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Sample records for century prnu garrison

  1. GARRISON ON KEYNES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edward W Fuller

    2015-01-01

      This paper examines Roger W. Garrison's interpretation of John Maynard Keynes. Garrison has given economists a useful way to illustrate Keynes's theory, but there are two fundamental problems with Garrison's interpretation...

  2. Garrison Leadership: Enlisting Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Successby COL Wayne A. Green, GC, Fort Leavenworth and Jennifer Mootz 16Garrison Leadership : Enlisting Othersby COL Charles Allen (Ret), Army War College 6...ARMY Leadership Pot Luck by COL Dan Thomas, GC, Fort Meade W e A re t he A R M Y’ S H O M E Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Garrison Leadership : Enlisting Others 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  3. Garrison Command Skills for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Leadership” in Leadership: Theory and Practice, third edition, by Peter G. Northouse (Thousand Oaks, CA.: Sage) 2006, pp. 206-210 11. From Garrison Commander briefing received via personal e-mail, Oct. 3, 2007.

  4. Hot Springs-Garrison Fiber Optic Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to upgrade its operational telecommunications system between the Hot Springs Substation and the Garrison Substation using a fiber optic system. The project would primarily involve installing 190 kilometers (120 miles) of fiber optic cable on existing transmission structures and installing new fiber optic equipment in BPA`s substation yards and control houses. BPA prepared an environmental assessment (EA) evaluating the proposed action. This EA was published in October 1994. The EA identifies a number of minor impacts that might occur as a result of the proposed action, as well as some recommended mitigation measures. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) identifies specific measures to avoid, minimize, or compensate for impacts identified in the EA.

  5. Despatch: Field Marshal Auchinleck, the Fall of the Tobruk Garrison ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hennie

    78. The 'Atomic' Despatch: Field Marshal Auchinleck, the Fall of the Tobruk Garrison and Post-War. Anglo-South African Relations. Dr Andrew Stewart*. King's College. In January 1948, a despatch written by Field Marshal Sir Claude Auchinleck was published in London. These detailed military operations involving British.

  6. Garrison's Capital-Based Macroeconomics: The Role of Deficit, Credit Control and Taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Ferlito, Carmelo

    2011-01-01

    It could be quite simple to quite simple to argue that, in the realm of the Austrian School of Economics, public finance plays no role. However, the Austrian perspective is very wide and, starting from Hayek, it is possible to trace a path that arrives to Roger Garrison. Garrison’s capital-based macroeconomics is the attempt to write a new general macroeconomics founded on time, expectations and capital. Starting from that basic graphic tool called Hayek’s triangle, Garrison tries to verif...

  7. Large dams and alluvial rivers in the Anthropocene: The impacts of the Garrison and Oahe Dams on the Upper Missouri River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalak, Katherine; Benthem, Adam J.; Schenk, Edward R.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Galloway, Joel M.; Nustad, Rochelle A.; Wiche, Gregg J.

    2013-01-01

    The Missouri River has had a long history of anthropogenic modification with considerable impacts on river and riparian ecology, form, and function. During the 20th century, several large dam-building efforts in the basin served the needs for irrigation, flood control, navigation, and the generation of hydroelectric power. The managed flow provided a range of uses, including recreation, fisheries, and habitat. Fifteen dams impound the main stem of the river, with hundreds more on tributaries. Though the effects of dams and reservoirs are well-documented, their impacts have been studied individually, with relatively little attention paid to their interaction along a river corridor. We examine the morphological and sedimentological changes in the Upper Missouri River between the Garrison Dam in ND (operational in 1953) and Oahe Dam in SD (operational in 1959). Through historical aerial photography, stream gage data, and cross sectional surveys, we demonstrate that the influence of the upstream dam is still a major control of river dynamics when the backwater effects of the downstream reservoir begin. In the “Anthropocene”, dams are ubiquitous on large rivers and often occur in series, similar to the Garrison Dam Segment. We propose a conceptual model of how interacting dams might affect river geomorphology, resulting in distinct and recognizable morphologic sequences that we term “Inter-Dam sequence” characteristic of major rivers in the US.

  8. Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Assessment Report for US Army Garrison, Japan - Honshu Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kora, Angela R.; Brown, Daryl R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2010-03-09

    This report documents an assessment was performed by a team of engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract to the Installation Management Command (IMCOM) Pacific Region Office (PARO). The effort used the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) model to determine how energy is consumed at five U.S. Army Garrison-Japan (USAG-J) installations in the Honshu area, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings.

  9. Correlation of psychosomatic health and situation idiosyncratic coping of army men garrisoned at islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei NIU

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the correlation between psychosomatic health and situation idiosyncratic coping of army men garrisoned at islands. Methods By randomized cluster sampling, a total of 499 service men garrisoned at islands were designated as experimental group, and 615 service men garrisoned out of islands were as control group. The both groups were assessed by Chinese Military Psychosomatic Health Scale and Chinese Military Situational Characteristics Scale in the Chinese Soldiers Mental Health Evaluation Instrument (TR-09, and the influencing factors were analyzed. Results The scores of each psychosomatic health factor of service men in experimental group were higher than those in control group (t=7.513-24.028, P<0.01. In the service men of experimental group, the scores of psychotic, anxiety and depression were higher than other factors, and the scores of cardiovascular and skin were lower. With exception of the factors of eye-ear and nervous system, the score of psychosomatic health was lower in the service men with college and above educational background than in those with junior and senior school educational background (F=0.526-3.245, P<0.05. The psychosomatic health were better in married service men than in unmarried ones (t=0.663-2.869, P<0.05. With exception of the cardiovascular system, the psychosomatic health score was higher in officers than in soldiers and non-commissioned officers (t=–1.434 - –4.381, P<0.05. With exception of psychotic factor, the psychosomatic health score in service men garrisoned at islands was negatively related to the active coping style (r=–0.065 - –0.121, P<0.05, and positively related to the inactive coping style (r=0.062-0.067, P<0.05. Conclusions The psychosomatic health of service men garrisoned at islands is worse. The psychosomatic health of service men with higher educational level, married and low ranked is better. Active coping style is beneficial to psychosomatic health of

  10. Garrison's model of self-directed learning: preliminary validation and relationship to academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Fattah, Sabry M

    2010-11-01

    In this project, 119 undergraduates responded to a questionnaire tapping three psychological constructs implicated in Garrison's model of self-directed learning: self-management, self-monitoring, and motivation. Mediation analyses showed that these psychological constructs are interrelated and that motivation mediates the relationship between self-management and self-monitoring. Path modeling analyses revealed that self-management and self-monitoring significantly predicted academic achievement over two semesters with self-management being the strongest predictor. Motivation significantly predicted academic achievement over the second semester only. Implications of these findings for self-directed learning and academic achievement in a traditional classroom setting are discussed.

  11. 77 FR 59646 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Garrison, Redstone Arsenal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Garrison, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, AL AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Army... by Redstone Arsenal and the U. S. Army Engineer District, St. Louis, Mandatory Center of Expertise...

  12. Garrison Rejoinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Jim

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to critiques of his essay titled "Individuality, Equality, and Creative Democracy--the Task Before Us." In his essay, the author has started sculpting short polemical pieces that purposefully overstate his case as a way of disrupting dominant educational discourses rather than arguing against…

  13. Contamination by Norovirus and Adenovirus on Environmental Surfaces and in Hands of Conscripts in Two Finnish Garrisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oristo, Satu; Rönnqvist, Maria; Aho, Mika; Sovijärvi, Ava; Hannila-Handelberg, Tuula; Hörman, Ari; Nikkari, Simo; Kinnunen, Paula M; Maunula, Leena

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the presence of norovirus and adenovirus, especially enteric adenovirus, on the environmental surfaces (n = 481) and military conscripts' hands (n = 109) in two Finnish garrisons (A and B) in 2013 and 2014. A questionnaire study was conducted to reveal possible correlations between viral findings on the conscripts' hands and their acute gastroenteritis symptoms. In addition to the swab samples, 14 fecal samples were obtained for viral analysis. In total, norovirus was present in 9.0 % of the surface swabs in 2013, whereas enteric adenovirus was present in 0.0 % and non-enteric adenovirus in 9.4 %. In the same year, 2.6 % of the hand swabs contained norovirus, 2.6 % enteric adenovirus, and 40.3 % non-enteric adenovirus. Norovirus GI.6 was continually detected on the surfaces of garrison A, and identical virus was detected in some of the fecal samples. In garrison B, two slightly different norovirus GII.4 strains were present on the surfaces. The questionnaires revealed no recent acute gastroenteritis cases in garrison A, but in garrison B, where the norovirus-positive hand swabs were collected, 30.6 % of the conscripts reported of recent symptoms. In 2014, norovirus was rarely detected, but adenovirus was again frequently present, both on the surfaces and hands. Taken together, our results suggest that gastroenteritis outbreaks occurred in 2013, but not in 2014. Due to the low number of hand swabs positive for enteric viruses, no conclusions about associations between viral findings and gastroenteritis symptoms could be drawn. This study increased our understanding of the possible transmission of viruses via contaminated environment and hands.

  14. Providing health services during a civil war: the experience of a garrison town in South Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevlihan, Rob

    2013-10-01

    The impact of conflict, particularly conflict arising during civil wars, on the provision of healthcare is a subject that has not been widely considered in conflict-related research. Combatants often target health services to weaken or to defeat the enemy, while attempts to maintain or improve health systems also can comprise part of counter-insurgency 'hearts-and-minds' strategies. This paper describes the dynamics associated with the provision of health services in Malakal, an important garrison town in South Sudan, during the second Sudanese civil war (1983-2005). Drawing on the concepts of opportunity hoarding and exploitation, it explores the social and political dynamics of service provision in and around the town during the war. These concepts provide a useful lens with which to understand better how health services are affected by conflict, while the empirical case study presented in the paper illustrates dynamics that may be repeated in other contexts. The concepts and case study set out in this paper should prove useful to healthcare providers working in conflict zones, including humanitarian aid agencies and their employees, increasing their understanding of the social and political dynamics that they are likely to face during future conflict-related complex emergencies. © 2013 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2013.

  15. Studies on sleep status of plateau garrison troops and chronic mountain sickness: A correlation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-lin ZHOU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the sleep status of troops stationed in highland areas, and approach its correlation with chronic mountain sickness (CMS. Methods Stratified-random sampling method was employed and 956 male soldiers stationed in plateau for more than 6 consecutive months were selected from a garrison troops as the study objects (plateau group, and 587 male soldiers from the same garrison troops stationed at plain areas without any experience of highland garrison were selected as the control group. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI was employed to collect the sleep status of the soldiers and CMS symptom questionnaire combined with physiological parameters was adopted to determine the existence of CMS and its severity. Physiological parameters and PSQI scores were studied and compared between soldiers in the plateau group as well as its two subgroups (healthy subgroup and CMS subgroup and those in the control group. Correlation analysis between PSQI and CMS scores and physiological parameters, as well as between PSQI of sleep quality and CMS scores of soldiers stationed at plateau were carried out. Differences of PSQI scores and physiological parameters among the three CMS subgroups (healthy subgroup, mild subgroup and moderate and severe subgroup were analyzed. Results The systolic blood pressure (SBP, heart rate (HR and hemoglobin (Hb concentration were significantly higher (P<0.05, while the oxyhemoglobin (SpO2 was significantly lower in plateau group than in control group (P<0.05. All the PSQI scores were higher in plateau group than in control group (P<0.05. Among the soldiers in plateau group, the SBP, HR, SpO2 and Hb concentration were significantly higher in those of healthy subgroup and the CMS subgroup than those in the control group (P<0.05. Meanwhile, the diastolic blood pressure (DBP was significantly higher in soldiers of the CMS subgroup than those in the control group (P<0.05. Except for the index of sleep medication

  16. BLENDED LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION FRAMEWORK, PRINCIPLES AND GUIDELINES by D. RANDY GARRISON AND NORMAN D. VAUGHAN - BOOK REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Yagcioglu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, I would like to write the review of the book, entitled “Blended Learning in Higher Education-Framework, Principles, and Guidelines”. It was written by D. Randy Garrison and Norman D. Vaughan. It was published in San Francisco by the Jossey-Bass Company. (A Wiley Imprint). It can be viewed from the following website: www.josseybass.com The first edition of this book was printed in the United States of America. The International Standard Book Number of this book i...

  17. JV Task-130 Technological Synergies for Recovery of Organic Pollutants from a Coal Seam at Garrison, North Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaroslav Solc

    2009-03-15

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) initiated remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater associated with gasoline release at the Farmers Union Oil station in Garrison, North Dakota. The remedial strategy implemented is based on application of two innovative concepts: (1) simultaneous operation of soil vapor and multiphase extraction systems allowing for water table control in challenging geotechnical conditions and (2) controlled hot-air circulation between injection and extraction wells to accelerated in situ volatilization and stripping of contaminants of concern (COC) alternatively using the same wells as either extraction or injection points. A proactive remedial approach is required to reduce high COC levels in the source and impacted areas and to eliminate long-term health risks associated with contaminant migration to water-bearing zones used as a regional water supply source. This report compiles results of Phase I focused on design, construction, and start-up of remediation systems.

  18. Survey on attitude and knowledge of food safety and sanitation among soldiers of Arak Malek- Ashtar Garrison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.H Jahed

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Food safety knowledge is considered as an important precautionary principle for foodborne illnesses as well as protecting environment from contamination.The purpose of this study was to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of soldiers of food safety and sanitation. A cross-sectional-analytical study was performed on 191 of Arak Malek-Ashtar garrison soldiers and the survey questionnaire contained personal information about food safety knowledge and attitude. According to the results, 57% of the soldiers had a good knowledge, 18% an average and 25% had a low degree of knowledge about food safety and sanitation. Although all soldiers had good attitude towards food safety, a statistically significant correlation (p

  19. Éloge de la méthode: A tribute to Garrison Sposito on the occasion of his retirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Charlet

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available When confronted with a great piece of art or research, one often wonders about what made it possible, what method was used by its author, in part so one can try to emulate it in one's own activities. Upon the retirement of Garrison Sposito after a long and very distinguished career, we considered that, as former doctoral students of Gary's, we were in a privileged position to write, in our own words and from our perspective, an account of the various key ingredients of his very successful method. In the following, we identify and review six components of this method, respectively his thorough bibliographical coverage, extreme rigor in research, meticulous crafting of manuscripts, parallel focus on several disciplines, firm conviction that it is not necessary to go out of one's way to promote good ideas or competent people, and finally his reluctance to jump on bandwagons. We hope that this analysis of the pillars of Gary's method, at least as we see them, will not only help pay tribute to an outstanding thinker, but also inspire and provide a roadmap to all those who strive to better themselves as researchers.

  20. JV Task 109 - Risk Assessment and Feasibility of Remedial Alternatives for Coal Seam at Garrison, North Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarda Solc

    2008-01-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted an evaluation of alternative technologies for remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated coal seam, including impacted soils and groundwater in Garrison, North Dakota. Geotechnical characteristics of the impacted fractured coal seam provide for rapid off-site contaminant transport, with the currently identified impacted zone covering an area of about 40 acres. Regardless of the exposure mechanism (free, dissolved, or vapor phase), results of laboratory tests confirmed secondary release of gasoline-based compounds from contaminated coal to water reaching concentrations documented from the impacted areas. Coal laboratory tests confirmed low risks associated with spontaneous ignition of gasoline-contaminated coal. High contaminant recovery efficiency for the vacuum-enhanced recovery pilot tests conducted at three selected locations confirmed its feasibility for full-scale remediation. A total of 3500 gallons (13.3 m{sup 3}) of contaminated groundwater and over 430,000 ft{sup 3} (12,200 m{sup 3}) of soil vapor were extracted during vacuum-enhanced recovery testing conducted July 17-24, 2007, resulting in the removal of about 1330 lb (603 kg) of hydrocarbons, an equivalent of about 213 gallons of product. The summary of project activities is as follows: (1) Groundwater and vapor monitoring for existing wells, including domestic wells, conducted on a monthly basis from December 12, 2006, to June 6, 2007. This monitoring activity conducted prior to initiation of the EERC field investigation was requested by NDDH in a letter dated December 1, 2006. (2) Drilling of 20 soil borings, including installation of extraction and monitoring wells conducted April 30-May 4 and May 14-18, 2007. (3) Groundwater sampling and water-table monitoring conducted June 11-13, 2007. (4) Evaluation of the feasibility of using a camera survey for delineation of mining voids conducted May 16 and September 10-11, 2007. (5) Survey of all wells

  1. Review: Kjetil Tronvoll, Daniel R. Mekonnen, The African Garrison State: Human Rights and Political Development in Eritrea (2014 / Andebrhan Welde Giorgis, Eritrea at a Crossroads: A Narrative of Triumph, Betrayal and Hope (2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih O. Nur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Kjetil Tronvoll and Daniel R. Mekonnen, The African Garrison State: Human Rights and Political Development in Eritrea, Rochester, NY: James Currey, 2014, ISBN-10: 1847010695, 223 pp.and Andebrhan Welde Giorgis, Eritrea at a Crossroads: A Narrative of Triumph, Betrayal and Hope, Houston, TX: Strategic Book Publishing, 2014, ISBN-10: 1628573317, 692 pp.

  2. Modeling potential impacts of the Garrison Diversion Unit project on Sand Lake and Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuges: a feasibility analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, David B.; Auble, Gregor T.; Farmer, Adrian H.; Roelle, James E.

    1987-01-01

    The Garrison Diversion Unit (GDU) of the Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin program was authorized in 1965, with the purpose of diverting Missouri River water to the James River for irrigation, municipal and industrial water supply, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and flood control. The project was reauthorized in 1986, with the specification that comprehensive studies be conducted to address a variety of issues. One of these ongoing studies addresses potential impacts of GDU construction and operation on lands of the National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) system, including Arrowwood and Sand Lake Refuges (the Refuges) on the James River. A number of concerns at these Refuges have been identified; the primary concerns addressed in this report include increased winter return flows, which would limit control of rough fish; increased turbidity during project construction, which would decrease production of sago pondweed; and increased water level fluctuations in the late spring and early summer, which would destroy the nests of some over-water nesting birds. The facilitated workshop described in this report was conducted February 18-20, 1987, under the joint sponsorship of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the North Dakota Game and Fish Department. The primary objectives of the workshop were to evaluate the feasibility of using simulation modeling techniques to estimate GDU impacts on Arrowwood and Sand Lake Refuges and to suggest enhancements to the James River Refuge monitoring program. The workshop was structured around the formulation of four submodels: a Hydrology and Water Quality submodel to simulate changes in Refuge pool elevations, turnover rates, and water quality parameters (e.g., total dissolved solids, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, water temperature, pesticides) due to GDU construction and operation; a Vegetation submodel to simulate concomitant changes in wetland communities (e.g., sago pondweed, wet meadows, deep

  3. century drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-11-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twenty-first century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman-Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  4. The 21st Century as Whose Century?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Scott

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Macro-analysis and East-West encounter are shown through consideration of objective yet subjective constructed concepts for the international system and international economy in the 21st century. Three paradigms are considered, namely the 21st century as the ‘Pacific Century’, as ‘China’s Century’ and as the ‘Asian Century’. Overlaps are shown between these three paradigms, as also developments in time, and gradually shift in geographical location. The ‘Pacific Century’, and its associated Rimspeak, was the paradigm emerging in the late 1970s, knitting together America’s West Coast and the Japanese economy. By the late 1980s this was already shifting to talk of the 21st century likely to be an ‘Asian Century’ model, mark-1, based on the Pacific Asia dynamism shown by the ‘Asian Tigers’ and Japan. However, the Asian financial crash of 1997-8, and the economic downturn in Japan, meant that such an ‘Asian Century’ seemed premature as the 21st century arrived. Instead, it was China’s economic growth that seemed most evident, and with it the concept of the 21st century as ‘China’s Century’. However, in turn that has already been modified during the first decade of the century by India’s arrival as a rapidly growing economy. Consequently the 21st century as ‘China’s Century’ and as ‘India’s Century’ has been combined into talk of an ‘Asian Century’, mark-2.

  5. Characterization and relation of precipitation, streamflow, and water-quality data at the U.S. Army Garrison Fort Carson and Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, Colorado, water years 2013–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Michael J.; Stogner, Sr., Robert W.; Bruce, James F.

    2016-11-29

    To evaluate the influence of military training activities on streamflow and water quality, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army, began a hydrologic data collection network on the U.S. Army Garrison Fort Carson in 1978 and on the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site in 1983. This report is a summary and characterization of the precipitation, streamflow, and water-quality data collected at 43 sites between October 1, 2012, and September 30, 2014 (water years 2013 and 2014).Variations in the frequency of daily precipitation, seasonal distribution, and seasonal and annual precipitation at 5 stations at the U.S. Army Garrison Fort Carson and 18 stations at or near the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site were evaluated. Isohyetal diagrams indicated a general pattern of increase in total annual precipitation from east to west at the U.S. Army Garrison Fort Carson and the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site. Between about 54 and 79 percent of daily precipitation was 0.1 inch or less in magnitude. Precipitation events were larger and more frequent between July and September.Daily streamflow data from 16 sites were used to evaluate temporal and spatial variations in streamflow for the water years 2013 and 2014. At all sites, median daily mean streamflow for the 2-year period ranged from 0.0 to 9.60 cubic feet per second. Daily mean streamflow hydrographs are included in this report. Five sites on the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site were monitored for peak stage using crest-stage gages.At the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, five sites had a stage recorder and precipitation gage, providing a paired streamflow-precipitation dataset. There was a statistically significant correlation between precipitation and streamflow based on Spearman’s rho correlation (rho values ranged from 0.17 to 0.35).Suspended-sediment samples were collected in April through October for water years 2013–14 at one site at the U.S. Army Garrison Fort Carson and five sites at the Pi

  6. Nineteenth-Century English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The article reviews the book "Nineteenth-Century English: Stability and Change," by Merja Kytö, Mats Rydèn and Erik Smitterberg......The article reviews the book "Nineteenth-Century English: Stability and Change," by Merja Kytö, Mats Rydèn and Erik Smitterberg...

  7. The solar century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, P.W. [CANOPUS Foundation, Freiburg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    The Solar Century (TSC) is a new solar developer, run by former head of the Solar Inititative at Greenpeace International, Dr. Jeremy Leggett, formed with the support from the financial services industry as a result of the December 1996 Oxford Solar Investment Summit, an event which brought together senior executives from finacial institutions and solar companies to discuss mutual strategic interests for the first time. Group of non-profit and for-profit companies. The Solar Century aims to provide an international solar developer service built primarily around a world-class British-American core operations consortium, twinned with local and regional partner companies. (orig./RHM)

  8. Century Tide Nicotine Patch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Century Tide Nicotine Patch, a hi-tech smoking control therapy, is designed in accordance with the scientific principle of nicotine replacement. The therapy is promoted by the World Health Organization. Meanwhile, it also integrates traditional Chinese medical therapy and adopts advanced TTS technology.

  9. Century of Nobel Prizes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1859-02-19

    GENERAL I ARTICLE. Century of Nobel Prizes. 1903 Chemistry Award: Svante August Arrhenius (1859-1927). Shridhar R Gadre. Svante August Arrhenius was born at Wijk, near lake Malar, in. Sweden on February 19, 1859. His parents were Svante Gustav. Arrhenius (a town land surveyor) and Carolina Christina.

  10. A Century of Acoustic Metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1998-01-01

    The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect.......The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect....

  11. Statisticians of the centuries

    CERN Document Server

    Seneta, E; Crépel, P; Fienberg, S; Gani, J

    2001-01-01

    Statisticians of the Centuries aims to demonstrate the achievements of statistics to a broad audience, and to commemorate the work of celebrated statisticians. This is done through short biographies that put the statistical work in its historical and sociological context, emphasizing contributions to science and society in the broadest terms rather than narrow technical achievement. The discipline is treated from its earliest times and only individuals born prior to the 20th Century are included. The volume arose through the initiative of the International Statistical Institute (ISI), the principal representative association for international statistics (founded in 1885). Extensive consultations within the statistical community, and with prominent members of ISI in particular, led to the names of the 104 individuals who are included in the volume. The biographies were contributed by 73 authors from across the world. The editors are the well-known statisticians Chris Heyde and Eugene Seneta. Chris Heyde is Pro...

  12. Arsenic and selenium in soils and shallow ground water in the Turtle Lake, New Rockford, Harvey Pumping, Lincoln Valley, and LaMoure irrigation areas of the Garrison Diversion Unit, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkas, W.R.; Komor, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    The Garrison Diversion Unit project was authorized as part of the Pick-Sloan Missouri River Basin program to divert water from Lake Sakakawea to irrigation areas in North Dakota. A special GarrisonCommission was created to evaluate an environmental concern that return flow from the irrigation areas might contain metals in toxic concentrations. This report summarizes the results of detailed investigations of the Turtle Lake, New Rockford, Harvey Pumping, Lincoln Valley, and LaMoure irrigation areas. A total of 223 soil samples were collected from the irrigation areas and analyzed for elemental composition. Water extractions were done on 40 of the 223 soil samplesusing a 1:5 soil-to-water extraction method, and the solution from the extraction was analyzed for elemental composition. A total of 52 ground-water samples were collected and analyzed for inorganic constituents and organic carbon. Average arsenic concentrations in the entire soil column ranged from 1.0 milligram per kilogram in the Harvey Pumping irrigation area to 70milligrams per kilogram in the New Rockford irrigation area. Average selenium concentrations ranged from less than 0.1 milligram per kilogramin the Turtle Lake, New Rockford, Harvey Pumping, and Lincoln Valley irrigation areas to 6.0 milligrams per kilogram in the Turtle Lakeirrigation area. In the Turtle Lake irrigation area, average arsenic and selenium concentrations generally increased with depth through the topsoil, oxidized soil, and transition soil but decreased in the reduced soil at the bottom of the sampled horizons.Average arsenic concentrations in the New Rockford irrigation area follow the same pattern as in the Turtle Lake irrigation area, but selenium concentrations do not show a clear pattern of variation with depth. In the Harvey Pumping and Lincoln Valley irrigation areas, arsenic andselenium concentrations do not appear to vary systematically with depth. No correlation is shown between the concentrations in soils and

  13. A century of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bromley, D Allan

    2002-01-01

    In this amazing tour d'horizon, D. Allan Bromley uses the occasion of the centenary of the American Physical Society to reflect upon the growth of physics over the past 100 years, its fragmentation into numerous subdisciplines, the impact physics has had upon modern technology, and the re-emergence of the fundamental unity of the discipline in recent years. Hundreds of historical illustrations accompany the text. Bromley conveys much of the excitement and wonder that research in physics generated in the 20th century and asks what new things are in store in the next century. He covers such topics as relativity and quantum mechanics, the Manhattan project, superconductivity, transistors and the revolution brought about by solid-state electronics, protein folding, the uses of nuclear and atomic physics in biology and medicine, plate tectonics, the expansion of the universe and the Big Bang, and gravitational radiation. Bromley, the Sterling Professor of the Sciences and Dean of Yale University, served as Assista...

  14. The management century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiechel, Walter

    2012-11-01

    In 1886, addressing the nascent American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Henry R. Towne proposed that "the management of works" be considered a modern art--thereby heralding the Management Century, when management as we know it came into being and shaped the world in which we work. Kiechel, a past editorial director of Harvard Business Publishing, elucidates the three eras that punctuate this period: the years leading up to World War II, during which scientific exactitude gave wings to a new managerial elite; the early postwar decades, managerialism's apogee of self-confidence and a time when wartime principles of strategy were adapted, sometimes ruthlessly, to the running of companies; and the 1980s to the present, years that saw fast-moving changes, disequilibrium, and a servitude to market forces but also ushered in globalism, unprecedented innovation, and heightened expectations about how workers are to be treated. Along the way he examines the contributions of thinkers such as Frederick Taylor, Elton Mayo, Peter Drucker, and Michael Porter. What lies ahead? Perhaps the biggest challenge facing the 21st-century company, Kiechel posits, is to truly free the spark of human imagination from the organization's tidal pull toward the status quo. There's almost always a better way, he concludes--and management will continue to seek it.

  15. A century of silence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielian, Jack

    2010-09-01

    This paper addresses how crimes of genocide go beyond a need for naked power, economic aggrandizement, or territorial conquest. Such crimes involve psychogenic and psychodynamic underpinnings that can be terrifying to contemplate. Yet their psychological study is essential. The Armenian genocide has been taken as a point of reference. Because the Armenian genocide has resulted in nearly a century-long effort of perpetrator denial, it can provide an important case study of how long-standing trauma and denial reinforce each other and illuminate each other. As a result, this genocide has aptly been called the "secret genocide," the "unremembered genocide," and a "crime without a name." The author holds that genocidal trauma (and trauma in general) is contagious and the contagion is likely to be insidious. All who come in contact with it can come away marked, including victim, victim families and progeny, observers, advocates, researchers, and yes, perpetrators.

  16. Precipitation, streamflow, suspended-sediment, and water-quality data for the U.S. Army Garrison Fort Carson and Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, Colorado, 1966–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L.R.

    2017-08-03

    The U.S. Army Garrison Fort Carson (AGFC) and the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site (PCMS) are facilities operated by the U.S. Department of the Army in southern Colorado. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army, established a hydrologic and water-quality data-collection network at the AGFC in June 1978 and at the PCMS in October 1982. The data-collection networks are designed to assess the quantity and quality of water resources and monitor the effects of military training activities on streamflow and water quality. Two preexisting U.S. Geological Survey streamgages at the PCMS were incorporated into the data-collection network at the time it was established, providing periods of record that begin as early as 1966. This report presents and summarizes precipitation, streamflow, suspended-sediment, and water-quality data from 34 U.S. Geological Survey sites on or near the AGFC and the PCMS for the period of record at each site. (Streamflow data are presented as discharge in cubic feet per second.)At AGFC, daily sum precipitation ranged from 0 to 11.85 inches, daily mean discharge ranged from 0 to 836 cubic feet per second, and daily mean suspended-sediment discharge ranged from 0 to 39,900 tons per day. With the exception of total (unfiltered) mercury and filtered sulfate at two sites and filtered manganese at three sites, 95th percentile trace element concentrations and median total (unfiltered) metal concentrations were less than regulatory numeric standards for all samples. However, individual water-quality results occasionally exceeded respective regulatory numeric standards.At the PCMS, daily sum precipitation ranged from 0 to 4.59 inches, daily mean discharge ranged from 0 to 4,190 cubic feet per second, and daily mean suspended-sediment discharge ranged from 0 to 21,100 tons per day. Water-quality results, 95th percentile trace element concentrations, and median total (unfiltered) metal concentrations were less than

  17. The Cosmic Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longair, Malcolm S.

    2013-04-01

    Part I. Stars and Stellar Evolution up to the Second World War: 1. The legacy of the nineteenth century; 2. The classification of stellar spectra; 3. Stellar structure and evolution; 4. The end points of stellar evolution; Part II. The Large-Scale Structure of the Universe, 1900-1939: 5. The Galaxy and the nature of spiral nebulae; 6. The origins of astrophysical cosmology; Part III. The Opening up of the Electromagnetic Spectrum: 7. The opening up of the electromagnetic spectrum and the new astronomies; Part IV. The Astrophysics of Stars and Galaxies since 1945: 8. Stars and stellar evolution; 9. The physics of the interstellar medium; 10. The physics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies; 11. High-energy astrophysics; Part V. Astrophysical Cosmology since 1945: 12. Astrophysical cosmology; 13. The determination of cosmological parameters; 14. The evolution of galaxies and active galaxies with cosmic epoch; 15. The origin of galaxies and the large-scale structure of the Universe; 16. The very early Universe; References; Name index; Object index; Subject index.

  18. Garrison Commanders - In Search of Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-23

    Army War College. 9 December 1987. (AWC BBS-3) 10. Temple , Herbert i., Jr., LTG. USAR, Reserve Comoonent Issues. Lecture. Carlisle Barracks: US Army War...55 APPENDI I -LIST OF INSTALLATIONS STUDIED Camp Mercer. Korea Camp Zeus . Japan Fort Hood, Texas Fort Leavenvorth. Kansas Fort Leonard Wood

  19. A Century of Galaxy Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Vera C.

    1995-10-01

    The first successful spectrum of a galaxy, M31, was obtained in 1898 and published in a two-page paper in the young Astrophysical Journal (Scheiner 1899). Thus the first century of galaxy spectroscopy and the first century of the Astrophysical Journal are almost coincident; I celebrate both in this paper. I describe the very early history of the determination of internal kinematics in spiral galaxies, often by quoting the astronomers' own published words. By mid-century, observations with improved optical and radio telescopes offered evidence that much of the matter in a galaxy is dark. As the century ends, research interests have enlarged to include study of spheroidal and disk galaxies with complex nuclear (and other) kinematics. These complicated velocity patterns are understood as the result of interactions, acquisitions, and mergers, and offer clear evidence of the important role of gravitational effects in galaxy evolution.

  20. Twenty-first century vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappuoli, Rino

    2011-01-01

    In the twentieth century, vaccination has been possibly the greatest revolution in health. Together with hygiene and antibiotics, vaccination led to the elimination of many childhood infectious diseases and contributed to the increase in disability-free life expectancy that in Western societies rose from 50 to 78–85 years (Crimmins, E. M. & Finch, C. E. 2006 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 103, 498–503; Kirkwood, T. B. 2008 Nat. Med 10, 1177–1185). In the twenty-first century, vaccination will be expected to eliminate the remaining childhood infectious diseases, such as meningococcal meningitis, respiratory syncytial virus, group A streptococcus, and will address the health challenges of this century such as those associated with ageing, antibiotic resistance, emerging infectious diseases and poverty. However, for this to happen, we need to increase the public trust in vaccination so that vaccines can be perceived as the best insurance against most diseases across all ages. PMID:21893537

  1. A Century of Environmental Legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Brooks; Cain, Louis

    2014-01-01

    We examine federal intervention in natural resource use by analyzing roll-call votes over the past century. These votes involved decisions regarding public land that reallocated the returns to users by changing the asset’s physical character or its usage rights. We suggest that long term conseque...

  2. Two Centuries of Soil Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    Narrates U.S. soil conservation history since the late eighteenth century. Discusses early practices such as contour plowing. Profiles individuals who promoted soil conservation and were largely responsible for the creation of the Soil Conservation Service. Explains the causes of erosion and how soil conservation districts help farmers prevent…

  3. [Mercury (and...) through the centuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłys, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    Mercury has a long history, fascinating in its many aspects. Through the centuries--from ancient times to the present day--the metal in its various forms, also known under the name "quicksilver", accompanied the man and was used for diversified purposes. Today, mercury is employed in manufacturing thermometers, barometers, vacuum pumps and explosives. It is also used in silver and gold mining processes. Mercury compounds play a significant role in dentistry, pharmaceutical industry and crop protection. The contemporary use of mercury markedly decreases, but historically speaking, the archives abound in materials that document facts and events occurring over generations and the immense intellectual effort aiming at discovering the true properties and mechanisms of mercury activity. Mercury toxicity, manifested in destruction of biological membranes and binding of the element with proteins, what disturbs biochemical processes occurring in the body, was discovered only after many centuries of the metal exerting its effect on the lives of individuals and communities. For centuries, mercury was present in the work of alchemists, who searched for the universal essence or quintessence and the so-called philosopher's stone. In the early modern era, between the 16th and 19th centuries, mercury was used to manufacture mirrors. Mercury compounds were employed as a medication against syphilis, which plagued mankind for more than four hundred years--from the Middle Ages till mid 20th century, when the discovery of penicillin became the turning point. This extremely toxic therapy resulted in much suffering, individual tragedies, chronic poisonings leading to fatalities and dramatic sudden deaths. In the last fifty years, there even occurred attempts of mentally imbalanced individuals at injecting themselves with metallic mercury, also as a performance-enhancing drug. Instances of mass mercury poisoning occurred many times in the past in consequence of eating food products

  4. Seventeenth-century indivisibles revisited

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The tremendous success of indivisibles methods in geometry in the seventeenth century, responds to a vast project: installation of infinity in mathematics. The pathways by the authors are very diverse, as are the characterizations of indivisibles, but there are significant factors of unity between the various doctrines of indivisible; the permanence of the language used by all authors is the strongest sign. These efforts do not lead to the stabilization of a mathematical theory (with principles or axioms, theorems respecting these first statements, followed by applications to a set of geometric situations), one must nevertheless admire the magnitude of the results obtained by these methods and highlights the rich relationships between them and integral calculus. The present book aims to be exhaustive since it analyzes the works of all major inventors of methods of indivisibles during the seventeenth century, from Kepler to Leibniz. It takes into account the rich existing literature usually devoted to a singl...

  5. Theft in nineteenth century Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Pullicino, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Malta’s crime history has been rather limited focusing mainly on sensational crimes and the prison. This article studies the different aspects of theft in 19th century Malta including motivations for theft and the disposal of the stolen items. Thieves and their victims exposed their social and economic problems when they appeared at the Criminal Court in Valletta. The statistics gleaned from the Criminal Court records from 1838-1888 reveal links between the occurrence of theft and...

  6. Hippocratic oath, 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand

    2010-04-01

    Hippocratic Oath was first promulgated in 400 BC. Since then it became mandatory to take this oath for any medical profesional who practices medicine. The Oath envisaged all the important guidelines required to be possessed before the medicine is practiced. Recently there had been debates over the traditional oath and various revisionist versions were recommended. The enormous available literature compells us to think and revisit the status of orignal oath vis a vis the practice of medicine in 21st Century.This theme is a part of Dr. KL Wig Oration of National Academy of Medical Sciences, delivered at Ahmedabad in December 2005.

  7. A Century of Environmental Legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cain, Louis P.; Kaiser, Brooks

    2016-01-01

    involved decisions regarding public land that reallocated the returns to users by changing the asset’s physical character or its usage rights. We suggest that long-term consequences affecting current resource allocations arose from disparities between broadly dispersed benefits and locally concentrated...... in natural resource use by analyzing roll call votes over the past century with a Random Utility Model (Manski, 1977) and conclude that economics mattered. So did ideology, but not uniformly. After World War II, the pro-environment vote which had been conservative shifted to being liberal. All these votes...

  8. Humanists for 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Campàs

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available From certain critical considerations with respect to which, faced with the new challenges and transformations brought on by the information society which affect areas of culture, knowledge and learning, only fears and concerns arise, and, likewise, from a positive assessment of the Humanist manifesto for the 21st century, this paper reflects on three aspects that serve to reconfigure a new digital humanism: the complexity paradigm, the digital revolution and globalisation, leading to an invitation to form a political commitment and praxis to not convert humanists into a cultural illusion and mere ornamental whim of the system.

  9. Nineteenth-century aether theories

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffner, Kenneth F

    2013-01-01

    Nineteenth-Century Aether Theories focuses on aether theories. The selection first offers information on the development of aether theories by taking into consideration the positions of Christiaan Huygens, Thomas Young, and Augustin Fresnel. The text then examines the elastic solid aether. Concerns include Green's aether theory, MacCullagh's aether theory, and Kelvin's aether theory. The text also reviews Lorentz' aether and electron theory. The development of Lorentz' ideas of the stagnant aether and electrons; Lorentz' theorem of corresponding states and its development; and Lorentz' respons

  10. The Century of Jerzy Grotowski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Attisani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the author, in the twentyfirst century there will be a discovery of the importance of the Polish master’s research and – especially through the mediation of the Workcenter of Jerzy Grotowski and Thomas Richards – it will be possible to use the results of the history and a conception of actors’s and directors’s praxis free from ideological and moral prejudices, so that Grotowski’s legacy will be one of the foundations of a new theatrical culture, based on presence and encounter.

  11. Synovial fluid over the centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with the most meaningful historical topics on the study of synovial fluid, by starting from the Greco- Roman Medicine, up to Paracelsus (1493-1541, who introduced the term “synovia” to name the intra-articular humour. Afterwards, some till now unreported historical sources are recorded, e.g., a short text by the Italian XVIII century physician Giambattista Contoli (“Breve Instruzione sopre il Glutine, ò Colla…, 1699”. Then, in keeping with some recent researches, a brief history of arthrocentesis is outlined, by considering the first procedures, which should have been performed in Mexico, during the precolonial period. Moreover, the first chemical analysis of synovial fluid, as carried out by the French chemist Jean-Louis Margueron (1792, and the first modern study on the synovial membrane by Marie-François-Xavier Bichat (1800 are explained. Finally, some XIX century investigations concerning the synovial pharmacodynamics, in particular an Italian one based on the elimination of certain chemical substances through the synovial membrane, are discussed.

  12. A CENTURY OF NEWS DISCOURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Bell

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the development of news discourse across the 20th century ihrough a case study ofthe coverage of three expeditions to the South Pole: Captain Scott in 1912, Sir Edmund Hillary in 1958, and Peter Hillary in 1999. The way the news about the three expeditions reached New Zealand media serves as a framework and an illustration to examine three related issues: how technology has changed the time and place dimensions of news delivery; the consequent and concomitant shifts in news presentation; and associated changes in how humans have understood time and place. News values remain the same at a broad level across the century, but different in detail. Nationalism is obtrusive, but its focus shifts. In news practice, the deadline and the scoop drive the news in al1 three periods, but the scooping medium shifts from press to radio to television. The lapse between an event and its reporting shrinks exponentially from months to hours to minutes. The design of newspaper front pages changes radically, and news language compresses. There are social impacts, with newsworthy figures receiving closer exposure and the audience being cast in a more voyeuristic role.

  13. Revolution, Romanticism and the Long Nineteenth Century

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Craciun

    2006-01-01

    In order to consider the future of Victorian literary studies within the long nineteenth century, we must go back to that earlier “period” of the nineteenth century, and the French Revolution of 1789. Drawing on the aesthetic and political innovations of 1790s women's writings, this essay argues that we need to reconceive of nineteenth-century literary studies beyond the period boundaries of Romantic and Victorian. The sexualization of revolutionary Terror, and particularly of Robespierre, in...

  14. 21st Century Security Manager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian ARION

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We live in world of uncertainty that generates major paradigms changing that affect security risk management. Modern organization’s security risks management can’t be done without a profound knowlegde and daily practice for security governance, security risk management and resilience. 21st Century security manager need to deal with several areas of konwledge in order to succesfully manage security risks. The document presents the advantages, disadvantages and challenges for security managers thah have government backgroud, or IT security backgroud, or are promoted from organization’s inside leaders. There are six different areas of knowledge that successful security programs of the future must incorporate, either in the knowledge base of their leaders or in the collective knowledge of the leading staff. They are government elements, security organization, emerging issue awareness, IT security, business elements and executive leadership.

  15. Urbanization in 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarejos, R G

    1990-01-01

    Due to a combination of rapid population growth and high levels of rural-urban migration, overcrowding will be common in many cities around the world in the 21st century. Currently at 5.3 billion, the global population is expected to increase to 6 billion by the year 2000, and to 9 billion by 2025. Experts predict that urban centers will bear the brunt of the population growth. Rural areas have seen declines in the standard of living, partly due to natural disasters, civil war, and economic policies favoring urban centers. In search of jobs, better access to education, and health services, rural populations will flock to cities. But the rapid growth of cities will inevitably lead to the creation of slums, which will hamper urban development. Urban demographers predict that by the end of the century, 1/2 of the world's population will be urban, and 1/5 of these people will be concentrated in "mega cities," populations of 4 million or more. International migration will play a significant role, as people cross borders in search of opportunity. But contrary to the traditional model of urban growth, much of it will take place in developing countries. According to a 1985 study, developed nations had an urbanization level of 71%, compared to 31% in developing countries. However, experts calculate that by 2025, these levels will practically even out, with an urbanization level of 74% for developing countries and 77% for developed countries. By 2025, 25 cities will have populations of over 9 million, including Mexico City (25.8), Sao Paulo (24.0), Tokyo (20.2), Calcutta (16.5), Greater Bombay (16.0), and New York (15.8).

  16. Plasticity in the 21st Century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Giessen, E.

    2001-01-01

    The 20th century has produced the theory of continuum plasticity as a powerful tool for engineering analysis. However it breaks down at length scales on the order of micrometers, i.e. the projected realm of miniature engineering in the 21st century. Discrete dislocation plasticity is presented as a

  17. Capital in the Twenty-First Century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per H.

    2014-01-01

    Review essay on: Capital in the Twenty-First Century. By Thomas Piketty . Translated by Arthur Goldhammer . Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2014. viii + 685 pp......Review essay on: Capital in the Twenty-First Century. By Thomas Piketty . Translated by Arthur Goldhammer . Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2014. viii + 685 pp...

  18. Compassionate Play in The Ludic Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Dyer

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2013 game designer Eric Zimmerman wrote a provocative manifesto entitled ‘Manifesto for a Ludic Century’ (2013a, in which Zimmerman declares the 21st Century’s dominant cultural form to be games. Consequently, Zimmerman proposes that the individual occupant of the century is therefore in a continuous state of game engagement. As such, this re-contextualisation of game space and play, indefinitely articulates the individual as a constant player and character, and thusly challenges the notions of selfhood. Importantly it should be noted, the state of a ludic century is explicitly assumed as a truth, however superficial it may appear. Accordingly, this paper is then afforded to be an extended hypothesis of the proposed ludic century, rather than a critical dissection and response to Zimmerman’s manifesto. This enables a hermeneutic framing of the questions: ‘What does it mean to live in a ludic century?’and ‘in what capacity may the self exist in the ludic century?’ These questions will attempt to distinguish play as an inherent cultural logic that extends beyond the limitations of explicit ‘gamification’ or instrumental play (Stenros et al., 2009; Zichermann, 2010. Concluding, it is claimed that the ludic century elicits a sustained delusion of self, as the player is confined to the designed game structure, which inhibits authentic engagement and interaction with environment and self. It is proposed that this evokes a form of suffering, the compassionate play within the ludic century.

  19. Nuclear computational science a century in review

    CERN Document Server

    Azmy, Yousry

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear engineering has undergone extensive progress over the years. In the past century, colossal developments have been made and with specific reference to the mathematical theory and computational science underlying this discipline, advances in areas such as high-order discretization methods, Krylov Methods and Iteration Acceleration have steadily grown. Nuclear Computational Science: A Century in Review addresses these topics and many more; topics which hold special ties to the first half of the century, and topics focused around the unique combination of nuclear engineering, computational

  20. AGING: A CHALLENGE FOR THE XXI CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAIDA AZEREDO

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ageing and its consequences are rather new in the Humanity history, that needs answers The author analyses some of the ageing challenges for XXI century which she think is important to give accurate answers.

  1. 21 CENTURY LIBRARIANS AND EFFECTIVE INFORMATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    from remote locations have also created dramatic changes by the end of the 20 th ... collaboration, creativity and innovation, critical thinking and problem solving, ... century librarian is an information warehouse, one with a desperate zeal.

  2. Science diplomacy in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoroff, Nina V

    2009-01-09

    Science diplomacy is the use of scientific collaborations among nations to address the common problems facing 21(st) century humanity and to build constructive international partnerships. There are many ways that scientists can contribute to this process.

  3. Mentoring Surgeons for the 21st Century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singletary, S Eva

    2005-01-01

    Effective mentoring is especially critical in the training of surgeons. The practice of surgery in the 21st century is changing rapidly at every level, requiring a more complex approach to mentoring young...

  4. Revolution, Romanticism and the Long Nineteenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Craciun

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to consider the future of Victorian literary studies within the long nineteenth century, we must go back to that earlier “period” of the nineteenth century, and the French Revolution of 1789. Drawing on the aesthetic and political innovations of 1790s women's writings, this essay argues that we need to reconceive of nineteenth-century literary studies beyond the period boundaries of Romantic and Victorian. The sexualization of revolutionary Terror, and particularly of Robespierre, in Romantic-era writings by women like Helen Maria Williams, Mary Robinson and Fanny Burney, offers surprising precedents for the feminization of Terror associated with the retrospectives of Victorian writers like Carlyle and Dickens. In this respect, and given many other aesthetic continuities (for example, the crossgender and cross-period appeal of the “poetess” figure, the “Victorian period” appears increasingly unsatisfactory when compared to the merits of a long nineteenth-century model for literary studies.

  5. Percy W. Bridgman's second century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, Russell J.

    2010-12-01

    Percy Williams Bridgman's impact on science began in 1909 with his first three experimental papers. These publications on high pressure calibration, techniques, and compressibility, together with the many articles that followed, established his influence on the course of modern high pressure research. Grounded in classical thermodynamics and practical mechanics, his developments showed how the variable of pressure leads to myriad transformations in materials. Studies carried out under a broader range of conditions now provide unprecedented insights into chemical and physical properties at multimegabar pressures and temperatures from millikelvins to thousands of degrees, where novel electronic, magnetic, and superconducting phases are now being discovered. With careful attention to experimental techniques and material performance, Bridgman extended the available pressure range that could be achieved in the laboratory with the development of new devices. We are now witness to continued refinement of static and dynamic compression methods and in situ measurement techniques, including the marriage of high pressure methods with large facilities such as synchrotron, neutron, and laser sources. Bridgman showed the broad range of implications of this work; the modern field of high pressure research now spans physics and chemistry, geosciences and planetary science, materials science and technology, and biology. Selected examples illustrate Bridgman's impact and legacy in this, his second century. For dense hydrogen, new insights have been obtained from high P-T measurements as well as studies of alloys and compounds of hydrogen, leading to the creation of new metallic and superconducting phases. Studies of other hydrogen-rich systems provide both tests of fundamental theory and potentially useful materials for hydrogen storage. High pressure studies of oxides have led to new ferroelectric and multiferroic materials and phases with remarkable properties that guide the

  6. Famous Funerals in 19th Century Cracow

    OpenAIRE

    Bernadeta Wilk

    2006-01-01

    Cracow, the old capital of Polish Kingdom, has always performed a particular role in the Polish history and culture. In the nineteenth century, particulary in the period of galician autonomy 1860-1914, Cracow became the spiritual capital of Poland for generations of Poles who lived in the partitioned country, which was ruled by the three foreign powers together. About this phenomenon decided not only the autonomy but also the old tradition and the symbolism of this town. In the 19 th century ...

  7. Fossil fuels in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Stephen F

    2005-12-01

    An overview of the importance of fossil fuels in supplying the energy requirements of the 21st century, their future supply, and the impact of their use on global climate is presented. Current and potential alternative energy sources are considered. It is concluded that even with substantial increases in energy derived from other sources, fossil fuels will remain a major energy source for much of the 21st century and the sequestration of CO2 will be an increasingly important requirement.

  8. The Greatest Photographers of the Twentieth Century

    OpenAIRE

    David Galenson

    2009-01-01

    A survey of textbooks reveals that scholars consider Alfred Stieglitz to have been the greatest photographer of the twentieth century, followed in order by Walker Evans, Cindy Sherman, Man Ray, and Eugène Atget. Stieglitz, Evans, and Atget were experimental artists, who were committed to realism, whereas Man Ray and Sherman were conceptual innovators, who constructed images to express ideas. During much of the twentieth century, photography was dominated by the experimental approach and aesth...

  9. St. Augustine in Twentieth-Century Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2012-01-01

    A discussion - in a cultural historical perspective - of primarily two important twentieth-century musical works setting texts by St Augustine: Klaus Huber's Soliloquia Sancti Aurelii Augustini and Michael Tippett's The Vision of Saint Augustine.......A discussion - in a cultural historical perspective - of primarily two important twentieth-century musical works setting texts by St Augustine: Klaus Huber's Soliloquia Sancti Aurelii Augustini and Michael Tippett's The Vision of Saint Augustine....

  10. Brazilian Cannibals in Sixteenth-Century Europe and Seventeenth-Century Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leca, R.

    2014-01-01

    This article follows the transmission of a visual trope depicting Brazilian cannibals from accounts of travelers to Brazil in the 16th century to world maps and popular tales in 17th century Japan. The image of tribesmen roasting human limbs over a fire in woodcut illustrations (such as Theodore de

  11. Materials for the 21st century

    CERN Document Server

    Segal, David

    2017-01-01

    The book is a general text that shows how materials can contribute to solving problems facing nations in the 21st century. It is illustrated with diverse applications and highlights the potential of existing materials for everyday life, healthcare and the economies of nations. There are 13 chapters and a glossary of 500 materials with their descriptions, historical development, their use or potential use and a range of references. Specific areas include synthetic polymers (e.g. nylon), natural polymers (e.g. proteins, cellulose) and the role of materials in the development of digital computers and in healthcare. Solid-state lighting, energy supplies in the 21st century, disruptive technologies and intellectual property, in particular patents, are discussed. The book concludes by asking how the 21st century will be characterised. Will it be the Silicon Age, Genomic Age or New Polymer Age, as examples?

  12. Nineteenth-century transnational urban history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus Møller

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to take stock of nineteenth-century transnational urban history. After a short introduction to transnational history, general urban histories are analysed with respect to the ways in which transnational perspectives are incorporated into the narratives. Specific...... contributions to urban history in a transnational perspective are analysed. Approaches to urban planning history that focus on transnational linkages and international organization are discussed. Approaches to urban history within enlarged geographical scales that go beyond the nation-state framework......, with a particular focus on cities as nodes in translocal networks, are analysed. The article concludes with a critical discussion of nineteenth-century transnational urban history....

  13. Women in Eighteenth-century Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    he eighteenth century looms large in the Scottish imagination. It is a century that saw the doubling of the population, rapid urbanisation, industrial growth, the political Union of 1707, the Jacobite Rebellions and the Enlightenment - events that were intrinsic to the creation of the modern nation...... and public lives, this interdisciplinary volume offers articles on women's work, criminal activity, clothing, family, education, writing, travel and more. Applying tools from history, art anthropology, cultural studies, and English literature, it draws on a wide-range of sources, from the written...

  14. Statistics in the 21st century

    CERN Document Server

    Wells, Martin T; Wells, Martin T

    2001-01-01

    Exactly what is the state of the art in statistics as we move forward into the 21st century? What promises, what trends does its future hold? Through the reflections of 70 of the world's leading statistical methodologists, researchers, theorists, and practitioners, Statistics in the 21st Century answers those questions. Originally published in the Journal of the American Statistical Association, this collection of vignettes examines our statistical past, comments on our present, and speculates on our future. Although the coverage is broad and the topics diverse, it reveals the essential intell

  15. [Evaluation of vital constants. 18th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez González, Natividad; Ortega Martínez, Carmen

    2002-05-01

    The evaluation of patients' vital statistics is part of health care and in many cases this is the first step in knowing what is the health status of a patient. Therefore, we are interested in analysing what knowledge nurses had regarding these vital statistics during the 18th century, how they evaluated these statistics and what treatment they applied in order to maintain or balance them whenever they became unstable. A manual written by a nurse in the 18th century in order to aid her colleagues in their treatment of patients is the source of the authors' research material.

  16. Malta and the Nineteenth Century Grain Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Paul Richard

    2009-01-01

    It is often assumed that Britain's colonies followed the British doctrine of free trade in the second half of the nineteenth century. Malta, which became a British colony in 1814, did indeed become an early free trader. However, she failed to liberalize the grain trade, even when the mother country...

  17. Malta and the Nineteenth Century Grain Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Paul Richard

    It is often assumed that Britain's colonies followed the British doctrine of free trade in the second half of the nineteenth century. Malta, which became a British colony in 1814, did indeed become an early free trader. However, she failed to liberalize the grain trade, even when the mother country...

  18. Surviving 1000 centuries can we do it?

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnet, Roger-Maurice

    2010-01-01

    This full color book provides a quantitative view of our civilization over the next 100,000 years. The authors present the dangers and stress the importance of taking decisions in the 21st century to ensure the long-term survival of people on Earth.

  19. Alan Turing: person of the XXth century?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sánchez Ron, José M

    2013-01-01

    “Time” magazine chose Albert Einstein as “Person of the Century.” This was undoubtedly a reasonable choice, but as I will argue in this article, there are also good reasons for contending that Turing might have received this honor...

  20. Looking back at the century of population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This article reports experts' views on the important population trends and events observed in the 20th century. One expert mentioned that demographically the 20th century was the most remarkable century ever. Among its major features were the following: highest rate of growth; highest annual increment; shortest period in history to add 1 billion people; unprecedented decline in fertility; unparalleled increases in life expectancy, with dramatic declines in mortality; and rapid urbanization and the emergence of megacities. An expert from Paris cited changes in ethnic composition in the US and changes in the religious composition of Europe. Among the events considered as important population trends for the 20th century are the following: fertility decline; increase in proportion of older persons; development of hormonal contraceptives; stagnation of population growth in economically rich and industrialized countries; literacy rate of the population; promotion of gender equality and equity; women's empowerment; adoption of broad reproductive health/rights policies; and prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV/AIDS.

  1. Curriculum for the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, David

    1983-01-01

    Urges reconsideration of educational ends. Suggests eight curriculum principles that can help Canadian schools move into the next century. Explains six educational needs roughly based on Maslow's hierarchy (aesthetic needs, need for meaning, self-actualization, self-concept, social needs, need for survival) and relates them to curriculum…

  2. Twentieth-Century Art: Issues of Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Julie

    1990-01-01

    Presents lesson plans designed for secondary students that assess the role of naturalistic representation in twentieth-century art by examining the artwork of four artists: Pablo Picasso, Rene Magritte, David Smith, and Jackson Pollock. Provides background information on each illustration, and outlines discussion and art production activities for…

  3. The 21st Century Information Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Rod

    This paper on the 21st century information environment begins with a section that discusses the impact of e-commerce over the next ten years. The second section addresses government focus areas, including ensuring a telecommunications infrastructure, developing the IT (information technology) industry, promoting innovation and entrepreneurship,…

  4. Directed panspermia: a 21st century perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleator, Roy D; Smith, Niall

    2017-05-01

    Applying 21st century technology to the design and development of a hypothetical extra-terrestrial colonisation programme, we reimagine 'directed panspermia' from the perspective of Crick and Orgel's 'technological society', 44 years after the publication of their original landmark paper.

  5. Making Sense of the Eighteenth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    Pressures on curriculum time force us all to make difficult choices about curriculum content, but the eighteenth century seems to have suffered particular neglect. Inspired by the tercentenary of the accession of the first Georgian king and the interest in the Acts of Union prompted by this year's referendum on Scottish independence, Katharine…

  6. Glimpses of a Century-Old Story

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 4. Glimpses of a Century-Old Story - Agrobacterium, a Pathogen Deployed for Genetic Engineering. Jasmine M Shah. General Article Volume 18 Issue 4 April 2013 pp 336-344 ...

  7. The "Casa dei Bambini": A Century Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the early history of Montessori education from the Italian State Orthophrenic School to the opening of the original Casa dei Bambini in San Lorenzo, Italy on January 6, 1907. Includes a synopsis of Maria Montessori's progressive revelations of the child's developing self over the past century. (JPB)

  8. Build Green: Wood Can Last for Centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen; Samuel V. Glass

    2012-01-01

    This report updates and revises information from the 1976 Forest Service publication by Rodney C. DeGroot, “Your Wood Can Last for Centuries.” It explains why wood decays, alerts the homeowner to conditions that can result in decay in buildings, and describes measures to prevent moisture-related damage to wood.

  9. Affinity Spaces and 21st Century Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, James Paul

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses video games as "attractors" to "affinity spaces." It argues that affinity spaces are key sites today where people teach and learn 21st Century skills. While affinity spaces are proliferating on the Internet as interest-and-passion-driven sites devoted to a common set of endeavors, they are not new, just…

  10. Towards a 21st century ready curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vloon, N.G.J.; Hammer, M.H.M.; Brahimi, N.

    2015-01-01

    Entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship education is generally viewed upon as being important for economic growth in the 21st century. Teaching entrepreneurship however seems to need another approach than regular education to fulfill the professional and ever changing needs. In this perspective active

  11. Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a project that underscores the critical role of this nation's museums and libraries in helping citizens build such 21st century skills as information, communications and technology literacy, critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, civic literacy, and global awareness. Recognizing that every individual requires these…

  12. Phonetics of English in the nineteenth century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    grew. This was reflected in the appearance of a large number of books and other publications dealing with speech sound, and also in the application of phonetics to such diverse areas as language teaching, elocution, teaching the deaf, shorthand writing and dialectology. The nineteenth century can...

  13. 21 CENTURY LIBRARIANS AND EFFECTIVE INFORMATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    competency, lack of technology literacy and inadequate power supply were highlighted as some of the challenges that hinder effective service delivery. The article submits that librarians should make efforts to acquire 21st century skills through personal training so as to be relevant and defend their profession since funds ...

  14. - ED ITO RIAL - A Century's Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rebellions - one in 1914 and another under the flag of the Ossewa-Brandwag during the. Second World War - before the Afrikanerisation of the milit:ur under Adv F.C. ... accomplished much good work with its History and Literature Series. Serious hiatuses still exist yet, at the end of a century and facing a fresh start, the time ...

  15. The twentieth century in European Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The Twentieth Century in European Memory investigates contested and divisive memories of conflicts, world wars, dictatorship, genocide and mass killing. Focusing on the questions of transculturality and reception, the book looks at the ways in which such memories are being shared, debated...

  16. Turkey: migration 18th-20th century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akgündüz, A.; Ness, I.

    2013-01-01

    For many centuries, Europe called the Ottoman empire "Turkey." This applied to the registry of population movements to and from the Ottoman empire insofar as such registrations were made. The country's rulers and inhabitants, however, only took on the name Turkey (Türkiye) in 1923, upon proclamation

  17. Learning from Twentieth Century Hermeneutic Phenomenology for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The implications of commonalities in the contributions of five key thinkers in twentieth century phenomenology are discussed in relation to both original aims and contemporary projects. It is argued that, contrary to the claims of Husserl, phenomenology can only operate as hermeneutic phenomenology. Hermeneutics arose ...

  18. Psychological Science in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Science is constantly changing. If one hopes to keep pace with advances in science, one cannot simply repeat what one has done in the past, whether deciding how to invest limited research funds, searching to replace a retiring colleague, or teaching introductory psychology. Psychological science in the 21st century is more central and integrated…

  19. Managing Reliability in the 21st Century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellin, T.A.

    1998-11-23

    The rapid pace of change at Ike end of the 20th Century should continue unabated well into the 21st Century. The driver will be the marketplace imperative of "faster, better, cheaper." This imperative has already stimulated a revolution-in-engineering in design and manufacturing. In contrast, to date, reliability engineering has not undergone a similar level of change. It is critical that we implement a corresponding revolution-in-reliability-engineering as we enter the new millennium. If we are still using 20th Century reliability approaches in the 21st Century, then reliability issues will be the limiting factor in faster, better, and cheaper. At the heart of this reliability revolution will be a science-based approach to reliability engineering. Science-based reliability will enable building-in reliability, application-specific products, virtual qualification, and predictive maintenance. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate a dialogue on the future of reliability engineering. We will try to gaze into the crystal ball and predict some key issues that will drive reliability programs in the new millennium. In the 21st Century, we will demand more of our reliability programs. We will need the ability to make accurate reliability predictions that will enable optimizing cost, performance and time-to-market to meet the needs of every market segment. We will require that all of these new capabilities be in place prior to the stint of a product development cycle. The management of reliability programs will be driven by quantifiable metrics of value added to the organization business objectives.

  20. High energy astrophysics 21st century workshop 'Space Capabilities in the 21st Century'. [NASA programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhome, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of 20th-century NASA accomplishments and of the infrastructure and technology that NASA plans to have in place in the 21st century is presented. Attention is given to the Great Observatories Program, AXAF, the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, the Cosmic Background Explorer, the Small Explorers Program, the Large Area Modular Array of Reflectors, and the X-Ray Background Survey Spectrometer. Also discussed are earth-to-orbit communication links, transportation in the 1990s, the evolution of the space infrastructure, and the Space Station Freedom. Consideration is given to the possibilities of the 21st-century infrastructure, with emphasis on exploration on Mars and the moon. Topics addressed include telecommunications, navigation, information management, and 21st-century space science.

  1. Evidence for the Dewey Discontinuity Hypothesis: A Rejoinder to Garrison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawat, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that John Dewey underwent a dramatic mid-career shift in thinking, addressing criticisms of two specific contensions (that Dewey backed away from the notion that the frustration of need-driven action begins the search for crative reorganization of behavior patterns and that Dewey disavowed instrumentalism). The paper also examines…

  2. Draft Environmental Impact Statement: Peacekeeper Rail Garrison Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    advanced culture characterized by an extensive trade network and a series of traits such as ceremonial architecture and maize (corn) agriculture...us Little 4N SELECTED HYDROLOGIC CHARACTERISTICS 2 148 8R 010 EB ST ATION REC USO RO USE _ //, I ,or _~ . CS I0 I, stn IA. 1Rtn~I APR 5 1 02

  3. The Garrison Domain: Civil Military Relations in the Cyberspace Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    governance, commerce , communications, and entertainment. The reliance on cyberspace is so predominant it seems unacceptable to not be part of the domain...Almost every type of person and organization on this planet arguably touches the cyberspace domain, directly or indirectly. Because this domain is...Department of Justice (DOJ) has also begun using cyberspace to gather information intelligence. Flying small civilian aircraft with electronic boxes to

  4. Military Organization in Transition from Garrison to Crisis Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    Weber [31; 32] was the role of the charismatic leader in crises environments. His studies of charismatic and situational leadership are classic. Charles...leader based on peacetime evaluative data. The situational leadership model is perhaps the most accepted explanation among scholars [9]. While it may

  5. Unification of the family of Garrison-Wright's phases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cui, Xiao-Dong; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    ... for unification of the abelian geometric phases for a biorthogonal quantum system modeled by a parameterized or time-dependent nonhermitian hamiltonian with a finite and nondegenerate instantaneous...

  6. some garrison and command regimental sergeant majors at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Union Defence Forces in which he served as a. Staff Officer in the Union during World War I and was promoted to the ... nent Force (1st SAMR) as a Battery Sergeant. Major. After service in the German South West. African Campaign ... Capt P. de Waal, Lt C.J.. Hearn, MC. Scientia Militaria, South African Journal of Military ...

  7. Environmental Impact Statement. Peacekeeper Rail Garrison Program. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    Vale Formation and Quaternary alluvium occur onbase. The Vale Formation is composed of shales, sandstones, and dolomite . The alluvium consists of...Woodland site (201$87) contains small amounts of fire-cracked rock, lithics, and calcined bone; two Archaic points are located nearby. Testing revealed no...The contact between these glacial deposits and the underlying Mississippian Age bedrock of carbonaceous shales and dolomitic limestone occurs at a

  8. A century of wind tunnels since Eiffel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanetz, Bruno

    2017-08-01

    Fly higher, faster, preserve the life of test pilots and passengers, many challenges faced by man since the dawn of the twentieth century, with aviation pioneers. Contemporary of the first aerial exploits, wind tunnels, artificially recreating conditions encountered during the flight, have powerfully contributed to the progress of aeronautics. But the use of wind tunnels is not limited to aviation. The research for better performance, coupled with concern for energy saving, encourages manufacturers of ground vehicles to perform aerodynamic tests. Buildings and bridge structures are also concerned. This article deals principally with the wind tunnels built at ONERA during the last century. Somme wind tunnels outside ONERA, even outside France, are also evocated when their characteristics do not exist at ONERA.

  9. Detergents of the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Tan Tai Louis

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Detergents of the 21st century will depend on evolutions in household appliances, in substrates and in consumer needs. In addition, the environmental constraints, which become more and more stringent, will also play an important role, particularly in the formulations. Surfactants, which constitute one of the main raw materials in detergents, will have to be more environmentally friendly with increasing criteria of biodegradability and renewable materials. Builders (phosphates or zeolithes, heavy metal complexants (EDTA and bleaching agents (combination perborate/TAED are also expected to be replaced by biodegradable compounds, with better performances and lower costs. The real raw materials of the detergents of the 21st century will probably be enzymes (oxidase, hydrolase, peroxidase which present several advantages. At the same time, efforts will be made on biodegradable packaging through the use of micro-organisms able to degrade polymers. Finally, in terms of product forms, the concept of concentration might come back through the use of tablets.

  10. Selective Reproduction in the 21st Century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . To this end, selective reproductive technologies (SRTs) have been developed and routinized over the last few decades. In today’s world, selective reproduction is taking place on a historically unprecedented scale; through sex-selective abortions following ultrasound scans, termination of pregnancies following......In the 21st century, human reproduction increasingly involves decisions about which gametes to fertilize, which embryos to implant, or which fetuses to abort. The term ‘selective reproduction’ refers to these increasingly widespread efforts to bring specific kinds of children into being...... detection of fetal anomalies during prenatal screening and testing programs, the development of preimplantation genetic diagnosis techniques as well as the screening of potential gamete donors by egg agencies and sperm banks. Selective Reproduction in the 21st Century provides unique ethnographic insights...

  11. Forest biorefinery : the next century of innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junyong Zhu

    2011-01-01

    The concept of producing cel¬lulosic biofuel, bioproducts, and chemicals using ligno¬celluloses in a biorefinery has been around for over a century. Renewed interest in the biorefinery concept has more recently arisen from concerns about climate change and the depletion of fossil fuels. Much research and progress has been made in the last three decades in the area of...

  12. VISUAL LITERACY FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

    OpenAIRE

    Supsakova, Bozena

    2017-01-01

    The dominance of the pictorial world forms the beginning of the effect of new visual civilisation in the 21st century. Today, we already know that photograph, film and television are just fist stage of visual era. The modern phenomena of digitalisation and mass communication related to the development of information and communication technologies and Internet, dramatically saturate the pictures and pictorial messages to public space and thus also to our everyday life. Posters, billboards and ...

  13. Developing 21st Century Senior Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    containing “required SSC.” Use this list to ensure the system is policed by the Senior Leader Development (SLD) and branch managers through the validation...colleges produce senior leaders who work as organizational managers , leaders , and operational artist. Department of Army should have a more focused...St ra te gy R es ea rc h Pr oj ec t DEVELOPING 21ST CENTURY SENIOR LEADERS BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL KEATON L. BEAUMONT United States Army

  14. Flexibility in 21st Century Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, J.; Miller, M.; Zinaman, O.; Milligan, M.; Arent, D.; Palmintier, B.; O' Malley, M.; Mueller, S.; Lannoye, E.; Tuohy, A.; Kujala, B.; Sommer, M.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Soonee, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    Flexibility of operation--the ability of a power system to respond to change in demand and supply--is a characteristic of all power systems. Flexibility is especially prized in twenty-first century power systems, with higher levels of grid-connected variable renewable energy (primarily, wind and solar). This paper summarizes the analytic frameworks that have emerged to measure this characteristic and distills key principles of flexibility for policy makers.

  15. Intelligence in the Twenty-First Century

    OpenAIRE

    Shebarshin, Leonid V.

    2000-01-01

    The author concludes that the world will most probably remain rife with conflict even in the twenty first century and that the traditional role of intelligence will not only continue but will increase in importance. He characterizes the international situation as being "more of the same historically"; that is, the existence of several different centers of power and mutual conflicts based solely on national interests. In order to protect and promote one's national interests, sovereign states w...

  16. The twentieth century: an American sexual history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuczka, D

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews the history of American sexuality in the 20th century. Section 1 reveals how the nation dealt with the economic technological and social effects of industrialization at the start of the century. Section 2 examines the second decade of the century, which was characterized by the emergence of social and feminist theorists such as Sigmund Freud, who reevaluated the meaning of sex and sexuality beyond the procreative framework. Section 3 explores the shift in sexual behaviors and attitudes, which began during the 1920s. Practices like dating, necking, and petting became part of growing up and a real form of sexuality education. Sections 4 and 5, respectively, examine American sexuality during the Great Depression and the changes in the sexual landscape during the 1940s. Section 6 offers a glimpse on sexuality in the pop culture decade, when television entered American homes. In this period sexual ethics became a hotly debated issue. Section 7 examines the effect of scientific research on female sexuality. Institutional breakthroughs on human sexuality in 1970s are considered in section 8. During this decade, a new goal for sexual education emerged: the promotion of sexual health. Section 9 reviews the issue of AIDS amidst religious-political extremism, which used the epidemic to advance an anti-homosexuality agenda and push abstinence education in schools. Section 10 describes American sexuality at the end of the 20th century, the availability of school-based sexuality education programs, the public response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic, sexuality and politics, and the role of the Internet.

  17. A Look at 20th Century Droughts

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Vijay P.; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2011-01-01

    Droughts exercise a profound effect on the social and economic fabric of nations. Many nations of the world experienced droughts encompassing the full spectrum of severity, areal extent and duration. The result has been that the economic development was hampered and many countries have not yet recouped fully from the ravages of droughts. The first decade of the 21st century has also witnessed varying degrees of droughts across the globe. Therefore, we ask the following questions: (a) Do...

  18. Famous Funerals in 19th Century Cracow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadeta Wilk

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Cracow, the old capital of Polish Kingdom, has always performed a particular role in the Polish history and culture. In the nineteenth century, particulary in the period of galician autonomy 1860-1914, Cracow became the spiritual capital of Poland for generations of Poles who lived in the partitioned country, which was ruled by the three foreign powers together. About this phenomenon decided not only the autonomy but also the old tradition and the symbolism of this town. In the 19 th century and before the First World War, Cracow was the most influential centre of the Polish national life. In this time Crakow’s citizens decided to continue the old tradition of the royal burial. Since there were no longer any Polish monarchs, they resolved that the remains of the greatest national heroes, of writers and artists be buried on the Wawel Cathedral in the cemetery Rakowice and later in the Church of Paulinites fathers “on the rock”. Famous funerals in 19 th century Cracow, of which the best known were those of prince Joseph Poniatowski in 1817, general Thaddeus Kosciusko in 1818, king Casmir the Great in 1869 and of poet Adam Mickiewicz in 1890 alluded to royal ceremonies from the time of Polish independence. These funerals have been one of the main elements in patriotic and religious ceremonies and important part of the nation’s patriotic educations.

  19. Science for the 21st Century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-07-01

    The Federal government plays a key role in supporting the country's science infrastructure, a national treasure, and scientific research, an investment in our future. Scientific discoveries transform the way we think about our universe and ourselves, from the vastness of space to molecular-level biology. In innovations such as drugs derived through biotechnology and new communications technologies we see constant evidence of the power of science to improve lives and address national challenges. We had not yet learned to fly at the dawn of the 20th century, and could not have imagined the amazing 20th century inventions that we now take for granted. As we move into the 21st century, we eagerly anticipate new insights, discoveries, and technologies that will inspire and enrich us for many decades to come. This report presents the critical responsibilities of our Federal science enterprise and the actions taken by the Federal research agencies, through the National Science and Technology Council, to align our programs with scientific opportunity and with national needs. The many examples show how our science enterprise has responded to the President's priorities for homeland and national security, economic growth, health research, and the environment. In addition, we show how the science agencies work together to set priorities; coordinate related research programs; leverage investments to promote discovery, translate science into national benefits, and sustain the national research enterprise; and promote excellence in math and science education and work force development.

  20. Dance Education in the 21st Century: A Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Anne Green

    2005-01-01

    Margaret H'Doubler brought the magic of dance to the 20th century, yet the 21st century has yet to find a person to rekindle the same public desire for dance education. Consequently, the future of dance education in the next century is hard to predict. Based on an informal survey of fellow advisory board members of Dance and the Child…

  1. A century of progress in industrial and organizational psychology: Discoveries and the next century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Eduardo; Kozlowski, Steve W J; Chen, Gilad

    2017-03-01

    In a century of research published in the Journal of Applied Psychology , we have seen significant advances in our science. The results of this science have broad applications to the workplace and implications for improving organizational effectiveness through a variety of avenues. Research has focused on understanding constructs, relationships, and processes at multiple levels, including individual, team, and organizational. A plethora of research methods and questions have driven this work, resulting in a nuanced understanding of what matters in the workplace. In this paper, we synthesize the most salient discoveries, findings, and/or conclusions in 19 domains. We seek to summarize the progress that has been made and highlight the most salient directions for future work such that the next century of research in industrial and organizational psychological science can be as impactful as the first century has been. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Soil Fertility Management a Century Ago in Farmers of Forty Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R. Heckman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Published just over a century ago, Farmers of Forty Centuries or Permanent Agriculture in China, Korea, and Japan, served to document the viability and productivity of traditional agricultural systems that relied on composting, and complete recycling of all types of natural waste materials, as a means of sustaining soil fertility. This cardinal rule of waste management and organic soil husbandry became known as “the law of return” to organic farming. With regards to nutrient management, organic farming methods uses restorative cultural practices that include the law of return principle which encourages the closure of nutrient cycles. In these respects, organic farming methods are arguably more firmly grounded in ecology and sustainability than the promotions of the chemical fertilizer industry which has largely displaced traditional soil fertility practices. Farmers of Forty Centuries is a classic with valuable lessons and experience to offer towards teaching modern concepts in sustainable agriculture.

  3. The Crimea and Rum in the 13th–14th centuries: The Anatolian Diaspora and Urban Culture of Solkhat »

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Kramarovsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It was within the period between the second half of the thirteenth century and the early fourteenth century that the Northern Black Sea region started to get islamized. Solkhat, the administrative centre of the Golden Horde in the Crimea, played a crucial part in this process. The current paper is concerned with two closely related issues: the Anatolian diaspora and the development of the “Asia Minor” vector in the culture of Solkhat. According to some historical sources, the Seljuk expansion into the Crimea started as early as in the 1220s, when Hussam al-Din Chopan seized Sudak. The Seljuks built a garrison Mosque there and established the Sharia lows for a certain period of time. These actions, however, didn’t have a far-reaching effect. There is no evidence of the population being forced into Islam. When Hussam al-Din moved over to Rum, he left a garrison in Sudak to control the sea ports. The archeological findings in the Byzantine settlement of Khersones reveal a more diverse pattern of relationships with Islamic Anatolia. The findings include a substantial group of the Seljuk ceramics of the thirteenth century, coins and some other artifacts. I believe it is not unlikely that there was a small Islamic community in the Northern part of the city. It could have been destroyed during the period of the Seljuk expansion in the first third of the thirteenth century. The Turkic people of Anatolia started to penetrate the Eastern Crimea in great numbers in 1265. This process was influenced by the diaspora made up of the supporters of the ex-sultan of Rum, ‘Izz ad-Din Kaykaus (1246–1257. ‘Izz ad-Din’s Horde arrived in Crimea via Dobrudja in 1265, following their patron. This fact is mentioned in a historical compilation made by a Turkish author Yiaziyi-oglu Ali under sultan Murad (1421–1451, probably, in 1424. According to this compilation, which, in its turn, is based on the information provided by Ibn Bibi (the thirteenth century

  4. 19th Century Ankara Through Historical Poems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özge Öztekin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A city is a place whose meaning is found in the poetry created there. In Kevin Lynch’s words, a city presents the imagination with an unlimited potential for “readability”. If we consider this unlimited readability through poetry, it can be said that attempts to find the zeitgeist of a city at a certain time through literary texts must evaluate the poetry, the city and the time. This is because poetry (or literature in general, just like a city, has an important memory which oscillates through ideas of its past and future. In this sense, divan poetry and one particular example of it—historical “manzume” poems—are memories which richly illustrate the ‘continuity’ and ‘change’ within a period. This work, on 19th century Ankara, aims to evaluate the traces reflected in historical manzume poems of the time they were written. Five historical manzume poems in three texts out of seventy 19th century divan collections scanned for this work were found to be about Ankara. Two of these manzumes are by Cazib, one by Ziver Pasha, and one by Mahmud Celaleddin Pasha. The first of these is on Ankara’s dervish lodge; the second on a barracks being built in Ankara; the third on Vecihi Pasha’s governorship of Ankara; the fourth on the the Mayoral Residence. In addition to these, a manzume on the construction of Hamidiye Caddesi by Mahmud Celaleddin Pasha is discovered with in scope of the work. The aim of this work is to provide a contribution to city history through a commentary on elements of 19th century poetry concerning Ankara.

  5. Haphazard Reality Half a Century of Science

    CERN Document Server

    Casimir, HBG

    2010-01-01

    Casimir, himself a famous physician, studied and worked with three great physicists of the twentieth century: Niels Bohr, Wolfgang Pauli and Paul Ehrenfest. In his autobiography, the brilliant theoretician lets the reader witness the revolution that led to quantum physics, whose influence on modern society turned out to be many times larger than the first atomic physicists could have imagined. Through his involvement in the technical-scientific and the business aspects of physics, through management positions at Philips Research Laboratory and as a member of the Board of Directors of Philips,

  6. France: 17th-20th centuries

    OpenAIRE

    Renneville, Marc

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Discutant du Panel 2 – 2.00-4.00 p.m. France: 17th-20th centuries Chair: Lorraine Paterson, Oxford University. An Experimental Penal Colony in the French Caribbean: The Fort-Royal ‘niggers chain’ (Martinique, 1764-1790) by Marie Houllemare, University of Amiens ; The Prison Administration in Morocco under the Era of the French Protectorate: The Improbable Control of an Institution by Nicolas Derasse, Lille 2 University; ‘Moral Rubbish in Close Proximity’: International...

  7. Benjamin Banneker's 18th Century Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Sethanne

    2018-01-01

    Benjamin Banneker is considered to be the first African-American man of science (1731-1806), a contempory of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. He was a self taught clock maker, mathematician, and astronomer. He owned land in Baltimore County near Ellicott City, Maryland where he farmed tobacco. He is especially known for his work on the Boundary Survey of our new Capital. Surveyors place boundary stones along the boundary of the nascent Capital. Banneker was part of the team who measured the latitutde and longitude for each stone. Using 18th century surveying techniques Banneker became part of the early history of Washington DC. He also published popular almanacs.

  8. 20th Century Accounts of American Citizenship

    OpenAIRE

    Jed Donoghue; Bob White

    2014-01-01

    Accounts of citizenship by Presidents of the American Political Science Association (APSA) are examined through Mannheim¡¯s sociology of knowledge. We use Marshall as a platform to reconceptualise the dynamics of Mannheim¡¯s three incommensurable ¡®thought styles¡¯: one liberal; one conservative; and one dialectically social. We suggest on this basis that American political citizenship in the twentieth century entails three incompatible but concurrent ¡®thought styles¡¯, that involve a triple...

  9. Half a century of Ramachandran plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carugo, Oliviero; Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina

    2013-08-01

    On the occasion of their fiftieth birthday, it is opportune to review the first half century of Ramachandran plots. In the present review, some of the most relevant aspects of this fifty-year history are summarized, from the original ideas of Gopalasamudram Narayana Ramachandran to subsequent revisions and to applications in structural biology. This will not be a guided walk through five decades of Ramachandran plots, but a commented summary of the lines along which the original ideas evolved and continue to develop, and of their applications.

  10. Danish Capitalism in the 20th Century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Martin Jes; Sløk-Madsen, Stefan Kirkegaard

    One of the most peculiar characteristics of the Danish economy is the many world leading, specialized corporations. With only approximately 5.5 million inhabitants the country hosts some of the world largest companies within several industries. These companies grew out of a capitalist economy...... marked by large-scale redistribution and a very active public sector. The purpose of this book project is to analyze development of Danish capitalism in the 20th century. The first of our hypothesis state that the phases of Danish capitalism and the general corporate strategies reflected each other...

  11. Arming shoes of the fifteenth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volken Marquita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Military footwear for the fifteenth century includes arming shoes worn under sabatons. Written sources suggest arming shoes and footwear used for fighting were ordinary shoes adapted for the purpose. Archaeological footwear was examined for signs of such modifications. Medieval shoe technology is presented, showing the range of footwear and its uses and gait biomechanics. Based on experiences from re-enactors wearing armours, medieval shoe styles are discussed for appropriateness as arming shoes. The question of why medieval military footwear shows no purposed development is addressed.

  12. Pro Bono Publico--a century later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S B; Salber, E J

    1977-08-01

    From the introduction of Pro Bono Publico smoking tobacco in Durham, NC a century ago, the production of tobacco products has become a vital part of the state's economy. How this may relate to the smoking behavior, and consequently to the health of its residents is assessed from smoking patterns of adult residents of a rural area of Durham County. Male smoking rates are considerably higher than U.S. estimates whereas female rates are lower. The national trend of increasing incidence of lung cancer can be expected to continue in North Carolina and may be even greater due to the high rate of smoking.

  13. Health Physics in the 21st Century

    CERN Document Server

    Bevelacqua, Joseph John

    2008-01-01

    Adopting a proactive approach and focusing on emerging radiation-generating technologies, Health Physics in the 21st Century meets the growing need for a presentation of the relevant radiological characteristics and hazards. As such, this monograph discusses those technologies that will affect the health physics and radiation protection profession over the decades to come. After an introductory overview, the second part of this book looks at fission and fusion energy, followed by a section devoted to accelerators, while the final main section deals with radiation on manned space missions.

  14. Mammalian developmental genetics in the twentieth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artzt, Karen

    2012-12-01

    This Perspectives is a review of the breathtaking history of mammalian genetics in the past century and, in particular, of the ways in which genetic thinking has illuminated aspects of mouse development. To illustrate the power of that thinking, selected hypothesis-driven experiments and technical advances are discussed. Also included in this account are the beginnings of mouse genetics at the Bussey Institute, Columbia University, and The Jackson Laboratory and a retrospective discussion of one of the classic problems in developmental genetics, the T/t complex and its genetic enigmas.

  15. 21st Century South African Science Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARAIVAN LUIZA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses some aspects of South African science fiction, starting with its beginnings in the 1920s and focusing on some 21st century writings. Thus Lauren Beukes’ novels Moxyland (2008 and Zoo City (2010 are taken into consideration in order to present new trends in South African literature and the way science fiction has been marked by Apartheid. The second South African science fiction writer whose writings are examined is Henrietta Rose-Innes (with her novel Nineveh, published in 2011 as this consolidates women's presence in the SF world.

  16. Extraction of 16th Century Calender Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Jakob Povl; Etheridge, Christian

    at the Cultural Heritage & Archaeometric Research Team, SDU. Upon finding medieval manuscript fragments in the university library’s special collections, scholars at the Centre for Medieval Literature are consulted. In most cases, digital pictures of the finds will circulate in the international community...... of medieval scholars. Thousands of 16th and 17th Century books are stored in the University Library of Southern Denmark. One out of five of these books is expected to contain medieval manuscript fragments or fragments of rare prints, e.g. incunabula....

  17. Federal laboratories for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gover, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huray, P.G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Federal laboratories have successfully filled many roles for the public; however, as the 21st Century nears it is time to rethink and reevaluate how Federal laboratories can better support the public and identify new roles for this class of publicly-owned institutions. The productivity of the Federal laboratory system can be increased by making use of public outcome metrics, by benchmarking laboratories, by deploying innovative new governance models, by partnerships of Federal laboratories with universities and companies, and by accelerating the transition of federal laboratories and the agencies that own them into learning organizations. The authors must learn how government-owned laboratories in other countries serve their public. Taiwan`s government laboratory, Industrial Technology Research Institute, has been particularly successful in promoting economic growth. It is time to stop operating Federal laboratories as monopoly institutions; therefore, competition between Federal laboratories must be promoted. Additionally, Federal laboratories capable of addressing emerging 21st century public problems must be identified and given the challenge of serving the public in innovative new ways. Increased investment in case studies of particular programs at Federal laboratories and research on the public utility of a system of Federal laboratories could lead to increased productivity of laboratories. Elimination of risk-averse Federal laboratory and agency bureaucracies would also have dramatic impact on the productivity of the Federal laboratory system. Appropriately used, the US Federal laboratory system offers the US an innovative advantage over other nations.

  18. The twenty-first century in space

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This final entry in the History of Human Space Exploration mini-series by Ben Evans continues with an in-depth look at the latter part of the 20th century and the start of the new millennium. Picking up where Partnership in Space left off, the story commemorating the evolution of manned space exploration unfolds in further detail. More than fifty years after Yuri Gagarin’s pioneering journey into space, Evans extends his overview of how that momentous voyage continued through the decades which followed. The Twenty-first Century in Space, the sixth book in the series, explores how the fledgling partnership between the United States and Russia in the 1990s gradually bore fruit and laid the groundwork for today’s International Space Station. The narrative follows the convergence of the Shuttle and Mir programs, together with standalone missions, including servicing the Hubble Space Telescope, many of whose technical and human lessons enabled the first efforts to build the ISS in orbit. The book also looks to...

  19. Three centuries of Slovakian drought dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büntgen, U.; Brázdil, R.; Frank, D.; Esper, J.

    2010-08-01

    Tree-ring data from Slovakia are used to reconstruct decadal-scale fluctuations of the self-calibrated Palmer Drought Severity Index (scPDSI) over 1744-2006. The ring width chronology correlates at 0.58 (annual) and 0.88 (decadal) with regional-scale (48-50°N and 18-20°E) summer (June-August) scPDSI variations (1901-2002). Driest and wettest years common to the tree-ring and target data are 1947, 1948, 1964, and 1916, 1927, 1938, 1941, respectively. The model indicates decadal-scale drought ~1780-1810, 1850-1870, 1940-1960, and during the late twentieth century. The wettest period occurred ~1745-1775. Instrumental measurements and documentary evidence allow the reconstructed drought extremes to be verified and also provide additional insights on associated synoptic drivers and socioeconomic impacts. Comparison of anomalous dry conditions with European-scale fields of 500 hPa geopotential height retains positive pressure anomalies centered over Central Europe leading to atmospheric stability, subsidence and dry conditions. Negative mid-tropospheric geopotential height anomalies over Western Europe are connected with anomalous wet conditions over Slovakia. Nine existing, annually resolved hydro-climatic reconstructions from Central Europe, which were herein considered for comparison with the Slovakian findings, reveal significant high- to low-frequency coherency among the majority of records. Differences between the Slovakian and the other reconstructions are most evident at the end of the nineteenth century.

  20. Three centuries of Slovakian drought dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buentgen, U.; Frank, D.; Esper, J. [Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Birmensdorf (Switzerland); Brazdil, R. [Masaryk University, Institute of Geography, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Tree-ring data from Slovakia are used to reconstruct decadal-scale fluctuations of the self-calibrated Palmer Drought Severity Index (scPDSI) over 1744-2006. The ring width chronology correlates at 0.58 (annual) and 0.88 (decadal) with regional-scale (48-50 N and 18-20 E) summer (June-August) scPDSI variations (1901-2002). Driest and wettest years common to the tree-ring and target data are 1947, 1948, 1964, and 1916, 1927, 1938, 1941, respectively. The model indicates decadal-scale drought {proportional_to}1780-1810, 1850-1870, 1940-1960, and during the late twentieth century. The wettest period occurred {proportional_to}1745-1775. Instrumental measurements and documentary evidence allow the reconstructed drought extremes to be verified and also provide additional insights on associated synoptic drivers and socioeconomic impacts. Comparison of anomalous dry conditions with European-scale fields of 500 hPa geopotential height retains positive pressure anomalies centered over Central Europe leading to atmospheric stability, subsidence and dry conditions. Negative mid-tropospheric geopotential height anomalies over Western Europe are connected with anomalous wet conditions over Slovakia. Nine existing, annually resolved hydro-climatic reconstructions from Central Europe, which were herein considered for comparison with the Slovakian findings, reveal significant high- to low-frequency coherency among the majority of records. Differences between the Slovakian and the other reconstructions are most evident at the end of the nineteenth century. (orig.)

  1. History of twentieth-century physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kapitza, Sergei P

    1995-01-01

    The meaning and message of the history of science will be discussed with relevance to XX century physics. This decisive period began in 1894-95 with the discoveries of the electron,X-rays and radioactivity,with the consequent development of relativity and quantumphysics. Connections of the development of science and society in XX century with culture and the influence on industry will be examined. Finally, the corruption of physics by the military will be considered. The influence of physics on chemistry and biology will be briefly treated and the impact of the approach and method of physics on modern thinking will be assessed. It should be kept in mind that the history of science is not a way of getting a simplified or adulterated presentation of the subject ,in this case of physics and so some understanding of general physics will be assumed. On the other hand, the broader generalisations of the history of ideas and events are illustrated (if not proven) by the facts (and myths) of science. Finally,as an e...

  2. Pharmacognosy in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas Kinghorn, A

    2001-02-01

    The term pharmacognosy as a constituent scientific discipline of pharmacy has been in use for nearly 200 years, and it refers to studies on natural product drugs. During the last half of the 20th century, pharmacognosy evolved from being a descriptive botanical subject to one having a more chemical and biological focus. At the beginning of the 21st century, pharmacognosy teaching in academic pharmacy institutions has been given new relevance, as a result of the explosive growth in the use of herbal remedies (phytomedicines) in modern pharmacy practice, particularly in western Europe and North America. In turn, pharmacognosy research areas are continuing to expand, and now include aspects of cell and molecular biology in relation to natural products, ethnobotany and phytotherapy, in addition to the more traditional analytical method development and phytochemistry. Examples are provided in this review of promising bioactive compounds obtained in two multidisciplinary natural product drug discovery projects, aimed at the elucidation of new plant-derived cancer chemotherapeutic agents and novel cancer chemopreventives, respectively. The systematic study of herbal remedies offers pharmacognosy groups an attractive new area of research, ranging from investigating the biologically active principles of phytomedicines and their mode of action and potential drug interactions, to quality control, and involvement in clinical trials.

  3. POLITICAL ISLAM IN THE 21ST CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferran Izquierdo Brichs

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s, political Islam or Islamism has created enormous concern both in the political media and the news media. The revolution in Iran in the late 1970s and the election victory by FIS in Algeria in the late 1980s represented two decisive points in the popular and ideological mobilisation by Islamist groups. Immediately after that, the civil war in Algeria and terrorist violence left their mark on the 1990s. The perception of Islamism today is still associated, in many cases, with the dynamics of the end of the past century, and with the jihadism of a few fundamentalist groups, without taking into account the fact that the majority of Islamist groups have undergone an enormous evolution, and that the context in which they are operating is also very different. As we will see, instead of the jihadism or the ideological radicalness of the past century, today’s political Islam is much better represented by the moderation (both ideological and in terms of political activity of Turkey’s AKP party, the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, Morocco’s PJD, Tunisia’s al-Nahdah and most of the parties and large groups. Central factors in this dynamic of moderation are, on one hand, the link between Islamist groups with regimes and, on the other, the claims for and acceptance of liberal democracy as a strategy in their political struggle.

  4. Early Portuguese meteorological measurements (18th century)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoforado, M. J.; Vaquero, J. M.; Trigo, R. M.; Taborda, J. P.

    2012-02-01

    Natural proxies, documentary evidence and instrumental data are the only sources used to reconstruct past climates. In this paper, we present the 18th century meteorologists (either Portuguese or foreigners) who made the first observations at several sites in Continental Portugal, Madeira Island and Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), from 1749 until 1802. Information is given concerning observation site, variables observed, measurement period, methods of measurements and sources (both manuscript and printed). Some examples from the data usefulness are given: rainfall variability in Madeira (1749-1753) and in continental Portugal (1781-1793) was reconstructed, allowing to extend towards the late 18th century the well known negative correlation between the NAO index and seasonal rainfall. Furthermore, previously unpublished data for 1783-1784 have allowed analysing the consequences of the Lakagígar eruption in Portugal: foggy and haze days are referred to in summer 1783, but unlike the hot summer observed in northern and central Europe, temperatures in Portugal were lower than average. Additionally, observations from Rio de Janeiro in Brazil show that the Lakagígar consequences may well have spread to sectors of the Southern Hemisphere. Although the series are short, the data have been used for climate reconstruction studies and may also be useful to improve the quality of large scale reconstruction datasets.

  5. Early Portuguese meteorological records (18th century)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoforado, M. J.; Vaquero, J. M.; Trigo, R. M.; Taborda, J. P.

    2011-10-01

    Natural proxies, documentary evidence and instrumental data are the main sources used to reconstruct past climates. In this paper, we present the 18th century meteorologists (either Portuguese or foreigners), who made the first observations at several sites in Continental Portugal, Madeira Island and Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), from 1749 until 1802. Information is given concerning observation site, variables observed, measurement period, methodologies and sources (both manuscript and printed). Some examples from the data usefulness are given: rainfall variability in Madeira (1749-1753) and in Continental Portugal (1781-1793) was reconstructed, allowing to extend towards the late 18th century the well known negative correlation between the NAO index and seasonal rainfall. Furthermore, previously unpublished data for 1783-1784 has allowed analysing the consequences of the Laki eruption in Portugal: foggy and haze days are referred to in summer 1783, but unlike the hot summer observed in Northern and Central Europe, temperatures in Portugal were lower than average. Additionally, observations from Rio de Janeiro in Brazil show that the Laki consequences may well have spread to sectors of the Southern Hemisphere. Although the series are short, the data will be used for climate reconstruction studies focused in Southern Portugal and are also useful to improve the quality of large scale reconstruction datasets.

  6. Knowledge society in 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Urbanová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the increasing need of education in 21st century and on some problems which emerged in this context – the economists prefer to emphasize the development and growth, profit and effectiveness, and they can overlook general, ethical, and essential problems and needs of the contemporary world. These problems are not resolved by simple algometrical approaches, but they require multi-disciplined paradigms, which can provide social sciences.Especially in the 21st century we need wide-ranging critical thinking as a basis of responsible ethical behaviour. However in the current educational environment in the tertiary educational system we can observe over-emphasizing of utilitarian requirements. We produce professionals who are expected to be able to find quick, effective but also far-seeing solutions of any given problem, which is in obvious contradiction. This article discussed three conceptions of a human with the emphasis on the concept of “homo socio-oeconomicus”. This concept enables to see the world in wide context and develops necessary critical thinking, which is also economically more advantageous from the long-term point of view. That is why education in sociological, psychological, philosophical, political and other social sciences should not be considered by economists as something useless without any economic value, but as something that can help them to understand themselves, their environment and the consequences of their decisions. This is the core of this contribution.

  7. Astrology in seventeenth-century Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseder, Claudia

    2010-06-01

    This article discusses three aspects of the history of astrology in seventeenth-century Peru that are of larger interest for the history of science in Latin America: Creole concerns about indigenous idolatry, the impact of the Inquisition on natural philosophy, and communication between scholars within the Spanish colonies and the transatlantic world. Drawing mainly on the scholars Antonio de la Calancha, Juan de Figueroa, and Ruiz de Lozano, along with several Jesuits, the article analyzes how natural and medical astrology took shape in Peru and how they fostered astronomical investigations of the southern skies. While natural and medical astrology, showing New and Old World influences, oscillated between orthodoxy and heterodoxy, and between scholasticism and new science, judicial astrology remained undeveloped. Toward the end of the seventeenth century the discourse about astrology took an unexpected turn, reflecting a newly invigorated moral and Christian reading of the heavens that was in part a response to a deep-rooted dissatisfaction with the failure of the extirpation of idolatry campaigns. Inscribing divine and cardinal virtues, the Virgin Mary, Christian saints, and Greco-Roman allegories into the heavens was considered a way to finally solve the problem of idolatry and to convey Creole greatness.

  8. Vaccines for the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delany, Isabel; Rappuoli, Rino; De Gregorio, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    In the last century, vaccination has been the most effective medical intervention to reduce death and morbidity caused by infectious diseases. It is believed that vaccines save at least 2–3 million lives per year worldwide. Smallpox has been eradicated and polio has almost disappeared worldwide through global vaccine campaigns. Most of the viral and bacterial infections that traditionally affected children have been drastically reduced thanks to national immunization programs in developed countries. However, many diseases are not yet preventable by vaccination, and vaccines have not been fully exploited for target populations such as elderly and pregnant women. This review focuses on the state of the art of recent clinical trials of vaccines for major unmet medical needs such as HIV, malaria, TB, and cancer. In addition, we describe the innovative technologies currently used in vaccine research and development including adjuvants, vectors, nucleic acid vaccines, and structure-based antigen design. The hope is that thanks to these technologies, more diseases will be addressed in the 21st century by novel preventative and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:24803000

  9. Exhibition: Linus Pauling and the Twentieth Century

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On April 28 the exhibit Linus Pauling and the Twentieth Century organised by UNIDIR (United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research) and SGI (Soka Gakkai International) as well as with the contributions of CERN and the University of Geneva, opened at the United Nations Office of Geneva. Linus Pauling is the only person to date to have won two unshared Nobel Prizes: Chemistry in 1954 and Peace in 1962. The first was awarded for his landmark research on the nature of the chemical bond and its application in understanding the structure of complex substances. The second one acknowledged his courageous protest against atmospheric nuclear testing and his championship of international peace. The exhibit, for audience of all ages, traces seven decades of Linus Pauling's life and influence on the 20th century. Before starting its European tour at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, the exhibit opened in 1998 in San Francisco and then travelled within the United-States and to Japan with an attendance of more than one...

  10. Exhibition: Linus Pauling and the Twentieth Century

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On April 28 the exhibit Linus Pauling and the Twentieth Century organised by UNIDIR (United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research) and SGI (Soka Gakkai International) as well as with the contributions of CERN and the University of Geneva, opens at the United Nations Office of Geneva. Linus Pauling is the only person to date to have won two unshared Nobel Prizes: Chemistry in 1954 and Peace in 1962. The first was awarded for his landmark research on the nature of the chemical bond and its application in understanding the structure of complex substances. The second one acknowledged his courageous protest against atmospheric nuclear testing and his championship of international peace. The exhibit, for all ages' audiences, traces seven decades of Linus Pauling's life and influence on the 20th century. Before starting its European tour at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, the exhibit opened in 1998 in San Francisco and then travelled within the United-States and to Japan with an attendance of more than one m...

  11. Nineteenth-Century Agrarian Populism and Twentieth-Century Communitarianism: Points of Contact and Contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael N.

    1995-01-01

    Connects contemporary communitarian ideas to the agenda of the 19th-century populist movement. The populist educational agenda (the agrarian revolt and Farmers' Alliance) provides historical examples of the implementation of communitarian educational theory. The populist movement as an example of communitarianism highlights an instance of a…

  12. Book of extremes why the 21st century isn’t like the 20th century

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Ted G

    2014-01-01

    What makes the 21st century different from the 20th century? This century is the century of extremes -- political, economic, social, and global black-swan events happening with increasing frequency and severity. Book of Extremes is a tour of the current reality as seen through the lens of complexity theory – the only theory capable of explaining why the Arab Spring happened and why it will happen again; why social networks in the virtual world behave like flashmobs in the physical world; why financial bubbles blow up in our faces and will grow and burst again; why the rich get richer and will continue to get richer regardless of governmental policies; why the future of economic wealth and national power lies in comparative advantage and global trade; why natural disasters will continue to get bigger and happen more frequently; and why the Internet – invented by the US -- is headed for a global monopoly controlled by a non-US corporation. It is also about the extreme innovations and heroic innovators yet t...

  13. Leadership for a healthy 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Every economic institution finds itself caught on the horns of a dilemma: Competing sets of values strike a conflict between social good and economic wealth, regardless of whether organizations articulate it. The struggle in U.S. health care, however, is both more acute and poignant. On the one hand, ethical and cultural values require societal commitments to the well-being of the individual. Who among us would want to refuse help to someone sick or injured? On the other hand, market forces require an economic accounting of health care. Social trends emphasize a mission to provide care for all, while managed care promotes the industry's fidelity to a balanced ledger. U.S. health care is thus defined by paradox. The nation spends more than $1.3 trillion annually on health care--a national line-item larger than the economies of all other nations except two (Germany and Japan). A new study by the Health Care Financing Administration warns that health care spending may nearly double to $2.1 trillion by 2007. Yet the industry is perceived to be too "resource-constrained" to assure health care services for all citizens. This poses a key question: Are there too few resources, or are we simply not allocating them in the best ways possible? Health care's "double bottom line"--social and economic accountability--typifies the social and economic milieu of health care as the final pages turn on the 20th Century. And, it is this duality that forms the underlying theme for the landmark study--Leadership for a Healthy 21st Century--conducted over the course of the past year by Arthur Andersen and The Healthcare Forum Foundation, with primary research support from DYG, Inc. and Baruch Lev, professor at the Stern School of Business, New York University. The study was designed to investigate a new economic model emerging in the information economy and its impact on health care; the evolving values of consumers in relation to business, health and health care; and the values of

  14. Viva Voce: Speech and Orality in Eighteenth-Century Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Walle, Taylor Fontaine

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation traces an alternative history of an understudied and often-maligned eighteenth-century genre: speech. Conventional narratives of the eighteenth century have tended to emphasize the increasing dominance of print, but my project recovers an active interest and confidence in spoken language. Despite a perception in the period that speech was transient, mutable, and vulnerable to corruption, I show that, paradoxically, eighteenth-century authors consistently turn to speech—both...

  15. L.S. Vygotsky in the 21st century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ardila Alfredo

    2016-01-01

      Although Lev Vygotsky's interpretation of human cognition was proposed almost one century ago, new scientific and technological advances have significantly supported many of his ideas and hypotheses...

  16. Financial crises of XIX century in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Z. Moshenskyi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article systematically examines the course of major financial crises of the late nineteenth century (the crises of 1848, 1857, 1873 in the financial centers of Ukraine at that time, namely Kуiv, Lviv, Odessa. The paper shows the specifics of these financial centers connected with the investments in profitable sugar industry of Kyiv; with the international trade and massive exports of grain in Odessa; with the beginning of Galician oil extraction and the creation of numerous oil companies in Lviv. After brief description of these crises in the world the author provides the numerous examples for each of the financial centers revealing their specificity inUkraine. The main emphasis is given on the impact of the crises on securities markets, particularly on the dynamics of stock prices.

  17. [Twentieth-century Penelopes: popular culture revisited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, Cleci Eulalia

    2010-01-01

    During their settlement of the so-called Old Italian Colonies of Rio Grande do Sul, immigrants constructed a set of positive values that were to serve as an emotional support and a means of outside communication. When women immigrants embroidered images and sayings on wall hangings or kitchen towels made of rustic fabric, they helped nourish the dream of a better life, sought by all and achieved by some. The objects crafted by these twentieth-century Penelopes bear witness to a way of doing, thinking, and acting. Local museums and exhibits have fostered the recovery of old-time embroidery techniques and themes; sold at open-air markets and regional festivals, these products represent income for women whose age excludes them from the formal labor market.

  18. Motivating Students in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedden, Mandy L; Clark, Kevin R

    2016-07-01

    To examine instructors' and students' perspectives on motivation in the classroom and clinical environments and to explore instructional strategies educators can use to motivate college students in the 21st century. Articles selected for this review were from peer-reviewed journals and scholarly sources that emphasized student and educator perspectives on motivation and instructional strategies to increase student motivation. Understanding how college students are motivated can help educators engage students in lessons and activities, ultimately improving the students' academic performance. Students exhibit increased motivation in classes when educators have high expectations, conduct an open-atmosphere classroom, and use multidimensional teaching strategies. Instructional styles such as connecting with students, creating an interactive classroom, and guiding and reminding students improved student motivation. Radiologic science educators must be mindful of how college students are motivated and use various instructional strategies to increase students' motivation in the classroom and clinical setting. ©2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  19. Digital Humanities in the 21st Century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2016-01-01

    In this article it is argued that one of the major transformative factors of the humanities at the beginning of the 21st century is the shift from analogue to digital source material, and that this shift will affect the humanities in a variety of ways. But various kinds of digital material...... are not digital in the same way, which a distinction between digitized, born-digital, and reborn-digital may help us acknowledge, thereby helping us to understand how each of these types of digital material affects different phases of scholarly work in its own way. This is illustrated by a detailed comparison...... of the nature of digitized collections and web archives....

  20. A Half-century of SETI Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuch, H. Paul

    We begin our journey with a brief review of half a century of SETI science. The material in this introductory chapter is offered for the benefit of those educated laypersons whose enthusiasm for the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence exceeds their detailed knowledge of the relevant technologies. It is my hope that readers of this volume will better appreciate the material which follows if they first have a basic understanding of SETI concepts. Hence, I offer an overview, which is intended not to be exhaustive, but rather representative. Together, we will explore the nature of radio telescopes, experimental design strategies, SETI instrumentation, signal analysis, and the hallmarks of artificiality that allow us to differentiate between natural astrophysical emissions and intelligent interstellar transmissions. If you are already a technical specialist in these areas, feel free to bypass this introduction, and proceed directly to the subsequent chapters.

  1. Effective Leadership in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Leaders know how to achieve goals and inspire people along the way. While the terms and definitions may change with the times, it is important to understand the skills and abilities needed to lead in the 21st century. Most effective leaders have one element in common, and that is they are able to keep their teams engaged. If team members are not engaged, they may very well leave the organization. With four generations in the workplace, leaders must adapt and modify their leadership style in order to maintain employee engagement. The ability to lead effectively is based on a number of skills, including communication, motivation, vision, modeling, demonstrating empathy, confidence, persistence, and integrity.

  2. Butterfly community shifts over two centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Jan Christian; Segerer, Andreas; Ulrich, Werner; Torchyk, Olena; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Schmitt, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Environmental changes strongly impact the distribution of species and subsequently the composition of species assemblages. Although most community ecology studies represent temporal snap shots, long-term observations are rather rare. However, only such time series allow the identification of species composition shifts over several decades or even centuries. We analyzed changes in the species composition of a southeastern German butterfly and burnet moth community over nearly 2 centuries (1840-2013). We classified all species observed over this period according to their ecological tolerance, thereby assessing their degree of habitat specialisation. This classification was based on traits of the butterfly and burnet moth species and on their larval host plants. We collected data on temperature and precipitation for our study area over the same period. The number of species declined substantially from 1840 (117 species) to 2013 (71 species). The proportion of habitat specialists decreased, and most of these are currently endangered. In contrast, the proportion of habitat generalists increased. Species with restricted dispersal behavior and species in need of areas poor in soil nutrients had severe losses. Furthermore, our data indicated a decrease in species composition similarity between different decades over time. These data on species composition changes and the general trends of modifications may reflect effects from climate change and atmospheric nitrogen loads, as indicated by the ecological characteristics of host plant species and local changes in habitat configuration with increasing fragmentation. Our observation of major declines over time of currently threatened and protected species shows the importance of efficient conservation strategies. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  3. Acoustic emission: The first half century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouillard, T.F.

    1994-08-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) is approaching the half century mark, having had its beginning in 1950 with the work of Joseph Kaiser. During the 1950s and 1960s researchers delved into the fundamentals of acoustic emission, developed instrumentation specifically for AE, and characterized the AE behavior of many materials. AE was starting to be recognized for its unique capabilities as an NDT method for monitoring dynamic processes. In the decade of the 1970s research activities became more coordinated and directed with the formation of the working groups, and its use as an NDT method continued to increase for industrial applications. In the 1980s the computer became a basic component for both instrumentation and data analysis, and today it has sparked a resurgence of opportunities for research and development. Today we are seeing a transition to waveform-based AE analysis and a shift in AE activities with more emphasis on applications than on research. From the beginning, we have been fortunate to have had so many dedicated savants with different fields of expertise contribute in a collective way to bring AE to a mature, fully developed technology and leave a legacy of knowledge recorded in its literature. AE literature has been a key indicator of the amount of activity, the proportion of research to application, the emphasis on what was of current interest, and the direction AE has taken. The following is a brief survey of the history of acoustic emission with emphasis on development of the infrastructure over the past half century.

  4. Inviting Twenty-First Century Students to the Eighteenth-Century Party

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Strong Hansen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a classroom activity that increases students’ connection to literary characters, and by extension, texts. The activity, constructed as a party attended by literary characters, tasks students with taking on the point of view of one character in an assigned novel. This can encourage a student to see the viewpoint of a character that differs from him or her in gender, social status, or any other category of difference. In heightening students’ relationship to eighteenth-century characters, I argue, instructors can bring the eighteenth century closer to contemporary students as well as increase students’ sensitivity to viewpoints that differ from their own. A post-activity writing assignment extends the activity to encourage student analysis and reflection.

  5. From 21st century skills to 21st century human being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjøllund, Niels-Peder Osmundsen; Jørgensen, Tobias Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    In Denmark, in Scandinavia and in all of Europe there is a lot of talk about the skills of the future. But if we want our students to aim for and gain a different learning outcome, we must set new and different standards for the way we teach – and start to walk the talk. The focus of the presenta......In Denmark, in Scandinavia and in all of Europe there is a lot of talk about the skills of the future. But if we want our students to aim for and gain a different learning outcome, we must set new and different standards for the way we teach – and start to walk the talk. The focus...... CLD and we must take the next step, where we stop thinking about skills and competencies and start thinking and acting on the fundamental existential implication of the 21st century. What we need now is not more 21st century skills, but 21st century human beings....

  6. Fostering Higher Order Critical Thinking in 21st Century Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Mary Miller

    2012-01-01

    Teachers working with increasingly diverse student populations are expected, for the first time in American history, to bring all students to high levels of proficiency. American graduates must compete with graduates from other nations, given the realities of the 21st century global economy. American teachers must possess 21st century skills in…

  7. Standards for the 21st-Century Learner in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of School Librarians (NJ3), 2009

    2009-01-01

    How are AASL's (American Association of School Librarians) new learning standards, the "Standards for the 21st-Century Learner," incorporated into the school library media program? This publication from AASL takes an in-depth look at the strands of the "Standards for the 21st-Century Learner" and the indicators within those strands. It also…

  8. [Prolegomenon of the Czech pharmacognosy: 21st century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opletal, Lubomír

    2013-04-01

    The paper analyzes the basic features of the development of pharmacognosy as the oldest profile subject of pharmacy primarily in Europe during the 20th century. Historical consequences of its development are declared, which should create the basis for its embedment, new content and tasks in Czech pharmacy of the 21st century, especially in education at Czech universities.

  9. 21 st century librarians and effective information service delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It sheds light on the development of hybrid libraries as a panacea for meeting the information needs of twenty first century library users who exhibit much dexterity in using new technologies. It further explores emerging trends in information provision which can be employed by 21st century librarians to reposition the ...

  10. 21st Century leadership skills for learning networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, Floor; Evers, Arnoud; Geijsel, Femke; Vermeulen, Marjan

    2018-01-01

    Ultimate goal: to prepare pupils for a life in a society that requires 21st century skills and actions Immediate focus: teachers and principals develop 21st century skills in the practice of their work → together with researchers principals co-create tools to support teacher learning.

  11. A century of trends in adult human height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Camilla Trab; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Molbo, Drude

    2016-01-01

    the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8-144.8). The height differential between the tallest...

  12. Commerce and morality in eighteenth-century Italian political thought

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.H. Stapelbroek (Koen)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis special issue presents a number of studies by young scholars in the history of eighteenth-century Italian political thought, a field that was put on the map in the second half of the twentieth century by the efforts of Franco Venturi. By taking up the theme of commerce and morality,

  13. Vast Electronic Catalog Transforms Research on the 18th Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Beverly T.

    1992-01-01

    A new electronic bibliography, the Eighteenth Century Short Title Catalog, currently contains title and location information for 315,000 English-language books, monographs, and ephemera printed during the eighteenth century. The database is available to scholars on the Research Libraries Information Network and the British Library Automated…

  14. Smart Social Networking: 21st Century Teaching and Learning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boholano, Helen B.

    2017-01-01

    Education in the 21st century highlights globalization and internationalization. Pre-service teachers in the 21st century are technology savvy. To effectively engage and teach generation Z students, preservice teachers will help the educational system meet this requirement. The educational systems must be outfitted with a prerequisite of ICT…

  15. A century of progress in weed control in hardwood seedbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. South

    2009-01-01

    Weeds have existed in nurseries since before the time Bartram grew hardwoods during the 18th century. Hand weeding was the primary method of weed control during the first part of the 20th century. From 1931 to 1970, advances in chemistry increased the use of herbicides, and advances in engineering increased the reliance on machines for cultivation. Many managers now...

  16. Global Warming and 21st Century Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdun, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-01-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twentyfirst century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman- Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  17. Osteogenic Sarcoma: A 21st Century Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osasan, Stephen; Zhang, Mingyong; Shen, Fan; Paul, Paulose J; Persad, Sujata; Sergi, Consolato

    2016-09-01

    Compared to other bone tumors, bone osteogenic sarcoma (BOS) continues to confer a much grimmer prognosis as the survival benefit of traditional chemotherapy treatment regimens is still unsatisfactory. Chemotherapy was demonstrated to be effective in eradicating both primary tumor and pulmonary metastases in the last century, with effective agents used in various combination regimens having changed the survival rate from less than 10% to 75%. The most common primary bone cancer, BOS is conventionally a primary intramedullary high-grade malignant tumor characterized by malignant cells forming immature bone or osteoid. BOS is a disease with diverse morphological presentations. The treatment of all morphological variants seem to have been the same for over 30 years. The introduction of antiproliferative agents such as insulin growth factor-binding protein 3 hold promise of a potentially veritable therapeutic target. In this review, we highlight recent data on osteosarcoma to consolidate a platform able to connect bench and bedside. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Biology curriculum in twentieth-century Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberá, Óscar; Zanón, Beatriz; Pérez-Pl, José Francisco

    1999-01-01

    One hundred years of history of Spanish biology curricula are reviewed in this article. The aim of this analysis is focused on the relationship between socially controversial biological issues and the decisionmaking procedures in the construction of the national curricula published under the different regimes that have governed Spain over the last 100 years. The study covers the secondary level of schooling (age 10 up to university), and is based mainly on the data afforded by the official publications of the nine national curricula in twentieth-century Spain, and some of the main textbooks used for this schooling level. Special attention is given to the teaching of evolution, the most sensitive issue in biology education, and some parallelisms are traced and compared with similar phenomena occurring in other countries. The new trends in biology education from the last reform of the Spanish education system are briefly discussed. This study provides a perspective of the pressures affecting socially controversial issues included in education. These pressures have been identified mainly as political, social, and religious beliefs held by powerful and influential social groups, the same kinds of forces that have existed in other countries worldwide. Studies such as this one, about the real forces that have shaped curriculum development in the past, are vital for understanding the present circumstances in biology education and, therefore, unavoidable in order to enhance future standards in biology education.

  19. REPUBLIC IN THE 18TH CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Wrześniak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article briefly studies the way of perceiving of the Uffizi Gallery in Florence by Polish travellers during the period when the museum was subject to the so-called Enlightenment order. The analysis of memoirs from diaries of the Polish Grand Tour indicates that they were considerably influenced by Italian guidebooks and texts by French travellers, among which the most popular was Voyage d’un français en Italie fait dans années 1765–1766 by Joseph- Jérôme Lalande, who was eagerly referred to and his passages quoted. Realising the scheme of the Uffizi Gallery’s descriptions by Polish travellers, one should not hastily assume they lacked the sense of observation, taste or aesthetic sensitivity, and finally the ability to assess a work of art. An in-depth analysis of Polish notes indicated that enlightened arrivals from the Vistula River could critically relate not only to the text of the guide or the French description mentioned, directly ascertaining: You were not right, Mr Lalande!, but also that they came to Florence prepared for the reception of an artwork and the museum itself. They were primarily interested in newly acquired objects or changes in the exhibition. The picture of a Polish traveller, as it is seen through Polish 18th-century accounts, who notes – frequently remotely – fleeting impressions, but without a doubt, they are perfectly aware of what they are looking at.

  20. Psycholinguistics: a half century of monologism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Daniel C; Kowal, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    The contention of this article is that, since its inception in the mid-twentieth century, mainstream psycholinguistics has been monologistic, that is, has concentrated on monologue as its source of empirical material and has, largely implicitly, involved a monologistic epistemology. The article is not a comprehensive history of psycholinguistics but does attempt to establish a historical perspective. Monologism has been the historical bias of Cartesianism, positivism, behaviorism, and cognitivism. Monologism is concerned only with the person in whom cognition takes place and from whom communication proceeds. It is essentially asocial. By contrast, the merits of dialogism include an openness to the sociocultural, interactive nature of all cognition and communication and an empirical engagement of contextualized discourse situations. Dialogism is presented here not as a supplement to mainstream psycholinguistics but as a radical innovation that construes mainstream psycholinguistics as "strongly misleading if presented as a full theory of communication through spoken interaction" (Linell, 1998, p. 23). Some approaches to dialogism and research on dialogue are critically reviewed.

  1. Biofabrication: a 21st century manufacturing paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, V; Trusk, T; Kasyanov, V; Little, S; Swaja, R; Markwald, R

    2009-06-01

    Biofabrication can be defined as the production of complex living and non-living biological products from raw materials such as living cells, molecules, extracellular matrices, and biomaterials. Cell and developmental biology, biomaterials science, and mechanical engineering are the main disciplines contributing to the emergence of biofabrication technology. The industrial potential of biofabrication technology is far beyond the traditional medically oriented tissue engineering and organ printing and, in the short term, it is essential for developing potentially highly predictive human cell- and tissue-based technologies for drug discovery, drug toxicity, environmental toxicology assays, and complex in vitro models of human development and diseases. In the long term, biofabrication can also contribute to the development of novel biotechnologies for sustainable energy production in the future biofuel industry and dramatically transform traditional animal-based agriculture by inventing 'animal-free' food, leather, and fur products. Thus, the broad spectrum of potential applications and rapidly growing arsenal of biofabrication methods strongly suggests that biofabrication can become a dominant technological platform and new paradigm for 21st century manufacturing. The main objectives of this review are defining biofabrication, outlining the most essential disciplines critical for emergence of this field, analysis of the evolving arsenal of biofabrication technologies and their potential practical applications, as well as a discussion of the common challenges being faced by biofabrication technologies, and the necessary conditions for the development of a global biofabrication research community and commercially successful biofabrication industry.

  2. Infectious diseases in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumate, J

    1997-01-01

    Infecto-contagious diseases in the twenty-first century with respect to precedent will see themselves deprived of smallpox, dracunculiasis and very probably of paralyzing poliomyelitis. Vaccination-preventable diseases, such as measles, whooping cough, diphtheria, tetanus, rabies, some forms of meningitis, yellow fever and episodes of disseminated tuberculosis will greatly diminish in their rates of morbi-lethality; the elimination of some, and the eradication of measles, are expected. Other diseases such as diarrhea (including cholera), geo-helminthiasis, some severe respiratory tract infections and the majority of vector-transmitted infectious diseases will decrease due to improvements in potable water services, drainage, sanitary food control, living quarters, and individual and community anti-vector action. Leprosy, onchocerciasis and several parasitoses will be controlled by the available antimicrobial drugs. Infectious diseases will continue to be an important health problem due to: Reduction in the immunocompetence resulting from the aging of the population, chemotherapies necessary for neoplasms, and autoimmune pathology and the survival of persons with primary immunodeficiencies; lifestyles prone to infectious pathology, such as mega-city urbanization, children in day care centers, industrialized foods, intravenous drug addiction, sexual liberation, global commerce, and tourism; antibiotic-multiresistant microbial flora; environmental disturbances as a result of global warming, deforestation, the settling of virgin areas, dams, the large-scale use of pesticides, fertilizers and antimicrobials, and natural/social disasters generators of poverty, violence and deprivation will result in emergence or re-emergence of infectious diseases already controlled in the past.

  3. Epidemiology of Stuttering: 21st Century Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yairi, Ehud; Ambrose, Nicoline

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological advances in stuttering during the current century are reviewed within the perspectives of past knowledge. The review is organized in six sections: (a) onset (b) incidence (c) prevalence (d) developmental paths, (e) genetics and (f) subtypes. It is concluded that: (1) most of the risk for stuttering onset is over by age 5, earlier than has been previously thought, with a male-to-female ratio near onset smaller than what has been thought, (2) there are indications that the lifespan incidence in the general population may be higher than the 5% commonly cited in past work, (3) the average prevalence over the lifespan may be lower than the commonly held 1%, (4) the effects of race, ethnicity, culture, bilingualism, and socioeconomic status on the incidence/prevalence of stuttering remain uncertain, (5) longitudinal, as well as incidence and prevalence studies support high levels of natural recovery from stuttering, (6) advances in biological genetic research have brought within reach the identification of candidate genes that contribute to stuttering in the population at large, (7) subtype-differentiation has attracted growing interest, with most of the accumulated evidence supporting a distinction between persistent and recovered subtypes. PMID:23773662

  4. Sarmatian Attributes in Archaeological Complexes of Catacombs Burials in Arys Culture of Southern Kazakhstan (1st Century B.C. - 3rd Century A.D.)

    OpenAIRE

    Podushkin Aleksandr Nikolaevich

    2015-01-01

    The publication is devoted to archaeological research of monuments of the catacomb of Arys culture of Southern Kazakhstan (1st Century B.C. - 3rd Century A.D.). Now scientists have a complete understanding of the range and typology, periodization and chronology of monuments of this culture. There are three stages: Karaultobe (4th century B.C. - 1st century A.D.); Karatobe (1st Century B.C. - 4th century A.D.); Altintobe (4th-6th centuries A.D.). These stages are characterized by specific ...

  5. Glaciers in 21st Century Himalayan Geopolitics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J. S.; Wessels, R.; Kieffer, H. H.

    2002-05-01

    Glaciers are ablating rapidly the world over. Nowhere are the rates of retreat and downwasting greater than in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya (HKH) region. It is estimated that over the next century, 40,000 square kilometers of present glacier area in the HKH region will become ice free. Most of this area is in major valleys and the lowest glaciated mountain passes. The existence and characteristics of glaciers have security impacts, and rapidly changing HKH glaciers have broad strategic implications: (1) Glaciers supply much of the fresh water and hydroelectric power in South and Central Asia, and so glaciers are valuable resources. (2) Shared economic interests in water, hydroelectricity, flood hazards, and habitat preservation are a force for common cause and reasoned international relations. (3) Glaciers and their high mountains generally pose a natural barrier tending to isolate people. Historically, they have hindered trade and intercultural exchanges and have protected against aggression. This has further promoted an independent spirit of the region's many ethnic groups. (4) Although glaciers are generally incompatible with human development and habitation, many of the HKH region's glaciers and their mountains have become sanctuaries and transit routes for militants. Siachen Glacier in Kashmir has for 17 years been "the world's highest battlefield," with tens of thousands of troops deployed on both sides of the India/Pakistan line of control. In 1999, that conflict threatened to trigger all-out warfare, and perhaps nuclear warfare. Other recent terrorist and military action has taken place on glaciers in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. As terrorists are forced from easily controlled territories, many may tend to migrate toward the highest ground, where definitive encounters may take place in severe alpine glacial environments. This should be a major concern in Nepali security planning, where an Army offensive is attempting to reign in an increasingly robust and brutal

  6. Forecasts for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, John

    1999-03-01

    The population of the world is increasing, mainly in the developing world, and is projected to saturate within about 100 years at up to twice the present population of 6 billion people [1]. Studies [2,3,4] show that, historically, the population growth rate has varied inversely as the annual per capita energy use in most parts of the developing world, where per capita energy use is typically less than 1 tonne of oil equivalent energy per year. However, in areas with more than 2 to 3 tonnes of oil equivalent of energy per year per person the growth rate is around zero. If this trend continues, a stable world population will require, allowing for energy efficiency improvements, some 2 to 3 times the present annual energy use. There is an abundance of energy in the world both exploited and potential to meet this need—fossil, fission, and renewables—but it is not evenly distributed, some is costly, and there are issues of environmental pollution in present use, that may limit use. Fusion energy is a potential longer-term source with attractive environmental features. It is the least developed energy option and still faces a challenging development path, but there are many of areas of the world that would benefit hugely from its deployment from the latter part of the 21st century onward, and it is important to consider how it might be deployed. Most fusion power plant options considered today show an economy of scale, owing to the fixed distance needed for shielding fusion neutrons, tritium breeding and handling the heat loads. One interesting approach is to use the power plant to co-produce electricity and hydrogen to facilitate the introduction of lower cost-of-electricity, multi-gigawatt power plants [5].

  7. Japanese Astronomy in the Seventh Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sôma, Mitsuru; Tanikawa, Kiyotaka

    There are astronomical records in both the α and β volumes of the Nihongi, and we have already shown that the reliability of these records depends on which particular volumes they appeared in. In order to strengthen and extend our previous conclusion, we study more thoroughly the astronomical data in the Nihongi and analyze the reliability more precisely with reference to Chinese and Korean history books. There are only three astronomical records in the volumes of the α group, and none of these can be said to be observational. In the volumes of the β group, there is, in each of the three volumes, one record, which was surely based on actual observations. Five records of comets are common to Chinese records, but wording and the form of the records are different in Japanese and in the continental records, so the records are judged not to have been transported from China or Korea. Most of the remaining records represent local phenomena, which we believe are all based on observation. In the case of eclipse records, we not only analyze the reliability of each event but also apply elementary statistics to weather records in order to examine the completeness of the records. We conclude that there were major changes in observational astronomy in Japan during the seventh century. Specifically, observations were made during AD 620-641 and AD 672-686 (in the β group of the Nihongi), but no observations were made between AD 642 and 671 (in the α group). After AD 686 (during the Jitô era), no observations were made except for one appulse observation of Mars and Jupiter.

  8. Technology and the 21st Century government organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, B.E.; Bronzini, M.S.; Goeltz, R.T.; Hilliard, M.; Irby, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design for the 21st Century government organization. This design is applicable to the future US Postal Service and generalizable to other large government agencies. The design is based on conjectures in three areas: capabilities of information technology in the early 21st Century; motivations, needs, strengths, and weaknesses of members of the 21st Century workforce; and needs of large public organizations. The design addresses topics such as coordination, career tracks, communications, and the seamless integration of information resources.

  9. Technology and the 21st Century government organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, B.E.; Bronzini, M.S.; Goeltz, R.T.; Hilliard, M.; Irby, M.

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents a conceptual design for the 21st Century government organization. This design is applicable to the future US Postal Service and generalizable to other large government agencies. The design is based on conjectures in three areas: capabilities of information technology in the early 21st Century; motivations, needs, strengths, and weaknesses of members of the 21st Century workforce; and needs of large public organizations. The design addresses topics such as coordination, career tracks, communications, and the seamless integration of information resources.

  10. XVII CENTURY TURKISH DIVAN POETS WHOSE WORKS HAVE BEEN COMPOSED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Nuri PARMAKSIZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical Turkish poetry and classical Turkish music have been inseparable art branches for centuries. The best examples of music and poems created in the same periods have been the most prominent proof of this. One of these periods without doubt have been 17th century. It has been observed that composers demand divan poetry of 17thand 18thcentury greatly. Mystical poems constitute most of the poems composed in these centuries. Almost all of the poems in the divans of some mystic divan poets have been composed. In this study, the poets in the mentioned century have been determined and then the poems in the new and previous repertoires of these poets have been tried to reveal with screening and comparasion methods .

  11. Tuvan modernization of the early 20th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimiza K. Lamazhaa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Article reviews the period from the end of 19th century to 1930 as a period of Tuvan modernization, justifies the distinction between this period and the period of forced Soviet mobilization (starting from 1930.

  12. 21st century librarians and effective information service delivery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to take risks; abiding public service perspective; good interpersonal skills; skill at enabling and ... century librarian can provide effective library services through mobile .... University Libraries: A Survey of Access, Usage, and Problems in the.

  13. Psychological symptoms and medical responses in nineteenth-century India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhika, P; Murthy, Pratima; Sarin, Alok; Jain, Sanjeev

    2015-03-01

    The article documents medical approaches to mental illness in mid- to late-nineteenth-century India through examining the Indian Medical Gazette and other medical accounts. By the late nineteenth century, psychiatry in Europe moved from discussions around asylum-based care to a nuanced and informed debate about the nature of mental symptoms. This included ideas on phrenology and craniometry, biological and psycho-social causes, physical and drug treatments, many of which travelled to India. Simultaneously, indigenous socio-medical ideas were being debated. From the early to the mid-nineteenth century, not much distinction was made between the Western and the native 'mind', and consequently the diagnosis and investigation of mental symptoms did not differ. However, by the late nineteenth century Western medicine considered the 'Western mind' as more civilized and sophisticated than the 'native mind. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Transforming Defense: National Security in the 21st Century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... We are convinced that the challenges of the twenty-first century will be quantitatively and qualitatively different from those of the Cold War and require fundamental change to our national security...

  15. Philosophy and science in geography, XVI-XXI centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Capel

    2016-03-01

    Without losing the critical contributions that the discipline had in the last half century, and the ones that they have been made in various branches of human geography, from the historical to cultural geography.

  16. Canonization in early twentieth-century Chinese art history

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guo Hui

    2014-01-01

    .... In Chinese art history, the idea of a canon including masterpieces, important artists, and forms of art, dates back to the mid ninth century when Zhang Yanyuan wrote his painting history Record...

  17. National Metrical Types in Nineteenth Century Art Song

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh VanHandel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available William Rothstein’s article “National metrical types in music of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries” (2008 proposes a distinction between the metrical habits of 18th and early 19th century German music and those of Italian and French music of that period. Based on theoretical treatises and compositional practice, he outlines these national metrical types and discusses the characteristics of each type. This paper presents the results of a study designed to determine whether, and to what degree, Rothstein’s characterizations of national metrical types are present in 19th century French and German art song. Studying metrical habits in this genre may provide a lens into changing metrical conceptions of 19th century theorists and composers, as well as to the metrical habits and compositional style of individual 19th century French and German art song composers.

  18. Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature and the Humanities Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roberta

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the work of Andrew Debicki, an academician with a commitment to twentieth century poetry. Considers the position of peninsular Spanish literature within the context of the humanities today. (Author/VWL)

  19. RSA Opening Minds: A Curriculum for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, Sara

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the RSA Opening Minds competence framework, an innovative curriculum to meet the needs of young people as future employees, lifelong learners and as citizens of the twenty-first century.

  20. Spectroscopy, colorimetry, and biological chemistry in the nineteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsler, M G

    1981-01-01

    The development of colorimetry and spectroscopy in the nineteenth century is described. An account is given of the application of their techniques to biological chemistry during that period. PMID:7014652

  1. Alan Turing: person of the XXth century?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez Ron, José M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available “Time” magazine chose Albert Einstein as “Person of the Century.” This was undoubtedly a reasonable choice, but as I will argue in this article, there are also good reasons for contending that Turing might have received this honor. One such reason I consider here is his purely scientific work, which stems from the greatest mathematical tradition, and how it affected the development of mathematics itself and was finally instrumental in shaping a new technological world. This is true both as regards the computation and treatment of information as well as the establishment of new forms of social relations. In relation to the foregoing, we have Turing’s contributions to the deciphering of secret codes during the Second World War, which in a somewhat metaphorical sense may be regarded as a new tool for undermining personal privacy, that civil right whose denial finally ruined his lifeEn diciembre de 1999, la revista Time eligió a Albert Einstein “The Person of the Century”. Fue, no cabe duda, una elección razonable, pero, como se argumenta en este artículo, existen también buenos argumentos para sostener que Turing podría haber recibido tal honor. En apoyo de semejante tesis están sus trabajos puramente científicos, que se esbozan aquí, trabajos que entroncan con la mejor tradición matemática, y cómo afectaron al desarrollo matemático, siendo finalmente instrumentales en la configuración de un nuevo mundo tecnológico, tanto en lo que al cálculo y manejo de información se refiere, como en lo relativo al establecimiento de nuevas formas de relaciones sociales. Relacionadas con lo anterior, se encuentran las aportaciones que hizo durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial al desciframiento de códigos secretos, que, en cierto sentido, metafórico, se pueden considerar como una nueva herramienta para socavar la privacidad, ese derecho civil cuya negación arruinó su propia vida.

  2. The Workforce for the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry O'Lawrence

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: In today’s changing economy, economic growth depends on career and technical programs for skill training. Background: This study discusses the key area in promoting individual learning and skill training and discusses the importance of career education and training as a way of promoting economic growth. Methodology\t: This study uses a qualitative study approach to investigate and report on the status and influence of Workforce Education and Development and its economic importance. Contribution: This report contributes to the knowledge base common to all work settings that can solve many human performance problems in the workplace. Findings: This study also justifies and validates the ideas on the importance of workforce education and development in the 21st century as a way of developing economic growth and providing learning to make individuals competitive in the global economy. Recommendations for Practitioners\t: For practitioners, this study suggests that we must always have discussions of what leads to career success and understanding that there is not enough high-skill/high-wage employment to go around. Therefore, developing these skills requires a decision about a career or related group of jobs to prepare to compete for them; we have to provide training needed in order to be competitive in global economy. Recommendation for Researchers: Researchers have to develop strategies to promote career direction with willingness to evaluate the level of academic interest, level of career focus and readiness for life away from home (attitudes, skills and knowledge of self. Impact on Society: Institutions must regularly evaluate curriculum to reflect the rapid technological changes and the globalization of world markets that reflect their mission and develop students’ mindset to always think big and think outside the box in order to be competitive in the global market. Change is external, transition is internal. It is important

  3. Comparative endocrinology in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denver, R.J.; Hopkins, P.M.; McCormick, S.D.; Propper, C.R.; Riddiford, L.; Sower, S.A.; Wingfield, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    responses to the environment. A major challenge for life scientists in the 21st century is to understand how a changing environment impacts all life on earth. A full understanding of the capabilities of organisms to respond to environmental variation, and the resilience of organisms challenged by environmental changes and extremes, is necessary for understanding the impact of pollution and climatic change on the viability of populations. Comparative endocrinologists have a key role to play in these efforts.

  4. Geoscience and the 21st Century Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Bralower, T. J.; Blockstein, D.; Keane, C. M.; Kirk, K. B.; Schejbal, D.; Wilson, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    Geoscience knowledge and skills play new roles in the workforce as our society addresses the challenges of living safely and sustainably on Earth. As a result, we expect a wider range of future career opportunities for students with education in the geosciences and related fields. A workshop offered by the InTeGrate STEP Center on 'Geoscience and the 21st Century Workforce' brought together representatives from 24 programs with a substantial geoscience component, representatives from different employment sectors, and workforce scholars to explore the intersections between geoscience education and employment. As has been reported elsewhere, employment in energy, environmental and extractive sectors for geoscientists with core geology, quantitative and communication skills is expected to be robust over the next decade as demand for resources grow and a significant part of the current workforce retires. Relatively little is known about employment opportunities in emerging areas such as green energy or sustainability consulting. Employers at the workshop from all sectors are seeking the combination of strong technical, quantitative, communication, time management, and critical thinking skills. The specific technical skills are highly specific to the employer and employment needs. Thus there is not a single answer to the question 'What skills make a student employable?'. Employers at this workshop emphasized the value of data analysis, quantitative, and problem solving skills over broad awareness of policy issues. Employers value the ability to articulate an appropriate, effective, creative solution to problems. Employers are also very interested in enthusiasm and drive. Participants felt that the learning outcomes that their programs have in place were in line with the needs expressed by employers. Preparing students for the workforce requires attention to professional skills, as well as to the skills needed to identify career pathways and land a job. This critical

  5. NATO’s Relevance in the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    5a. CONTRACT NUMBER NATO’S RELEVANCE IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...belief of community, partnership and cooperation are essential elements of the advancement of self interest.5 In the era of globalization nations still...Christopher Coker, Globalisation and Insecurity in the Twenty-first Century: NATO and the Management of Risk (The International Institute for Strategic

  6. The Mid-Century Revolution in American Foreign Policy Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    world politics in the 20th century: 1 I. The expansion of the European state system into a world system, with the superpowers peripheral to Europe playing...emergence of science and technology as great and semi-independent variables in the equations of world politics . This has, in turn, created the...transoceanic states of .. , THERE HAVE BEEN AT LEAST SIX IMPORTANT TRANS- FORMATIONS AFFECTING THE US ROLE IN WORLD POLITICS IN THE 20TH CENTURY. European

  7. Japan: Asian peacekeeper of the 21st century?

    OpenAIRE

    Young, William J.

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The building of a "New World Order" presents the United States with novel opportunities and problems. If the 21st century is to be the "Pacific Century," US-Japan relations will become the cornerstone of US policy. The ongoing drawdown of US forces places a renewed emphasis on the security relationship between the two countries. The United States has long desired an increase in the security role played by Japanese military ...

  8. Technology transfer and expert migration in nineteenth-century Cuba

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández de Pinedo Echevarría, Nadia; Pretel, David

    2013-01-01

    During the nineteenth century the Cuban sugar plantation became a highly dynamic space, open to foreign intervention at many levels. The increasing commercial prospects in the Cuban economy from the mid-nineteenth century led American, French and British manufacturers of refining equipment to actively commercialize their innovations in Cuba. Many of these foreign manufacturers of machinery had branches and agents in Havana. This article seeks to highlight the technological links b...

  9. Absinthism: a fictitious 19th century syndrome with present impact

    OpenAIRE

    Lachenmeier Dirk W; Padosch Stephan A; Kröner Lars U

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Absinthe, a bitter spirit containing wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L.), was banned at the beginning of the 20th century as consequence of its supposed unique adverse effects. After nearly century-long prohibition, absinthe has seen a resurgence after recent de-restriction in many European countries. This review provides information on the history of absinthe and one of its constituent, thujone. Medical and toxicological aspects experienced and discovered before the prohibition of ab...

  10. Wrong lovers in the 19th century Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekma, G

    Various styles of "male love" occurring in the 19th century are introduced. Locations and public ordinances relating to these styles of love are discussed. The development of the homosexual role is broached along with the question of whether attitudes and laws of the 19th century were responsible in part for the development of normative expectations for homosexuality which might in turn have repressed its growth.

  11. Radically Rethinking Agriculture for the 21st Century

    KAUST Repository

    Fedoroff, N. V.

    2010-02-11

    Population growth, arable land and fresh water limits, and climate change have profound implications for the ability of agriculture to meet this century\\'s demands for food, feed, fiber, and fuel while reducing the environmental impact of their production. Success depends on the acceptance and use of contemporary molecular techniques, as well as the increasing development of farming systems that use saline water and integrate nutrient flows. © 2010 American Association for the Advancement for Science. All Rights Reserved.

  12. A Conceptual World: Why the Art of the Twentieth Century is So Different From the Art of All Earlier Centuries

    OpenAIRE

    David W. Galenson

    2006-01-01

    This paper surveys 31 new genres of art that were invented during the twentieth century, chronologically from collage, papier colle, and readymades through installation, performance, and earthworks. This unprecedented proliferation in art forms was a direct consequence of the dominant role of conceptual innovation in the century's art, as a series of young iconoclasts deliberately broke the conventions and rules of existing artistic practice in the process of devising new ways to express thei...

  13. 21st Century Water Conservation Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2013-12-01

    This is an encore presentation of what was presented at the 2012 AGU International Conference. It was entitled: 'The Importance of Water Conservation in the 21st Century.' The poster presentation, however, has been redesigned and reorganized with new, revised perspectives. The importance of water conservation principles has been emphasized. The population of United States has more than doubled over the past 50 years. The need for water however, has tripled. The EPA estimates that more than 36 states face water shortage during the forthcoming years. The EPA has prepared a plan for achieving environmental and energy performance. This will be coupled with leadership and accountability. Carbon neutrality is also of prime importance. The objective is to focus on six important, essential areas. 1. Efficient use of already available energy resources. 2. Intelligent water consumption and focusing on water conservation. 3. Expand the use of renewable energy resources. 4. Explore innovative transportation systems and methodologies. 5. Change building codes and promote high performance sustainable buildings. 6. Focus on developing creative environment management systems. Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide occur naturally in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is also emitted to the atmosphere through a variety of natural processes and also some human activities. However, fluorinated gases are emitted to the atmosphere solely through human activities, because they are created by humans. It is very important to observe that water conservation is probably the most cost-effective way to reduce our demand for water. Furthermore, it is certainly environmentally justifiable. The Environmental Protection Agency has a plan called E2PLAN. It is EPA's plan for achieving energy and environmental performance, leadership, accountability, and carbon neutrality. In June 2011, the EPA published a comprehensive, multi-year planning document called Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. The

  14. The influence of psychology on Russian didactic terminology (early 18th century — first half of 20th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordovskaia, Nina V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Success in the development of cross-disciplinary connections between psychology and pedagogy in today’s Russia depends on many factors, including understanding the historical traditions of theoretical comprehension of educational innovations. To identify the specific influence of psychology on didactic terminology from the early 18th century through the first half of the 20th century. The study was designed based on historiographic, diachronic, and synchronic methods, and context and content analysis of 129 texts (105 words with general usage frequency of 81,397 units were analyzed. It was found reasonable to split the development of psychological-didactic terminology into two stages: the instrumental stage (early 18th century — first half of 19th century and the reference stage (second half of 19th century — first half of 20th century. The first stage was found to be characterized by psychological terms performing predominantly an instrumental function, that is, describing psychological factors that affect the effectiveness of training. The second stage featured the growing significance of psychological knowledge, not only in solving educational tasks, but also in explaining didactic patterns. During the first stage of development of psychological-didactic terminology, teachers frequently used the psychological terms “teaching”, “ability”, and “diligence”; during the second stage — “teaching”, “senses”, and “development”. Statistical methods were used to prove stable conceptual and terminological connections between psychology and pedagogy.

  15. Italian musicians in Greece during the nineteenth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanou Ekaterini

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In Greece, the monophonic chant of the Orthodox church and its neumatic notation have been transmitted as a popular tradition up to the first decades of the 20th century. The transformation of Greek musical tradition to a Western type of urban culture and the introduction of harmony, staff notation and western instruments and performance practices in the country began in the 19th century. Italian musicians played a central role in that process. A large number of them lived and worked on the Ionian Islands. Those Italian musicians have left a considerable number of transcriptions and original compositions. Quite a different cultural background existed in Athens. Education was in most cases connected to the church - the institution that during the four centuries of Turkish occupation kept Greeks united and nationally conscious. The neumatic notation was used for all music sung by the people, music of both western and eastern origin. The assimilation of staff notation and harmony was accelerated in the last quarter of the 19th century. At the beginning of the 20th century in Athens a violent cultural clash was provoked by the reformers of music education all of them belonging to German culture. The clash ended with the displacement of the Italian and Greek musicians from the Ionian Islands working at the time in Athens, and the defamation of their fundamental work in music education.

  16. A century of trends in adult human height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13410.001 PMID:27458798

  17. From Sentiment to Sentimentality: A Nineteenth-Century Lexicographical Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Banfield

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The brief account of the lexicographical history of the word ‘sentiment' in the nineteenth century, and the table of definitions which follows it, grew from my increasing sense of the shifting and ambivalent nature of the term in the literature of the period, despite the resonance and the proverbial solidity of phrases such as ‘Victorian sentiment' and ‘Victorian sentimentality'. The table is self explanatory, representing the findings of a search, among a wide range of nineteenth-century dictionaries over the period, for the changing meanings accrued by the word ‘sentiment' over time, its extensions and its modifications. The nineteenth-century lexicographical history of the word ‘sentiment' has its chief roots in the Eighteenth-century enlightenment, with definitions from Samuel Johnson and quotations from John Locke, chiefly based on intellect and reason. The nineteenth century generated a number of derivatives of the word over a period of time to express altered modes of feeling, thought and moral concern. The history of the word ‘sentiment' offers a psychological as well as a linguistic narrative.

  18. The Higher Spaces of the Late Nineteenth-Century Novel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Blacklock

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay builds from Isobel Armstrong’s identification of Kantian space as ‘foundational’ for the nineteenth-century novel to consider what happens to the novel after the emergence of a new type of space. It shows how the development of 'n'-dimensional space in a variety of cultural contexts in the second half of the nineteenth century complicated key Kantian propositions and specifically the idea of incongruent counterparts. It reads a deliberately esoteric array of fictions concerned with higher space — high- and low-cultural, short- and long-form, generic and literary, 'fin-de-siècle' and early twentieth century — to give some picture of the literary response to this newly shaken spatial imaginary. Focusing on Henry James’s theorization of his practice, it argues that the erosion of the foundations of Kantian space nourished modernist literary production at the level of technique.

  19. A History of the Danubian Costume in the XIXth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Partenie

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays we attach a great importance to the clothes we wear from the moment we buy or make them, to the moment we decide if they are appropriate with our personal style, the place where we wear them or when we use them. If the XIXth century tries to preserve the tradition with great accuracy the way it was transmitted from generation to generation, in the tumultuous XXth century we attend to the birth of a real industry of fashion. Some reminiscences remain, however, which gives us the opportunity to draw up a study in this regard. The present paper intends to add information regarding the folk costumes in Galati County, especially in the XIXth century. It is a short presentation of some of the most traditional clothes such as: skirt, apron, hood, shirt male and shirt female, decorative designs, footwear; without claiming to have finished the subject we intend to go on with further research.

  20. Evolution of the framework for 21st century competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sdenka Z. Salas-Pilco

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the successive changes and evolution of the frameworks for 21st century competencies, since the appearance of the first conceptual models during the final years of the last century, and also it is a review of the competencies that are needed in the 21st century with a special focus on the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT competencies. The included frameworks have been elaborated by diverse institutions such as international organizations, private consortia and also governments as a guideline for educational policies in elementary and secondary schools. Later, the frameworks are compared and analyzed according to a classification of the competencies into general categories, in order to visualize some trends and obtain some insights about the direction they are heading. Finally, it provides some suggestions for the conception of future frameworks.

  1. THE DANCING SCULPTURES OF THE 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel ALMELEK ISMAN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dance has been an indispensable element of human life for centuries. Painters and sculptors have created the dynamism of dance steps either on the canvas or stone with the same excitement. Charits, Nymphs, Bacchantes and Satyrs, the Greek and Roman mythological figures who attract attention with their dances have been a source of inspiration for artists. In this research, the dancing sculptures of the 19th century which is an interesting period in European art because of its witnessing of long term styles like Neoclassicism and Romanticism and short term movements such as Realism and Impressionism are examined. Examples of sculptures which brings dance to life before and after the 19th century have also been mentioned. The likenesses as well as dissimilarities in the way the arts of painting and sculpture approach to the theme of dance has been briefly evaluated.

  2. An early first-century earthquake in the Dead Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J B; Schwab, Markus J.; Achim Brauer;  

    2012-01-01

    This article examines a report in the 27th chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament that an earthquake was felt in Jerusalem on the day of the crucifixion of Jesus of Nazareth. We have tabulated a varved chronology from a core from Ein Gedi on the western shore of the Dead Sea between deformed sediments due to a widespread earthquake in 31 BC and deformed sediments due to an early first-century earthquake. The early first-century seismic event has been tentatively assigned a date...

  3. Family Life in Europe in the Twentieth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIE MAREČKOVÁ

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Family life in Europe has undergone many changes in the twentieth century. Th ese include the lifestyle of women, their legal freedom, family relations, relations with partners, relations with the older generation, and relations with children. Th e position of women in society has also undergone many transformations. Problems remain, however, in the social and family policy of the state, as women engaged in the working process give preference to their own plans and their need for self-fulfi lment. Th e main goal of state family policy in the twenty-fi rst century is, then, to ensure a harmonious balance between professional activity and family life

  4. The experience o f motherhood in the XX century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOANNA SZABLIŃSKA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is an attempt of reconstruction of a motherhood pattem in XIX century. Two models of women have been taken into consideration, namely woman as a housewife and as a mother. In order to reconstruct these models, it was planned to use knowledge written down in XIX century guide literature. Through analisys of chosen group of guide books, state of social consciousness and some generalization of universal phenomena were examined. Ali common advice connected with the aspects of raising children were also noticed and mentioned in this report

  5. Five centuries of ways to the revival of the Olympics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bubka S.N.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of the revival of the Olympic Games in the countries of Western, Central Europe and North America in the period from XV to XIX centuries. Prerequisites including society humanization, development of education, science and major national systems of physical education, development of competitive sports in different organizational forms and scales, which contributed to the creation of the environment initiating the revival of the Olympics, have been considered. The role of personalities in the revival of the Olympic movement during five centuries of the historical development of the society has been shown.

  6. Princess and Villages. Salerno, 9th-11th Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito LORÉ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the documentary research of the Lombard southern Italy, two case studies can be used to study the relationship between princes and ruralsocieties: Nocera in the 9th Century and Cilento in the 10th and 11th Centuries. The comparison between these two cases can be used to show both the differences between two rural societies included in the same political environment, and the princes’ ability to change strategies and tools in order to adapt to different circumstances and situations.

  7. Awkward Appendages: Comic Umbrellas in Nineteenth-Century Print Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, Maria

    2017-01-01

    In nineteenth-century comic writing, the umbrella represents a troublesome material world: umbrellas were always threatening to break, flip inside out or to disappear and reappear in the most mysterious fashion. The umbrella was a trope for oddness, resistance and perversity of intent. With the h......In nineteenth-century comic writing, the umbrella represents a troublesome material world: umbrellas were always threatening to break, flip inside out or to disappear and reappear in the most mysterious fashion. The umbrella was a trope for oddness, resistance and perversity of intent...

  8. Rational Number Theory in the 20th Century

    CERN Document Server

    Narkiewicz, Wladyslaw

    2012-01-01

    The last one hundred years have seen many important achievements in the classical part of number theory. After the proof of the Prime Number Theorem in 1896, a quick development of analytical tools led to the invention of various new methods, like Brun's sieve method and the circle method of Hardy, Littlewood and Ramanujan; developments in topics such as prime and additive number theory, and the solution of Fermat's problem. "Rational Number Theory in the 20th Century: From PNT to FLT" offers a short survey of 20th century developments in classical number theory, documenting between

  9. Theories of Space and the Nineteenth-Century Novel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobel Armstrong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the construction of a spatial and interspatial subject in the nineteenth-century novel, examining initially the epistemologies of space developed by Kant and Hegel, and concluding with discussion of two further theorists of space, Bachelard and Lefebvre. It deploys this rich array of theorization to illuminate strategies through which the nineteenth-century novelist creates situatedness in language, asking how 'does' the novel represent space, and arguing that if we take away this almost miraculous verbal construction of space there is not much left to the novel.

  10. The thirteenth-century runic revival in Denmark and Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wills, Tarrin Jon

    2016-01-01

    alphabet. This paper examines a number of runic phenomenon from the thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries in Denmark and Iceland to argue that they belong to a cultural revival movement rather than forming part of a continuous runic tradition stretching back into the early Middle Ages. Some...... of these runic texts show some connection with the Danish royal court, and should rather be seen as forming part of the changes in literary culture emanating from continental Europe from the late twelfth century and onwards: they all show a combined interest in Latin learning and vernacular literary forms....

  11. The Use of Primitivism in Some Twentieth Century Western Art ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Abstract. This study examines the concept of “primitivism” as used in some twentieth century Western art movements. It also aims at highlighting the impact of this art form on Western art styles. The method used to explore its usage is based on the art-historical approach of formalism. Modern African scholars often.

  12. New Challenges in 21st-Century Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassing, Gayle

    2010-01-01

    To become competent in today's society, individuals need multiliteracies. The 21st-century dancer needs to be an artist, choreographer, educator, and researcher who can meet challenges and make an impact within the profession, as well as across education, the arts, and society. As dance professionals assess how to utilize their resources better…

  13. Resource scarcity in the 21st century: conflict or cooperation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qasem, I.

    2010-01-01

    Oil and natural gas, water, food, and minerals are critical to ensuring our wellbeing and prosperity. The mismatch between future demand and supply is crystallizing into one of the most complex and urgent issues policymakers will face in the 21st Century. Unless the challenges arising from these

  14. Designing Blended Learning Interventions for the 21st Century Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleton, Saramarie

    2017-01-01

    The learning requirements of diverse groups of students in higher education challenge educators to design learning interventions that meet the need of 21st century students. A model was developed to assist lecturers, especially those that are new to the profession, to use a blended approach to design meaningful learning interventions for…

  15. Interactionism in Personality in the Twentieth Century. Research Report #146.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endler, Norman S.; Edwards, Jean M.

    This paper examines the historical development of the interaction model of personality in the 20th century. The philosophical roots of interactionism can be traced to the writings of Aristotle and Descartes. One of the earliest interactionist positions in psychology can be found in the works of Kantor (1924, 1926). Although theoretical interest in…

  16. Authenticating the Vocabulary: A Study in Seventeenth-Century ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thomas Blount is unique among English compilers of the seventeenth century in systematically naming books and authors as evidence for the use of words entered in his dictionary. Such documentation of the vocabulary would now be associated with scholarly historical dictionaries such as the Johnson and the OED, ...

  17. [SANTORIO AND THE FIRST SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION OF XVII CENTURY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jmurkin, V P; Chalova, V V

    2015-01-01

    The national publications about Santorio and his works factually provide no information to medical society of Russia. The article presents discussion about significance of his works for the first scientific revolution in XVII century. The conception of this significance is expanded. The personal position is substantiated concerning evaluation of ratio of inputs by Santorio and Galileo into initiation of scientific revolution.

  18. Ancient Christian care for prisoners: first and second centuries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study deals with the question as to whether first- and second-century sources reflect ancient Christian practices of care for prisoners and in how far these sources help clarify the reasons why Christians cared for prisoners in different contexts. The study explores material not only from the New Testament Gospels (Matt.

  19. Our Time: The Legacy of the Twentieth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Tom

    2014-01-01

    We are probably only at the beginning of our understanding of a period of time that gave us a new name for an old language, "ASL," a new consciousness called "Deaf culture," a national uprising called "DPN," and a science fiction-like new technology called "VP." The two halves of the twentieth century might…

  20. Exploring a Century of Advancements in the Science of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, P. Karen; Knight, Stephanie L.

    2016-01-01

    The past century has yielded a plethora of advancements in the science of learning, from expansions in the theoretical frames that undergird education research to cultural and contextual considerations in educational practice. The overarching purpose of this chapter is to explore and document the growth and development of the science of learning…

  1. A Dutch Book of Hours from the 15th Century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrieland, Seán D.; Hansen, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    Private books of hours were the European bestseller of the 14th-16th centuries, especially among the aristocracy and urban élite. They typically began with a calendar, which listed saints’ days and other religious holidays, the most important of which were written in red – the so-called “red...

  2. Football in England of first half 20th century

    OpenAIRE

    Dohnal, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    (English) This disetation describes progress of football as a sport in the first half of the 20th century, including his position in society during both World Wars Keywords: football competition, number of fans and their culture, football in World Wars, women football, football clubs, organisation of football, football and the media

  3. Transforming Power Systems; 21st Century Power Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-20

    The 21st Century Power Partnership - a multilateral effort of the Clean Energy Ministerial - serves as a platform for public-private collaboration to advance integrated solutions for the large-scale deployment of renewable energy in combination with deep energy ef?ciency and smart grid solutions.

  4. Zoological Collections and Collecting in Cuba during the Twentieth Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Gilberto Silva

    1994-01-01

    Traces the history of 20th-century zoological collections in Cuba, and the present whereabouts of Cuba's zoological collections. The historical accounts are divided into two periods: from 1902 to 1959 and from 1959 to the present. A preliminary survey of the nature, size, and current state of these collections is included. (MDH)

  5. Looking Backward: Educational Reform in the Twentieth Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses five lasting 20th-century education reforms: ability grouping, testing, district/school consolidation, vocational education, and specialization. The future seems aimed at personalized instruction, smaller schools, less differentiation between academic and vocational education, greater trust in local governance units, and philosophic…

  6. Educational Expansion and Social Mobility in the 20th Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Sociologists consider inequality in educational attainment to be a major cause of inequality between people in their chances of occupying a more advantageous class position. However, there is dispute as to whether educational inequality according to social class background declined during the 20th century. What is not in doubt is the expansion of…

  7. Changes in African smallholder agriculture in the twentieth century ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first half of the twentieth century witnessed profound changes in smallholder agriculture in many parts of Africa. There was a rapid spread of exotic staple food crops such as maize, cassava and sweet potatoes. In many cases the adoption of these crops led to increases in productivity as they replaced millets and ...

  8. Developing Classroom Web Sites for 21st Century Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingen, Jennifer; Philbeck, Lauren; Holcomb, Lori B.

    2011-01-01

    Classroom Web sites have the potential to support and enhance student learning by targeting 21st century skills, such as collaboration among teachers, students, parents, and other teachers, media literacy, and interpersonal and self-directional skills, as well as thinking and problem-solving skills. Web 2.0 tools such as blogs, vokis, and podcasts…

  9. Considerations for 21st-Century Disciplinary Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englehart, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    While the conceiving of 21st-century schools has rightly included much discussion on curriculum and instruction, changing demands and conditions also present necessary changes in the way that student behavior is managed. A review of the literature on student discipline over the past decade reveals three particular issues that warrant attention in…

  10. Toward the 'new century'of handedness in biology: In ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 41; Issue 2. Toward the 'new century' of handedness in biology: In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Francis Crick. Koji Tamura. Clipboard Volume 41 Issue 2 June 2016 pp 169-170 ...

  11. The social lives of paintings in Sixteenth-Century Venice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, Elisabeth Johanna Maria van

    2011-01-01

    This thesis studies Venetian painting in its golden age, the sixteenth century, from an unconventional, anthropological point of view. Paintings of masters like Titian are demonstrated to have had social lives. Together with human beings they were embedded in social networks in which humans and

  12. Half a Century of Islamic Education in Dutch Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Avest, K. H.; Rietveld-van Wingerden, M.

    2017-01-01

    During the second half of the twentieth century, faithful followers of non-Western religions immigrated into Western European countries. Their children were a challenge for the respective educational system in the host countries. In the Dutch context, the educational system consists of public and private schools in which religion is the most…

  13. The art of human anatomy: Renaissance to 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hee, Robrecht; Wells, F C; Ballestriero, Roberta; Richardson, Ruth; Mazzarello, Paolo; Cani, Valentina; Catani, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This session examines the relationship between the art and science of anatomy from the time of Vesalius to the present with particular emphasis on the role of the medical artist and the changing nature of anatomical illustration over the last five centuries. Pivotal changes in the art of anatomy will be examined including the evolution of media and brain imaging from Golgi to Geschwind.

  14. Adventurous Lives: Teacher Qualities for 21st Century Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Julie; Latham, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    What kinds of teachers are needed for 21st century learners? While there is recognition that curriculum content, classroom practices and learning environments must alter, there is less attention focussed on the teachers' dispositions for negotiating uncertainty. In this paper, the authors turn their attention to the importance of teachers' lives…

  15. The Spanish Theater in the Twentieth Century: 7509.52.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada, Clara

    Developed for a high school quinmester unit on the Spanish theater in the 20th century, this guide is designed to improve students' reading and writing skills and knowledge of human values, contemporary philosophy, and character portrayal through class dramatizations of plays. Some of the objectives for the course include analysis and discussion…

  16. Challenges for Educational Technologists in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Robin; Natividad, Gloria; Spector, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    In 1972, Edsger Dijkstra claimed that computers had only introduced the new problem of learning to use them effectively. This is especially true in 2015 with regard to powerful new educational technologies. This article describes the challenges that 21st century educational technologists are, and will be, addressing as they undertake the effective…

  17. Developing 21st Century Process Skills through Project Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jeong-Ju; MacDonald, Nora M.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to illustrate how the promotion of 21st Century process skills can be used to enhance student learning and workplace skill development: thinking, problem solving, collaboration, communication, leadership, and management. As an illustrative case, fashion merchandising and design students conducted research for a…

  18. 21st centuries skill implication on educational system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrahatnolo, T.; Munoto

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify skill needed in 21st centuries and its implication on Indonesia’s educational system. This research found that the 21st centuries skill application has more measurable benefits in some sections of life, such as critical thinking and problem solving, initiative, creativity, and entrepreneurship, communication, teamwork, metacognition (change of mindset), digital literature. This study applied qualitative data analysis. The data were taken from different sources and literature. The analysis showed that The 21st centuries education concept’s implementation can be applied in the curriculum of the required subject that is addressed to achieve learning and innovation skills competence and also technology and information media skills competence. While supporting subject group directed to achieve life and career skills competence. All subjects are the derivation from core subject 3R, which are reading, writing, and arithmetic. Based on the description above, it can be concluded that 21st centuries skill needs; (1) a life planning; (2) flexibility and adaptability; (3) initiative and self-management (4) entrepreneurship; (5) social and cultural interaction; (6) productivity and accountability; (7) leadership; (8) critical thinking, (9) problem solving; (10) communication; (11) collaboration and teamwork; (12) lifelong learning; and (13) digital literation.

  19. University medical education in the twenty first century: Challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University medical education in the twenty first century: Challenges of social determinants of health and noncommunicable diseases. ... The challenge begins with an analysis of how the Medical Education that is offered at the graduate level prepares graduates in understanding the role of SDH in NCDs. Objectives: To ...

  20. Technology Integration for the "New" 21st Century Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Nancye

    2012-01-01

    A dramatic shift is sweeping through the schools. Third graders texting on their cell phones. Kindergarteners who can navigate an iPod Touch better than educators can. Middle schoolers who already have an Internet following on their blog or YouTube channel. These are not the same 21st century learners people came to know over the first decade of…

  1. Tiv exchange relations in the nineteeth century: a study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The trade routes, internal markets and the currencies that were used are also examined. The paper notes that despite the limitations posed by insecurity of passage on trade routes and the fact that movement of goods depended largely on human porterage; the conclusion is that the nineteenth century was a period of high ...

  2. A 21st-Century Humanities for the Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Barry; Elden, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    This essay examines not only the role the humanities play in the community college curriculum but also how our approach to and understanding of the humanities must change. The defense of a 21st-century humanities has to begin in the experience of our students and not in the traditional canons of our disciplines.

  3. Opioid dependence and pregnancy in early twentieth-century America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauger, Nathan

    2017-11-11

    Research on Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome has prompted discussion over how to ensure best outcomes for pregnant women who use drugs and for drug-dependent newborns. Before Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome and the 1980s panic of "crack babies," turn-of-the-century American medical journals discussed infants born to drug-using mothers. This paper aimed to determine whether women who used drugs while pregnant in early twentieth-century America were subject to the stigma many face today. Records from early twentieth century medical journals, narcotic maintenance clinics, prisons that held drug users, and conferences on narcotics were examined. Dr. Charles Terry's outspokenness on drug addiction and pregnancy merited closer examination of his work, particularly The Opium Problem. Some physicians saw drug-dependent newborns as scientific proof that addiction was a physiological disease and not subject to questions of morality. This theory was discarded in the 1920s. In that decade, beliefs that children born to drug-using parents threatened national well-being proliferated. Following formal medicine's retreat from addiction treatment, research on drug addiction and pregnancy fell into obscurity until decades later. The precedent that women who use drugs while pregnant deserve humane treatment extends to the early twentieth century in the US. From 1910 to 1930, perceptions of infants of drug-using women changed from hopeful to fearful. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. The 19th Century Anglo-Yoruba Relations | Abimbola | AFRREV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the Anglo-Yoruba relations in the 19th century via the influence of the Ijebu people, a sub-group of the Yoruba; using oriki(Ijebu), a very important oral poetic genre among the Yoruba people of Southwestern Nigeria. 60 groups of oral art performers were sampled; data were drawn from 60 Ijebu towns ...

  5. Digital earth applications in the twenty-first century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de By, R.A.; Georgiadou, P.Y.

    2014-01-01

    In these early years of the twenty-first century, we must look at how the truly cross-cutting information technology supports other innovations, and how it will fundamentally change the information positions of government, private sector and the scientific domain as well as the citizen. In those

  6. Upholding humanity: challenges of peace in the 21st century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2000-01-01

    In this presentation we shall, first of all, explore the background to the topic for today as formulated by the organisers: Peace in the 21st century: between the supranational and the grassroots. From there some remarks will follow on the meaning of commemoration and liberation by giving you a very

  7. The political economy of warfare in nineteeth century Benin kingdom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines how the interactions of politics and economy influenced the changing perspective on warfare in nineteenth century Benin Kingdom. The study investigates how the combined political and economic behaviour of Benin affected the rebuilding of military power as instrument of political policy in furtherance ...

  8. Sustainability: The Next 21st Century Workplace Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopnicki, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    At Virginia Beach City Public Schools (VBCPS), the three pillars of sustainability--environmental, economical and social--are very much on the minds of educators and administrators. It is so much that the school system has selected sustainability as one of its 21-century skills--one that all 68,751 students in the system must learn. This selection…

  9. Buildings for the 21st Century Newsletter, Fall 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromly, K.

    2000-10-19

    This issue of Buildings for the 21st Century, a quarterly newsletter on the DOE building programs and technology, highlights the new high-performance visitor center at Zion National Park, Maryland's new Clean Energy Incentive Act, the Ohio State Weatherization Program, the Rebuild America Program and Native American communities joining forces, and Energy Star{reg_sign} clothes washers.

  10. Understanding China's Curriculum Reform for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Wing-Wah

    2014-01-01

    This article uses curriculum-making frameworks to analyse and reconstruct the Chinese curriculum-making model and unpack the dynamics, complexity and constraints of China's curriculum reform since the early 1990s. It argues that curriculum reform is China's main human capital development strategy for coping with the challenges of the 21st century,…

  11. Economic and Financial Education for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Mark; Lopus, Jane

    2008-01-01

    The Partnership for 21st Century Skills places an important emphasis on fundamental social science subjects including history, geography, government and civics, and economics as well as a stress on other important subjects such as English, foreign languages, arts, and science in the school curriculum. It has also identified what it calls 21st…

  12. Cyber Portfolio: The Innovative Menu for 21st Century Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Ava Clare Marie O.

    2012-01-01

    Cyber portfolio is a valuable innovative menu for teachers who seek out strategies or methods to integrate technology into their lessons. This paper presents a straightforward preparation on how to innovate a menu that addresses the 21st century skills blended with higher order thinking skills, multiple intelligence, technology and multimedia.…

  13. Teaching with Autoharps in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The excitement of playing an instrument is one of the greatest motivating forces in teaching general music to students. The autoharp, which may be long forgotten in the general music classrooms of the 21st century, is an ideal instrument to "re-introduce" to students. The teaching of a traditional folk instrument provides advantages for…

  14. School Autonomy and 21st Century Learning: The Canadian Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul; da Costa, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the policy and practice contexts for school autonomy and twenty-first century learning in Canadian provinces. Design/methodology/approach: This paper reports on an analysis of policies in Canadian provinces (particularly the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan). The authors review policies…

  15. Antikythera Calculator advances modern science of 19 centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Giovanni

    2010-08-01

    The Greek astronomic calculator, discovered in the depth of the sea in a naval wreckage of the 1st century B.C. in front of the island of Antikythera, is the most amazing among the archaeological discoveries of last century. The mechanism immediately appeared like a device out of its time. After years of study this devise is still provoking a discussion between scientists and archaeologists because of the complexity and the modernity of the scientific knowledge the work presupposes. Its epicyclical gearings show the high level of the scientific culture reached in that period of history. The knowledge of the planetary motion, necessary to the design of the epicyclic gearing of the Calculator of Antikythera, presumes that ancient Greek scientists knew the planetary motion of the celestial bodies and had already achieved the same results that have been attributed to scientists 19 centuries later. The scientific value of this gear mechanism is indisputable because the inventor of the Calculator of Antikythera had the knowledge that was "re-discovered" centuries later as the heliocentric theory proposed by Niccolò Copernicus in 1543 ( De revolutionibus orbium coelestium), the universal gravitation law formulated by Isaac Newton in 1687 ( Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica), and the kinematic study of the epicyclical gearings published by Robert Willis in 1841 ( Principles of mechanism).

  16. A Case of Epilepsy and Psychosis in the Seventeenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ovsiew

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A seventeenth-century painter left an account of his seizures, trances and visions; in 1923 Freud commented on this “demonological neurosis” without discussing the seizures. Attention is drawn to the concurrence of epilepsy and psychosis in this early autobiographical source.

  17. The power of mathematics education in the 18th century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruger, J.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    In the Dutch Republic in the 18th century mathematics was considered very important for many professions. However there were hardly any national or regional educational institutes which provided mathematics education. Three orphanages in different towns received a large inheritance under condition

  18. Psoriatic arthropathy in a 17th century archaeological protestant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriatic arthropathy in a 17th century archaeological protestant population belonging to Saint-Maurice cemetery in France. Djillali Hadjouis. Djillali Hadjouis is a research archaeologist at laboratoire d'Archéologie du Val de Marne, France. Specialized in research paleontology, paleoanthropology and paleopathology ...

  19. NOAA-CIRES 20th Century Reanalysis (V2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 20th Century Reanalysis version 2 (20CRV2)is an effort led by PSD and the CIRES at the University of Colorado to produce a reanalysis dataset spanning the entire...

  20. NOAA-CIRES 20th Century Reanalysis (V2c)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 20th Century Reanalysis version 2c (20CRV2c)is an effort led by PSD and the CIRES at the University of Colorado to produce a reanalysis dataset spanning the...

  1. Boko Haram: Religion and Violence in the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O. Voll

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Boko Haram in Nigeria provides an important example of the combination of religion and violence in the conditions of the twenty-first century. It is both a movement in the pattern of religiously-justified violence and a significant representative of the emergence of new types of modern terrorism in recent years. This article examines both of these aspects of Boko Haram as an example of religious violence. In the general development of religiously justified violence, Boko Haram is the heir to a long jihad tradition in West Africa. Its emergence follows well-established patterns of older militant Muslim groups, but it also departs significantly from those patterns as it shapes itself as a movement in the patterns of contemporary, twenty-first century modes of religious violence. Boko Haram is also identified, in twenty-first century terms, as a religious terrorist organization. As a religious terrorist group, it fits the pattern of what David Rapoport calls the fourth wave—the religious wave—of modern terrorism. However, in the second decade of the twenty-first century, Boko Haram exhibits characteristics of a new style of religious terrorism that is more like the so-called Islamic State than the older type of terrorist organization of al-Qa’idah.

  2. [Half century of botany publishing in Revista de Biologia Tropical].

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    Over its first half century the Revista de Biología Tropical published many papers and supplements dealing with the botany. However, the Revista is not a primary botanical journal. A wide variety of topics and geographic sources have been included, taking into consideration species from the Neotropics, but also from India and Nigeria. A complete index of botanical papers is presented.

  3. Lion and dragon: four centuries of Dutch-Vietnamese relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinen, J.; van der Zwan, B.; Moors, H.; van Zeeland, T.

    2008-01-01

    Dutch-Vietnamese relations go back as far as the beginning of the seventeenth century. For a long time, relations between the Dutch lion and the Vietnamese dragon have been fragile and even violent. Although the relations were not continuously bad, they remained distant rather than warm. Today

  4. Affective computing: A reverence for a century of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, E.L. van den

    2012-01-01

    To bring affective computing a leap forward, it is best to start with a step back. A century of research has been conducted on topics, which are crucial for affective computing. Understanding this vast amount of research will accelerate progress on affective computing. Therefore, this article

  5. Affective computing: a reverence for a century of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Esposito, Anna; Esposito, Antonietta M.; Vinciarelli, Alessandro; Hoffmann, Rüdiger; Müller, Vincent C.

    2012-01-01

    To bring affective computing a leap forward, it is best to start with a step back. A century of research has been conducted on topics, which are crucial for affective computing. Understanding this vast amount of research will accelerate progress on affective computing. Therefore, this article

  6. Joe Calafato: a late twentieth century South African precious metal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Joe Calafato: a late twentieth century South African precious metal artist. ... This information was integrated with available archival documentation, a sketch book, order books, an autograph book and newspaper reports along with photographs of his work in private collections. Whereas specific attention is paid to his ...

  7. [The engraving of pharmacopoeia between XVIth-XVIIIth Century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    The pharmacopea is mainly known like a book containing descriptions of drugs and preparations of medicines. During the XVIth-XVIIIth centuries, some of these books were illustrated with engraving frontispieces. This study shows the meaning of these pictures, the composition and the artists and the messages which are incorporated.

  8. American Marriage in the Early Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherlin, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    During the past century the U.S. family system has seen vast changes--in marriage and divorce rates, cohabitation, childbearing, sexual behavior, and women's work outside the home. Andrew Cherlin reviews these historic changes, noting that marriage remains the most common living arrangement for raising children, but that children, especially poor…

  9. Questions for the 21st-Century Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The American Association of School Librarians' (AASL) "Standards for the 21st-Century Learner" (2007), with their emphasis on multiple literacies and the social context in which information skills develop, embrace instruction that engages students' critical thinking about the changing communications environment. An inquiry-based approach to…

  10. The Role of Rhetoric in the Twelfth Century Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliese, John

    The medieval study of classical rhetoric reached its zenith in the twelfth century. Rhetoric in its medieval phase can be divided into four distinct subdisciplines: "ars praedicandi," or the preaching art; "ars dictaminis," or the art of letter writing; "ars poetriae," which focused on style and developed elaborate theories of versification; and…

  11. Whose Music of a Century? Performance, History and Multiple Voices

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It's the small words that do the most cultural work. THE MUSIC OF A CENTURY, the title of the conference for which this paper was written, imputes a spurious singularity to a multiplicity of cultural practices, and begs the question of in whose interests this singularity is being constructed. An alternative question, 'WHOSE ...

  12. ASBO at 100: A Century of School Business Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Business Affairs, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article talks about Association of School Business Officials International (ASBO) at a century of school business management. As ASBO International celebrates its centennial, one should reflect on the truth of this often-heard quote and how it applies to the field of school business management in general and the association in particular.…

  13. Towards a Global 21 st Century African Popular Music: ASSATA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The world is increasingly becoming a global village, due mainly to the technological advancements of the 21st century and increased interactions and collaborations between peoples of the earth. Consequently, compartmentalization of cultures is fast giving way to the emergence of a 'global mass culture' with increasing ...

  14. Natural History in Hispanic Journalism in the Late Eighteenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo MORGADO GARCÍA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the Hispanic world of the late Eighteenth Century there was a certain amount of divulgation of Natural History, aided by the utilitarian nature of the Spanish Enlightenment, and by the fact that Natural History did not contradict Catholic doctrine. This paper approaches the diffusion of news of Natural History through periodicals, focusing on zoological references.

  15. Collection Development Challenges for the 21st Century Academic Librarian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Susan

    2004-01-01

    In the down-sized academic library of the twenty-first century, many librarians with little or no formal collection development training or experience are being entrusted with large departmental budgets, occasionally without the collaboration of a department liaison. How do new librarians, or librarians new to a discipline, deal with this…

  16. Time, Domesticity and Print Culture in Nineteenth-Century Britain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, Maria

    In this innovative study, Damkjær shows that nineteenth-century texts gave domesticity not just a spatial, but also a temporal dimension. Novels by Dickens and Gaskell, as well as periodicals, cookery books and albums, all showed domesticity as a process. Damkjær argues that texts’ material form...

  17. Time, Domesticity and Print Culture in Nineteenth-Century Britain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, Maria

    In this innovative study, Damkjær shows that nineteenth-century texts gave domesticity not just a spatial, but also a temporal dimension. Novels by Dickens and Gaskell, as well as periodicals, cookery books and albums, all showed domesticity as a process. Damkjær argues that texts’ material form ...

  18. Moral Psychology for the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidt, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Lawrence Kohlberg slayed the two dragons of twentieth-century psychology--behaviorism and psychoanalysis. His victory was a part of the larger cognitive revolution that shaped the world in which all of us study psychology and education today. But the cognitive revolution itself was modified by later waves of change, particularly an "affective…

  19. The International "Trial of the 20th Century": Nuremberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemerinsky, Erwin

    1999-01-01

    Considers the Nuremberg trials to be the "Trial of the Century." Highlights the series of 13 trials in which Nazi leaders, officials, judges, and others were tried, and most convicted, for war crimes. Relates that these trials had far-reaching effects in that they showed that moral obligations transcend national boundaries. (CMK)

  20. Rethinking Folk Culture in Twentieth-Century Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Research on folk culture in twentieth-century Britain has focused on elite and transgressive political episodes, but these were not its mainstream manifestations. This article re-evaluates the place of folk culture in twentieth-century Britain in the context of museums. It argues that in the modern heritage landscape folk culture was in an active dialogue with the modern democracy. This story begins with the vexed, and ultimately failed, campaign for a national English folk museum and is traced through the concurrent successes of local, regional, and Celtic 'first wave' folk museums across Britain from the 1920s to the 1960s. The educational activities of these museums are explored as emblematic of a 'conservative modernity', which gave opportunities to women but also restricted their capacity to do intellectual work. By the 1970s, a 'second wave' folk museology is identified, revealing how forms of folk culture successfully accommodated the rapid social change of the later twentieth century, particularly in deindustrializing regions. From this new, museums' perspective, folk culture appears far less marginal to twentieth-century British society. In museums folk culture interacted with mainstream concerns about education, regionalism, and commercialization. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. A New Leadership Paradigm for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, Calvin; Parsons, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Leadership in the 21st century will require new insights and a new paradigm. With nearly 100 years of combined experience in community college teaching and administration, the authors of this chapter blend theory and experience into a design for engaging the "new normal."

  2. Training requirements for agriculture in the 21st century | Obioha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... identified area of need, e.g. poultry, pigs, rabbits, vegetables, ornamental plants, organic fertilizers, orchard gardens, soya milk, soya cakes, etc. The NAAS and the faculty leadership can solicit funds for this novel enterprise which will enhance confidence, competence and proficiency for our graduates of the 21st century.

  3. Bringing Foreign Language Learning into the 21st century | Thomas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bringing Foreign Language Learning into the 21st Century. The different challenges facing foreign language lecturers are considered as well as the different methods used to teach a foreign language. Technology and multimedia are proposed not only as tools and supports but also as a possible solution. With the change ...

  4. Cyberbullying and Sexting: Technology Abuses of the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del

    2010-01-01

    Many young people cannot remember a time before Instant Messaging (IM), cell phone text messaging, video conferencing, blogging, e-mailing, and MySpace and Facebook postings existed. Thanks to the ubiquitous nature of technology in the 21st century, digital natives are accustomed to seeing, and being seen, on a scale that was unimaginable by their…

  5. Projecting twenty-first century regional sea-level changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A.B.A.; Carson, M.; Katsman, C.A.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Köhl, A.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.; Stammer, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present regional sea-level projections and associated uncertainty estimates for the end of the 21 (st) century. We show regional projections of sea-level change resulting from changing ocean circulation, increased heat uptake and atmospheric pressure in CMIP5 climate models. These are combined

  6. Projecting twenty-first century regional sea-level changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A. B A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314189386; Carson, M.; Katsman, C. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/14550560X; van de Wal, R. S W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/101899556; Köhl, A.; Vermeersen, L. L A; Stammer, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present regional sea-level projections and associated uncertainty estimates for the end of the 21st century. We show regional projections of sea-level change resulting from changing ocean circulation, increased heat uptake and atmospheric pressure in CMIP5 climate models. These are combined with

  7. The devaluation controversy in eighteenth-century Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.H. Stapelbroek (Koen)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractFollowing the Succession Wars of the early eighteenth-century, political economists across Italy discussed a range of possible reforms. Among the issues drawing most attention was the complicated problem whether devaluation policies were appropriate means for boosting economic growth.

  8. Mythologies and Panics: Twentieth Century Constructions of Child Prostitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alyson

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines twentieth century social constructions of child prostitutes and child prostitution, the origins of these representations and the extent to which they have been used as metaphors for other perceived social, economic and political problems. It is important to recognise that these children have been sexually abused and that…

  9. Fostering 21st Century Skills through Game Design and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    This reflection paper argues that the design and development of digital games teach essential 21st century skills. Intrinsic to application and game development is design thinking. Design thinking requires iterative development, which demands creativity, critical thinking and problem solving. Students are engaged through learning by doing in both…

  10. [Astrologic and medical manuscript of the 18th Century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugener, Henri

    2010-01-01

    We present a manuscript from the 18th century, an extract taken from the "Great and the Little Albert" attributed to Albertus Magnus. The linguistic variety in the paper is typical for a text composed in Luxembourg. Added to this text are two incantations and a short cartomancy paper.

  11. Local/global: women artists in the nineteenth century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherry, D.; Helland, J.

    2006-01-01

    Local/Global: Women Artists in the Nineteenth Century is the first book to investigate women artists working in disparate parts of the world. This major new book offers a dazzling array of compelling essays on art, architecture and design by leading writers: Joan Kerr on art in Australia by

  12. Leadership: moving into the twenty-first century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrezo, R J; Witte, R E

    1993-05-01

    Leadership and management affect business, political and societal ventures as well as healthcare organizations. By studying the traits and qualities of these key positions, nurses can analyze potential leaders and expand their roles as they move into the 21st century.

  13. Affective computing: a reverence for a century of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Esposito, Anna; Esposito, Antonietta M.; Vinciarelli, Alessandro; Hoffmann, Rüdiger; Müller, Vincent C.

    To bring affective computing a leap forward, it is best to start with a step back. A century of research has been conducted on topics, which are crucial for affective computing. Understanding this vast amount of research will accelerate progress on affective computing. Therefore, this article

  14. Attempts to Save Tragedy in the 19th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Przybyszewska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the issue of genre-transformation of tragedy in 19th-century Polish drama. The fundamental question is tragedy’s potential after liberation from the most important structural categories of the genre: the three unities, catharsis and anagnorisis. The discussion on the 19th-century patterns of tragedy, derived from contemporary theory, criticism, and theatrical production, are based on research by Marek Dybizbański, who presented an interesting analysis of the problem, which was an important indicator of contemporary literary thought, in his study called Tragedia polska drugiej połowy XIX wieku — wzorce i odstępstwa [The Polish Tragic Drama in Late 19th Century — Patterns and Divergence]. The issues discussed were: disproportion between expectations and effects, indicated by repertoires and contemporary debate on drama, lack of standard productions of tragedy, matched by great surplus of texts that tried to set the standard, and by programmatic declarations on how to do it. The author, following Dybizbański’s discussion, focuses on the question why the 19th century in Poland was, for tragedy, a lost time.

  15. Outdoor Physical Education in French Schools during the Twentieth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attali, Michaël; Saint-Martin, Jean

    2017-01-01

    During the twentieth century, outdoor physical education (OPE) gradually integrated with the French education system. Culturally speaking, OPE had to overcome several hurdles because it promoted values such as freedom, initiative and responsibility that were deemed incompatible with the existing educational model. Beyond being a pedagogical tool,…

  16. The 8th Century Megadrought Across North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahle, D. W.; Therrell, M. D.; Cleaveland, M. K.; Fye, F. K.; Cook, E. R.; Grissino-Mayer, H. D.; Acuna-Soto, R.

    2002-12-01

    Tree-ring data suggest that the 8th and 16th century megadroughts may have been the most severe and sustained droughts to impact North America in the past 1500 years. The 16th century megadrought may have persisted for up to 40 years, and extended from the tropics to the boreal forest and from the Pacific to Atlantic coasts. Evidence for the 8th century drought is sparse, but tree-ring and lake sediment data indicate that this drought extended from the northern Great Plains, across the southwestern United States, and into central Mexico and the Yucatan peninsula. Tree-ring data from Colorado and New Mexico document severe drought from A.D. 735-765, and may provide accurate and precise dating for the onset of the epic droughts reconstructed during the late first millennium A.D. with sedimentary data from Elk Lake, Minnesota; Moon Lake, South Dakota; La Piscina de Yuriria, Guanajuato; and Lake Chichancanab, Yucatan. If these chronological refinements are correct, then the sedimentary records suggest much greater persistence to the 8th century megadrought than indicated by the very high resolution tree-ring data, and a strong second pulse of prolonged drought late in the first millennium. Analyses of instrumental precipitation and drought indices during the 20th century, along with tree-ring reconstructions of climate in Mexico and the Southwest, indicate that annual and decadal droughts can both simultaneously impact the entire region from New Mexico and Texas down into central Mexico. The intensity and large-scale impact of drought across this region seem to be greatest when La Nina conditions and the low phase of the North Pacific oscillation prevail. The tree-ring dated 8th century megadrought occurred near the decline of the Classic Period civilizations at Teotihuacan in central Mexico and in the Mayan region of the Yucatan. The 8th century megadrought may have interacted with anthropogenic environmental degradation, epidemic disease, and social upheaval to

  17. Zooming Albanian factor in the nineteenth century through Western lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA. Arben Salihu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The developments of the nineteenth century were determining for the history of Balkan region as it shaped the future of many generations to come, resulting in (mainly growing discontents that led to several wars during the last century. It was beginning of the decay of the Ottoman Empire that many longed for, and many nations used every opportunity to take a full advantage of it. The aim of this work is to explore exclusively (only Western sources in an attempt to provide, as much as possible, an objective and neutral picture. Therefore, the idea behind the decision to examine non-Balkan sources is impartiality, in order to bring the reader as close as possible to the reality of the nineteenth century. A number of nineteenth century books, magazines and newspapers of the time, by respective Western authors, are explored and analysed. Reading and examining a large volume of data and information of this period, offers a unique sense of feeling, similar to that of living the nineteenth century world. Albanians, who have historically populated the heart of Balkans, are focal point of this region (in many of the regional and international sources for this particular period, vis-à-vis the Ottoman governance as well as relations with other regional neighbours. Their contribution to the history of nations in the region was unquestionably critical, but their conduct in relations to their own cause has produced an unproductive image, portrayed often with confused and incomprehensible deeds. By using authentic sources of the time, the study intends to develop arguments on many points raised, like population and religion. This work also touches briefly the sensitive issue of education in the region and initial Albanian inputs in the history of Balkan education map. Finally the study concludes that Albanians’ altruism and largely visionless focus, produced a relatively expected detrimental outcome.

  18. Literacy Is "Not" Enough: 21st Century Fluencies for the Digital Age. The 21st Century Fluency Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Lee; Jukes, Ian; Churches, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Educating students to traditional literacy standards is no longer enough. If students are to thrive in their academic and 21st century careers, then independent and creative thinking hold the highest currency. The authors explain in detail how to add these new components of literacy: (1) Solution Fluency; (2) Information Fluency; (3) Creativity…

  19. 21st Century Climate Change in the European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobiet, Andreas; Kotlarski, Sven; Stoffel, Markus; Heinrich, Georg; Rajczak, Jan; Beniston, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The Alps are particularly sensitive to global warming and warmed twice as much as the global average in the recent past. In addition, the Alps and its surroundings are a densly populated areas where society is affected by climate change in many ways, which calls for reliable estimates of future climate change. However, the complex Alpine region poses considerable challenges to climate models, which translate to uncertainties in future climate projections. Against this background, the present study reviews the state-of-knowledge about 21st century climate change in the Alps based on existing literature and additional analyses. It will be demonstrated that considerable and accelerating changes are not only to be expected with regard to temperature, but also precipitation, global radiation, relative humidity, and closely related impacts like floods, droughts, snow cover, and natural hazards will be effected by global warming. Under the A1B emission scenario, about 0.25 °C warming per decade until the mid of the 21st century and accelerated 0.36 °C warming per decade in the second half of the century is expected. Warming will most probably be associated with changes in the seasonality of precipitation, global radiation, and relative humidity. More intense precipitation extremes and flooding potential are particularly expected in the colder part of the year. The conditions of currently record breaking warm or hot winter or summer seasons, respectively, may become normal at the end of the 21st century, and there is indication for droughts to become more severe in the future. Snow cover is expected to drastically decrease below 1500 - 2000 m and natural hazards related to glacier and permafrost retreat are expected to become more frequent. Such changes in climatic variables and related quantities will have considerable impact on ecosystems and society and will challenge their adaptive capabilities. Acknowledgements: This study has been initiated and is partly funded by

  20. Groundhog Day: Expectation Management by Examining Warfare in the Early Twentieth Century Balkans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Athey, John R

    2007-01-01

    .... History leading up to the Twentieth century contained numerous conflicts between nations on the peninsula and the first 50 years of the Twentieth century contained four additional major conflicts...

  1. In vitro Toxicity Testing in the Twenty-First Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggen, Erwin L

    2011-01-01

    The National Research Council (NRC) article "Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A vision and A Strategy" (National Research Council, 2007) was written to bring attention to the application of scientific advances for use in toxicity tests so that chemicals can be tested in a more time and cost efficient manner while providing a more relevant and mechanistic insight into the toxic potential of a compound. Development of tools for in vitro toxicity testing constitutes an important activity of this vision and contributes to the provision of test systems as well as data that are essential for the development of computer modeling tools for, e.g., system biology, physiologically based modeling. This article intends to highlight some of the issues that have to be addressed in order to make in vitro toxicity testing a reality in the twenty-first century.

  2. In Vitro Toxicity testing in the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin L Roggen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The National Research Council (NRC article Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A vision and A Strategy (National Research Council, 2007 was written to bring attention to the application of scientific advances for use in toxicity tests so that chemicals can be tested in a more time and cost efficient manner while providing a more relevant and mechanistic insight into the toxic potential of a compound.Development of tools for in vitro toxicity testing constitutes an important activity of this vision and contributes to the provision of test systems as well as data that are essential for the development of computer modelling tools for e.g. system biology, physiologically-based modelling. This article intends to highlight some of the issues that have to be addressed in order to make in vitro toxicity testing a reality in the 21st century.

  3. [Hippocrates and the nineteenth-century French medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, In-sok

    2003-12-01

    Hippocrates, the father of medicine, has been represented in many ways throughout the history of medicine. His influence on later medicine took different forms from one epoch to another. Hippocrates' medical doctrine was quite influential until Renaissance period, and with the arrival of modern medicine, the method or the spirit of Hippocrates had been valued more highly than his medical doctrine. Nineteenth century French medicine shows us how the influence of Hippocrates is still vivid even in the nineteenth century. Hippocrates, as the author of the Air, Water, Places, became the founder of environmental medicine with the flourishing of meteorological medicine. And in the hands of medical ideologies he also became a proclaimer of the ideology that stressed the correspondence between men, society and nature. Laennec represented Hippocrates as the true pioneer in Clinical Medicine to which he himself made a great contribution. These various images of Hippocrates show us the universal nature of his medicine.

  4. Challenges of peace education in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Herrero Rico

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article makes a review of the history of Peace Education (PE in Spain during the 20th century in order to propose, subsequently, the opportunities and challenges which PE has to face at the beginning of this new 21st century. With this historical and pedagogical revision of the PE we see what has been already done and what we have still pending to do as a peace educators and peace workers. Moreover, as we all know, to understand the present and todesign the future with a major guarantee it is first required knowing the past. This reflections and analysis come from the REM (Reconstructive-Empowering Approach which reconstructs our human competences to make peace and to empower us for the peaceful action from our personal and daily experiences.

  5. RESEARCH ON THE RUST FUNGI DURING THE TWENTIETH CENTURY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Richard C.

    2000-01-01

    Interest in the rust fungi derives from their success as plant pathogens. For example, the epidemic on coffee had serious economic and social impacts on diverse cultures. During the century, research on the rust germling shifted from a study of germling development, including a search for the signals that induce differentiation, to an examination of the genes expressed during host colonization. Research on host resistance was most influenced by Stakman, who studied the genetics and epidemiology of rust disease. His innovations enabled Flor to propose the gene-for-gene hypothesis, a concept that stimulated development of resistant crops, and led to research that gradually shifted during the century to an examination of the molecular basis of rust genetics.

  6. The Risorgimento in 20th century Italian political discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn; Forlenza, Rosario

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to understand both continuities and changes in the reference to the Risorgimento in 20th century political discourse. The narrative proceeds by analyzing historical “snapshots,” from the Liberal period to post-Cold War Italy, that allows us to spell out what has changed...... and what has remained constant in the memorization and actualization of the Risorgimento in the 20th century political discourse. We single out historical events, public rituals and public discourses unfolding in the context of symbolic years and anniversaries of the nation like 1911, 1932, and 1961 where...... the nexus between the Risorgimento past and the political present came to the fore with particular emphasis. In the contextual discussion of these memorization events, we discuss intellectual elaborations of Risorgimento memorization and indicate how such elaborations spread to wider layers of the populace...

  7. Terrorism, Globalization, and Fear: Physics in the 21st Century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerch, Irving (American Physical Society)

    2002-09-11

    In the last half of the 20th century, the US emerged as a center for physics education and research. European science, which had all but relocated to the American continent after the war, rapidly returned to create a resurgent inventory of centers of excellence. Nonetheless, throughout the remainder of the century, students continued to flock to US Universities and labs - first from Europe and increasingly from Asia. But declining federal investments, enhanced global distribution of the research enterprise, and falling undergraduate enrollments worldwide have increased the viscosity of international scientific exchange. Terrorist attacks and alarms of espionage have produced policy proposals that may exacerbate this trend. Is this the end for American prominence in science?

  8. Caring and healing in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, S L

    1998-01-01

    As the 21st century approaches, nurses must be prepared to offer new treatment methods when caring for children. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with human caring theory and complementary and alternative medicine, and to offer a practical way of integrating these methods into nursing care. Nurses can learn to choose simple, conservative, noninvasive, nonintrusive healing methods that are met with little resistance by other health care professionals. Clinical implications of the Nurse's Tool Box suggest methods such as drawing, acupressure, guided imagery, storytelling, therapeutic touch, soft music, and humor as ways to help children heal. By tapping into certain frequency currents through the use of these tools, nurses may build, repattern, or facilitate human energies to replenish children's minds, bodies, and souls, creating wholeness and harmony. By understanding human caring theory and complementary and alternative medicine, and by using a practical approach to healing, nurses in the new century can mend children in ways they never have before.

  9. 21st Century Kinematics : The 2012 NSF Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    21st Century Kinematics focuses on algebraic problems in the analysis and synthesis of mechanisms and robots, compliant mechanisms, cable-driven systems and protein kinematics. The specialist contributors provide the background for a series of presentations at the 2012 NSF Workshop. The text shows how the analysis and design of innovative mechanical systems yield increasingly complex systems of polynomials, characteristic of those systems. In doing so, takes advantage of increasingly sophisticated computational tools developed for numerical algebraic geometry and demonstrates the now routine derivation of polynomial systems dwarfing the landmark problems of even the recent past. The 21st Century Kinematics workshop echoes the NSF-supported 1963 Yale Mechanisms Teachers Conference that taught a generation of university educators the fundamental principles of kinematic theory. As such these proceedings will be provide admirable supporting theory for a graduate course in modern kinematics and should be of consid...

  10. 16th century European earthquakes described in some contemporary woodcuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deresiewicz, H.

    1985-01-01

    In the middle of the 15th century, shortly after Gutenberg’s invention of printing using individual lead type, the first illustrated broadsides (or broadsheets) began appearing in southern Germany.  Usually printed on one side of a sheet of paper, they consisted of a woodcut illustration, sometimes colored, either by hand or by stencil, and several columns of text, often in verse.  The appeal of the publications to the mass reader was often stimulated by sensationalism in word and picture, somewhat like that purveyed today’s tabloid press.  What follows are woodcuts and portions of the text from 16th to 17th century broadsheets that describe earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  11. Building 21st. Century literacies through digital animated storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This paper will present the preliminary findings from a R&D project on developing 21st. Century literacies in a digital Storylab at a public library, doing digital animated storytelling, in collaboration with municipal schools. It will explore the implications for the approach to digital story......-based learning for learner’s engagement, motivation and multimodal learning in a mixed methods study based on surveys, interviews and observations. The key literacy skills needed for 21st. Century learners have shifted from a predominant focus on verbal text towards multimodal literacies, that combine the visual......, auditory and verbal with a fluency with digital tools. There is an interest to teach multimodal literacy in open schooling, while bridging informal and formal learning in hybrid environments, that is involving collaboration with libraries and museums. Designs for multimodal learning with animation may have...

  12. The expression of emotions in 20th century books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerbi, Alberto; Lampos, Vasileios; Garnett, Philip; Bentley, R Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We report here trends in the usage of "mood" words, that is, words carrying emotional content, in 20th century English language books, using the data set provided by Google that includes word frequencies in roughly 4% of all books published up to the year 2008. We find evidence for distinct historical periods of positive and negative moods, underlain by a general decrease in the use of emotion-related words through time. Finally, we show that, in books, American English has become decidedly more "emotional" than British English in the last half-century, as a part of a more general increase of the stylistic divergence between the two variants of English language.

  13. John Stewart Bell and twentieth century physics vision and integrity

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    John Stewart Bell (1928-1990) was one of the most important figures in twentieth-century physics, famous for his work on the fundamental aspects of the century's most important theory, quantum mechanics. While the debate over quantum theory between the supremely famous physicists, Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr, appeared to have become sterile in the 1930s, Bell was able to revive it and to make crucial advances - Bell's Theorem or Bell's Inequalities. He was able to demonstrate a contradiction between quantum theory and essential elements of pre-quantum theory - locality and causality. The book gives a non-mathematical account of Bell's relatively impoverished upbringing in Belfast and his education. It describes his major contributions to quantum theory, but also his important work in the physics of accelerators, and nuclear and elementary particle physics.

  14. Valladolid, a Festival Town (17th-18th Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes AMIGO VÁZQUEZ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The festival was a great sociocultural event whose dimensions reached their maximum evolution in Early Modern Spain, especially in the 17th and 18th centuries and in its urban centres. This was the «festive society» par excellence, because of the frequency of the celebrations and the multiplicity of meanings, implications and consequences. Society and power, ultimately, were represented at the festival. In this context, the specific case of Valladolid demonstrates both its character as a germane model, applicable to any other town, and its uniqueness. Significantly, in the early 17th century it was once again the seat of the Court and yet even after being abandoned by Philip III in 1606, it continued to be one of the most important towns of Castile, the seat of the Royal Chancellery.

  15. The individual’s triumph: the eighteenth-century consolidation of authorship and art historiography

    OpenAIRE

    David Pullins

    2017-01-01

    The eighteenth-century consolidation of authorial identity – apparent in Salon livrets, art criticism, sales catalogs, inventories, the theoretical development of maniera, signing and hanging practices – was crucial to subsequent, nineteenth-century Romantic notions of what constituted individual authorship and to the kinds of eighteenth-century painting that were eventually written into or out of art history. Situating eighteenth-century paintings and drawings executed by multiple hands in a...

  16. Hybrid Warfare: the 21st Century Russian Way of Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    images is not permissible. iii Abstract Hybrid Warfare: The 21st Century Russian Way of Warfare, by MAJ Amos C. Fox, US Army, 73 pages. In...echelons far above a tactical battalion. Robert Leonhard suggests, “As the Cold War receded into the history books , the day-to-day reality of...Russian brand of hybrid warfare. Furthermore, Leonhard’s definition has more far-reaching applicability than other definitions analyzed, making it usable

  17. DOE pollution prevention in the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This document presents abstracts of the topics covered in the DOE Pollution Prevention in the 21st Century conference held July 9-11, 1996. These topics include: model facilities; Federal/NEPA/stake- holders; microchemistry; solvents and reduction; education and outreach; return on investments; energy management; decontamination and decommissioning; planning and regulations; environmental restoration; recycling; affirmative procurement in the executive branch; construction and demolition; materials exchange; and ISO 2000.

  18. Energy in ASEAN: An outlook into the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arismunandar, A.; Dupuis, P.

    The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was formed in Bangkok in 1967 by five countries: Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. A sixth nation, recently independent Brunei Darussalam, joined the association in 1984. The story on enery in the ASEAN is presented. The topics covered include the following: energy resources; energy demand versus elasticity; how to cope with energy demand; and an outlook into the 21st century.

  19. How Terrorist Groups End: Studies of the Twentieth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    and varied. Some perish in exhaustion, be it physical, psychological, or organizational; an early post– World War II example was the fatigue of Luis ...power. In September 1992, a tiny police intelligence unit located leader Abimael Guzman and made an arrest; he has since been locked up on an island...never left the field. As a hardened Maoist, Guzman would know the stories of the twentieth-century “comebacks” after jail or hardship—Adolf Hitler

  20. [Hospitals in Europe and Yugoslavia through the centuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalović, R

    1998-01-01

    The primary object of this paper is to give a retrospective of hospital development in Europe and Yugoslavia for the past twenty-five centuries. The earliest records of hospitals called the "iatreia" date back to the V century B.C., ancient Greece. The sick in those hospitals were treated with drugs as well operated on. The Romans, during the reign of the emperor Augustus, built valetudinaries within military camps. The name "hospital" was introduced in the IV century A.D. and has been used ever since. The first hospital was founded in Cesarea, i.e. in the East Roman Empire in Asia Minor. The chronology of the hospital development in the Middle Ages is given in table 1--"Chronology of Hospital Development in the Middle Ages." St. Sava (Nemanjić) founded the first Serbian hospital in the Monastery of Hilandar about 1199 and in 1208/1209 a hospital in the Monastery of Studenica. In the hospital of the Monastery of St. Arhangel in Prizren, according to the regulations prescribed by tzar Dusan, only curable patients were to be treated. The first hospital in Vojvodina in Bac near Novi Sad dates back to 1234. More data about hospitals in former Yugoslavia are given in table 2--"The Oldest Hospitals in former Yugoslavia" and about the Frontier Hospitals in Vojvodina in table 3--"Frontier Hospitals for the Wounded and Sick in Vojvodina". The first medical high school was established in Salerno in the IX century and the first European University in Bologna in 1088, where the School of Medicine was founded in 1156. The University in Paris was founded in 1107 and in Oxford in 1145.

  1. National Metrical Types in Nineteenth Century Art Song

    OpenAIRE

    Leigh VanHandel

    2010-01-01

    William Rothstein’s article “National metrical types in music of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries” (2008) proposes a distinction between the metrical habits of 18th and early 19th century German music and those of Italian and French music of that period. Based on theoretical treatises and compositional practice, he outlines these national metrical types and discusses the characteristics of each type. This paper presents the results of a study designed to determine whether, and to...

  2. SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP IN THE 21th CENTURY

    OpenAIRE

    Sorin George Toma

    2008-01-01

    The emergence and evolution of globalization have produced major changes not only in the economy, but also in society and environment. In the 21st century, today’ s companies are increasingly operating at a global scale. They have to act locally and think globally. Today’ s companies are facing higher expectations from society and stakeholders. This is why, they must assume multiple responsibilities both locally and globally. Besides their economic responsibility, social and environmental res...

  3. Designing vaccines for the 21st century society

    OpenAIRE

    Oretta eFinco; Rino eRappuoli

    2014-01-01

    The history of vaccination clearly demonstrates that vaccines have been highly successful in preventing infectious diseases, reducing significantly the incidence of childhood diseases and mortality. However many infections are still not preventable with the currently available vaccines and they represent a major cause of mortality worldwide. In the 21st century, the innovation brought by novel technologies in antigen discovery and formulation together with a deeper knowledge of the human imm...

  4. Designing Vaccines for the Twenty-First Century Society

    OpenAIRE

    Finco, Oretta; Rappuoli, Rino

    2014-01-01

    The history of vaccination clearly demonstrates that vaccines have been highly successful in preventing infectious diseases, reducing significantly the incidence of childhood diseases and mortality. However, many infections are still not preventable with the currently available vaccines and they represent a major cause of mortality worldwide. In the twenty-first century, the innovation brought by novel technologies in antigen discovery and formulation together with a deeper knowledge of the h...

  5. Time, Domesticity and Print Culture in Nineteenth-Century Britain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, Maria

    In this innovative study, Damkjær shows that nineteenth-century texts gave domesticity not just a spatial, but also a temporal dimension. Novels by Dickens and Gaskell, as well as periodicals, cookery books and albums, all showed domesticity as a process. Damkjær argues that texts’ material form ...... – serialised, fragmented or reappropriated – had a profound influence on their representation of domestic time....

  6. Beautiful Death: the Nineteenth-Century Fascination with Antigone

    OpenAIRE

    Beaney, Tara

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the reception of Sophocles’ Antigone in early nineteenth-century Germany, a period in which interest in ancient Greek tragedy flourished, with Antigone being particularly prominent. The essay considers two influential figures of the period who regarded the work highly: the philosopher G.W.F. Hegel (1770-1831) and the poet Friedrich Hölderlin (1770- 1843). In discussing their attitudes towards Antigone, the article raises the long-standing philosophical problem of how...

  7. Gerbert of Aurillac: astronomy and geometry in tenth century Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Gerbert of Aurillac was the most prominent personality of the tenth century: astronomer, organ builder and music theoretician, mathematician, philosopher, and finally pope with the name of Silvester II (999-1003). Gerbert introduced firstly the arabic numbers in Europe, invented an abacus for speeding the calculations and found a rational approximation for the equilateral triangle area, in the letter to Adelbold here discussed. Gerbert described a semi-sphere to Constantine of Fleury with bui...

  8. Clothing the Poor in Nineteenth-Century England

    OpenAIRE

    Richmond, Vivienne

    2013-01-01

    In this pioneering study Vivienne Richmond reveals the importance of dress to the nineteenth-century English poor, who valued clothing not only for its practical utility, but also as a central element in the creation and assertion of collective and individual identities. During this period of rapid industrialisation and urbanisation formal dress codes, corporate and institutional uniforms and the spread of urban fashions replaced the informal dress of agricultural England. This laid the found...

  9. Megadrought and megadeath in 16th century Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna-Soto, Rodolfo; Stahle, David W; Cleaveland, Malcolm K; Therrell, Matthew D

    2002-04-01

    The native population collapse in 16th century Mexico was a demographic catastrophe with one of the highest death rates in history. Recently developed tree-ring evidence has allowed the levels of precipitation to be reconstructed for north central Mexico, adding to the growing body of epidemiologic evidence and indicating that the 1545 and 1576 epidemics of cocoliztli (Nahuatl for "pest") were indigenous hemorrhagic fevers transmitted by rodent hosts and aggravated by extreme drought conditions.

  10. [Cocaine: half a century of therapeutic use (1880-1930)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricot, J P

    1991-01-01

    After observations concerning the cultivation, the trade and the use of coca by the Peruvian population, several Spanish physicians--among whom MONARDES--had already in the XVIth century, proposed to use this plant as a medicine. Therapeutical experiments however were not effected until the second half of the XIXth century. In 1559 the Italian neurologist MANTEGAZZA was the first to try out the remedy on himself and to advocate the use of coca as an internal medicine. Experiments with cocaine were still made during about twenty years, until more and more therapeutical applications clearly appeared. In psychiatry cocaine was used--also on Freud's recommendation--as an euphoriant excitant in cases of melancholia, both physical and psychic exhaustion and of cachexia. It was further used as a substitution therapy for morphine-addicts. 1884 also meant a break-through for the use of cocaine as a local anesthetic. It was first used in eye-surgery and was applied later on in dentistry and in cases of minor surgery. Local pain-killing injections seems to have been used at the beginning of our century in all sorts of indications. Cocaine was also applied to cure asthma, mountain-sickness, sea-sickness, pregnancy vomiting and all possible sorts of cramping pains. Although in the last years of the XIXth century the medical literature already clearly warned against the danger of therapeutically induced cocaine mania, it is only several years after World War I that the use of cocaine pills for painful diseases of the mouth and of the upper digestion organs still appeared. Between 1880 and 1930, we may assert that cocaine had taken the place of the universal panacea of the Middle Ages, the Theriaca.

  11. A 21st Century National Public Health System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    populations throughout history.1 From some of the earliest recorded epidemics of bubonic plague and smallpox to the deadly 1918 Spanish Flu...journey. xvi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 I. INTRODUCTION A. BACKGROUND Emerging and reemerging infectious diseases have plagued human...developing effective public health systems. As well, Thomas Abraham in Twenty First Century Plague : The Story of SARS (2004) contributes to an

  12. The top ten California floods of the 20th century

    OpenAIRE

    Roos, Maurice

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the biggest northern California floods of the 20th century. Flooding in California can occur from different causes. At least three types of floods occur: 1. Winter general floods, which cover a large area. 2. Spring and early summer snowmelt floods unique to the higher-elevation central and southern Sierra Nevada, which occur about once in 10 years on the average. 3. Local floods from strong thunderstorms, with intense rain over a ...

  13. [Amazing health rates in turn-of-the-century Majorca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujosa, F

    1998-01-01

    Majorca's mortality rates in the turn of the century were the lowest of Spain and nearer to those of the northern European countries than to Mediterranean ones and therefore their amazing quality. This paper seeks to contribute to solve that riddle and, as a first step, it reviews the island's demographic conditions and its economic, political and social and cultural context, including the analysis of the development of medical sciences and the sanitary reform of the city of Palma proposed by Eusebio Estada.

  14. Crystalline-Silicon Solar Cells for the 21st Century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuo, Y. S.; Wang, T. H.; Ciszek, T. F.

    1999-05-10

    The worldwide market share for crystalline-silicon solar cells has increased steadily in the last 10 years. In 1998, about 87% of the photovoltaic modules shipped worldwide are based on crystalline silicon. This dominance will likely continue into at least the first few years of the 21st century. The long-term growth of crystalline-silicon solar cells will depend on the development of low-cost polysilicon feedstock, silicon films, and advanced cell and module manufacturing processes.

  15. Nineteenth-Century Measurements of the Mechanical Equivalent of Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2002-04-01

    Today the measurement of the mechanical equivalent of heat is a laboratory exercise in which the student tries to come close to the accepted value. How different was the attitude of the 19th-century physicists and engineers, for which the value was a key link between mechanics and thermodynamics, two seemingly separate domains of physics. This article discusses some of the pioneering experiments, translating them into modern nomenclature and units.

  16. Identifying 21st century STEM competencies using workplace data

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Hyewon

    2015-01-01

    Gaps between Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education and required workplace skills have been identified in industry, academia, and government. Educators acknowledge the need to reform STEM education to better prepare students for their future careers. We pursue this growing interest in the skills needed for STEM disciplines and ask whether frameworks for 21st century skills and engineering education cover all of important STEM competencies. In this study, we identif...

  17. The Long Twentieth Century and Barriers to China's Hegemonic Accession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Gulick

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Giovanni Arrighi's The Long Twentieth Century is an almost unfathomably ambitious andcomplex work. Its monumentality derives from Arrighi 's conviction that the best way to handicapthe possible futures of the world capitalist geo-economy is to analyze the structural evolution ofthis global system, an evolution spanning more than five centuries; the genius of the work rests inthe distinctive approach that Arrighi takes. At the core of his approach is the identification ofthose long-term trends and accreted characteristics - one might call them "systemiccontradictions" - that promise to send the world capitalist geo-economy in a radically differentdevelopmental direction as US hegemony wanes. Arrighi 's assessment of these contradictionscompel him to make a provocative suggestion: in all likelihood, no singular concentration of stateand economic power possesses the territorial scale or the organizational capacities required tolead the global system through another round of restructuring and expansion. Properly framed,this illuminating insight could serve as the starting point for a theoretical exploration of thesocio-ecological constraints to global capitalist reproduction, but such is a journey (mostly nottaken by Arrighi in The Long Twentieth Century. In fact, to the degree that he subsequentlycontemplates the prospect of a China-centered reconstitution of the world geo-economy, Arrighimarginalizes the question of global systemic contradictions altogether.

  18. A century of trends in adult human height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Camilla Trab; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Molbo, Drude

    2016-01-01

    in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5-22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3-19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over......Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain...... the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8-144.8). The height differential between the tallest...

  19. Going East or West? Finnish Travelers in Nineteenth Century Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letsios Vassilis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article I will discuss two different attitudes of traveling in mid-nineteenth century Greece, at a crucial time for the “western” or “eastern” orientation of the Greek state. To capture this I will demonstrate aspects of the travel writing of two Finnish travelers in nineteenth century Greece. The first recognized in modern Greece the light of classical antiquity and the importance of its conveying to the west, the second focused on contemporary Greece and its connection with the east. The two travelers, with a common starting point and at about the same time, traveled in a very different way in nineteenth century Greece and with their different skills “opened” different ideological horizons in a place that they both “loved” and “hated” for different reasons. How does the binary “east/west?” relate to the travelers’ expectations and predispositions at a time of the development of modern Greek identities and consciousness?

  20. Civilian Power from Space in the Early 21st Century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, R; Ishikawa, M; Wood, L

    2003-06-01

    If power beamed from space is to be become widely used on Earth in the first half of the 21St century, several thus-far-persistent impediments must be obviated, including threshold effects and problematic aspects of cost, availability, reliability, hazards and environmental impacts. We sketch a generally-applicable route to doing so, noting key enabling technologies and practical features. Likely-essential features of any successful strategy include vigorous, systematic leveraging of all intrinsic features of space-derived power, e.g., addressing marginal, high-value-added markets for electric power in space- and time-agile manners to conveniently provide power-upon-demand, and incrementally ''wedging'' into ever-larger markets with ever more cost-efficient generations and scales of technology. We suggest that no prudent strategic plan will rely upon large-scale, long-term public subsidies--fiscal, regulatory, etc.--with their attendant ''sovereign risks'' and interminable delays, and that plan-essential governmental support likely will be limited to early feasibility demonstrations, provision of threshold technologies and a rational, competition-neutral licensing environment. If salient realities are uniformly respected and accessible technologies are intelligently leveraged, electricity derived from space-sourced power-beams may come into significant civilian use during the latter part of the first quarter of this century, and may become widely used by the half-century point.

  1. How 21st century droughts affect food and environmental security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Felix

    The first 13th years of the 21st century has begun with a series of widespread, long and intensive droughts around the world. Extreme and severe-to-extreme intensity droughts covered 2-6% and 7-16% of the world land, respectively, affecting environment, economies and humans. These droughts reduced agricultural production, leading to food shortages, human health deterioration, poverty, regional disturbances, population migration and death. This presentation is a travelogue of the 21st century global and regional droughts during the warmest years of the past 100 years. These droughts were identified and monitored with the NOAA operational space technology, called Vegetation Health (VH), which has the longest period of observation and provide good data quality. The VH method was used for assessment of vegetation condition or health, including drought early detection and monitoring. The VH method is based on operational satellites data estimating both land surface greenness (NDVI) and thermal conditions. The 21st century droughts in the USA, Russia, Australia Argentina, Brazil, China, India and other principal grain producing countries were intensive, long, covered large areas and caused huge losses in agricultural production, which affected food and environmental security and led to food riots in some countries. This presentation investigate how droughts affect food and environmental security, if they can be detected earlier, how to monitor their area, intensity, duration and impacts and also their dynamics during the climate warming era with satellite-based vegetation health technology.

  2. Tendencies in evolution of 21st century management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Buble

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical paradigm of management formulated over century ago started to receive substantial critics already in the second half of 20th century. First attack on the paradigm appeared by the end of 1960s when the environment finally started to be treated as an important element of management. The second significant attack appeared in 1978 when Tom Peters (1978 developed the concept of eight principles of excellence which were in complete contradiction with the principles of classical paradigm of management. Peter Senge created further deflection from the paradigm in the 1990 with the concept of learning organization, while in the same year Michael Hammer and James Champy founded the thesis of organization of work around processes, as opposed to organization around tasks. At the beginning of 21st century a significant attack on the traditional paradigm of management was carried out by Peter Drucker who pointed out the changes which will emerge and their implications on enterprise, its organization and management. The greatest attack on classical paradigm of management was carried out by Gary Hamel (2007, stating that many management principles and systems are based on inadequate paradigm(s, and therefore manager's innovations represent ultimate source of competitive advantages. All of this led some authors to ask themselves a question: Is the end of management on the way? In search for an answer to this question, this paper shows that the end of management has not come, but its future is yet to be devised.

  3. Smart Social Networking: 21st Century Teaching and Learning Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen B. Boholano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Education in the 21st century highlights globalization and internationalization. Preservice teachers in the 21st century are technology savvy. To effectively engage and teach generation Z students, preservice teachers will help the educational system meet this requirement. The educational systems must be outfitted with a prerequisite of ICT resources both hardware and software, and curricula must be designed to promote a collaborative learner-centered environment to which students will relate and respond. This study determines the 21st century skills possessed by the pre-service teachers in terms of social networking. Pre-service teachers use computers in very advanced ways, but educators must remember that they still need guidance to use technology safely and effectively. Through social media the pre-service teachers can use a multitude of applications, including Web 2.0, for their projects. Smart social networking requires critical-thinking skills and the ability to integrate and evaluate real-world scenarios and authentic learning skills for validation.

  4. 21ST-CENTURY TEACHERS: THE STUDENTS’ PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maida Norahmi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The issues regarding the demands of creative, innovative, and professional teachers are certainly on the concern of stakeholders and practitioners in education. Substantial efforts were conducted by the government to meet the 21st-century teachers having the four competencies required for being a teacher and coping with the needs of modern education. A survey research was conducted to collect respondents’ opinion as the main source of data to describe whether the 21st-century teachers are on the demands and to gain information that the students have a similar perception to teacher’s competencies required by the government. Seventy-five questionnaires related to the competencies were given to students of English Education Study Program of 2013 to 2016. The questionnaires were aimed at collecting written information dealing with what the students perceived towards the activities implemented by teachers in the process of teaching and learning. The result of questionnaire analysis revealed that most students expected the 21st-century teachers to have skills in teaching and in connecting it with the development of today’s technology and today’s student characteristics. The data also showed that the students constructed the same characteristics of teacher’s competencies required by the government regarding pedagogy, personality, sociality, and professionality.

  5. Diabetes insipidus: celebrating a century of vasopressin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Sana; Galiveeti, Sneha; Bichet, Daniel G; Roth, Jesse

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus, widely known to the ancients for polyuria and glycosuria, budded off diabetes insipidus (DI) about 200 years ago, based on the glucose-free polyuria that characterized a subset of patients. In the late 19th century, clinicians identified the posterior pituitary as the site of pathology, and pharmacologists found multiple bioactivities there. Early in the 20th century, the amelioration of the polyuria with extracts of the posterior pituitary inaugurated a new era in therapy and advanced the hypothesis that DI was due to a hormone deficiency. Decades later, a subset of patients with polyuria unresponsive to therapy were recognized, leading to the distinction between central DI and nephrogenic DI, an early example of a hormone-resistant condition. Recognition that the posterior pituitary had 2 hormones was followed by du Vigneaud's Nobel Prize winning isolation, sequencing, and chemical synthesis of oxytocin and vasopressin. The pure hormones accelerated the development of bioassays and immunoassays that confirmed the hormone deficiency in vasopressin-sensitive DI and abundant levels of hormone in patients with the nephrogenic disorder. With both forms of the disease, acquired and inborn defects were recognized. Emerging concepts of receptors and of genetic analysis led to the recognition of patients with mutations in the genes for 1) arginine vasopressin (AVP), 2) the AVP receptor 2 (AVPR2), and 3) the aquaporin 2 water channel (AQP2). We recount here the multiple skeins of clinical and laboratory research that intersected frequently over the centuries since the first recognition of DI.

  6. Parasitic diseases: opportunities and challenges in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Colley

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The opportunities and challenges for the study and control of parasitic diseases in the 21st century are both exciting and daunting. Based on the contributions from this field over the last part of the 20th century, we should expect new biologic concepts will continue to come from this discipline to enrich the general area of biomedical research. The general nature of such a broad category of infections is difficult to distill, but they often depend on well-orchestrated, complex life cycles and they often involve chronic, relatively well-balanced host/parasite relationships. Such characteristics force biological systems to their limits, and this may be why studies of these diseases have made fundamental contributions to molecular biology, cell biology and immunology. However, if these findings are to continue apace, parasitologists must capitalize on the new findings being generated though genomics, bioinformatics, proteomics, and genetic manipulations of both host and parasite. Furthermore, they must do so based on sound biological insights and the use of hypothesis-driven studies of these complex systems. A major challenge over the next century will be to capitalize on these new findings and translate them into successful, sustainable strategies for control, elimination and eradication of the parasitic diseases that pose major public health threats to the physical and cognitive development and health of so many people worldwide.

  7. Early twenty-first-century droughts during the warmest climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Kogan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first 13 years of the twenty-first century have begun with a series of widespread, long and intensive droughts around the world. Extreme and severe-to-extreme intensity droughts covered 2%–6% and 7%–16% of the world land, respectively, affecting environment, economies and humans. These droughts reduced agricultural production, leading to food shortages, human health deterioration, poverty, regional disturbances, population migration and death. This feature article is a travelogue of the twenty-first-century global and regional droughts during the warmest years of the past 100 years. These droughts were identified and monitored with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration operational space technology, called vegetation health (VH, which has the longest period of observation and provides good data quality. The VH method was used for assessment of vegetation condition or health, including drought early detection and monitoring. The VH method is based on operational satellites data estimating both land surface greenness (NDVI and thermal conditions. The twenty-first-century droughts in the USA, Russia, Australia and Horn of Africa were intensive, long, covered large areas and caused huge losses in agricultural production, which affected food security and led to food riots in some countries. This research also investigates drought dynamics presenting no definite conclusion about drought intensification or/and expansion during the time of the warmest globe.

  8. Russia and the Horde in the 15th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Gorsky

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the dynamics of relations between Russia and the Horde during the 15th century. These relations were determined by the gradual disintegration of the Horde and the parallel strengthening of the Moscow principality. The author defines the main attributes of the Russian political dependence on the Horde in the 14th century (the practice of granting the yarlyk’s authorizing the rule of the Russian princes and their obligation to pay an “exit fee”, which had a direct influence on the nature of mutual relations. The article traces both the persistent attempts of the Moscow princes to free themselves from vassalage during periods of political instability in the Horde and the constant tendency to recognize subordination in the periods of the strengthening of the khans’ power. The author points to a significant activation of the foreign policy of the Moscow princes over a few decades prior to the approval of Russian independence. This tendency had determined the subsequent foreign policy of the Muscovite tzars after the collapse of the Horde at the beginning of the 16th century.

  9. [Suicide and cultural criticism in 19th century Spanish medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumed Domingo, José Javier; Novella, Enric J

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the major role of suicide in the cultural criticism deployed by 19th century Spanish doctors by analysing the most important theoretical models that inspired their contributions to its aetiology. In the first half of the century, the most commonly debated causal factor was the passions, which were thought to stand in a permanent tension with a free, reflexive and conscious self, in accordance with the spiritualist doctrine that was then dominant. In the context of a growing somatisation of moral and intellectual phenomena, the notion of suicide as an act of free will was later modified, and it became considered the consequence of certain organic disturbances. However, this process did not alter the central role of suicidal behaviour within 19th-century cultural criticism, because the advent of degeneration theory meant that doctors finally had a doctrine that allowed them to combine biological determinism with the extended perception of a moral and social crisis threatening the stability and achievements of bourgeois society.

  10. Two centuries of economic territorial dynamics: the case of France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Talandier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an analysis of the socio-economic development processes at work in territories at the scale of French communes from 1806 to 2010. This is an extremely fine scale for such analysis, given that there are 36,000 communes in mainland France. The diachronic dimension, spanning two centuries, makes it possible to consider the temporal depth of territorial development. But the primary interest is not so much demographics as the socio-economic dimension of these variations over two centuries. We have analysed demographic changes as the expression of the socio-economic processes that shaped French territory over two centuries. Dynamic mapping of long-term population shifts reflects the industrial expansion of certain territories, decline due to the end of traditional farming practices, the shock produced by two world wars, the Fordist period and the post-war boom; the subsequent impact of an increasingly globalized, metropolitan economy then becomes apparent. We thus identify, map and analyse several historico-socio-economic phases.

  11. Mustaches and masculine codes in early twentieth-century America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldstone-Moore, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to deepen our understanding of twentieth-century masculinity by considering the social function of facial hair. The management of facial hair has always been a medium of gendered body language, and as such has elicited a nearly continuous private and public conversation about manliness. Careful attention to this conversation, and to trends in facial hairstyles, illuminates a distinct and consistent pattern of thought about masculinity in early twentieth-century America. The preeminent form of facial hair - mustaches - was used to distinguish between two elemental masculine types: sociable and autonomous. A man was neither wholly one nor the other, but the presence and size of a mustache - or its absence - served to move a man one way or another along the continuum that stretched from one extreme to the other. According to the twentieth-century gender code, a clean-shaven man's virtue was his commitment to his male peers and to local, national or corporate institutions. The mustached man, by contrast, was much more his own man: a patriarch, authority figure or free agent who was able to play by his own rules. Men and women alike read these signals in their evaluation of men.

  12. American Internal Medicine in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddle, Thomas S; Centor, Robert; Heudebert, Gustavo R

    2003-01-01

    American internal medicine suffers a confusion of identity as we enter the 21st century. The subspecialties prosper, although unevenly, and retain varying degrees of connection to their internal medicine roots. General internal medicine, identified with primary care since the 1970s, retains an affinity for its traditional consultant-generalist ideal even as primary care further displaces that ideal. We discuss the origins and importance of the consultant-generalist ideal of internal medicine as exemplified by Osler, and its continued appeal in spite of the predominant role played by clinical science and accompanying subspecialism in determining the academic leadership of American internal medicine since the 1920s. Organizing departmental clinical work along subspecialty lines diminished the importance of the consultant-generalist ideal in academic departments of medicine after 1950. General internists, when they joined the divisions of general internal medicine that appeared in departments of medicine in the 1970s, could sometimes emulate Osler in practicing a general medicine of complexity, but often found themselves in a more limited role doing primary care. As we enter the 21st century, managed care threatens what remains of the Oslerian ideal, both in departments of medicine and in clinical practice. Twenty-first century American internists will have to adjust their conditions of work should they continue to aspire to practice Oslerian internal medicine. PMID:12950486

  13. A Comparative Analysis of International Frameworks for 21st Century Competences: Implications for National Curriculum Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, Joke; Roblin, Natalie Pareja

    2012-01-01

    National curricula need to change drastically to comply with the competences needed for the 21st century. In this paper eight frameworks describing 21st century competences were analysed. A comprehensive search for information about 21st century competences was conducted across the official websites of the selected frameworks, resulting in 32…

  14. The Role of the School District toward Preparing Students for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Torres, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation reflects the outcomes of a small school district that is successfully incorporating 21st century skills with the demands set forth by our current educational policy, No Child Left Behind. Considerations regarding globalization, future work force and work skills, definition of 21st century skills, supporting 21st century skills in…

  15. The finger of God : anatomical practice in 17th century Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Tijs

    2008-01-01

    A description of 17th century anatomical activity at the major Dutch university in a cultural context This study offers a history of the Leiden anatomical theatre in the first century of its existence; who were the scientists working there in the 17th century, the Dutch Golden Age. What was the

  16. Marriage in North-Western Transylvania (2nd Half of the 19th Century – Beginning of the 20th Century). External Conditionings and Marital Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Brie, Mircea

    2009-01-01

    Marriage in North-Western Transylvania (2nd Half of the 19th Century – Beginning of the 20th Century). External Conditionings and Marital Strategies In the latter half of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, in north-western Transylvania there was a traditional rural society, except for some urban centres and their neighbouring areas (the urban character is also proved by the analysis of the marital behaviour). The major events in the family life, such as baptism, marriage ...

  17. The Investigation in Terms of Design Component of Ottoman Women Entari in 19th Century and Early 20th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliha AĞAÇ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to study various entaries belonging to the 19th century and early 20th century in terms of design elements and principles. As result of the studies, it was seen that the X silhouette, the straight line type, vertical line direction, velvet, and silky textures, purple color tones in the base, and golden yellow in the embroidery were mostly used. Symmetric balance and symmetric decoration are observed most and it was determined that there were no principle of motion in entari in general, the point of emphasis was in the embroidery, there was no contrast in line and color elements and all design details were in compliance with each other. This study is deemed significant in terms of attracting attention to and introduction of historical clothing important in protecting cultural heritage, and for exhibiting the refined superior aesthetics of period Ottoman Turks.

  18. Object lessons: notes on geometry in Norman Allison Calkins’ textbook (Brazil, end of nineteenth century, beginning of twentieth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Magalhães Gomes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary object lessons, by Norman Allison Calkins, ranslated by Rui Barbosa, a book that was widely disseminated in Brazil during the final years of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, presents object teaching as a general method to be used in every subject or primary school. This article analyses Calkins’ book according to its presentation of mathematical content, focusing particularly on geometry lessons. It also iscusses five features of the approach adopted by Calkins: the presentation of plane geometry before geometry in space, the several materials necessary to the teaching of geometry, the drawing lessons associated with the lessons on shape, the sequence of presentation of the contents and the relations between geometry teaching and children’s pleasure and curiosity. Comments about the utilization and circulation of Calkins’ manual in geometry teaching in Brazil are also provided.

  19. Arctic Ocean Pathways in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Yevgeny; van Gennip, Simon J.; Kelly, Stephen J.; Popova, Ekaterina E.; Yool, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    In the last three decades, changes in the Arctic environment have been occurring at an increasing rate. The opening up of large areas of previously sea ice-covered ocean affects the marine environment with potential impacts on Arctic ecosystems, including through changes in Arctic access, industries and societies. Changes to sea ice and surface winds result in large-scale shifts in ocean circulation and oceanic pathways. This study presents a high-resolution analysis of the projected ocean circulation and pathways of the Arctic water masses across the 21st century. The analysis is based on an eddy-permitting high-resolution global simulation of the ocean general circulation model NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) at the 1/4-degree horizontal resolution. The atmospheric forcing is from HadGEM2-ES model output from IPCC Assessment Report 5 (AR5) simulations performed for Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5), and follow the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) scenario. During the 21st century the AO experiences a significant warming, with sea surface temperature increased by in excess of 4 deg. C. Annual mean Arctic sea ice thickness drops to less than 0.5m, and the Arctic Ocean is ice-free in summer from the mid-century. We use an off-line tracer technique to investigate Arctic pathways of the Atlantic and Pacific waters (AW and PW respectively) under this future climate. The AW tracers have been released in the eastern Fram Strait and in the western Barents Sea, whereas the PW tracer has been seeded in the Bering Strait. In the second half of the century the upper 1000 m ocean circulation shows a reduction in the eastward AW flow along the continental slopes towards the Makarov and Canada basins and a deviation of the PW flow away from the Beaufort Sea towards the Siberian coast. Strengthening of Arctic boundary current and intensification of the cyclonic gyre in the Nansen basin of the Arctic Ocean is accompanied by

  20. Northern Hemisphere hydroclimate patterns in the last 12 centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier Ljungqvist, Fredrik; Krusic, Paul J.; Sundqvist, Hanna S.; Zorita, Eduardo; Brattström, Gudrun; Frank, David

    2015-04-01

    Variations in local to continental-scale hydroclimate have a strong impact on ecosystem functioning, crop yields, and society's water resources. Consequently, the ability to model and predict with reasonable certainty the dynamic and spatial response of precipitation to global warming is essential. The uncertainty in hydroclimate projections from model simulations remains large as a consequence of significant gaps in our knowledge of preindustrial boundary conditions due to the short length of instrumental measurements of precipitation. In this study, we assembled an unprecedentedly large network of 196 records hydroclimatic records from the Northern Hemisphere (NH) to place recent hydrological changes and future precipitation scenarios in the context of spatially resolved and temporally persistent hydroclimatic variations over the last twelve centuries. The data from grid cells corresponding to the proxy locations were obtained from six CMIP5 last millennium simulations and treated in a similar way as the proxy data in order to facilitate a model-proxy comparison. The most extensive areas of low moisture availability are found during the 12th and 15th centuries. It is notable that the intensification of wet and dry anomalies during the 20th century shown in coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations is not supported by empirical evidence. Our results reveals that prominent hydroclimatic see-saw patterns, also observed in instrumental data, of alternating moisture regimes between the east and west Mediterranean, southwest vs. northwest United States, east vs. west China have been operating consistently during the past millennium. Key findings: - Dry as well as wet conditions can prevail under both warm and cold climate states in most regions. - In some regions a tendency can be seen for either increased aridity or wetness with increasing or decreasing temperatures. - Such changes can be expressed in localized wet-dry seesaw patterns that climate models seems unable

  1. [The technicalization of medicine in the 19th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsén, J E

    2001-01-01

    The paper focuses on the role that instruments played in the medical discourse of the 19th century. Towards the end of the century, instruments had imbued the medical sciences to such an extent that the situation soon was compared to the vernacular confusion of the biblical tower of Babel. Whereas the autonomical recordings of laboratory apparatus, vouched for guarantee against biased test results, clinicians and general practitioners were finding it difficult to incorporate the new techniques into their daily routines. A tension between the instrument as invention, moulded to fit a particular series of experiments, and the instrument as a reproducible item, was inevitable. Hence, the unification of the science and practice of medicine, became an important topic at the international medical meetings of the late 19th century. Seen in the light of the industrialization and urbanization of occidental culture and society, the instrumentation of medicine entailed a number of significant issues which hinged on the relationship between the biological destiny of man and the artificial wonders of technology. Grand metaphors like the organic machine and the human motor, did not only signal a scientific preoccupation with the shortcomings of the living organism as opposed to the perfection of the machine, but also indicated closer ties between the human body and technology at large. In a certain sense, medical instruments, along with apparatuses such as the camera, the steam-engine, the telegraph, the phonograph and the cinematograph, offered a new set-up of codes with which the body and its functions could be reinterpreted. In this respect, the late nineteenth-century strive for the standardisation and unification of medical instruments, was not irreconcilable with the notion of the l'homme moyen, as conceived, for example, in the work of the Belgian mathematician Adolphe Quetelet. The paper outlines the span of medical measuring devices, dating from the sphygmometer of

  2. Diabetes type 2 pandemic in 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginter, E; Simko, V

    2010-01-01

    In the second half of the 20th century it became obvious that a relentless increase in diabetes type 2 (DM) affecting the economically affluent countries, is gradually afflicting also the developing world. This review juxtaposes the threat that the DM epidemic represents to mankind, with the astonishing recent discoveries on the role of obesity and of the body fat in this metabolic disorder. Presently, the highest prevalence of DM is in Saudi Arabia, a country deep in riches generated by its oil wells. DM is very high, in over 10% of adults in the USA, Switzerland and Austria. Prevalence is low in Norway, China and in Iceland. Predictions of epidemiologists for the first third of the 21st century claim up to 2.5 times increase in DM in the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, India, rest of Asia and in the Latin America. In China the number of patients with DM will double but in the economically advanced countries that experienced rise in DM in the 20th century, the increase will be only about 50%. Remarkably, a lowest increase in DM is expected in the countries that formerly belonged to the Soviet political space. Increasing urbanization, aging populations, obesity, and falling levels of physical activity are all contributing to the rise of DM worldwide. The main cause of DM pandemic is growing prevalence of obesity, in Europe and in the Latin America. In the North America obesity is considered to be responsible for 90% of DM in females. Male obesity is associated with DM slightly less, at 70-80% in the European Union and in the US. The precise mechanism by which obesity leads to insulin resistance and to DM is not completely described but it may be related to several biochemical factors, such as abnormalities in free fatty acids, adipokines, leptin and other substances (Tab. 1, Fig. 4, Ref. 24).

  3. Cements in the 21(st) Century: Challenges, Perspectives, and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernacki, Joseph J; Bullard, Jeffrey W; Sant, Gaurav; Banthia, Nemkumar; Brown, Kevin; Glasser, Fredrik P; Jones, Scott; Ley, Tyler; Livingston, Richard; Nicoleau, Luc; Olek, Jan; Sanchez, Florence; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Stutzman, Paul E; Sobolev, Konstantine; Prater, Tracie

    2017-07-01

    In a book published in 1906, Richard Meade outlined the history of portland cement up to that point(1). Since then there has been great progress in portland cement-based construction materials technologies brought about by advances in the materials science of composites and the development of chemical additives (admixtures) for applications. The resulting functionalities, together with its economy and the sheer abundance of its raw materials, have elevated ordinary portland cement (OPC) concrete to the status of most used synthetic material on Earth. While the 20(th) century was characterized by the emergence of computer technology, computational science and engineering, and instrumental analysis, the fundamental composition of portland cement has remained surprisingly constant. And, although our understanding of ordinary portland cement (OPC) chemistry has grown tremendously, the intermediate steps in hydration and the nature of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), the major product of OPC hydration, remain clouded in uncertainty. Nonetheless, the century also witnessed great advances in the materials technology of cement despite the uncertain understanding of its most fundamental components. Unfortunately, OPC also has a tremendous consumption-based environmental impact, and concrete made from OPC has a poor strength-to-weight ratio. If these challenges are not addressed, the dominance of OPC could wane over the next 100 years. With this in mind, this paper envisions what the 21(st) century holds in store for OPC in terms of the driving forces that will shape our continued use of this material. Will a new material replace OPC, and concrete as we know it today, as the preeminent infrastructure construction material?

  4. Absinthism: a fictitious 19th century syndrome with present impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachenmeier Dirk W

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Absinthe, a bitter spirit containing wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L., was banned at the beginning of the 20th century as consequence of its supposed unique adverse effects. After nearly century-long prohibition, absinthe has seen a resurgence after recent de-restriction in many European countries. This review provides information on the history of absinthe and one of its constituent, thujone. Medical and toxicological aspects experienced and discovered before the prohibition of absinthe are discussed in detail, along with their impact on the current situation. The only consistent conclusion that can be drawn from those 19th century studies about absinthism is that wormwood oil but not absinthe is a potent agent to cause seizures. Neither can it be concluded that the beverage itself was epileptogenic nor that the so-called absinthism can exactly be distinguished as a distinct syndrome from chronic alcoholism. The theory of a previous gross overestimation of the thujone content of absinthe may have been verified by a number of independent studies. Based on the current available evidence, thujone concentrations of both pre-ban and modern absinthes may not have been able to cause detrimental health effects other than those encountered in common alcoholism. Today, a questionable tendency of absinthe manufacturers can be ascertained that use the ancient theories of absinthism as a targeted marketing strategy to bring absinthe into the spheres of a legal drug-of-abuse. Misleading advertisements of aphrodisiac or psychotropic effects of absinthe try to re-establish absinthe's former reputation. In distinction from commercially manufactured absinthes with limited thujone content, a health risk to consumers is the uncontrolled trade of potentially unsafe herbal products such as absinthe essences that are readily available over the internet.

  5. Absinthism: a fictitious 19th century syndrome with present impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padosch, Stephan A; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Kröner, Lars U

    2006-01-01

    Absinthe, a bitter spirit containing wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L.), was banned at the beginning of the 20th century as consequence of its supposed unique adverse effects. After nearly century-long prohibition, absinthe has seen a resurgence after recent de-restriction in many European countries. This review provides information on the history of absinthe and one of its constituent, thujone. Medical and toxicological aspects experienced and discovered before the prohibition of absinthe are discussed in detail, along with their impact on the current situation. The only consistent conclusion that can be drawn from those 19th century studies about absinthism is that wormwood oil but not absinthe is a potent agent to cause seizures. Neither can it be concluded that the beverage itself was epileptogenic nor that the so-called absinthism can exactly be distinguished as a distinct syndrome from chronic alcoholism. The theory of a previous gross overestimation of the thujone content of absinthe may have been verified by a number of independent studies. Based on the current available evidence, thujone concentrations of both pre-ban and modern absinthes may not have been able to cause detrimental health effects other than those encountered in common alcoholism. Today, a questionable tendency of absinthe manufacturers can be ascertained that use the ancient theories of absinthism as a targeted marketing strategy to bring absinthe into the spheres of a legal drug-of-abuse. Misleading advertisements of aphrodisiac or psychotropic effects of absinthe try to re-establish absinthe's former reputation. In distinction from commercially manufactured absinthes with limited thujone content, a health risk to consumers is the uncontrolled trade of potentially unsafe herbal products such as absinthe essences that are readily available over the internet. PMID:16722551

  6. Absinthism: a fictitious 19th century syndrome with present impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padosch, Stephan A; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Kröner, Lars U

    2006-05-10

    Absinthe, a bitter spirit containing wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L.), was banned at the beginning of the 20th century as consequence of its supposed unique adverse effects. After nearly century-long prohibition, absinthe has seen a resurgence after recent de-restriction in many European countries. This review provides information on the history of absinthe and one of its constituent, thujone. Medical and toxicological aspects experienced and discovered before the prohibition of absinthe are discussed in detail, along with their impact on the current situation. The only consistent conclusion that can be drawn from those 19th century studies about absinthism is that wormwood oil but not absinthe is a potent agent to cause seizures. Neither can it be concluded that the beverage itself was epileptogenic nor that the so-called absinthism can exactly be distinguished as a distinct syndrome from chronic alcoholism.The theory of a previous gross overestimation of the thujone content of absinthe may have been verified by a number of independent studies. Based on the current available evidence, thujone concentrations of both pre-ban and modern absinthes may not have been able to cause detrimental health effects other than those encountered in common alcoholism. Today, a questionable tendency of absinthe manufacturers can be ascertained that use the ancient theories of absinthism as a targeted marketing strategy to bring absinthe into the spheres of a legal drug-of-abuse. Misleading advertisements of aphrodisiac or psychotropic effects of absinthe try to re-establish absinthe's former reputation. In distinction from commercially manufactured absinthes with limited thujone content, a health risk to consumers is the uncontrolled trade of potentially unsafe herbal products such as absinthe essences that are readily available over the internet.

  7. Twenty-First Century Creativity: An Investigation of How the Partnership for 21st Century Instructional Framework Reflects the Principles of Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiajun; Woulfin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to consider how the 21st-century learning framework reflects principles of creativity. This article provides a qualitative analysis of the Partnership for 21st Century's (P21) policy documents, with a specific focus on how the principles of creativity, one of the 4Cs (creativity, critical thinking, collaboration, and…

  8. Serials cataloging at the turn of the century

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, James W

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the research topics and trends that have appeared over the last five years, Serials Cataloging at the Turn of the Century doesn't just tell you that there has been a lot of change--that the information environment is something of a chameleon, always beguiling and slipping out of grasp. Instead, it gives you the plain facts on the specific challenges serials catalogers have been facing and how they're meeting adversity head-on, ready to gain the advantage in the rumble with proliferating information and formats.Comprehensive, resource-packed, and easy-to-digest, Serials Catalogin

  9. Public Debt, Financial Markets and Economy in XVIIth Century Castile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Marcos Martín

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay deals with the negative consequences brought by the expansion of the consolidated debt since the XVIth century through the massive issues of long term annuities (juros on the Castilian economy. The article analyses the reasons which reduced the appeal of these financial assets among private investors. This prompted the Royal Treasury to follow an alternative course and, trying to expand its credit base, the Crown resorted to the financial systems of the Castilian cities, which became closely subordinated to the needs of the Royal Treasury.

  10. US Environmental Legislation and Biodiversity over the 20th Century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Brooks

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Endangered Species Act is held up both as an example of strict legislation working to guard biodiversity preservation (Yaffee, 1982) and an uneconomical law that creates perverse incentives that may actually reduce such preservation (Brown and Shogren, 1998; Lueck & Michael, 2003; List et...... back throughout the development of the United States over the 20th century and continues into the present. We trace this evolution of federal political action to ask how the evolution of U.S. wildlife legislation reflects the tradeoffs between environment and development in spatial and temporal...

  11. Building 21st. Century literacies through digital animated storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This paper will present the preliminary findings from a R&D project on developing 21st. Century literacies in a digital Storylab at a public library, doing digital animated storytelling, in collaboration with municipal schools. It will explore the implications for the approach to digital story......, auditory and verbal with a fluency with digital tools. There is an interest to teach multimodal literacy in open schooling, while bridging informal and formal learning in hybrid environments, that is involving collaboration with libraries and museums. Designs for multimodal learning with animation may have...

  12. CONSUMER CREDIT IN AUSTRALIA DURING THE 20TH CENTURY

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre van der Eng

    2008-01-01

    This article surveys the growth of consumer credit in Australia during the 20th century, particularly after World War II. Until the 1970s, the regulation of Australia’s financial market caused formal consumer credit to be provided mainly by finance companies under hire-purchase contracts, largely for the purchase of cars and household durables. Deregulation of the financial market since the 1960s allowed banks to gain a dominant share in the market for personal loans. Quantification of long-t...

  13. Colombian school text and education policies during the twentieth century

    OpenAIRE

    Graffe, Gilberto; Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela.; Orrego, Gloria; Universidad de Santander, Bucaramanga, Colombia.

    2013-01-01

    The article is a result of the review of public policies; topic treated in the thesis “The public policies of the woman and its treatment in the illustrations of school Colombian texts of the 20th century” of the Central University of Venezuela. The same ones appear from its theoretical conception, up to entering advances of the public educational policies, relating them to the public policies of the school text, during the 20th century. Also it presents the managing that has give...

  14. Breast Reconstruction: A Century of Controversies and Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsy, Antoine; Rüegg, Eva; Montandon, Denys; Vlastos, Georges; Modarressi, Ali; Pittet, Brigitte

    2018-01-31

    Breast cancer treatment has dramatically changed over the past century. Since Halsted's first description of radical mastectomy in 1882, breast reconstruction has evolved slowly from being considered as a useless or even dangerous procedure by surgeons to the possibility nowadays of reconstructing almost any kind of defect. In this review on the development of breast reconstruction, we outline the historical milestone innovations that led to the current management of the mastectomy defect in an attempt to understand the economic, social and psychological factors, which contributed to slow down its acceptance for several decades.

  15. Young Adult Dystopias: Bildungsroman for the 21st Century

    OpenAIRE

    Ljiljana Gavrilović

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines young adult dystopian novels written in the first decade of the 21st century, as heirs to the tradition of the bildungsroman, and the great dystopias. The focus of this new genre has shifted from maintaining "the best of all worlds" – where the young person adjusts and fits into the existing world, to the shaping of the hero’s critical spirit which is supposed to result in the hero/heroine growing up, but also in changes in the world which they inhabit. Two other important ...

  16. Evolution of Electromagnetics in the 19th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Lindell

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Steps leading to the present-day electromagnetic theory made in the 19th Century are briefly reviewed. The progress can be roughly divided in two branches which are called Continental and British Electromagnetics. The former was based on Newton's action-at-a-distance principle and French mathematics while the latter grew from Faraday's contact-action principle, the concept of field lines and physical analogies. Maxwell's field theory and its experimental verification marked the last stage in the process.

  17. Challenges to Ship Hydrodynamics in the XXI Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Kobylinski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of twenty-first century is characterized with important changes in world shipping and exploitation of ocean resources. Three important trends are clearly visible: environment protection, safety and economy. They materialize in important changes in the structure of world fleet where some existing ship types are going to disappear and new ship types emerge. Increasing the size of some ship types is another visible tendency. Stress on environment protection has serious impact on the hydrodynamic characteristics of ships whether with regard to safety zero accident rate is the goal. Important challenges to ship hydrodynamics caused by those tendencies are discussed in the paper.

  18. xxi Century Latin American Journalists: Beyond Post-Truth Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Amado

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the complexity of circumstances that journalism is facing, academia should rethink the classical conceptions of the profession, especially when they reduce journalism to abstract models disregarding reporters’ actual practices. Results of a global research propose a new definition of journalism, a profession caught between conflicting interests that lack the supremacy of news production, as it used to be in the past century. It is all about broadening the debate to reconsider the role of the journalist in the contemporary information report, beyond current concepts such as post-truth.

  19. Learning disabilities at the dawn of the XXI century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goikoetxea, Edurne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to inform to the reader the current debate on learning disabilities area. The language barrier imposed by the scientific literature in English makes professionals and college to miss the exciting progress on this diagnostic category so controversial from its formal beginning. We first analyze the definitions of specific learning disabilities that have been in force until the first decade of this century, then make the new definitions formulated to now and discuss characteristics of the history of definitions in this field. We conclude with the demands that we face because of the new definitions.

  20. Roads and cities of 18th century France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Julien; Gribaudi, Maurizio; Barthelemy, Marc

    2015-09-01

    The evolution of infrastructure networks such as roads and streets are of utmost importance to understand the evolution of urban systems. However, datasets describing these spatial objects are rare and sparse. The database presented here represents the road network at the french national level described in the historical map of Cassini in the 18th century. The digitization of this historical map is based on a collaborative methodology that we describe in detail. This dataset can be used for a variety of interdisciplinary studies, covering multiple spatial resolutions and ranging from history, geography, urban economics to network science.

  1. [Bernardino Ramazzini's influence in medical science in the XVIII century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinozzi, S

    2010-01-01

    Neo-hippocratism consists in a rational and mechanic method to explain pathological phenomena and discover the causes of diseases. Bernardino Ramazzini uses Hippocratic empirical observation to investigate the relations between the alterations of the air--due to mephitic vapours, of organic and inorganic origin--and the development of pathological processes. His notion of corruption of the atmosphere as the origin of epidemics and specific diseases, and that of prevention as the main strategy of modern medicine, is developed in medical literature and in the Public Medicine projects of the end of the Seventeenth century.

  2. The development of the dementia concept in 19th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Caixeta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The dementia concept has been reformulated through its history and the 19th century was remarkable in the construction of this concept as we understand it today. Like other syndromes, much of the history of the dementia concept comes from the attempt to separate it from other nosological conditions, giving it a unique identity. The fundamental elements for the arising of the dementia modern concept were: a correlation of the observed syndrome with organic-cerebral lesions; b understanding of the irreversibility of the dementia evolution; c its relation with human ageing; and d the choice of the cognitive dysfunction as a clinical marker of the dementia concept.

  3. Classical elements in the endowments of Serbian XIII century donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gligorijević-Maksimović Mirjana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In Byzantine painting, starting from the XIII and particularly during the XIV century, there was a visible return to models from the period of Antiquity. The influences of ancient, ostensibly, Hellenistic heritage were reflected in the shapes, in the content of the compositions, as well as in the drawing, modellation and colours. In the art that came into being in the course of the XIII century, in the endowments of the Serbian donors numerous elements emerged that had existed in ancient art. In the frescoes in the Church of the Mother of God in Studenica, the endowment of Stefan Nemanja and his sons, we see personifications, symbols, the introduction of details, and space acquiring depth, features that were later to come to full expression, especially from the middle of the XIII century. The few preserved frescoes dating from the XIII century in the Church of the Resurrection in the Žiča monastery, the endowment of Stefan the First Crowned, his son Radoslav and his brother Sava, are an iconographic continuation of the trends in the art one encounters in Studenica. The frescoes in the Church of Christ's Ascension in Mileševa, the endowment of King Vladislav, with their subtly fashioned figures and carefully modelled faces, as well as refined colouring, signal a return to the Hellenistic models. The painting in the Church of Dormition of the Virgin in the Morača monastery, the endowment of Prince Stefan, nephew of king Stefan, with its well-proportioned, firmly modelled figures, landscapes and architecture deepening the space, reminds one of the Sopoćani frescoes. In the fresco painting of the Holy Apostles in Peć, the endowment of Archbishop Sava which owed its outcome to the efforts of Archbishop Arsenije I, the images are very vivid, and the painted architecture is depicted in an abbreviated form, using different kinds of perspective. The painting in the Church of the Holy Trinity in Sopoćani, the endowment of king Uroš I, represents

  4. After the book information services for the 21st century

    CERN Document Server

    Stachokas, George

    2014-01-01

    Libraries and librarians have been defined by the book throughout modern history. What happens when society increasingly lets print go in favour of storing, retrieving and manipulating electronic information? What happens after the book? After the Book explores how the academic library of the 21st Century is first and foremost a provider of electronic information services. Contemporary users expect today's library to provide information as quickly and efficiently as other online information resources. The book argues that librarians need to change what they know, how they work, and how they ar

  5. Sajarah Cina A nineteenth-century apology in Javanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem van der Molen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The sometimes precarious position of the Chinese in Indonesia has a long history. The (most probably nineteenth-century author, Apdul Mutalip, advocated a more balanced view by pointing out some fundamental contributions the Chinese had made to the welfare of the Javanese; he also demonstrates that their presence in Java has a basis in law. Although seems like a poem in Javanese metre, his Sajarah Cina, written in Javanese, is remarkable not only for its subject matter but also for the way the material is presented, in a rhetoric unknown to exist in Javanese literature by most scholars.

  6. PEOPLE IN PHYSICS: 'Lady Newton' - an eighteenth century Marquise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badilescu, Simona

    1996-07-01

    The contribution of Voltaire and Mme du Châtelet to the diffusion of Newtonian physics in eighteenth century France is outlined. Their most important writings in the realm of physics (Philosophical Letters, Elements de la philosophie de Newton, Institutions de Physique) are analysed and the impact of the new ideas on the traditional Cartesian physics is emphasized. The genesis of the first French translation of Newton's Principia is described. The usefulness of the historically connected stories in the teaching of physics is envisaged.

  7. 21st Century Power Partnership: September 2016 Fellowship Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reber, Timothy J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rambau, Prudence [Eskom, Pretoria (South Africa); Mdhluli, Sipho [Eskom, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2017-09-29

    This report details the 21st Century Power Partnership fellowship from September 2016. This Fellowship is a follow-up to the Technical Audit of Eskom's Medium- and Long-term Modelling Capabilities, conducted by U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in April 2016. The prospect and role of variable renewable energy (vRE) in South Africa poses new modelling-related challenges that Eskom is actively working to address by improving the fidelity of PLEXOS LT and ST models.

  8. [Theodor Billroth: more than a century of artistic greatness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Valdés, Julio César

    2014-01-01

    Christian Albert Theodor Billroth, a German surgeon of great artistry and immense culture and promoter of abdominal surgery, who drove the length of the physiology of the surgical field through the use of experimental surgery, is considered the leading German medical figure of the second half of the 19th century in Europe. His works and techniques transcended through time and continue to be implemented (albeit with modifications). He founded a new school of surgery based in criticism, the influence of which affected the development of numerous European and American surgeons. He was also a born artist who excelled in the music field, with many interests in music criticism and public events.

  9. One century of cosmic rays – A particle physicist's view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton Christine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments on cosmic rays and the elementary particles share a common history that dates back to the 19th century. Following the discovery of radioactivity in the 1890s, the paths of the two fields intertwined, especially during the decades after the discovery of cosmic rays. Experiments demonstrated that the primary cosmic rays are positively charged particles, while other studies of cosmic rays revealed various new sub-atomic particles, including the first antiparticle. Techniques developed in common led to the birth of neutrino astronomy in 1987 and the first observation of a cosmic γ-ray source by a ground-based cosmic-ray telescope in 1989.

  10. Mexico and the 21st Century Power Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-02-01

    The 21st Century Power Partnership's program in Mexico (21CPP Mexico) is one initiative of the Clean Energy Ministerial, carried out in cooperation with government and local stakeholders, drawing upon an international community of power system expertise. The overall goal of this program is to support Mexico's power system transformation by accelerating the transition to a reliable, financially robust, and low-carbon system. 21CPP Mexico activities focus on achieving positive outcomes for all participants, especially addressing critical questions and challenges facing policymakers, regulators, and system operators. In support of this goal, 21CPP Mexico taps into deep networks of expertise and professional connections.

  11. Dinosaur or Phoenix: Nuclear Bombers in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    REPORT DATE 02-04-10 2. REPORT TYPE Master’s Thesis 3. DATES COVERED 31-07-09 to 16-06-10 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dinosaur or Phoenix: Nuclear...WARFIGHTING SCHOOL DINOSAUR OR PHOENIX: NUCLEAR BOMBERS IN THE 21ST CENTURY by John W. Morehead Colonel, United States Air Force A paper...can argue Secretary Gates’ decision to halt development of a follow-on bomber indicates the DOD views nuclear bombers as dinosaurs no longer needed as

  12. Higher Education Leadership: Challenge of the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutjipto Sutjipto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the 21 st century, higher education (HE will play a very crucial role; in spite of its limited resources, HE should be able to respond to the challenges caused by the very fast advancement of technology. For this purpose managers of HE should be professional, those who are prepared to become the managers, so that they reflect wide perspectives, good attitudes, and quality skills in managing the HE in such a competitive era. Higher education leadership is expected to make use of the system and opportunity to improve its performance

  13. Nursing and the 21st century: what's happened to leadership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbasi, Sally; Gaston, Carol

    2002-01-01

    This paper has stemmed from several conversations between the authors over recent times about the current state of leadership in nursing. The authors believe a lack of effective leadership has much to do with the times in which we live. As a result, this paper explores leadership against a backdrop of social and political change and seeks to revise the concept in light of 21st century developments. The demise of leadership is discussed and ideas about the emergence of new leadership brought to light. Finally the need for nurses and nursing to shake off the depressive effects of economic rationalism, join forces and unite for a cause is recommended.

  14. Organic light emission structures — XXI century technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokin V. M.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The given review allows to believe, that the decision of a complex technological, materialstechnological, technical problems at creation modern OLED- and PLED-devices in nearest 5—10 years will result in creation of devices with power efficiency more than 100 lm/W and service life till 100 000 hours. The realization of such parameters will allow to expand area of application of the considered systems and to create in the future unique flat powereffective organic lighting systems of new generation — light sources XXI of century.

  15. Observing by hand sketching the nebulae in the nineteenth century

    CERN Document Server

    Nasim, Omar W

    2014-01-01

    Today we are all familiar with the iconic pictures of the nebulae produced by the Hubble Space Telescope's digital cameras. But there was a time, before the successful application of photography to the heavens, in which scientists had to rely on handmade drawings of these mysterious phenomena.           Observing by Hand sheds entirely new light on the ways in which the production and reception of handdrawn images of the nebulae in the nineteenth century contributed to astronomical observation. Omar W. Nasim investigates hundreds of unpublished observing books and paper records from six ninete

  16. Social Aesthetics in Learning Practices in the 21st Century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Ejsing-Duun, Stine

    Social Aesthetics in Learning Practices in the 21st Century Due to the extensive reliance on media in our everyday perception of the surroundings we see a shift in relation to aesthetics from an individual focus to social negotiations around a situation. This article presents how individuals shape......, both, theoretically and through an explorative study: Theoretically we draw from visual culture (Buhl, 2012;Bourriaud, 2002; Mitchell, 2002), learning (Dohn, 2002) and digital media studies (Ejsing-Duun, 2011). The explorative case study is focused on the use of the mobile application Draw Something...... approach in which the process of decoding and negotiations around practices in social media is significant....

  17. The two-century journey of Parkinson disease research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przedborski, Serge

    2017-03-17

    Since the first formal description of Parkinson disease (PD) two centuries ago, our understanding of this common neurodegenerative disorder has expanded at all levels of description, from the delineation of its clinical phenotype to the identification of its neuropathological features, neurochemical processes and genetic factors. Along the way, findings have led to novel hypotheses about how the disease develops and progresses, challenging our understanding of how neurodegenerative disorders wreak havoc on human health. In this Timeline article, I recount the fascinating 200-year journey of PD research.

  18. Child psychiatric nursing. Moving into the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, L M

    1994-03-01

    Changes in health care policy must be made to pave the way for the appropriate treatment and prevention of child and adolescent mental health problems. Nurses can provide the leadership needed to make the changes. Organizations such as the Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nurses and the Society for Education and Research in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing are already making important contributions. Challenges in the arenas of treatment, education, and research are before us in child psychiatric nursing. We are facing these demands, however, and are moving forward into the twenty-first century.

  19. Nominalism and constructivism in seventeenth-century mathematical philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Sepkoski, David

    2013-01-01

    What was the basis for the adoption of mathematics as the primary mode of discourse for describing natural events by a large segment of the philosophical community in the seventeenth century? In answering this question, this book demonstrates that a significant group of philosophers shared the belief that there is no necessary correspondence between external reality and objects of human understanding, which they held to include the objects of mathematical and linguistic discourse. The result is a scholarly reliable, but accessible, account of the role of mathematics in the works of (

  20. A Century of Evidence on Trend-Following Investing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurst, Brian; Ooi, Yao Hua; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    We study the performance of trend-following investing across global markets since 1903, extending the existing evidence by more than 80 years. We fi nd that trend-following has delivered strong positive returns and realized a low correlation to traditional asset classes each decade for more than...... a century. We analyze trend-following returns through various economic environments and highlight the diversifi cation benefi ts the strategy has historically provided in equity bear markets. Finally, we evaluate the recent environment for the strategy in the context of these long-term results....

  1. International dimensions of higher education in nursing in Canada: tapping the wisdom of the 20th century while embracing possibilities for the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Linda D; Paul, Pauline; Burgess-Pinto, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    New focus on the internationalization of universities occurred in the late 20th century and higher education in nursing has been quick to embrace the opportunities. In this manuscript, writers provide a brief overview of the nursing and more general literature from the late 20th century relating to key dimensions of internationalization, as well as present data from a survey conducted in 1995-96 of the international activities and dimensions at Canadian faculties/schools of nursing. While it is clear that nurses in Canadian universities were engaged in significant international endeavours in the 20th century, the literature and our experience suggest that the extent of such activity has increased substantially in recent years. Discussion centres on examination of how knowledge generated in the 20th century can inform current internationalization initiatives and on identification of key questions that merit consideration as we move forward in the 21st century.

  2. 21st Century jobs initiative - building the foundations for a 21st Century economy. Final main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The 21st Century Jobs Initiative has been launched in the context of new realities in Washington, D.C., rapid restructuring of the US economy and accelerating changes in the makeup of the East Tennessee economy driven by these and other external economic forces. Continuing downward pressure on Federal budgets for programs that support three key institutions in the region - DOE`s Oak Ridge complex, the Tennessee Valley Authority and research programs of the University of Tennessee - are especially threatening to the region. With a large part of its economy dependent on Federal spending, the area is at risk of troublesome impacts that could ripple out from the Oak Ridge and Knoxville home of these institutions throughout the entire 15-county {open_quotes}Resource Valley.{close_quotes} As these economic forces play out in the region`s economy, important questions arise. How will East Tennessee {open_quotes}earn its living{close_quotes} in the future if the Federal government role in the economy shrinks? What kind of new industries will be formed to replace those at risk due to Federal cutbacks and economic restructuring? Where will the jobs come from for the next generation of job seekers? These are among the questions driving the 21st Century Jobs Initiative, an action-oriented program designed and implemented by local leaders in response to the economic challenges facing East Tennessee. Fortunately, the region`s economy is strong today. Unemployment is at near record lows in most counties. Moreover, leaders are increasingly aware of the threats on the horizon and are already moving to action. And the impacts from the forces at work on the economy will probably come slowly, over the next decade or so. Based on economic research and input from local leaders knowledgeable about the economy, the 21st Century Jobs Initiative has set forth a strategic economic development plan for the region.

  3. Don Quijote in Nineteenth-Century English Theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Garrido Ardila

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article brings to light a group of Cervantine English literary works hitherto unknown to present-day Cervantes studies: seven theatrical adaptations of Don Quixote (two anonymous ones in addition to those by Charles Dibdin, Joseph Moser, G. A. Macfarren, C. A. Maltby and P. Milton, a comedy with a Quixotic title (by George Dance, and five Quixotic fictions (two anonymous, in addition to those by Lily Spender, Maurice Hewlett and A. T. Quiller-Couch. Three of these plays, had been noted by Leopoldo Rius in 1899 (Moser, Macfarren, Maltby; the other four are presented for the first time here. In order to chart a fuller and more complete history of Don Quixote on the English stage, this article provides relevant information on those seven plays. An examination of these works reinforces the previous theses that underscore the essentially comical nature of Quixotic plays in nineteenth-century England, a fact of relevance in the study of the English reception of Don Quixote in the course of that century.

  4. Tolerate the Custom: Fairs and Romerias in the Eighteenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Peña Díaz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the middle of the 18th Century, the Bourbon governments became obsessed with the public order vigilance, because of Esquilache´s riot caused fear of the crowd. In the meantime the episcopal authorities close to Jansenism, and adversaries of the popular base, attempted to banish the superstitious, and inmoral popular religious acts that Tridentine discipline had not got to eradicate. Even though the changes and the repressions applied during the 18th Centurie had the hoped outcomes. The Church attitude was cautious and limited to reassert the image of its power, and to eradicate what were considered that the governmental reforms desecrated a lot. This attitude was similar to the civil Government. If the activated repression caused tensions and complaints, it would have be better to go on tolerating the Custom. From the large documentary signs about fairs, and local religious festivities, this paper examine a socio-cultural daily life related to transgressions, resistances, and established negotiations when the rulers tried to accomplish the discipline Tridentine Project.

  5. Epilepsy on the silver screen in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxendale, Sallie

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy remains an attractive vehicle for filmmakers in the twenty-first century. This review examines the themes of twenty-one films, released between 2000 and 2014, that feature a character with epilepsy or a pivotal scene involving a seizure. Epilepsy continues to be associated with the supernatural in modern cinematic output. Demonic possession and epilepsy now share a similar cinematic lexicon. Unfortunately, the overlap is more than just visual. Supernatural treatments of narratives that claim to be 'based on a true story' of someone with epilepsy continue to blur the lines between medical and spiritual realms. Although there has been a steady progression away from concealment of the condition, epilepsy continues to signal 'otherness' in movie characters and seldom in a good way. All too often, a character has epilepsy to maximize the unease of the audience with them; it is a device that is used to signal 'this character is not like you'. However, amongst the hackneyed negative stereotypes, accurate portrayals of the condition are beginning to emerge, not least due to active collaborations between filmmakers and epilepsy advocacy groups. Far from being worthy, it is heartening that these films are also those that are the most absorbing and thought-provoking of the cinematic output thus far this century. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Creating a 21st-century intelligent health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newt, Gingrich; Nancy, Desmond

    2008-02-01

    In most areas of life, Americans enjoy the ease and convenience offered by advances in technology, communications, and transportation. Every day we experience the 21st-century model of America, which is one of effectiveness, accuracy, speed, flexibility, efficiency, lower cost, more choices, and greater achievement. We can shop online, compare prices for goods and services, and when decisions need to be made, we have access to a wide array of information sources to assist in making those decisions. In short, Americans enjoy great latitude in our power to determine what is best for us. This is not, however, the case when it comes to health and healthcare. In our current healthcare system, individuals are dependent on a structure that has resisted the natural progress and modernization achieved by market-oriented, 21st-century industries. The information age has been leaving health behind. Although it is the nature of a science- and technology-based entrepreneurial free market to provide more choices of higher quality at lower cost, in the healthcare sector, prices continue to rise, quality is inconsistent, and individuals lack the information, incentives, and power to make choices.

  7. Gerbert of Aurillac: Astronomy and Geometry in Tenth Century Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Gerbert of Aurillac was the most prominent personality of the tenth century: astronomer, organ builder and music theoretician, mathematician, philosopher, and finally pope with the name of Silvester II (999-1003). Gerbert introduced firstly the arabic numbers in Europe, invented an abacus for speeding the calculations and found a rational approximation for the equilateral triangle area, in the letter to Adelbold here discussed. Gerbert described a semi-sphere to Constantine of Fleury with built-in sighting tubes, used for astronomical observations. The procedure to identify the star nearest to the North celestial pole is very accurate and still in use in the XII century, when Computatrix was the name of Polaris. For didactical purposes the Polaris would have been precise enough and much less time consuming, but here Gerbert was clearly aligning a precise equatorial mount for a fixed instrument for accurate daytime observations. Through the sighting tubes it was possible to detect equinoxes and solstices by observing the Sun in the corresponding days. The horalogium of Magdeburg was probably a big and fixed-mount nocturlabe, always pointing the star near the celestial pole.

  8. Plague Epidemic s in Syria b etween XIII - XV. Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra ATMACA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemic diseases that cause mass death has been one of the greatest fears of the society in the past century Usually due to poor living conditions, poverty, the inadequate treatment. Plague is one of them. Plague word is sometimes used synonymously with t he word tâûn, sometimes considered to be a greater sense of the Word plague. These outbreaks occured repeatedly in human society and many times occured between XIII - XV. centuries. Our research aims to examine the plague occured in Syria in the Mamluk state domination discussed period. One of the outbreaks have occured in the period between the years 1347 - 1351. Epidemic was looming at the same time with the European named the black death or large extinction. Many people have been killed in Syria as in other places where the epidemic has spread. Rumors about them are given in the source is situated in the form of the issuance of the number of people who died in one day and sometimes the total number of deaths took place at a given date range. In this study, we aimed to determine which is more severe than the others in the outbreak, to assess the rumor about the number of deaths from this cause, to reveal the difficulties of the funeral of the dead, to uncover practices that people do to get rid of this disease.

  9. Training Librarians for 21st Century Repository Services: Emerging Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Emasealu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviewed the emerging roles of the 21st century librarians, charged with the responsibility to manage repository services across libraries in present-day information technology environment. Librarians need to be trained and empowered with requisite skills and knowledge needed for successful management of the ICT driven repository initiatives that the 21st century demands. Literature was reviewed on the roles and responsibilities of librarians, training needs and opportunities, career path and recruitment of librarians, and community support necessary for effective and efficient implementation and management of repository initiatives. This entails the ability to comprehend trends and change patterns which are essential for providing research focused and user-friendly models in open repository services that are based on thorough analytical understanding of the challenges of emerging trends. To achieve this requires the training and retraining of librarians to reposition them as information specialists in their career path. The role of the library as an integral part of its social environment is to educate the community about the existence of an open repository by building partnership with community-oriented research centres through seminars, workshops, symposium, training, and awareness programmes. The study recommends that librarians should strategize and collaborate with researchers to make open repository an essential research tool.

  10. Anatomy and anatomists in Tuscany in the 17th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, Giovanni E; Paternostro, Ferdinando

    2010-01-01

    The 17th century was characterized by a real revolution in the field of scientific research due to the introduction of the experimental method, promoted by Galileo Galilei who was the most representative scientist of this period. Therefore, medical disciplines, particularly Anatomy, underwent innovative and deep changes shattering traditional culture and representing the background for the modern science. In this fermenting period, Tuscany played a significant role since numerous distinguished scientists were gathered by Medici Grand Dukes (especially Ferdinando the 2nd and Cosimo the 3rd) at Pisa University and at their court in Florence. Among them, it must be mentioned Giovanni Alfonso Borelli, creator of iathromechanics, Marcello Malpighi, founder of microscopic Anatomy, Francesco Redi, who denied the insect spontaneous generation, Nils Steensen who continued in Florence his anatomical studies on lymph nodes and salivary glands while setting also the bases of modern geology. Moreover, at the end of the 17th century, the anatomical wax modelling techniques arose and developed in Florence thanks to the work of Gaetano Zumbo (or Zummo), capable of creating some real masterpieces, still very well preserved and collected in the Museum of Natural Sciences "La Specola".

  11. American neurophysiology and two nineteenth-century American Physiological Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, J Wayne

    2017-01-01

    This article contrasts two American Physiological Societies, one founded near the beginning of the nineteenth century in 1837 and the other founded near its end in 1887. The contrast allows a perspective on how much budding neuroscience had developed during the nineteenth century in America. The contrast also emphasizes the complicated structure needed in both medicine and physiology to allow neurophysiology to flourish. The objectives of the American Physiological Society of 1887 were (and are) to promote physiological research and to codify physiology as a discipline. These would be accomplished by making physiology much more inclusive than traditionally accepted by raising research standards, by giving prestige to its members, by providing members a source of professional interchange, by protecting its members from antivivisectionists, and by promoting physiology as fundamental to medicine. The quantity of neuroscientific experiments by its members was striking. The main organizers of the society were Silas Weir Mitchell, John Call Dalton, Henry Pickering Bowditch, and Henry Newell Martin. The objective of the American Physiological Society of 1837 was to disperse knowledge of the "laws of life" and to promote human health and longevity. The primary organizers were William Andrus Alcott and Sylvester Graham with the encouragement of John Benson. Its technique was to use physiological information, not create it as was the case in 1887. Its object was to disseminate the word that healthy eating will improve the quality of life.

  12. Music, neurology, and psychology in the nineteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Amy B; Johnson, Julene K

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines connections between research in music, neurology, and psychology during the late-nineteenth century. Researchers in all three disciplines investigated how music is processed by the brain. Psychologists and comparative musicologists, such as Carl Stumpf, thought in terms of multiple levels of sensory processing and mental representation. Early thinking about music processing can be linked to the start of Gestalt psychology. Neurologists such as August Knoblauch also discussed multiple levels of music processing, basing speculation on ideas about language processing. Knoblauch and others attempted to localize music function in the brain. Other neurologists, such as John Hughlings Jackson, discussed a dissociation between music as an emotional system and language as an intellectual system. Richard Wallaschek seems to have been the only one from the late-nineteenth century to synthesize ideas from musicology, psychology, and neurology. He used ideas from psychology to explain music processing and audience reactions and also used case studies from neurology to support arguments about the nature of music. Understanding the history of this research sheds light on the development of all three disciplines-musicology, neurology, and psychology. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Silencing Deafness: Displacing Disability in the Nineteenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esme Cleall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the way in which the language of displacement and silence were used in nineteenth-century discussions of deafness and connects this tendency to the marginalised place deaf experience occupies historically. Throughout the nineteenth century, a period which saw the consolidation of ‘the deaf and dumb’ as a social category, the word ‘forgetting’ crept into numerous discussions of deafness by both deaf and hearing commentators. Some, such as the educationalist Alexander Graeme Bell, were overt in their desire to forget deafness, demanding disability was ‘bred out’ and deaf culture condemned to the forgotten past. Others used the term ambivalently and sometimes metaphorically discussing the deaf as ‘forgotten’ by society, and ‘children of silence’. Some even pleaded that people who were deaf were not forgotten. But, though varied, the use of the imagery of forgetting and silence to evoke deafness is recurrent, and may, therefore, be seen to reveal something about how deaf experience can be approached as a displacement where deafness was spatially and imaginatively marginalised. I argue that one of the consequences of the conceptual framing of deafness through the language of forgetting was actively to silence deafness and to neutralise the idea that disability should be marginal and could be forgotten.

  14. Locating therapeutic vaccines in nineteenth-century history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradmann, Christoph

    2008-06-01

    This essay places some therapeutic vaccines, including particularly the diphtheria antitoxin, into their larger historical context of the late nineteenth century. As industrially produced drugs, these vaccines ought to be seen in connection with the structural changes in medicine and pharmacology at the time. Given the spread of industrial culture and technology into the field of medicine and pharmacology, therapeutic vaccines can be understood as boundary objects that required and facilitated communication between industrialists, medical researchers, public health officials, and clinicians. It was in particular in relation to evaluation and testing for efficacy in animal models that these medicines became a model for twentieth-century medicine. In addition, these medicines came into being as a parallel invention in two very distinct local cultures of research: the Institut Pasteur in Paris and the Institut für Infektionskrankheiten in Berlin. While their local cultural origins were plainly visible, the medicines played an important role in the alignment of the methods and objects that took place in bacteriology research in France and Germany in the 1890s. This article assesses the two locally specific regimes for control in France and in Imperial Germany. In France the Institut Pasteur, building on earlier successful vaccines, enjoyed freedom from scrutinizing control. The tight and elaborate system of control that evolved in Imperial Germany is portrayed as being reliant on experiences that were drawn from the dramatic events that surrounded the launching of a first example of so-called "bacteriological medicine," tuberculin, in 1890.

  15. Memoirs a twentieth-century journey in science and politics

    CERN Document Server

    Teller, Edward

    2001-01-01

    The story of Edward Teller is the story of the twentieth century. Born in Hungary in 1908, Teller witnessed the rise of Nazism and anti-Semitism, two world wars, the McCarthy era, and the changing face of big science. A brilliant and controversial figure whose work on nuclear weapons was key to the American war effort, Teller has long believed in freedom through strong defense, a philosophy reflected in his stance on arms control and nuclear policy. These extraordinary recollections at last reveal the man behind the headlines-passionate and humorous, devoted and loyal. In clear and compelling prose, Teller tells of the people, events, and ideas that shaped him as a scientist, beginning with his early love of music and math, and continuing with his study of quantum physics with Werner Heisenberg. Present at many of the pivotal moments in modern science, Teller also describes his friendships with some of the century's greatest minds-Einstein, Bohr, Fermi, Szilard, von Neumann, Oppenheimer-and offers an honest a...

  16. Dynamical structure and risk assessment of 20th Century Windstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varino, Filipa; Philippe, Arbogast; Bruno, Joly; Gwendal, Rivière; Marie-Laure, Fandeur; Henry, Bovy; Jean-Baptiste, Granier; Mitchell-Wallace, Kirsten

    2017-04-01

    Windstorms play an important role in weather variability over western Europe. Strong winds associated with fronts and sting jets can lead to several social and economic damages. However, in addition to wind intensity, the displacement speed of the storm, its area and position are also important factors in determining loss. In this study we focus on windstorms associated with the highest damages of the 20th century, and we analyse whether the dynamical structure of the storm is related to its impact. First, we apply an extra-tropical storm tracking algorithm to the ECMWF ERA-20C reanalysis that covers the whole twentieth century and for the whole Northern Hemisphere. Secondly, using the same data, we compute the 3-hourly Loss and Meteorological index for 18 different European countries as in Pinto et al. (2012) with a 25km grid resolution. Thirdly, we develop a High-Loss Tracking Method that matches information from the Loss Index results and the trajectories tracked to systematically associate damages over a particular country to a particular storm. Such a combination provides information on the typical life cycle of storms that create strong damages over a particular country. Finally, only storms hitting France are considered. More than 1500 storms are detected over the whole period and their evolution is analyzed by performing various composites depending on their position relative to the jet stream and their region of impact.

  17. Charles Girard: Relationships and Representation in Nineteenth Century Systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Aleta

    2017-08-01

    Early nineteenth century systematists sought to describe what they called the Natural System or the Natural Classification. In the nineteenth century, there was no agreement about the basis of observed patterns of similarity between organisms. What did these systematists think they were doing, when they named taxa, proposed relationships between taxa, and arranged taxa into representational schemes? In this paper I explicate Charles Frederic Girard's (1822-1895) theory and method of systematics. A student of Louis Agassiz, and subsequently (1850-1858) a collaborator with Spencer Baird, Girard claimed that natural classificatory methods do not presuppose either a special creationist or an evolutionary theory of the natural world. The natural system, in Girard's view, comprises three distinct ways in which organisms can be related to each other. Girard analyzed these relationships, and justified his classificatory methodology, by appeal to his embryological and physiological work. Girard offers an explicit theoretical answer to the question, what characters are evidence for natural classificatory hypotheses? I show that the challenge of simultaneously depicting the three distinct types of relationship led Girard to add a third dimension to his classificatory diagrams.

  18. [19th century Russian research about collective behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engmann, Birk; Steinberg, Holger

    2017-05-01

    In the 19th century, collective behavior or crowd psychology was given a broad interest in psychiatric research. But until today the focus had always been on French, English or German publications neglecting the comprehensive Russian research that exists. That's why, the authors wish to elaborate 19th century Russian points of view on crowd psychology.Our research revealed that most of the Russian authors discussed imitation, suggestion, and hereditary predisposition - as did their colleagues in the West. Contrary to that, the 1881 monograph by Viktor Kandinsky could be regarded as an outstanding work because it presents an independent hypothesis on crowd psychology. Kandinsky postulated a gradual transition from normal to pathological based on neuro-anatomical und physiological presumptions. He postulated a causal chain which starts with exaltation followed by ecstasy, illusions, and at least hallucinations. He regarded exaltation to be a precondition in which a person accepts notions uncritically. Thus, in an exalted crowd one person that hallucinates may "infect" the others easily. People prone to mysticism, with a passion for mysterious things or on outstanding skills would be at a high risk of being infected. On the other hand, Kandinsky's hypothesis also implies that no one is exempt from such infection. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Transforming Epidemiology for 21st Century Medicine and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Muin J.; Lam, Tram Kim; Ioannidis, John P.A.; Hartge, Patricia; Spitz, Margaret R.; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Croyle, Robert T.; Goddard, Katrina A.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Herceg, Zdenko; Hiatt, Robert A.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Kramer, Barnet S.; Lauer, Michael S.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Palmer, Julie R.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Seminara, Daniela; Ransohoff, David F.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Tourassi, Georgia; Winn, Deborah M.; Zauber, Ann; Schully, Sheri D.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) engaged the scientific community to provide a vision for cancer epidemiology in the 21st century. Eight overarching thematic recommendations, with proposed corresponding actions for consideration by funding agencies, professional societies, and the research community emerged from the collective intellectual discourse. The themes are (i) extending the reach of epidemiology beyond discovery and etiologic research to include multilevel analysis, intervention evaluation, implementation, and outcomes research; (ii) transforming the practice of epidemiology by moving towards more access and sharing of protocols, data, metadata, and specimens to foster collaboration, to ensure reproducibility and replication, and accelerate translation; (iii) expanding cohort studies to collect exposure, clinical and other information across the life course and examining multiple health-related endpoints; (iv) developing and validating reliable methods and technologies to quantify exposures and outcomes on a massive scale, and to assess concomitantly the role of multiple factors in complex diseases; (v) integrating “big data” science into the practice of epidemiology; (vi) expanding knowledge integration to drive research, policy and practice; (vii) transforming training of 21st century epidemiologists to address interdisciplinary and translational research; and (viii) optimizing the use of resources and infrastructure for epidemiologic studies. These recommendations can transform cancer epidemiology and the field of epidemiology in general, by enhancing transparency, interdisciplinary collaboration, and strategic applications of new technologies. They should lay a strong scientific foundation for accelerated translation of scientific discoveries into individual and population health benefits. PMID:23462917

  20. Anti-gravity: The key to 21st century physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    The masses coupling constants and cosmological parameters obtained using our discrete and combinatorial physics based on discrimination between bit-strings indicate that we can achieve the unification of quantum mechanics with relativity which had become the goal of twentieth century physics. To broaden our case we show that limitations on measurement of the position and velocity of an individual massive particle observed in a colliding beam scattering experiment imply real, rational commutation relations between position and velocity. Prior to this limit being pushed down to quantum effects, the lower bound is set by the available technology, but is otherwise scale invariant. Replacing force by force per unit mass and force per unit charge allows us to take over the Feynman-Dyson proof of the Maxwell Equations and extend it to weak gravity. The crossing symmetry of the individual scattering processes when one or more particles are replaced by anti-particles predicts both Coulomb attraction (for charged particles) and a Newtonian repulsion between any particle and its anti-particle. Previous quantum results remain intact, and predict the expected relativistic fine structure and spin dependencies. Experimental confirmation of this anti-gravity prediction would inaugurate the physics of the twenty-first century.

  1. Strategy in the 20th Century: Explanations from History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Silveira Conke

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this essay, we argue that an historical perspective helps to understand some of the strategic choices made by organizations. More specifically, the purpose here is to describe the great influence of historical events (related to economy, politics, technological advancement etc. on the creation, acceptance, spreading and / or establishment of the strategic theories and tools developed since the beginning of the 20th century. Texts that usually discuss management and history outline only the Industrial Revolution or the transition from feudalism to capitalism, underestimating other historical forces that offer additional explanations to the evolution of strategic thinking. As a result of an extensive bibliographical research, we were able to identify four periods where the strategic theories developed reveal suitable responses to the challenges created by the environment: in the first one (1900-1938, strategy is concerned with organization and control of business activities, resembling the ideas developed by Scientific Administration; in the second period (1939-1964, strategic planning is formalized and the area is broadly recognized; the next decades (1965-1989 are characterized by competition and uncertainty, making strategy focus on problems emerged from the outside; finally, on the turn of the century (1990-2010, the unlimited information availability enhances the need for strategists’ conceptual and practical knowledge. Also, as a final contribution, we suggest two possible trends to the future of strategy.

  2. [Epidemics on the sea: migrants journeys in the nineteenth century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatani, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    In the nineteenth century travelling by ship became faster due to the introduction of the steam engine. Population growth, economic crises and food shortages forced millions of Italians to consider migration towards the Americas as a real opportunity. Travel conditions on ships and steamers were particularly difficult. People were crammed into dormitories where ventilation was poor, food was insufficient, hygiene was appalling and promiscuity was rife. Under such conditions, epidemics of cholera, typhus and measles were all too likely to develop, but mycobacterium tuberculosis also proliferated. The health authorities attempted to block the spread of epidemics by means of either health licenses - papers certifying good health of the crew and passengers, which had to be exhibited on arrival - or quarantine, involving the ship and all its contents, if infectious diseases were detected or suspicious deaths occurred during the ship's voyage. In this article the particularly unfortunate stories of Italian immigrants, who boarded ships and steamers, are reported. In the second half of the nineteenth century, but also in the first decades of the twentieth, millions of Italians whose aim was to reach the Americas paid a very high price. Italy did not provide acceptable living conditions for millions of farmers and town-dwellers, and migration in search of work was in many cases the only solution. Although many during their sea voyages became ill or died of starvation or infectious diseases, migration, supported by hope, continued.

  3. YAROSLAVL DEMIDOV CAMERAL LYCEUM IN THE MIDDLE OF XIX CENTURY

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    Svetlana Yurevna Ierusalymskaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Article is devoted to the history of Yaroslavl Demidov Lyceum in the middle of the XIX century, from the moment of his conversion from Yaroslavl Higher School. The author analyzes the Lyceum's Statute in 1845, reveals the role of the institution and used in it the course of cameral sciences in the training of the Russian bureaucracy, as well as considering the financial component of Lyceum’s activity and the number of students. The author notes that during the existence of the cameral lyceum it was ended up by several hundred students, mostly from Yaroslavl province. Most of them were nobles. Studying the teaching staff, author concludes of the high professionalism of them, among who were well-known in Russia Ushinskiy K.D., D.I. Semyonovskiy, G.F. Pokrovskiy. Among the famous students of the Lyceum was Gennadiy Karpov - a member of the Imperial Society of History and Antiquities of Russia (1866, Archaeographic Commission, the Russian Historical Society, one of the founding members (together with T.S. Morozova et al. of the Society of Ancient Literature. The author concludes that in the middle of the XIX century Lyceum experienced ups and downs, but overall, it is a period of stagnation in the development of the institution. On the one hand this was due to the reduction of the number of students and the lack of adequate teaching staff, on the other hand - the lack of funding and increasing the bureaucracy in the management.

  4. The Diffuse Interstellar Bands: Solving a Century Old Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2017-01-01

    The Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) are a set of apporoximately 500 absorption bands that are seen in the spectra of reddened stars (i.e., stars obscured by the presence of interstellar clouds in their line of sight). The first DIBs were detected in the visible over a century ago. Diffuse Interstellar Bands are now detected from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared in the spectra of reddened stars spanning a variety of interstellar environments in our local, and in other galaxies. Although DIB carriers are a significant part of the interstellar chemical inventory as they account for a noticeable fraction of the interstellar extinction, the nature of their carriers is still unknown over a century after the detection of the first bands. DIB carriers are stable and ubiquitous in a broad variety of interstellar environments and play a unique role in interstellar physics and chemistry. It has long been realized that the solving of the DIB problem requires a strong synergy between astronomical observations, laboratory astrophysics and astrochemistry, quantum chemistry calculations and astrophysical modeling of line-of-sights. In this review, we'll present and discuss the current state of this perplexing problem. We'll review the progress and the failures that have been encountered in the long quest for the identification of the carriers of these ubiquitous interstellar bands.

  5. Neonatal Bacterial Conjunctivitis in Korea in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Kang Yeun; Kim, Sung Il; Lee, Jong Soo

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the microbial cause and antibiotic susceptibility of neonatal bacterial conjunctivitis in Korean patients in the 21st century. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients diagnosed with neonatal bacterial conjunctivitis between January 2000 and December 2015. We recorded the organism, antibiotic susceptibility, and antibiotics used. A total of 82 neonates were included in the study (53 males and 29 females), with a mean age of 17.5 ± 7.1 days. The most commonly isolated organisms were Staphylococcus aureus (43 cases, 52.4%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (11 cases, 13.4%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (11 cases, 13.4%), Serratia marcescens (4 cases, 4.9%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (4 cases, 4.9%), and Enterobacter cloacae (3 cases, 3.7%). We found no cases of Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Resistance to methicillin (83.7%), macrolide (81.4%), and aminoglycoside (23.3%) was observed in patients with S. aureus infection. Conjunctivitis that did not improve with erythromycin or tobramycin generally improved with the additional use of tosufloxacin. The prevalence of neonatal gonococcal or chlamydial conjunctivitis has decreased in the 21st century. However, methicillin-resistant S. aureus has been increasing, but these cases are responsive to tosufloxacin.

  6. PLACE IDENTITY IN 21ST CENTURY ARCHITECTURE IN SOUTH KOREA

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    Hee Sun (Sunny Choi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the built environment brought about by economic and cultural globalization have resulted in a blurring of national identities worldwide. Consequently, place identity has emerged as a central concern for setting the 21st century urban development agenda. This paper examines the ways in which specific aspects of urban typology relate with cultural engagements and meanings within old and new, in terms of the transferable values of place identity, particularly within South East and Far East Asian countries. Firstly, the theoretical and practical key concepts for design ideology are described in relation to the value of place identity within contemporary urban forms. These key concepts are then operationalized in order to identify the implementation of the role of place identity, not only within architectural typology, but also through a cultural sense of space and time; a hybrid typological language. The focus of this paper is to explore how the role of place identity in physical built form relates with design qualities and cultural engagement, and how the needs of local culture can be incorporated, sustained and developed alongside contemporary architecture and rapid urban development. The paper provides a critical reflection and discussion of 21st Century architecture in South Korea, particularly how the locally situated and informed might be reconciled with the global aspirations of the contemporary city.

  7. Learning from Pulsating Stars: Progress over the Last Century (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) Scarcely more than a century has elapsed since it began to be widely accepted that pulsation plays an important role in the variability of stars. During that century pulsating stars have been used as tools to explore a variety of astrophysical questions, including the determination of distances to other galaxies, the testing of timescales of evolution through the HR diagram, and the identification of the ages and star formation histories of stellar populations. Among the significant early milestones along this investigative path are Henrietta Leavitt's discovery of a relation between the periods and luminosities of Cepheids, Harlow Shapley's proposal that all Cepheids are pulsating stars, and Arthur Stanley Eddington's use of the observed period change of d Cephei to constrain its power source. Today our explorations of pulsating stars are bolstered by long observational histories of brighter variables, surveys involving unprecedentedly large numbers of stars, and improved theoretical analyses. This talk will review aspects of the history and our current understanding of pulsating stars, paying particular attention to RR Lyrae, d Scuti, and Cepheid variables. Observations by AAVSO members have provided insight into several questions regarding the behavior of these stars.

  8. Institutionalising senile dementia in 19th-century Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Emily Stella

    2017-02-01

    This article explains how old, poor people living with dementia came to be institutionalised in 19th-century Britain (with a focus on London), and how they were responded to by the people who ran those institutions. The institutions in question are lunatic asylums, workhouses and charitable homes. Old people with dementia were admitted to lunatic asylums, workhouses and charitable homes, but were not welcome there. Using the records of Hanwell lunatic asylum, published texts of psychiatric theory, and the administrative records that all of these institutions generated at local and national levels, this article argues that 'the senile' were a perpetual classificatory residuum in the bureaucracy of 19th-century health and welfare. They were too weak and unresponsive to adhere to the norms of the asylum regime, yet too challenging in their behaviour to conform to that of the workhouse, or the charitable home. Across all of these institutions, old people with dementia were represented as an intractable burden, many decades before the 'ageing society' became a demographic reality. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  9. Identifying 21st Century STEM Competencies Using Workplace Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyewon

    2016-04-01

    Gaps between science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and required workplace skills have been identified in industry, academia, and government. Educators acknowledge the need to reform STEM education to better prepare students for their future careers. We pursue this growing interest in the skills needed for STEM disciplines and ask whether frameworks for 21st century skills and engineering education cover all of important STEM competencies. In this study, we identify important STEM competencies and evaluate the relevance of current frameworks applied in education using the standardized job-specific database operated and maintained by the US Department of Labor. Our analysis of the importance of 109 skills, types of knowledge and work activities, revealed 18 skills, seven categories of knowledge, and 27 work activities important for STEM workers. We investigate the perspectives of STEM and non-STEM job incumbents, comparing the importance of each skill, knowledge, and work activity for the two groups. We aimed to condense dimensions of the 52 key areas by categorizing them according to the Katz and Kahn (1978) framework and testing for inter-rater reliability. Our findings show frameworks for 21st century skills and engineering education do not encompass all important STEM competencies. Implications for STEM education programs are discussed, including how they can bridge gaps between education and important workplace competencies.

  10. [Welfare and health in the century of social security].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, S

    1999-12-10

    Great achievements for public health in this century include penicillin, oral contraception, vaccination and transplantation, but the greatest contribution to the health of Norwegians may have been made by social security and the welfare state policies. The beneficial effects of social security include: less social inequality, a factor which in itself makes for better health, some degree of financial security for people who are ill and unable to support themselves or their families, universal availability of medical and health services. This paper explores the ideas and sources from which present-day social security legislation stems. The emergence of state based welfare legislation was inspired by developments in Germany under Bismarck; accident insurance for industrial workers was the first to be introduced in 1894. Several periods of active social security legislation followed at times when labour unions and socialist ideas were strong, supported, to some degree, by radical clergy and public health doctors. Social democratic governments, inspired by the British Beveridge plan towards the end of World War II, took the lead during the long post-war period until the mid 1970s. The Scandinavian model of social security is based on universal coverage and a single payer system. However, since the 1980s, as in other countries of Northern Europe, the social security system has come under pressure from market liberalism. Now at the turn of the century, increasing social inequalities cause some concern for the future of the welfare state.

  11. Anatomists and entrepreneurs in early eighteenth-century London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrini, Anita

    2004-04-01

    Anatomical demonstration in the eighteenth century took place in many formats. In this essay I discuss public anatomical demonstration as performed by entrepreneurial anatomists in London between 1700 and 1740. These anatomists offered courses, advertised in newspapers, to anyone who was willing to pay. In contrast to courses offered in official settings to prospective physicians and surgeons, these courses emphasized natural philosophy and natural theology rather than practical knowledge. Entrepreneurial lecturers also aimed to entertain. In this article I examine the lectures of James Douglas, William Cheselden, and Frank Nicholls, each of whom differed significantly from the others in style and content but were all anatomical entrepreneurs. All of them, moreover, employed not only human cadavers but also living and dead animals in their lessons. I examine the content of the lectures and the motivations of the lecturers' audiences. I also argue that the prevailing historiographical representation of eighteenth-century science as "polite" requires considerable revision to accommodate as impolite an activity as public anatomy.

  12. Changing perspectives of apheresis in India in the twentieth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R

    2002-04-01

    Globally, the last century (20th) has seen many changes in terms of amazing advancements and applications of modern science, medicine, biotechnology and computers. One of the dramatic outcomes of such great inventions and discoveries was that the medical profession got the wonderful tool of immunomodulation and haemapheresis which has changed the outlook of the entire spectrum of immune complex disorders both in terms of the great success in treatment and the rehabilitation from so-called incurable diseases. Additionally this has resulted in a better quality of life and lower morbidity and mortality. Organ transplants have become a reality and immunomodulation plays a pivotal role in their success. India also has tasted this sweet recipe of modern medicine and has imbibed it in its medical culture. India is not only famous for the Taj Mahal and Hawa Mahal (Agra and Jaipur) but also for its brain (of brain drain/otherwise) and betz cells which have brought glories and laurels in the field of medicine, mathematics, engineering, literature, physics and computers, etc. to the native countries and India equally. Apheresis has now invaded the Indian scenario also and there is a growing interest, demand and application for it in the clinical field. But, being a unique country, the problems encountered are also unique. This paper deals with an overview of the changing perspectives of apheresis in India in the 20th century.

  13. David Levi. A Child of the Nineteenth Century

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    Alessandro Grazi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper examines the main biographical traits of the Italian author, politician and Risorgimento activist David Levi (1816-1898. Early in life, Levi abandoned the traditional religious spheres of Judaism but always remained attached to his Jewish heritage, as emerges from his oeuvre. Levi’s relevance derives from his constant effort to amalgamate Italian and Jewish identities in a context of increasing secularity. An analysis of his figure and activities, therefore enables us to investigate some crucial issues at the center of current historiographical debate, such as the nineteenth-century Jewish transition from a traditional to a modern identity, the discussion around the concepts of “assimilation”and “integration,” orientalist researches and the study of religions in nineteenth-century Italy, and the important role of Freemasonry and Saintsimonism in Levi’s secularization modes. In fact, their concept of “Religion of Humanity” helped him to create a synthesis between Enlightenment’s aspirations to universalism and Risorgimento’s cosmopolitan nationalism.

  14. The migratory bird treaty and a century of waterfowl conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael G.; Alisauskas, Ray T.; Batt, Bruce D. J.; Blohm, Robert J.; Higgins, Kenneth F.; Perry, Matthew; Ringelman, James K.; Sedinger, James S.; Serie, Jerome R.; Sharp, David E.; Trauger, David L.; Williams, Christopher K.

    2018-01-01

    In the final decades of the nineteenth century, concern was building about the status of migratory bird populations in North America. In this literature review, we describe how that concern led to a landmark conservation agreement in 1916, between the United States and Great Britain (on behalf of Canada) to conserve migratory birds shared by Canada and the United States. Drawing on published literature and our personal experience, we describe how subsequent enabling acts in both countries gave rise to efforts to better estimate population sizes and distributions, assess harvest rates and demographic impacts, design and fund landscape-level habitat conservation initiatives, and organize necessary political and regulatory processes. Executing these steps required large-scale thinking, unprecedented regional and international cooperation, ingenuity, and a commitment to scientific rigor and adaptive management. We applaud the conservation efforts begun 100 years ago with the Migratory Bird Treaty Convention. The agreement helped build the field of wildlife ecology and conservation in the twentieth century but only partially prepares us for the ecological and social challenges ahead. 

  15. 1912 – 2012: a century of studying cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    One year ago, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer was docked to the International Space Station. This state-of-the-art tool for studying cosmic rays has revolutionised methods of detecting cosmic radiation, which was discovered barely a century ago.   Victor Francis Hess (in the basket), back from his balloon flight in August 1912. Source: American Physical Society. Exactly one hundred years ago, the Austrian-American physicist Victor Francis Hess discovered cosmic rays. The researcher observed the phenomenon while on board a balloon; he found that at an altitude of 1,000 to 5,000 metres, the wires of his Wulf electrometer (a tool used to measure radiation) showed an increase in electrical charge. Hess had just proven the existence of ionising radiation coming from outside the Earth’s atmosphere. Twenty years or so later, the invention of the Geiger-Müller counter enabled physicists to study the properties of the rays more precisely. One century later, cosmic rays and the ques...

  16. Cast Iron in The 19th Century Building Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasek, Michał; Piwek, Aleksander

    2017-10-01

    Cast iron is a material, characteristics of which enable to receive extremely artistic elements. It maintains good strength properties at the same time. That combination of these seemingly contrary traits makes it a commodity that was widely used in the 19th century industry and architecture. These usages were not only as decorative elements, technical and structural ones. The production of new household utilities started, which made people’s lives more comfortable. Cast iron allowed for fast and cheap production while maintaining high aesthetic qualities. Useful elements, which often were ornamental parts of buildings were created. The aim of the article is to characterise elements of interior equipment of the 19th century building that are made of cast iron. As it appears from performed bibliography, archival and field studies, the ways of exploitation are very broad. Some were mounted into the building; the others were a mobile equipment. As it occurred they were most commonly used as functional items. Cast iron was used to produce the minor elements, which were only parts of the bigger wooden or stone items. Notwithstanding, there were also bigger ones casted as a whole, and frequently ones that were assembled from many elements. Nowadays, elements of an interior feature are one of the subjects of study during the restoration work of the buildings. They can provide important information about the building and the way people lived and are considered as the essential part of historical objects.

  17. Chinese Avant-garde Art in the Late Twentieth Century

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    Nataša Vampelj Suhadolnik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of the present paper is the '85 Art Movement, which was the first significant nationwide Avant-garde art movement in China. This movement, which arose in the mid-80s, defined the aesthetic foundations and identity of contemporary Chinese art, and represented Chinese globalized society on the threshold of the 21st century. Whilst focusing on China’s specific cultural and political contexts, the present paper analyses the concepts of humanism (renwen 人文 and idea (guannian 觀念. The spirit of humanism, with a rationalist connotation, and the desire for a revolution of ideas were the two main factors underpinning the Chinese Avant-garde movement and its artistic expressions. The paper also shows that the '85 Art Movement did not stem solely from the socio-political challenges of the 1980s, but should be regarded in the wider context of the “modernization project of Chinese art”, in the early 20th century.

  18. State, nation and democracy on the 21st century

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    Nidia Catherine González Piñeros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the relationship between State and Nation in the recent events in Japan and Bolivia, cases in which the universally shared ideas about development and democracy are met with the common criteria for the majority of the countries in the world. This relationship is analyzed comparing the particularities of each context regarding the concepts mentioned. Japan, despite being considered as an economically developed country, is criticized for its lack of exercise of democratic, popular politics. That country, despite being in the 21st century, remains a constitutional monarchy. Thus, given the catastrophic episode from March, 2011, the destiny of the citizens was defined by the imperial family. Bolivia, for its part, since the beginning of this century has managed a national reconstruction that has re-founded the Constitution and, therefore, the nation and the State. However, this democratic reorganization now faces a number of dilemmas where the State is debating between democracy and authoritarianism, as well as between liberal development and development from a communal perspective.

  19. Motivation related to work: A century of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanfer, Ruth; Frese, Michael; Johnson, Russell E

    2017-03-01

    Work motivation is a topic of crucial importance to the success of organizations and societies and the well-being of individuals. We organize the work motivation literature over the last century using a meta-framework that clusters theories, findings, and advances in the field according to their primary focus on (a) motives, traits, and motivation orientations (content); (b) features of the job, work role, and broader environment (context); or (c) the mechanisms and processes involved in choice and striving (process). Our integrative review reveals major achievements in the field, including more precise mapping of the psychological inputs and operations involved in motivation and broadened conceptions of the work environment. Cross-cutting trends over the last century include the primacy of goals, the importance of goal striving processes, and a more nuanced conceptualization of work motivation as a dynamic, goal-directed, resource allocation process that unfolds over the related variables of time, experience, and place. Across the field, advances in methodology and measurement have improved the match between theory and research. Ten promising directions for future research are described and field experiments are suggested as a useful means of bridging the research-practice gap. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Quantum generations: a history of physics in the twentieth century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechenberg, H

    2000-11-01

    Full text: The author attempts to handle the most important physics development of the twentieth century, namely that of quantum theory, in one, not too bulky, volume. This heroic task is split into 29 chapters, each treating a topic that forms a well defined subpart of the big theme embracing quantum theory itself (and also some of its companions), and the experimental discoveries, technology, sociology and science politics connected with it. The contents of Part One cover roughly the first twenty years of the century. There are also chapters on the introduction of the quantum of action and atomic constitution, on discharge in gases, low-temperature research and the interaction of science with industrial and military affairs in World War I. Part Two, leading up to the Hiroshima bomb, includes, beyond such central chapters as the rise of nuclear physics, quantum field theory and the physical and philosophical interpretation of quantum mechanics, further accounts of the Eddington-Milne cosmology, physics in the dictatorial regimes of National Socialism, Fascism and Stalinism, and the intellectual immigration during the 1930s into the USA. Part Three brings the story up to the end of the century, embracing great topics like nuclear energy, Big Science (i.e. physics in military and civil projects), fundamental particle theories up to speculations about 'grand unification', quantum electronics, or the increasingly hostile attitude toward science in the past 30 years. The short Part Four contains two chapters on a century in retrospect, which was really the century of physics. An enormous amount of material has been addressed in this book, and one wonders how one person can say anything reasonable about all these topics. The overall organization and the selection of chapters appears to be well planned and carried out quite successfully. In this reviewer's opinion, some chapters, e.g. on Dirac's theoretical work or cosmology (on which the author has

  1. Sarmatian Attributes in Archaeological Complexes of Catacombs Burials in Arys Culture of Southern Kazakhstan (1st Century B.C. - 3rd Century A.D.

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    Podushkin Aleksandr Nikolaevich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The publication is devoted to archaeological research of monuments of the catacomb of Arys culture of Southern Kazakhstan (1st Century B.C. - 3rd Century A.D.. Now scientists have a complete understanding of the range and typology, periodization and chronology of monuments of this culture. There are three stages: Karaultobe (4th century B.C. - 1st century A.D.; Karatobe (1st Century B.C. - 4th century A.D.; Altintobe (4th-6th centuries A.D.. These stages are characterized by specific clusters of signs in the form of artifacts. The author also carried out the ethnic attribution of the Arys culture in association with the ancient state Kangiuj. As a result of this work, the ethnicity of the state Kangiuj was revealed: in particular, late Saka’s, Sarmatian, Huns and Kangiuj ethnic components which are relevant to archaeological complexes, were identified. In the Arys monuments of culture the author discovered complexes of findings which associated with the Sarmatian world of Eurasia by their ethno-cultural parameters. They include typical for the Sarmatians list of ritual action and the funerary equipment, including weapons, bronze mirrors, ritual and religious objects, signs-tamgas, jewelry (including Egyptian faience, articles in “animal”, gold-turquoise and polychrome style. The characteristics of the burial complexes of catacombs of the Arys culture discussed in the publication and corresponding to chronological calculations and ethno-cultural interpretations, allow to speak about presence in the territory of South Kazakhstan of the Asian Sarmatians or any local branch of the Union of the Sarmatian tribes in the 1st century B.C. - 3rd century A.D.

  2. A Century of changes for Razelm-Sinoe Lagoon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrieciu, Marian-Albert; Stanica, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    A Century of changes for Razelm-Sinoe Lagoon System Marian-Albert Scrieciu (a), Adrian Stanica (a) (a) National Institute of Marine Geology and Geoecology e GeoEcoMar, Str. Dimitrie Onciul 23e25, Sector 2, 024053 Bucharest, Romania Razelm-Sinoe Lagoon System, situated in the NW part of the Black Sea, in tight connection with the Danube Delta, has been subject to major changes due to human interventions in the past century. These changes have resulted into a complete change of the Lagoon specific ecosystems compared to its pristine state. In its natural state, as brackish - transitional environment, Antipa (1894) mentions Razelm Lagoon as one of the places with the greatest fisheries around the Black Sea coast (about 1879 - 1884, there were approximately 10,000 fishermen, all working on the Razelm Sinoe Lagoon System). Starting with the end of the XIXth Century, new canals were dug and existing channels were dredged in order to develop tighter connections with the Danube River. The natural inlet of Portita was blocked four decades ago and connections between the various parts of the lagoon system were controlled by the building of locks and sluices. The 2 inlets of Sinoe Lagoon were also controlled during early 1980s. Under these conditions, the lagoon ecosystem changed from brackish towards freshwater, with major effects on the existing flora and fauna. The period of brutal interventions ended in 1989 and the Razelm-Sinoe Lagoon System became part of the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve in 1991, with a strict policy of nature protection and restoration. Spatial planning has been the major management option for the entire reserve, lagoon system included. Plans for sustainable development of the Razelm-Sinoe Lagoon System have been built in a participative manner, involving the local stakeholders, as part of FP7 ARCH project. Special attention has been given to impacts of climate change. The study presents the vision for the development Razelm-Sinoe Lagoon System over

  3. Hilbert problems for the geosciences in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghil, M.

    The scientific problems posed by the Earth's fluid envelope, and its atmosphere, oceans, and the land surface that interacts with them are central to major socio-economic and political concerns as we move into the 21st century. It is natural, therefore, that a certain impatience should prevail in attempting to solve these problems. The point of this review paper is that one should proceed with all diligence, but not excessive haste: "festina lente," as the Romans said two thousand years ago, i.e. "hurry in a measured way." The paper traces the necessary progress through the solutions to the ten problems: 1. What is the coarse-grained structure of low-frequency atmospheric variability, and what is the connection between its episodic and oscillatory description? 2. What can we predict beyond one week, for how long, and by what methods? 3. What are the respective roles of intrinsic ocean variability, coupled ocean-atmosphere modes, and atmospheric forcing in seasonal-to-interannual variability? 4. What are the implications of the answer to the previous problem for climate prediction on this time scale? 5. How does the oceans' thermohaline circulation change on interdecadal and longer time scales, and what is the role of the atmosphere and sea ice in such changes? 6. What is the role of chemical cycles and biological changes in affecting climate on slow time scales, and how are they affected, in turn, by climate variations? 7. Does the answer to the question above give us some trigger points for climate control? 8. What can we learn about these problems from the atmospheres and oceans of other planets and their satellites? 9. Given the answer to the questions so far, what is the role of humans in modifying the climate? 10. Can we achieve enlightened climate control of our planet by the end of the century? A unified framework is proposed to deal with these problems in succession, from the shortest to the longest timescale, i.e. from weeks to centuries and millennia. The

  4. Calendars of the Serbian early 15™ century manuscripts

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    Subotin-Golubović Tatjana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the corpus of Byzantine manuscripts, a prominent place is occupied by synaxaria, collections of texts in which hagiographic material is arranged according to the calendar order. The differences among such collections are to be noted in the structure, composition and size of the texts included. The existence of text collections in which early hagiographies are compiled and partly codified can be traced back into the 6th to 7th centuries. The principle center of agglomeration and codification of this type of materials used to be Constantinople. The older type synaxaria, known as prolog in Slavonic tradition, authored by Constantin from Mokissa, have been preserved in relatively large numbers of Southern Slavic transcripts. The prologs of the newer type, the so called "verse prologs" (regularly preceded by a few short verses, might have been translated, according to the opinion of D. Bogdanović, as early as the end of the 13th century, and in the Serbian environment. This opinion is corroborated by the fact that the oldest hitherto preserved prologs of this type, dating from the 14th century, were written in the Serbian redaction of Old Church Slavonic. Bogdanović's studies of prologs is based on manuscripts from the monastery of Decani. A relative abundance of verse prologs is treasured in the library of the monastery of Chilandar. Introduction of the new type of prolog has undoubtedly been caused by the introduction of the Jerusalem typicon into the liturgical practice of the Serbian church. Occasionally, hagiographic texts used to be inserted into menaion acolouthia after the sixth ode of the canon. Presently the oldest Serbian menaion containing hagiographies of the new type is the MS nr. 11 from the Archives of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, written sometime around 1400 A.D. Thus menaia also include multiply augmented hagiographic materials. The comparative analysis of prologs and menaia for the months of July (MS Decani 53

  5. ADVANCES IN PLANT HEALTH MANAGEMENT IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, R. James

    2000-01-01

    Plant health management is the science and practice of understanding and overcoming the succession of biotic and abiotic factors that limit plants from achieving their full genetic potential as crops, ornamentals, timber trees, or other uses. Although practiced as long as agriculture itself, as a science-based concept, plant heath management is even younger than integrated pest management (IPM), and includes and builds upon but is not a replacement for IPM. Probably the greatest collection of success stories for plant health management is the number of diseases managed by cleaning up the planting material. The record for root health management is more mixed, with the loss or phase-out of soil fumigants, and practices such as crop rotation and clean tillage being replaced with more intensive cropping and less or no tillage. Perhaps the greatest scientific and technical advances for plant health management have come from the work aimed at management of the pathogens, pests, and other hazards that arrive by air. Flor's work on flax rust, which produced the gene-for-gene model, is possibly the most significant contribution of plant pathology to the life sciences in the twentieth century. Research aimed at the management of foliar pathogens is also the basis for modern theory on epidemiology, population biology, aerobiology, and disease prediction and decision-support systems. Even IPM arose mainly in response to the need to protect crops from pests that arrive by air. If the definition of biological control includes the plant induced or genetically modified to defend itself, as it should, then biological control has been the most significant approach to plant health management during the twentieth century and promises through modern biotechnology to be even more significant in the twenty-first century. Rather than "reducing losses," the advances are discussed here within the simple framework of achieving the attainable yield by increasing the actual and/or affordable

  6. Health Paradigm Shifts in the 20th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel DeAngulo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of systems theory and the study of complexity to medicine and human health allows for a more comprehensive understanding and a more holistic view of what it means to be human. Such application overcomes the limitations of the traditional, fragmented understanding of phenomena and problems based on the mechanistic or Newtonian worldview. It recognizes that phenomena are interrelated, and that individual parts cannot be understood by only focusing on the analysis of their individual qualities. Rather, the individual parts can only be understood in relation to the whole and by being analyzed in the context of their interaction with the whole. The door is opened to previously unimagined models of thinking.In the 20th Century there have been shifts in the paradigms that have governed medicine and human health in the modern western world. There has been a shift from the focus on specific biological analysis and pathological diagnostics to complex human interactions with the environment and with sociopolitical and economic processes. There are complex models of systems in immunology, in neuroscience, and in genetics, as well as complex ways of understanding interactions as in epidemic modeling, in social media technologies, socioeconomic factors, and artificial intelligence.In this paper we describe three paradigms of the health-disease process that in some degree correspond to the historical development of modern medicine and healthcare over the previous century. The oldest paradigm focused on specific disease mechanisms and treatment. This gave way to paradigms that historically were broader and more inclusive, such as “international health”. The international health paradigm focused primarily on the control of epidemics across national borders and considered government as the only health actor. However, this perspective has come to be seen as excessively reductionist and excluded many critical components essential to a robust

  7. Serbian Astronomers in Science Citation Index in the XX Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijevic, Milan S.

    The book is written paralelly in Serbian and English. The presence of works of Serbian astronomers and works in astronomical journals published by other Serbian scientists, in Science Citation Index within the period from 1945 up to the end of 2000, has been analyzed. Also is presented the list of 38 papers which had some influence on the development of astronomy in the twentieth century. A review of the development of astronomy in Serbia in the last century is given as well. Particular attention is payed to the Astronomical Observatory, the principal astronomical institution in Serbia, where it is one of the oldest scientific organizations and the only autonomous astronomical institute. Its past development forms an important part of the history of science and culture in these regions. In the book is also considered and the history of the university teaching of astronomy in Serbia after the second world war. First of all the development of the Chair of Astronomy at the Faculty of Mathematics in Belgrade, but also the teaching of astronomy at University in Novi Sad, Ni and Kragujevac is discussed. In addition to professional Astronomy, well developed in Serbia is also the amateur Astronomy. In the review is first of all included the largest and the oldest organization of amateur-astronomers in Serbia, founded in 1934. Besides, here are the Astronomical Society "Novi Sad", ADNOS and Research Station "Petnica". In Valjevo, within the framework of the Society of researchers "Vladimir Mandic - Manda", there is active also the Astronomical Group. In Kragujevac, on the roof of the Institute of Physics of the Faculty of Sciences, there is the "Belerofont" Observatory. In Ni, at the close of the sixties and the start of the seventies, there was operating a branch of the Astronomical Society "Rudjer Bokovic", while at the Faculty of Philosophy there existed in the period 1976-1980 the "Astro-Geophysical Society". In the year 1996 there was founded Astronomical Society

  8. Hilbert problems for the geosciences in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghil

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific problems posed by the Earth's fluid envelope, and its atmosphere, oceans, and the land surface that interacts with them are central to major socio-economic and political concerns as we move into the 21st century. It is natural, therefore, that a certain impatience should prevail in attempting to solve these problems. The point of this review paper is that one should proceed with all diligence, but not excessive haste: "festina lente," as the Romans said two thousand years ago, i.e. "hurry in a measured way." The paper traces the necessary progress through the solutions to the ten problems: 1. What is the coarse-grained structure of low-frequency atmospheric variability, and what is the connection between its episodic and oscillatory description? 2. What can we predict beyond one week, for how long, and by what methods? 3. What are the respective roles of intrinsic ocean variability, coupled ocean-atmosphere modes, and atmospheric forcing in seasonal-to-interannual variability? 4. What are the implications of the answer to the previous problem for climate prediction on this time scale? 5. How does the oceans' thermohaline circulation change on interdecadal and longer time scales, and what is the role of the atmosphere and sea ice in such changes? 6. What is the role of chemical cycles and biological changes in affecting climate on slow time scales, and how are they affected, in turn, by climate variations? 7. Does the answer to the question above give us some trigger points for climate control? 8. What can we learn about these problems from the atmospheres and oceans of other planets and their satellites? 9. Given the answer to the questions so far, what is the role of humans in modifying the climate? 10. Can we achieve enlightened climate control of our planet by the end of the century? A unified framework is proposed to deal with these problems in succession, from the shortest to the longest timescale, i.e. from weeks to

  9. Globalized Security: An Allied Industrial Base for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Globalized Security: An Allied Industry Base for the 21st Century 151 OP NION GLOBALIZED SECURITY: AN ALLIED INDUSTRIAL BASE FOR THE 21ST CENTURY Lt...Col Shannon Sullivan, USAF During the Cold War, the United States maintained an extensive industrial base in the event of a global war with the Soviet...2002 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Globalized Security: An Allied Industrial Base for the 21st Century 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  10. Spanish economy XIX & XX century : does the past explain the present?

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Pérez, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is an economic trip to the Spain of the XIX and XX century. We will analyze how the industrial revolution was in Spain, how it developed during these important centuries, and always taking in account Europe. We will compare the different economic sectors between all the European countries and its evolution during those centuries. It finally will give as a picture of how the past influences in our nowadays economic situation. After this analysis will get into an important answer to...

  11. Physical stature of Jewish Dutchmen: an overview of three cases from the nineteenth century

    OpenAIRE

    Tassenaar, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    I investigated the changes in stature of Jewish and Non-Jewish conscripts in Amsterdam (northern Holland) and Groningen (Groningen) during the second half of the nineteenth century. In the middle of the nineteenth century the position of the Jewish population was rather weak from an economic perspective. In the last decades of the nineteenth century there was a general process of convergence in the biological standard of living (height). However, during this period Jewish conscripts in Amster...

  12. Valerie Kivelson, Desperate Magic, The Moral Economy of Witchcraft in Seventeenth‑Century Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Dysa, Kateryna

    2016-01-01

    Historiography of European witchcraft trials grows larger year after year and already numbers thousands of works. History of Russian witchcraft has also attracted attention of scholars, but the most stimulating and comprehensive studies were written about eighteenth‑century Russian witchcraft (works by Aleksandr Lavrov and Elena Smilianskaia). For some reason, seventeenth‑century witch‑trials hardly attracted scholars’ attention after the early twentieth‑century publication of trial materials...

  13. Building Better Leaders: Developing Air Force Squadron Leadership for the Next Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Building Better Leaders : Developing Air Force Squadron Leadership for the Next Century Lt Col Timothy M. Zadalis, USAF Lt Col...Better Leaders : Developing Air Force Squadron Leadership for the Next Century 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...iv Building Better Leaders Squadron Commanders for the Next Century Illustrations Page Figure 1-1 Leadership Development/Command

  14. The wall paintings of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries at Stemnitsa in the Peloponnese, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proestaki Xanthi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Five churches with mural paintings of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries have survived in Stemnitsa, a wealthy post-Byzantine town with a rich historical heritage in the central Peloponnese. In the sixteenth century the Church of St Nicholas and in the seventeenth century the wall-paintings in four churches, Panagia Baphero, Prophet Elijah, St Panteleemon and the katholikon of the monastery of the Zoodochos Pege are consistent with the general clime of seventeenth-century painting in the Peloponnese where many and different trends developed in this period.

  15. Nineteenth-Century Digital Worlds: Hilary Fraser Interviews Jerome McGann

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Fraser

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hilary Fraser discusses nineteenth-century digital humanities with Jerome McGann, thinking about the institutional history of '19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century' in the context of 'RaVoN', the 'Rossetti Archive', and NINES. The discussion addresses the institutional and disciplinary challenges in integrating digital skills in humanities training; digital environments that preserve, reconstitute, and enhance nineteenth-century scholarship online, supplement the transient nineteenth-century paper archive, and respond to the technical, ethnographic, and archaeological problems posed by work that cuts across medium boundaries.

  16. Engines of discovery a century of particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Sessler, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Particle accelerators exploit the cutting edge of every aspect of today's technology and have themselves contributed to many of these technologies. The largest accelerators have been constructed as research tools for nuclear and high energy physics and there is no doubt that it is this field that has sustained their development culminating in the Large Hadron Collider. An earlier book by the same authors, Engines of Discovery: A Century of Particle Accelerators chronicled the development of these large accelerators and colliders, emphasizing the critical discoveries in applied physics and engineering that drove the field. Particular attention was given to the key individuals who contributed, the methods they used to arrive at their particular discoveries and inventions, often recalling how their human strengths and attitudes may have contributed to their achievements. Much of this historical picture is also to be found, little changed, in Part A of this sequel. Since the first book was written it has become ...

  17. Intergenerational Educational Rank Mobility in 20th Century United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2015-01-01

    in the overall schooling distribution both over time and among population groups defined by race and gender.METHODS & DATA: To analyze educational rank mobility, I use quantile transition matrices known from studies on intergenerational income mobility. However, because schooling distributions are quite lumpy......BACKGROUND: Studies of educational mobility in the United States report widespread persistence in the association between parental and offspring schooling over most of the 20th century. Despite this apparent persistency, many other studies report substantial improvements in the educational...... performance of historically disadvantaged groups. To reconcile these diverging trends, I propose examining educational mobility in terms of percentile ranks in the respective schooling distributions of parents and offspring. Using a novel estimator of educational rank, I compare patterns of mobility...

  18. Pyrometallurgy near the end of the 20th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themelis, Nickolas J.

    1994-08-01

    The second part of this century has seen great developments with a variety of new technologies, such as telecommunications, computers, and space travel. However, an age-old technology, the use of fire to make metals, also developed dramatically during this period—pyrometallurgy was used to produce more metal than the cumulative production of the millennia before it. The following discusses the extraordinary developments in flash-and bath-smelting technologies; the article also examines the issues that will drive the prospects of pyrometallurgy for the future. Currently, metal markets are on "easy street": metal profits are low, and government and industry in the United States have little interest in metals extraction research and development. This article discusses factors that may change this situation in the near future.

  19. Reimagining Society in 18th Century French Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgård, Jonas Ross

    to citizens culminated in the summer of 1789 but it was preceded by an immense piece of imaginative work. Because of their medium, authors of fictional literature were well placed to help imagine society anew. New political bodies and conceptions of sovereignty, alternative codes of civil conduct and forms...... literature who contributed alongside pamphleteers, politicians, and philosophers to the establishment of this new political arena, filled with sometimes vague, yet insisting notions of happiness and rights. The shift from monarchical to popular sovereignty and the corollary transition from subjects...... of interpersonal interaction flourished in the rich generic landscape of late eighteenth century French literature. These works of literature, the forgotten as well as the canonized ones, continuously intervened in that burgeoning social imaginary within which the struggle to define the happiness of all took place....

  20. Changes to postgraduate medical education in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mehool

    2016-08-01

    Medicine is a constantly evolving profession, especially with the advent of rapid advances in the scientific base that underpins this vocation. In order to ensure that training in medicine is contemporary with the continuous evolution of the profession, there has been a multitude of changes to postgraduate medical education, particularly in the UK. This article aims to provide an overview of relevant key changes to postgraduate medical education in the UK during the 21st century, including changes to the structure, governance and commissioning of medical education, effects of European Working Time Directive on training, recent recommendations in the Future Hospital Commission report and Shape of training report, and recent requirements for accreditation of medical education trainers. Many of these recommendations will require complex discussions often at organisational levels, hopefully with some realistic and pragmatic solutions for implementation. © 2016 Royal College of Physicians.

  1. TENDENCIES OF DEVELOPMENT OF IMMIGRATION SCHOOLING IN THE XX CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Віталій Мацько

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with objective and subjective tendencies of development of primary, secondary and higher education in the countries west, inhabited by immigrants from Ukraine. It is proved that during the XX century Ukrainian emigration schooling went that evolutional way, which other nations did in foreign environment. Unlike schools that existed in the USSR, the emigrants kept schools at their own expense and only in some cases the state assumed the obligation to teach Ukrainian children (Czechoslovakia, Canada. In the history of pedagogy the activity of school of Ukrainian studies outside the motherland – is a unique example of preservation of national identity, instilling in the younger generation the knowledge about Ukraine, its customs and traditions. The practice proves that children, who learned early the basics of the Ukrainian language and literature in foreign environment, fluently speak their native language during their lives.

  2. A century of general relativity: astrophysics and cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, R D

    2015-03-06

    One hundred years after its birth, general relativity has become a highly successful physical theory in the sense that it has passed a large number of experimental and observational tests and finds extensive application to a wide variety of cosmic phenomena. It remains an active area of research as new tests are on the way, epitomized by the exciting prospect of detecting gravitational waves from merging black holes. General relativity is the essential foundation of the standard model of cosmology and underlies our description of the black holes and neutron stars that are ultimately responsible for the most powerful and dramatic cosmic sources. Its interface with physics on the smallest and largest scales will continue to provide fertile areas of investigation in its next century. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Financial crises of the early twentieth century in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Z. Moshenskyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the major financial crises in Ukraine at early twentieth century dealing with the crises of 1899–1902 and 1908–1910. The main attention is paid to the large-scale crisis of 1899–1902 at the new industrial region in Eastern Ukraine where numerous steel and mining companies based on massive foreign investment (mainly Belgian and French were created shortly. The general boom of new joint-stock companies and insufficient provision of these companies by state orders were the main reason of the crisis which was the reflection of the international industrial and financial crisis of those years. The author also researches the crisis of 1908–1910 in the Ukrainian sugar industry.

  4. Maundy Thursday Wawel ceremonials of 16th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Fedorowicz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The two liturgical codexes of the first half of the 16th century, preserved in the cathedral archives in Krakow and presented above, are nearly identical in their contents. They both refer to the same Maundy Thursday episcopal celebration, for which they contain identical formulas. The more essential difference lies only in the amount of rubrics, which when set together, don’t reveal any discrepancies in celebrating particular rites. However the books differ almost in everything as far as their external appearance is concerned, that is: their size, cover, edition, „breaking text”, writing and decoration. Owing to the great number of peculiar rubricistic information both ceremonials constitute a precious source for reconstructing the Maundy Thursday liturgy of the past, which apart from the Mass of the Last Supper contained the rites of blessing of the oil of the sick, the oil of catechumens and the chrism.

  5. [Surgeons among the pirates in the 17th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelders, S

    2005-12-24

    The memoirs of ship's surgeons that sailed with the Caribbean buccaneers and pirates of the 17th century are an important source of information on how they lived and worked. The surgeons enjoyed a full-fledged position among the egalitarian buccaneers. Known buccaneer surgeons whose memoirs have been preserved were apparently not entirely qualified according to the traditional guild system. Besides the usual work of ship's surgeons in general, the buccaneer surgeons had to be able to cope with the specific demands of the tropical climate. Botanical knowledge obtained from the Indian tribes played an important role in surviving the jungles of Central America. In addition, they were required to assist with duels, which played an important role among pirates and buccaneers in the settling of conflicts aboard ship, this in contrast to the situation on merchant and navy ships.

  6. Musical instruments in the 21st century identities, configurations, practices

    CERN Document Server

    Campo, Alberto; Egermann, Hauke; Hardjowirogo, Sarah-Indriyati; Weinzierl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    By exploring the many different types and forms of contemporary musical instruments, this book contributes to a better understanding of the conditions of instrumentality in the 21st century. Providing insights from science, humanities and the arts, authors from a wide range of disciplines discuss the following questions: · What are the conditions under which an object is recognized as a musical instrument? · What are the actions and procedures typically associated with musical instruments? · What kind of (mental and physical) knowledge do we access in order to recognize or use something as a musical instrument? · How is this knowledge being shaped by cultural conventions and temporal conditions? · How do algorithmic processes 'change the game' of musical performance, and as a result, how do they affect notions of instrumentality? · How do we address the question of instrumental identity within an instrument's design process? · What properties can be used to differentiate successful and unsuccessful ins...

  7. The Hopelessness Theory of Depression: A Quarter Century in Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Richard T.; Kleiman, Evan M.; Nestor, Bridget A.; Cheek, Shayna M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the formulation of the hopelessness theory of depression (Abramson, Metalsky, & Alloy, 1989) a quarter century ago, it has garnered considerable interest. The current paper presents a systematic review of this theory including its subsequent elaborations (Rose and Abramson’s [1992] developmental elaboration, Abela and Sarin’s [2002] weakest-link approach, Panzarella, Alloy, and Whitehouse’s [2006] expansion of the hopelessness theory, and the hopelessness theory of suicide [Abramson et al., 2000]), followed by recommendations for future study. Although empirical support was consistently found for several major components of the hopelessness theory, further work is required assessing this theory in relation to clinically significant phenomena. Among the most significant hindrances to advancement in this area is the frequent conceptual confusion between the hopelessness theory and the reformulated learned helplessness theory. PMID:26709338

  8. When to celebrate the end of the century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Bruce A.

    I was saddened to read an ad for AGU's Fall Meeting that described it as “the last geophysical meeting to be held in this century” It is not. “This” century (the twentieth) ends on December 31, 2000. If scientists aren't sure what the word “century” means or have difficulty counting off intervals of one hundred, starting at one, how can we ever expect the news media and general public to get things right?Some say this is just a matter of semantics or religious significance. Not so: it is about consistent definitions and counting—something scientists are supposed to care about and attend to.

  9. Seigniorage in the 21st Century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Ole; McCann, Duncan; Macfarlane, Laurie

    This paper develops a new theory of seigniorage suited to modern economies where the majority of money is created not by the state or central bank but by commercial banks and other monetary financial institutions via their lending activity. We identify four different forms of seigniorage that tak...... of created money and profits arising from flows of interest payments on newly created assets. We illustrate our theoretical framework with empirical data on commercial bank seigniorage and related variables in the United Kingdom and the Denmark over the past quarter century.......This paper develops a new theory of seigniorage suited to modern economies where the majority of money is created not by the state or central bank but by commercial banks and other monetary financial institutions via their lending activity. We identify four different forms of seigniorage that take...

  10. The furniture trade in Catalonia during the 18th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Miquel, Mónica

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Through various types of documentation it is possible to determine the different methods of sale and consumption used in the internal furniture trade in Catalonia during the 18th century. The author offers information concerning the construction and commerce of pieces —new as well as second-hand ones— from the workshops of carpenters, and their prices. She also studies the major business of rentals offered by carpenters and secondhand dealers.

    A partir de documentación de distinta índole conocemos los diferentes sistemas de venta y consumo utilizados en el comercio interno de muebles en Cataluña durante el siglo XVIII. Ofrecemos informaciones sobre la construcción de piezas y sobre su comercio desde los talleres de carpinteros, tanto de obras nuevas como de segunda mano y sus precios. Igualmente, estudiamos el importante negocio de muebles de alquiler ofrecido por carpinteros y por ropavejeros.

  11. 21st century wheat breeding: plot selection or plate detection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebner, Robert M D; Summers, Richard W

    2003-02-01

    The publicly reported limited application of marker-assisted selection (MAS) in wheat breeding programmes to date is reviewed and contrasted with the current situation, in which it has increasingly become technically feasible to tag almost any gene with a microsatellite assay. Although this capability is starting to have an impact on the conduct of large breeding programmes, a much more profound change in breeding strategy will become possible when single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) technology has matured sufficiently so that the throughput of molecular marker-based genotyping is able to keep pace with the numbers of plants that breeders routinely handle in the field. We explore the extent to which the genomics revolution might generate a change in the conventional breeding paradigm, which has operated with such success for the best part of the 20th century, and identify the need for a substantial reduction in assay price before MAS is likely to make more than a marginal impact on present practice.

  12. Reimagining Human Research Protections for 21st Century Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, Cinnamon; Nebeker, Camille; Bietz, Matthew; Bae, Deborah; Bigby, Barbara; Devereaux, Mary; Fowler, James; Waldo, Ann; Weibel, Nadir; Patrick, Kevin; Klemmer, Scott; Melichar, Lori

    2016-12-22

    Evolving research practices and new forms of research enabled by technological advances require a redesigned research oversight system that respects and protects human research participants. Our objective was to generate creative ideas for redesigning our current human research oversight system. A total of 11 researchers and institutional review board (IRB) professionals participated in a January 2015 design thinking workshop to develop ideas for redesigning the IRB system. Ideas in 5 major domains were generated. The areas of focus were (1) improving the consent form and process, (2) empowering researchers to protect their participants, (3) creating a system to learn from mistakes, (4) improving IRB efficiency, and (5) facilitating review of research that leverages technological advances. We describe the impetus for and results of a design thinking workshop to reimagine a human research protections system that is responsive to 21st century science.

  13. The Turn to Precarity in Twenty-First Century Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison Jago

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen several attempts by writers and critics to understand the changed sensibility in post-9/11 fiction through a variety of new -isms. This essay explores this cultural shift in a different way, finding a ‘turn to precarity’ in twenty-first century fiction characterised by a renewal of interest in the flow and foreclosure of affect, the resurgence of questions about vulnerability and our relationships to the other, and a heightened awareness of the social dynamics of seeing. The essay draws these tendencies together via the work of Judith Butler in Frames of War, in an analysis of Trezza Azzopardi’s quasi-biographical study of precarious life, Remember Me.

  14. Continuum mechanics through the twentieth century a concise historical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Maugin, Gerard A

    2013-01-01

    This overview of the development of continuum mechanics throughout the twentieth century is unique and ambitious. Utilizing a historical perspective, it combines an exposition on the technical progress made in the field and a marked interest in the role played by remarkable individuals and scientific schools and institutions on a rapidly evolving social background. It underlines the newly raised technical questions and their answers, and the ongoing reflections on the bases of continuum mechanics associated, or in competition, with other branches of the physical sciences, including thermodynamics. The emphasis is placed on the development of a more realistic modeling of deformable solids and the exploitation of new mathematical tools. The book presents a balanced appraisal of advances made in various parts of the world. The author contributes his technical expertise, personal recollections, and international experience to this general overview, which is very informative albeit concise.

  15. Caravaggio four centuries later: psychoanalytic portraits of ambivalence and ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajnberg, Nathan M

    2013-04-01

    Rome celebrated the four hundredth anniversary of Michelangelo Marisi da Caravaggio's death with an historical exhibition of his brief lifetime's work. Yet psychoanalysis has not studied this work extensively, despite the artist's compelling portrayal of a full range of human affects, including ambivalence. Psychoanalysis has studied artistic pioneers such as da Vinci (Freud 1910) and Michelangelo (Freud 1914), Giotto's use of blue sky as psychologically innovative (Blatt 1994), and Magritte's play with external reality (Spitz 1994). What can we learn about Caravaggio's work-including innovative contributions such as visual representation of expressed emotions, particularly negative emotions, including ambivalence, and remarkably candid, even critical, self-representations-and how can this late-sixteenth-century artist teach us about the development of the concept of mind underlying psychoanalysis?

  16. Designing blended learning interventions for the 21st century student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleton, Saramarie

    2017-06-01

    The learning requirements of diverse groups of students in higher education challenge educators to design learning interventions that meet the need of 21st century students. A model was developed to assist lecturers, especially those that are new to the profession, to use a blended approach to design meaningful learning interventions for physiology. The aim of the model is to encourage methodical development of learning interventions, while the purpose is to provide conceptual and communication tools that can be used to develop appropriate operational learning interventions. A whole brain approach that encourages challenging the four quadrants is encouraged. The main arguments of the model are to first determine the learning task requirements, as these will inform the design and development of learning interventions to facilitate learning and the assessment thereof. Delivery of the content is based on a blended approach. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Monetary Romanticism, Currency and Central Banks in the Nineteenth Century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn Sørensen, Anders

    How do monetary institutions, such as currencies and central banks, interrelate to the construction of national communities? Using the national conflict between the Danish state and the Duchies of Schleswig-Holstein in the nineteenth century as an exemplary case, this article demonstrates how both...... banks and currencies were mobilized as political symbols to promote an agenda of regional nationalism. In the article I show how the local Schleswig-Holstein currency and the local Schleswig-Holsteinische Landsbank became symbolic antagonists to the Danish central bank and the official state......-sanctioned currency – which by Danish politicians were considers key elements in the attempt to consolidate the Danish nation-state. The article highlights the symbolic qualities of monetary institutions and offers an example of the interrelation between currencies, banks and nations. Through an empirical analysis...

  18. Love the Truth in the Franciscan School (XIIIth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Lázaro Pulido

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Love to the truth is a fundamental question in the Franciscan School. It has your origin on the Franciscan practical needs to transmit the evangelical message to all the men. The universality of the message inspires the concept of wisdom as a base to love the truth. The truth appears as occasion of reference to God, the significatio never subordinates to the res. The article exposes the fundamental milestones of this construction from the origins of the Franciscan School to the ends of the 13th century with Gonzalo Hispano, indicating the common points and the internal discussions of a School according Anthony of Lisbon/Padua, Alexander of Hales, Odo Rigaldus, William of Melitona, Robert Grosseteste, Roger Bacon, Bonaventure, Matthew of Aquasparta, Peter John Olivi and Gonsalvus of Spain

  19. The first century of the "clinica del lavoro" in Milan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Foà, Vito

    2005-01-01

    The Clinica del Lavoro was created in Milan at the beginning of the 20th century by Luigi Devotto, who deemed it essential for physicians and health researchers to get involved in the life and health problems of working populations. The main roles of the Clinica del Lavoro were to educate medical students and train physicians; study actual workplaces, examine health and safety hazards and their noxious effects; and create initiatives and services to protect and promote workers' health. Important scientific contributions were made in several fields, including chemical carcinogenesis, effects of mineral and biologicalfibers, mechanism of action of silica dust, methods for the detection and measurements of toxic substances in both the work environment and workers' biological media.

  20. [Physiology in XXI century: natural science and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-09-01

    Progress of physiology is closely connected with achievements of the adjacent sciences that developed particularly intensively at the end of the XX century. The key role in strategy of physiological investigations is played by study of the nature of regulation of individual processes providing activity of the organism as a whole. By the example of study of renal function there are discussed the issue of integration of its incretory and secretory functions, elucidation of the mechanism of activity of regulatory systems with taking into account the wide diversity of types and subtypes of receptors, interaction of numerous variants of cotransporters, pumps, water and ion channels, which eventually provides the amazing efficiency of the coordinated work of several organs and systems for stabilization of physical-chemical parameters of the internal environment. Development of physiology is of importance for progress of natural science and clinical medicine, as its achievements facilitate discovery of mechanisms of physiological functions, elucidation of defect of the locus underlying dysfunction.