found to be correlated with the amount of defects. The linear stress–strain curves tend to show a higher tensile strength, a higher Young’s modulus, and a lower strain to failure than the nonlinear curves. Finally, the fibres are found to fracture by a complex...

  12. Thermally induced structural changes in Nomex fibres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anjana Jain; Kalyani Vijayan

    2002-08-01

    Thermally aged Nomex fibres manifest several residual effects viz. reduction in X-ray crystallinity, weight loss and deterioration in tensile characteristics. Surface damages in the form of longitudinal openings, holes, material deposits etc have also been observed. Based on the data from thermally exposed fibres, the time needed for states of zero tensile strength and modulus have been predicted.

  13. Fibre optic cables for the ALICE experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    These thin fibres will transmit the signal received in detectors at the ALICE experiment when it starts up with the LHC in 2008. The analogue signals produced in the detectors are first converted into digital pulse, which are transported in light down such fibres. Computers then read this digital signal to produce the final set of data.

  14. Cotton fibre cross-section properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    From a structural perspective the cotton fibre is a singularly discrete, elongated plant cell with no junctions or inter-cellular boundaries. Its form in nature is essentially unadulterated from the field to the spinning mill where its cross-section properties, as for any textile fibre, are central ...

  15. Fibre positioning algorithms for the WEAVE spectrograph

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terrett, David L.; Lewis, Ian J.; Dalton, Gavin; Abrams, Don Carlos; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Middleton, Kevin; Trager, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field optical spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. It is a multi-object "pick and place" fibre fed spectrograph with more than one thousand fibres, similar in concept to the Australian Astronomical Observ

  16. Winding of fibre composites; Vikling af fiberkompositter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lystrup, Aage

    2006-01-01

    Within the project 'Storage of hydrogen in advanced high pressure vessels' under the PSO-R AND D 2005 program one of the tasks is to describe the technology, which is used for manufacturing of fibre reinforced pressure vessels. Fibre reinforced pressure vessels for high pressures are manufactured by winding structural load bearing fibres around a mandrel or an internal liner. There are two different types of cylindrical pressure vessels: 1) Cylinders with thick metal liner, where only the cylindrical part is over wrapped with hoop windings, and 2) cylinders with a thin metal or polymer liner, where both the cylindrical part and the end domes are over wrapped with more layers with different fibre orientations (helical and hoop windings). This report describes the fundamental principles for filament winding of fibre reinforced polymer composites. After a short introduction to the advanced fibre composites, their properties and semi-raw materials used for fibre composites, the focus is on the process parameters, which have influence on the material quality of filament wound components. The report is both covering winding of fibre reinforced thermo-setting polymers as well as thermoplastic polymers, and there are references to vendors of filament winding machines, accessory equipment and computer software for design and manufacturing of filament wound components. (au)

  17. Selective filling of Photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian; Noordegraaf, Danny; Sørensen, Thorkild

    2005-01-01

    A model for calculating the time necessary for filling one or more specific holes in a photonic crystal fibre is made. This model is verified for water, and its enabling potential is illustrated by a polymer application. Selective filling of the core in an air-guide photonic crystal fibre is demo...

  18. Development of the fibres of MOONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinouard, Isabelle; Lee, David; Schnetler, Hermine; Taylor, William; Amans, Jean-Philippe; Montgomery, David; Oliva, Ernesto

    2014-07-01

    MOONS will exploit the full 500 square arcmin field of view offered by the Nasmyth focus of the Very Large Telescope and will be equipped with two identical triple arm cryogenic spectrographs covering the wavelength range 0.8 - 1.8 μm, with a multiplex capability of approximately 1000 fibres. Each triple arm spectrograph will produce spectra for half of the targets simultaneously. The system will have both a medium resolution (R~4000-6000) mode and a high resolution (R~20000) mode. The fibres are used to pick off each sub field of 1.05 arcseconds and are used to transport the light from the instrument focal plane to the two spectrographs. Each fibre has a microlens to focus the beam into the fibre at a relative fast focal ratio of F/3.65 to reduce the Focal Ratio Degradation (FRD). This paper presents the overall design of the fibre system and describes the specific developments required to optimise its performance. The design of the fibre input optics, the choice of the fibre connector, and the layout of the slit end are described. The results of preliminary tests to measure the effect of twisting on the FRD performance of prototype fibres are also discussed.

  19. Innovations with protein nano-fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der E.

    2006-01-01

    Proteins in solution can form objects of various shapes. One fascinating possibility is the formation of fibres with a length up to micrometers, but with a thickness of a few nanometers, therefore referring to them as nano-fibres. Many proteins show this behaviour under the appropriate conditions. G

  20. Winding of fibre composites; Vikling af fiberkompositter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lystrup, Aage

    2006-01-01

    Within the project 'Storage of hydrogen in advanced high pressure vessels' under the PSO-R AND D 2005 program one of the tasks is to describe the technology, which is used for manufacturing of fibre reinforced pressure vessels. Fibre reinforced pressure vessels for high pressures are manufactured by winding structural load bearing fibres around a mandrel or an internal liner. There are two different types of cylindrical pressure vessels: 1) Cylinders with thick metal liner, where only the cylindrical part is over wrapped with hoop windings, and 2) cylinders with a thin metal or polymer liner, where both the cylindrical part and the end domes are over wrapped with more layers with different fibre orientations (helical and hoop windings). This report describes the fundamental principles for filament winding of fibre reinforced polymer composites. After a short introduction to the advanced fibre composites, their properties and semi-raw materials used for fibre composites, the focus is on the process parameters, which have influence on the material quality of filament wound components. The report is both covering winding of fibre reinforced thermo-setting polymers as well as thermoplastic polymers, and there are references to vendors of filament winding machines, accessory equipment and computer software for design and manufacturing of filament wound components. (au)

  1. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Nielsen, Laila

    1997-01-01

    (capillary water uptake) is used, involving an in-situ method and a laboratory method. Three different concrete qualities as well as steel fibres (ZP) and polypropylene fibres (PP) are used. Results of the durability tests on cracked FRC-beams are compared to results for uncracked FRC-beams and beams without...

  2. Image analysis of insulation mineral fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, H; Lee, T; Jeulin, D; Hanton, D; Hobbs, L W

    2000-12-01

    We present two methods for measuring the diameter and length of man-made vitreous fibres based on the automated image analysis of scanning electron microscopy images. The fibres we want to measure are used in materials such as glass wool, which in turn are used for thermal and acoustic insulation. The measurement of the diameters and lengths of these fibres is used by the glass wool industry for quality control purposes. To obtain reliable quality estimators, the measurement of several hundred images is necessary. These measurements are usually obtained manually by operators. Manual measurements, although reliable when performed by skilled operators, are slow due to the need for the operators to rest often to retain their ability to spot faint fibres on noisy backgrounds. Moreover, the task of measuring thousands of fibres every day, even with the help of semi-automated image analysis systems, is dull and repetitive. The need for an automated procedure which could replace manual measurements is quite real. For each of the two methods that we propose to accomplish this task, we present the sample preparation, the microscope setting and the image analysis algorithms used for the segmentation of the fibres and for their measurement. We also show how a statistical analysis of the results can alleviate most measurement biases, and how we can estimate the true distribution of fibre lengths by diameter class by measuring only the lengths of the fibres visible in the field of view.

  3. Interfaces between a fibre and its matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilholt, H.; Sørensen, B. F.

    2017-07-01

    The interface between a fibre and its matrix represents an important element in the characterization and exploitation of composite materials. Both theoretical models and analyses of experimental data have been presented in the literature since modern composite were developed and many experiments have been performed. A large volume of results for a wide range of composite systems exists, but rather little comparison and potential consistency have been reached for fibres and/or for matrices. Recently a materials mechanics approach has been presented to describe the interface by three parameters, the interfacial energy [J/m2], the interfacial frictional shear stress [MPa] and the mismatch strain [-] between fibre and matrix. The model has been used for the different modes of fibre pull-out and fibre fragmentation. In this paper it is demonstrated that the governing equations for the experimental parameters (applied load, debond length and relative fibre/matrix displacement) are rather similar for these test modes. A simplified analysis allows the direct determination of the three interface parameters from two plots for the experimental data. The complete analysis is demonstrated for steel fibres in polyester matrix. The analysis of existing experimental literature data is demonstrated for steel fibres in epoxy matrix and for tungsten wires in copper matrix. These latter incomplete analyses show that some results can be obtained even if all three experimental parameters are not recorded.

  4. Microstructural characterization of stone wool fibre network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapelle, Lucie; Brøndsted, Povl; Kusano, Yukihiro;

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of fibrous network as complex as stone wool materials requires a relevant description of their microstructure and architecture. In this study, different methods have been proposed to characterize the fibre orientation, diameter and length of fibres as well...

  5. Insertion of optic fibre for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The MicroJET system uses high pressure to carefully put the optical fibres into their protective tubes. These fibres are vital for rapid data transfer, but are also very delicate and, if damanged, may not work at the required efficiency. Similiar methods are used to install cables for the telecommunications industry.

  6. Recent advances in poled optical fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pruneri, V.; Margulis, W.; Myrén, N.

    2005-01-01

    A second-order nonlinearity can be induced in optical fibres through poling. We describe accomplishments of the EU project GLAMOROUS in making low-cost high performance electrooptic and nonlinear optical fibre- and waveguide-based components. In particular a comparison with more traditional...

  7. Recent advances in poled optical fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pruneri, V.; Margulis, W.; Myrén, N.;

    2005-01-01

    A second-order nonlinearity can be induced in optical fibres through poling. We describe accomplishments of the EU project GLAMOROUS in making low-cost high performance electrooptic and nonlinear optical fibre- and waveguide-based components. In particular a comparison with more traditional...

  8. Fibre Distribution in Friction-spun Yarns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Oyondi Nganyi; YU Chong-wen

    2006-01-01

    According to the yarn forming characteristics in friction spinning, the arrangement of fed sliver is designed, to get the desired fiber distribution in the resultant yarn. On the base of that, the relation between the theoretical fibre distribution and the actual fibre distribution is analyzed by use of electron microscope.

  9. High pressure ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  10. Fiscal 1997 report on the results of the R and D of industrial scientific technology. R and D of synergistic ceramics (R and D of corrosion prevention technology for the petroleum production system); 1997 nendo sangyo kagaku gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Synergy ceramics no kenkyu kaihatsu (sekiyu seisan system fushoku boshi gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    To heighten durability and safety of materials/parts for undersea oil drilling, the development of ceramic base materials was made by developing function harmony type process technology which harmonizes on a high grade contrary characteristics and various functions. The paper summed up the fiscal 1997 results. In the design of system formation, computational simulation technology was developed to the composite process and the diploid system. The development of multifunction simultaneous manifestation materials was trially made by the higher nano structure process. A study was made of control of microstructures of porous materials and matrix filling by the gas phase precipitation control. Proposed were selective control of grain growth from species crystals and the columnar particle orientation laminated structure of simultaneous manifestation of strength and toughness. By composite precipitation reaction control, studied were simultaneous dispersion of whisker and increase in density of matrixes, and harmonization with long fibers. Silicon nitride was trially made with low lubrication/friction coefficients and high strength. A simulation method for crack progress behavior evaluation was developed using a testing notched specimen heterogeneous microstructures. Analyses were made of brittle fracture mechanics and reliability evaluation. 273 refs., 344 figs., 29 tabs.

  11. Processing, structure and flexural strength of CNT and carbon fibre reinforced, epoxy-matrix hybrid composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Chandra Shekar; M Sai Priya; P K Subramanian; Anil Kumar; B Anjaneya Prasad; N Eswara Prasad

    2014-05-01

    Advanced materials such as continuous fibre-reinforced polymer matrix composites offer significant enhancements in variety of properties, as compared to their bulk, monolithic counterparts. These properties include primarily the tensile stress, flexural stress and fracture parameters. However, till date, there are hardly any scientific studies reported on carbon fibre (Cf) and carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced hybrid epoxy matrix composites (unidirectional). The present work is an attempt to bring out the flexural strength properties along with a detailed investigation in the synthesis of reinforced hybrid composite. In this present study, the importance of alignment of fibre is comprehensively evaluated and reported. The results obtained are discussed in terms of material characteristics, microstructure and mode of failure under flexural (3-point bend) loading. The study reveals the material exhibiting exceptionally high strength values and declaring itself as a material with high strength to weight ratio when compared to other competing polymer matrix composites (PMCs); as a novel structural material for aeronautical and aerospace applications.

  12. A Review of Refractometric Sensors Based on Long Period Fibre Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rego

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade refractometric sensors have attracted an increasing interest by the scientific community due to their ability to perform ambient monitoring, to assess food quality and safety, and also to the fact that they enable the development of label free sensors in the biomedical area. These advances result, namely, from the use of long period fibre gratings in the turning points and/or with thin films in the transition region that allows resolutions of 10−6 to changes in the refractive index of the surrounding medium. Resolutions exceeding 10−8 can also be achieved when long period fibre gratings are combined with evanescent field based devices. This paper reviews the recent path towards the development of ultrahigh sensitive optical fibre refractometric sensors.

  13. A review of refractometric sensors based on long period fibre gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, G

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade refractometric sensors have attracted an increasing interest by the scientific community due to their ability to perform ambient monitoring, to assess food quality and safety, and also to the fact that they enable the development of label free sensors in the biomedical area. These advances result, namely, from the use of long period fibre gratings in the turning points and/or with thin films in the transition region that allows resolutions of 10(-6) to changes in the refractive index of the surrounding medium. Resolutions exceeding 10(-8) can also be achieved when long period fibre gratings are combined with evanescent field based devices. This paper reviews the recent path towards the development of ultrahigh sensitive optical fibre refractometric sensors.

  14. Metal-coated Bragg grating reflecting fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorovskiy, Yu. K.; Butov, O. V.; Kolosovskiy, A. O.; Popov, S. M.; Voloshin, V. V.; Vorob'ev, I. L.; Vyatkin, M. Yu.

    2017-03-01

    High-temperature optical fibres (OF) with fibre Bragg gratings (FBG) arrays written over a long length and in-line metal coating have been made for the first time. The optical parameters of the FBG arrays were tested by the optical frequency domain reflectometer (OFDR) method in a wide temperature range, demonstrating no degradation in reflection at heating up to 600 °C for a fibre with Al coating. The mechanical strength of the developed fibre was practically the same as "ordinary" OF with similar coating, showing the absence of the influence of FBG writing process on fibre strength. Further experiments are necessary to evaluate the possibility of further increases in the operational temperature range.

  15. Simulation of complex phenomena in optical fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Allington-Smith, Jeremy; Lemke, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Optical fibres are essential for many types of highly-multiplexed and precision spectroscopy. The success of the new generation of multifibre instruments under construction to investigate fundamental problems in cosmology, such as the nature of dark energy, requires accurate modellisation of the fibre system to achieve their signal-to-noise goals. Despite their simple construction, fibres exhibit unexpected behaviour including non-conservation of Etendue (Focal Ratio Degradation; FRD) and modal noise. Furthermore, new fibre geometries (non-circular or tapered) have become available to improve the scrambling properties that, together with modal noise, limit the achievable SNR in precision spectroscopy. These issues have often been addressed by extensive tests on candidate fibres and their terminations but these are difficult and time-consuming. Modelling by ray-tracing and wave analysis is possible with commercial software packages but these do not address the more complex features, in particular FRD. We use a...

  16. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  17. Review article: dietary fibre-microbiota interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, H L; Campbell, B J

    2015-07-01

    Application of modern rapid DNA sequencing technology has transformed our understanding of the gut microbiota. Diet, in particular plant-based fibre, appears critical in influencing the composition and metabolic activity of the microbiome, determining levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) important for intestinal health. To assess current epidemiological, experimental and clinical evidence of how long-term and short-term alterations in dietary fibre intake impact on the microbiome and metabolome. A Medline search including items 'intestinal microbiota', 'nutrition', 'diet', 'dietary fibre', 'SCFAs' and 'prebiotic effect' was performed. Studies found evidence of fibre-influenced differences in the microbiome and metabolome as a consequence of habitual diet, and of long-term or short-term intervention (in both animals and humans). Agrarian diets high in fruit/legume fibre are associated with greater microbial diversity and a predominance of Prevotella over Bacteroides. 'Western'-style diets, high in fat/sugar, low in fibre, decrease beneficial Firmicutes that metabolise dietary plant-derived polysaccharides to SCFAs and increase mucosa-associated Proteobacteria (including enteric pathogens). Short-term diets can also have major effects, particularly those exclusively animal-based, and those high-protein, low-fermentable carbohydrate/fibre 'weight-loss' diets, increasing the abundance of Bacteroides and lowering Firmicutes, with long-term adherence to such diets likely increasing risk of colonic disease. Interventions to prevent intestinal inflammation may be achieved with fermentable prebiotic fibres that enhance beneficial Bifidobacteria or with soluble fibres that block bacterial-epithelial adherence (contrabiotics). These mechanisms may explain many of the differences in microbiota associated with long-term ingestion of a diet rich in fruit and vegetable fibre. © 2015 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Scientific communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Kobylarek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles the problem of models of communication in science. The formal division of communication processes into oral and written does not resolve the problem of attitude. The author defines successful communication as a win-win game, based on the respect and equality of the partners, regardless of their position in the world of science. The core characteristics of the process of scientific communication are indicated , such as openness, fairness, support, and creation. The task of creating the right atmosphere for science communication belongs to moderators, who should not allow privilege and differentiation of position to affect scientific communication processes.

  19. Effects of fibre content on mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of short carbon fibre reinforced geopolymer matrix composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tiesong Lin; Dechang Jia; Meirong Wang; Peigang He; Defu Liang

    2009-02-01

    Geopolymer matrix composites reinforced with different volume fractions of short carbon fibres (Cf/geopolymer composites) were prepared and the mechanical properties, fracture behaviour and microstructure of as-prepared composites were studied and correlated with fibre content. The results show that short carbon fibres have a great strengthening and toughening effect at low volume percentages of fibres (3.5 and 4.5 vol.%). With the increase of fibre content, the strengthening and toughening effect of short carbon fibres reduce, possibly due to fibre damage, formation of high shear stresses at intersect between fibres and strong interface cohesion of fibre/matrix under higher forming pressure. The property improvements are primarily based on the network structure of short carbon fibre preform and the predominant strengthening and toughening mechanisms are attributed to the apparent fibre bridging and pulling-out effect.

  20. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, D.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls (United States); Murphy, W.M. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 {degrees}C, a higher temperature (1450 {degrees}C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature.

  1. Knowledge about dietary fibre: a fibre study framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiné, Raquel P F; Ferreira, Manuela; Correia, Paula; Duarte, João; Leal, Marcela; Rumbak, Ivana; Barić, Irena C; Komes, Drazenka; Satalić, Zvonimir; Sarić, Marijana M; Tarcea, Monica; Fazakas, Zita; Jovanoska, Dijana; Vanevski, Dragoljub; Vittadini, Elena; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Szűcs, Viktória; Harangozó, Júlia; El-Kenawy, Ayman; El-Shenawy, Omnia; Yalçın, Erkan; Kösemeci, Cem; Klava, Dace; Straumite, Evita

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this work was to study the degree of knowledge about dietary fibre (DF), as influenced by factors such as gender, level of education, living environment or country. For this, a descriptive cross-sectional study was undertaken on a non-probabilistic sample of 6010 participants from 10 countries in different continents (Europe, Africa and America). The results showed that the participants revealed on average a positive but still low global level of knowledge, which alerts for the need to take some actions to further inform the population about DF and its role as a component of a healthy diet. The results also indicated differences between genders, levels of education, living environments and countries. The highest level of knowledge was revealed by the participants from female gender, with higher education and living in urban areas. Concerning the country, the best informed were the participants from Romania, followed by those from Portugal and Turkey while the least informed were from Egypt.

  2. Carcinogenicity studies on fibres, metal compounds, and some other dusts in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, F; Ziem, U; Reiffer, F J; Huth, F; Ernst, H; Mohr, U

    1987-01-01

    About 50 dusts were examined on their carcinogenicity in rats mainly after intraperitoneal injection and some after intratracheal instillation. In the i.p. test, very low doses between 0.05 and 0.5 mg asbestos led to tumour incidences of about 20 to 80%. Polyvinyl-pyridine-N-oxide prolonged the tumour latency after injection of actinolite. 60 mg attapulgite from three sources with short fibre lengths were not shown to be carcinogenic but an attapulgite sample with longer fibres had a moderate effect. Relatively thick rock and ceramic fibres (median greater than 1 micron) induced tumours, but slag and wollastonite fibres did not, probably because of their better solubility. Intratracheal instillations of glass microfibres (20 X 0.5 mg) led to lung tumours in 5 of 34 rats (0 in control). The carcinogenic potency of an inorganic fibre depends on its size and persistency, and possibly also on other properties, especially on the surface. Nickel powder, nickel oxide, nickel subsulfide and cadmium sulfide were all found to be carcinogenic in the two tests. Cadmium chloride and cadmium oxide could only be administered in very low doses because of their high acute toxicity. A high amount of magnetite (15 X 15 mg i.tr.) led to an unexpected lung tumour incidence of 69%. The i.p. test in rats proved to be very sensitive for detecting the carcinogenic potency of non-acute toxic natural and man-made mineral dusts as well as metal compounds. This means that, if a high dose of one of these dusts does not induce tumours in this test, no suspicion of carcinogenic potency can be substantiated.

  3. Fluoro-edenite and carbon nanotubes: The health impact of ‘asbestos-like’ fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIOZZI, EDOARDO; RAPISARDA, VENERANDO; MARCONI, ANDREA; COSTA, CHIARA; POLITO, IRENE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; LIBRA, MASSIMO; FENGA, CONCETTINA

    2016-01-01

    Several decades have passed since Wagner et al demonstrated a causal link between asbestos fibre inhalation and the development of pleural mesothelioma in 1960. It was later suggested that pleural plaques are a benign consequence of exposure to these fibres. Most recently, a significant association between exposure to asbestos and cancer diagnosed at various sites, such as the peritoneum, stomach, pharynx, colon and ovaries has been demonstrated. The great concerns about public health that arose from the scientific evidence presented above have led to the banning of asbestos in several countries. Over the years, the suspicion that particles with a high aspect ratio may have asbestos-like pathogenicity has been supported by increasing evidence. Natural occurring minerals, as well as man-made fibres, have proven capable of inducing either chronic inflammation of serous membranes, or, in some cases, the development of peritoneal and pleural mesothelioma. The pathogenic role of both fluoro-edenite and carbon nanotubes, two ‘asbestos-like’ fibres is summarized and discussed in this review. The data presented herein support the notion that occupational exposure to these two types of fibre contributes to the development of different types of cancer. PMID:26889212

  4. Fluoro-edenite and carbon nanotubes: The health impact of 'asbestos-like' fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miozzi, Edoardo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Marconi, Andrea; Costa, Chiara; Polito, Irene; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Libra, Massimo; Fenga, Concettina

    2016-01-01

    Several decades have passed since Wagner et al demonstrated a causal link between asbestos fibre inhalation and the development of pleural mesothelioma in 1960. It was later suggested that pleural plaques are a benign consequence of exposure to these fibres. Most recently, a significant association between exposure to asbestos and cancer diagnosed at various sites, such as the peritoneum, stomach, pharynx, colon and ovaries has been demonstrated. The great concerns about public health that arose from the scientific evidence presented above have led to the banning of asbestos in several countries. Over the years, the suspicion that particles with a high aspect ratio may have asbestos-like pathogenicity has been supported by increasing evidence. Natural occurring minerals, as well as man-made fibres, have proven capable of inducing either chronic inflammation of serous membranes, or, in some cases, the development of peritoneal and pleural mesothelioma. The pathogenic role of both fluoro-edenite and carbon nanotubes, two 'asbestos-like' fibres is summarized and discussed in this review. The data presented herein support the notion that occupational exposure to these two types of fibre contributes to the development of different types of cancer.

  5. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  6. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  7. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  8. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  9. Fibre optic Bragg grating sensors: an alternative method to strain gauges for measuring deformation in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresvig, T; Ludvigsen, P; Steen, H; Reikerås, O

    2008-01-01

    Strain gauges are currently the default method for measuring deformation in bone. Strain gauges are not well suited for in vivo measurements because of their size and because they are difficult to use in bone. They are also unsuitable for repeated measurements over time since they cannot be left in the patient. The optical Bragg grating fibres behave like selective filters of light. As a result the structure will transmit most wavelengths of light, but will reflect certain specific wavelengths. If the Bragg grating is strained along the fibre axis, the wavelength will shift, and this change represents a measure of strain. The optical fibres are very thin, no thicker than a standard surgical suture and are easy to adhere to bone by use of the FDA approved polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) as bonding adhesive. Since they are made of biocompatible silica porous bioglass ceramics, it should also be possible to leave the fibres in the patient between and after measurements. We have shown that fibre optic Bragg grating sensors can be used as a measurement tool for bone strain by performing measurements both on an acryl tube and on an extracted sample of human femur diaphysis. On either of them we used four fibre optic sensors and four strain gauges, interspersed at every 45 degrees around the circumference. The standard deviation of the measurements on the acrylic tube for each of the sensors, both optical fibres and strain gauges, varied from 1.0 to 5.2%. Every sensor, both optical fibre and strain gauge, correlated significantly with all of the rest at the 0.01 level with a Pearson correlation coefficient r ranging from 0.986 to 1.0. The linearity for all of the sensors versus load was excellent, the lowest linearity of the eight sensors was 0.996 as expressed by r(2) (coefficient of determination), with no significant difference in linearity between optical fibres and strain gauges. Bone is not an ideal isotropic material, and we found that the strain readings of the

  10. Comparison of Acoustic Characteristics of Date Palm Fibre and Oil Palm Fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamyaa Abd ALRahman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated and compared the acoustic characteristics of two natural organic fibres: date palm fibre and oil palm fibre, these materials eligible for acoustical absorption. During the processing stage, both fibre sheets are treated with latex. The two fibres are compressed after latex treatment Circular samples (100 mm in diameter and 28 mm, based on the measurement tube requirements are cut out of the sheets. The density of the date palm fibre sheet is 150 kg/m3 for a 50 mm thickness and 130 kg/m3 for a 30 mm thickness. In contrast, the density of oil palm fibre is 75 kg/m3 for a 50 mm thickness and 65 kg/m3 for a 30 mm thickness. An impedance tube was used to test the thicknesses of both samples based on international standards. The results show that the date palm fibre exhibits two Acoustic Absorption Coefficient (AAC peaks: 0.93 at 1356 Hz and 0.99 at 4200-4353 Hz for the 50-mm-thick sample. In contrast, the 30-mm-thick sample has a single AAC peak of 0.83 at 2381.38-2809.38 Hz. However, the 50-mm-thick oil palm fibre has an AAC peak of 0.75 at 1946.88-2178.13 Hz and the 30-mm-thick oil palm fibre has an acoustic absorption coefficient peak 0.59 at 3225-3712.5 Hz. Thus, the date palm fibre has a higher acoustic absorption coefficient for high and low frequencies than does oil palm fibre. Both fibres are promising for use as sound absorber materials to protect against environmental noise pollution.

  11. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  12. Degradability of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1992-09-01

    The degradation of dental ceramics generally occurs because of mechanical forces or chemical attack. The possible physiological side-effects of ceramics are their tendency to abrade opposing dental structures, the emission of radiation from radioactive components, the roughening of their surfaces by chemical attack with a corresponding increase in plaque retention, and the release of potentially unsafe concentrations of elements as a result of abrasion and dissolution. The chemical durability of dental ceramics is excellent. With the exception of the excessive exposure to acidulated fluoride, ammonium bifluoride, or hydrofluoric acid, there is little risk of surface degradation of virtually all current dental ceramics. Extensive exposure to acidulated fluoride is a possible problem for individuals with head and/or neck cancer who have received large doses of radiation. Such fluoride treatment is necessary to minimize tooth demineralization when saliva flow rates have been reduced because of radiation exposure to salivary glands. Porcelain surface stains are also lost occasionally when abraded by prophylaxis pastes and/or acidulated fluoride. In each case, the solutes are usually not ingested. Further research that uses standardized testing procedures is needed on the chemical durability of dental ceramics. Accelerated durability tests are desirable to minimize the time required for such measurements. The influence of chemical durability on surface roughness and the subsequent effect of roughness on wear of the ceramic restorations as well as of opposing structures should also be explored on a standardized basis.

  13. Ductility Performance of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Eswari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a study on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete. The influence of fibre content on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete specimens having different fibre volume fractions was investigated. The parameters of investigation included modulus of rupture, ultimate load, service load, ultimate and service load deflection, crack width, energy ductility and deflection ductility. A total of 27 specimens, 100×100×500 mm, were tested to study the above parameters. The specimens incorporated 0.0 to 2.0% volume fraction of polyolefin and steel fibres in different proportions. The ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete specimens was compared with that of plain concrete. The test results show that addition of 2.0% by volume of hybrid fibres improves the ductility performance appreciably. An adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy based model has been proposed to predict the ductility performance characteristics. A reasonably close agreement has been obtained between the experimental and predicted results.

  14. Controllable spatiotemporal nonlinear effects in multimode fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Logan G.; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Wise, Frank W.

    2015-05-01

    Multimode fibres are of interest for next-generation telecommunications systems and the construction of high-energy fibre lasers. However, relatively little work has explored nonlinear pulse propagation in multimode fibres. Here, we consider highly nonlinear ultrashort pulse propagation in the anomalous-dispersion regime of a graded-index multimode fibre. Low modal dispersion and strong nonlinear coupling between the fibre's many spatial modes result in interesting behaviour. We observe spatiotemporal effects reminiscent of nonlinear optics in bulk media—self-focusing and multiple filamentation—at a fraction of the usual power. By adjusting the spatial initial conditions, we generate on-demand, megawatt, ultrashort pulses tunable between 1,550 and 2,200 nm dispersive waves over one octave; intense combs of visible light; and a multi-octave-spanning supercontinuum. Our results indicate that multimode fibres present unique opportunities for observing new spatiotemporal dynamics and phenomena. They also enable the realization of a new type of tunable, broadband fibre source that could be useful for many applications.

  15. [Assessment of exposure to ceramic fibers during insulation operations in a thermoelectric power plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, A; Cavariani, F; Carai, A; Cacchioli, G; Papandrea, F; Cacchioli, E

    2001-01-01

    Refractory ceramic fibre concentrations were measured during renewal of the insulation lining of a turbine located in a large power plant. Personal and stationary samples were collected during operations, which involved installing and ripping out standard and pre-coated and pre-shaped ceramic fibre blankets. Operation-length average (OLA) and TWA exposure levels were about 500 F/l and about 100 F/l, respectively, for installing and ripping out operations where non-coated blankets were handled. In these cases specific task-associated personal exposure levels up to 1000 F/l were measured. Personal exposure levels up to as much as 10 times lower were observed in operations involving pre-coated and pre-shaped blankets. The average concentration levels from area samples were always lower than those from personal samples, and showed a downward gradient with the distance from the source. Given the current carcinogenic classification of refractory ceramic fibres (class 2, European), the necessity is stressed of introducing adequate working practices and control measures (adoption of pre-coated and pre-shaped fibrous materials whenever possible, confinement of working area, use of local air extractions ventilation with HEPA filter unit, use of garments for personal protection and respirators, use of wetting or binding liquids prior to removal, quick cleaning of debris from working area), in order to keep the exposure levels and the number of potentially exposed workers to the minimum.

  16. Comparison of two novel approaches to model fibre reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radtke, F.K.F.; Simone, A.; Sluys, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present two approaches to model fibre reinforced concrete. In both approaches, discrete fibre distributions and the behaviour of the fibre-matrix interface are explicitly considered. One approach employs the reaction forces from fibre to matrix while the other is based on the partition of unity f

  17. Coherent Beam Combination of Two Polarization Maintaining Ytterbium Fibre Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jing; XIAO Rui; JIANG Zong-Fu; CHENG Xiang-Ai; SHU Bai-Hong; CHEN Jin-Bao; LIU Ze-Jin

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate coherent beam combination of fibre laser beams by phase locking. Phase noise of a polarization maintaining ytterbium fibre amplifier is inspected with a fibre interferometer. In a feed back control loop, two fibre polarization maintaining ytterbium amplifiers are phase locked and coherent combined when the phase noise is properly controlled by a LiNO3 phase modulator.

  18. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  19. Clinically used adhesive ceramic bonding methods: a survey in 2007, 2011, and in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosa, K; Meyer, G; Kern, M

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate practices of dentists regarding adhesive cementation of all-ceramic restorations over a period of 8 years. The authors developed a questionnaire regarding adhesive cementation procedures for all-ceramic restorations. Restorations were distinguished between made out of silicate ceramic or oxide ceramic. The questionnaire was handed out to all dentists participating in a local annual dental meeting in Northern Germany. The returned questionnaires were analyzed to identify incorrect cementation procedures based upon current evidence-based technique from the scientific dental literature. The survey was conducted three times in 2007, 2011, and 2015 and their results were compared. For silicate ceramic restorations, 38-69 % of the participants used evidence-based bonding procedures; most of the incorrect bonding methods did not use a silane containing primer. In case of oxide ceramic restorations, most participants did not use air-abrasion prior to bonding. Only a relatively low rate (7-14 %) of dentists used evidence-based dental techniques for bonding oxide ceramics. In adhesive cementation of all-ceramic restorations, the practices of surveyed dentists in Northern Germany revealed high rates of incorrect bonding. During the observation period, the values of evidence-based bonding procedures for oxide ceramics improved while the values for silicate ceramics declined. Based on these results, some survey participants need additional education for adhesive techniques. Neglecting scientifically accepted methods for adhesive cementation of all-ceramic restorations may result in reduced longevity of all-ceramic restorations.

  20. Nonlinear microstructured polymer optical fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frosz, Michael Henoch

    . The combination of a small core size and zero-dispersion wavelength at the operating wavelength of widely available femtosecond Ti:sapphire lasers led to an extensive research in supercontinuum generation and other nonlinear effects in PCFs. It is crucial for the efficiency of many nonlinear mechanisms...... that the pump laser wavelength is close to the zero-dispersion wavelength and that the core size is small. Recently, work in fabricating PCFs from materials other than silica has intensified. One of the advantages of using alternative materials can be a higher inherent material nonlinearity, which...... to accurately obtain a small core size while maintaining small structural variations during fibre drawing. This talk will give a presentation of how the mPOFs are fabricated and the route to obtaining nonlinear effects in them....

  1. A Study in Physical and Mechanical Properties of Hemp Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Shahzad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the experiments undertaken to evaluate various physical and mechanical properties of hemp fibres. The study of these properties is vital for comparison with similar properties of synthetic fibres and for assessing hemp fibres’ suitability for use as reinforcement in composite materials. The properties of hemp fibres were found to be good enough to be used as reinforcement in composite materials. However, the issues of relatively high moisture content of fibres, variability in fibre properties, and relatively poor fibre/matrix interfacial strength were identified as factors that can reduce the efficiency with which these fibres can be utilised.

  2. Radiation tolerance tests of scintillating fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavardi, Laura; Albrecht, Johannes [TU Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: LHCb-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    An upgrade of the LHCb detector is planned during the shutdown which will take place from mid 2018 to the end of 2019. The proposed upgrade for the tracking system is a detector composed of scintillating fibres read out by silicon photomultipliers. The tracking detector will be working in an environment exposed to radiation, so that the resistance of the fibres to radiation is an important quality, which needs to be investigated. In this talk tests of scintillating fibres tolerance to radiation will be presented.

  3. Analysing the nanoporous structure of aramid fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauw, Brian Richard; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Mortensen, Kell;

    2010-01-01

    After consideration of the applicability of classical methods, a novel analysis method for the characterization of fibre void structures is presented, capable of fitting the entire anisotropic two-dimensional scattering pattern to a model of perfectly aligned, polydisperse ellipsoids. It is tested...... for validity against the computed scattering pattern for a simulated nanostructure, after which it is used to fit the scattering from the void structure of commercially available heat-treated poly(p-phenylene terephtalamide) fibre and its as-spun precursor fibre. The application shows a reasonable fit...

  4. Silica holey fibres: fabrication and nonlinear effects

    OpenAIRE

    Belardi, W.; Monro, T.M.; Lee, J.H.; Yusoff, Z.; Price, J.H.V.; Malinowski, A.; Piper, A; Richardson, D J

    2002-01-01

    Holey fibres (HFs) [1] have emerged as a novel class of optical fibres which can provide completely new optical properties, such as endlessly single mode operation and novel dispersion properties as anomalous dispersion below 1.3µm, broadband flat dispersion and highly normal dispersion at 1.55µm. Moreover by changing the HF parameters (i.e. hole and core size), it is possible to fabricate HFs with an effective area so high as 800µm2 or so low as approximately 1µm2 [2]. A holey fibre perform ...

  5. Fibre Optic Protection System for Concrete Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.S.Leng; A.Hameed; D.Winter; R.A.Barnes; G.C.Mays; G.F.Fernando

    2006-01-01

    The design concepts, modelling and implementation of various fibre optic sensor protection systems for development in concrete structures were investigated. Design concepts and on-site requirements for surface-mounted and embedded optical fibre sensor in concrete were addressed. Finite element (FE) modelling of selected sensor protection systems in strain-transfer efficiency from the structure to the sensing region was also studied. And experimental validation of specified sensor protection system was reported. Results obtained indicate that the protection system for the sensors performs adequately in concrete environment and there is very good correlation between results obtained by the protected fibre optic sensors and conventional electrical resistance strain gauges.

  6. Fibre optic power meter calibration uncertainties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nel, M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available thereof. It was done only for standard single mode fibre with FC (ferrule connector) connectors, and using a 1310 and a 1550 nm Fabry Perot laser (FP laser). The calibration set-up and procedure The uncertainty contributions for fibre optic power..., in this case 1310 or 1550 nm, is fed to the fibre optic power meter (secondary standard or unit under test (UUT)) via an attenuator. The attenuator serves to reduce back-reflections into the source and to set the power to the desired level. In Fig. 1...

  7. The coupling performance of photonic crystal fibres in fibre stellar interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corbett, J.; Dabirian, A.; Butterley, T.;

    2006-01-01

    Large mode area (LMA), single-mode photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) have the potential to provide significant instrumental advantages in fibre stellar interferometry, due to their broadband attenuation spectrum, endlessly single-moded performance and very large core size. We investigate the theoret......Large mode area (LMA), single-mode photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) have the potential to provide significant instrumental advantages in fibre stellar interferometry, due to their broadband attenuation spectrum, endlessly single-moded performance and very large core size. We investigate...... the theoretical performance of coupling the telescope point spread function directly into LMA PCFs. We find that a single LMA fibre can replace as many as three step-index fibres for atmospheric seeing characterized by D-T/r(o) >= 2 with approximately the same coupling performance and a slower feed from...

  8. Rare-Earth Doped Photonic Crystal Fibre Lasers and Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristian G.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, a theoretical and numerical study of the use of rare-earthdoped photonic crystal fibres as optical amplifiers and lasers, has been performed. Photonic crystal fibres or microstructured optical fibres is a new kind of optical fibre in which the cladding region typically consist...... of a periodic microstructure, resulting in a fibre with very different properties compared to conventional optical fibres. The properties of photonic crystals fibres are described, with focus on the advantages this technology provides compared to conventional fibres, within the area of optical amplification....... The thesis also presents the basic properties of optical amplification, and describes the numerical model developed to model the behaviour of lasers and amplifiers based on photonic crystal fibres. The developed numerical tools are then used to investigate specific applications of photonic crystal fibres...

  9. Methodology for characterisation of glass fibre composite architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Larsen, J.B.; Østergaard, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    of the fibres. The information is used for different analyses to investigate and characterise the fibre architecture. As an example, the methodology is applied to glass fibre reinforced composites with varying fibre contents. The different fibre volume fractions (FVFs) affect the number of contact points per......The present study outlines a methodology for microstructural characterisation of fibre reinforced composites containing circular fibres. Digital micrographs of polished cross-sections are used as input to a numerical image processing tool that determines spatial mapping and radii detection...... fibre, the communal fibre distance and the local FVF. The fibre diameter distribution and packing pattern remain somewhat similar for the considered materials. The methodology is a step towards a better understanding of the composite microstructure and can be used to evaluate the interconnection between...

  10. A temperature-independent fibre-optic magnetic-field sensor using thin-core fibre tailored fibre Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qin; Feng, Zhongyao; Rong, Qiangzhou; Wan, Yun; Qiao, Xueguang; Hu, Manli; Yang, Hangzhou; Wang, Ruohui; Shao, Zhihua; Yang, Tingting

    2017-06-01

    A temperature-independent fibre-optic magnetic-field sensor is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The device consists of a thin-core fibre (TCF) sandwiched in the upstream of a fibre Bragg grating (FBG). Because of the core-mismatch between the TCF and the single-mode fibre (SMF), the core mode is coupled to the cladding modes within the TCF cladding, and parts of them are recoupled back to the leading-in SMF by the downstream FBG. The cladding modes are sensitive to the ambient refractive index (RI), and therefore have the ability to respond to a RI change in the magnetic fluid determined by the ambient magnetic field. The intensities of the cladding-mode resonances are highly sensitive to the magnetic field change, while, in contrast, the resonance wavelengths always remain unchanged. This property can allow the sensor to act as a power-referenced reflection probe for magnetic field measurements.

  11. Polymerizing the fibre between bacteria and host cells: the biogenesis of functional amyloid fibres

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid fibres are proteinaceous aggregates associated with several human diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s and Creutzfeldt Jakob’s. Disease-associated amyloid formation is the result of proteins that misfold and aggregate into β sheet-rich fibre polymers. Cellular toxicity is readily associated with amyloidogenesis, although the molecular mechanism of toxicity remains unknown. Recently, a new class of ‘functional’ amyloid fibres was discovered that demonstrates that amyloids can ...

  12. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Strength Evaluation of Steel-Nylon Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Maniram Kumar; Er. Ankush Khadwal

    2014-01-01

    When fibres like steel, glass, polypropylene, nylon, carbon, aramid, polyester, jute, etc are mixed with concrete known as fibre reinforced concrete. To overcome the deficiencies of concrete; fibres are added to improve the performance of concrete. In this research hybrid reinforced concrete is made by using steel and nylon 6 fibres. The inclusion of both steel and nylon 6 fibres are used in order to combine the benefits of both fibers; structural improvements provided by stee...

  14. Scientific Crossbreeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Rolf

    This thesis presents an alternative approach to the analysis of interdisciplinarity. One of the basic reasons for developing an alternative method for evaluation of interdisciplinary activities is that epistemic issues are insufficiently dealt with in the existing literature on the topic. To deve......This thesis presents an alternative approach to the analysis of interdisciplinarity. One of the basic reasons for developing an alternative method for evaluation of interdisciplinary activities is that epistemic issues are insufficiently dealt with in the existing literature on the topic....... To develop a more adequate way of capturing what is at stake in interdisciplinarity, I suggest drawing inspiration from the contemporary philosophical literature on scientific representation. The development of a representation based approach to the analysis of interdisciplinarity, and the discussion...... of the concept of “scientific discipline” and disciplinary difference. This chapter provides reasons to assume that conventional scientific taxonomies do not provide a good basis for analysing epistemic aspects of interdisciplinary science. On this background it is argued that the concept of “approaches...

  15. Synchronously pumped picosecond all-fibre Raman laser based on phosphorus-doped silica fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtsev, Sergey; Kukarin, Sergey; Kokhanovskiy, Alexey

    2015-07-13

    Reported for the first time is picosecond-range pulse generation in an all-fibre Raman laser based on P₂O₅-doped silica fibre. Employment of phosphor-silicate fibre made possible single-cascade spectral transformation of pumping pulses at 1084 nm into 270-ps long Raman laser pulses at 1270 nm. The highest observed fraction of the Stokes component radiation at 1270 nm in the total output of the Raman laser amounted to 30%. The identified optimal duration of the input pulses at which the amount of Stokes component radiation in a ~16-m long phosphorus-based Raman fibre converter reaches its maximum was 140-180 ps.

  16. Polarisation effects in twin-core fibre: Application for mode locking in a fibre laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobach, I. A.; Kablukov, S. I.; Podivilov, Evgenii V.; Babin, Sergei A.; Apolonski, A. A.

    2012-09-01

    We report the first measurements of the longitudinal power distribution in a twin-core optical fibre at different input light polarisations. Experimental evidence is presented that, because of the difference in birefringence between the cores, the power in them depends on which core the beam is launched into. Experimental data are interpreted in terms of a modified polarisation model for mode coupling in twin-core fibres which takes into account the birefringence of the cores. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time the use of the polarisation properties of a twincore fibre for mode locking in a fibre laser.

  17. Yb3+-Doped Double-Clad Fibre Laser Based on Fibre Bragg Grating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范万德; 付圣贵; 张强; 宁鼎; 李丽君; 王志; 袁树忠; 董孝义

    2003-01-01

    A novel Yb3+-doped double-clad fibre laser based on a double-clad fibre Bragg grating is presented. The fibre Bragg grating, as the output mirror, has been formed in Yb3+-doped double-clad fibre with the phase-mask method. When the input pump power is 2.8 W, the maximum laser output power is 570mW, with < 0.2 nm in line-width at the wavelength of 1.058μm, over 40dB signal-to-noise ratio and 24% slope efficiency.

  18. ELASTICITY of SHORT FIBRE REINFORCED POLYAMIDE: MORPHOLOGICAL AND NUMERICAl ANALYSIS OF FIBRE ORIENTATION EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cosmi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behaviour of injection moulded short fibre reinforced polymers depends upon fibre orientation, as shown in experiments conducted with notched specimens injected through different injection gates. The different fatigue behaviour is mainly related to the different local elastic properties, as determined by the different fibre orientation patterns, resulting into different strain distributions. In order to quantify the relationship between fibre orientation and elastic constants, the Cell Method was applied to volumes extracted from the specimens, reconstructed by micro-tomography.

  19. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  20. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  1. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  2. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  3. Individual fibre segmentation from 3D X-ray computed tomography for characterising the fibre orientation in unidirectional composite materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerson, Monica Jane; Jespersen, Kristine Munk; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to characterise the fibre orientation in unidirectional fibre reinforced polymers, namely glass and carbon fibre composites. The compression strength of the composite is related to the orientation of the fibres. Thus the orientation is essential when designing materials...... for wind turbine blades. The calculation of the fibre orientation distribution is based on segmenting the individual fibres from volumes that have been acquired through X-ray tomography. The segmentation method presented in this study can accurately extract individual fibres from low contrast X-ray scans...... of composites with high fibre volume fraction. From the individual fibre orientations, it is possible to obtain results which are independent of the scanning quality. The compression strength for both composites is estimated from the average fibre orientations and is found to be of the same order of magnitude...

  4. Cooled Ceramic Turbine Vane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — N&R Engineering will investigate the feasibility of cooled ceramics, such as ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade concepts that can decrease specific...

  5. Modern fibre-optic coherent lidars for remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Chris

    2015-10-01

    This paper surveys some growth areas in optical sensing that exploit near-IR coherent laser sources and fibreoptic hardware from the telecoms industry. Advances in component availability and performance are promising benefits in several military and commercial applications. Previous work has emphasised Doppler wind speed measurements and wind / turbulence profiling for air safety, with recent sharp increases in numbers of lidar units sold and installed, and with wider recognition that different lidar / radar wavebands can and should complement each other. These advances are also enabling fields such as microDoppler measurement of sub-wavelength vibrations and acoustic waves, including non-lineof- sight acoustic sensing in challenging environments. To shed light on these different applications we review some fundamentals of coherent detection, measurement probe volume, and parameter estimation - starting with familiar similarities and differences between "radar" and "laser radar". The consequences of changing the operating wavelength by three or four orders of magnitude - from millimetric or centimetric radar to a typical fibre-optic lidar working near 1.5 μm - need regular review, partly because of continuing advances in telecoms technology and computing. Modern fibre-optic lidars tend to be less complicated, more reliable, and cheaper than their predecessors; and they more closely obey the textbook principles of easily adjusted and aligned Gaussian beams. The behaviours of noises and signals, and the appropriate processing strategies, are as expected different for the different wavelengths and applications. For example, the effective probe volumes are easily varied (e.g. by translating a fibre facet) through six or eight orders of magnitude; as the average number of contributing scatterers varies, from >1, we should review any assumptions about "many" scatterers and Gaussian statistics. Finally, some much older but still relevant scientific work (by A G Bell, E H

  6. Design Methods for Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The present paper describes the outline of a research project on Fibre Reinforced Concrete (FRC) currently being carried out in Denmark under the supervision of Danish Council of Technology, Danish Technical Research Council and Danish Natural Science Research Counsil....

  7. Optical fibres bringing the LHC into focus

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    New components are being added to CERN's optical fibre network, which will transport the torrents of data produced by the LHC. 1500 kilometres of cables will be installed in the tunnels and at ground level.

  8. Chinese Market for Fibres and Cables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This article presents a summary of Chinese market of optical fibres and cables based on the development of the optical communications industry. Analysis shows that the market will keep growing for sometime in the future.

  9. Flatus emission patterns and fibre intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, T D; Stanton, R A

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the normal range of flatus emissions and their relationship to diet, particularly fibre, would be helpful in managing patients who complain of excessive flatus or abdominal distention. Sixty men and 60 women aged between 17 and 67 kept a three-day daily record, including one week-end day, of their flatus emissions, dietary fibre intake and beer consumption. Daily flatus emissions averaged 12.7 (range to 2-53) for men and 7.1 (range 1-32) for women. Fibre intake averaged 28+/-13 g for men and 24+/-3 g for women. Flatus emissions significantly correlated with dietary fibre intake (pflatus emissions and beer intake in men and men recorded more aromatic flatus than women. This study of 120 normal individuals eating their choice of foods provides a basis to judge degrees of abnormality in patients complaining of excessive flatus.

  10. Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Poeggel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

  11. Central Tracking Detector Based on Scintillating Fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Scintillating fibres form a reasonable compromise for central tracking detectors in terms of price, resolution, response time, occupancy and heat production. \\\\ \\\\ New fluorescents with large Stokes shifts have been produced, capable of working without wavelength shifters. Coherent multibundles have been developed to achieve high packing fractions. Small segments of tracker shell have been assembled and beam tests have confirmed expectations on spatial resolution. An opto-electronic delay line has been designed to delay the track patterns and enable coincidences with a first level trigger. Replacement of the conventional phosphor screen anode with a Si pixel chip is achieved. This tube is called ISPA-tube and has already been operated in beam tests with a scintillating fibres tracker. \\\\ \\\\ The aim of the proposal is to improve hit densities for small diameter fibres by increasing the fraction of trapped light, by reducing absorption and reflection losses, by reflecting light at the free fibre end, and by inc...

  12. Step index fibre using laser interferometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Hamed

    2014-03-01

    model is suggested to describe the fringe shift which occurs due to the phase variations of cladded glass fibre introduced between the two plates of the liquid wedge interferometer illuminated with a He–Ne laser. The fringe shift of the phase object which appears in the denominator of the Airy distribution formula of the multiple beam interference is represented in the harmonic term. An experiment is conducted using liquid wedge interferometer where the step index glass fibre of a nearly quadratic thickness variation is introduced between the two plates of the interferometer. The obtained fringe shift shows a good agreement with the proposed quadratic model. The Matlab code is written to plot the interferometer fringes comprising the shift of the step index fibre. Secondly, recognition of elliptical fibres is outlined using tomographic imaging. Finally, results and concluding remarks are given.

  13. 77 FR 32942 - Application(s) for Duty-Free Entry of Scientific Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... Section 6(c) of the Educational, Scientific and Cultural Materials Importation Act of 1966 (Pub. L. 89-651... melting of metals. Suction casting is required to achieve nanocrystalline grains, and ceramic powder...

  14. BN interphase in composite materials with nicalon Si-C-O fibers and with vitro ceramic matrix of MAS type; L`interphase BN dans les materiaux composites a fibres Si-C-O nicalon et a matrice vitroceramique de type MAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricca, N.

    1994-03-14

    BN has been suggested as an interphase in silica-based glass-ceramic matrix composites with a view to use these materials in oxidizing atmospheres at medium or high temperatures. The matrix had a boron-doped MAS (MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}) composition and was prepared from an hydrosol precursor. Pseudo-ID composites were prepared according to a sol impregnations/calcination/hot-pressing route. Chemical and microstructural characterizations of the fiber/matrix interfacial area were conducted by mean of TEM/EELS and AES analyses. The efficiency of BN as a coupling interphase for this particular composite system was successfully demonstrated through tensile tests performed on either as-processed or aged specimens (100 hours at 1000 deg C in air or under argon). In addition, composites maintained in air at 600 deg C, 800 deg C and 900 deg C while simultaneously loaded did not fail after 150 hours or more. Thus, a BN interphase appeared to be compatible with an oxidizing environment (i.e. the oxide matrix and/or air from 600 to 1000 deg C) and should therefore successfully replace the usual carbon interphase at least for use at medium temperatures. (author)

  15. Rolling contact fatigue of ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Hadfield, Mark

    1993-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/steel contacts under lubricated rolling conditions are studied. This work is of interest to ball bearing manufacturers as the use of ceramics in the design of these components has some advantages over traditional bearing-steel materials. Low density and increased stiffness are the mechanical properties which gas-turbine and machine tool manufacturers are most likel...

  16. Polarisation control of DFB fibre lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varming, Poul; Philipsen, Jacob Lundgreen; Berendt, Martin Ole

    1998-01-01

    The polarisation properties of a distributed feedback (DFB) fibre laser are investigated. It is shown experimentally that the birefringence of the UV induced phase-shift is the dominating effect controlling the polarisation properties of the laser......The polarisation properties of a distributed feedback (DFB) fibre laser are investigated. It is shown experimentally that the birefringence of the UV induced phase-shift is the dominating effect controlling the polarisation properties of the laser...

  17. Dynamic response analysis of DFB fibre lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yujun, Qian; Varming, Poul; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard

    1998-01-01

    We present a model for relative intensity noise (RIN) in DFB fibre lasers which predicts measured characteristics accurately. Calculation results implies that the RIN decreases rapidly with stronger Bragg grating and higher pump power. We propose here a simplified model based on three spatially...... independent rate equations to describe the dynamic response of erbium doped DFB fibre lasers on pump power fluctuations, using coupled-mode theory to calculate the steady-state hole-burning of the erbium ion inversion...

  18. Design of distributed feedback fibre lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Vibeke Claudia; Søndergaard, Thomas; Varming, Poul

    1997-01-01

    A numerical model for erbium fibre lasers with Bragg gratings is presented. The model is used to optimize the location of a discrete phase-shift and the phase-shift magnitude for a distributed phase-shift.......A numerical model for erbium fibre lasers with Bragg gratings is presented. The model is used to optimize the location of a discrete phase-shift and the phase-shift magnitude for a distributed phase-shift....

  19. Energy transfer during the hydroentanglement of fibres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moyo, D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available , and the resultant degree of fibre entanglement, determines the tensile strength of the nonwoven fabric as a consequence of the inter-fibre friction. Here, the relationship between hydroentangling energy from the waterjets and the changes it brings about... in the nonwoven fabric strength were studied. In the study, the energies of the waterjets transferred to every fabric sample as a function of the waterjet pressure, machine speed, machine efficiency and the web area weight were quantified, and the resultant...

  20. Fibre-optic sensors in health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazia Mignani, Anna; Baldini, Francesco

    1997-05-01

    Biomedical fibre-optic sensors are attractive for the measurement of physical, chemical and biochemical parameters and for spectral measurements directly performed on the patient. An overview of fibre-optic sensors for in vivo monitoring is given, with particular attention paid to the advantages that these sensors are able to offer in different application fields such as cardiovascular and intensive care, angiology, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, oncology, neurology, dermatology and dentistry.

  1. Photonic crystal fibres in the market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Laurila, Marko; Noordegraaf, Danny;

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) emerged as a research topic in the mid 1990'ies [1]. Today, 15 years later, these fibres are increasing deployed in various commercial markets. Here, we will address three of these markets; medical imaging, materials processing and sensors. We will describe how...... the PCFs provide radical improvements and illustrate the strong diversity in the evolution of PCFs to serve these different markets....

  2. Force focusing in confined fibres and sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Victor; Cerda, Enrique [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago, Av. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Witten, T A; Liang Tao [James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: t-witten@uchicago.edu

    2008-07-07

    A thin fibre or sheet curled into a circular container has a detached region whose shape and force ratios are independent of material properties and container radius. We compute this shape and compare it with experiments. The discrete forces acting at either end of the detached region have a ratio that depends only on the length of the fibre or sheet relative to the circle radius. We calculate this force ratio in three regimes of circle radius. (fast track communication)

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  4. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  5. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  6. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  7. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  8. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  10. Potential Use of Plant Fibres and their Composites for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Namvar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant-based fibers such as flax, jute, sisal, hemp, and kenaf have been frequently used in the manufacturing of biocomposites. Natural fibres possess a high strength to weight ratio, non-corrosive nature, high fracture toughness, renewability, and sustainability, which give them unique advantages over other materials. The development of biocomposites by reinforcing natural fibres has attracted attention of scientists and researchers due to environmental benefits and improved mechanical performance. Manufacturing of biocomposites from renewable sources is a challenging task, involving metals, polymers, and ceramics. Biocomposites are already utilized in biomedical applications such as drug/gene delivery, tissue engineering, orthopedics, and cosmetic orthodontics. The first essential requirement of materials to be used as biomaterial is its acceptability by the human body. A biomaterial should obtain some important common properties in order to be applied in the human body either for use alone or in combination. Biocomposites have potential to replace or serve as a framework allowing the regeneration of traumatized or degenerated tissues or organs, thus improving the patients’ quality of life. This review paper addresses the utilization of plant fibres and its composites in biomedical applications and considers potential future research directed at environment-friendly biodegradable composites for biomedical applications.

  11. Preparation and characterization of photo chromic effect for ceramic tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atay, B.; Goktas, A.; Dogan, A.

    2011-07-01

    Ceramic tile industry is developing due to the technological researches in scientific area and new tiles which are not only a traditional ceramic also have many multiple functionalities have been marketed nowadays. These tiles like photo catalytic, photovoltaic, antibacterial and etc. improve the quality of life and provide lots of benefits such as self cleaning, energy production, climate control. The goal of this study was to enhance the photo chromic function on ceramic tiles which is the attitude of changing color in a reversible way by electromagnetic radiation and widely used in many areas because of its aesthetic and also functional properties. High response time of photo chromic features of ceramic tiles have been achieved by employing of polymeric gel with additives of photoactive dye onto the ceramic surface. Photo chromic layer with a thickness of approximately 45- 50 {mu}m was performed by using spray coating technique which provided homogeneous deposition on surface. Photo chromic ceramic tiles with high photo chromic activity such as reversibly color change between {delta}E= 0.29 and 26.31 were obtained successfully. The photo chromic performance properties and coloring-bleaching mechanisms were analyzed by spectrophotometer. The microstructures of coatings were investigated both by stereo microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). (Author) 13 refs.

  12. Economics Of Optical Fibre Transmission Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, W. J.

    1983-08-01

    Optical fibre as a telecommunication transmission medium has become one of the most significant developments so far of the digital era. A major contributory factor to the availability of optical fibre transmission systems has been the outstanding progress in the technology of manufacturing high quality glass fibre having relatively low attenuation and broad bandwidths. This and other achievements has enabled manufacturers in the United Kingdom to develop a range of optical fibre cables and transmission equipment for operation over short and long distances at the CCITT recommended digital hierarchical rates of 2, 8, 34 and 140Mbit/s which have been adopted by British Telecom (BT) for modernisation to an all digital transmission network. These optical fibre systems are now becoming increasingly price and performance competitive with conventional technology in many parts of telecommunications networks. In the British Telecom (BT) network the 140Mbit/s optical fibre systems are now economically competitive with equivalent systems on coaxial cable and microwave radio. The economics of 8 and 34Mbit/s systems are not yet sufficiently attractive, compared with 2Mbit/s digital line systems on pair type copper cables, for large scale use in rural and local distribution networks and are presently only justified on cost in and around large cities. As system costs decrease large applications are predicted particularly in support of future high speed data, cable television and visual information services.

  13. Fibre positioning algorithms for the WEAVE spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrett, David L.; Lewis, Ian J.; Dalton, Gavin; Abrams, Don Carlos; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Middleton, Kevin; Trager, Scott C.

    2014-07-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field optical spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. It is a multi-object "pick and place" fibre fed spectrograph with more than one thousand fibres, similar in concept to the Australian Astronomical Observatory's 2dF1 instrument with two observing plates, one of which is observing the sky while other is being reconfigured by a robotic fibre positioner. It will be capable of acquiring more than 10000 star or galaxy spectra a night. The WEAVE positioner concept uses two robots working in tandem in order to reconfigure a fully populated field within the expected 1 hour dwell-time for the instrument (a good match between the required exposure times and the limit of validity for a given configuration due to the effects of differential refraction). This presents additional constraints and complications for the software that determines the optimal path from one configuration to the next, particularly given the large number of fibre crossings implied by the 1000 fibre multiplex. This paper describes the algorithms and programming techniques used in the prototype implementations of the field configuration tool and the fibre positioner robot controller developed to support the detailed design of WEAVE.

  14. Criticality and isostaticity in fibre networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broedersz, Chase P.; Mao, Xiaoming; Lubensky, Tom C.; Mackintosh, Frederick C.

    2011-12-01

    Disordered fibre networks are the basis of many man-made and natural materials, including structural components of living cells and tissue. The mechanical stability of such networks relies on the bending resistance of the fibres, in contrast to rubbers, which are governed by entropic stretching of polymer segments. Although it is known that fibre networks exhibit collective bending deformations, a fundamental understanding of such deformations and their effects on network mechanics has remained elusive. Here we introduce a lattice-based model of fibrous networks with variable connectivity to elucidate the roles of single-fibre elasticity and network structure. These networks exhibit both a low-connectivity rigidity threshold governed by fibre-bending elasticity and a high-connectivity threshold governed by fibre-stretching elasticity. Whereas the former determines the true onset of network rigidity, we show that the latter exhibits rich zero-temperature critical behaviour, including a crossover between various mechanical regimes along with diverging strain fluctuations and a concomitant diverging correlation length.

  15. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.; Im, K.H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this project include the development of analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters, and to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  16. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  17. Beating the forger: authenticating ceramic antiquities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneham, Doreen; Stoneham, Marshall

    2010-09-01

    Today's forger may have skills to match the artists and craftsmen of the past. But can they be exposed by scientific methods? Ceramic antiquities - including pottery, porcelains, and bronzes with a casting core - have long been valued, and demonstrable antiquity is crucial. Thermoluminescence provides key evidence as to when the object was fired. We describe the basic ideas, the methods themselves, and some of the potential limitations. Examples illustrate the remarkable ingenuity of forgers, who are making determined efforts to beat the physics-based tests of authenticity.

  18. Jute fibre reinforced plastic: evaluation of application based properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Sajin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A fibre extracted from jute is a budding component identified for its potential application in composites. It is imperative to evaluate the parametric and property based features to determine its suitability. In this research study, considering the possible application of the fibre composites, the aptness of these fibres are examined with respect to their physical, mechanical [by layered manufacturing technique(LM] and thermal properties. This study focuses on evaluating the properties and behaviour of raw Jute fibres and NaOH surface treated fibres. Subsequently, the fibres are subjected to thermo-gravimetry tests. The outcome of the thermal analysis clearly indicates that the temperature peak shifts to a higher region in the treated fibre compared to raw fibre. The overall observation strongly emphasize that the physical properties and the thermal behaviour of jute fibre are enhanced after surface treatments which makes it more feasible for its application in composite structures.

  19. Scientific Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    As one of the world's largest grain consumers,food security has always been a major concern for the Chinese nation.China must confront the challenge of feeding a fifth of the world's population with less than 9 percent of the planet's arable land.In 2011,China's grain output recorded growth for the eighth successive year,and total production reached an all-time high of 571million tons.In terms of food security,China's goal is to maintain a self-sufficiency rate of above 95 percent.However,an annual net population growth of 7.39 million and the effective decline of the area of farmland in the country,as a result of urbanization,make achieving such selfsufficiency a serious challenge.Given the heavy burden placed on Chinese agriculture,constantly raising productivity by relying on scientific and technological progress has become a priority for China's agricultural sector.The Ministry of Agriculture,for example,has worked to raise China's annual grain yield per-unit area by 1 percent,on average,over the past decade.Last year,the contributory rate of scientific and technological development to China's agriculture reached 52 percent,surpassing the contribution made by land,labor and other production factors for the first time in history.

  20. Loss of type I fibres in canine pectineus muscle hypotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihemelandu, E C

    1980-01-01

    The total number of fibres, as well as, the number of fibres per fibre type were determined by the indirect fibre-counting method in 32 pectineus muscles from 16 dogs of mixed sexes. Eight pairs of muscles from 8 dogs were judged to be hypotrophic, while the other 8 pairs from another 8 dogs were judged to be normal. The hypotrophic muscles had extremely small muscle fibres, particularly type II fibres. They also had apparently higher percentages of type II muscle fibres within a section. The apparently higher percentage of type II fibres usually observed in the hitsochemical examination of the sections of hypotrophic pectineus muscles did not result from failure of type II fibres to transform to type I fibres. It was rather due to too few type I fibres being present in these muscles as compared to the normal muscles. It was not because there were more type II fibres present in them than in the normal muscles. The fewer type I fibres resulted most likely from loss of already differentiated type I fibres. The loss may be of neural origin.

  1. [Optical parameters of Er3+ in oxyfluoride glass ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chen-juan; Chen, Luan; Meng, Chao; Song, Zeng-fu; Wang, Zhi-guang; Meng, Guang-zheng

    2002-08-01

    Recently, in virtue of the develop of the semiconductor laser and the doped laser materials with rare-earth ions, the up-conversion laser with resonant pump has became a scientific subject in great demand. The doped oxyfluoride glass ceramic with rare-earth ions is a very excellent material, its optical property and chemical stability are outstanding. So, absorption spectrum of Er3+ in Fluoroxide glass ceramic was measured, and intensity parameters omega lambda were calculated using Judd-Oflet theory. Some predicted spectroscopic parameters of the excited states, like the spontaneous radiative transition rate, branching ratio and integrated emission cross section were given.

  2. Environment Conscious Ceramics (Ecoceramics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Environment conscious ceramics (Ecoceramics) are a new class of materials, which can be produced with renewable natural resources (wood) or wood wastes (wood sawdust). Silicon carbide-based ecoceramics have been fabricated by reactive infiltration of carbonaceous preforms by molten silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. These carbonaceous preforms have been fabricated by pyrolysis of solid wood bodies at 1000 C. The fabrication approach, microstructure, and mechanical properties of SiC-based ecoceramics are presented. Ecoceramics have tailorable properties and behave like ceramic materials manufactured by conventional approaches.

  3. Displacive Transformation in Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    single cycle[21]. In zirconia , ferroelastic domains appeared during the cubic to tetragonal transformation at -2200’C, where [c] axes were elongated...Mechanism in Tetragonal Zirconia ( TZP ) Ceramics," Adv. in Ceramics 24 (1986) 653-662. 26. K. Mehta, J. F. Jue and A. V. Virkar, "Grinding-Liduced...barium copper oxide (YBa2Cu306+x) and dicalcium silicate (Ca 2 SiO4 ). The cubic to tetragonal transformation in PbTiO3 40 was proven to be

  4. The effect of fibre content, fibre size and alkali treatment to Charpy impact resistance of Oil Palm fibre reinforced composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri, Muhamad; Mahzan, Shahruddin

    2016-11-01

    In this research, the effect of fibre content, fibre size and alkali treatment to the impact resistance of the composite material have been investigated, The composite material employs oil palm fibre as the reinforcement material whereas the matrix used for the composite materials are polypropylene. The Oil Palm fibres are prepared for two conditions: alkali treated fibres and untreated fibres. The fibre sizes are varied in three sizes: 5mm, 7mm and 10mm. During the composite material preparation, the fibre contents also have been varied into 3 different percentages: 5%, 7% and 10%. The statistical approach is used to optimise the variation of specimen determined by using Taguchi method. The results were analyzed also by the Taguchi method and shows that the Oil Palm fibre content is significantly affect the impact resistance of the polymer matrix composite. However, the fibre size is moderately affecting the impact resistance, whereas the fibre treatment is insignificant to the impact resistance of the oil palm fibre reinforced polymer matrix composite.

  5. Crack Growth Monitoring by Embedded Optical Fibre Bragg Grating Sensors: Fibre Reinforced Plastic Crack Growing Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; McGugan, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a novel method to asses a crack growing/damage event in fibre reinforced plastic, or adhesive using Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors embedded in a host material. Different features of the crack mechanism that induce a change in the FBG response were identified. Double Canti...

  6. Magnesium Coated Bioresorbable Phosphate Glass Fibres: Investigation of the Interface between Fibre and Polyester Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioresorbable phosphate glass fibre reinforced polyester composites have been investigated as replacement for some traditional metallic orthopaedic implants, such as bone fracture fixation plates. However, composites tested revealed loss of the interfacial integrity after immersion within aqueous media which resulted in rapid loss of mechanical properties. Physical modification of fibres to change fibre surface morphology has been shown to be an effective method to improve fibre and matrix adhesion in composites. In this study, biodegradable magnesium which would gradually degrade to Mg2+ in the human body was deposited via magnetron sputtering onto bioresorbable phosphate glass fibres to obtain roughened fibre surfaces. Fibre surface morphology after coating was observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM. The roughness profile and crystalline texture of the coatings were determined via atomic force microscope (AFM and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, respectively. The roughness of the coatings was seen to increase from 40±1 nm to 80±1 nm. The mechanical properties (tensile strength and modulus of fibre with coatings decreased with increased magnesium coating thickness.

  7. Hybrid RSOA and fibre raman amplified long reach feeder link for WiMAX-on-fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaya Fernández, Ferney Orlando; Martinez, Javier; Yu, Xianbin;

    2009-01-01

    A distributed fibre Raman amplified long reach optical access feeder link using a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier in the remote base station is experimentally demonstrated for supporting WiMAXover- fibre transmission. The measured values for the error vector magnitude for quadrature ph...

  8. Estimation of Single-fibre Tensile Properties from the Bundle Tensile Curve of Polyester Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于伟东

    2004-01-01

    Fibre bundle tensile curves can be used to characterise fibre processing properties and end-use performance directly and to predict single-fibre properties in theory. In this paper, the tensile behaviour of polyester fibre-bundles has been analysed in characteristic values and diagramming. The characteristic distributions which include the symmetry distribution on right part, SRBS′ (e), on left part, SLBS′(e) and the curve on base-line modification, MBS′ (e),based on the modulus distribution, BS′ (e), as well as the frequency density function of broken fibres, B′ (e), have been derived from the tail of bundle tensile curves. The theoretical and measured results show that the most important curves are MBS′ ( e ) and B′ ( e ) and can be used to estimate the breaking-extension distribution of single fibres. Especially for MBS′(e), the modulus distribution can accurately characterize single-fibre tensile properties and is no limitation as the calculation of B′(e) because the bundle specific stress Y(e) of no fibre breaking at extension e should be found at first.

  9. Strength Evaluation of Steel-Nylon Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maniram Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available When fibres like steel, glass, polypropylene, nylon, carbon, aramid, polyester, jute, etc are mixed with concrete known as fibre reinforced concrete. To overcome the deficiencies of concrete; fibres are added to improve the performance of concrete. In this research hybrid reinforced concrete is made by using steel and nylon 6 fibres. The inclusion of both steel and nylon 6 fibres are used in order to combine the benefits of both fibers; structural improvements provided by steel fibers and the resistance to plastic shrinkage improvements provided by nylon fibers. So the aim of this project is to investigate the mechanical properties (compressive strength, flexure strength and split tensile strength of hybrid fiber reinforced concrete under compression, flexure & tension. The total volume of fibre was taken 0.75 % of total volume of concrete. In this experimental work, four different concrete mix proportions were casted with fibres and one mix without fibres. Four different mix combinations of steel- nylon 6 fibres were 100-00%, 75-25%, 50-50% and 25-75%. Superplasticizer was used in all mixes to make concrete more workable. The results shown that compressive, split tensile and flexural strength of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete increase by increasing quantity of steel and nylon 6 fibres. The increase in compressive and tensile strength due to incorporation of steel fibre is greater than that of using nylon fibre. For the nylon 6 fibres, adding more fibres into the concrete has a limited improvement on splitting tensile strength. Inclusion of nylon 6 fibres along with steel fibres results in considerable improvement in flexural strength as compared to solo steel fibre.

  10. D fibre antenna for microcellular communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatti, Ajaz

    2003-07-01

    Over the years, optical fibre sensors have been developed for many application areas. With the recent growth of microcellular communication systems this area has great economic potential. Therefore with this in mind one promising application for a new optical fibre sensor system is in the detection of Radio Frequency/Electric Fields (RF/EF). By constructing such a sensor from totally dielectric materials, it could be used as an antenna for receiving radio frequency transmissions without distorting or disturbing the field lines since there are no metallic components to reflect or transmit radio frequency energy. One of the key issues in the realisation of Radio-over-Fibre (RoF) architecture is the development of an effective means of generating and transmitting the radio subcarrier. The simplest method for the optical generation of radio signals, for transmission through an optical network is to directly modulate the light source with the received RF signal. Direct modulation of the laser can lead to a number of problems such as relative intensity noise (RIN), chirp and intermodulation distortion (IMD). A novel approach as described in this thesis, for generating an externally modulated optical signal would be to use an optical antenna comprising of a piezoelectric polymer coated D-fibre configured within a Mach-Zehnder interferometer to phase modulate the lightwave with a received RF electrical signal. One of the primary advantages of the D-fibre antenna over conventional antennae is its ability to serve a dual purpose. First it can be used to directly detect the RF signal, and secondly it provides a convenient means for modulating the light within the fibre thus bypassing the need for directly modulating the laser. The work presented in this thesis forms a comprehensive study on the design and modelling of a novel all-optical antenna using D-shaped optical fibre for use in next generation RoF networks. For the first time Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used

  11. Fibre Bragg Grating and Long Period Grating Sensors in Polymer Optical Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundalo, Ivan-Lazar

    of applications and pushing the limits. The first part of the work focuses on the fabrication of FBGs in polymer optical fibres. FBGs are a periodic perturbation of the refractive index of the optical fibre core which act as a wavelength specific reflector. The fibres used are made of Polymethyl methacrylate......, strain duration, increasing number of cycles, and it decreases with relaxation duration. For strains up to 0.9%, fast relaxing ΔΛfast range takes no less than 65% of the total strain range. Increase in ΔΛslow due to cyclic straining and relaxing seems to reach an equilibrium value, suggesting that ΔΛslow...... which translates the outside pressure into strain on the fibre. The transducer consisted of a 3Dprinted skeleton through which the fibre is pulled. A latex material is then wrapped around it and all the holes were sealed in order to prevent the air from leaking out. The pod transducer was tested...

  12. Study of the behaviour of the fibre Bragg grating fabricated with cladding mode suppression fibre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐新华; 吕昌贵; 崔一平

    2003-01-01

    One effective method for suppression of coupling from guided optical modes into cladding modes in an optical fibre Bragg grating is to use cladding mode suppression fibre.In this specially engineered fibre,the grating is written into the core and the inner cladding,both of which are photosensitive.A theory is presented in this paper to analyse the spectral characteristics of this kind of gratings.A fibre Bragg grating was experimentally fabricated with this kind of photosensitive fibre(PS-RMS-50 from StockerYale).It is shown both theoretically and experimentally that such gratings exhibit strong suppression of the coupling between core mode and cladding mode.The experimental result is in good agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  13. Hemp fibres: Enzymatic effect of microbial processing on fibre bundle structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Liu, Ming; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of microbial pretreatment on hemp fibres were evaluated after microbial retting using the white rot fungi Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Phlebia radiata Cel 26 and water retting. Based on chemical composition, P. radiata Cel 26 showed the highest selectivity for pectin and lignin...... degradation and lowest cellulose loss (14%) resulting in the highest cellulose content (78.4%) for the treated hemp fibres. The pectin and lignin removal after treatment with P. radiata Cel 26 were of the order 82% and 50%, respectively. Aligned epoxy-matrix composites were made from hemp fibres defibrated...... hemp fibres were badly impregnated due to porosity caused by surface impurities such as epidermis and other pectin rich plant cells. The pectin and lignin mainly located in the outer part of the fibres were assumed to be extracted and degraded by pectinase and peroxidase enzymes produced by the fungi....

  14. Polarisation maintaining fibre with pure silica core and two depressed claddings for fibre optic gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatov, A. M.; Kurbatov, R. A.; Voloshin, V. V.; Vorob'ev, I. L.; Kolosovsky, A. O.

    2016-12-01

    Polarisation maintaining (PM) fibre is described with pure silica core and two depressed claddings for fibre optic gyro (FOG) sensing coil. Detailed mathematical simulation is presented by supermodes method, which is extremely necessary for such fibre. Simulation is fulfilled by frequency domain finite difference method (FDFDM), taking into account all details of realistic index profile with stress applying parts, while the leakage/bend loss occur in the region with complex index, surrounding the fibre. Cutoff and small bend loss are theoretically predicted and experimentally measured with excellent agreement between theory and experiment. Polarisation maintaining ability is measured in the form of conventional h-parameter (7.1·10-6 1/m) for 90-μm diameter fibre with birefringence value only 3.9·10-4.

  15. DESIGN NOTE: Surface microscopy and fibre characterization using a multimode-fibre reflectance microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukins, P. B.; Rehman, S.; Stevens, G. B.

    2000-04-01

    A remarkably simple scanning infrared surface-reflectance microscope based on a multimode-fibre-coupled diode laser together with straightforward electronics and scanning stage is described. The design does not require alignment and completely avoids the use of objectives, beamsplitters and other optics normally associated with such microscopes. The axial response, resolution and imaging properties for non-interferometric operation are characterized. A geometric model for the transmission of such a microscope using an idealized step/graded-index multimode fibre is presented. This model is used to explain the axial response of the microscope. Finally, a new method for determination of the numerical aperture and index-grading parameter of multimode fibres is proposed. This method is based on the geometric model together with axial-response measurements using the microscope in such a way that the fibre probe is the actual test fibre.

  16. Mechanical processing of bast fibres: The occurrence of damage and its effect on fibre structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hänninen, Tuomas; Thygesen, Anders; Mehmood, Shahid

    2012-01-01

    Currently, separation processes used for natural fibres for composite reinforcing textiles cause a significant amount of damage to the fibres. Microscopic analysis showed that industrially processed flax (Linum usitassimium L.) fibres contained significantly more defects than green or retted ones...... and that further mechanical processing did not significantly increase the amount of defects. In this study it has been shown, by analysing the degree of polymerisation of cell wall components indirectly by viscosity measurements, that mechanically induced defects do not significantly cleave the cell wall polymers....... Acid hydrolysis, however, induced more degradation of the cell wall polymers in fibres having a greater degree of damage, indicating that that defects are more susceptible to certain chemical reactions and which in turn might cause problems for example, during chemical modification of fibres due...

  17. Effects of Polarization-Maintaining Fibre Degrading on Precision of Fibre Optic Gyroscopes in Radiation Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Wen; LIU De-Wen; LIU Yang; YI Xiao-Su; CONG Lin

    2008-01-01

    @@ In the space environment, the precision of fibre optic gyroscopes (FOGs) degrades because of space radiation.Photonic components of FOGs axe affected by radiation, especially the polaxization-maintaining (PM) fibre coil.In relation to the space radiation environment characteristic, we have carried out a series of radiation experiments on a PM fibre coil with 60Co radiation source at different dose rates. Based on the experimental results, the formula between the PM-fibre loss and radiation dose rata is built, and the relation between the precision of FOG and radiation dose is obtained accordingly. The results strongly show that the precision of our FOG degrades owing to the attenuation of the polarization-maintaining fibre, which provides theoretical foundation for the radiation-resistant design of the FOG.

  18. Strength degradation mechanisms in h-BN/NiAl coated sapphire fibres with a reactive Hf or Y interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajas, D.E. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH-Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 16, 52074 Aachen (Germany)], E-mail: hajas@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Kyrsta, S. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH-Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 16, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Richter, S.; Mayer, J. [Central Facility of Electron Microscopy, RWTH-Aachen University, Ahornstrasse 55, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Schneider, J.M. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH-Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 16, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    NiAl strengthened with ceramic fibres is considered as a load-bearing component in the combustion zone turbine blades. Sapphire fibres coated with hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) and Y (or Hf) interlayers and NiAl were investigated to strengthen the fibre matrix interface by compound formation with the transition metals introduced. Our goal is to identify strength degradation relevant mechanisms active during composite formation and application. Therefore, the tensile strength of coated fibres before and after annealing was measured to simulate the effect of composite fabrication. Strength degradation mechanisms were identified by electron microscopy. Chemical reactions between Y or Hf and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as surface diffusion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} into irregularities in the adjacent coating, alter the surface morphology and may act as crack initiation sites. Based on these results, future strategies for avoiding or minimizing strength degradation during production of intermetallic matrix composites (IMCs) can be compiled.

  19. Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention, Conference, Keramik Museum, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Invited conference speaker, Westerwald Keramik Museum, August 2009. Paper title: Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention.\\ud \\ud This paper will examine the integration of non-ceramic media into the discourse of ceramics.

  20. Voronoi cells, fractal dimensions and fibre composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerscales, J.; Guild, F. J.; Pearce, N. R. L.; Russell, P. M.

    2001-02-01

    The use of fibre-reinforced polymer matrix composite materials is growing at a faster rate than the gross domestic product (GDP) in many countries. An improved understanding of their processing and mechanical behaviour would extend the potential applications of these materials. For unidirectional composites, it is predicted that localized absence of fibres is related to longitudinal compression failure. The use of woven reinforcements permits more effective manufacture than for unidirectional fibres. It has been demonstrated experimentally that compression strengths of woven composites are reduced when fibres are clustered. Summerscales predicted that clustering of fibres would increase the permeability of the reinforcement and hence expedite the processing of these materials. Commercial fabrics are available which employ this concept using flow-enhancing bound tows. The net effect of clustering fibres is to enhance processability whilst reducing the mechanical properties. The effects reported above were qualitative correlations. To improve the design tools for reinforcement fabrics we have sought to quantify the changes in the micro/meso-structure of woven reinforcement fabrics. Gross differences in the appearance of laminate sections are apparent for different weave styles. The use of automated image analysis is essential for the quantification of subtle changes in fabric architecture. This paper considers Voronoi tessellation and fractal dimensions for the quantification of the microstructures of woven fibre-reinforced composites. It reviews our studies in the last decade of the process-property-structure relationships for commercial and experimental fabric reinforcements in an attempt to resolve the processing vs. properties dilemma. A new flow-enhancement concept has been developed which has a reduced impact on laminate mechanical properties.

  1. Latest developments in silica fibre luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D. A.; Abdul S, S. F.; Jafari, S. M.; Alanazi, A. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, GU2 7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Amouzad M, G. [University of Malaya, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Lightwave Research Group, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Addul R, H. A.; Mizanur R, A. K. M.; Zubair, H. T.; Begum, M.; Yusoff, Z.; Omar, N. Y. M. [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, 2010 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Maah, M. J. [University of Malaya, Department of Chemistry, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Collin, S. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 OLW Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mat-Sharif, K. A.; Muhd-Yassin, S. Z.; Zulkifli, M. I., E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.uk [Telekom Malaysia Research and Development Sdn Bhd., 63000 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Using tailor made sub-mm diameter doped-silica fibres, we are carrying out luminescence dosimetry studies for a range of situations, including thermoluminescence (Tl)investigations on a liquid alpha source formed of {sup 223}RaCl (the basis of the Bayer Health care product Xofigo), the Tl response to a 62 MeV proton source and Tl response to irradiation from an {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. In regard to the former, in accord with the intrinsic high linear energy transfer (Let) and short path length (<100 um) of the α-particles in calcified tissue, the product is in part intended as a bone-seeking radionuclide for treatment of metastatic cancer, offering high specificity and efficacy. The Tl yield of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} fibres has been investigated including for photonic crystal fibre un collapsed, flat fibres and single mode fibres, these systems offering many advantages over conventional passive dosimetry types. In particular, one can mention comparable and even superior sensitivity, an effective atomic number Z{sub eff} of the silica dosimetric material close to that of bone, and the glassy nature of the fibres offering the additional advantage of being able to place such dosimeters directly into liquid environments. Finally we review the use of our tailor made fibres for on-line radioluminescence measurements of radiotherapy beams. The outcome from these various lines of research is expected to inform development of doped fiber radiation dosimeters of versatile utility, ranging from clinical applications through to industrial studies and environmental evaluations. (Author)

  2. Influence of the Testing Gage Length on the Strength, Young's Modulus and Weibull Modulus of Carbon Fibres and Glass Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Claudio Pardini

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibres and glass fibres are reinforcements for advanced composites and the fiber strength is the most influential factor on the strength of the composites. They are essentially brittle and fail with very little reduction in cross section. Composites made with these fibres are characterized by a high strength/density ratio and their properties are intrisically related to their microstructure, i.e., amount and orientation of the fibres, surface treatment, among other factors. Processing parameters have an important role in the fibre mechanical behaviour (strength and modulus. Cracks, voids and impurities in the case of glass fibres and fibrillar misalignments in the case of carbon fibres are created during processing. Such inhomogeneities give rise to an appreciable scatter in properties. The most used statistical tool that deals with this characteristic variability in properties is the Weibull distribution. The present work investigates the influence of the testing gage length on the strength, Young's modulus and Weibull modulus of carbon fibres and glass fibres. The Young's modulus is calculated by two methods: (i ASTM D 3379M, and (ii interaction between testing equipment/specimen The first method resulted in a Young modulus of 183 GPa for carbon fibre, and 76 GPa for glass fibre. The second method gave a Young modulus of 250 GPa for carbon fibre and 50 GPa for glass fibre. These differences revelead differences on how the interaction specimen/testing machine can interfere in the Young modulus calculations. Weibull modulus can be a tool to evaluate the fibre's homogeneity in terms of properties and it is a good quality control parameter during processing. In the range of specimen gage length tested the Weibull modulus for carbon fibre is ~ 3.30 and for glass fibres is ~ 5.65, which indicates that for the batch of fibres tested, the glass fibre is more uniform in properties.

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-05-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  4. Nanocrystalline and Nanoporous Ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, Henk

    1996-01-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanoporous ceramics, renowned for their special transport properties, have typical applications in the fields of energy, the environment, and separation technology. One example is a solid oxide fuel cell, where an anode with improved characteristics was obtained by an optimized n

  5. Transformation Toughening of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    chanical twing of ualaneeting Ceramica at High Temperatures. ILondo, Patigue-crack growth in overaged and partially stabi- U.K., 198.""IS. Itoribe... Ceramica " Chapter 18 In Mechanical Prop- ŗR. M. !AcMeeding and A. 0. Evans, ’Mechanics of Transformation ertles of Engineering Ceramics. Edited by W.W

  6. Statistic><Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2008-01-01

    Co-organizer for and participant at the exhibition: Statistic><Ceramics The Röhsska Museum of Design and Decorative Arts; Gothenborg 5/2-16/3 2008 Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg 3/4-27/4 2008...

  7. GLUT4 expression at the plasma membrane is related to fibre volume in human skeletal muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Vach, W; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2002-01-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between GLUT4 expression at the plasma membrane and muscle fibre size in fibre-typed human muscle fibres by immunocytochemistry and morphometry in order to gain further insight into the regulation of GLUT4 expression. At the site of the plasma membrane......, GLUT4 was more abundantly expressed in slow as compared to fast fibres at the same fibre diameter (p diabetic and obese was reduced...... compared to control subjects at the same diameter (p diabetic subjects expressed a fibre-volume-dependent GLUT4 expression (p diabetic p = 0.06). Our results show that increasing...

  8. Plant fibre composites - porosity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Thygesen, Anders; Lilholt, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Plant fibre composites contain typically a relatively large amount of porosity which influences their performance. A model, based on a modified rule of mixtures, is presented to include the influence of porosity on the composite stiffness. The model integrates the volumetric composition of the co......Plant fibre composites contain typically a relatively large amount of porosity which influences their performance. A model, based on a modified rule of mixtures, is presented to include the influence of porosity on the composite stiffness. The model integrates the volumetric composition...... of the composites with their mechanical properties. The fibre weight fraction is used as an independent parameter to calculate the complete volumetric composition. A maximum obtainable stiffness of the composites is calculated at a certain transition fibre weight fraction, which is characterised by a best possible...... combination of high fibre volume fraction and low porosity. The model is validated with experimental data from the literature on several types of composites. A stiffness diagram is presented to demonstrate that the calculations can be used for tailoring and design of composites with a given profile...

  9. A large Scintillating Fibre Tracker for LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greim, R.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb experiment will be upgraded during LHC Long Shutdown 2 to be able to record data at a higher instantaneous luminosity. The readout rate is currently limited to 1 MHz by the Level 1 trigger. In order to achieve the target integrated luminosity of 50 fb-1 during LHC Run 3, all subdetectors have to be read out by a 40 MHz trigger-less readout system. Especially, the current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet suffer from large detector dead times and a small granularity in the Outer Tracker, which consists of proportional straw tubes. Therefore, the Downstream Tracker will be replaced by a Scintillating Fibre Tracker with Silicon Photomultiplier readout. The total sensitive area of 340 m2 is made up of 2.5 m long fibre mats consisting of six staggered layers of 250 μm thin scintillating fibres. The scintillation light created by the charged particles traversing the fibre mats is transported to the fibre ends via total internal reflection and detected by state-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays. This paper presents the detector concept, design, challenges, custom-made readout chips, as well as laboratory and beam test results.

  10. Influence of Slip on the Plateau-Rayleigh Instability on a Fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Haefner, Sabrina; Baümchen, Oliver; Salez, Thomas; Peters, Robert; McGraw, Joshua D; Jacobs, Karin; Raphaël, Elie; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Glistening pearls of water on a spider's web, or the breakup of a cylindrical jet of water into droplets, are familiar manifestations of the Plateau-Rayleigh instability (PRI). By evolving into droplets, the surface area of the liquid, and consequently the surface energy, are reduced. This instability also acts for a liquid film coating a solid fibre, though the flow boundary condition at the solid-liquid interface provides additional complexity to the system. While the breakup of a homogenous film into droplets on a fibre may be a nuisance in coating technologies of e.g. wires and optical fibres, this fundamental instability turns out to be very useful: take for example water collection through fog harvesting, a biomimetic approach that is perfected in nature by the spider's web. Here, we take advantage of the PRI on a fibre to gain physical insight into the solid-liquid boundary condition. Indeed, understanding the break-down of the no-slip boundary condition is of major interest to the scientific and indus...

  11. Ceramic tubesheet design analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    A transport combustor is being commissioned at the Southern Services facility in Wilsonville, Alabama to provide a gaseous product for the assessment of hot-gas filtering systems. One of the barrier filters incorporates a ceramic tubesheet to support candle filters. The ceramic tubesheet, designed and manufactured by Industrial Filter and Pump Manufacturing Company (EF&PM), is unique and offers distinct advantages over metallic systems in terms of density, resistance to corrosion, and resistance to creep at operating temperatures above 815{degrees}C (1500{degrees}F). Nevertheless, the operational requirements of the ceramic tubesheet are severe. The tubesheet is almost 1.5 m in (55 in.) in diameter, has many penetrations, and must support the weight of the ceramic filters, coal ash accumulation, and a pressure drop (one atmosphere). Further, thermal stresses related to steady state and transient conditions will occur. To gain a better understanding of the structural performance limitations, a contract was placed with Mallett Technology, Inc. to perform a thermal and structural analysis of the tubesheet design. The design analysis specification and a preliminary design analysis were completed in the early part of 1995. The analyses indicated that modifications to the design were necessary to reduce thermal stress, and it was necessary to complete the redesign before the final thermal/mechanical analysis could be undertaken. The preliminary analysis identified the need to confirm that the physical and mechanical properties data used in the design were representative of the material in the tubesheet. Subsequently, few exploratory tests were performed at ORNL to evaluate the ceramic structural material.

  12. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  13. EDITORIAL: Optical Fibre Sensors 18 (OFS-18)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Julian D. C.; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2007-10-01

    The International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors (OFS-18) was held in October 2006 in Cancún, Mexico, under the general chairmanship of Dr Alexis Mendez (MCH Engineering LLC, USA) and Dr Fernando Mendoza (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico). 'OFS', as it has become known, is firmly established as the leading international conference for the optical fibre sensor community. Since its inception, in London in 1983, and under the leadership of an international steering committee independent of any learned society or professional institution, it has been held approximately every eighteen months. The venue nominally rotates from Europe, to the Americas, and thence to Asia and the Pacific. OFS-18 demonstrated the continuing vigour of the community, with some 250 papers presented, plus two workshops, with attendance as international as ever. In recent years, it has become a tradition to publish a post-conference special issue in the journal Measurement Science and Technology, and these special issues offer a representative sample of the current status of the field. In the nearly 25 years since OFS began, many of the early ideas and laboratory-based proof-of-principle experiments have led to highly developed instrumentation systems, and to successful commercial products. Perhaps the most mature of all of these technologies is the optical fibre gyroscope, with the fibre hydrophone a close second—originally developed for defence applications for which it is now established, but with increasing relevance to the oil and gas industry; electromagnetic sensors based on the Faraday and electro-optic effects are of growing significance in the power generation and distribution industry; whilst in-fibre grating-based sensors occupy an expanding niche in structural monitoring, especially in civil engineering. It is therefore appropriate that the first day of OFS was devoted to workshops on structural health monitoring, and to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the

  14. Fatigue processes in thermoplastic fibres; Les mecanismes de fatigue dans les fibres thermoplastiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera Ramirez, J.M.

    2004-09-15

    The present study examines and compares the behaviour of the two types of PA66 fibres and two types of PET fibres under fatigue loading up to failure, and the correlation between the fibres (nano)structures and their structural heterogeneities, with fatigue lifetimes. Several techniques have been used to analyze the materials, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), microanalysis (EDS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. A meticulous analysis by scanning electron microscopy of the fracture morphology of fibres broken in tension and in fatigue, as well as a study of the fatigue life, were undertaken. The fatigue process occurs when the cyclic load amplitude is sufficiently large, however a condition for fatigue failure is that the minimum load each cycle must be lower than a threshold stress level. Failure under fatigue conditions leads to distinctive fracture morphologies which are very different from those seen after tensile or creep failure and this allows easy identification of the fatigue process. The fibres have been analyzed in the as received state and after fatigue failure in order to observe the microstructural changes resulting from the fatigue loading. The results will be compared with those obtained for fibres loaded under conditions where the fatigue process was hindered. The role of the microstructure of the fibres in determining fatigue will be discussed in this work and the possibility of improving their resistance to fatigue or eliminating the fatigue process will be discussed. (author)

  15. Study of injection moulded long glass fibre-reinforced polypropylene and the effect on the fibre length and orientation distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveeen, B.; Caton-Rose, P.; Costa, F.; Jin, X.; Hine, P.

    2014-05-01

    Long glass fibre (LGF) composites are extensively used in manufacturing to produce components with enhanced mechanical properties. Long fibres with length 12 to 25mm are added to a thermoplastic matrix. However severe fibre breakage can occur in the injection moulding process resulting in shorter fibre length distribution (FLD). The majority of this breakage occurs due to the melt experiencing extreme shear stress during the preparation and injection stage. Care should be taken to ensure that the longer fibres make it through the injection moulding process without their length being significantly degraded. This study is based on commercial 12 mm long glass-fibre reinforced polypropylene (PP) and short glass fibre Nylon. Due to the semi-flexiable behaviour of long glass fibres, the fibre orientation distribution (FOD) will differ from the orientation distribution of short glass fibre in an injection molded part. In order to investigate the effect the change in fibre length has on the fibre orientation distribution or vice versa, FOD data was measured using the 2D section image analyser. The overall purpose of the research is to show how the orientation distribution chnages in an injection moulded centre gated disc and end gated plaque geometry and to compare this data against fibre orientation predictions obtained from Autodesk Moldflow Simulation Insight.

  16. Pulse Compression And Raman Amplification In Optical Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Kevin C.

    1988-06-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on Raman amplification in fibres have been carried out and simultaneous amplification and pulse compression observed. With a fibre design optimised for amplification high gain may be obtained at practical pump power levels.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Man-Made Mineral glass fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Majbritt Deichgræber; Yue, Yuanzheng

    In nature basaltic volcanic glass fibres are know from Hawaii as Pele's hair, formed by droplets of lava thrown into the air during volcanic eruption. The concept of glass fibre formation by an air stream dragging fibres from drops of melt is copied in industry to form basaltic glass wool fibres......; man-made mineral glass fibres. The basaltic melt is prevented from crystallizing due to the high cooling rate, forming the mineral glass wool fibres. Basaltic mineral wool fibres are of high interest in industry due to their good chemical durability and excellent heat and sound insulation properties...... of the information gained from the mechanical tests, fracture characteristics of individual glass fibres are imaged by scanning electron microscopy. The fracture surfaces showed to fall in three groups; 1) surfaces including fracture mirror, mist and hackle, 2) bend fracture surfaces and 3) surfaces including pores...

  18. Fibre-Optic Strain Measurement For Structural Integrity Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, A.J.A.; Zuylen, P. van; Lamberts, C.W.; Krijger, A.J.T. de

    1984-01-01

    A method is demonstrated for monitoring the structural integrity of large structures, using an optical fibre. The strain distribution along the structure is monitored by measuring the attentuation of light along the length of the fibre.

  19. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Aligned Natural Fibre Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten

    properties (stiffness-to-density ratio). The perspective of using natural fibres is to have a sustainable, biodegradable, CO2-neutral alternative to glass fibres. However, so far, it has not been possible to take full advantage of the natural fibre properties when using them for composite applications......Recently, there has been a great interest in developing and maturing natural fibre composites for structural applications. Natural fibres derived from plants such as flax and hemp have the potential to compete with traditional glass fibres as reinforcements in polymer matrices, due to good specific....... Several challenges have to be addressed and solved, many of which pertain to the fact that the fibres are sourced from a natural resource: 1) Inconsistent properties, depending on plant species, growth and harvest conditions, and fibre extraction techniques. 2) Strength values of composites are lower than...

  20. On the behaviour of gelled fibre suspensions in steady shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Bettina [Unilever Corporate Research, Bedford (United Kingdom); University of Nottingham, Division of Food Sciences, Loughborough (United Kingdom); White, Duncan; Melrose, John R.; Frith, William J. [Unilever Corporate Research, Bedford (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-15

    The shear rheological properties of suspensions of gelled agar fibres in a low viscosity Newtonian matrix fluid were investigated. Two classes of fibres, low aspect ratio fibres and high aspect ratio fibres with an aspect ratio of the order of 10 and 100 respectively were included in the investigations. For all fibre phase volumes investigated, from as low as 0.01 upwards, the flow curves are characterised by an apparent yield stress followed by shear-thinning which was independent of the fibre aspect ratio. Based on our analysis of the flow curves, we conclude that the high aspect ratio fibres behave like flexible threads in contrast to the low aspect ratio fibres whose high shear relative viscosity is successfully described by a relation for long rigid rods. These findings are supported by flow visualisation using an optical shearing stage coupled to a light microscope. (orig.)

  1. Rare Earth Doped Optical Fibre From Oxide Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minati Chatterjee; Aharon Gedanken; Renata Reisfeld; Ranjan Sen; Mrinmay Pal; Milan Naskar; Mukul Paul; Shyamal Bhadra; Kamal Dasgupta; Dibyendu Ganguli; Tarun Bandyopadhyay

    2003-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) doped optical fibres were fabricated by using RE oxides coated silica nanoparticles. The fibre properties are comparable to those prepared by conventional techniques. The process offers better control over RE incorporation and homogeneity in the preform.

  2. Special Polymer Optical Fibres and Devices for Photonic Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang-Ding Peng

    2003-01-01

    Remarkable progresses have been made in developing special polymer optical fibres and devices for photonic applications in recent years. This presentation will mainly report on the development of electro-optic, photosensitive and photorefractive polymer optical fibres and related devices.

  3. Manufacturing Titanium Metal Matrix Composites by Consolidating Matrix Coated Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Xin PENG

    2005-01-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) reinforced by continuous silicon carbide fibres are being developed for aerospace applications. TiMMCs manufactured by the consolidation of matrix-coated fibre (MCF) method offer optimum properties because of the resulting uniform fibre distribution, minimum fibre damage and fibre volume fraction control. In this paper, the consolidation of Ti-6Al-4V matrix-coated SiC fibres during vacuum hot pressing has been investigated. Experiments were carried out on multi-ply MCFs under vacuum hot pressing (VHP). In contrast to most of existing studies, the fibre arrangement has been carefully controlled either in square or hexagonal arraysthroughout the consolidated sample. This has enabled the dynamic consolidation behaviour of MCFs to be demonstrated by eliminating the fibre re-arrangement during the VHP process. The microstructural evolution of the matrix coating was reported and the deformation mechanisms involved were discussed.

  4. Turbulence hierarchy in a random fibre laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Iván R. Roa; Lima, Bismarck C.; Pincheira, Pablo I. R.; Brum, Arthur A.; Macêdo, Antônio M. S.; Vasconcelos, Giovani L.; de S. Menezes, Leonardo; Raposo, Ernesto P.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Kashyap, Raman

    2017-05-01

    Turbulence is a challenging feature common to a wide range of complex phenomena. Random fibre lasers are a special class of lasers in which the feedback arises from multiple scattering in a one-dimensional disordered cavity-less medium. Here we report on statistical signatures of turbulence in the distribution of intensity fluctuations in a continuous-wave-pumped erbium-based random fibre laser, with random Bragg grating scatterers. The distribution of intensity fluctuations in an extensive data set exhibits three qualitatively distinct behaviours: a Gaussian regime below threshold, a mixture of two distributions with exponentially decaying tails near the threshold and a mixture of distributions with stretched-exponential tails above threshold. All distributions are well described by a hierarchical stochastic model that incorporates Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence, which includes energy cascade and the intermittence phenomenon. Our findings have implications for explaining the remarkably challenging turbulent behaviour in photonics, using a random fibre laser as the experimental platform.

  5. TAIPAN fibre feed and spectrograph: engineering overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Nicholas F.; Lawrence, Jon; Zhelem, Ross; Content, Robert; Churilov, Vladimir; Case, Scott; Brown, Rebecca; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kuehn, Kyler; Pai, Naveen; Klauser, Urs; Nichani, Vijay; Waller, Lew

    2016-07-01

    TAIPAN will conduct a stellar and galaxy survey of the Southern sky. The TAIPAN positioner is being developed as a prototype for the MANIFEST instrument on the GMT. The TAIPAN Spectrograph is an AAO designed all-refractive 2-arm design that delivers a spectral resolution of R>2000 over the wavelength range 370-870 nm. It is fed by a custom fibre cable from the TAIPAN Starbugs positioner. The design for TAIPAN incorporates 150 optical fibres (with an upgrade path to 300). Presented is an engineering overview of the UKST Fibre Cable design used to support Starbugs, the custom slit design, and the overall design and build plan for the TAIPAN Spectrograph.

  6. Development of SERS active fibre sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Polwart, E

    2002-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is sensitive and selective and when coupled with fibre-optics could potentially produce an effective chemical sensing system. This thesis concerns the development of a single-fibre-based sensor, with an integral SERS-active substrate. A number of different methods for the manufacture of SERS-active surfaces on glass substrates were investigated and compared. The immobilisation of metal nanoparticles on glass functionalised with (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane emerged as a suitable approach for the production of sensors. Substrates prepared by this approach were characterised using UV-visible spectroscopy, electron microscopy and Raman mapping. It was found that exposure of substrates to laser radiation led to a decrease in the signal recorded from adsorbed analytes. This speed of the decrease was shown to depend on the analyte, and the exciting wavelength and power. SERS-active fibre sensors were produced by immobilisation of silver nanoparticles at the distal end of a...

  7. Optical fibre cantilever sensor for biological application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Zhou, Y. X.; Patterson, G.; Shu, W. M.; Maier, R. R. J.; Fowler, R.; Hand, D. P.; MacPherson, W. N.

    2014-05-01

    Micro-cantilever sensors have shown great promise in a wide range of application are as including chemical and biological sensing. However, many of these devices are based upon a sensor `chip' that requires careful alignment between the cantilever and the read-out system, which can be challenging. Furthermore, optical interrogation typically involves a bulky free-space system. Optical fibre addressed cantilevers have been reported previously in the literature and in this paper we propose techniques to design and fabricate polymer micro-cantilevers for attachment onto the end of standard single mode fibres using laser machining. Low-cost optical sources and a fibre coupled spectrometer are employed to monitor the cantilever deflection and therefore observe biological binding between a species of interest and an activated cantilever. Proof-of-concept experiments show that the sensor is capable of detecting pathogen concentration with down to a level of 105cfu/ml.

  8. Secure Communication System Basedon Chaosin Optical Fibre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pak L Chu; Fan Zhang; William Mak; Robust Lai

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recently, there have been intense research activities on the study of synchronized chaos generated by fibre lasers [1] and its application to secure communication systems . So far, all studies concentrate on two aspects:[2].So far,all studies concentrate on two aspects:(1) the effect of the transmission channel between the transmitter and the receiver has been neglected, and (2)the chaos and the signal are carried by one wavelength.Both theoretical and experimental investigations make these two assumptions. In the experiments, the transmission fibre is invariably short, in the order of tens of metres. Hence its dispersion and nonlinear effects are negligible. The fibre laser responsible for the generation of chaos is often designed to lase at one wavelength only.

  9. Space Division Multiplexing in Optical Fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, D J; Nelson, L E

    2013-01-01

    Optical communications technology has made enormous and steady progress for several decades, providing the key resource in our increasingly information-driven society and economy. Much of this progress has been in finding innovative ways to increase the data carrying capacity of a single optical fibre. In this search, researchers have explored (and close to maximally exploited) every available degree of freedom, and even commercial systems now utilize multiplexing in time, wavelength, polarization, and phase to speed more information through the fibre infrastructure. Conspicuously, one potentially enormous source of improvement has however been left untapped in these systems: fibres can easily support hundreds of spatial modes, but today's commercial systems (single-mode or multi-mode) make no attempt to use these as parallel channels for independent signals.

  10. Mineral fibre problems: a management view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, H D

    1980-01-01

    Fibre is a form of matter that imparts exclusive properties to end-products; however, most fibres have been associated with health problems. Although management has a responsibility to ensure the safety of products and processes, data on which to base risk-equation decisions are often inadequate. The limitations of current dust measurement technology suggest that apparently precise numerical exposure data are as subjective as use of the terms 'heavy', 'moderate' or 'light'. Control of any useful but hazardous material is preferable to the ultimate sanction of prohibition. The man-made mineral fibre industry and national and international regulatory agencies should learn from the asbestos industry. It is suggested that a process of consultation, rather than one of confrontation, is more likely to produce widely acceptable solutions in each generation.

  11. Laser acceleration... now with added fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Laser acceleration technology is plagued by two main issues: efficiency and repetition rates. In other words, lasers consume too much power and cannot sustain accelerating particles long enough to produce collisions. ICAN, a new EU-funded project, is examining how fibre lasers may help physicists tackle these issues.   A diode-pumped fibre laser. (Image courtesy of Laser Zentrum Hannover.) The International Coherent Amplification Network (ICAN) is studying the potential of lasers for collision physics. CERN is a beneficiary of the project and will collaborate with 15 other institutes from around the world, including KEK in Japan, Fermilab in the USA, and DESY in Germany. “The network is looking into existing fibre laser technology, which we believe has fantastic potential for accelerators,” says Gerard Mourou, ICAN co-ordinator at the École Polytechnique in France. “The hope is to make laser acceleration competitive with traditional radio-fre...

  12. Interfaces between a fibre and its matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilholt, Hans; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2017-01-01

    The interface between a fibre and its matrix represents an important element in the characterization and exploitation of composite materials. Both theoretical models and analyses of experimental data have been presented in the literature since modern composite were developed and many experiments...... have been performed. A large volume of results for a wide range of composite systems exists, but rather little comparison and potential consistency have been reached for fibres and/or for matrices. Recently a materials mechanics approach has been presented to describe the interface by three parameters...... in polyester matrix. The analysis of existing experimental literature data is demonstrated for steel fibres in epoxy matrix and for tungsten wires in copper matrix. These latter incomplete analyses show that some results can be obtained even if all three experimental parameters are not recorded....

  13. Ceramic Stereolithography: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics by Photopolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic stereolithography and related additive manufacturing methods involving photopolymerization of ceramic powder suspensions are reviewed in terms of the capabilities of current devices. The practical fundamentals of the cure depth, cure width, and cure profile are related to the optical properties of the monomer, ceramic, and photo-active components. Postpolymerization steps, including harvesting and cleaning the objects, binder burnout, and sintering, are discussed and compared with conventional methods. The prospects for practical manufacturing are discussed.

  14. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  15. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  16. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louiza B Thomsen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A TTX-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none tetrodotoxin (TTX -sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than one second affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette.

  17. FOAM CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT BY BASALT FIBRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors demonstrate that the foam concrete performance can be improved by dispersed reinforcement, including methods that involve basalt fibres. They address the results of the foam concrete modeling technology and assess the importance of technology-related parameters. Reinforcement efficiency criteria are also provided in the article. Dispersed reinforcement improves the plasticity of the concrete mix and reduces the settlement crack formation rate. Conventional reinforcement that involves metal laths and rods demonstrates its limited application in the production of concrete used for thermal insulation and structural purposes. Dispersed reinforcement is preferable. This technology contemplates the infusion of fibres into porous mixes. Metal, polymeric, basalt and glass fibres are used as reinforcing components. It has been identified that products reinforced by polypropylene fibres demonstrate substantial abradability and deformability rates even under the influence of minor tensile stresses due to the low adhesion strength of polypropylene in the cement matrix. The objective of the research was to develop the type of polypropylene of D500 grade that would demonstrate the operating properties similar to those of Hebel and Ytong polypropylenes. Dispersed reinforcement was performed by the basalt fibre. This project contemplates an autoclave-free technology to optimize the consumption of electricity. Dispersed reinforcement is aimed at the reduction of the block settlement in the course of hardening at early stages of their operation, the improvement of their strength and other operating properties. Reduction in the humidity rate of the mix is based on the plasticizing properties of fibres, as well as the application of the dry mineralization method. Selection of optimal parameters of the process-related technology was performed with the help of G-BAT-2011 Software, developed at Moscow State University of Civil Engineering. The authors also

  18. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys.

  19. Zeonex Microstructured Polymer Optical Fibre Bragg Grating Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Fasano, Andrea; Markos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated an endlessly single mode and humidity insensitive Zeonex microstructured polymer optical fibre (mPOF) for fibre Bragg grating (FBG) temperature and strain sensors. We inscribed and characterise FBGs in Zeonex mPOF for the first time.......We fabricated an endlessly single mode and humidity insensitive Zeonex microstructured polymer optical fibre (mPOF) for fibre Bragg grating (FBG) temperature and strain sensors. We inscribed and characterise FBGs in Zeonex mPOF for the first time....

  20. Fibre Bragg Grating Components for Filtering, Switching and Lasing

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) are key components for a vast number of applications in optical communication systems, microwave photonics systems, and optical sensors, etc. The main topic of this thesis is fibre Bragg grating fabrication and applications in direct microwave optical filtering, high speed switching and switchable dual-wavelength fibre lasers. First, a brief overview is given about the photosensitivity in optical fibre, basic FBG fabrication techniques, the popular coupled-mode the...

  1. Photonic Crystal Fibres - the State-of-the-Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Hansen, K. P.; Hansen, Theis Peter;

    2002-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibres having microstructured air-silica cross sections offer new optical properties compared to conventional fibres. These include novel guiding mechanisms, unique spectral properties and nonlinear possibilities. Recent results within the field are reviewed.......Photonic crystal fibres having microstructured air-silica cross sections offer new optical properties compared to conventional fibres. These include novel guiding mechanisms, unique spectral properties and nonlinear possibilities. Recent results within the field are reviewed....

  2. Mathematical Model for Fabrication of Micro-Structure Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Gui-Yao; HOU Zhi-Yun; LI Shu-Guang; HOU Lan-Tian

    2005-01-01

    @@ Using the classic principles of mechanics, we discuss the shape transformation of the micro-structure fibre preform under high temperature of the fibre drawing process, which leads to the theoretical relations among the structural diameter of the micro-structure fibre, the drawing technical parameter, and the physical constant of the microstructure fibre material. The theoretic values are basically in agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Fibre function and perception during cutaneous nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, R A; Burke, D; Skuse, N F; Lethlean, A K

    1975-09-01

    In awake human subjects, neural responses in radial nerves to electrical stimulation were recorded with intrafascicular tungsten microelectrodes. Changes in the activity of individual fibre groups during blocking procedures were recorded and correlated with simultaneous alterations in the perception of standardized stimuli. Light touch sensibility in hairy skin appeared to depend on the integrity of A-beta-gamma fibres, cold and pinprick on A-delta fibres, and warmth and dull pain on C fibres.

  4. Fabrication and applications of highly nonlinear silica holey fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Belardi, W.; Monro, T.M.; Price, J.H.V.; Lee, J.H.; Petropoulos, P.; Richardson, D J

    2001-01-01

    Holey fibre (HF) technology provides a new way to fabricate novel highly nonlinear silica based fibres. The cladding of a HF is defined by an arrangement of air holes that run along the fibre length surrounding a central silica core. The reduction in core size and increase in refractive index contrast that is possible in a HF allows the production of fibres with extremely high effective nonlinearity. HFs can also exhibit, by design of the hole configuration [2], dispersion properties not poss...

  5. The Significance of Defects on the Failure of Fibre Composites,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    effects produced by discontinuous and kinked plies in unidirectional carbon fibre reinforced plastic under tension. The mean stress at failure on the...5 to6.5%) void contents on changes in torsional properties of carbon fibre reinforced plastic when exposed at various temperatures to dry or wet...properties of carbon fibre/Kevlar fibre reinforced plastic hybrid composites." RAE Technical Report 76057 (1976)* 15 G. Dorey, D.J. Portsmouth, Private

  6. Crack Growth Monitoring by Embedded Optical Fibre Bragg Grating Sensors: Fibre Reinforced Plastic Crack Growing Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; McGugan, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a novel method to asses a crack growing/damage event in fibre reinforced plastic, or adhesive using Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors embedded in a host material. Different features of the crack mechanism that induce a change in the FBG response were identified. Double...... Cantilever Beams specimens made with glass fibre glued with structural adhesive, were instrumented with an array of FBG sensors embedded in the material and tested using an experimental fracture procedure. A digital image correlation technique was used to determine the presence of the specific phenomena...

  7. Fibre Optical Parametric Amplification in Defect Bragg Fibres with Zero Dispersion Slow Light Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Li; ZHANG Wei; HUANG Yi-Dong; PENG Jiang-De; ZHAO Hong; YANG Ke-Wu

    2008-01-01

    Nonfinearity enhancement by slow light effect and strong light confinement in defect Bragg fibres is demonstrated and analysed in applications of fibre optical parametric amplifiers. Broadband low group velocity and zero dispersion as well as the strong light confinement by band gap enhances the nonlinear coefficient up to more than one order than the conventional high nonlinear fibres.Moreover,the zero dispersion wavelength of coupled core mode can be designed arbitrarily,under which the phase-matching bandwidth of the nonlinear process can be extended.

  8. Solution electrospinning of particle-composite fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse; Fojan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning is a simple and fast way to produce nano- and microfibers. By applying high voltage to a droplet of solution or polymer melt, fibre mats can be produced. These mats are porous in the micrometre domain, and have a high surface area to volume ratio.......Electrospinning is a simple and fast way to produce nano- and microfibers. By applying high voltage to a droplet of solution or polymer melt, fibre mats can be produced. These mats are porous in the micrometre domain, and have a high surface area to volume ratio....

  9. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1998-01-01

    Durability studies are carried out at BKM as part of the research project "Design Methods for Fibre Reinforced Concrete" (FRC) involving BKM, The Concrete Research Center at DTI, Building Technology at Aalborg University, Rambøll, 4K-Beton and Rasmussen & Schiøtz. Concrete beams with or without...... structure are made on specimens drilled or sawed from beams after unloading (mechanical load). The pore structure of the concretes will be studied by microscopy, sorption and suction curves. The test programme involves three different concrete qualities (water-cement ratios). Both steel fibres (ZP...

  10. High Power Photonic Crystal Fibre Raman Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Pei-Guang; RUAN Shuang-Chen; YU Yong-Qin; GUO Chun-Yu; GUO Yuan; LIU Cheng-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    A cw Raman laser based on a 100-m photonic crystal fibre is demonstrated with up to 3.8 W output power at the incident pump power of 12 W, corresponding to an optical-to-optical efficiency of about 31.6%. The second order Stokes light, which is firstly reported in a cw photonic crystal fibre Raman laser, is obtained at 1183nm with an output power of 1.6 W and a slope efficiency of about 45.7%.

  11. Spinothalamic fibres, pain conduction and cordotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffie, D

    1975-01-01

    Description of four cases of cordotomy for intractable pain in which autopsy could be performed. In two of the cases the lesion had been placed (unintentionally) in the posterior quadrant of the spinal cord with good results as to the abolishing of pain. It is concluded that the conduction of pain and temperature stimuli is not restricted to the anterolateral part of the spinal cord but that this conduction may also take place along fibres in the posterolateral quadrant. A further conclusion is that the results of cordotomy are related to the number of cut fibres.

  12. Liquid filling of photonic crystal fibres for grating writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Canning, John; Lægsgaard, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    liquid filling of photonic crystal fibres reduces the scattering from air–glass interfaces during Bragg grating writing in many layered photonic crystal fibres. Within experimental uncertainty, the grating index modulation of a grating written in germanium-doped photonic crystal fibre with 10 rings...

  13. Calculation of the conduction velocity of short nerve fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vliet, G.H.; Holsheimer, J.

    1980-01-01

    The conduction velocity v of a nerve fibre is calculated from the time delay Δ of a propagating action potential between two recording sites along the fibre. However, the conventional method of determining Δ cannot be applied to short nerve fibres. Therefore several linear signal analysis methods

  14. Optical fibre Bragg grating recorded in TOPAS cyclic olefin copolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, I.P.; Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    A report is presented on the inscription of a fibre Bragg grating into a microstructured polymer optical fibre fabricated from TOPAS cyclic olefin copolymer. This material offers two important advantages over poly (methyl methacrylate), which up to now has formed the basis for polymer fibre Bragg...

  15. Design of fibre reinforced PV concepts for building integrated applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.; de Wit, H.; de Boer, Andries; Ossenbrink Sinke, W.; Helm, P.

    2009-01-01

    Fibre reinforced polymers present an interesting encapsulation medium for PV-modules. Glass fibres can provide increased strength and stiffness to thin polymer layers overcoming the brittleness and limited deformability of glass-panes. Glass fibre reinforced polymers allows for transparency over a

  16. Mechanical properties of short-flax-fibre reinforced compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, H.L.; Müssig, J.; Oever, van den M.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanical properties of flax/polypropylene compounds, manufactured both with a batch kneading and an extrusion process were determined and compared with the properties of Natural fibre Mat Thermoplastic (NMT) composites. The fibre length and width distributions of the fibres from the compounds

  17. Modelling fibre laydown and web uniformity in nonwoven fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battocchio, F.; Sutcliffe, M. P. F.

    2017-04-01

    The mechanical and functional performance of nonwoven fabric critically depends on the fibre architecture. The fibre laydown process plays a key role in controlling this architecture. The fibre dynamic behaviour during laydown is studied through a finite element model which describes the role of the parameters in defining the area covered by a single fibre when deposited on the conveyor belt. The path taken by a fibre is described in terms of the radius of gyration, which characterises the area covered by the fibre in the textile, and the spectrum of curvature, which describes the degree of fibre looping as a function of the arc length. Starting from deterministic and idealised fibre curvature spectra, stochastic Monte Carlo simulations are undertaken to generate full nonwoven web samples and reproduce the uniformity of fibre density. A novel image analysis technique that allows measurement of the uniformity of real spunbonded nonwoven samples from images of textiles is used to confirm the validity of the model. It is shown that the main parameter that governs the fibre density uniformity is the ratio of the fibre spinning velocity to the velocity of conveyor belt, while fibre oscillations prior to deposition play a secondary role.

  18. Wet spinning of asymmetric hollow fibre membranes for gas separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, van 't Jacob Adriaan

    1988-01-01

    This thesis describes the spinning and characterizatin of hollow fibre membranes for gas separation. The type of fibres studied here are made by a wet spinning process. A homogeneous solution is prepared, consisting of a polymer in a suitable organic solvent, and extruded as a hollow fibre. Both the

  19. Environmental impact assessment of man-made cellulose fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, L.; Worrell, E.; Patel, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Man-made cellulose fibres have played an important role in the production of textile products for more than 70 years. The purpose of this study is to assess the environmental impact of man-made cellulose fibres. Life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted for three types of fibres (i.e. Viscose, Modal

  20. Wet spinning of asymmetric hollow fibre membranes for gas separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Jacob Adriaan

    1988-01-01

    This thesis describes the spinning and characterizatin of hollow fibre membranes for gas separation. The type of fibres studied here are made by a wet spinning process. A homogeneous solution is prepared, consisting of a polymer in a suitable organic solvent, and extruded as a hollow fibre. Both the