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  1. Cyclin G2 is a centrosome-associated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that influences microtubule stability and induces a p53-dependent cell cycle arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    mature centriole present at microtubule foci, indicates that cyclin G2 resides primarily on the mother centriole. Copurification of cyclin G2 and PP2A subunits with microtubules and centrosomes, together with the effects of ectopic cyclin G2 on cell cycle progression, nuclear morphology and microtubule growth and stability, suggests that cyclin G2 may modulate the cell cycle and cellular division processes through modulation of PP2A and centrosomal associated activities

  2. Centrosome-associated regulators of the G2/M checkpoint as targets for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broaddus Russell R

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In eukaryotic cells, control mechanisms have developed that restrain cell-cycle transitions in response to stress. These regulatory pathways are termed cell-cycle checkpoints. The G2/M checkpoint prevents cells from entering mitosis when DNA is damaged in order to afford these cells an opportunity to repair the damaged DNA before propagating genetic defects to the daughter cells. If the damage is irreparable, checkpoint signaling might activate pathways that lead to apoptosis. Since alteration of cell-cycle control is a hallmark of tumorigenesis, cell-cycle regulators represent potential targets for therapy. The centrosome has recently come into focus as a critical cellular organelle that integrates G2/M checkpoint control and repairs signals in response to DNA damage. A growing number of G2/M checkpoint regulators have been found in the centrosome, suggesting that centrosome has an important role in G2/M checkpoint function. In this review, we discuss centrosome-associated regulators of the G2/M checkpoint, the dysregulation of this checkpoint in cancer, and potential candidate targets for cancer therapy.

  3. Protein Requirements during Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Courtney-Martin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein recommendations for elderly, both men and women, are based on nitrogen balance studies. They are set at 0.66 and 0.8 g/kg/day as the estimated average requirement (EAR and recommended dietary allowance (RDA, respectively, similar to young adults. This recommendation is based on single linear regression of available nitrogen balance data obtained at test protein intakes close to or below zero balance. Using the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO method, we estimated the protein requirement in young adults and in both elderly men and women to be 0.9 and 1.2 g/kg/day as the EAR and RDA, respectively. This suggests that there is no difference in requirement on a gender basis or on a per kg body weight basis between younger and older adults. The requirement estimates however are ~40% higher than the current protein recommendations on a body weight basis. They are also 40% higher than our estimates in young men when calculated on the basis of fat free mass. Thus, current recommendations may need to be re-assessed. Potential rationale for this difference includes a decreased sensitivity to dietary amino acids and increased insulin resistance in the elderly compared with younger individuals.

  4. Protein Requirements during Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney-Martin, Glenda; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B; Elango, Rajavel

    2016-01-01

    Protein recommendations for elderly, both men and women, are based on nitrogen balance studies. They are set at 0.66 and 0.8 g/kg/day as the estimated average requirement (EAR) and recommended dietary allowance (RDA), respectively, similar to young adults. This recommendation is based on single linear regression of available nitrogen balance data obtained at test protein intakes close to or below zero balance. Using the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method, we estimated the protein requirement in young adults and in both elderly men and women to be 0.9 and 1.2 g/kg/day as the EAR and RDA, respectively. This suggests that there is no difference in requirement on a gender basis or on a per kg body weight basis between younger and older adults. The requirement estimates however are ~40% higher than the current protein recommendations on a body weight basis. They are also 40% higher than our estimates in young men when calculated on the basis of fat free mass. Thus, current recommendations may need to be re-assessed. Potential rationale for this difference includes a decreased sensitivity to dietary amino acids and increased insulin resistance in the elderly compared with younger individuals. PMID:27529275

  5. SDCCAG8 Interacts with RAB Effector Proteins RABEP2 and ERC1 and Is Required for Hedgehog Signaling.

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    Rannar Airik

    Full Text Available Recessive mutations in the SDCCAG8 gene cause a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy with Bardet-Biedl syndrome-like features in humans. Our previous characterization of the orthologous Sdccag8gt/gt mouse model recapitulated the retinal-renal disease phenotypes and identified impaired DNA damage response signaling as an underlying disease mechanism in the kidney. However, several other phenotypic and mechanistic features of Sdccag8gt/gt mice remained unexplored. Here we show that Sdccag8gt/gt mice exhibit developmental and structural abnormalities of the skeleton and limbs, suggesting impaired Hedgehog (Hh signaling. Indeed, cell culture studies demonstrate the requirement of SDCCAG8 for ciliogenesis and Hh signaling. Using an affinity proteomics approach, we demonstrate that SDCCAG8 interacts with proteins of the centriolar satellites (OFD1, AZI1, of the endosomal sorting complex (RABEP2, ERC1, and with non-muscle myosin motor proteins (MYH9, MYH10, MYH14 at the centrosome. Furthermore, we show that RABEP2 localization at the centrosome is regulated by SDCCAG8. siRNA mediated RABEP2 knockdown in hTERT-RPE1 cells leads to defective ciliogenesis, indicating a critical role for RABEP2 in this process. Together, this study identifies several centrosome-associated proteins as novel SDCCAG8 interaction partners, and provides new insights into the function of SDCCAG8 at this structure.

  6. Tank binding kinase 1 is a centrosome-associated kinase necessary for microtubule dynamics and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Smitha; Nguyen, Jonathan; Johnson, Joseph; Haura, Eric; Coppola, Domenico; Chellappan, Srikumar

    2015-01-01

    TANK Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) is a non-canonical IκB kinase that contributes to KRAS-driven lung cancer. Here we report that TBK1 plays essential roles in mammalian cell division. Specifically, levels of active phospho-TBK1 increase during mitosis and localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and midbody, and selective inhibition or silencing of TBK1 triggers defects in spindle assembly and prevents mitotic progression. TBK1 binds to the centrosomal protein CEP170 and to the mitotic apparatus protein NuMA, and both CEP170 and NuMA are TBK1 substrates. Further, TBK1 is necessary for CEP170 centrosomal localization and binding to the microtubule depolymerase Kif2b, and for NuMA binding to dynein. Finally, selective disruption of the TBK1-CEP170 complex augments microtubule stability and triggers defects in mitosis, suggesting that TBK1 functions as a mitotic kinase necessary for microtubule dynamics and mitosis.

  7. Protein requirement in critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2016-05-01

    How much protein do critically ill patients require? For the many decades that nutritional support has been used there was a broad consensus that critically ill patients need much more protein than required for normal health. Now, however, some clinical investigators recommend limiting all macronutrient provision during the early phase of critical illness. How did these conflicting recommendations emerge? Which of them is correct? This review explains the longstanding recommendation for generous protein provision in critical illness, analyzes the clinical trials now being claimed to refute it, and concludes with suggestions for clinical investigation and practice. PMID:26914090

  8. Human Protein and Amino Acid Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, L John

    2016-05-01

    Human protein and amino acid nutrition encompasses a wide, complex, frequently misunderstood, and often contentious area of clinical research and practice. This tutorial explains the basic biochemical and physiologic principles that underlie our current understanding of protein and amino acid nutrition. The following topics are discussed: (1) the identity, measurement, and essentiality of nutritional proteins; (2) the definition and determination of minimum requirements; (3) nutrition adaptation; (4) obligatory nitrogen excretion and the minimum protein requirement; (5) minimum versus optimum protein intakes; (6) metabolic responses to surfeit and deficient protein intakes; (7) body composition and protein requirements; (8) labile protein; (9) N balance; (10) the principles of protein and amino acid turnover, including an analysis of the controversial indicator amino acid oxidation technique; (11) general guidelines for evaluating protein turnover articles; (12) amino acid turnover versus clearance; (13) the protein content of hydrated amino acid solutions; (14) protein requirements in special situations, including protein-catabolic critical illness; (15) amino acid supplements and additives, including monosodium glutamate and glutamine; and (16) a perspective on the future of protein and amino acid nutrition research. In addition to providing practical information, this tutorial aims to demonstrate the importance of rigorous physiologic reasoning, stimulate intellectual curiosity, and encourage fresh ideas in this dynamic area of human nutrition. In general, references are provided only for topics that are not well covered in modern textbooks. PMID:26796095

  9. Protein and Amino Acid Requirements during Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elango, Rajavel; Ball, Ronald O

    2016-07-01

    Protein forms an essential component of a healthy diet in humans to support both growth and maintenance. During pregnancy, an exceptional stage of life defined by rapid growth and development, adequate dietary protein is crucial to ensure a healthy outcome. Protein deposition in maternal and fetal tissues increases throughout pregnancy, with most occurring during the third trimester. Dietary protein intake recommendations are based on factorial estimates because the traditional method of determining protein requirements, nitrogen balance, is invasive and undesirable during pregnancy. The current Estimated Average Requirement and RDA recommendations of 0.88 and 1.1 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), respectively, are for all stages of pregnancy. The single recommendation does not take into account the changing needs during different stages of pregnancy. Recently, with the use of the minimally invasive indicator amino acid oxidation method, we defined the requirements to be, on average, 1.2 and 1.52 g · kg(-1) · d(-1) during early (∼16 wk) and late (∼36 wk) stages of pregnancy, respectively. Although the requirements are substantially higher than current recommendations, our values are ∼14-18% of total energy and fit within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range. Using swine as an animal model we showed that the requirements for several indispensable amino acids increase dramatically during late gestation compared with early gestation. Additional studies should be conducted during pregnancy to confirm the newly determined protein requirements and to determine the indispensable amino acid requirements during pregnancy in humans. PMID:27422521

  10. BIOMARKERS TO DEFINE OPTIMAL PROTEIN REQUIREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Di Girolamo, Filippo Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Dietary proteins are the source of the amino acids required by the body for tissue growth and maintenance. The Population Reference Intake (PRI) for proteins, as defined by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) for healthy adults, including the elderly, is 0.83 g/kg body weight/day. This amount is defined on the net balance of body protein (or “nitrogen balance”, given by the difference between dietary nitrogen intake and losses) equivalent to 0.66 g/kg/day plus a safety factor for interp...

  11. Protein requirement for Trichogaster lalius, blue variety

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    Jener Alexandre Sampaio Zuanon

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the protein requirement of juvenile Trichogaster lalius, blue variety. The experimental design was of randomised blocks (B1 = initial weight of 1.04±0.05 g and B2 = 1.36±0.02 g, with two replicates within each block and five treatments (230, 270, 310, 350 and 390 g CP/kg diet. The fish were fed to satiation, three times a day for 90 days. The study evaluated: survival rate, weight gain, final length, feed intake, feed conversion ratio, protein efficiency ratio, specific growth rate and condition factor. There was a linear effect of dietary protein levels for protein efficiency ratio, specific growth rate (positive linear effect and feed conversion ratio (negative linear effect. For weight gain, final length, feed intake and condition factor a quadratic effect of dietary protein levels was observed, with estimated values of 409.8, 366.2, 317.4 and 365.0 g CP/kg diet, to improve their performance parameters. Analysis of growth based on the length of the fish shows that 366.2 g of CP/kg diet meets the protein requirement of juvenile Trichogaster lalius, blue variety.

  12. Dynamic requirements for a functional protein hinge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, James G; Jung, Ju-Yeon; Ragain, Christina; Sampson, Nicole S; Loria, J Patrick

    2007-04-20

    The enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is a model of catalytic efficiency. The 11 residue loop 6 at the TIM active site plays a major role in this enzymatic prowess. The loop moves between open and closed states, which facilitate substrate access and catalysis, respectively. The N and C-terminal hinges of loop 6 control this motion. Here, we detail flexibility requirements for hinges in a comparative solution NMR study of wild-type (WT) TIM and a quintuple mutant (PGG/GGG). The latter contained glycine substitutions in the N-terminal hinge at Val167 and Trp168, which follow the essential Pro166, and in the C-terminal hinge at Lys174, Thr175, and Ala176. Previous work demonstrated that PGG/GGG has a tenfold higher Km value and 10(3)-fold reduced k(cat) relative to WT with either d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate or dihyrdroxyacetone phosphate as substrate. Our NMR results explain this in terms of altered loop-6 dynamics in PGG/GGG. In the mutant, loop 6 exhibits conformational heterogeneity with corresponding motional rates hinge design in proteins: structural rigidity is essential for focused motional freedom of active-site loops.

  13. Protein catabolism and requirements in severe illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, L; Pichard, C

    2011-03-01

    Reduced total body protein mass is a marker of protein-energy malnutrition and has been associated with numerous complications. Severe illness is characterized by a loss of total body protein mass, mainly from the skeletal muscle. Studies on protein turnover describe an increased protein breakdown and, to a lesser extent, an increased whole-body protein synthesis, as well as an increased flux of amino acids from the periphery to the liver. Appropriate nutrition could limit protein catabolism. Nutritional support limits but does not stop the loss of total body protein mass occurring in acute severe illness. Its impact on protein kinetics is so far controversial, probably due to the various methodologies and characteristics of nutritional support used in the studies. Maintaining calorie balance alone the days after an insult does not clearly lead to an improved clinical outcome. In contrast, protein intakes between 1.2 and 1.5 g/kg body weight/day with neutral energy balance minimize total body protein mass loss. Glutamine and possibly leucine may improve clinical outcome, but it is unclear whether these benefits occur through an impact on total body protein mass and its turnover, or through other mechanisms. Present recommendations suggest providing 20 - 25 kcal/kg/day over the first 72 - 96 hours and increasing energy intake to target thereafter. Simultaneously, protein intake should be between 1.2 and 1.5 g/kg/day. Enteral immunonutrition enriched with arginine, nucleotides, and omega-3 fatty acids is indicated in patients with trauma, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and mild sepsis. Glutamine (0.2 - 0.4 g/kg/day of L-glutamine) should be added to enteral nutrition in burn and trauma patients (ESPEN guidelines 2006) and to parenteral nutrition, in the form of dipeptides, in intensive care unit (ICU) patients in general (ESPEN guidelines 2009). PMID:22139565

  14. Protein Requirements and Recommendations for Older People: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Caryl Nowson; Stella O'Connell

    2015-01-01

    Declines in skeletal muscle mass and strength are major contributors to increased mortality, morbidity and reduced quality of life in older people. Recommended Dietary Allowances/Intakes have failed to adequately consider the protein requirements of the elderly with respect to function. The aim of this paper was to review definitions of optimal protein status and the evidence base for optimal dietary protein. Current recommended protein intakes for older people do not account for the compensa...

  15. Protein Requirements and Recommendations for Older People: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryl Nowson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Declines in skeletal muscle mass and strength are major contributors to increased mortality, morbidity and reduced quality of life in older people. Recommended Dietary Allowances/Intakes have failed to adequately consider the protein requirements of the elderly with respect to function. The aim of this paper was to review definitions of optimal protein status and the evidence base for optimal dietary protein. Current recommended protein intakes for older people do not account for the compensatory loss of muscle mass that occurs on lower protein intakes. Older people have lower rates of protein synthesis and whole-body proteolysis in response to an anabolic stimulus (food or resistance exercise. Recommendations for the level of adequate dietary intake of protein for older people should be informed by evidence derived from functional outcomes. Randomized controlled trials report a clear benefit of increased dietary protein on lean mass gain and leg strength, particularly when combined with resistance exercise. There is good consistent evidence (level III-2 to IV that consumption of 1.0 to 1.3 g/kg/day dietary protein combined with twice-weekly progressive resistance exercise reduces age-related muscle mass loss. Older people appear to require 1.0 to 1.3 g/kg/day dietary protein to optimize physical function, particularly whilst undertaking resistance exercise recommendations.

  16. [Meeting of calory and protein requirements in developing countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, H D

    1976-03-01

    While we have definite ideas regarding the requirements for energy and proteins, we have to rely on statistical data whether these requirements are actually met. In spite of the common unreliability of these data, they serve as an useful indicator of the general situation. The supply of nutritional energy represents the average energy requirement for the populations of most developing countries. However, the insufficient supply of high grade protein remains the main nutritional problem of most of these countries. To solve these problems, the following possibilities exist: --Ensuring a sufficient calorie supply so that valuable protein is not wasted for the production of energy --Improving the supply of protein-rich staple food --Supplementing of food with local protien-rich products --Introducing lifestock only when the foodstuff available cannot be used directly for human consumption -- Improving the staple food, introducing higher grade strains of cereals --Producing protein-rich vegetable mixture from local foodstuff --Utilization of synthetic amino acids and of new protein sources. To meet the requirements for calories, and especially for hgih grade protein, is possible only by international and interdisciplinary efforts of all experts concerned with nutrition in any way.

  17. CENP-32 is required to maintain centrosomal dominance in bipolar spindle assembly.

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    Ohta, Shinya; Wood, Laura; Toramoto, Iyo; Yagyu, Ken-Ichi; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-04-01

    Centrosomes nucleate spindle formation, direct spindle pole positioning, and are important for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis in most animal cells. We previously reported that centromere protein 32 (CENP-32) is required for centrosome association with spindle poles during metaphase. In this study, we show that CENP-32 depletion seems to release centrosomes from bipolar spindles whose assembly they had previously initiated. Remarkably, the resulting anastral spindles function normally, aligning the chromosomes to a metaphase plate and entering anaphase without detectable interference from the free centrosomes, which appear to behave as free asters in these cells. The free asters, which contain reduced but significant levels of CDK5RAP2, show weak interactions with spindle microtubules but do not seem to make productive attachments to kinetochores. Thus CENP-32 appears to be required for centrosomes to integrate into a fully functional spindle that not only nucleates astral microtubules, but also is able to nucleate and bind to kinetochore and central spindle microtubules. Additional data suggest that NuMA tethers microtubules at the anastral spindle poles and that augmin is required for centrosome detachment after CENP-32 depletion, possibly due to an imbalance of forces within the spindle. PMID:25657325

  18. A protein required for prion generation: [URE3] induction requires the Ras-regulated Mks1 protein

    OpenAIRE

    Edskes, Herman K.; Wickner, Reed B.

    2000-01-01

    Infectious proteins (prions) can arise de novo as well as by transmission from another individual. De novo prion generation is believed responsible for most cases of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and for initiating the mad cow disease epidemic. However, the cellular components needed for prion generation have not been identified in any system. The [URE3] prion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an infectious form of Ure2p, apparently a self-propagating amyloid. We now demonstrate a protein required f...

  19. Dietary protein requirement of juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus Linnaeus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingwang; Mai, Kangsen; Liufu, Zhiguo; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-04-01

    The dietary protein requirement of juvenile turbot (initial average weight, 38.2 g ± 0.1 g) reared indoor in aerated aquaria was determined in this study. Five energy equal experimental diets were formulated with fish meal as protein source, which contained different concentrations of protein (47.2%, 51.0%, 54.6%, 59.3% and 63.6% of dry diet). Three groups of fish with 18 individuals in each, were cultured in 300-L tanks and fed twice a day for 8 weeks. During culture, temperature was controlled between 15.0 and 18.0°C, salinity was controlled between 28.5 and 32.0, acidity was controlled between pH7.8 and pH8.5, and ammonia nitrogen was maintained below 0.03 mg L-1 and dissolved oxygen was maintained about 7 mg L-1. Results showed that the growth of fish was significantly affected by dietary protein content ( P turbot increased when dietary protein content varied between 47.2% and 51.0% ( P 0.05). Broken-line regression analysis of SGR showed that the optimal dietary protein requirement of turbot was about 57.0%.

  20. Models of protein and amino acid requirements for cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Orlindo Tedeschi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein supply and requirements by ruminants have been studied for more than a century. These studies led to the accumulation of lots of scientific information about digestion and metabolism of protein by ruminants as well as the characterization of the dietary protein in order to maximize animal performance. During the 1980s and 1990s, when computers became more accessible and powerful, scientists began to conceptualize and develop mathematical nutrition models, and to program them into computers to assist with ration balancing and formulation for domesticated ruminants, specifically dairy and beef cattle. The most commonly known nutrition models developed during this period were the National Research Council (NRC in the United States, Agricultural Research Council (ARC in the United Kingdom, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA in France, and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO in Australia. Others were derivative works from these models with different degrees of modifications in the supply or requirement calculations, and the modeling nature (e.g., static or dynamic, mechanistic, or deterministic. Circa 1990s, most models adopted the metabolizable protein (MP system over the crude protein (CP and digestible CP systems to estimate supply of MP and the factorial system to calculate MP required by the animal. The MP system included two portions of protein (i.e., the rumen-undegraded dietary CP - RUP - and the contributions of microbial CP - MCP as the main sources of MP for the animal. Some models would explicitly account for the impact of dry matter intake (DMI on the MP required for maintenance (MPm; e.g., Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System - CNCPS, the Dutch system - DVE/OEB, while others would simply account for scurf, urinary, metabolic fecal, and endogenous contributions independently of DMI. All models included milk yield and its components in estimating MP required for lactation

  1. PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroki, Misao [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Ariumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ariumi@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Hijikata, Makoto [Department of Viral Oncology, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ikeda, Masanori; Dansako, Hiromichi [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Wakita, Takaji [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Shimotohno, Kunitada [Research Center for Hepatitis and Immunology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Ichikawa, Chiba 272-8516 (Japan); Kato, Nobuyuki [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML is dispensable for HCV RNA replication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCV could not alter formation of PML-NBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer INI1 and DDX5, PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV life cycle. -- Abstract: PML tumor suppressor protein, which forms discrete nuclear structures termed PML-nuclear bodies, has been associated with several cellular functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and antiviral defense. Recently, it was reported that the HCV core protein colocalizes with PML in PML-NBs and abrogates the PML function through interaction with PML. However, role(s) of PML in HCV life cycle is unknown. To test whether or not PML affects HCV life cycle, we examined the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity of HCV in the culture supernatants as well as the level of HCV RNA in HuH-7-derived RSc cells, in which HCV-JFH1 can infect and efficiently replicate, stably expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to PML. In this context, the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity in the supernatants from PML knockdown cells was remarkably reduced, whereas the level of HCV RNA in the PML knockdown cells was not significantly affected in spite of very effective knockdown of PML. In fact, we showed that PML is unrelated to HCV RNA replication using the subgenomic HCV-JFH1 replicon RNA, JRN/3-5B. Furthermore, the infectivity of HCV-like particle in the culture supernatants was significantly reduced in PML knockdown JRN/3-5B cells expressing core to NS2 coding region of HCV-JFH1 genome using the trans-packaging system. Finally, we also demonstrated that INI1 and DDX5, the PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV production. Taken together, these findings suggest that PML is required for HCV production.

  2. Protein "requirements" beyond the RDA: implications for optimizing health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Stuart M; Chevalier, Stéphanie; Leidy, Heather J

    2016-05-01

    Substantial evidence supports the increased consumption of high-quality protein to achieve optimal health outcomes. A growing body of research indicates that protein intakes well above the current Recommended Dietary Allowance help to promote healthy aging, appetite regulation, weight management, and goals aligned with athletic performance. Higher protein intakes may help prevent age-related sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass, and strength that predisposes older adults to frailty, disability, and loss of autonomy. Higher protein diets also improve satiety and lead to greater reductions in body weight and fat mass compared with standard protein diets, and may therefore serve as a successful strategy to help prevent and/or treat obesity. Athletes can also benefit from higher protein intakes to maximize athletic performance given the critical role protein plays in stimulating muscle protein remodelling after exercise. Protein quality, per meal dose, and timing of ingestion are also important considerations. Despite persistent beliefs to the contrary, we can find no evidence-based link between higher protein diets and renal disease or adverse bone health. This brief synopsis highlights recent learnings based on presentations at the 2015 Canadian Nutrition Society conference, Advances in Protein Nutrition across the Lifespan. Current evidence indicates intakes in the range of at least 1.2 to 1.6 g/(kg·day) of high-quality protein is a more ideal target for achieving optimal health outcomes in adults. PMID:26960445

  3. Computing wheat nitrogen requirements from grain yield and protein maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optical protein sensors and mass-flow yield monitors provide the opportunity to continuously measure grain quality and quantity during harvesting. This chapter illustrates how yield monitor and grain protein measurements may provide useful postharvest information for evaluating water or nitrogen (N)...

  4. Computing wheat nitrogen requirements from grain yield and protein maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optical protein sensors and mass-flow yield monitors provide the opportunity to continuously measure grain quality and quantity during harvesting. This chapter illustrates how yield monitor and grain protein measurements may provide useful post-harvest information for evaluating water or nitrogen (...

  5. The bioinformatics of nucleotide sequence coding for proteins requiring metal coenzymes and proteins embedded with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremberger, G.; Dehipawala, Sunil; Cheung, E.; Holden, T.; Sullivan, R.; Nguyen, A.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2015-09-01

    All metallo-proteins need post-translation metal incorporation. In fact, the isotope ratio of Fe, Cu, and Zn in physiology and oncology have emerged as an important tool. The nickel containing F430 is the prosthetic group of the enzyme methyl coenzyme M reductase which catalyzes the release of methane in the final step of methano-genesis, a prime energy metabolism candidate for life exploration space mission in the solar system. The 3.5 Gyr early life sulfite reductase as a life switch energy metabolism had Fe-Mo clusters. The nitrogenase for nitrogen fixation 3 billion years ago had Mo. The early life arsenite oxidase needed for anoxygenic photosynthesis energy metabolism 2.8 billion years ago had Mo and Fe. The selection pressure in metal incorporation inside a protein would be quantifiable in terms of the related nucleotide sequence complexity with fractal dimension and entropy values. Simulation model showed that the studied metal-required energy metabolism sequences had at least ten times more selection pressure relatively in comparison to the horizontal transferred sequences in Mealybug, guided by the outcome histogram of the correlation R-sq values. The metal energy metabolism sequence group was compared to the circadian clock KaiC sequence group using magnesium atomic level bond shifting mechanism in the protein, and the simulation model would suggest a much higher selection pressure for the energy life switch sequence group. The possibility of using Kepler 444 as an example of ancient life in Galaxy with the associated exoplanets has been proposed and is further discussed in this report. Examples of arsenic metal bonding shift probed by Synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopy data and Zn controlled FOXP2 regulated pathways in human and chimp brain studied tissue samples are studied in relationship to the sequence bioinformatics. The analysis results suggest that relatively large metal bonding shift amount is associated with low probability correlation R

  6. Contemporary Issues in Protein Requirements and Consumption for Resistance Trained Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Jacob

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years an explosion of research papers concerning protein consumption has been published. The need to consolidate this information has become critical from both practical and future research standpoints. For this reason, the following paper presents an in depth analysis of contemporary issues in protein requirements and consumption for resistance trained athletes. Specifically, the paper covers: 1. protein requirements for resistance trained athletes; 2. the effect of the digestion rate of protein on muscular protein balance; 3. the optimal timing of protein intake relative to exercise; 4. the optimal pattern of protein ingestion, relative to how an individual should consume their protein throughout a 24 hour period, and what sources are utilized during this time frame; 5. protein composition and its interaction with measures of protein balance and strength performance; 6. the combination of protein and carbohydrates on plasma insulin levels and protein balance; 7. the efficacy of protein supplements and whole food protein sources. Our goal is to provide the reader with practical information in optimizing protein intake as well as for provision of sound advice to their clients. Finally, special care was taken to provide future research implications.

  7. Identification of protein complexes required for efficient sister chromatid cohesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayer, Melanie L; Pot, Isabelle; Chang, Michael; Xu, Hong; Aneliunas, Victoria; Kwok, Teresa; Newitt, Rick; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boone, Charles; Brown, Grant W; Hieter, Philip

    2004-01-01

    Ctf8p is a component of Ctf18-RFC, an alternative replication factor C-like complex required for efficient sister chromatid cohesion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We performed synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis with a ctf8 deletion strain as a primary screen to identify other nonessential genes r

  8. LAMP proteins are required for fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Kassidy K; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Scott, Cameron C; Malevanets, Anatoly; Saftig, Paul; Grinstein, Sergio

    2007-01-24

    Lysosome-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) are delivered to phagosomes during the maturation process. We used cells from LAMP-deficient mice to analyze the role of these proteins in phagosome maturation. Macrophages from LAMP-1- or LAMP-2-deficient mice displayed normal fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes. Because ablation of both the lamp-1 and lamp-2 genes yields an embryonic-lethal phenotype, we were unable to study macrophages from double knockouts. Instead, we reconstituted phagocytosis in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) by transfection of FcgammaIIA receptors. Phagosomes formed by FcgammaIIA-transfected MEFs obtained from LAMP-1- or LAMP-2- deficient mice acquired lysosomal markers. Remarkably, although FcgammaIIA-transfected MEFs from double-deficient mice ingested particles normally, phagosomal maturation was arrested. LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 double-deficient phagosomes acquired Rab5 and accumulated phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, but failed to recruit Rab7 and did not fuse with lysosomes. We attribute the deficiency to impaired organellar motility along microtubules. Time-lapse cinematography revealed that late endosomes/lysosomes as well as phagosomes lacking LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 had reduced ability to move toward the microtubule-organizing center, likely precluding their interaction with each other. PMID:17245426

  9. Studies on the protein and sulfur amino acid requirements of young bobwhite quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with purified diets to examine the influence of protein level and to estimate the sulfur amino acid (S.A.A.) requirement of young Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus). These studies demonstrated (I) that 26% protein was sufficient for rapid growth when the diet was supplemented with methionine; (2) that diets containing higher levels of protein (29.3% and 31.3%) failed to support satisfactory growth unless they contained supplemental methionine; and (3) that young Bobwhite quail require no more than 1.0% sulfur-containing amino acids for optimal growth and efficiency of feed utilization. A fifth experiment was conducted to examine the protein and S.A.A. requirements of young Bobwhite quail using practical rations and to compare results with those obtained with purified diets. Diets containing 24%, 26% and 28% protein were supplied with and without supplemental methionine in a five week study. Results showed significant growth responses to protein and supplemental methionine. Responses showed that Bobwhite quail require no more than 26% protein for maximum growth and efficiency of feed utilization when the S.A.A. level of the diet was approximately 1.0%. The results were in close agreement with those obtained with purified diets. These findings define more precisely than had been known the quantitative requirements of young Bobwhite quail for protein and for the S.A.A. necessary for optimal growth.

  10. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong, E-mail: yerong24@fudan.edu.cn

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  11. 40 CFR 180.1204 - Harpin protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Harpin protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1204 Section 180.1204 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... no more than one cystine residue. (b) The source(s) of genetic material encoding the protein...

  12. Protein Requirements in Healthy Adults:A Meta-analysis of Nitrogen Balance Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Min; SUN Feng; PIAO Jian Hua; YANG Xiao Guang

    2014-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to analyze protein requirements in healthy adults through a meta-analysis of nitrogen balance studies. Methods A comprehensive search for nitrogen balance studies of healthy adults published up to October 2012 was performed, each study were reviewed, and data were abstracted. The studies were first evaluated for heterogeneity. The average protein requirements were analyzed by using the individual data of each included studies. Study site climate, age, sex, and dietary protein source were compared. Results Data for 348 subjects were gathered from 28 nitrogen balance studies. The natural logarithm of requirement for 348 individuals had a normal distribution with a mean of 4.66. The estimated average requirement was the exponentiation of the mean of the log requirement, 105.64 mg N/kg·d. No significant differences between adult age, source of dietary protein were observed. But there was significant difference between sex and the climate of the study site (P Conclusion The estimated average requirement and recommended nutrient intake of the healthy adult population was 105.64 mg N/kg·d (0.66 g high quality protein/kg·d) and 132.05 mg N/kg·d (0.83 g high quality protein/kg·d), respectively.

  13. Evaluation of the Protein Requirement in Chinese Young Adults Using the Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Min; ZHANG Yu Hui; WANG Zhi Ling; GOU Ling Yan; LI Wei Dong; TIAN Yuan; HU Yi Chun; WANG Rui; PIAO Jian Hua; YANG Xiao Guang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To accurately calculate the protein requirements in Chinese young adults using the indicator amino acid oxidation technique. Methods Nine women and ten men received a restricted daily level of protein intake (0.75, 0.82, 0.89, 0.97, and 1.05 g/kg), along with L-[1-13C]-leucine. Subjects’ protein requirement was determined by a biphasic linear regression crossover analysis of F13CO2 data. In doing so, a breakpoint at the minimal rate of appearance of 13CO2 expiration specific to each level of dietary protein was identified. This trial was registered with the Chinese clinical trial registry as ChiCTR-ONC-11001407. Results The Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) and the Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI) of protein for healthy Chinese young adults were determined to be 0.87 and 0.98 g/(kg·d), respectively, based on the indicator amino acid oxidation technique. Conclusion The EAR and RNI of mixed protein are 5% and 16% that are lower than the current proposed EAR and RNI (0.92 and 1.16 g/(kg·d), respectively), as determined by the nitrogen balance method. The respective EAR and RNI recommendations of 0.87 and 0.98 g/(kg·d) of mixed protein are estimated to be reasonable and suitable for Chinese young adults.

  14. Mammalian Clusterin associated protein 1 is an evolutionarily conserved protein required for ciliogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasek Raymond C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clusterin associated protein 1 (CLUAP1 was initially characterized as a protein that interacts with clusterin, and whose gene is frequently upregulated in colon cancer. Although the consequences of these observations remain unclear, research of CLUAP1 homologs in C. elegans and zebrafish indicates that it is needed for cilia assembly and maintenance in these models. To begin evaluating whether Cluap1 has an evolutionarily conserved role in cilia in mammalian systems and to explore the association of Cluap1 with disease pathogenesis and developmental abnormalities, we generated Cluap1 mutant mice. Methods Cluap1 mutant embryos were generated and examined for gross morphological and anatomical defects using light microscopy. Reverse transcription PCR, β-galactosidase staining assays, and immunofluorescence analysis were used to determine the expression of the gene and localization of the protein in vivo and in cultured cell lines. We also used immunofluorescence analysis and qRT-PCR to examine defects in the Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in mutant embryos. Results Cluap1 mutant embryos die in mid-gestation, indicating that it is necessary for proper development. Mutant phenotypes include a failure of embryonic turning, an enlarged pericardial sac, and defects in neural tube development. Consistent with the diverse phenotypes, Cluap1 is widely expressed. Furthermore, the Cluap1 protein localizes to primary cilia, and mutant embryos were found to lack cilia at embryonic day 9.5. The phenotypes observed in Cluap1 mutant mice are indicative of defects in Sonic hedgehog signaling. This was confirmed by analyzing hedgehog signaling activity in Cluap1 mutants, which revealed that the pathway is repressed. Conclusions These data indicate that the function of Cluap1 is evolutionarily conserved with regard to ciliogenesis. Further, the results implicate mammalian Cluap1 as a key regulator of hedgehog signaling and as an

  15. Spike protein assembly into the coronavirion: exploring the limits of its sequence requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coronavirus spike (S) protein, required for receptor binding and membrane fusion, is incorporated into the assembling virion by interactions with the viral membrane (M) protein. Earlier we showed that the ectodomain of the S protein is not involved in this process. Here we further defined the requirements of the S protein for virion incorporation. We show that the cytoplasmic domain, not the transmembrane domain, determines the association with the M protein and suffices to effect the incorporation into viral particles of chimeric spikes as well as of foreign viral glycoproteins. The essential sequence was mapped to the membrane-proximal region of the cytoplasmic domain, which is also known to be of critical importance for the fusion function of the S protein. Consistently, only short C-terminal truncations of the S protein were tolerated when introduced into the virus by targeted recombination. The important role of the about 38-residues cytoplasmic domain in the assembly of and membrane fusion by this approximately 1300 amino acids long protein is discussed

  16. Strategic study on energy-protein requirements for local sheep: 5. Ewes during lactation phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-W Mathius

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-six Javanese thin-tail ewes in the end of late pregnancy phase were set out to study the energy and crude protein requirements during the first eight-week of lactation phase. The ewes were penned individually in doors and randomly assigned to a 3 x 3 factorial arrangement, consisting of three levels of energy (low, medium and high and three levels of crude protein (low, medium and high diets with four ewes per treatment. The diets were pelleted and offered four times daily in approximately equal amount. Feed intake, nutrient digestibility, body weight and milk production were recorded. Results showed that, total lamb birth weights was not affected, but protein content on the ration treatments significantly altered (P0.05, while crude protein content on the ration highly significantly affected (P<0.01. Based on data recorded, the energy and protein requirements for ewes during lactation phase are highly significantly depended on ewes’ live weight, milk production and the ratio of energy metabolism and crude protein of the ration. It was concluded that in order to fulfil the crude protein and energy needs of the ewes during lactation phase, the ration given should contain crude protein and energy as much as 16% (based on dry matter and 13.4 MJ/kg dry matter respectively.

  17. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 is required for protein localization to Cajal body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Kotova

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the nuclear protein known as Poly (ADP-ribose Polymerase1 (PARP1 was shown to play a key role in regulating transcription of a number of genes and controlling the nuclear sub-organelle nucleolus. PARP1 enzyme is known to catalyze the transfer of ADP-ribose to a variety of nuclear proteins. At present, however, while we do know that the main acceptor for pADPr in vivo is PARP1 protein itself, by PARP1 automodification, the significance of PARP1 automodification for in vivo processes is not clear. Therefore, we investigated the roles of PARP1 auto ADP-ribosylation in dynamic nuclear processes during development. Specifically, we discovered that PARP1 automodification is required for shuttling key proteins into Cajal body (CB by protein non-covalent interaction with pADPr in vivo. We hypothesize that PARP1 protein shuttling follows a chain of events whereby, first, most unmodified PARP1 protein molecules bind to chromatin and accumulate in nucleoli, but then, second, upon automodification with poly(ADP-ribose, PARP1 interacts non-covalently with a number of nuclear proteins such that the resulting protein-pADPr complex dissociates from chromatin into CB.

  18. Discovery of cellular proteins required for the early steps of HCV infection using integrative genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hoon Park

    Full Text Available Successful viral infection requires intimate communication between virus and host cell, a process that absolutely requires various host proteins. However, current efforts to discover novel host proteins as therapeutic targets for viral infection are difficult. Here, we developed an integrative-genomics approach to predict human genes involved in the early steps of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. By integrating HCV and human protein associations, co-expression data, and tight junction-tetraspanin web specific networks, we identified host proteins required for the early steps in HCV infection. Moreover, we validated the roles of newly identified proteins in HCV infection by knocking down their expression using small interfering RNAs. Specifically, a novel host factor CD63 was shown to directly interact with HCV E2 protein. We further demonstrated that an antibody against CD63 blocked HCV infection, indicating that CD63 may serve as a new therapeutic target for HCV-related diseases. The candidate gene list provides a source for identification of new therapeutic targets.

  19. Topology of Legionella pneumophila DotA: an inner membrane protein required for replication in macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, C R; Isberg, R R

    1997-01-01

    The Legionella pneumophila dotA gene is required for intracellular growth of the bacterium in macrophages. In this study, a structure-function analysis of the DotA protein was conducted to elucidate the role of this protein in L. pneumophila pathogenesis. Translational fusions of dotA to the Escherichia coli phoA and lacZ genes indicated that DotA is an integral cytoplasmic membrane protein with eight membrane-spanning domains. DotA contains two large periplasmic domains of approximately 503 ...

  20. The fission yeast heterochromatin protein Rik1 is required for telomere clustering during meiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuzon, Creighton T; Borgstrøm, Britta; Weilguny, Dietmar;

    2004-01-01

    Telomeres share the ability to silence nearby transcription with heterochromatin, but the requirement of heterochromatin proteins for most telomere functions is unknown. The fission yeast Rik1 protein is required for heterochromatin formation at centromeres and the mating-type locus, as it recrui...... meiosis. However, Rik1 is dispensable for the protective roles of telomeres in preventing chromosome end-fusion. Thus, a Swi6-independent heterochromatin function distinct from that at centromeres and the mating-type locus operates at telomeres during sexual differentiation....

  1. Transition fibre protein FBF1 is required for the ciliary entry of assembled intraflagellar transport complexes

    OpenAIRE

    WEI, QING; Xu, Qingwen; Zhang, Yuxia; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Zeng; Harris, Peter C.; Torres, Vicente E.; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Sensory organelle cilia play critical roles in mammalian embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia. Yet how this large complex passes through the size-dependent barrier at the ciliary base remains enigmatic. Here we report that FBF1, a highly conserved transition fibre protein, is required for the ciliary import of assembled IFT particles at the cilia base. We cloned dyf-19, the C. elegans homol...

  2. BH4 domain of bcl-2 protein is required for its proangiogenic function under hypoxic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabellini, Chiara; De Luca, Teresa; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Desideri, Marianna; Di Martile, Marta; Passeri, Daniela; Candiloro, Antonio; Biffoni, Mauro; Rizzo, Maria Giulia; Orlandi, Augusto; Del Bufalo, Donatella

    2013-11-01

    Beyond its classical role as apoptosis inhibitor, bcl-2 protein promotes tumor angiogenesis and the removal of N-terminal bcl-2 homology (BH4) domain abrogates bcl-2-induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in hypoxic cancer cells. Using M14 human melanoma cell line and its derivative clones stably overexpressing bcl-2 wild-type or deleted of its BH4 domain, we found that conditioned media (CM) from cells expressing BH4-deleted bcl-2 protein showed a reduced capability to increase in vitro human endothelial cells proliferation and differentiation, and in vivo neovascularization compared with CM from cells overexpressing wild-type bcl-2. Moreover, xenografts derived from cells expressing bcl-2 lacking BH4 domain showed a reduction of metastatic potential compared with tumors derived from wild-type bcl-2 transfectants injection. Stably expressing the Flag-tagged N-terminal sequence of bcl-2 protein, encompassing BH4 domain, we found that this domain is sufficient to enhance the proangiogenic HIF-1/VEGF axis under hypoxic condition. Indeed, lacking of BH4 domain abolishes the interaction between bcl-2 and HIF-1α proteins and the capability of exogenous bcl-2 protein to localize in the nucleus. Moreover, when endoplasmic reticulum-targeted bcl-2 protein is overexpressed in cells, this protein lost the capability to synergize with hypoxia to induce the proangiogenic HIF-1/VEGF axis as shown by wild-type bcl-2 protein. These results demonstrate that BH4 domain of bcl-2 is required for the ability of this protein to increase tumor angiogenesis and progression and indicate that bcl-2 nuclear localization may be required for bcl-2-mediated induction of HIF-1/VEGF axis. PMID:23836782

  3. Current issues in determining dietary protein and amino-acid requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pencharz, P; Jahoor, F; Kurpad, A;

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy and the first two years of life are periods of rapid growth and yet the knowledge of requirements for protein and dietary indispensable amino acids is very limited. The development of carbon oxidation methods opens the way to studies that should fill these important gaps in knowledge...

  4. The orphan adapter protein SLY1 as a novel anti-apoptotic protein required for thymocyte development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beer-Hammer Sandra

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SH3 containing Lymphocyte Protein (SLY1 is a putative adapter protein exclusively expressed in lymphocytes which is involved in antigen receptor induced activation. We previously have generated SLY1Δ/Δ mice harbouring a partial deletion in the N-terminal region of SLY1 which revealed profound immunological defects in T and B cell functions. Results In this study, T cell development in SLY1-/- and SLY1Δ/Δ mice was analysed ex vivo and upon cultivation with the bone marrow stromal cell line OP9. SLY1-deficient thymocytes were compromised in inducing nutrient receptor expression and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation, indicating a defect in mTOR complex activation. Furthermore, SLY1 was identified as a novel anti-apoptotic protein required for developmental progression of T cell precursors to the CD4+CD8+ double-positive stage by protecting from premature programmed cell death initiation in developing CD4-CD8- double-negative thymocytes. In addition, SLY1 phosphorylation was differentially regulated upon Notch ligand-mediated stimulation and expression of the preTCR. Conclusion Thus, our results suggest a non-redundant role for SLY1 in integrating signals from both receptors in early T cell progenitors in the thymus.

  5. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  6. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies novel host proteins required for alphavirus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw Shin Ooi

    Full Text Available The enveloped alphaviruses include important and emerging human pathogens such as Chikungunya virus and Eastern equine encephalitis virus. Alphaviruses enter cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and exit by budding from the plasma membrane. While there has been considerable progress in defining the structure and function of the viral proteins, relatively little is known about the host factors involved in alphavirus infection. We used a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host factors that promote or inhibit alphavirus infection in human cells. Fuzzy homologue (FUZ, a protein with reported roles in planar cell polarity and cilia biogenesis, was required for the clathrin-dependent internalization of both alphaviruses and the classical endocytic ligand transferrin. The tetraspanin membrane protein TSPAN9 was critical for the efficient fusion of low pH-triggered virus with the endosome membrane. FUZ and TSPAN9 were broadly required for infection by the alphaviruses Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, and Chikungunya virus, but were not required by the structurally-related flavivirus Dengue virus. Our results highlight the unanticipated functions of FUZ and TSPAN9 in distinct steps of alphavirus entry and suggest novel host proteins that may serve as targets for antiviral therapy.

  7. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Run Lei; Ke Zhang; Yanxia Wei; Min Chen; Weinstein, Lee S.; Yang Hong; Minyan Zhu; Hongchang Li; Huashun Li

    2016-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and cranio...

  8. KAR5 Encodes a Novel Pheromone-inducible Protein Required for Homotypic Nuclear Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Beh, Christopher T.; Brizzio, Valeria; Rose, Mark D.

    1997-01-01

    KAR5 is required for membrane fusion during karyogamy, the process of nuclear fusion during yeast mating. To investigate the molecular mechanism of nuclear fusion, we cloned and characterized the KAR5 gene and its product. KAR5 is a nonessential gene, and deletion mutations produce a bilateral defect in the homotypic fusion of yeast nuclei. KAR5 encodes a novel protein that shares similarity with a protein in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that may play a similar role in nuclear fusion. Kar5p is i...

  9. A conserved OmpA-like protein in Legionella pneumophila required for efficient intracellular replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Ian P; Kumova, Ogan K; Ninio, Shira

    2016-08-01

    The OmpA-like protein domain has been associated with peptidoglycan-binding proteins, and is often found in virulence factors of bacterial pathogens. The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila encodes for six proteins that contain the OmpA-like domain, among them the highly conserved uncharacterized protein we named CmpA. Here we set out to characterize the CmpA protein and determine its contribution to intracellular survival of L. pneumophila Secondary structure analysis suggests that CmpA is an inner membrane protein with a peptidoglycan-binding domain at the C-teminus. A cmpA mutant was able to replicate normally in broth, but failed to compete with an isogenic wild-type strain in an intracellular growth competition assay. The cmpA mutant also displayed significant intracellular growth defects in both the protozoan host Acanthamoeba castellanii and in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, where uptake into the cells was also impaired. The cmpA phenotypes were completely restored upon expression of CmpA in trans The data presented here establish CmpA as a novel virulence factor of L. pneumophila that is required for efficient intracellular replication in both mammalian and protozoan hosts. PMID:27421957

  10. Late Protein Synthesis-Dependent Phases in CTA Long-Term Memory: BDNF Requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Araceli; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F.; Escobar, Martha L.

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that long-term memory (LTM) persistence requires a late protein synthesis-dependent phase, even many hours after memory acquisition. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an essential protein synthesis product that has emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators for long-term synaptic plasticity. Studies in the rat hippocampus have been shown that BDNF is capable to rescue the late-phase of long-term potentiation as well as the hippocampus-related LTM when protein synthesis was inhibited. Our previous studies on the insular cortex (IC), a region of the temporal cortex implicated in the acquisition and storage of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), have demonstrated that intracortical delivery of BDNF reverses the deficit in CTA memory caused by the inhibition of IC protein synthesis due to anisomycin administration during early acquisition. In this work, we first analyze whether CTA memory storage is protein synthesis-dependent in different time windows. We observed that CTA memory become sensible to protein synthesis inhibition 5 and 7 h after acquisition. Then, we explore the effect of BDNF delivery (2 μg/2 μl per side) in the IC during those late protein synthesis-dependent phases. Our results show that BDNF reverses the CTA memory deficit produced by protein synthesis inhibition in both phases. These findings support the notion that recurrent rounds of consolidation-like events take place in the neocortex for maintenance of CTA memory trace and that BDNF is an essential component of these processes. PMID:21960964

  11. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae centromere protein Slk19p is required for two successive divisions during meiosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, X.; Saunders, W S

    2000-01-01

    Meiotic cell division includes two separate and distinct types of chromosome segregation. In the first segregational event the sister chromatids remain attached at the centromere; in the second the chromatids are separated. The factors that control the order of chromosome segregation during meiosis have not yet been identified but are thought to be confined to the centromere region. We showed that the centromere protein Slk19p is required for the proper execution of meiosis in Saccharomyces c...

  12. Pheromone-induced signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the sequential function of three protein kinases.

    OpenAIRE

    Z.Zhou; Gartner, A...; Cade, R.; Ammerer, G; Errede, B

    1993-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an important role in pheromone-induced differentiation processes of haploid yeast cells. Among the components necessary for signal transduction are the STE7 and STE11 kinases and either one of the redundant FUS3 and KSS1 kinases. FUS3 and presumably KSS1 are phosphorylated and activated during pheromone induction by a STE7-dependent mechanism. Pheromone also induces the accumulation of STE7 in a hyperphosphorylated form. This modification of STE7 requires the STE...

  13. Pocket proteins pRb and p107 are required for cortical lamination independent of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, D S; Paquin, A; Park, D S; Slack, R S

    2013-12-01

    Pocket proteins (pRb, p107 and p130) are well studied in their role of regulating cell cycle progression. Increasing evidence suggests that these proteins also control early differentiation and even later stages of cell maturation, such as migration. However, pocket proteins also regulate apoptosis, and many of the developmental defects in knock out models have been attributed to increased cell death. Here, we eliminate ectopic apoptosis in the developing brain through the deletion of Bax, and show that pocket proteins are required for radial migration independent of their role in cell death regulation. Following loss of pRb and p107, a population of cortical neurons fails to pass through the intermediate zone into the cortical plate. Importantly, these neurons are born at the appropriate time and this migration defect cannot be rescued by eliminating ectopic cell death. In addition, we show that pRb and p107 regulate radial migration through a cell autonomous mechanism since pRb/p107 deficient neurons fail to migrate to the correct cortical layer within a wild type brain. These results define a novel role of pocket proteins in regulating cortical lamination through a cell autonomous mechanism independent of their role in apoptosis.

  14. DNA and Protein Requirements for Substrate Conformational Changes Necessary for Human Flap Endonuclease-1-catalyzed Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algasaier, Sana I; Exell, Jack C; Bennet, Ian A; Thompson, Mark J; Gotham, Victoria J B; Shaw, Steven J; Craggs, Timothy D; Finger, L David; Grasby, Jane A

    2016-04-01

    Human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) catalyzes the essential removal of single-stranded flaps arising at DNA junctions during replication and repair processes. hFEN1 biological function must be precisely controlled, and consequently, the protein relies on a combination of protein and substrate conformational changes as a prerequisite for reaction. These include substrate bending at the duplex-duplex junction and transfer of unpaired reacting duplex end into the active site. When present, 5'-flaps are thought to thread under the helical cap, limiting reaction to flaps with free 5'-terminiin vivo Here we monitored DNA bending by FRET and DNA unpairing using 2-aminopurine exciton pair CD to determine the DNA and protein requirements for these substrate conformational changes. Binding of DNA to hFEN1 in a bent conformation occurred independently of 5'-flap accommodation and did not require active site metal ions or the presence of conserved active site residues. More stringent requirements exist for transfer of the substrate to the active site. Placement of the scissile phosphate diester in the active site required the presence of divalent metal ions, a free 5'-flap (if present), a Watson-Crick base pair at the terminus of the reacting duplex, and the intact secondary structure of the enzyme helical cap. Optimal positioning of the scissile phosphate additionally required active site conserved residues Tyr(40), Asp(181), and Arg(100)and a reacting duplex 5'-phosphate. These studies suggest a FEN1 reaction mechanism where junctions are bound and 5'-flaps are threaded (when present), and finally the substrate is transferred onto active site metals initiating cleavage.

  15. The Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS gene encodes two secreted proteins required for genetic transformation of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Larry D; Lee, Lan-Ying; McNett, Henry; Gelvin, Stanton B; Ream, Walt

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes are related pathogens that cause crown gall and hairy root diseases, which result from integration and expression of bacterial genes in the plant genome. Single-stranded DNA (T strands) and virulence proteins are translocated into plant cells by a type IV secretion system. VirD2 nicks a specific DNA sequence, attaches to the 5' end, and pilots the DNA into plant cells. A. tumefaciens translocates single-stranded DNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells where it likely binds T strands and may aid in targeting them into the nucleus. Although some A. rhizogenes strains lack VirE2, they transfer T strands efficiently due to the GALLS gene, which complements an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant for tumor formation. Unlike VirE2, full-length GALLS (GALLS-FL) contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. GALLS-FL and VirE2 contain nuclear localization signals (NLS) and secretion signals. Mutations in any of these domains abolish the ability of the GALLS gene to substitute for virE2. Here, we show that the GALLS gene encodes two proteins from one open reading frame: GALLS-FL and a protein comprised of the C-terminal domain, which initiates at an internal in-frame start codon. On some hosts, both GALLS proteins were required to substitute for VirE2. GALLS-FL tagged with yellow fluorescent protein localized to the nucleus of tobacco cells in an NLS-dependent manner. In plant cells, the GALLS proteins interacted with themselves, VirD2, and each other. VirD2 interacted with GALLS-FL and localized inside the nucleus, where its predicted helicase activity may pull T strands into the nucleus. PMID:18952790

  16. Formation of rigid, non-flight forewings (elytra of a beetle requires two major cuticular proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Arakane

    Full Text Available Insect cuticle is composed primarily of chitin and structural proteins. To study the function of structural cuticular proteins, we focused on the proteins present in elytra (modified forewings that become highly sclerotized and pigmented covers for the hindwings of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. We identified two highly abundant proteins, TcCPR27 (10 kDa and TcCPR18 (20 kDa, which are also present in pronotum and ventral abdominal cuticles. Both are members of the Rebers and Riddiford family of cuticular proteins and contain RR2 motifs. Transcripts for both genes dramatically increase in abundance at the pharate adult stage and then decline quickly thereafter. Injection of specific double-stranded RNAs for each gene into penultimate or last instar larvae had no effect on larval-larval, larval-pupal, or pupal-adult molting. The elytra of the resulting adults, however, were shorter, wrinkled, warped, fenestrated, and less rigid than those from control insects. TcCPR27-deficient insects could not fold their hindwings properly and died prematurely approximately one week after eclosion, probably because of dehydration. TcCPR18-deficient insects exhibited a similar but less dramatic phenotype. Immunolocalization studies confirmed the presence of TcCPR27 in the elytral cuticle. These results demonstrate that TcCPR27 and TcCPR18 are major structural proteins in the rigid elytral, dorsal thoracic, and ventral abdominal cuticles of the red flour beetle, and that both proteins are required for morphogenesis of the beetle's elytra.

  17. Sprinter: a novel transmembrane protein required for Wg secretion and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Robyn M; Thombre, Shreya; Firtina, Zeynep; Gray, Dione; Betts, Daniella; Roebuck, Jamie; Spana, Eric P; Selva, Erica M

    2006-12-01

    Wingless (Wg) is a secreted ligand that differentially activates gene expression in target tissues. It belongs to the Wnt family of secreted signaling molecules that regulate cell-to-cell interactions during development. Activation of Wg targets is dependent on the ligand concentration in the extracellular milieu; cellular mechanisms that govern the synthesis, delivery and receipt of Wg are elaborate and complex. We have identified sprinter (srt), which encodes a novel, evolutionarily conserved transmembrane protein required for the transmission of the Wg signal. Mutations in srt cause the accumulation of Wg in cells that express it, and retention of the ligand prevents activation of its target genes in signal-receiving cells. In the absence of Srt activity, levels of Wg targets (including Engrailed in embryos lacking maternal and zygotic srt, and Senseless and Achaete in wing discs) are reduced. Activation of Wg targets in the receiving cells does not require srt. Hence, the function of Srt is restricted to events occurring within the Wg-producing cells. We show that srt is not required for any aspect of Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction, suggesting specificity of srt for the Wg pathway. We propose that srt encodes a protein required for Wg secretion that regulates maturation, membrane targeting or delivery of Wg. Loss of srt function in turn diminishes Wg-pathway activation in receiving cells.

  18. 40 CFR 174.531 - Coat protein of plum pox virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coat protein of plum pox virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.531 Coat protein of plum pox virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the coat protein of plum pox virus in or on...

  19. 40 CFR 174.512 - Coat Protein of Potato Virus Y; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coat Protein of Potato Virus Y...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.512 Coat Protein of Potato Virus Y; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Potato Virus Y are exempt...

  20. 40 CFR 174.515 - Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.515 Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus are...

  1. Essential genetic interactors of SIR2 required for spatial sequestration and asymmetrical inheritance of protein aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Song

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sir2 is a central regulator of yeast aging and its deficiency increases daughter cell inheritance of stress- and aging-induced misfolded proteins deposited in aggregates and inclusion bodies. Here, by quantifying traits predicted to affect aggregate inheritance in a passive manner, we found that a passive diffusion model cannot explain Sir2-dependent failures in mother-biased segregation of either the small aggregates formed by the misfolded Huntingtin, Htt103Q, disease protein or heat-induced Hsp104-associated aggregates. Instead, we found that the genetic interaction network of SIR2 comprises specific essential genes required for mother-biased segregation including those encoding components of the actin cytoskeleton, the actin-associated myosin V motor protein Myo2, and the actin organization protein calmodulin, Cmd1. Co-staining with Hsp104-GFP demonstrated that misfolded Htt103Q is sequestered into small aggregates, akin to stress foci formed upon heat stress, that fail to coalesce into inclusion bodies. Importantly, these Htt103Q foci, as well as the ATPase-defective Hsp104Y662A-associated structures previously shown to be stable stress foci, co-localized with Cmd1 and Myo2-enriched structures and super-resolution 3-D microscopy demonstrated that they are associated with actin cables. Moreover, we found that Hsp42 is required for formation of heat-induced Hsp104Y662A foci but not Htt103Q foci suggesting that the routes employed for foci formation are not identical. In addition to genes involved in actin-dependent processes, SIR2-interactors required for asymmetrical inheritance of Htt103Q and heat-induced aggregates encode essential sec genes involved in ER-to-Golgi trafficking/ER homeostasis.

  2. Preliminary evaluation of protein requirements of Dover sole (Solea solea juveniles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D'Agaro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of new species in aquaculture requires a research support in order to establish nutrient requirements, optimal environmental conditions and rearing techniques. Common sole is a fish well known in the European market and the interest in farming has been stimulated largely by the desire for the existing marine fish farming industry to diversity (Howell, 1997. This species proved relatively easy to rear through the larval stages and many scientific papers have considered this topic. On the contrary, the knowledge concerning feed formulation for the juvenile and ongrowing stages are quite limited and data on growth rate of juveniles with artificial diets are scarce (Day et al. 1997. The present research was performed in order to gather a first set of information on protein requirements of this species.

  3. Arabidopsis VIRE2 INTERACTING PROTEIN2 is required for Agrobacterium T-DNA integration in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ajith; Krichevsky, Alexander; Schornack, Sebastian; Lahaye, Thomas; Tzfira, Tzvi; Tang, Yuhong; Citovsky, Vitaly; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2007-05-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation is an efficient tool for genetic engineering of plants. VirE2 is a single-stranded DNA binding Agrobacterium protein that is transported into the plant cell and presumably protects the T-DNA from degradation. Using a yeast two-hybrid system, we identified Arabidopsis thaliana VIRE2-INTERACTING PROTEIN2 (VIP2) with a NOT domain that is conserved in both plants and animals. Furthermore, we provide evidence supporting VIP2 interaction with VIP1, a basic domain/leucine zipper motif-containing protein required for nuclear import and integration of T-DNA. Virus-induced gene silencing of VIP2 in Nicotiana benthamiana and characterization of the Arabidopsis vip2 mutant (At vip2) demonstrate that VIP2 is required for Agrobacterium-mediated stable transformation but not for transient transformation. Assays based upon a promoter-trap vector and quantification of T-DNA integration further confirmed VIP2 involvement in T-DNA integration. Interestingly, VIP2 transcripts were induced to a greater extent over prolonged periods after infection with a T-DNA transfer-competent Agrobacterium strain compared with the transfer-deficient Agrobacterium strain. Transcriptome analyses of At vip2 suggest that VIP2 is likely a transcriptional regulator, and the recalcitrancy to transformation in At vip2 is probably due to the combination of muted gene expression response upon Agrobacterium infection and repression of histone genes resulting in decreased T-DNA integration events. PMID:17496122

  4. Zebrafish Thsd7a is a neural protein required for angiogenic patterning during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chieh-Huei; Chen, I-Hui; Kuo, Meng-Wei; Su, Pei-Tsu; Lai, Zih-Yin; Wang, Chian-Huei; Huang, Wei-Chang; Hoffman, Jana; Kuo, Calvin J; You, May-Su; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2011-06-01

    Angiogenesis is a highly organized process under the control of guidance cues that direct endothelial cell (EC) migration. Recently, many molecules that were initially described as regulators of neural guidance were subsequently shown to also direct EC migration. Here, we report a novel protein, thrombospondin type I domain containing 7A (Thsd7a), that is a neural molecule required for directed EC migration during embryonic angiogenesis in zebrafish. Thsd7a is a vertebrate conserved protein. Zebrafish thsd7a transcript was detected along the ventral edge of the neural tube in the developing zebrafish embryos, correlating with the growth path of angiogenic intersegmental vessels (ISVs). Morpholino-knockdown of Thsd7a caused a lateral deviation of angiogenic ECs below the thsd7a-expressing sites, resulting in aberrant ISV patterning. Collectively, our study shows that zebrafish Thsd7a is a neural protein required for ISV angiogenesis, and suggests an important role of Thsd7a in the neurovascular interaction during zebrafish development.

  5. Host ESCRT proteins are required for bromovirus RNA replication compartment assembly and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Diaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses genome replication invariably is associated with vesicles or other rearranged cellular membranes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV RNA replication occurs on perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes in ~70 nm vesicular invaginations (spherules. BMV RNA replication vesicles show multiple parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose envelopment and release depend on the host ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport membrane-remodeling machinery. We now find that deleting components of the ESCRT pathway results in at least two distinct BMV phenotypes. One group of genes regulate RNA replication and the frequency of viral replication complex formation, but had no effect on spherule size, while a second group of genes regulate RNA replication in a way or ways independent of spherule formation. In particular, deleting SNF7 inhibits BMV RNA replication > 25-fold and abolishes detectable BMV spherule formation, even though the BMV RNA replication proteins accumulate and localize normally on perinuclear ER membranes. Moreover, BMV ESCRT recruitment and spherule assembly depend on different sets of protein-protein interactions from those used by multivesicular body vesicles, HIV-1 virion budding, or tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV spherule formation. These and other data demonstrate that BMV requires cellular ESCRT components for proper formation and function of its vesicular RNA replication compartments. The results highlight growing but diverse interactions of ESCRT factors with many viruses and viral processes, and potential value of the ESCRT pathway as a target for broad-spectrum antiviral resistance.

  6. Host ESCRT proteins are required for bromovirus RNA replication compartment assembly and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Arturo; Zhang, Jiantao; Ollwerther, Abigail; Wang, Xiaofeng; Ahlquist, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses genome replication invariably is associated with vesicles or other rearranged cellular membranes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA replication occurs on perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes in ~70 nm vesicular invaginations (spherules). BMV RNA replication vesicles show multiple parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose envelopment and release depend on the host ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) membrane-remodeling machinery. We now find that deleting components of the ESCRT pathway results in at least two distinct BMV phenotypes. One group of genes regulate RNA replication and the frequency of viral replication complex formation, but had no effect on spherule size, while a second group of genes regulate RNA replication in a way or ways independent of spherule formation. In particular, deleting SNF7 inhibits BMV RNA replication > 25-fold and abolishes detectable BMV spherule formation, even though the BMV RNA replication proteins accumulate and localize normally on perinuclear ER membranes. Moreover, BMV ESCRT recruitment and spherule assembly depend on different sets of protein-protein interactions from those used by multivesicular body vesicles, HIV-1 virion budding, or tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) spherule formation. These and other data demonstrate that BMV requires cellular ESCRT components for proper formation and function of its vesicular RNA replication compartments. The results highlight growing but diverse interactions of ESCRT factors with many viruses and viral processes, and potential value of the ESCRT pathway as a target for broad-spectrum antiviral resistance.

  7. TYLCV-Is movement in planta does not require V2 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hak, Hagit [Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan (Israel); Department of Biological Chemistry, The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Levy, Yael; Chandran, Sam A.; Belausov, Eduard [Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan (Israel); Loyter, Abraham [Department of Biological Chemistry, The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Lapidot, Moshe [Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan (Israel); Gafni, Yedidya, E-mail: ygafni@volcani.agri.gov.il [Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan (Israel)

    2015-03-15

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a major tomato pathogen causing extensive crop losses, is a whitefly-transmitted geminivirus. V2 mutants of TYLCV-Is and related viruses tend to induce symptomless infection with attenuated viral DNA levels, while accumulating close to wild-type DNA levels in protoplasts, suggesting V2 as a movement protein. The discovery of plant-silencing mechanisms and viral silencing suppressors, V2 included, led us to reconsider V2's involvement in viral movement. We studied two mutant versions of the virus, one impaired in V2 silencing-suppression activity, and another carrying a non-translatable V2. While both mutant viruses spread in the infected plant to newly emerged leaves at the same rate as the wild-type virus, their DNA-accumulation levels were tenfold lower than in the wild-type virus. Thus, we suggest that the setback in virus proliferation, previously ascribed to a movement impediment, is due to lack of silencing-suppression activity. - Highlights: • TYLCV-Is V2 protein is localized in distinct microbodies throughout the cell cytoplasm, around the nucleus and in association with cytoplasmic strands but is not associated with the plasmodesmata. • Disruption of RNA-silencing suppression activity of TYLCV-Is V2 protein causes low titer of the virus in the infected plants. • The movement of TYLCV-Is in planta does not require a functional V2 protein.

  8. Activation of resting human T cells requires prolonged stimulation of protein kinase C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, N.; Ase, K.; Kishimoto, A.; Nishizuka, Y. (Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    Purified resting human T cells can be induced to express the {alpha} subunit of the interleukin 2 receptor and to proliferate by treatment with 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus ionomycin but not with 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin. Determination of the translocation of protein kinase C showed that 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus ionomycin caused a prolonged membrane association of the enzyme for more than 4 hr, whereas 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin induced a transient membrane association, which was maximal at 20 min. Delivery of multiple additions of 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin to the T cells resulted in progressively increased expression of the {alpha} subunit of the interleukin 2 receptor and proliferation commensurate with the number of multiple additions delivered, suggesting that prolonged protein kinase C activity is required for T-cell activation.

  9. Determination of the amino acid requirements for a protein hinge in triosephosphate isomerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, J.; Sampson, N. S.

    1998-01-01

    We have determined the sequence requirements for a protein hinge in triosephosphate isomerase. The codons encoding the hinge at the C-terminus of the active-site lid of triosephosphate isomerase were replaced with a genetic library of all possible 8,000 amino acid combinations. The most active of these 8,000 mutants were selected using in vivo complementation of a triosephosphate isomerase deficient strain of E. coli, DF502. Approximately 3% of the mutants complement DF502 with an activity th...

  10. Obif, a Transmembrane Protein, Is Required for Bone Mineralization and Spermatogenesis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Mizuhashi

    Full Text Available Various kinds of transmembrane and secreted proteins play pivotal roles in development through cell-cell communication. We previously reported that Obif (Osteoblast induction factor, Tmem119, encoding a single transmembrane protein, is expressed in differentiating osteoblasts, and that Obif-/- mice exhibit significantly reduced bone volume in the femur. In the current study, we characterized the Obif protein and further investigated the biological phenotypes of a variety of tissues in Obif-/- mice.First, we found that O-glycosylation of the Obif protein occurs at serine residue 36 in the Obif extracellular domain. Next, we observed that Obif-/- mice exhibit bone dysplasia in association with significantly increased osteoid volume per osteoid surface (OV/OS and osteoid maturation time (Omt, and significantly decreased mineral apposition rate (MAR and bone formation rate per bone surface (BFR/BS. In addition, we observed that Obif-/- mice show a significant decrease in testis weight as well as in sperm number. By histological analysis, we found that Obif is expressed in spermatocytes and spermatids in the developing testis and that spermatogenesis is halted at the round spermatid stage in the Obif-/- testis that lacks sperm. However, the number of litters fathered by male mice was slightly reduced in Obif-/- mice compared with wild-type mice, although this was not statistically significant.Our results, taken together with previous observations, indicate that Obif is a type Ia transmembrane protein whose N-terminal region is O-glycosylated. In addition, we found that Obif is required for normal bone mineralization and late testicular differentiation in vivo. These findings suggest that Obif plays essential roles in the development of multiple tissues.

  11. The Unfolded Protein Response Is Induced by the Cell Wall Integrity Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Cascade and Is Required for Cell Wall Integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Scrimale, Thomas; DiDone, Louis; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Krysan, Damian J.

    2009-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is an extracellular structure that is dependent on secretory and membrane proteins for its construction. We investigated the role of protein quality control mechanisms in cell wall integrity and found that the unfolded protein response (UPR) and, to a lesser extent, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) pathways are required for proper cell wall construction. Null mutation of IRE1, double mutation of ERAD components (hrd1Δ and ubc7Δ) and ire1Δ, or expres...

  12. The nuclear protein Waharan is required for endosomal-lysosomal trafficking in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Mohiddin; Kungl, Theresa; Koper, Andre; Bottenberg, Wolfgang; Kammerer, Richard; Klein, Melanie; Sweeney, Sean T; Auburn, Richard P; O'Kane, Cahir J; Prokop, Andreas

    2010-07-15

    Here we report Drosophila Waharan (Wah), a 170-kD predominantly nuclear protein with two potential human homologues, as a newly identified regulator of endosomal trafficking. Wah is required for neuromuscular-junction development and muscle integrity. In muscles, knockdown of Wah caused novel accumulations of tightly packed electron-dense tubules, which we termed 'sausage bodies'. Our data suggest that sausage bodies coincide with sites at which ubiquitylated proteins and a number of endosomal and lysosomal markers co-accumulate. Furthermore, loss of Wah function generated loss of the acidic LysoTracker compartment. Together with data demonstrating that Wah acts earlier in the trafficking pathway than the Escrt-III component Drosophila Shrb (snf7 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe), our results indicate that Wah is essential for endocytic trafficking at the late endosome. Highly unexpected phenotypes result from Wah knockdown, in that the distribution of ubiquitylated cargos and endolysosomal morphologies are affected despite Wah being a predominant nuclear protein. This finding suggests the existence of a relationship between nuclear functions and endolysosomal trafficking. Future studies of Wah function will give us insights into this interesting phenomenon.

  13. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-05-26

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. PMID:25916847

  14. A Protein Complex Required for Polymerase V Transcripts and RNA- Directed DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Julie A.

    2010-05-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification associated with gene silencing. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation is established by DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE 2 (DRM2), which is targeted by small interfering RNAs through a pathway termed RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) [1, 2]. Recently, RdDM was shown to require intergenic noncoding (IGN) transcripts that are dependent on the Pol V polymerase. These transcripts are proposed to function as scaffolds for the recruitment of downstream RdDM proteins, including DRM2, to loci that produce both siRNAs and IGN transcripts [3]. However, the mechanism(s) through which Pol V is targeted to specific genomic loci remains largely unknown. Through affinity purification of two known RdDM components, DEFECTIVE IN RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DRD1) [4] and DEFECTIVE IN MERISTEM SILENCING 3 (DMS3) [5, 6], we found that they copurify with each other and with a novel protein, RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (RDM1), forming a complex we term DDR. We also found that DRD1 copurified with Pol V subunits and that RDM1, like DRD1 [3] and DMS3 [7], is required for the production of Pol V-dependent transcripts. These results suggest that the DDR complex acts in RdDM at a step upstream of the recruitment or activation of Pol V. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Run; Zhang, Ke; Wei, Yanxia; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; Hong, Yang; Zhu, Minyan; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and craniofacial skeleton defects. Histological and anatomical analysis reveal that the cleft palate in Gsα knockout mice is a secondary defect resulting from craniofacial skeleton deficiencies. In Gsα knockout mice, the morphologies of NCCs-derived cranial nerves are normal, but the development of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia are impaired. Furthermore, loss of Gsα in NCCs does not affect cranial NCCs migration or cell proliferation, but significantly accelerate osteochondrogenic differentiation. Taken together, our study suggests that Gsα is required for neural crest cells-derived craniofacial development. PMID:26859889

  16. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Run Lei

    Full Text Available The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and craniofacial skeleton defects. Histological and anatomical analysis reveal that the cleft palate in Gsα knockout mice is a secondary defect resulting from craniofacial skeleton deficiencies. In Gsα knockout mice, the morphologies of NCCs-derived cranial nerves are normal, but the development of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia are impaired. Furthermore, loss of Gsα in NCCs does not affect cranial NCCs migration or cell proliferation, but significantly accelerate osteochondrogenic differentiation. Taken together, our study suggests that Gsα is required for neural crest cells-derived craniofacial development.

  17. Hadp1, a newly identified pleckstrin homology domain protein, is required for cardiac contractility in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D. Wythe

    2011-09-01

    The vertebrate heart is one of the first organs to form, and its early function and morphogenesis are crucial for continued embryonic development. Here we analyze the effects of loss of Heart adaptor protein 1 (Hadp1, which we show is required for normal function and morphogenesis of the embryonic zebrafish heart. Hadp1 is a pleckstrin homology (PH-domain-containing protein whose expression is enriched in embryonic cardiomyocytes. Knockdown of hadp1 in zebrafish embryos reduced cardiac contractility and altered late myocyte differentiation. By using optical mapping and submaximal levels of hadp1 knockdown, we observed profound effects on Ca2+ handling and on action potential duration in the absence of morphological defects, suggesting that Hadp1 plays a major role in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ handling in the heart. Hadp1 interacts with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI4P; also known as PtdIns(4P] derivatives via its PH domain, and its subcellular localization is dependent upon this motif. Pharmacological blockade of the synthesis of PI4P derivatives in vivo phenocopied the loss of hadp1 in zebrafish. Collectively, these results demonstrate that hadp1 is required for normal cardiac function and morphogenesis during embryogenesis, and suggest that hadp1 modulates Ca2+ handling in the heart through its interaction with phosphatidylinositols.

  18. Dynamic binding of replication protein a is required for DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ran; Subramanyam, Shyamal; Elcock, Adrian H.; Spies, Maria; Wold, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is essential for replication, repair and recombination. High-affinity ssDNA-binding by RPA depends on two DNA binding domains in the large subunit of RPA. Mutation of the evolutionarily conserved aromatic residues in these two domains results in a separation-of-function phenotype: aromatic residue mutants support DNA replication but are defective in DNA repair. We used biochemical and single-molecule analyses, and Brownian Dynamics simulations to determine the molecular basis of this phenotype. Our studies demonstrated that RPA binds to ssDNA in at least two modes characterized by different dissociation kinetics. We also showed that the aromatic residues contribute to the formation of the longer-lived state, are required for stable binding to short ssDNA regions and are needed for RPA melting of partially duplex DNA structures. We conclude that stable binding and/or the melting of secondary DNA structures by RPA is required for DNA repair, including RAD51 mediated DNA strand exchange, but is dispensable for DNA replication. It is likely that the binding modes are in equilibrium and reflect dynamics in the RPA–DNA complex. This suggests that dynamic binding of RPA to DNA is necessary for different cellular functions. PMID:27131385

  19. The AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1 is required for differential auxin responses mediating root growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Tromas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In plants, the phytohormone auxin is a crucial regulator sustaining growth and development. At the cellular level, auxin is interpreted differentially in a tissue- and dose-dependent manner. Mechanisms of auxin signalling are partially unknown and the contribution of the AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1 (ABP1 as an auxin receptor is still a matter of debate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we took advantage of the present knowledge of the root biological system to demonstrate that ABP1 is required for auxin response. The use of conditional ABP1 defective plants reveals that the protein is essential for maintenance of the root meristem and acts at least on the D-type CYCLIN/RETINOBLASTOMA pathway to control entry into the cell cycle. ABP1 affects PLETHORA gradients and confers auxin sensitivity to root cells thus defining the competence of the cells to be maintained within the meristem or to elongate. ABP1 is also implicated in the regulation of gene expression in response to auxin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data support that ABP1 is a key regulator for root growth and is required for auxin-mediated responses. Differential effects of ABP1 on various auxin responses support a model in which ABP1 is the major regulator for auxin action on the cell cycle and regulates auxin-mediated gene expression and cell elongation in addition to the already well known TIR1-mediated ubiquitination pathway.

  20. Niche-specific requirement for hyphal wall protein 1 in virulence of Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet F Staab

    Full Text Available Specialized Candida albicans cell surface proteins called adhesins mediate binding of the fungus to host cells. The mammalian transglutaminase (TG substrate and adhesin, Hyphal wall protein 1 (Hwp1, is expressed on the hyphal form of C. albicans where it mediates fungal adhesion to epithelial cells. Hwp1 is also required for biofilm formation and mating thus the protein functions in both fungal-host and self-interactions. Hwp1 is required for full virulence of C. albicans in murine models of disseminated candidiasis and of esophageal candidiasis. Previous studies correlated TG activity on the surface of oral epithelial cells, produced by epithelial TG (TG1, with tight binding of C. albicans via Hwp1 to the host cell surfaces. However, the contribution of other Tgs, specifically tissue TG (TG2, to disseminated candidiasis mediated by Hwp1 was not known. A newly created hwp1 null strain in the wild type SC5314 background was as virulent as the parental strain in C57BL/6 mice, and virulence was retained in C57BL/6 mice deleted for Tgm2 (TG2. Further, the hwp1 null strains displayed modestly reduced virulence in BALB/c mice as did strain DD27-U1, an independently created hwp1Δ/Δ in CAI4 corrected for its ura3Δ defect at the URA3 locus. Hwp1 was still needed to produce wild type biofilms, and persist on murine tongues in an oral model of oropharyngeal candidiasis consistent with previous studies by us and others. Finally, lack of Hwp1 affected the translocation of C. albicans from the mouse intestine into the bloodstream of mice. Together, Hwp1 appears to have a minor role in disseminated candidiasis, independent of tissue TG, but a key function in host- and self-association to the surface of oral mucosa.

  1. The eco-nutrition requirements for dietary protein and its rhomb characteristics in juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; JIANG Keyong; SUN Guoxiang; GAO Tingting; ZHOU Bangwei

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the dietary protein requirements of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.)and their effects on aquatic quality.Five experimental diets were formulated containing 450,480,500,520,and 540 g/kg.Each diet was randomly assigned to triplicate groups of juvenile turbot (mean initial body weight 34.5±5.5 g) for 88 d.Both the weight gain ratio and feed efficiency increased with increasing dietary protein up to 500 g/kg,but no further improvement was detected when dietary protein levels were >500 g/kg.Protein intake and digestion increased with protein levels,while fecal nitrogen and nitrogen content in seawater increased only when dietary protein exceeded 500 g/kg.Protein digestibility was highest at intermediate dietary protein levels.Chemical oxygen demand,nitrite-nitrogen (NO2- -N) and phosphatic-phosphor (PO43 -P) levels increased in the rearing water as dietary protein levels increased.The optimum eco-nutrition level of dietary protein for juvenile turbot was 500 g/kg under the current experimental conditions.The diets containing 540 and 500 g/kg protein had similar growth rates and feed conversion ratios,but levels of ammonia (NH4+) and nitrogen were considerably higher in the water and feces,respectively,at the higher level of dietary protein.The difference in the pattem of change between body weight gain and ammonia concentration in water with increasing dietary protein is described by rhomb characteristics.

  2. Transition fibre protein FBF1 is required for the ciliary entry of assembled intraflagellar transport complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qing; Xu, Qingwen; Zhang, Yuxia; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Zeng; Harris, Peter C; Torres, Vicente E; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Sensory organelle cilia have critical roles in mammalian embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia. Yet, how this large complex passes through the size-dependent barrier at the ciliary base remains enigmatic. Here we report that FBF1, a highly conserved transition fibre protein, is required for the ciliary import of assembled IFT particles at the ciliary base. We cloned dyf-19, the Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of human FBF1, in a whole-genome screen for ciliogenesis mutants. DYF-19 localizes specifically to transition fibres and interacts directly with the IFT-B component DYF-11/IFT54. Although not a structural component of transition fibres, DYF-19 is required for the transit of assembled IFT particles through the ciliary base. Furthermore, we found that human FBF1 shares conserved localization and function with its worm counterpart. We conclude that FBF1 is a key functional transition fibre component that actively facilitates the ciliary entry of assembled IFT machinery. PMID:24231678

  3. Ethanol extraction requirement for purification of protein labeled with [3H]leucine in aquatic bacterial production studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-insoluble fraction of water column bacteria labeled with [3H]leucine contained an ethanol-soluble fraction accounting for up to 44% of the label. A component of the ethanol-soluble fraction is [3H]leucine. Labeled-protein purification requires an ethanol wash step. Cold TCA can replace hot TCA for precipitation of labeled proteins

  4. Prm3p Is a Pheromone-induced Peripheral Nuclear Envelope Protein Required for Yeast Nuclear Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Shu; Tobery, Cynthia E.; Rose, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear membrane fusion is the last step in the mating pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We adapted a bioinformatics approach to identify putative pheromone-induced membrane proteins potentially required for nuclear membrane fusion. One protein, Prm3p, was found to be required for nuclear membrane fusion; disruption of PRM3 caused a strong bilateral defect, in which nuclear congression was completed but fusion did not occur. Prm3p was localized to the nuclear envelope in pheromon...

  5. Protein crystals in Adenovirus type 5-infected cells: requirements for intranuclear crystallogenesis, structural and functional analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Franqueville

    Full Text Available Intranuclear crystalline inclusions have been observed in the nucleus of epithelial cells infected with Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 at late steps of the virus life cycle. Using immuno-electron microscopy and confocal microscopy of cells infected with various Ad5 recombinants modified in their penton base or fiber domains, we found that these inclusions represented crystals of penton capsomers, the heteromeric capsid protein formed of penton base and fiber subunits. The occurrence of protein crystals within the nucleus of infected cells required the integrity of the fiber knob and part of the shaft domain. In the knob domain, the region overlapping residues 489-492 in the FG loop was found to be essential for crystal formation. In the shaft, a large deletion of repeats 4 to 16 had no detrimental effect on crystal inclusions, whereas deletion of repeats 8 to 21 abolished crystal formation without altering the level of fiber protein expression. This suggested a crucial role of the five penultimate repeats in the crystallisation process. Chimeric pentons made of Ad5 penton base and fiber domains from different serotypes were analyzed with respect to crystal formation. No crystal was found when fiber consisted of shaft (S from Ad5 and knob (K from Ad3 (heterotypic S5-K3 fiber, but occurred with homotypic S3K3 fiber. However, less regular crystals were observed with homotypic S35-K35 fiber. TB5, a monoclonal antibody directed against the Ad5 fiber knob was found by immunofluorescence microscopy to react with high efficiency with the intranuclear protein crystals in situ. Data obtained with Ad fiber mutants indicated that the absence of crystalline inclusions correlated with a lower infectivity and/or lower yields of virus progeny, suggesting that the protein crystals might be involved in virion assembly. Thus, we propose that TB5 staining of Ad-infected 293 cells can be used as a prognostic assay for the viability and productivity of fiber-modified Ad5

  6. Stearoyl CoA Desaturase Is Required to Produce Active, Lipid-Modified Wnt Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rios-Esteves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wnt proteins contain palmitoleic acid, an unusual lipid modification. Production of an active Wnt signal requires the acyltransferase Porcupine and depends on the attachment of palmitoleic acid to Wnt. The source of this monounsaturated fatty acid has not been identified, and it is not known how Porcupine recognizes its substrate and whether desaturation occurs before or after fatty acid transfer to Wnt. Here, we show that stearoyl desaturase (SCD generates a monounsaturated fatty acid substrate that is then transferred by Porcupine to Wnt. Treatment of cells with SCD inhibitors blocked incorporation of palmitate analogs into Wnt3a and Wnt5a and reduced Wnt secretion as well as autocrine and paracrine Wnt signaling. The SCD inhibitor effects were rescued by exogenous addition of monounsaturated fatty acids. We propose that SCD is a key molecular player responsible for Wnt biogenesis and processing and that SCD inhibition provides an alternative mechanism for blocking Wnt pathway activation.

  7. Functional requirements of AID's higher order structures and their interaction with RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Samiran; Begum, Nasim A; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku

    2016-03-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for the somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes. Although both the N and C termini of AID have unique functions in DNA cleavage and recombination, respectively, during SHM and CSR, their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay combined with glycerol gradient fractionation, we revealed that the AID C terminus is required for a stable dimer formation. Furthermore, AID monomers and dimers form complexes with distinct heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). AID monomers associate with DNA cleavage cofactor hnRNP K whereas AID dimers associate with recombination cofactors hnRNP L, hnRNP U, and Serpine mRNA-binding protein 1. All of these AID/ribonucleoprotein associations are RNA-dependent. We propose that AID's structure-specific cofactor complex formations differentially contribute to its DNA-cleavage and recombination functions. PMID:26929374

  8. Rybp, a polycomb complex-associated protein, is required for mouse eye development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiber-Agus Nicole

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rybp (Ring1 and YY1 binding protein is a zinc finger protein which interacts with the members of the mammalian polycomb complexes. Previously we have shown that Rybp is critical for early embryogenesis and that haploinsufficiency of Rybp in a subset of embryos causes failure of neural tube closure. Here we investigated the requirement for Rybp in ocular development using four in vivo mouse models which resulted in either the ablation or overexpression of Rybp. Results Our results demonstrate that loss of a single Rybp allele in conventional knockout mice often resulted in retinal coloboma, an incomplete closure of the optic fissure, characterized by perturbed localization of Pax6 but not of Pax2. In addition, about one half of Rybp-/- Rybp+/+ chimeric embryos also developed retinal colobomas and malformed lenses. Tissue-specific transgenic overexpression of Rybp in the lens resulted in abnormal fiber cell differentiation and severe lens opacification with increased levels of AP-2α and Sox2, and reduced levels of βA4-crystallin gene expression. Ubiquitous transgenic overexpression of Rybp in the entire eye caused abnormal retinal folds, corneal neovascularization, and lens opacification. Additional changes included defects in anterior eye development. Conclusion These studies establish Rybp as a novel gene that has been associated with coloboma. Other genes linked to coloboma encode various classes of transcription factors such as BCOR, CBP, Chx10, Pax2, Pax6, Six3, Ski, Vax1 and Vax2. We propose that the multiple functions for Rybp in regulating mouse retinal and lens development are mediated by genetic, epigenetic and physical interactions between these genes and proteins.

  9. Truncation of LEAFY COTYLEDON1 protein is required for asexual reproduction in Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcês, Helena M P; Koenig, Daniel; Townsley, Brad T; Kim, Minsung; Sinha, Neelima R

    2014-05-01

    Kalanchoë daigremontiana reproduces asexually by generating numerous plantlets on its leaf margins. The formation of plantlets requires the somatic initiation of organogenic and embryogenic developmental programs in the leaves. However, unlike normal embryogenesis in seeds, leaf somatic embryogenesis bypasses seed dormancy to form viable plantlets. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), seed dormancy and embryogenesis are initiated by the transcription factor LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1). The K. daigremontiana ortholog of LEC1 is expressed during leaf somatic embryo development. However, KdLEC1 encodes for a LEC1-type protein that has a unique B domain, with 11 unique amino acids and a premature stop codon. Moreover, the truncated KdLEC1 protein is not functional in Arabidopsis. Here, we show that K. daigremontiana transgenic plants expressing a functional, chimeric KdLEC1 gene under the control of Arabidopsis LEC1 promoter caused several developmental defects to leaf somatic embryos, including seed dormancy characteristics. The dormant plantlets also behaved as typical dormant seeds. Transgenic plantlets accumulated oil bodies and responded to the abscisic acid biosynthesis inhibitor fluridone, which broke somatic-embryo dormancy and promoted their normal development. Our results indicate that having a mutated form of LEC1 gene in K. daigremontiana is essential to bypass dormancy in the leaf embryos and generate viable plantlets, suggesting that the loss of a functional LEC1 promotes viviparous leaf somatic embryos and thus enhances vegetative propagation in K. daigremontiana. Mutations resulting in truncated LEC1 proteins may have been of a selective advantage in creating somatic propagules, because such mutations occurred independently in several Kalanchoë species, which form plantlets constitutively.

  10. The CXXC finger 5 protein is required for DNA damage-induced p53 activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a critical component of the DNA damage response pathway that induces a set of genes responsible for cell cycle arrest,senescence,apoptosis,and DNA repair.The ataxia te-langiectasia mutated protein kinase(ATM) responds to DNA-damage stimuli and signals p53 stabiliza-tion and activation,thereby facilitating transactivation of p53 inducible genes and maintainence of genome integrity.In this study,we identified a CXXC zinc finger domain containing protein termed CF5 as a critical component in the DNA damage signaling pathway.CF5 induces p53 transcriptional activity and apoptosis in cells expressing wild type p53 but not in p53-deficient cells.Knockdown of CF5 in-hibits DNA damage-induced p53 activation as well as cell cycle arrest.Furthermore,CF5 physically interacts with ATM and is required for DNA damage-induced ATM phosphorylation but not its recruitment to chromatin.These findings suggest that CF5 plays a crucial role in ATM-p53 signaling in response to DNA damage.

  11. Dengue Virus Infection of Aedes aegypti Requires a Putative Cysteine Rich Venom Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlin Londono-Renteria

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes serious human disease and mortality worldwide. There is no specific antiviral therapy or vaccine for DENV infection. Alterations in gene expression during DENV infection of the mosquito and the impact of these changes on virus infection are important events to investigate in hopes of creating new treatments and vaccines. We previously identified 203 genes that were ≥5-fold differentially upregulated during flavivirus infection of the mosquito. Here, we examined the impact of silencing 100 of the most highly upregulated gene targets on DENV infection in its mosquito vector. We identified 20 genes that reduced DENV infection by at least 60% when silenced. We focused on one gene, a putative cysteine rich venom protein (SeqID AAEL000379; CRVP379, whose silencing significantly reduced DENV infection in Aedes aegypti cells. Here, we examine the requirement for CRVP379 during DENV infection of the mosquito and investigate the mechanisms surrounding this phenomenon. We also show that blocking CRVP379 protein with either RNAi or specific antisera inhibits DENV infection in Aedes aegypti. This work identifies a novel mosquito gene target for controlling DENV infection in mosquitoes that may also be used to develop broad preventative and therapeutic measures for multiple flaviviruses.

  12. The acyl-CoA binding protein is required for normal epidermal barrier function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Bek, Signe; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Neess, Ditte; Brewer, Jonathan; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian; Helledie, Torben; Fenger, Christina; Due, Marianne; Berzina, Zane; Neubert, Reinhard; Chemnitz, John; Finsen, Bente; Clemmensen, Anders; Wilbertz, Johannes; Saxtorph, Henrik; Knudsen, Jens; Bagatolli, Luis; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-10-01

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa intracellular protein expressed in all eukaryotic species. Mice with targeted disruption of Acbp (ACBP(-/-) mice) are viable and fertile but present a visible skin and fur phenotype characterized by greasy fur and development of alopecia and scaling with age. Morphology and development of skin and appendages are normal in ACBP(-/-) mice; however, the stratum corneum display altered biophysical properties with reduced proton activity and decreased water content. Mass spectrometry analyses of lipids from epidermis and stratum corneum of ACBP(+/+) and ACBP(-/-) mice showed very similar composition, except for a significant and specific decrease in the very long chain free fatty acids (VLC-FFA) in stratum corneum of ACBP(-/-) mice. This finding indicates that ACBP is critically involved in the processes that lead to production of stratum corneum VLC-FFAs via complex phospholipids in the lamellar bodies. Importantly, we show that ACBP(-/-) mice display a ∼50% increased transepidermal water loss compared with ACBP(+/+) mice. Furthermore, skin and fur sebum monoalkyl diacylglycerol (MADAG) levels are significantly increased, suggesting that ACBP limits MADAG synthesis in sebaceous glands. In summary, our study shows that ACBP is required for production of VLC-FFA for stratum corneum and for maintaining normal epidermal barrier function. PMID:22829653

  13. Platelet protein disulfide isomerase is required for thrombus formation but not for hemostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungho; Hahm, Eunsil; Li, Jing; Holbrook, Lisa-Marie; Sasikumar, Parvathy; Stanley, Ronald G; Ushio-Fukai, Masuko; Gibbins, Jonathan M; Cho, Jaehyung

    2013-08-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) derived from intravascular cells is required for thrombus formation. However, it remains unclear whether platelet PDI contributes to the process. Using platelet-specific PDI-deficient mice, we demonstrate that PDI-null platelets have defects in aggregation and adenosine triphosphate secretion induced by thrombin, collagen, and adenosine diphosphate. Such defects were rescued by wild-type but not mutant PDI, indicating that the isomerase activity of platelet surface PDI is critical for the regulatory effect. PDI-deficient platelets expressed increased levels of intracellular ER protein 57 (ERp57) and ERp72. Platelet PDI regulated αIIbβ3 integrin activation but not P-selectin exposure, Ca(2+) mobilization, β3-talin1 interaction, or platelet spreading on immobilized fibrinogen. Inhibition of ERp57 further diminished αIIbβ3 integrin activation and aggregation of activated PDI-deficient platelets, suggesting distinct roles of PDI and ERp57 in platelet functions. We found that platelet PDI is important for thrombus formation on collagen-coated surfaces under shear. Intravital microscopy demonstrates that platelet PDI is important for platelet accumulation but not initial adhesion and fibrin generation following laser-induced arteriolar injury. Tail bleeding time in platelet-specific PDI-deficient mice were not significantly increased. Our results provide important evidence that platelet PDI is essential for thrombus formation but not for hemostasis in mice. PMID:23788140

  14. Temporal Requirements of cMyc Protein for Reprogramming Mouse Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Heffernan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous expression of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc forces mammalian somatic cells to adopt molecular and phenotypic characteristics of embryonic stem cells, commencing with the required suppression of lineage-associated genes (e.g., Thy1 in mouse. Although omitting cMyc from the reprogramming cocktail minimizes risks of uncontrolled proliferation, its exclusion results in fold reductions in reprogramming efficiency. Thus, the feasibility of substituting cMyc transgene with (non-integrative recombinant “pTAT-mcMyc” protein delivery was assessed, without compromising reprogramming efficiency or the pluripotent phenotype. Purification and delivery of semisoluble/particulate pTAT-mcMyc maintained Oct4-GFP+ colony formation (i.e., reprogramming efficiency whilst supporting pluripotency by various criteria. Differential repression of Thy1 by pTAT-mcMyc ± Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4 (OSK suggested differential (and non-additive mechanisms of repression. Extending these findings, attempts to enhance reprogramming efficiency through a staggered approach (prerepression of Thy1 failed to improve reprogramming efficiency. We consider protein delivery a useful tool to decipher temporal/molecular events characterizing somatic cell reprogramming.

  15. Protein delivery to vacuole requires SAND protein-dependent Rab GTPase conversion for MVB-vacuole fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.K. Singh; F. Krüger; H. Beckmann; S. Brumm; J.E.M. Vermeer; T. Munnik; U. Mayer; Y.D. Stierhof; C. Grefen; K. Schumacher; G. Jürgens

    2014-01-01

    Plasma-membrane proteins such as ligand-binding receptor kinases, ion channels, or nutrient transporters are turned over by targeting to a lytic compartment--lysosome or vacuole--for degradation. After their internalization, these proteins arrive at an early endosome, which then matures into a late

  16. A cellulose synthase-like protein is required for osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jianhua

    2010-04-16

    Osmotic stress imposed by soil salinity and drought stress significantly affects plant growth and development, but osmotic stress sensing and tolerance mechanisms are not well understood. Forward genetic screens using a root-bending assay have previously identified salt overly sensitive (sos) mutants of Arabidopsis that fall into five loci, SOS1 to SOS5. These loci are required for the regulation of ion homeostasis or cell expansion under salt stress, but do not play a major role in plant tolerance to the osmotic stress component of soil salinity or drought. Here we report an additional sos mutant, sos6-1, which defines a locus essential for osmotic stress tolerance. sos6-1 plants are hypersensitive to salt stress and osmotic stress imposed by mannitol or polyethylene glycol in culture media or by water deficit in the soil. SOS6 encodes a cellulose synthase-like protein, AtCSLD5. Only modest differences in cell wall chemical composition could be detected, but we found that sos6-1 mutant plants accumulate high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under osmotic stress and are hypersensitive to the oxidative stress reagent methyl viologen. The results suggest that SOS6/AtCSLD5 is not required for normal plant growth and development but has a critical role in osmotic stress tolerance and this function likely involves its regulation of ROS under stress. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. The Cladosporium fulvum virulence protein Avr2 inhibits host proteases required for basal defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esse, H Peter; Van't Klooster, John W; Bolton, Melvin D; Yadeta, Koste A; van Baarlen, Peter; Boeren, Sjef; Vervoort, Jacques; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2008-07-01

    Cladosporium fulvum (syn. Passalora fulva) is a biotrophic fungal pathogen that causes leaf mold of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). During growth in the apoplast, the fungus establishes disease by secreting effector proteins, 10 of which have been characterized. We have previously shown that the Avr2 effector interacts with the apoplastic tomato Cys protease Rcr3, which is required for Cf-2-mediated immunity. We now show that Avr2 is a genuine virulence factor of C. fulvum. Heterologous expression of Avr2 in Arabidopsis thaliana causes enhanced susceptibility toward extracellular fungal pathogens, including Botrytis cinerea and Verticillium dahliae, and microarray analysis showed that Avr2 expression triggers a global transcriptome reflecting pathogen challenge. Cys protease activity profiling showed that Avr2 inhibits multiple extracellular Arabidopsis Cys proteases. In tomato, Avr2 expression caused enhanced susceptibility toward Avr2-defective C. fulvum strains and also toward B. cinerea and V. dahliae. Cys protease activity profiling in tomato revealed that, in this plant also, Avr2 inhibits multiple extracellular Cys proteases, including Rcr3 and its close relative Pip1. Finally, silencing of Avr2 significantly compromised C. fulvum virulence on tomato. We conclude that Avr2 is a genuine virulence factor of C. fulvum that inhibits several Cys proteases required for plant basal defense.

  18. 40 CFR 174.504 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1F protein in cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1F protein in cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.504 Section 174.504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances...

  19. 40 CFR 174.517 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry9C protein in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry9C protein in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.517 Section 174.517 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances...

  20. 40 CFR 174.502 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A.105 protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A.105 protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.502 Section 174.502 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances...

  1. 40 CFR 174.520 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1F protein in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1F protein in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.520 Section 174.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances...

  2. 40 CFR 174.530 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in cotton; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in cotton; temporary exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.530 Section 174.530 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED...

  3. 40 CFR 174.509 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.509 Section 174.509 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and...

  4. Differential Requirement of the Extracellular Domain in Activation of Class B G Protein-coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Hua; Yin, Yanting; Yang, Dehua; Liu, Bo; Hou, Li; Wang, Xiaoxi; Pal, Kuntal; Jiang, Yi; Feng, Yang; Cai, Xiaoqing; Dai, Antao; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Ming-Wei; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-07-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from the secretin-like (class B) family are key players in hormonal homeostasis and are important drug targets for the treatment of metabolic disorders and neuronal diseases. They consist of a large N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) and a transmembrane domain (TMD) with the GPCR signature of seven transmembrane helices. Class B GPCRs are activated by peptide hormones with their C termini bound to the receptor ECD and their N termini bound to the TMD. It is thought that the ECD functions as an affinity trap to bind and localize the hormone to the receptor. This in turn would allow the hormone N terminus to insert into the TMD and induce conformational changes of the TMD to activate downstream signaling. In contrast to this prevailing model, we demonstrate that human class B GPCRs vary widely in their requirement of the ECD for activation. In one group, represented by corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R), parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R), and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide type 1 receptor (PAC1R), the ECD requirement for high affinity hormone binding can be bypassed by induced proximity and mass action effects, whereas in the other group, represented by glucagon receptor (GCGR) and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), the ECD is required for signaling even when the hormone is covalently linked to the TMD. Furthermore, the activation of GLP-1R by small molecules that interact with the intracellular side of the receptor is dependent on the presence of its ECD, suggesting a direct role of the ECD in GLP-1R activation. PMID:27226600

  5. Temporal requirements of the fragile X mental retardation protein in modulating circadian clock circuit synaptic architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl L Gatto

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Loss of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 gene function is the most common cause of inherited mental retardation and autism spectrum disorders, characterized by attention disorder, hyperactivity and disruption of circadian activity cycles. Pursuit of effective intervention strategies requires determining when the FMR1 product (FMRP is required in the regulation of neuronal circuitry controlling these behaviors. In the well-characterized Drosophila disease model, loss of the highly conserved dFMRP causes circadian arrhythmicity and conspicuous abnormalities in the circadian clock circuitry. Here, a novel Sholl Analysis was used to quantify over-elaborated synaptic architecture in dfmr1-null small ventrolateral neurons (sLNvs, a key subset of clock neurons. The transgenic Gene-Switch system was employed to drive conditional neuronal dFMRP expression in the dfmr1-null mutant background in order to dissect temporal requirements within the clock circuit. Introduction of dFMRP during early brain development, including the stages of neurogenesis, neuronal fate specification and early pathfinding, provided no rescue of dfmr1 mutant phenotypes. Similarly, restoring normal dFMRP expression in the adult failed to restore circadian circuit architecture. In sharp contrast, supplying dFMRP during a transient window of very late brain development, wherein synaptogenesis and substantial subsequent synaptic reorganization (e.g. use-dependent pruning occur, provided strong morphological rescue to reestablish normal sLNvs synaptic arbors. We conclude that dFMRP plays a developmentally restricted role in sculpting synaptic architecture in these neurons that cannot be compensated for by later reintroduction of the protein at maturity.

  6. Cholesterol and F-actin are required for clustering of recycling synaptic vesicle proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dason, Jeffrey S; Smith, Alex J; Marin, Leo; Charlton, Milton P

    2014-02-15

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) and their proteins must be recycled for sustained synaptic transmission. We tested the hypothesis that SV cholesterol is required for proper sorting of SV proteins during recycling in live presynaptic terminals. We used the reversible block of endocytosis in the Drosophila temperature-sensitive dynamin mutant shibire-ts1 to trap exocytosed SV proteins, and then examined the effect of experimental treatments on the distribution of these proteins within the presynaptic plasma membrane by confocal microscopy. SV proteins synaptotagmin, vglut and csp were clustered following SV trapping in control experiments but dispersed in samples treated with the cholesterol chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin to extract SV cholesterol. There was accumulation of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) in presynaptic terminals following SV trapping and this was reduced following SV cholesterol extraction. Reduced PIP2 accumulation was associated with disrupted accumulation of actin in presynaptic terminals. Similar to vesicular cholesterol extraction, disruption of actin by latrunculin A after SV proteins had been trapped on the plasma membrane resulted in the dispersal of SV proteins and prevented recovery of synaptic transmission due to impaired endocytosis following relief of the endocytic block. Our results demonstrate that vesicular cholesterol is required for aggregation of exocytosed SV proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane and are consistent with a mechanism involving regulation of PIP2 accumulation and local actin polymerization by cholesterol. Thus, alteration of membrane or SV lipids may affect the ability of synapses to undergo sustained synaptic transmission by compromising the recycling of SV proteins.

  7. Two Outer Membrane Proteins Are Required for Maximal Type I Secretion of the Caulobacter crescentus S-Layer Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Toporowski, Michael C.; Nomellini, John F.; Awram, Peter; Smit, John

    2004-01-01

    Transport of RsaA, the crystalline S-layer subunit protein of Caulobacter crescentus, is mediated by a type I secretion mechanism. Two proteins have been identified that play the role of the outer membrane protein (OMP) component in the RsaA secretion machinery. The genes rsaFa and rsaFb were identified by similarity to the Escherichia coli hemolysin secretion OMP TolC by using the C. crescentus genome sequence. The rsaFa gene is located several kilobases downstream of the other transporter g...

  8. Adhesion protein VSIG1 is required for the proper differentiation of glandular gastric epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odgerel Oidovsambuu

    Full Text Available VSIG1, a cell adhesion protein of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is preferentially expressed in stomach, testis, and certain gastric, esophageal and ovarian cancers. Here, we describe the expression patterns of three alternatively spliced isoforms of mouse Vsig1 during pre- and postnatal development of stomach and potential function of Vsig1 in differentiation of gastric epithelia. We show that isoforms Vsig1A and Vsig1B, which differ in the 3'untranslated region, are expressed in the early stages of stomach development. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that VSIG1 is restricted to the adherens junction of the glandular epithelium. The shorter transcript Vsig1C is restricted to the testis, encodes an N-terminal truncated protein and is presumably regulated by an internal promoter, which is located upstream of exon 1b. To determine whether the 5' flanking region of exon 1a specifically targets the expression of Vsig1 to stomach epithelia, we generated and analyzed transgenic mice. The 4.8-kb fragment located upstream of exon 1a was sufficient to direct the expression of the reporter gene to the glandular epithelia of transgenic stomach. To determine the role of VSIG1 during the development of stomach epithelia, an X-linked Vsig1 was inactivated in embryonic stem cells (ESCs. Although Vsig1(-/Y ESCs were only able to generate low coat color chimeric mice, no male chimeras transmitted the targeted allele to their progeny suggesting that the high contribution of Vsig1(-/Y cells leads to the lethality of chimeric embryos. Analysis of chimeric stomachs revealed the differentiation of VSIG1-null cells into squamous epithelia inside the glandular region. These results suggest that VSIG1 is required for the establishment of glandular versus squamous epithelia in the stomach.

  9. RNA:protein ratio of the unicellular organism as a characteristic of phosphorous and nitrogen stoichiometry and of the cellular requirement of ribosomes for protein synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sams Carl E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mean phosphorous:nitrogen (P:N ratios and relationships of P:N ratios with the growth rate of organisms indicate a surprising similarity among and within microbial species, plants, and insect herbivores. To reveal the cellular mechanisms underling this similarity, the macromolecular composition of seven microorganisms and the effect of specific growth rate (SGR on RNA:protein ratio, the number of ribosomes, and peptide elongation rate (PER were analyzed under different conditions of exponential growth. Results It was found that P:N ratios calculated from RNA and protein contents in these particular organisms were in the same range as the mean ratios reported for diverse organisms and had similar positive relationships with growth rate, consistent with the growth-rate hypothesis. The efficiency of protein synthesis in microorganisms is estimated as the number of active ribosomes required for the incorporation of one amino acid into the synthesized protein. This parameter is calculated as the SGR:PER ratio. Experimental and theoretical evidence indicated that the requirement of ribosomes for protein synthesis is proportional to the RNA:protein ratio. The constant of proportionality had the same values for all organisms, and was derived mechanistically from the characteristics of the protein-synthesis machinery of the cell (the number of nucleotides per ribosome, the average masses of nucleotides and amino acids, the fraction of ribosomal RNA in the total RNA, and the fraction of active ribosomes. Impairment of the growth conditions decreased the RNA:protein ratio and increased the overall efficiency of protein synthesis in the microorganisms. Conclusion Our results suggest that the decrease in RNA:protein and estimated P:N ratios with decrease in the growth rate of the microorganism is a consequence of an increased overall efficiency of protein synthesis in the cell resulting from activation of the general stress response and

  10. TTC26/DYF13 is an intraflagellar transport protein required for transport of motility-related proteins into flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Ide, Takahiro; Yagi, Toshiki; Jiang, Xue; Hirono, Masafumi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Haruaki; Wemmer, Kimberly A; Stainier, Didier YR; Qin, Hongmin; Kamiya, Ritsu; Marshall, Wallace F

    2014-01-01

    Cilia/flagella are assembled and maintained by the process of intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly conserved mechanism involving more than 20 IFT proteins. However, the functions of individual IFT proteins are mostly unclear. To help address this issue, we focused on a putative IFT protein TTC26/DYF13. Using live imaging and biochemical approaches we show that TTC26/DYF13 is an IFT complex B protein in mammalian cells and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Knockdown of TTC26/DYF13 in zebrafish embryos or mutation of TTC26/DYF13 in C. reinhardtii, produced short cilia with abnormal motility. Surprisingly, IFT particle assembly and speed were normal in dyf13 mutant flagella, unlike in other IFT complex B mutants. Proteomic and biochemical analyses indicated a particular set of proteins involved in motility was specifically depleted in the dyf13 mutant. These results support the concept that different IFT proteins are responsible for different cargo subsets, providing a possible explanation for the complexity of the IFT machinery. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01566.001 PMID:24596149

  11. Analysis of the thermal energy requirements for the extraction of leaf protein concentrate from some green plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangka, Julius K. [Dschang Univ., Dept. of Agricultural Engineering, Dschang (Cameroon)

    2003-12-01

    Extraction of protein from the leaves of green plants is very important because of the high cost of conventional forms of protein such as meat, milk and fish. In order to design machinery for this extraction, and also to embark on leaf protein concentrate extraction, it is necessary to measure and analyse the energy requirements to carry out each process involved in the extraction, using different plant species. Experiments were carried out to determine the amount of crude protein, and the thermal energy required to extract leaf protein concentrate, from juices obtained from the leaves of some plant species. Leaves from the following plants were selected: cassava (Manihot esculanta), Siam weed (Chromolaena odorata), bitter leaf (Vernonia amygdalina), gliricidia (Gliricidia maculata) and thorny tree (Hura crepetans). The leaves from the plant species were macerated in a laboratory pulper. Juice was obtained from the samples using perforated cylinders and a hydraulic press. The specific heat capacity of the juices was determined using the cooling curve method. The values of the heat capacities were used to calculate the amount of thermal energy required to raise the temperature of each juice from its normal temperature of about 25 deg C to a total protein coagulation temperature of about 80 deg C. The crude protein content of the extract was determined using the Kjeldal method. Results indicate that the green coagulum extracted from all the juices all have a protein content of at least 37%. The thermal energy required to coagulate protein from the juices ranges from 1.59 kJ kg{sup -1} for Hura crepetans to 2.7 kJ kg{sup -1} for Vernonia amygdalina. The energy requirement to obtain crude protein (CP) ranges from 8 kJ kg{sup -1} [CP] with Bura crepetans to 182 kJ kg{sup -1} [CP] with Vernonia amygdalina. Both results are statistically significant at the 0.01 confidence interval. It is concluded that the choice of plant species can significantly lower the thermal energy

  12. Energy and Protein Requirements for - to -Week-Age Gushi Chicks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Xiang-tao; TIAN Ya-dong; SONG Su-fang

    2002-01-01

    In this experiment, 540 male and female chicks of 1-day-age were selected respectively and reared separately. 3 × 3 factorial experiment was designed. Gushi chicks were fed with nine diets under different metabolizable energy (ME) and crude protein (CP). Effects of different diets on the performances and carcass ingredients of 0-to 4-week-age Gushi chicks were studied by rearing, comparative slaughter and metabolism experiments. Based on the results of three experiments, ME intake per kilogram metabolic weight was regarded as dependent variable (Y), and its corresponding net energy (NE) deposition per kilogram metabolic weight was regarded as independent variable (X), respectively. Lineal regressive analysis was made according to the mathematic model: Y=a+bX. Maintenance ME(MEm) and the converted coefficient from net energy for gain(NEg) to ME for gain(MEg) were found out, then ME requirement was divided into MErm+ MEg,which is ME = 359.14 W0.75 + 10.47/△W; CP intake and corresponding metabolic weight were regarded as dependent variable and independent variable respectively, and then regressive analysis was made. The result was CP = 0. 57 + 8.21 W0.75. Consequently, average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake and metabolic weight were put into the regressive equations, and then ME and CP requirements for 0- to 4-week-age Gushi chicks were obtained, 12.38 MJ kg-1 and 20.13%, respectively, the ratio of CP to ME was 16.26 g MJ-1.

  13. Requirements and ontology for a G protein-coupled receptor oligomerization knowledge base

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skrabanek, L.; Murcia, M.; Bouvier, M.; Devi, L.; George, S.R.; Lohse, M.J.; Milligan, G.; Neubig, R.; Palczewski, K.; Parmentier, M.; Pin, J.P.; Vriend, G.; Javitch, J.A.; Campagne, F.; Filizola, M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are a large and diverse family of membrane proteins whose members participate in the regulation of most cellular and physiological processes and therefore represent key pharmacological targets. Although several bioinformatics resources support research

  14. Cancer-Related NEET Proteins Transfer 2Fe-2S Clusters to Anamorsin, a Protein Required for Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipper, Colin H.; Paddock, Mark L.; Onuchic, José N.; Mittler, Ron; Nechushtai, Rachel; Jennings, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis is executed by distinct protein assembly systems. Mammals have two systems, the mitochondrial Fe-S cluster assembly system (ISC) and the cytosolic assembly system (CIA), that are connected by an unknown mechanism. The human members of the NEET family of 2Fe-2S proteins, nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1) and mitoNEET (mNT), are located at the interface between the mitochondria and the cytosol. These proteins have been implicated in cancer cell proliferation, and they can transfer their 2Fe-2S clusters to a standard apo-acceptor protein. Here we report the first physiological 2Fe-2S cluster acceptor for both NEET proteins as human Anamorsin (also known as cytokine induced apoptosis inhibitor-1; CIAPIN-1). Anamorsin is an electron transfer protein containing two iron-sulfur cluster-binding sites that is required for cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly. We show, using UV-Vis spectroscopy, that both NAF-1 and mNT can transfer their 2Fe-2S clusters to apo-Anamorsin with second order rate constants similar to those of other known human 2Fe-2S transfer proteins. A direct protein-protein interaction of the NEET proteins with apo-Anamorsin was detected using biolayer interferometry. Furthermore, electrospray mass spectrometry of holo-Anamorsin prepared by cluster transfer shows that it receives both of its 2Fe-2S clusters from the NEETs. We propose that mNT and NAF-1 can provide parallel routes connecting the mitochondrial ISC system and the CIA. 2Fe-2S clusters assembled in the mitochondria are received by NEET proteins and when needed transferred to Anamorsin, activating the CIA. PMID:26448442

  15. Requirement of JIP scaffold proteins for NMDA-mediated signal transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Norman J.; Martin, Gilles; Ehrhardt, Anka G.; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Rakic, Pasko; Richard A Flavell; Treistman, Steven N.; Davis, Roger J

    2007-01-01

    JIP scaffold proteins are implicated in the regulation of protein kinase signal transduction pathways. To test the physiological role of these scaffold proteins, we examined the phenotype of compound mutant mice that lack expression of JIP proteins. These mice were found to exhibit severe defects in N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor function, including decreased NMDA-evoked current amplitude, cytoplasmic Ca++, and gene expression. The decreased NMDA receptor activity in JIP-deficient n...

  16. ATP hydrolysis is required for DEAD-box protein recycling but not for duplex unwinding

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fei; Putnam, Andrea; Jankowsky, Eckhard

    2008-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins, the largest helicase family, catalyze ATP-dependent remodeling of RNA–protein complexes and the unwinding of RNA duplexes. Because DEAD-box proteins hydrolyze ATP in an RNA-dependent fashion, the energy provided by ATP hydrolysis is commonly assumed to drive the energetically unfavorable duplex unwinding. Here, we show efficient unwinding of stable duplexes by several DEAD-box proteins in the presence of the nonhydrolyzable ATP analog ADP-beryllium fluoride. Another ATP ana...

  17. A nuclear export signal within the structural Gag protein is required for prototype foamy virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coiffic Audrey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gag polyproteins play distinct roles during the replication cycle of retroviruses, hijacking many cellular machineries to fulfill them. In the case of the prototype foamy virus (PFV, Gag structural proteins undergo transient nuclear trafficking after their synthesis, returning back to the cytoplasm for capsid assembly and virus egress. The functional role of this nuclear stage as well as the molecular mechanism(s responsible for Gag nuclear export are not understood. Results We have identified a leptomycin B (LMB-sensitive nuclear export sequence (NES within the N-terminus of PFV Gag that is absolutely required for the completion of late stages of virus replication. Point mutations of conserved residues within this motif lead to nuclear redistribution of Gag, preventing subsequent virus egress. We have shown that a NES-defective PFV Gag acts as a dominant negative mutant by sequestrating its wild-type counterpart in the nucleus. Trans-complementation experiments with the heterologous NES of HIV-1 Rev allow the cytoplasmic redistribution of FV Gag, but fail to restore infectivity. Conclusions PFV Gag-Gag interactions are finely tuned in the cytoplasm to regulate their functions, capsid assembly, and virus release. In the nucleus, we have shown Gag-Gag interactions which could be involved in the nuclear export of Gag and viral RNA. We propose that nuclear export of unspliced and partially spliced PFV RNAs relies on two complementary mechanisms, which take place successively during the replication cycle.

  18. FGF21-Mediated Improvements in Glucose Clearance Require Uncoupling Protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M. Kwon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21-mediated weight loss and improvements in glucose metabolism correlate with increased uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1 levels in adipose tissues, suggesting that UCP1-dependent thermogenesis may drive FGF21 action. It was reported that FGF21 is equally effective at reducing body weight and improving glucose homeostasis without UCP1. We find while FGF21 can lower body weight in both wild-type and Ucp1 knockout mice, rapid clearance of glucose by FGF21 is defective in the absence of UCP1. Furthermore, in obese wild-type mice there is a fall in brown adipose tissue (BAT temperature during glucose excursion, and FGF21 improves glucose clearance while preventing the fall in BAT temperature. In Ucp1 knockout mice, the fall in BAT temperature during glucose excursion and FGF21-mediated changes in BAT temperature are lost. We conclude FGF21-mediated improvements in clearance of a glucose challenge require UCP1 and evoke UCP1-dependent thermogenesis as a method to increase glucose disposal.

  19. Alpha-fetoprotein, the major fetal serum protein, is not essential for embryonic development but is required for female fertility

    OpenAIRE

    Gabant, Philippe; Forrester, Lesley; Nichols, Jennifer; Van Reeth, Thierry; De Mees, Christelle; Pajack, Bernard; Watt, Alistair; Smitz, Johan; Alexandre, Henri; Szpirer, Claude; Szpirer, Josiane

    2002-01-01

    The alpha-fetoprotein gene (Afp) is a member of a multigenic family that comprises the related genes encoding albumin, alpha-albumin, and vitamin D binding protein. The biological role of this major embryonic serum protein is unknown although numerous speculations have been made. We have used gene targeting to show that AFP is not required for embryonic development. AFP null embryos develop normally, and individually transplanted homozygous embryos can develop in an AFP-deficient microenviron...

  20. Protein synthesis required for long-term memory is induced by PKC activation on days before associative learning

    OpenAIRE

    Alkon, Daniel L.; Epstein, Herman; Kuzirian, Alan; Bennett, M. Catherine; Nelson, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Protein synthesis has long been known to be required for associative learning to consolidate into long-term memory. Here we demonstrate that PKC isozyme activation on days before training can induce the synthesis of proteins necessary and sufficient for subsequent long-term memory consolidation. Bryostatin (Bryo), a macrolide lactone with efficacy in subnanomolar concentrations and a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease, is a potent activator of PKC, some of whose isozymes undergo pr...

  1. Protein Requirements Are Elevated in Endurance Athletes after Exercise as Determined by the Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kato

    Full Text Available A higher protein intake has been recommended for endurance athletes compared with healthy non-exercising individuals based primarily on nitrogen balance methodology. The aim of this study was to determine the estimated average protein requirement and recommended protein intake in endurance athletes during an acute 3-d controlled training period using the indicator amino acid oxidation method. After 2-d of controlled diet (1.4 g protein/kg/d and training (10 and 5km/d, respectively, six male endurance-trained adults (28±4 y of age; Body weight, 64.5±10.0 kg; VO2peak, 60.3±6.7 ml·kg-1·min-1; means±SD performed an acute bout of endurance exercise (20 km treadmill run prior to consuming test diets providing variable amounts of protein (0.2-2.8 g·kg-1·d-1 and sufficient energy. Protein was provided as a crystalline amino acid mixture based on the composition of egg protein with [1-13C]phenylalanine provided to determine whole body phenylalanine flux, 13CO2 excretion, and phenylalanine oxidation. The estimated average protein requirement was determined as the breakpoint after biphasic linear regression analysis with a recommended protein intake defined as the upper 95% confidence interval. Phenylalanine flux (68.8±8.5 μmol·kg-1·h-1 was not affected by protein intake. 13CO2 excretion displayed a robust bi-phase linear relationship (R2 = 0.86 that resulted in an estimated average requirement and a recommended protein intake of 1.65 and 1.83 g protein·kg-1·d-1, respectively, which was similar to values based on phenylalanine oxidation (1.53 and 1.70 g·kg-1·d-1, respectively. We report a recommended protein intake that is greater than the RDA (0.8 g·kg-1·d-1 and current recommendations for endurance athletes (1.2-1.4 g·kg-1·d-1. Our results suggest that the metabolic demand for protein in endurance-trained adults on a higher volume training day is greater than their sedentary peers and current recommendations for athletes based

  2. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious

  3. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious

  4. Food and nutritional security requires adequate protein as well as energy, delivered from whole-year crop production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Graeme D; Wratten, Stephen D; Porter, John R

    2016-01-01

    Human food security requires the production of sufficient quantities of both high-quality protein and dietary energy. In a series of case-studies from New Zealand, we show that while production of food ingredients from crops on arable land can meet human dietary energy requirements effectively, requirements for high-quality protein are met more efficiently by animal production from such land. We present a model that can be used to assess dietary energy and quality-corrected protein production from various crop and crop/animal production systems, and demonstrate its utility. We extend our analysis with an accompanying economic analysis of commercially-available, pre-prepared or simply-cooked foods that can be produced from our case-study crop and animal products. We calculate the per-person, per-day cost of both quality-corrected protein and dietary energy as provided in the processed foods. We conclude that mixed dairy/cropping systems provide the greatest quantity of high-quality protein per unit price to the consumer, have the highest food energy production and can support the dietary requirements of the highest number of people, when assessed as all-year-round production systems. Global food and nutritional security will largely be an outcome of national or regional agroeconomies addressing their own food needs. We hope that our model will be used for similar analyses of food production systems in other countries, agroecological zones and economies.

  5. Food and nutritional security requires adequate protein as well as energy, delivered from whole-year crop production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Graeme D; Wratten, Stephen D; Porter, John R

    2016-01-01

    Human food security requires the production of sufficient quantities of both high-quality protein and dietary energy. In a series of case-studies from New Zealand, we show that while production of food ingredients from crops on arable land can meet human dietary energy requirements effectively, requirements for high-quality protein are met more efficiently by animal production from such land. We present a model that can be used to assess dietary energy and quality-corrected protein production from various crop and crop/animal production systems, and demonstrate its utility. We extend our analysis with an accompanying economic analysis of commercially-available, pre-prepared or simply-cooked foods that can be produced from our case-study crop and animal products. We calculate the per-person, per-day cost of both quality-corrected protein and dietary energy as provided in the processed foods. We conclude that mixed dairy/cropping systems provide the greatest quantity of high-quality protein per unit price to the consumer, have the highest food energy production and can support the dietary requirements of the highest number of people, when assessed as all-year-round production systems. Global food and nutritional security will largely be an outcome of national or regional agroeconomies addressing their own food needs. We hope that our model will be used for similar analyses of food production systems in other countries, agroecological zones and economies. PMID:27478691

  6. Vascular endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction requires phosphorylation of ERK1/2 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Guogang; Jamali, Roya; Cao, Yong-Xiao;

    2006-01-01

    RNA and protein expressions. The endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction was associated with increase in phosphorylation of extracellular regulation kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) proteins and elevated levels of intracellular calcium. The elevation curve of intracellular calcium consisted of two phases: one rapid...... and one sustained. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by SB386023 or blockage of calcium channels by nifedipine significantly reduced the endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction (P..., phosphorylation of ERK1/2 proteins and elevation of intracellular calcium level are required for endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction in rat mesenteric artery....

  7. Human-Chromatin-Related Protein Interactions Identify a Demethylase Complex Required for Chromosome Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Marcon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  8. Correct interpretation of comprehensive phosphorylation dynamics requires normalization by protein expression changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ronghu; Dephoure, Noah; Haas, Wilhelm; Huttlin, Edward L; Zhai, Bo; Sowa, Mathew E; Gygi, Steven P

    2011-08-01

    The interpretation of quantitative phosphoproteomics studies is complicated because each differential phosphorylation event integrates both changes in protein expression and phosphorylation. Here we investigated this phenomenon by performing parallel comparisons of protein expression and phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae. In each of two experiments comparing yeast mutants bearing deletions in FUS3 or STE7 with their wild-type counterparts, we quantified over 4100 proteins, including all members of the yeast mating pathway. We also identified 12,499 unique phosphorylation sites in this work. We demonstrate the critical importance of controlling the protein-level false-discovery rate and provide a novel method to assess the accuracy of protein false-discovery rate estimates. For the first time, 96% of nonredundant phosphopeptide ratios could be calibrated by protein levels, allowing truly differential phosphorylation to be distinguished from altered protein expression. This revealed a starkly different view, with 25% of seemingly differential phosphopeptides now attributed to changes in protein expression. Combined protein expression and phosphorylation surveys uncovered both independent and concerted changes in protein expression and phosphorylation, while highlighting the partially redundant role of a second MAPK (Kss1) in the mating pathway. PMID:21551504

  9. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poortmans, J.R.; Carpentier, A. [Laboratory for Biometry and Sport Nutrition, Faculty of Motor Sciences, Free University of Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Pereira-Lancha, L.O. [Departamento de Nutrição, Instituto Vita, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lancha, A. Jr. [Laboratório de Nutrição Aplicada à Atividade Motora, Escola de Educação Física e Esporte, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-06-08

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers ({sup 13}C-lysine, {sup 15}N-glycine, {sup 2}H{sub 5}-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g·kg{sup −1}·day{sup −1} compared to 0.8 g·kg{sup −1}·day{sup −1} in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h.

  10. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Poortmans

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers (13C-lysine, 15N-glycine, ²H5-phenylalanine and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils. Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g·kg-1·day-1 compared to 0.8 g·kg-1·day-1 in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h.

  11. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers (13C-lysine, 15N-glycine, 2H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g·kg−1·day−1 compared to 0.8 g·kg−1·day−1 in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h

  12. Genes required for formation of the apoMoFe protein of Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, G S; White, T C; Flory, J E; Orme-Johnson, W H

    1990-09-15

    A binary plasmid system was used to produce nitrogenase components in Escherichia coli and subsequently to define a minimum set of nitrogen fixation (nif) genes required for the production of the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco) reactivatable apomolybdenum-iron (apoMoFe) protein of nitrogenase. The active MoFe protein is an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer containing two FeMoco clusters and 4 Fe4S4 P centers (for review see, Orme-Johnson, W.H. (1985) Annu. Rev. Biophys. Biophys. Chem. 14, 419-459). The plasmid pVL15, carrying a tac-promoted nifA activator gene, was coharbored in E. coli with the plasmid pGH1 which contained nifHDKTYENXUSVWZMF' derived from the chromosome of the nitrogen fixing bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae. The apoMoFe protein produced in E. coli by pGH1 + VL15 was identical to the apoprotein in derepressed cells of the nifB- mutant of K. pneumoniae (UN106) in its electrophoretic properties on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels as well as in its ability to be activated by FeMoco. The constituent peptides migrated identically to those from purified MoFe protein during electrophoresis on denaturing gels. The concentrations of apoMoFe protein produced in nif-transformed strains of E. coli were greater than 50% of the levels of MoFe protein observed in derepressed wild-type K. pneumoniae. Systematic deletion of individual nif genes carried by pGH1 has established the requirements for the maximal production of the FeMoco-reactivatable apoMoFe protein to be the following gene products, NifHDKTYUSWZM+A. It appears that several of the genes (nifT, Y, U, W, and Z) are only required for maximal production of the apoMoFe protein, while others (nifH, D, K, and S) are absolutely required for synthesis of this protein in E. coli. One curious result is that the nifH gene product, the peptide of the Fe protein, but not active Fe protein itself, is required for formation of the apoMoFe protein. This suggests the possibility of a ternary complex of the NifH, D, and K

  13. The Development of Digestion and Absorption and the Energy Protein Lipid and Carbohydrate Requirements of the Premature Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Aydın, Ahmet; Çam, Halit; Fıçıcıoğlu, Can; Mıkla, Şerare

    1994-01-01

    Premature infants have high energy and nutrient requirements for their rapid growth The knowledge of the development of salivary gastric biliary and intestinal enzymes and factors involved in digestion and absorption plays important roles in the choice of the feeding constituents In this review we shall discuss the protein lipid and carbohydrate requirements of the premature infants and the importance of breast feeding Key words: Premature Infant Nutriton Gastrointestinal Functions

  14. Protein phosphatases decrease their activity during capacitation: a new requirement for this event.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janetti R Signorelli

    Full Text Available There are few reports on the role of protein phosphatases during capacitation. Here, we report on the role of PP2B, PP1, and PP2A during human sperm capacitation. Motile sperm were resuspended in non-capacitating medium (NCM, Tyrode's medium, albumin- and bicarbonate-free or in reconstituted medium (RCM, NCM plus 2.6% albumin/25 mM bicarbonate. The presence of the phosphatases was evaluated by western blotting and the subcellular localization by indirect immunofluorescence. The function of these phosphatases was analyzed by incubating the sperm with specific inhibitors: okadaic acid, I2, endothall, and deltamethrin. Different aliquots were incubated in the following media: 1 NCM; 2 NCM plus inhibitors; 3 RCM; and 4 RCM plus inhibitors. The percent capacitated sperm and phosphatase activities were evaluated using the chlortetracycline assay and a phosphatase assay kit, respectively. The results confirm the presence of PP2B and PP1 in human sperm. We also report the presence of PP2A, specifically, the catalytic subunit and the regulatory subunits PR65 and B. PP2B and PP2A were present in the tail, neck, and postacrosomal region, and PP1 was present in the postacrosomal region, neck, middle, and principal piece of human sperm. Treatment with phosphatase inhibitors rapidly (≤1 min increased the percent of sperm depicting the pattern B, reaching a maximum of ∼40% that was maintained throughout incubation; after 3 h, the percent of capacitated sperm was similar to that of the control. The enzymatic activity of the phosphatases decreased during capacitation without changes in their expression. The pattern of phosphorylation on threonine residues showed a sharp increase upon treatment with the inhibitors. In conclusion, human sperm express PP1, PP2B, and PP2A, and the activity of these phosphatases decreases during capacitation. This decline in phosphatase activities and the subsequent increase in threonine phosphorylation may be an important

  15. Proteolytic activation of human pancreatitis associated protein is required for peptidoglycan binding and bacterial aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Medveczky, Péter; Szmola, Richárd; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatitis associated protein (PAP) is a 16 kDa lectin-like protein, which becomes robustly upregulated in the pancreatic juice during acute pancreatitis. Trypsin cleaves the N terminus of PAP, which in turn forms insoluble fibrils. PAP and its paralog the pancreatic stone protein induce bacterial aggregation and, more recently, PAP was shown to bind to the peptidoglycan of Gram positive bacteria and exert a direct bactericidal effect. However, the role of N-terminal processing in the antib...

  16. The tomato xylem sap protein XSP10 is required for full susceptibility to Fusarium wilt disease

    OpenAIRE

    Krasikov, Vladimir; Dekker, Henk L.; Rep, Martijn; Takken, Frank L. W.

    2010-01-01

    XSP10 is an abundant 10 kDa protein found in the xylem sap of tomato. The protein displays structural similarity to plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are involved in various physiological processes, including disease resistance, and some are able to bind and transfer diverse lipid molecules. XSP10 abundance in xylem sap declines upon infection with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), implying involvement of XSP10 in the plant–pathogen interaction. Here, the biochemical chara...

  17. A hydrophobic domain within the small capsid protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is required for assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Christopher M; Grzesik, Peter; Kreitler, Dale; Pryce, Erin N; Desai, Keshal V; Coombs, Gavin; McCaffery, J Michael; Desai, Prashant J

    2014-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) capsids can be produced in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses for protein expression. All six capsid proteins are required for this process to occur and, unlike for alphaherpesviruses, the small capsid protein (SCP) ORF65 is essential for this process. This protein decorates the capsid shell by virtue of its interaction with the capsomeres. In this study, we have explored the SCP interaction with the major capsid protein (MCP) using GFP fusions. The assembly site within the nucleus of infected cells was visualized by light microscopy using fluorescence produced by the SCP-GFP polypeptide, and the relocalization of the SCP to these sites was evident only when the MCP and the scaffold protein were also present - indicative of an interaction between these proteins that ensures delivery of the SCP to assembly sites. Biochemical assays demonstrated a physical interaction between the SCP and MCP, and also between this complex and the scaffold protein. Self-assembly of capsids with the SCP-GFP polypeptide was evident. Potentially, this result can be used to engineer fluorescent KSHV particles. A similar SCP-His6 polypeptide was used to purify capsids from infected cell lysates using immobilized affinity chromatography and to directly label this protein in capsids using chemically derivatized gold particles. Additional studies with SCP-GFP polypeptide truncation mutants identified a domain residing between aa 50 and 60 of ORF65 that was required for the relocalization of SCP-GFP to nuclear assembly sites. Substitution of residues in this region and specifically at residue 54 with a polar amino acid (lysine) disrupted or abolished this localization as well as capsid assembly, whereas substitution with non-polar residues did not affect the interaction. Thus, this study identified a small conserved hydrophobic domain that is important for the SCP-MCP interaction. PMID:24824860

  18. Distinct determinants in HIV-1 Vif and human APOBEC3 proteins are required for the suppression of diverse host anti-viral proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: APOBEC3G (A3G and related cytidine deaminases of the APOBEC3 family of proteins are potent inhibitors of many retroviruses, including HIV-1. Formation of infectious HIV-1 requires the suppression of multiple cytidine deaminases by Vif. HIV-1 Vif suppresses various APOBEC3 proteins through the common mechanism of recruiting the Cullin5-ElonginB-ElonginC E3 ubiquitin ligase to induce target protein polyubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. The domains in Vif and various APOBEC3 proteins required for APOBEC3 recognition and degradation have not been fully characterized. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study, we have demonstrated that the regions of APOBEC3F (A3F that are required for its HIV-1-mediated binding and degradation are distinct from those reported for A3G. We found that the C-terminal cytidine deaminase domain (C-CDD of A3F alone is sufficient for its interaction with HIV-1 Vif and its Vif-mediated degradation. We also observed that the domains of HIV-1 Vif that are uniquely required for its functional interaction with full-length A3F are also required for the degradation of the C-CDD of A3F; in contrast, those Vif domains that are uniquely required for functional interaction with A3G are not required for the degradation of the C-CDD of A3F. Interestingly, the HIV-1 Vif domains required for the degradation of A3F are also required for the degradation of A3C and A3DE. On the other hand, the Vif domains uniquely required for the degradation of A3G are dispensable for the degradation of cytidine deaminases A3C and A3DE. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that distinct regions of A3F and A3G are targeted by HIV-1 Vif molecules. However, HIV-1 Vif suppresses A3F, A3C, and A3DE through similar recognition determinants, which are conserved among Vif molecules from diverse HIV-1 strains. Mapping these determinants may be useful for the design of novel anti-HIV inhibitors.

  19. The V protein of canine distemper virus is required for virus replication in human epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Otsuki

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV becomes able to use human receptors through a single amino acid substitution in the H protein. In addition, CDV strains possessing an intact C protein replicate well in human epithelial H358 cells. The present study showed that CDV strain 007Lm, which was isolated from lymph node tissue of a dog with distemper, failed to replicate in H358 cells, although it possessed an intact C protein. Sequence analyses suggested that a cysteine-to-tyrosine substitution at position 267 of the V protein caused this growth defect. Analyses using H358 cells constitutively expressing the CDV V protein showed that the V protein with a cysteine, but not that with a tyrosine, at this position effectively blocked the interferon-stimulated signal transduction pathway, and supported virus replication of 007Lm in H358 cells. Thus, the V protein as well as the C protein appears to be functional and essential for CDV replication in human epithelial cells.

  20. The acyl-CoA binding protein is required for normal epidermal barrier function in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Bek, Signe; Marcher, Ann-Britt;

    2012-01-01

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa intracellular protein expressed in all eukaryotic species. Mice with targeted disruption of Acbp (ACBP(-/-) mice) are viable and fertile but present a visible skin and fur phenotype characterized by greasy fur and development of alopecia and scaling...

  1. A transmembrane ubiquitin ligase required to sort membrane proteins into multivesicular bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reggiori, Fulvio; Pelham, Hugh R B; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2002-01-01

    Membrane proteins with transmembrane domains (TMDs) that contain polar residues exposed to the lipid bilayer are selectively sorted into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and delivered to the yeast vacuole. Sorting of some, although not all, proteins into these structures is mediated by ubiquitination. W

  2. Defining meal requirements for protein to optimize metabolic roles of amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary protein provides essential amino acids (EAAs) for the synthesis of new proteins plus an array of other metabolic functions; many of these functions are sensitive to postprandial plasma and intracellular amino acid concentrations. Recent research has focused on amino acids as metabolic signal...

  3. TTC26/DYF13 is an intraflagellar transport protein required for transport of motility-related proteins into flagella

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Ide, Takahiro; Yagi, Toshiki; Jiang, Xue; Hirono, Masafumi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Haruaki; Wemmer, Kimberly A; Stainier, Didier YR; Qin, Hongmin; Kamiya, Ritsu; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest Sperm cells have tails called flagella that propel them towards an egg. Other cells have similar, but shorter, structures called cilia that sway back and forth on their surface. In addition to sweeping dust and debris out of our lungs and airways, cilia have a number of other crucial roles during development. This means that faulty cilia can lead to serious birth defects, as well as diseases of the kidneys and respiratory system. Cilia and flagella are made from proteins that are...

  4. An NB-LRR protein required for HR signalling mediated by both extra- and intracellular resistance proteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.H.E.J. Gabriels; J.H. Vossen; S.K. Ekengren; G. van Ooijen; A.M. Abd-El-Haliem; G.C.M. van den Berg; D.Y. Rainey; G.B. Martin; F.L.W. Takken; P.J.G.M. de Wit; M.H.A.J. Joosten

    2007-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Cf resistance genes confer hypersensitive response (HR)-associated resistance to strains of the pathogenic fungus Cladosporium fulvum that express the matching avirulence (Avr) gene. Previously, we identified an Avr4-responsive tomato (ART) gene that is required for Cf-

  5. An NB-LRR protein required for HR signalling mediated by both extra- and intracellular resistance proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriëls, S.H.E.J.; Vossen, J.H.; Ekengren, S.K.; Ooijen, van G.; Abd-El-Haliem, A.M.; Berg, van den G.C.M.; Rainey, D.Y.; Martin, G.B.; Takken, F.L.W.; Wit, de P.J.G.M.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Cf resistance genes confer hypersensitive response (HR)-associated resistance to strains of the pathogenic fungus Cladosporium fulvum that express the matching avirulence (Avr) gene. Previously, we identified an Avr4-responsive tomato (ART) gene that is required for Cf-

  6. Sporophyte Formation and Life Cycle Completion in Moss Requires Heterotrimeric G-Proteins1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Quatrano, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the functional characterization of heterotrimeric G-proteins from a nonvascular plant, the moss Physcomitrella patens. In plants, G-proteins have been characterized from only a few angiosperms to date, where their involvement has been shown during regulation of multiple signaling and developmental pathways affecting overall plant fitness. In addition to its unparalleled evolutionary position in the plant lineages, the P. patens genome also codes for a unique assortment of G-protein components, which includes two copies of Gβ and Gγ genes, but no canonical Gα. Instead, a single gene encoding an extra-large Gα (XLG) protein exists in the P. patens genome. Here, we demonstrate that in P. patens the canonical Gα is biochemically and functionally replaced by an XLG protein, which works in the same genetic pathway as one of the Gβ proteins to control its development. Furthermore, the specific G-protein subunits in P. patens are essential for its life cycle completion. Deletion of the genomic locus of PpXLG or PpGβ2 results in smaller, slower growing gametophores. Normal reproductive structures develop on these gametophores, but they are unable to form any sporophyte, the only diploid stage in the moss life cycle. Finally, the mutant phenotypes of ΔPpXLG and ΔPpGβ2 can be complemented by the homologous genes from Arabidopsis, AtXLG2 and AtAGB1, respectively, suggesting an overall conservation of their function throughout the plant evolution. PMID:27550997

  7. An Accessory Protein Required for Anchoring and Assembly of Amyloid Fibers in B. subtilis Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Diego; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Cells within Bacillus subtilis biofilms are held in place by an extracellular matrix that contains cell-anchored amyloid fibers, composed of the amyloidogenic protein TasA. As biofilms age they disassemble because the cells release the amyloid fibers. This release appears to be the consequence of incorporation of D-tyrosine, D-leucine, D-tryptophan and D-methionine into the cell wall. Here, we characterize the in vivo roles of an accessory protein TapA (TasA anchoring/assembly protein; previo...

  8. The V Protein of Canine Distemper Virus Is Required for Virus Replication in Human Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Noriyuki Otsuki; Yuichiro Nakatsu; Toru Kubota; Tsuyoshi Sekizuka; Fumio Seki; Kouji Sakai; Makoto Kuroda; Ryoji Yamaguchi; Makoto Takeda

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) becomes able to use human receptors through a single amino acid substitution in the H protein. In addition, CDV strains possessing an intact C protein replicate well in human epithelial H358 cells. The present study showed that CDV strain 007Lm, which was isolated from lymph node tissue of a dog with distemper, failed to replicate in H358 cells, although it possessed an intact C protein. Sequence analyses suggested that a cysteine-to-tyrosine substitution at posit...

  9. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Is Required for Berberine-Induced Reduction of Atherosclerosis in Mice: The Role of Uncoupling Protein 2

    OpenAIRE

    Qilong Wang; Miao Zhang; Bin Liang; Najeeb Shirwany; Yi Zhu; Ming-Hui Zou

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: Berberine, a botanical alkaloid purified from Coptidis rhizoma, is reported to activate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Whether AMPK is required for the protective effects of berberine in cardiovascular diseases remains unknown. This study was designed to determine whether AMPK is required for berberine-induced reduction of oxidative stress and atherosclerosis in vivo. METHODS: ApoE (ApoE⁻/⁻) mice and ApoE⁻/⁻/AMPK alpha 2⁻/⁻ mice that were fed Western diets were treated with be...

  10. The RecA Protein of Helicobacter pylori Requires a Posttranslational Modification for Full Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    The RecA protein is a central component of the homologous recombination machinery and of the SOS system in most bacteria. In performing these functions, it is involved in DNA repair processes and plays an important role in natural transformation competence. This may be especially important in Helicobacter pylori, where an unusually high degree of microdiversity among strains is generated by homologous recombination. We have suggested previously that the H. pylori RecA protein is subject to po...

  11. Critical lysine residues of Klf4 required for protein stabilization and degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Klf4 undergoes the 26S proteasomal degradation by ubiquitination on its multiple lysine residues. • Essential Klf4 ubiquitination sites are accumulated between 190–263 amino acids. • A mutation of lysine at 232 on Klf4 elongates protein turnover. • Klf4 mutants dramatically suppress p53 expression both under normal and UV irradiated conditions. - Abstract: The transcription factor, Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) plays a crucial role in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). As the ubiquitination and degradation of the Klf4 protein have been suggested to play an important role in its function, the identification of specific lysine sites that are responsible for protein degradation is of prime interest to improve protein stability and function. However, the molecular mechanism regulating proteasomal degradation of the Klf4 is poorly understood. In this study, both the analysis of Klf4 ubiquitination sites using several Klf4 deletion fragments and bioinformatics predictions showed that the lysine sites which are signaling for Klf4 protein degradation lie in its N-terminal domain (aa 1–296). The results also showed that Lys32, 52, 232, and 252 of Klf4 are responsible for the proteolysis of the Klf4 protein. These results suggest that Klf4 undergoes proteasomal degradation and that these lysine residues are critical for Klf4 ubiquitination

  12. Critical lysine residues of Klf4 required for protein stabilization and degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Key-Hwan; Kim, So-Ra; Ramakrishna, Suresh; Baek, Kwang-Hyun, E-mail: baek@cha.ac.kr

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Klf4 undergoes the 26S proteasomal degradation by ubiquitination on its multiple lysine residues. • Essential Klf4 ubiquitination sites are accumulated between 190–263 amino acids. • A mutation of lysine at 232 on Klf4 elongates protein turnover. • Klf4 mutants dramatically suppress p53 expression both under normal and UV irradiated conditions. - Abstract: The transcription factor, Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) plays a crucial role in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). As the ubiquitination and degradation of the Klf4 protein have been suggested to play an important role in its function, the identification of specific lysine sites that are responsible for protein degradation is of prime interest to improve protein stability and function. However, the molecular mechanism regulating proteasomal degradation of the Klf4 is poorly understood. In this study, both the analysis of Klf4 ubiquitination sites using several Klf4 deletion fragments and bioinformatics predictions showed that the lysine sites which are signaling for Klf4 protein degradation lie in its N-terminal domain (aa 1–296). The results also showed that Lys32, 52, 232, and 252 of Klf4 are responsible for the proteolysis of the Klf4 protein. These results suggest that Klf4 undergoes proteasomal degradation and that these lysine residues are critical for Klf4 ubiquitination.

  13. The J Domain of Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen Is Required To Functionally Inactivate RB Family Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zalvide, Juan; Stubdal, Hilde; DeCaprio, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Transformation by simian virus 40 large T antigen (TAg) is dependent on the inactivation of cellular tumor suppressors. Transformation minimally requires the following three domains: (i) a C-terminal domain that mediates binding to p53; (ii) the LXCXE domain (residues 103 to 107), necessary for binding to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein, pRB, and the related p107 and p130; and (iii) an N-terminal domain that is homologous to the J domain of DnaJ molecular chaperone proteins. We ha...

  14. A tetanus toxin sensitive protein other than VAMP 2 is required for exocytosis in the pancreatic acinar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padfield, P J

    2000-11-01

    The neurotoxin sensitivity of regulated exocytosis in the pancreatic acinar cell was investigated using streptolysin-O permeabilized pancreatic acini. Treatment of permeabilized acini with botulinum toxin B (BoNT/B) or botulinum toxin D (BoNT/D) had no detectable effect on Ca(2+)-dependent amylase secretion but did result in the complete cleavage of VAMP 2. In comparison, tetanus toxin (TeTx) treatment both significantly inhibited Ca(2+)-dependent amylase secretion and cleaved VAMP 2. These results indicate that regulated exocytosis in the pancreatic acinar cell requires a tetanus toxin sensitive protein(s) other than VAMP 2.

  15. Gli2 and gli3 localize to cilia and require the intraflagellar transport protein polaris for processing and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Intraflagellar transport (IFT proteins are essential for cilia assembly and have recently been associated with a number of developmental processes, such as left-right axis specification and limb and neural tube patterning. Genetic studies indicate that IFT proteins are required for Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling downstream of the Smoothened and Patched membrane proteins but upstream of the Glioma (Gli transcription factors. However, the role that IFT proteins play in transduction of Shh signaling and the importance of cilia in this process remain unknown. Here we provide insights into the mechanism by which defects in an IFT protein, Tg737/Polaris, affect Shh signaling in the murine limb bud. Our data show that loss of Tg737 results in altered Gli3 processing that abrogates Gli3-mediated repression of Gli1 transcriptional activity. In contrast to the conclusions drawn from genetic analysis, the activity of Gli1 and truncated forms of Gli3 (Gli3R are unaffected in Tg737 mutants at the molecular level, indicating that Tg737/Polaris is differentially involved in specific activities of the Gli proteins. Most important, a negative regulator of Shh signaling, Suppressor of fused, and the three full-length Gli transcription factors localize to the distal tip of cilia in addition to the nucleus. Thus, our data support a model where cilia have a direct role in Gli processing and Shh signal transduction.

  16. Gli2 and Gli3 localize to cilia and require the intraflagellar transport protein polaris for processing and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney J Haycraft

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Intraflagellar transport (IFT proteins are essential for cilia assembly and have recently been associated with a number of developmental processes, such as left-right axis specification and limb and neural tube patterning. Genetic studies indicate that IFT proteins are required for Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling downstream of the Smoothened and Patched membrane proteins but upstream of the Glioma (Gli transcription factors. However, the role that IFT proteins play in transduction of Shh signaling and the importance of cilia in this process remain unknown. Here we provide insights into the mechanism by which defects in an IFT protein, Tg737/Polaris, affect Shh signaling in the murine limb bud. Our data show that loss of Tg737 results in altered Gli3 processing that abrogates Gli3-mediated repression of Gli1 transcriptional activity. In contrast to the conclusions drawn from genetic analysis, the activity of Gli1 and truncated forms of Gli3 (Gli3R are unaffected in Tg737 mutants at the molecular level, indicating that Tg737/Polaris is differentially involved in specific activities of the Gli proteins. Most important, a negative regulator of Shh signaling, Suppressor of fused, and the three full-length Gli transcription factors localize to the distal tip of cilia in addition to the nucleus. Thus, our data support a model where cilia have a direct role in Gli processing and Shh signal transduction.

  17. Gli2 and Gli3 localize to cilia and require the intraflagellar transport protein polaris for processing and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycraft, Courtney J; Banizs, Boglarka; Aydin-Son, Yesim; Zhang, Qihong; Michaud, Edward J; Yoder, Bradley K

    2005-10-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins are essential for cilia assembly and have recently been associated with a number of developmental processes, such as left-right axis specification and limb and neural tube patterning. Genetic studies indicate that IFT proteins are required for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling downstream of the Smoothened and Patched membrane proteins but upstream of the Glioma (Gli) transcription factors. However, the role that IFT proteins play in transduction of Shh signaling and the importance of cilia in this process remain unknown. Here we provide insights into the mechanism by which defects in an IFT protein, Tg737/Polaris, affect Shh signaling in the murine limb bud. Our data show that loss of Tg737 results in altered Gli3 processing that abrogates Gli3-mediated repression of Gli1 transcriptional activity. In contrast to the conclusions drawn from genetic analysis, the activity of Gli1 and truncated forms of Gli3 (Gli3R) are unaffected in Tg737 mutants at the molecular level, indicating that Tg737/Polaris is differentially involved in specific activities of the Gli proteins. Most important, a negative regulator of Shh signaling, Suppressor of fused, and the three full-length Gli transcription factors localize to the distal tip of cilia in addition to the nucleus. Thus, our data support a model where cilia have a direct role in Gli processing and Shh signal transduction. PMID:16254602

  18. Gli2 and Gli3 Localize to Cilia and Require the Intraflagellar Transport Protein Polaris for Processing and Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaud III, Edward J [ORNL; Haycraft, Courtney J [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Aydin Son, Yesim [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhang, Qihong [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Yoder, Bradley [University of Alabama, Birmingham

    2005-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins are essential for cilia assembly and have recently been associated with a number of developmental processes, such as left-right axis specification and limb and neural tube patterning. Genetic studies indicate that IFT proteins are required for Sonic hedgehog (Shh)signaling downstream of the Smoothened and Patched membrane proteins but upstream of the Glioma (Gli) transcription factors. However, the role that IFT proteins play in transduction of Shh signaling and the importance of cilia in this process remain unknown. Here we provide insights into the mechanism by which defects in an IFT protein, Tg737/Polaris, affect Shh signaling in the murine limb bud. Our data show that loss of Tg737 results in altered Gli3 processing that abrogates Gli3-mediated repression of Gli1 transcriptional activity. In contrast to the conclusions drawn from genetic analysis, the activity of Gli1 and truncated forms of Gli3 (Gli3R) are unaffected in Tg737 mutants at the molecular level, indicating that Tg737/Polaris is differentially involved in specific activities of the Gli proteins. Most important, a negative regulator of Shh signaling, Suppressor of fused, and the three full-length Gli transcription factors localize to the distal tip of cilia in addition to the nucleus. Thus, our data support a model where cilia have a direct role in Gli processing and Shh signal transduction.

  19. The N-Terminal of Aquareovirus NS80 Is Required for Interacting with Viral Proteins and Viral Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Reovirus replication and assembly occurs within viral inclusion bodies that formed in specific intracellular compartments of cytoplasm in infected cells. Previous study indicated that aquareovirus NS80 is able to form inclusion bodies, and also can retain viral proteins within its inclusions. To better understand how NS80 performed in viral replication and assembly, the functional regions of NS80 associated with other viral proteins in aquareovirus replication were investigated in this study. Deletion mutational analysis and rotavirus NSP5-based protein association platform were used to detect association regions. Immunofluorescence images indicated that different N-terminal regions of NS80 could associate with viral proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 and NS38. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the interaction between VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 with different regions covering the N-terminal amino acid (aa, 1-471 of NS80, respectively. Moreover, removal of NS80 N-terminal sequences required for interaction with proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 not only prevented the capacity of NS80 to support viral replication in NS80 shRNA-based replication complementation assays, but also inhibited the expression of aquareovirus proteins, suggesting that N-terminal regions of NS80 are necessary for viral replication. These results provided a foundational basis for further understanding the role of NS80 in viral replication and assembly during aquareovirus infection.

  20. Stimulation of TLR4 by recombinant HSP70 requires structural integrity of the HSP70 protein itself

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luong Michael

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is activated by bacterial endotoxin, a prototypical pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP. It has been suggested that TLR4 can also be activated by damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP proteins such as HSP70. It remains a challenge to provide unequivocal evidence that DAMP proteins themselves play a role in TLR4 activation, as the DAMP proteins used are often contaminated with endotoxin and other TLR ligands introduced during protein expression and/or purification. Results Here we report that the activation of TLR4 on primary human macrophage cultures by recombinant HSP70 is not solely due to contaminating endotoxin. Polymyxin B pretreatment of HSP70 preparations to neutralize contaminating endotoxin caused significant reductions in the amount of TNF-α induced by the recombinant protein as determined by ELISA. However, digestion of HSP70 with Proteinase K-agarose beads also dramatically reduced the TNF-α response of macrophages to HSP70, while leaving levels of contaminating endotoxin largely unchanged relative to controls. Conclusions These results indicate that the stimulatory effect of recombinant HSP70 requires both the presence of endotoxin and structural integrity of the heat shock protein itself.

  1. Transmembrane Protein 184A Is a Receptor Required for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Raymond J; Slee, Joshua B; Farwell, Sara Lynn N; Li, Yaqiu; Barthol, Trista; Patton, Walter A; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Vascular cell responses to exogenous heparin have been documented to include decreased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation following decreased ERK pathway signaling. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which heparin interacts with cells to induce those responses has remained unclear. Previously characterized monoclonal antibodies that block heparin binding to vascular cells have been found to mimic heparin effects. In this study, those antibodies were employed to isolate a heparin binding protein. MALDI mass spectrometry data provide evidence that the protein isolated is transmembrane protein 184A (TMEM184A). Commercial antibodies against three separate regions of the TMEM184A human protein were used to identify the TMEM184A protein in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. A GFP-TMEM184A construct was employed to determine colocalization with heparin after endocytosis. Knockdown of TMEM184A eliminated the physiological responses to heparin, including effects on ERK pathway activity and BrdU incorporation. Isolated GFP-TMEM184A binds heparin, and overexpression results in additional heparin uptake. Together, these data support the identification of TMEM184A as a heparin receptor in vascular cells.

  2. A component of the Sec61 ER protein transporting pore is required for plant susceptibility to powdery mildew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen-Jing; Hanisch, Susanne; Kwaaitaal, Mark Adrianus Cornelis J;

    2013-01-01

    and retrotranslocon pores, the latter being part of the ER-associated protein degradation machinery. We provide support for a model suggesting that the retrotranslocon function of HvSec61βa is required for successful powdery mildew fungal infection. HvSec61βa-GFP and a luminal ER marker were co-localized to the ER...... the EHM, the fungus obtains nutrients from and secretes effector proteins into the plant cell. In the plant cell these effectors interfere with cellular processes such as pathogen defense and membrane trafficking. However, the mechanisms behind effector delivery are largely unknown. This paper provides....... Effector transport across this EHM-ER interface may occur by a vesicle-mediated process, while the Sec61 retrotranslocon pore potentially provides an escape route for these proteins to reach the cytosol....

  3. Arabidopsis VARIEGATED 3 encodes a chloroplast-targeted, zinc-finger protein required for chloroplast and palisade cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Holm, Agnethe; Jenkins, Tom;

    2004-01-01

    The stable, recessive Arabidopsis variegated 3 (var3) mutant exhibits a variegated phenotype due to somatic areas lacking or containing developmentally retarded chloroplasts and greatly reduced numbers of palisade cells. The VAR3 gene, isolated by transposon tagging, encodes the 85.9 kDa VAR3...... protein containing novel repeats and zinc fingers described as protein interaction domains. VAR3 interacts specifically in yeast and in vitro with NCED4, a putative polyene chain or carotenoid dioxygenase, and both VAR3 and NCED4 accumulate in the chloroplast stroma. Metabolic profiling demonstrates...... that pigment profiles are qualitatively similar in wild type and var3, although var3 accumulates lower levels of chlorophylls and carotenoids. These results indicate that VAR3 is a part of a protein complex required for normal chloroplast and palisade cell development....

  4. Arabidopsis VARIEGATED 3 encodes a chloroplasttargeted, zinc-finger protein required for chloroplast and palisade cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Holm, A.; Jenkins, T.;

    2004-01-01

    The stable, recessive Arabidopsis variegated 3 (var3) mutant exhibits a variegated phenotype due to somatic areas lacking or containing developmentally retarded chloroplasts and greatly reduced numbers of palisade cells. The VAR3 gene, isolated by transposon tagging, encodes the 85.9 kDa VAR3...... protein containing novel repeats and zinc fingers described as protein interaction domains. VAR3 interacts specifically in yeast and in vitro with NCED4, a putative polyene chain or carotenoid dioxygenase, and both VAR3 and NCED4 accumulate in the chloroplast stroma. Metabolic profiling demonstrates...... that pigment profiles are qualitatively similar in wild type and var3, although var3 accumulates lower levels of chlorophylls and carotenoids. These results indicate that VAR3 is a part of a protein complex required for normal chloroplast and palisade cell development....

  5. Mutational definition of binding requirements of an hnRNP-like protein in Arabidopsis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leder, Verena [Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University (Germany); Biomolecular Photonics, Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University (Germany); Lummer, Martina [Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University (Germany); Tegeler, Kathrin [Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University (Germany); Biomolecular Photonics, Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University (Germany); Humpert, Fabian [Biomolecular Photonics, Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University (Germany); Lewinski, Martin [Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University (Germany); Schüttpelz, Mark [Biomolecular Photonics, Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University (Germany); Staiger, Dorothee, E-mail: dorothee.staiger@uni-bielefeld.de [Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University (Germany)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We use FCS to investigate binding site requirements for the hnRNP-like protein AtGRP7. • We identify three nucleotides critical for AtGRP7 binding to its own intron. • Mutation of the conserved R{sup 49} abolishes binding altogether. • The paralogue AtGRP8 binds to an overlapping motif with different sequence requirement. • The glycine-rich stretch of a plant hnRNP-like protein contributes to binding. - Abstract: Arabidopsis thaliana glycine-rich RNA binding protein 7 (AtGRP7) is part of a negative feedback loop through which it regulates alternative splicing and steady-state abundance of its pre-mRNA. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate the requirements for AtGRP7 binding to its intron using fluorescently-labelled synthetic oligonucleotides. By systematically introducing point mutations we identify three nucleotides that lead to an increased K{sub d} value when mutated and thus are critical for AtGRP7 binding. Simultaneous mutation of all three residues abrogates binding. The paralogue AtGRP8 binds to an overlapping motif but with a different sequence preference, in line with overlapping but not identical functions of this protein pair. Truncation of the glycine-rich domain reduces the binding affinity of AtGRP7, showing for the first time that the glycine-rich stretch of a plant hnRNP-like protein contributes to binding. Mutation of the conserved R{sup 49} that is crucial for AtGRP7 function in pathogen defence and splicing abolishes binding.

  6. Mutational definition of binding requirements of an hnRNP-like protein in Arabidopsis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We use FCS to investigate binding site requirements for the hnRNP-like protein AtGRP7. • We identify three nucleotides critical for AtGRP7 binding to its own intron. • Mutation of the conserved R49 abolishes binding altogether. • The paralogue AtGRP8 binds to an overlapping motif with different sequence requirement. • The glycine-rich stretch of a plant hnRNP-like protein contributes to binding. - Abstract: Arabidopsis thaliana glycine-rich RNA binding protein 7 (AtGRP7) is part of a negative feedback loop through which it regulates alternative splicing and steady-state abundance of its pre-mRNA. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate the requirements for AtGRP7 binding to its intron using fluorescently-labelled synthetic oligonucleotides. By systematically introducing point mutations we identify three nucleotides that lead to an increased Kd value when mutated and thus are critical for AtGRP7 binding. Simultaneous mutation of all three residues abrogates binding. The paralogue AtGRP8 binds to an overlapping motif but with a different sequence preference, in line with overlapping but not identical functions of this protein pair. Truncation of the glycine-rich domain reduces the binding affinity of AtGRP7, showing for the first time that the glycine-rich stretch of a plant hnRNP-like protein contributes to binding. Mutation of the conserved R49 that is crucial for AtGRP7 function in pathogen defence and splicing abolishes binding

  7. TBC-2 is required for embryonic yolk protein storage and larval survival during L1 diapause in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laëtitia Chotard

    Full Text Available C. elegans first stage (L1 larvae hatched in the absence of food, arrest development and enter an L1 diapause, whereby they can survive starvation for several weeks. The physiological and metabolic requirements for survival during L1 diapause are poorly understood. However, yolk, a cholesterol binding/transport protein, has been suggested to serve as an energy source. Here, we demonstrate that C. elegans TBC-2, a RAB-5 GTPase Activating Protein (GAP involved in early-to-late endosome transition, is important for yolk protein storage during embryogenesis and for L1 survival during starvation. We found during embryogenesis, that a yolk::green fluorescent protein fusion (YP170::GFP, disappeared much more quickly in tbc-2 mutant embryos as compared with wild-type control embryos. The premature disappearance of YP170::GFP in tbc-2 mutants is likely due to premature degradation in the lysosomes as we found that YP170::GFP showed increased colocalization with Lysotracker Red, a marker for acidic compartments. Furthermore, YP170::GFP disappearance in tbc-2 mutants required RAB-7, a regulator of endosome to lysosome trafficking. Although tbc-2 is not essential in fed animals, we discovered that tbc-2 mutant L1 larvae have strongly reduced survival when hatched in the absence of food. We show that tbc-2 mutant larvae are not defective in maintaining L1 diapause and that mutants defective in yolk uptake, rme-1 and rme-6, also had strongly reduced L1 survival when hatched in the absence of food. Our findings demonstrate that TBC-2 is required for yolk protein storage during embryonic development and provide strong correlative data indicating that yolk constitutes an important energy source for larval survival during L1 diapause.

  8. Canavanine-induced longevity in mice may require diets with greater than 15.7% protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Dan L

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary administration of 1% canavanine had been shown to improve survival in female BALB/c mice consuming diets containing 23.4% protein (dry matter basis. Methods In order to determine if this effect also obtains at more moderate dietary protein concentrations, 30 female BALB/c mice were fed a basal diet with 14% protein (15.7% dry matter basis and another 30 were fed the same diet plus 1% canavanine. Results Neither mean (Control 873.2 d, Canavanine 870.0 d; SEM = 34.2 d; P = 0.949 from ANOVA nor median (Control 902 d, Canavanine 884.5 d; P = 0.9058 from Mann-Whitney lifespans differed between groups. Although mean antinuclear antibody (ANA titers did not differ between control and canavanine-treated mice at 833 days of age (19.84 vs 20.39 respectively; SEM = 2.64; P = 0.889 from ANOVA, one canavanine-treated mouse displayed an outlying ANA value of 50 (next lower value = 30 denoting possible early sign of incipient autoimmune disease in that individual. Conclusion There may be an interaction between dietary protein level and canavanine with respect to lifespan in mice.

  9. An accessory protein required for anchoring and assembly of amyloid fibres in B. subtilis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2011-06-01

    Cells within Bacillus subtilis biofilms are held in place by an extracellular matrix that contains cell-anchored amyloid fibres, composed of the amyloidogenic protein TasA. As biofilms age they disassemble because the cells release the amyloid fibres. This release appears to be the consequence of incorporation of D-tyrosine, D-leucine, D-tryptophan and D-methionine into the cell wall. Here, we characterize the in vivo roles of an accessory protein TapA (TasA anchoring/assembly protein; previously YqxM) that serves both to anchor the fibres to the cell wall and to assemble TasA into fibres. TapA is found in discrete foci in the cell envelope and these foci disappear when cells are treated with a mixture of D-amino acids. Purified cell wall sacculi retain a functional form of this anchoring protein such that purified fibres can be anchored to the sacculi in vitro. In addition, we show that TapA is essential for the proper assembly of the fibres. Its absence results in a dramatic reduction in TasA levels and what little TasA is left produces only thin fibres that are not anchored to the cell. PMID:21477127

  10. CREB binding protein is required for both short-term and long-term memory formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, G.; Zou, X.; Watanabe, H.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Shen, J.

    2010-01-01

    CREB binding protein (CBP) is a transcriptional coactivator with histone acetyltransferase activity. Our prior study suggested that CBP might be a key target of presenilins in the regulation of memory formation and neuronal survival. To elucidate the role of CBP in the adult brain, we generated cond

  11. The dyf-3 gene encodes a novel protein required for sensory cilium formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Takashi; Toh, Yoshihiro; Ohshima, Yasumi; Koga, Makoto

    2005-02-25

    Ciliated neurons in animals are important for the reception of environmental stimuli. To understand the mechanism of cilium morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we analyzed dyf-3 mutants that are defective in uptake of a fluorescent dye and abnormal in sensory cilium structure. Expression of green fluorescent protein in sensory neurons of a dyf-3 mutant revealed that the mutant has stunted cilia and abnormal posterior projections in some sensory neurons. The dyf-3 gene encodes three proteins with different N-terminals. The largest DYF-3 protein has 404 amino acid residues that are 38% identical with those of a predicted human protein of unknown function. Expression of a functional dyf-3Colon, two colonsgfp fusion gene is detected in 26 chemosensory neurons, including six IL2 neurons, eight pairs of amphid neurons (ASE, ADF, ASG, ASH, ASI, ASJ, ASK and ADL) and two pairs of phasmid neurons (PHA and PHB). Expression of a dyf-3 cDNA in specific neurons of dyf-3 animals indicated that dyf-3 acts cell-autonomously for fluorescent dye uptake. Reduction of dyf-3Colon, two colonsgfp expression in a daf-19 mutant suggests that dyf-3 expression is regulated by DAF-19 transcription factor, and DYF-3 may be involved in the intraflagellar transport system. PMID:15713455

  12. The Cladosporium fulvum virulence protein Avr2 inhibits host proteases require for basal defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladosporium fulvum (syn. Passalora fulva) is a biotrophic fungal pathogen that causes leaf mold of tomato. During growth in the apoplast, the fungus secretes effector proteins enabling it to establish disease. For most of these effectors, cognate C. fulvum resistance (Cf) loci have been identified...

  13. Mitogen requirement for cell cycle progression in the absence of pocket protein activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foijer, Floris; Wolthuis, Rob M F; Doodeman, Valerie; Medema, René H; te Riele, Hein

    2005-01-01

    Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking expression of all three retinoblastoma protein family members (TKO MEFs) have lost the G1 restriction point. However, in the absence of mitogens these cells become highly sensitive to apoptosis. Here, we show that TKO MEFs that survive serum depletion pass

  14. Smad2/3 Proteins Are Required for Immobilization-induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tando, Toshimi; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Funayama, Atsushi; Kanaji, Arihiko; Hao, Wu; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Oike, Takatsugu; Miyamoto, Kana; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Tomita, Masaru; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy promotes muscle weakness, limiting activities of daily living. However, mechanisms underlying atrophy remain unclear. Here, we show that skeletal muscle immobilization elevates Smad2/3 protein but not mRNA levels in muscle, promoting atrophy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myostatin, which negatively regulates muscle hypertrophy, is dispensable for denervation-induced muscle atrophy and Smad2/3 protein accumulation. Moreover, muscle-specific Smad2/3-deficient mice exhibited significant resistance to denervation-induced muscle atrophy. In addition, expression of the atrogenes Atrogin-1 and MuRF1, which underlie muscle atrophy, did not increase in muscles of Smad2/3-deficient mice following denervation. We also demonstrate that serum starvation promotes Smad2/3 protein accumulation in C2C12 myogenic cells, an in vitro muscle atrophy model, an effect inhibited by IGF1 treatment. In vivo, we observed IGF1 receptor deactivation in immobilized muscle, even in the presence of normal levels of circulating IGF1. Denervation-induced muscle atrophy was accompanied by reduced glucose intake and elevated levels of branched-chain amino acids, effects that were Smad2/3-dependent. Thus, muscle immobilization attenuates IGF1 signals at the receptor rather than the ligand level, leading to Smad2/3 protein accumulation, muscle atrophy, and accompanying metabolic changes. PMID:27129272

  15. The neuronal PAS domain protein 4 (Npas4 is required for new and reactivated fear memories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Ploski

    Full Text Available The Neuronal PAS domain protein 4 (Npas4 is a neuronal activity-dependent immediate early gene that has recently been identified as a transcription factor which regulates the transcription of genes that control inhibitory synapse development and synaptic plasticity. The role Npas4 in learning and memory, however, is currently unknown. Here, we systematically examine the role of Npas4 in auditory Pavlovian fear conditioning, an amygdala-dependent form of emotional learning. In our first series of experiments, we show that Npas4 mRNA and protein are regulated in the rat lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA in a learning-dependent manner. Further, knockdown of Npas4 protein in the LA via adeno-associated viral (AAV mediated gene delivery of RNAi was observed to impair fear memory formation, while innate fear and the expression of fear memory were not affected. In our second series of experiments, we show that Npas4 protein is regulated in the LA by retrieval of an auditory fear memory and that knockdown of Npas4 in the LA impairs retention of a reactivated, but not a non-reactivated, fear memory. Collectively, our findings provide the first comprehensive look at the functional role of Npas4 in learning and memory.

  16. Comments on the minimum number of observations required in the study of protein turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a simple two-compartment model for the analysis of clinical data on protein turnover. The first compartment of the model consists of measuring the catabolic rate by either the clearance method or by using a whole body counter. The second compartment of the model uses the extravascular pool and synthesis rate. A discussion of the model follows the explanation

  17. Capping protein beta is required for actin cytoskeleton organisation and cell migration during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogienko, Anna A; Karagodin, Dmitry A; Lashina, Valentina V; Baiborodin, Sergey I; Omelina, Eugeniya S; Baricheva, Elina M

    2013-02-01

    Capping protein (CP) is a well-characterised actin-binding protein important for regulation of actin filament (AF) assembly. CP caps the barbed end of AFs, inhibiting the addition and loss of actin monomers. In Drosophila melanogaster, the gene encoding CP β-subunit is named capping protein beta (cpb; see Hopmann et al. [1996] J Cell Biol 133: 1293-305). The cpb level is reduced in the Drosophila bristle actin cytoskeleton and becomes disorganised with abnormal morphology. A reduced level of the CP protein in ovary results in disruption of oocyte determination, and disturbance of nurse cell (NC) cortical integrity and dumping. We describe novel defects appearing in cpb mutants during oogenesis, in which cpb plays an important role in border and centripetal follicle cell migration, ring canal development and cytoplasmic AF formation. The number of long cytoplasmic AFs was dramatically reduced in cpb hypomorphs and abnormal actin aggregates was seen on the inner side of NC membranes. A hypothesis to explain the formation of abnormal short-cut cytoplasmic AFs and actin aggregates in the cpb mutant NCs was proffered, along with a discussion of the reasons for 'dumpless' phenotype formation in the mutants.

  18. Canavanine-induced longevity in mice may require diets with greater than 15.7% protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dan L

    2005-02-25

    BACKGROUND: Dietary administration of 1% canavanine had been shown to improve survival in female BALB/c mice consuming diets containing 23.4% protein (dry matter basis). METHODS: In order to determine if this effect also obtains at more moderate dietary protein concentrations, 30 female BALB/c mice were fed a basal diet with 14% protein (15.7% dry matter basis) and another 30 were fed the same diet plus 1% canavanine. RESULTS: Neither mean (Control 873.2 d, Canavanine 870.0 d; SEM = 34.2 d; P = 0.949 from ANOVA) nor median (Control 902 d, Canavanine 884.5 d; P = 0.9058 from Mann-Whitney) lifespans differed between groups.Although mean antinuclear antibody (ANA) titers did not differ between control and canavanine-treated mice at 833 days of age (19.84 vs 20.39 respectively; SEM = 2.64; P = 0.889 from ANOVA), one canavanine-treated mouse displayed an outlying ANA value of 50 (next lower value = 30) denoting possible early sign of incipient autoimmune disease in that individual. CONCLUSION: There may be an interaction between dietary protein level and canavanine with respect to lifespan in mice. PMID:15733319

  19. THE TSC COMPLEX IS REQUIRED FOR THE BENEFITS OF DIETARY PROTEIN RESTRICTION ON STRESS RESISTANCE IN VIVO

    OpenAIRE

    Eylul Harputlugil; Christopher Hine; Dorathy Vargas; Lauren Robertson; Brendan D. Manning; James R. Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    Protein restriction (PR) is important for the benefits of dietary restriction on longevity and stress resistance, but relevant nutrient sensors and downstream effectors in mammals remain poorly defined. We used PR-mediated protection from hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury to probe genetic requirements for the evolutionarily conserved nutrient sensors GCN2 and mTORC1 in stress resistance. One week of PR reduced free amino acids and circulating growth factors, activating GCN2 and mTORC1 repre...

  20. Death by a thousand knives: Multiple BH3-only proteins are required for maximal apoptosis triggered through the BCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Matthew J; Cragg, Mark S

    2016-03-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) represents a key driver of B-cell development. Consequently, multiple mechanisms link inappropriate BCR signaling to apoptosis. Recently, we characterized the molecular regulators involved in lymphoma cells, confirming a major role for Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) and supplementary roles for Bcl-2 interacting killer (Bik) and Noxa, and showing that all 3 proteins are required for maximal apoptosis. PMID:27308607

  1. Molecular and functional analyses of a maize autoactive NB-LRR protein identify precise structural requirements for activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Feng Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant disease resistance is often mediated by nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NLR proteins which remain auto-inhibited until recognition of specific pathogen-derived molecules causes their activation, triggering a rapid, localized cell death called a hypersensitive response (HR. Three domains are recognized in one of the major classes of NLR proteins: a coiled-coil (CC, a nucleotide binding (NB-ARC and a leucine rich repeat (LRR domains. The maize NLR gene Rp1-D21 derives from an intergenic recombination event between two NLR genes, Rp1-D and Rp1-dp2 and confers an autoactive HR. We report systematic structural and functional analyses of Rp1 proteins in maize and N. benthamiana to characterize the molecular mechanism of NLR activation/auto-inhibition. We derive a model comprising the following three main features: Rp1 proteins appear to self-associate to become competent for activity. The CC domain is signaling-competent and is sufficient to induce HR. This can be suppressed by the NB-ARC domain through direct interaction. In autoactive proteins, the interaction of the LRR domain with the NB-ARC domain causes de-repression and thus disrupts the inhibition of HR. Further, we identify specific amino acids and combinations thereof that are important for the auto-inhibition/activity of Rp1 proteins. We also provide evidence for the function of MHD2, a previously uncharacterized, though widely conserved NLR motif. This work reports several novel insights into the precise structural requirement for NLR function and informs efforts towards utilizing these proteins for engineering disease resistance.

  2. Protein Tpr is required for establishing nuclear pore-associated zones of heterochromatin exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Sandra; Dörries, Julia; Boysen, Björn; Reidenbach, Sonja; Magnius, Lars; Norder, Helene; Thyberg, Johan; Cordes, Volker C

    2010-05-19

    Amassments of heterochromatin in somatic cells occur in close contact with the nuclear envelope (NE) but are gapped by channel- and cone-like zones that appear largely free of heterochromatin and associated with the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). To identify proteins involved in forming such heterochromatin exclusion zones (HEZs), we used a cell culture model in which chromatin condensation induced by poliovirus (PV) infection revealed HEZs resembling those in normal tissue cells. HEZ occurrence depended on the NPC-associated protein Tpr and its large coiled coil-forming domain. RNAi-mediated loss of Tpr allowed condensing chromatin to occur all along the NE's nuclear surface, resulting in HEZs no longer being established and NPCs covered by heterochromatin. These results assign a central function to Tpr as a determinant of perinuclear organization, with a direct role in forming a morphologically distinct nuclear sub-compartment and delimiting heterochromatin distribution.

  3. Protein turnover and plant RNA and phosphorus requirements in relation to nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A

    2012-06-01

    Phosphorus (P) is the proximate (immediate) limiting element for primary productivity in some habitats, and is generally the ultimate limiting element for primary productivity. Although RNA can account for over half of the non-storage P in photosynthetic organisms, some primary producers have more ribosomes than the minimum needed for the observed rate of net protein synthesis; some of this RNA may be needed for protein turnover. Two cases of protein turnover which can occur at a much faster rate than the bulk protein turnover are those of photodamaged photosystem II and O(2)-damaged nitrogenase. While RNA involved in photosystem II repair accounts for less than 1% of the non-storage P in photosynthetic organisms, a maximum, of 12% of non-storage P could occur in RNA associated with replacement of damaged nitrogenase and/or O(2) damage avoidance mechanism in diazotrophic (N(2) fixing) organisms. There is a general trend in published data towards lower P use efficiency (g dry matter gain per day per mol P in the organism) for photosynthetic diazotrophic organisms growing under P limitation with N(2) as their nitrogen source, rather than with NH(4)(+), urea or NO(3)(-). Additional work is needed to examine the generality of a statistically verified decrease in P use efficiency for diazotrophic growth relative to growth on other nitrogen sources and, if this is confirmed, further investigation of the mechanism is needed. The outcome of such work would be important for relating the global distribution of diazotrophy to P availability. There are no known P acquisition mechanisms specific to diazotrophs. Phosphorus (P) is the proximate (immediate) limiting element for primary productivity in some habitats, and is generally the ultimate limiting element for primary productivity. Although RNA can account for over half of the non-storage P in photosynthetic organisms, some primary producers have more ribosomes than the minimum needed for the observed rate of net protein

  4. Anaerobic survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by pyruvate fermentation requires an Usp-type stress protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, K; Boes, N; Escbach, M;

    2006-01-01

    :4596-4604, 2004). Anaerobic long-term survival of P. aeruginosa might be essential for survival in deeper layers of a biofilm and the persistent infection of anaerobic mucus plaques in the cystic fibrosis lung. Proteome analysis of P. aeruginosa cells during a 7-day period of pyruvate fermentation revealed......Recently, we identified a pyruvate fermentation pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa sustaining anaerobic survival in the absence of alternative anaerobic respiratory and fermentative energy generation systems (M. Eschbach, K. Schreiber, K. Trunk, J. Buer, D. Jahn, and M. Schobert, J. Bacteriol. 186...... the induced synthesis of three enzymes involved in arginine fermentation, ArcA, ArcB, and ArcC, and the outer membrane protein OprL. Moreover, formation of two proteins of unknown function, PA3309 and PA4352, increased by factors of 72- and 22-fold, respectively. Both belong to the group of universal stress...

  5. Insulin Is Required to Maintain Albumin Expression by Inhibiting Forkhead Box O1 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Lu, Mingjian; Monks, Bobby R; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2016-01-29

    Diabetes is accompanied by dysregulation of glucose, lipid, and protein metabolism. In recent years, much effort has been spent on understanding how insulin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, whereas the effect of insulin on protein metabolism has received less attention. In diabetes, hepatic production of serum albumin decreases, and it has been long established that insulin positively controls albumin gene expression. In this study, we used a genetic approach in mice to identify the mechanism by which insulin regulates albumin gene transcription. Albumin expression was decreased significantly in livers with insulin signaling disrupted by ablation of the insulin receptor or Akt. Concomitant deletion of Forkhead Box O1 (Foxo1) in these livers rescued the decreased albumin secretion. Furthermore, activation of Foxo1 in the liver is sufficient to suppress albumin expression. These results suggest that Foxo1 acts as a repressor of albumin expression.

  6. A chromodomain protein, Chp1, is required for the establishment of heterochromatin in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Sadaie, Mahito; Iida, Tetsushi; URANO, TAKESHI; Nakayama, Jun-ichi

    2004-01-01

    The chromodomain is a conserved motif that functions in the epigenetic control of gene expression. Here, we report the functional characterization of a chromodomain protein, Chp1, in the heterochromatin assembly in fission yeast. We show that Chp1 is a structural component of three heterochromatic regions—centromeres, the mating-type region, and telomeres—and that its localization in these regions is dependent on the histone methyltransferase Clr4. Although deletion of the chp1+ gene causes c...

  7. Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase is required for protein trafficking in Saccharomyces cerevisiae COPI mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jarmoszewicz

    Full Text Available Retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER depends on the formation of vesicles coated with the multiprotein complex COPI. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae ubiquitinated derivatives of several COPI subunits have been identified. The importance of this modification of COPI proteins is unknown. With the exception of the Sec27 protein (β'COP neither the ubiquitin ligase responsible for ubiquitination of COPI subunits nor the importance of this modification are known. Here we find that the ubiquitin ligase mutation, rsp5-1, has a negative effect that is additive with ret1-1 and sec28Δ mutations, in genes encoding α- and ε-COP, respectively. The double ret1-1 rsp5-1 mutant is also more severely defective in the Golgi-to-ER trafficking compared to the single ret1-1, secreting more of the ER chaperone Kar2p, localizing Rer1p mostly to the vacuole, and increasing sensitivity to neomycin. Overexpression of ubiquitin in ret1-1 rsp5-1 mutant suppresses vacuolar accumulation of Rer1p. We found that the effect of rsp5 mutation on the Golgi-to-ER trafficking is similar to that of sla1Δ mutation in a gene encoding actin cytoskeleton proteins, an Rsp5p substrate. Additionally, Rsp5 and Sla1 proteins were found by co-immunoprecipitation in a complex containing COPI subunits. Together, our results show that Rsp5 ligase plays a role in regulating retrograde Golgi-to-ER trafficking.

  8. NOA1 is an essential GTPase required for mitochondrial protein synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kolanczyk, M; Pech, M.; Zemojtel, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Mikula, I.; Calvaruso, M.A.; Brand, M.A.M. van den; R. Richter; Fischer, B.; Ritz, A.; Kossler, N.; Thurisch, B; Spoerle, R.; Smeitink, J A; Kornak, U.

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide associated-1 (NOA1) is an evolutionarily conserved guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding protein that localizes predominantly to mitochondria in mammalian cells. On the basis of bioinformatic analysis, we predicted its possible involvement in ribosomal biogenesis, although this had not been supported by any experimental evidence. Here we determine NOA1 function through generation of knockout mice and in vitro assays. NOA1-deficient mice exhibit midgestation lethality associated wi...

  9. Adhesion Protein VSIG1 Is Required for the Proper Differentiation of Glandular Gastric Epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Odgerel Oidovsambuu; Gunsmaa Nyamsuren; Shuai Liu; Wolfgang Göring; Wolfgang Engel; Adham, Ibrahim M

    2011-01-01

    VSIG1, a cell adhesion protein of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is preferentially expressed in stomach, testis, and certain gastric, esophageal and ovarian cancers. Here, we describe the expression patterns of three alternatively spliced isoforms of mouse Vsig1 during pre- and postnatal development of stomach and potential function of Vsig1 in differentiation of gastric epithelia. We show that isoforms Vsig1A and Vsig1B, which differ in the 3'untranslated region, are expressed in the early ...

  10. A human telomerase holoenzyme protein required for Cajal body localization and telomere synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Venteicher, Andrew S.; Abreu, Eladio B.; Meng, Zhaojing; McCann, Kelly E.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Terns, Michael P.; Artandi, Steven E.

    2009-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that synthesizes telomere repeats in tissue progenitor cells and cancer cells. Active human telomerase consists of at least three principal subunits, including the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the telomerase RNA (TERC), and dyskerin. Here, we identify a holoenzyme subunit, TCAB1 (telomerase Cajal body protein1), uniquely enriched in Cajal bodies, nuclear sites of RNP processing important for telomerase function. TCAB1 associates with...

  11. Activation of resting human T cells requires prolonged stimulation of protein kinase C.

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, N; Ase, K; Kishimoto, A.; Nishizuka, Y

    1990-01-01

    Purified resting human T cells can be induced to express the alpha subunit of the interleukin 2 receptor and to proliferate by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus ionomycin but not with 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin. Determination of the translocation of protein kinase C showed that 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus ionomycin caused a prolonged membrane association of the enzyme for more than 4 hr, whereas 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin induced a tr...

  12. Sorbitol dehydrogenase is a cytosolic protein required for sorbitol metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, María Francisca; Ampuero, Diego; Mandujano, Patricio; Parada, Roberto; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Gallart, Marta; Altabella, Teresa; Cabrera, Ricardo; Stange, Claudia; Handford, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Sorbitol is converted to fructose in Rosaceae species by SORBITOL DEHYDROGENASE (SDH, EC 1.1.1.14), especially in sink organs. SDH has also been found in non-Rosaceae species and here we show that the protein encoded by At5g51970 in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. possesses the molecular characteristics of an SDH. Using a green fluorescent protein-tagged version and anti-SDH antisera, we determined that SDH is cytosolically localized, consistent with bioinformatic predictions. We also show that SDH is widely expressed, and that SDH protein accumulates in both source and sink organs. In the presence of NAD+, recombinant SDH exhibited greatest oxidative activity with sorbitol, ribitol and xylitol as substrates; other sugar alcohols were oxidized to a lesser extent. Under standard growth conditions, three independent sdh- mutants developed as wild-type. Nevertheless, all three exhibited reduced dry weight and primary root length compared to wild-type when grown in the presence of sorbitol. Additionally, under short-day conditions, the mutants were more resistant to dehydration stress, as shown by a reduced loss of leaf water content when watering was withheld, and a greater survival rate on re-watering. This evidence suggests that limitations in the metabolism of sugar alcohols alter the growth of Arabidopsis and its response to drought.

  13. Arabidopsis R-SNARE proteins VAMP721 and VAMP722 are required for cell plate formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis is facilitated by SNARE complex-mediated vesicle fusion at the cell-division plane. However, our knowledge regarding R-SNARE components of membrane fusion machinery for cell plate formation remains quite limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the in vivo function of Arabidopsis VAMP721 and VAMP722, two closely sequence-related R-SNAREs, in cell plate formation. Double homozygous vamp721vamp722 mutant seedlings showed lethal dwarf phenotypes and were characterized by rudimentary roots, cotyledons and hypocotyls. Furthermore, cell wall stubs and incomplete cytokinesis were frequently observed in vamp721vamp722 seedlings. Confocal images revealed that green fluorescent protein-tagged VAMP721 and VAMP722 were preferentially localized to the expanding cell plates in dividing cells. Drug treatments and co-localization analyses demonstrated that punctuate organelles labeled with VAMP721 and VAMP722 represented early endosomes overlapped with VHA-a1-labeled TGN, which were distinct from Golgi stacks and prevacuolar compartments. In addition, protein traffic to the plasma membrane, but not to the vacuole, was severely disrupted in vamp721vamp722 seedlings by subcellular localization of marker proteins. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that VAMP721 and VAMP722 are involved in secretory trafficking to the plasma membrane via TGN/early endosomal compartment, which contributes substantially to cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis.

  14. Somitogenesis clock-wave initiation requires differential decay and multiple binding sites for clock protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Campanelli

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Somitogenesis is a process common to all vertebrate embryos in which repeated blocks of cells arise from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM to lay a foundational pattern for trunk and tail development. Somites form in the wake of passing waves of periodic gene expression that originate in the tailbud and sweep posteriorly across the PSM. Previous work has suggested that the waves result from a spatiotemporally graded control protein that affects the oscillation rate of clock-gene expression. With a minimally constructed mathematical model, we study the contribution of two control mechanisms to the initial formation of this gene-expression wave. We test four biologically motivated model scenarios with either one or two clock protein transcription binding sites, and with or without differential decay rates for clock protein monomers and dimers. We examine the sensitivity of wave formation with respect to multiple model parameters and robustness to heterogeneity in cell population. We find that only a model with both multiple binding sites and differential decay rates is able to reproduce experimentally observed waveforms. Our results show that the experimentally observed characteristics of somitogenesis wave initiation constrain the underlying genetic control mechanisms.

  15. Transport of the outer dynein arm complex to cilia requires a cytoplasmic protein Lrrc6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Yasuko; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Botilde, Yanick; Nabeshima, Ryo; Takaoka, Katsuyoshi; Ajima, Rieko; Lamri, Lynda; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Saga, Yumiko; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Hamada, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lrrc6 encodes a cytoplasmic protein that is expressed specifically in cells with motile cilia including the node, trachea and testes of the mice. A mutation of Lrrc6 has been identified in human patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Mutant mice lacking Lrrc6 show typical PCD defects such as hydrocephalus and laterality defects. We found that in the absence of Lrrc6, the morphology of motile cilia remained normal, but their motility was completely lost. The 9 + 2 arrangement of microtubules remained normal in Lrrc6(-/-) mice, but the outer dynein arms (ODAs), the structures essential for the ciliary beating, were absent from the cilia. In the absence of Lrrc6, ODA proteins such as DNAH5, DNAH9 and IC2, which are assembled in the cytoplasm and transported to the ciliary axoneme, remained in the cytoplasm and were not transported to the ciliary axoneme. The IC2-IC1 interaction, which is the first step of ODA assembly, was normal in Lrrc6(-/-) mice testes. Our results suggest that ODA proteins may be transported from the cytoplasm to the cilia by an Lrrc6-dependent mechanism.

  16. Assembly of Lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli Requires the Essential LapB Heat Shock Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality. PMID:24722986

  17. Assembly of lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli requires the essential LapB heat shock protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-05-23

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality.

  18. Phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid transport between the ER and plasma membrane during PLC activation requires the Nir2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeun Ju; Guzman-Hernandez, Maria Luisa; Wisniewski, Eva; Echeverria, Nicolas; Balla, Tamas

    2016-02-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated hydrolysis of the limited pool of plasma membrane (PM) phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] requires replenishment from a larger pool of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) via sequential phosphorylation by PtdIns 4-kinases and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) 5-kinases. Since PtdIns is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and PtdIns(4,5)P2 is generated in the PM, it has been postulated that PtdIns transfer proteins (PITPs) provide the means for this lipid transfer function. Recent studies identified the large PITP protein, Nir2 as important for PtdIns transfer from the ER to the PM. It was also found that Nir2 was required for the transfer of phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) from the PM to the ER. In Nir2-depleted cells, activation of PLC leads to PtdOH accumulation in the PM and PtdIns synthesis becomes severely impaired. In quiescent cells, Nir2 is localized to the ER via interaction of its FFAT domain with ER-bound VAMP-associated proteins VAP-A and-B. After PLC activation, Nir2 also binds to the PM via interaction of its C-terminal domains with diacylglycerol (DAG) and PtdOH. Through these interactions, Nir2 functions in ER-PM contact zones. Mutations in VAP-B that have been identified in familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou-Gehrig's disease) cause aggregation of the VAP-B protein, which then impairs its binding to several proteins, including Nir2. These findings have shed new lights on the importance of non-vesicular lipid transfer of PtdIns and PtdOH in ER-PM contact zones with a possible link to a devastating human disease.

  19. Solution structure of the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus p9 protein: a rationalization of its different ALIX binding requirements compared to the analogous HIV-p6 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henklein Peter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The equine infection anemia virus (EIAV p9 Gag protein contains the late (L- domain required for efficient virus release of nascent virions from the cell membrane of infected cell. Results In the present study the p9 protein and N- and C-terminal fragments (residues 1-21 and 22-51, respectively were chemically synthesized and used for structural analyses. Circular dichroism and 1H-NMR spectroscopy provide the first molecular insight into the secondary structure and folding of this 51-amino acid protein under different solution conditions. Qualitative 1H-chemical shift and NOE data indicate that in a pure aqueous environment p9 favors an unstructured state. In its most structured state under hydrophobic conditions, p9 adopts a stable helical structure within the C-terminus. Quantitative NOE data further revealed that this α-helix extends from Ser-27 to Ser-48, while the N-terminal residues remain unstructured. The structural elements identified for p9 differ substantially from that of the functional homologous HIV-1 p6 protein. Conclusions These structural differences are discussed in the context of the different types of L-domains regulating distinct cellular pathways in virus budding. EIAV p9 mediates virus release by recruiting the ALG2-interacting protein X (ALIX via the YPDL-motif to the site of virus budding, the counterpart of the YPXnL-motif found in p6. However, p6 contains an additional PTAP L-domain that promotes HIV-1 release by binding to the tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101. The notion that structures found in p9 differ form that of p6 further support the idea that different mechanisms regulate binding of ALIX to primary versus secondary L-domains types.

  20. Analysis of Phosphorylation-dependent Protein Interactions of Adhesion and Degranulation Promoting Adaptor Protein (ADAP) Reveals Novel Interaction Partners Required for Chemokine-directed T cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuropka, Benno; Witte, Amelie; Sticht, Jana; Waldt, Natalie; Majkut, Paul; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Schraven, Burkhart; Krause, Eberhard; Kliche, Stefanie; Freund, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Stimulation of T cells leads to distinct changes of their adhesive and migratory properties. Signal propagation from activated receptors to integrins depends on scaffolding proteins such as the adhesion and degranulation promoting adaptor protein (ADAP)(1). Here we have comprehensively investigated the phosphotyrosine interactome of ADAP in T cells and define known and novel interaction partners of functional relevance. While most phosphosites reside in unstructured regions of the protein, thereby defining classical SH2 domain interaction sites for master regulators of T cell signaling such as SLP76, Fyn-kinase, and NCK, other binding events depend on structural context. Interaction proteomics using different ADAP constructs comprising most of the known phosphotyrosine motifs as well as the structured domains confirm that a distinct set of proteins is attracted by pY571 of ADAP, including the ζ-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa (ZAP70). The interaction of ADAP and ZAP70 is inducible upon stimulation either of the T cell receptor (TCR) or by chemokine. NMR spectroscopy reveals that the N-terminal SH2 domains within a ZAP70-tandem-SH2 construct is the major site of interaction with phosphorylated ADAP-hSH3(N) and microscale thermophoresis (MST) indicates an intermediate binding affinity (Kd = 2.3 μm). Interestingly, although T cell receptor dependent events such as T cell/antigen presenting cell (APC) conjugate formation and adhesion are not affected by mutation of Y571, migration of T cells along a chemokine gradient is compromised. Thus, although most phospho-sites in ADAP are linked to T cell receptor related functions we have identified a unique phosphotyrosine that is solely required for chemokine induced T cell behavior.

  1. Protein import into mitochondria: the requirement for external ATP is precursor-specific whereas intramitochondrial ATP is universally needed for translocation into the matrix.

    OpenAIRE

    Wachter, C.; Schatz, G.; Glick, B S

    1994-01-01

    ATP is needed for the import of precursor proteins into mitochondria. However, the role of ATP and its site of action have been unclear. We have now investigated the ATP requirements for protein import into the mitochondrial matrix. These experiments employed an in vitro system that allowed ATP levels to be manipulated both inside and outside the mitochondrial inner membrane. Our results indicate that there are two distinct ATP requirements for mitochondrial protein import. ATP in the matrix ...

  2. Grsf1-induced translation of the SNARE protein Use1 is required for expansion of the erythroid compartment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Nieradka

    Full Text Available Induction of cell proliferation requires a concomitant increase in the synthesis of glycosylated lipids and membrane proteins, which is dependent on ER-Golgi protein transport by CopII-coated vesicles. In this process, retrograde transport of ER resident proteins from the Golgi is crucial to maintain ER integrity, and allows for anterograde transport to continue. We previously showed that expression of the CopI specific SNARE protein Use1 (Unusual SNARE in the ER 1 is tightly regulated by eIF4E-dependent translation initiation of Use1 mRNA. Here we investigate the mechanism that controls Use1 mRNA translation. The 5'UTR of mouse Use1 contains a 156 nt alternatively spliced intron. The non-spliced form is the predominantly translated mRNA. The alternatively spliced sequence contains G-repeats that bind the RNA-binding protein G-rich sequence binding factor 1 (Grsf1 in RNA band shift assays. The presence of these G-repeats rendered translation of reporter constructs dependent on the Grsf1 concentration. Down regulation of either Grsf1 or Use1 abrogated expansion of erythroblasts. The 5'UTR of human Use1 lacks the splice donor site, but contains an additional upstream open reading frame in close proximity of the translation start site. Similar to mouse Use1, also the human 5'UTR contains G-repeats in front of the start codon. In conclusion, Grsf1 controls translation of the SNARE protein Use1, possibly by positioning the 40S ribosomal subunit and associated translation factors in front of the translation start site.

  3. SGT1 interacts with the Prf resistance protein and is required for Prf accumulation and Prf-mediated defense signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kud, Joanna; Zhao, Zhulu; Du, Xinran; Liu, Yule; Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Fangming

    2013-02-15

    The highly conserved eukaryotic co-chaperone SGT1 (suppressor of the G2 allele of skp1) is an important signaling component of plant defense responses and positively regulates disease resistance conferred by many resistance (R) proteins. In this study, we investigated the contribution of SGT1 in the Prf-mediated defense responses in both Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). SGT1 was demonstrated to interact with Prf in plant cells by co-immunoprecipitation. The requirement of SGT1 in the accumulation of Prf or autoactive Prf(D1416V) was determined by the degradation of these proteins in N. benthamiana, in which SGT1 was repressed by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Pseudomonas pathogen assay on the SGT1-silenced tomato plants implicates SGT1 is required for the Prf-mediated full resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). These results suggest that, in both N. benthamiana and tomato, SGT1 contributes to the Prf-mediated defense responses by stabilizing Prf protein via its co-chaperone activity.

  4. Maintenance of muscle myosin levels in adult C. elegans requires both the double bromodomain protein BET-1 and sumoylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Attenuation of RAS-mediated signalling is a conserved process essential to control cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Cooperative interactions between histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation and sumoylation are crucial for proper attenuation in C. elegans, implying that the proteins recognising these histone modifications could also play an important role in attenuation of RAS-mediated signalling. We sought to systematically identify these proteins and found BET-1. BET-1 is a conserved double bromodomain protein that recognises acetyl-lysines on histone tails and maintains the stable fate of various lineages. Unexpectedly, adults lacking both BET-1 and SUMO-1 are depleted of muscle myosin, an essential component of myofibrils. We also show that this muscle myosin depletion does not occur in all animals at a specific time, but rather that the penetrance of the phenotype increases with age. To gain mechanistic insights into this process, we sought to delay the occurrence of the muscle myosin depletion phenotype and found that it requires caspase activity and MEK-dependent signalling. We also performed transcription profiling on these mutants and found an up-regulation of the FGF receptor, egl-15, a tyrosine kinase receptor acting upstream of MEK. Consistent with a MEK requirement, we could delay the muscle phenotype by systemic or hypodermal knock down of egl-15. Thus, this work uncovered a caspase- and MEK-dependent mechanism that acts specifically on ageing adults to maintain the appropriate net level of muscle myosin.

  5. The Actin-Binding Protein α-Adducin Is Required for Maintaining Axon Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Carvalho Leite

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The actin-binding protein adducin was recently identified as a component of the neuronal subcortical cytoskeleton. Here, we analyzed mice lacking adducin to uncover the function of this protein in actin rings. α-adducin knockout mice presented progressive axon enlargement in the spinal cord and optic and sciatic nerves, followed by axon degeneration and loss. Using stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy, we show that a periodic subcortical actin cytoskeleton is assembled in every neuron type inspected including retinal ganglion cells and dorsal root ganglia neurons. In neurons devoid of adducin, the actin ring diameter increased, although the inter-ring periodicity was maintained. In vitro, the actin ring diameter adjusted as axons grew, suggesting the lattice is dynamic. Our data support a model in which adducin activity is not essential for actin ring assembly and periodicity but is necessary to control the diameter of both actin rings and axons and actin filament growth within rings.

  6. A novel chloroplast-localized protein EMB1303 is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaozhen Huang; Xiaoyan Zhang; Shuhua Yang

    2009-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized the albino mutant emb1303-1 in Arabidopsis. The mutant displayed a severe dwarf phenotype with small albino rosette leaves and short roots on a synthetic medium containing sucrose. It is pigment-deficient and seedling lethal when grown in soil. Embryo development was delayed in the mutant, although seed germination was not significantly im-paired. The plastids of emb1303-1 were arrested in early developmental stages without the classical stack of thylakoid membrane. Genetic and molecular analyses uncovered that the EMB1303 gene encodes a novel chloroplast-localized protein. Mieroarray and RT-PCR analyses revealed that a number of nuclear-and plastid-encoded genes involved in photosynthesis and chloroplast biogenesis were substantially downregulated in the mutant. Moreover, the accu-mulation of several major chloroplast proteins was severely compromised in emb1303-1. These results suggest that EMBI303 is essential for chloroplast development.

  7. Production of recombinant snakehead rhabdovirus: the NV protein is not required for viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M C; Simon, B E; Kim, C H; Leong, J A

    2000-03-01

    Snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV) affects warm water fish in Southeast Asia and belongs to the genus Novirhabdovirus by virtue of its nonvirion gene (NV). Because SHRV grows best at temperatures between 28 and 31 degrees C, we were able to use the T7 expression system to produce viable recombinant SHRV from a cloned cDNA copy of the viral genome. Expression of a positive-strand RNA copy of the 11, 550-nucleotide SHRV genome along with the viral nucleocapsid (N), phosphoprotein (P), and polymerase (L) proteins resulted in the generation of infectious SHRV in cells preinfected with a vaccinia virus vector for T7 polymerase expression. Recombinant virus production was verified by detection of a unique restriction site engineered into the SHRV genome between the NV and L genes. Since we were now able to begin examining the function of the NV gene, we constructed a recombinant virus containing a nonsense mutation located 22 codons into the coding sequence of the NV protein. The NV knockout virus was produced at a concentration as high as that of wild-type virus in cultured fish cells, and the resulting virions appeared to be identical to the wild-type virions in electron micrographs. These initial studies suggest that NV has no critical function in SHRV replication in cultured fish cells.

  8. The NG2 Protein Is Not Required for Glutamatergic Neuron-NG2 Cell Synaptic Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passlick, Stefan; Trotter, Jacqueline; Seifert, Gerald; Steinhäuser, Christian; Jabs, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    NG2 glial cells (as from now NG2 cells) are unique in receiving synaptic input from neurons. However, the components regulating formation and maintenance of these neuron-glia synapses remain elusive. The transmembrane protein NG2 has been considered a potential mediator of synapse formation and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) clustering, because it contains 2 extracellular Laminin G/Neurexin/Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin domains, which in neurons are crucial for formation of transsynaptic neuroligin-neurexin complexes. NG2 is connected via Glutamate Receptor-Interacting Protein with GluA2/3-containing AMPARs, thereby possibly mediating receptor clustering in glial postsynaptic density. To elucidate the role of NG2 in neuron-glia communication, we investigated glutamatergic synaptic transmission in juvenile and aged hippocampal NG2 cells of heterozygous and homozygous NG2 knockout mice. Neuron-NG2 cell synapses readily formed in the absence of NG2. Short-term plasticity, synaptic connectivity, postsynaptic AMPAR current kinetics, and density were not affected by NG2 deletion. During development, an NG2-independent acceleration of AMPAR current kinetics and decreased synaptic connectivity were observed. Our results indicate that the lack of NG2 does not interfere with genesis and basic properties of neuron-glia synapses. In addition, we demonstrate frequent expression of neuroligins 1-3 in juvenile and aged NG2 cells, suggesting a role of these molecules in synapse formation between NG2 glia and neurons.

  9. Defining Protein Requirements of Preterm Infants by Using Metabolic Studies in Fetuses and Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker, Chris H P; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids form one of the main building blocks for fetal and neonatal growth. Despite improvements in neonatal care, including postnatal nutrition, growth faltering and suboptimal outcome after premature birth are still frequently encountered. Nutrition can partly be held responsible. Over the years, there has been a trend in delivering amino acids earlier from birth on and in larger quantities. Unfortunately, little is known about the specific metabolism of proteins, especially during fetal life or during disease. This review gives an overview of different methods of studying metabolism during early life and what we have come to learn so far. Different examples are given on the complex interplay between the placenta and the fetus. From both ovine and human studies, we know that amino acids are not only used for protein synthesis in the fetus, they are also oxidized to a large extent. Postnatally, we have succeeded in improving the nitrogen balance in preterm infants, but the preconditions need also to be improved before concluding that today's policy is optimal. Only by gaining more knowledge on both fetal and neonatal physiology and disease will we be able to further optimize growth and functional outcome in premature infants. PMID:27336406

  10. The Rho-GTPase binding protein IQGAP2 is required for the glomerular filtration barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Yuya; Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Auberger, Ines; Ziegler, Urs; Segerer, Stephan; Cohen, Clemens D; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Loffing, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Podocyte dysfunction impairs the size selectivity of the glomerular filter, leading to proteinuria, hypoalbuminuria, and edema, clinically defined as nephrotic syndrome. Hereditary forms of nephrotic syndrome are linked to mutations in podocyte-specific genes. To identify genes contributing to podocyte dysfunction in acquired nephrotic syndrome, we studied human glomerular gene expression data sets for glomerular-enriched gene transcripts differentially regulated between pretransplant biopsy samples and biopsies from patients with nephrotic syndrome. Candidate genes were screened by in situ hybridization for expression in the zebrafish pronephros, an easy-to-use in vivo assay system to assess podocyte function. One glomerulus-enriched product was the Rho-GTPase binding protein, IQGAP2. Immunohistochemistry found a strong presence of IQGAP2 in normal human and zebrafish podocytes. In zebrafish larvae, morpholino-based knockdown of iqgap2 caused a mild foot process effacement of zebrafish podocytes and a cystic dilation of the urinary space of Bowman's capsule upon onset of urinary filtration. Moreover, the glomerulus of zebrafish morphants showed a glomerular permeability for injected high-molecular-weight dextrans, indicating an impaired size selectivity of the glomerular filter. Thus, IQGAP2 is a Rho-GTPase binding protein, highly abundant in human and zebrafish podocytes, which controls normal podocyte structure and function as evidenced in the zebrafish pronephros. PMID:26154927

  11. Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) protein is required for normal mouse liver development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szunyogova, Eva; Zhou, Haiyan; Maxwell, Gillian K.; Powis, Rachael A.; Francesco, Muntoni; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Parson, Simon H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by mutation or deletion of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Decreased levels of, cell-ubiquitous, SMN protein is associated with a range of systemic pathologies reported in severe patients. Despite high levels of SMN protein in normal liver, there is no comprehensive study of liver pathology in SMA. We describe failed liver development in response to reduced SMN levels, in a mouse model of severe SMA. The SMA liver is dark red, small and has: iron deposition; immature sinusoids congested with blood; persistent erythropoietic elements and increased immature red blood cells; increased and persistent megakaryocytes which release high levels of platelets found as clot-like accumulations in the heart. Myelopoiesis in contrast, was unaffected. Further analysis revealed significant molecular changes in SMA liver, consistent with the morphological findings. Antisense treatment from birth with PMO25, increased lifespan and ameliorated all morphological defects in liver by postnatal day 21. Defects in the liver are evident at birth, prior to motor system pathology, and impair essential liver function in SMA. Liver is a key recipient of SMA therapies, and systemically delivered antisense treatment, completely rescued liver pathology. Liver therefore, represents an important therapeutic target in SMA. PMID:27698380

  12. 15-zinc finger protein Bloody Fingers is required for zebrafish morphogenetic movements during neurulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumanas, Saulius; Zhang, Bo; Dai, Rujuan; Lin, Shuo

    2005-07-01

    A novel zebrafish gene bloody fingers (blf) encoding a 478 amino acid protein containing fifteen C(2)H(2) type zinc fingers was identified by expression screening. As determined by in situ hybridization, blf RNA displays strong ubiquitous early zygotic expression, while during late gastrulation and early somitogenesis, blf expression becomes transiently restricted to the posterior dorsal and lateral mesoderm. During later somitogenesis, blf expression appears only in hematopoietic cells. It is completely eliminated in cloche, moonshine but not in vlad tepes (gata1) mutant embryos. Morpholino (MO) knockdown of the Blf protein results in the defects of morphogenetic movements. Blf-MO-injected embryos (morphants) display shortened and widened axial tissues due to defective convergent extension. Unlike other convergent extension mutants, blf morphants display a split neural tube, resulting in a phenotype similar to the human open neural tube defect spina bifida. In addition, dorsal ectodermal cells delaminate in blf morphants during late somitogenesis. We propose a model explaining the role of blf in convergent extension and neurulation. We conclude that blf plays an important role in regulating morphogenetic movements during gastrulation and neurulation while its role in hematopoiesis may be redundant.

  13. Protein N-glycosylation and N-glycan trimming are required for postembryonic development of the pest beetle Tribolium castaneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walski, Tomasz; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Christiaens, Olivier; De Pauw, Edwin; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-01-01

    In holometabolous insects the transition from larva to adult requires a complete body reorganization and relies on N-glycosylated proteins. N-glycosylation is an important posttranslational modification that influences protein activity but its impact on the metamorphosis has not been studied yet. Here we used the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, to perform a first comprehensive study on the involvement of the protein N-glycosylation pathway in metamorphosis. The transcript levels for genes encoding N-glycan processing enzymes increased during later developmental stages and, in turn, transition from larva to adult coincided with an enrichment of more extensively modified paucimannose glycans, including fucosylated ones. Blockage of N-glycan attachment resulted in larval mortality, while RNAi of α-glucosidases involved in early N-glycan trimming and quality control disrupted the larva to pupa transition. Additionally, simultaneous knockdown of multiple genes responsible for N-glycan processing towards paucimannose structures revealed their novel roles in pupal appendage formation and adult eclosion. Our findings revealed that, next to hormonal control, insect post-embryonic development and metamorphosis depend on protein N-glycan attachment and efficient N-glycan processing. Consequently, disruption of these processes could be an effective new approach for insect control. PMID:27731363

  14. TATA-binding protein (TBP)-like protein is required for p53-dependent transcriptional activation of upstream promoter of p21Waf1/Cip1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidefumi; Ito, Ryo; Ikeda, Kaori; Tamura, Taka-Aki

    2012-06-01

    TATA-binding protein-like protein (TLP) is involved in development, checkpoint, and apoptosis through potentiation of gene expression. TLP-overexpressing human cells, especially p53-containing cells, exhibited a decreased growth rate and increased proportion of G(1) phase cells. TLP stimulated expression of several growth-related genes including p21 (p21(Waf1/Cip1)). TLP-mediated activation of the p21 upstream promoter in cells was shown by a promoter-luciferase reporter assay. The p53-binding sequence located in the p21 upstream promoter and p53 itself are required for TLP-mediated transcriptional activation. TLP and p53 bound to each other and synergistically enhanced activity of the upstream promoter. TLP specifically activated transcription from the endogenous upstream promoter, and p53 was required for this activation. Etoposide treatment also resulted in activation of the upstream promoter as well as nuclear accumulation of TLP and p53. Moreover, the upstream promoter was associated with endogenous p53 and TLP, and the p53 recruitment was enhanced by TLP. The results of the present study suggest that TLP mediates p53-governed transcriptional activation of the p21 upstream promoter.

  15. The polycomb group protein Suz12 is required for embryonic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Bracken, Adrian P; Hansen, Jacob Bo Højberg;

    2007-01-01

    results in early lethality of mouse embryos. Here, we demonstrate that Suz12(-/-) mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be established and expanded in tissue culture. The Suz12(-/-) ES cells are characterized by global loss of H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and higher expression levels of differentiation......-specific genes. Moreover, Suz12(-/-) ES cells are impaired in proper differentiation, resulting in a lack of repression of ES cell markers as well as activation of differentiation-specific genes. Finally, we demonstrate that the PcGs are actively recruited to several genes during ES cell differentiation, which...... despite an increase in H3K27me3 levels is not always sufficient to prevent transcriptional activation. In summary, we demonstrate that Suz12 is required for the establishment of specific expression programs required for ES cell differentiation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that PcGs have different...

  16. A Salmonella protein that is required for resistance to antimicrobial peptides and transport of potassium.

    OpenAIRE

    Parra-Lopez, C; Lin, R; Aspedon, A; Groisman, E A

    1994-01-01

    The ability of invading pathogens to proliferate within host tissues requires the capacity to resist the killing effects of a wide variety of host defense molecules. sap mutants of the facultative intracellular parasite Salmonella typhimurium exhibit hypersensitivity to antimicrobial peptides, cannot survive within macrophages in vitro and are attenuated for mouse virulence in vivo. We conducted a molecular genetic analysis of the sapG locus and showed that it encodes a product that is 99% id...

  17. Estimation of the dietary essential amino acid requirements of colliroja Astyanax fasciatus by using the ideal protein concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Massamitu Furuya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Colliroja, Astyanax fasciatus, is a new aquaculture species, and information on its dietary essential amino acid requirements is lacking. The whole body composition of 120 farmed fish (16.2 ± 8.8 g was determined to estimate the dietary essential amino acid requirement based on the ideal protein concept ((each essential amino acid/lysine x100, and the findings were correlated to the whole body essential amino acid content of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. The dietary essential amino acids, including cysteine and tyrosine, accounted for 5.46, 4.62, 1.16, 3.28, 5.63, 2.01, 2.59, 2.84, 4.66, 3.39, 0.65, and 3.51% of the total protein for lysine, arginine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, methionine+tyrosine, phenylalanine, phenylalanine+tyrosine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine, respectively. There were positive linear and high correlations (r = 0.971 between the whole body amino acid profiles of colliroja and Nile tilapia. Thus, the whole body amino acid profile of colliroja might be used to estimate accurately the essential amino acid requirement.

  18. Stem-loop binding protein is required for retinal cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and intraretinal axon pathfinding in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Fumiyasu; Yoshizawa, Asuka; Matsuzaki, Ayako; Oguri, Eri; Araragi, Masato; Nishiwaki, Yuko; Masai, Ichiro

    2014-10-01

    In the developing retina, neurogenesis and cell differentiation are coupled with cell proliferation. However, molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell proliferation and differentiation are not fully understood. In this study, we found that retinal neurogenesis is severely delayed in the zebrafish stem-loop binding protein (slbp) mutant. SLBP binds to a stem-loop structure at the 3'-end of histone mRNAs, and regulates a replication-dependent synthesis and degradation of histone proteins. Retinal cell proliferation becomes slower in the slbp1 mutant, resulting in cessation of retinal stem cell proliferation. Although retinal stem cells cease proliferation by 2 days postfertilization (dpf) in the slbp mutant, retinal progenitor cells in the central retina continue to proliferate and generate neurons until at least 5dpf. We found that this progenitor proliferation depends on Notch signaling, suggesting that Notch signaling maintains retinal progenitor proliferation when faced with reduced SLBP activity. Thus, SLBP is required for retinal stem cell maintenance. SLBP and Notch signaling are required for retinal progenitor cell proliferation and subsequent neurogenesis. We also show that SLBP1 is required for intraretinal axon pathfinding, probably through morphogenesis of the optic stalk, which expresses attractant cues. Taken together, these data indicate important roles of SLBP in retinal development.

  19. Protein SUMOylation Is Required for Regulatory T Cell Expansion and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao; Wang, Aibo; Ma, Xiaopeng; Demarque, Maud; Jin, Wei; Xin, Huawei; Dejean, Anne; Dong, Chen

    2016-07-26

    Foxp3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for immune tolerance; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying Treg cell expansion and function are still not well understood. SUMOylation is a protein post-translational modification characterized by covalent attachment of SUMO moieties to lysines. UBC9 is the only E2 conjugating enzyme involved in this process, and loss of UBC9 completely abolishes the SUMOylation pathway. Here, we report that selective deletion of Ubc9 within the Treg lineage results in fatal early-onset autoimmunity similar to Foxp3 mutant mice. Ubc9-deficient Treg cells exhibit severe defects in TCR-driven homeostatic proliferation, accompanied by impaired activation and compromised suppressor function. Importantly, TCR ligation enhanced SUMOylation of IRF4, a critical regulator of Treg cell function downstream of TCR signals, which regulates its stability in Treg cells. Our data thus have demonstrated an essential role of SUMOylation in the expansion and function of Treg cells. PMID:27425617

  20. The NG2 Protein Is Not Required for Glutamatergic Neuron-NG2 Cell Synaptic Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passlick, Stefan; Trotter, Jacqueline; Seifert, Gerald; Steinhäuser, Christian; Jabs, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    NG2 glial cells (as from now NG2 cells) are unique in receiving synaptic input from neurons. However, the components regulating formation and maintenance of these neuron-glia synapses remain elusive. The transmembrane protein NG2 has been considered a potential mediator of synapse formation and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) clustering, because it contains 2 extracellular Laminin G/Neurexin/Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin domains, which in neurons are crucial for formation of transsynaptic neuroligin-neurexin complexes. NG2 is connected via Glutamate Receptor-Interacting Protein with GluA2/3-containing AMPARs, thereby possibly mediating receptor clustering in glial postsynaptic density. To elucidate the role of NG2 in neuron-glia communication, we investigated glutamatergic synaptic transmission in juvenile and aged hippocampal NG2 cells of heterozygous and homozygous NG2 knockout mice. Neuron-NG2 cell synapses readily formed in the absence of NG2. Short-term plasticity, synaptic connectivity, postsynaptic AMPAR current kinetics, and density were not affected by NG2 deletion. During development, an NG2-independent acceleration of AMPAR current kinetics and decreased synaptic connectivity were observed. Our results indicate that the lack of NG2 does not interfere with genesis and basic properties of neuron-glia synapses. In addition, we demonstrate frequent expression of neuroligins 1-3 in juvenile and aged NG2 cells, suggesting a role of these molecules in synapse formation between NG2 glia and neurons. PMID:25100858

  1. Ck2-Dependent Phosphorylation Is Required to Maintain Pax7 Protein Levels in Proliferating Muscle Progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia González

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle regeneration and long term maintenance is directly link to the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. In turn, satellite cell fate is influenced by a functional interaction between the transcription factor Pax7 and members of the MyoD family of muscle regulatory factors. Thus, changes in the Pax7-to-MyoD protein ratio may act as a molecular rheostat fine-tuning acquisition of lineage identity while preventing precocious terminal differentiation. Pax7 is expressed in quiescent and proliferating satellite cells, while its levels decrease sharply in differentiating progenitors Pax7 is maintained in cells (reacquiring quiescence. While the mechanisms regulating Pax7 levels based on differentiation status are not well understood, we have recently described that Pax7 levels are directly regulated by the ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4, thus promoting proteasome-dependent Pax7 degradation in differentiating satellite cells. Here we show that Pax7 levels are maintained in proliferating muscle progenitors by a mechanism involving casein kinase 2-dependent Pax7 phosphorylation at S201. Point mutations preventing S201 phosphorylation or casein kinase 2 inhibition result in decreased Pax7 protein in proliferating muscle progenitors. Accordingly, this correlates directly with increased Pax7 ubiquitination. Finally, Pax7 down regulation induced by casein kinase 2 inhibition results in precocious myogenic induction, indicating early commitment to terminal differentiation. These observations highlight the critical role of post translational regulation of Pax7 as a molecular switch controlling muscle progenitor fate.

  2. Chromosome movements promoted by the mitochondrial protein SPD-3 are required for homology search during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Labrador

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Pairing of homologous chromosomes during early meiosis is essential to prevent the formation of aneuploid gametes. Chromosome pairing includes a step of homology search followed by the stabilization of homolog interactions by the synaptonemal complex (SC. These events coincide with dramatic changes in nuclear organization and rapid chromosome movements that depend on cytoskeletal motors and are mediated by SUN-domain proteins on the nuclear envelope, but how chromosome mobility contributes to the pairing process remains poorly understood. We show that defects in the mitochondria-localizing protein SPD-3 cause a defect in homolog pairing without impairing nuclear reorganization or SC assembly, which results in promiscuous installation of the SC between non-homologous chromosomes. Preventing SC assembly in spd-3 mutants does not improve homolog pairing, demonstrating that SPD-3 is required for homology search at the start of meiosis. Pairing center regions localize to SUN-1 aggregates at meiosis onset in spd-3 mutants; and pairing-promoting proteins, including cytoskeletal motors and polo-like kinase 2, are normally recruited to the nuclear envelope. However, quantitative analysis of SUN-1 aggregate movement in spd-3 mutants demonstrates a clear reduction in mobility, although this defect is not as severe as that seen in sun-1(jf18 mutants, which also show a stronger pairing defect, suggesting a correlation between chromosome-end mobility and the efficiency of pairing. SUN-1 aggregate movement is also impaired following inhibition of mitochondrial respiration or dynein knockdown, suggesting that mitochondrial function is required for motor-driven SUN-1 movement. The reduced chromosome-end mobility of spd-3 mutants impairs coupling of SC assembly to homology recognition and causes a delay in meiotic progression mediated by HORMA-domain protein HTP-1. Our work reveals how chromosome mobility impacts the different early meiotic events that promote

  3. Exigências de proteína de bovinos anelorados em pastejo Protein requirements of grazing Zebu steers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Henrique Bevitori Kling de Moraes

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se determinar as exigências proteicas de bovinos anelorados sob pastejo em cinco piquetes de Brachiaria decumbens. Utilizaram-se 27 animais não-castrados, com peso corporal (PC médio inicial de 311,0 kg e idade média de 14 meses. Três animais foram abatidos após o período de adaptação para servirem como referência para as estimativas do peso de corpo vazio (PCVZ e da composição corporal iniciais dos animais mantidos no experimento. Dos 24 animais restantes, quatro foram designados ao grupo mantença, que teve tempo de pastejo restrito. Os 20 demais foram distribuídos em quatro tratamentos: mistura mineral, autocontrole e duas frequências de alimentação: três vezes/semana (às segunda, quartas e sextas-feiras ou diariamente. As exigências líquidas de proteína para ganho diminuíram com o aumento do peso vivo (PV dos animais. A exigência líquida de proteína encontrada para um animal com peso corporal de 250 kg foi de 153,71 g/kg GPCVZ, enquanto para um animal de 400 kg foi de 141,86 g/kg GPCVZ. A seguinte equação foi obtida para estimativa da proteína retida em relação ao ganho de peso vivo em jejum (GPVJ e da energia retida (ER: PR (g/dia = -34,6109 + 257,956*GPVJ – 17,01*ER. As exigências de proteína metabolizável estimadas para mantença e ganho de peso foram de 357,77 e 288,33 g/kg PC, respectivamente, para um bovino não-castrado de 400 kg de PC sob pastejo. Animais que consomem suplementos proteicos apresentam maiores exigências de proteína degradável no rúmen (PDR em comparação a animais sem suplementação, em virtude do maior consumo de nutrientes digestíveis totais. Para um animal de 400 kg de PV sob suplementação, as exigências de proteína degradável no rúmen e proteína não-degradável no rúmen são de 764,22 e 73,89, respectivamente, que correspondem à exigência de proteína bruta de 838,10 g/dia.The objective of this study was to determine the protein requirements of Zebu

  4. Autophosphorylation of the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit is required for rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Doug W.; Chen, Benjamin Ping-Chi; Prithivirajsingh, Sheela; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Story, Michael D.; Qin, Jun; Chen, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway that repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), consisting of Ku and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), is activated by DNA in vitro and is required for NHEJ. We report that DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated at Thr2609 in vivo in a Ku-dependent manner in response to ionizing radiation. Phosphorylated DNA-PKcs colocalizes with both γ-H2AX and 53BP1 after DNA damage. Mutation o...

  5. A Type II Protein Secretory Pathway Required for Levansucrase Secretion by Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus

    OpenAIRE

    Arrieta, Juan G.; Sotolongo, Mailin; Menéndez, Carmen; Alfonso, Dubiel; Trujillo, Luis E; Soto, Melvis; Ramírez, Ricardo; Lázaro HERNÁNDEZ

    2004-01-01

    The endophytic diazotroph Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus secretes a constitutively expressed levansucrase (LsdA, EC 2.4.1.10) to utilize plant sucrose. LsdA, unlike other extracellular levansucrases from gram-negative bacteria, is transported to the periplasm by a signal-peptide-dependent pathway. We identified an unusually organized gene cluster encoding at least the components LsdG, -O, -E, -F, -H, -I, -J, -L, -M, -N, and -D of a type II secretory system required for LsdA translocation ac...

  6. Transcriptional activation requires protection of the TATA-binding protein Tbp1 by the ubiquitin-specific protease Ubp3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Boon Shang; Siew, Wee Leng; Xiao, Benjamin; Lehming, Norbert

    2010-11-01

    Tbp1, the TATA-binding protein, is essential for transcriptional activation, and Gal4 and Gcn4 are unable to fully activate transcription in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae TBP1E86D mutant strain. In the present study we have shown that the Tbp1E186D mutant protein is proteolytically instable, and we have isolated intragenic and extragenic suppressors of the transcription defects of the TBP1E186D mutant strain. The TBP1R6S mutation stabilizes the Tbp1E186D mutant protein and suppresses the defects of the TBP1E186D mutant strain. Furthermore, we found that the overexpression of the de-ubiquitinating enzyme Ubp3 (ubiquitin-specific protease 3) also stabilizes the Tbp1E186D mutant protein and suppresses of the defects of the TBP1E186D mutant strain. Importantly, the deletion of UBP3 and its cofactor BRE5 lead to increased degradation of wild-type Tbp1 protein and to defects in transcriptional activation by Gal4 and Gcn4. Purified GST (glutathione transferase)-Ubp3 reversed Tbp1 ubiquitination, and the deletion of UBP3 lead to the accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated species of Tbp1 in a proteaseome-deficient genetic background, demonstrating that Ubp3 reverses ubiquitination of Tbp1 in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Ubp3 was recruited to the GAL1 and HIS3 promoters upon the induction of the respective gene, indicating that protection of promoter-bound Tbp1 by Ubp3 is required for transcriptional activation.

  7. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Is Required for Central Nervous System Myelination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GABRIELA FRAGOSO; JEFFERY D. HAINES; JANICE ROBERSTON; LILIANA PEDRAZA; WALTER E. MUSHYNSKI; GUILLERMINA ALMAZAN

    2008-01-01

    p38MAPKs是一个激酶家族,负责调节包括细胞迁移、增生和分化在内的多种细胞功能.本文主要介绍p38对少突胶质细胞分化的调节作用.采用PD169316和SB203580抑制p38后,不同分化阶段少突胶质细胞特异性标志物的蛋白和mRNA的聚集减少,包括髓鞘碱性蛋白、髓鞘相关糖蛋白、鞘糖脂、半乳糖酰基鞘氨醇和硫脂.同时,细胞周期调节因子p27kip1和转录因子Sox10的表达也有显著的下降.最为重要的是,p38抑制剂能够通过少突胶质细胞完全和不可逆地阻断背根神经节神经元的髓鞘形成,并阻止轴-胶粘附分子Caspr的轴膜组装.本实验结果提示p38MAPKs在OLGs成熟和启动髓鞘形成的关键调控步骤中扮演了重要角色.%The p38 MAPKs are a family of kinases that regulate a number of cellular functions including cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Here, we report that p38 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation. Inhibition of p38 with PD169316 and SB203580 prevented accumulation of protein and mRNA of cell-stage specific markers characteristic of differentiated oligodendrocytes, including myelin basic protein, myelin-associated glycoprotein, and the glycosphingolipids, galactosylceramide and sulfatide. In addition, the cell cycle regulator p27kip1 and the transcription factor Sox10 were also significantly reduced. Most significantly, p38 inhibitors completely and irreversibly blocked myelination of dorsal root ganglion neurons by oligodendrocytes and prevented the axolemmal organization of the axo-glial adhesion molecule Caspr. Our results suggest a role(s) for this kinase in key regulatory steps in the maturation of OLGs and initiation of myelination.

  8. Determination of protein and amino acid requirements of lactating sows using a population-based factorial approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strathe, Anja Varmløse; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Theil, P. K.;

    2015-01-01

    Determination of appropriate nutritional requirements is essential to optimize the productivity and longevity of lactating sows. The current recommendations for requirements do not consider the large variation between animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the amino acid...... for maintenance and milk. The energy balance of the sows was either negative or zero depending on feed intake being a limiting factor. Some parameters in the model were sow-specific and others were population-specific, depending on state of knowledge. Each simulation was for 1000 sows repeated 100 times using...... during lactation. The inclusion of between-sow variation gives information on safety margins when developing new dietary recommendations of amino acids and protein for lactating sows....

  9. The polarity protein Pard3 is required for centrosome positioning during neurulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Elim; Jayachandran, Pradeepa; Brewster, Rachel

    2010-05-15

    Microtubules are essential regulators of cell polarity, architecture and motility. The organization of the microtubule network is context-specific. In non-polarized cells, microtubules are anchored to the centrosome and form radial arrays. In most epithelial cells, microtubules are noncentrosomal, align along the apico-basal axis and the centrosome templates a cilium. It follows that cells undergoing mesenchyme-to-epithelium transitions must reorganize their microtubule network extensively, yet little is understood about how this process is orchestrated. In particular, the pathways regulating the apical positioning of the centrosome are unknown, a central question given the role of cilia in fluid propulsion, sensation and signaling. In zebrafish, neural progenitors undergo progressive epithelialization during neurulation, and thus provide a convenient in vivo cellular context in which to address this question. We demonstrate here that the microtubule cytoskeleton gradually transitions from a radial to linear organization during neurulation and that microtubules function in conjunction with the polarity protein Pard3 to mediate centrosome positioning. Pard3 depletion results in hydrocephalus, a defect often associated with abnormal cerebrospinal fluid flow that has been linked to cilia defects. These findings thus bring to focus cellular events occurring during neurulation and reveal novel molecular mechanisms implicated in centrosome positioning.

  10. A conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is required for mating in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangye; Chen, Jing; Lane, Shelley; Liu, Haoping

    2002-12-01

    Candida albicans had been thought to lack a mating process until the recent discovery of a mating type-like locus and mating between MTLa and MTL(alpha) strains. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms that regulate mating in C. albicans, we examined the function of Cph1 and its upstream mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway in mating, as they are homologues of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that overexpressing CPH1 in MTLa, but not in MTLa/alpha strains, induced the transcription of orthologues of S. cerevisiae pheromone-induced genes and also increased mating efficiency. Furthermore, cph1 and hst7 mutants were completely defective in mating, and cst20 and cek1 mutants showed reduced mating efficiency, as in S. cerevisiae. The partial mating defect in cek1 results from the presence of a functionally redundant MAP kinase, Cek2. CEK2 complemented the mating defect of a fus3 kss1 mutant of S. cerevisiae and was expressed only in MTLa or MTL(alpha), but not in MTLa/alpha cell types. Moreover, a cek1 cek2 double mutant was completely defective in mating. Our data suggest that the conserved MAP kinase pathway regulates mating in C. albicans. We also observed that C. albicans mating efficiency was greatly affected by medium composition, indicating the potential involvement of nutrient-sensing pathways in mating in addition to the MAP kinase pathway. PMID:12453219

  11. The Dysferlin Domain-Only Protein, Spo73, Is Required for Prospore Membrane Extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Yuuya; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi S; Tanaka, Takayuki; Inoue, Ichiro; Suda, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Nakanishi, Hideki; Nakamura, Shugo; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a developmental process in which an ascus containing four haploid spores forms from a diploid cell. During this process, newly formed membrane structures called prospore membranes extend along the nuclear envelope and engulf and package daughter nuclei along with cytosol and organelles to form precursors of spores. Proteins involved in prospore membrane extension, Vps13 and Spo71, have recently been reported; however, the overall mechanism of membrane extension remains unclear. Here, we identified Spo73 as an additional factor involved in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of a spo73∆ mutant revealed that it shows defects similar to those of a spo71∆ mutant during prospore membrane formation. Spo73 localizes to the prospore membrane, and this localization is independent of Spo71 and Vps13. In contrast, a Spo73 protein carrying mutations in a surface basic patch mislocalizes to the cytoplasm and overexpression of Spo71 can partially rescue localization to the prospore membrane. Similar to spo71∆ mutants, spo73∆ mutants display genetic interactions with the mutations in the SMA2 and SPO1 genes involved in prospore membrane bending. Further, our bioinformatic analysis revealed that Spo73 is a dysferlin domain-only protein. Thus, these results suggest that a dysferlin domain-only protein, Spo73, functions with a dual pleckstrin homology domain protein, Spo71, in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of Spo73 will provide insights into the conserved function of dysferlin domains, which is related to dysferlinopathy. IMPORTANCE Prospore membrane formation consists of de novo double-membrane formation, which occurs during the developmental process of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Membranes are formed into their proper size and shape, and thus, prospore membrane formation has been studied as a general model of membrane formation. We identified SPO73, previously shown to be required for spore wall formation

  12. The insulator protein BEAF-32 is required for Hippo pathway activity in the terminal differentiation of neuronal subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukam, David; Viets, Kayla; Anderson, Caitlin; Zhou, Cyrus; DeFord, Peter; Yan, Jenny; Cao, Jinshuai; Johnston, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The Hippo pathway is crucial for not only normal growth and apoptosis but also cell fate specification during development. What controls Hippo pathway activity during cell fate specification is incompletely understood. In this article, we identify the insulator protein BEAF-32 as a regulator of Hippo pathway activity in Drosophila photoreceptor differentiation. Though morphologically uniform, the fly eye is composed of two subtypes of R8 photoreceptor neurons defined by expression of light-detecting Rhodopsin proteins. In one R8 subtype, active Hippo signaling induces Rhodopsin 6 (Rh6) and represses Rhodopsin 5 (Rh5), whereas in the other subtype, inactive Hippo signaling induces Rh5 and represses Rh6. The activity state of the Hippo pathway in R8 cells is determined by the expression of warts, a core pathway kinase, which interacts with the growth regulator melted in a double-negative feedback loop. We show that BEAF-32 is required for expression of warts and repression of melted Furthermore, BEAF-32 plays a second role downstream of Warts to induce Rh6 and prevent Rh5 fate. BEAF-32 is dispensable for Warts feedback, indicating that BEAF-32 differentially regulates warts and Rhodopsins. Loss of BEAF-32 does not noticeably impair the functions of the Hippo pathway in eye growth regulation. Our study identifies a context-specific regulator of Hippo pathway activity in post-mitotic neuronal fate, and reveals a developmentally specific role for a broadly expressed insulator protein. PMID:27226322

  13. The SLO1 PPR protein is required for RNA editing at multiple sites with similar upstream sequences in Arabidopsis mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Tzu-Ying; Tseng, Ching-Chih; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2010-08-01

    In Arabidopsis, RNA editing changes more than 500 cytidines to uridines in mitochondrial transcripts. The editing enzyme and co-factors involved in these processes are largely unknown. We have identified a nuclear gene SLOW GROWTH1 (SLO1) encoding an E motif-containing pentatricopeptide repeat protein that is required for RNA editing of nad4 and nad9 in Arabidopsis mitochondria. The SLO1 protein is localized to the mitochondrion, and its absence gives rise to small plants with slow growth and delayed development. A survey of approximately 500 mitochondrial RNA editing sites in Arabidopsis reveals that the editing of two sites, nad4-449 and nad9-328, is abolished in the slo1 mutants. Sequence comparison in the upstream (from -1 to -15 bp) of nad4-449 and nad9-328 editing sites shows that nine of the 15 nucleotides are identical. In addition to RNA editing, we used RNA gel blot analysis to compare the abundance and banding patterns of mitochondrial transcripts between the wild type and slo1 mutants. Of the 79 genes and open reading frames examined, steady-state levels of 56 mitochondrial transcripts are increased in the slo1 mutants. These results suggest that the SLO1 protein may indirectly regulate plant growth and development via affecting mitochondrial RNA editing and gene expression.

  14. Talpid3-binding centrosomal protein Cep120 is required for centriole duplication and proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanqing Wu

    Full Text Available Granule neuron progenitors (GNPs are the most abundant neuronal type in the cerebellum. GNP proliferation and thus cerebellar development require Sonic hedgehog (Shh secreted from Purkinje cells. Shh signaling occurs in primary cilia originating from the mother centriole. Centrioles replicate only once during a typical cell cycle and are responsible for mitotic spindle assembly and organization. Recent studies have linked cilia function to cerebellar morphogenesis, but the role of centriole duplication in cerebellar development is not known. Here we show that centrosomal protein Cep120 is asymmetrically localized to the daughter centriole through its interaction with Talpid3 (Ta3, another centrosomal protein. Cep120 null mutant mice die in early gestation with abnormal heart looping. Inactivation of Cep120 in the central nervous system leads to both hydrocephalus, due to the loss of cilia on ependymal cells, and severe cerebellar hypoplasia, due to the failed proliferation of GNPs. The mutant GNPs lack Hedgehog pathway activity. Cell biological studies show that the loss of Cep120 results in failed centriole duplication and consequently ciliogenesis, which together underlie Cep120 mutant cerebellar hypoplasia. Thus, our study for the first time links a centrosomal protein necessary for centriole duplication to cerebellar morphogenesis.

  15. Requirements of Slm proteins for proper eisosome organization, endocytic trafficking and recycling in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chitra Kamble; Sandhya Jain; Erin Murphy; Kyoungtae Kim

    2011-03-01

    Eisosomes are large immobile assemblies at the cortex of a cell under the membrane compartment of Can1 (MCC) in yeast. Slm1 has recently been identified as an MCC component that acts downstream of Mss4 in a pathway that regulates actin cytoskeleton organization in response to stress. In this study, we showed that inactivation of Slm proteins disrupts proper localization of the primary eisosome marker Pil1, providing evidence that Slm proteins play a role in eisosome organization. Furthermore, we found that slmts mutant cells exhibit actin defects in both the ability to polarize cortical F-actin and the formation of cytoplasmic actin cables even at the permissive temperature (30°C). We further demonstrated that the actin defect accounts for the slow traffic of FM4-64-labelled endosome in the cytoplasm, supporting the notion that intact actin is essential for endosome trafficking. However, our real-time microscopic analysis of Abp1-RFP revealed that the actin defect in slmts cells was not accompanied by a noticeable defect in actin patch internalization during receptor-mediated endocytosis. In addition, we found that slmts cells displayed impaired membrane recycling and that recycling occurred in an actin-independent manner. Our data provide evidence for the requirement of Slm proteins in eisosome organization and endosome trafficking and recycling.

  16. The Evolutionarily Conserved Protein PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 Is Required for Efficient Manganese Uptake at the Thylakoid Membrane in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Anja; Steinberger, Iris; Herdean, Andrei; Gandini, Chiara; Eisenhut, Marion; Kurz, Samantha; Morper, Anna; Hoecker, Natalie; Rühle, Thilo; Labs, Mathias; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Geimer, Stefan; Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Husted, Søren; Weber, Andreas P M; Spetea, Cornelia; Leister, Dario

    2016-04-01

    In plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-driven oxidation of water. The oxygen-evolving complex of PSII is a Mn4CaO5 cluster embedded in a well-defined protein environment in the thylakoid membrane. However, transport of manganese and calcium into the thylakoid lumen remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 (PAM71) is an integral thylakoid membrane protein involved in Mn(2+) and Ca(2+) homeostasis in chloroplasts. This protein is required for normal operation of the oxygen-evolving complex (as evidenced by oxygen evolution rates) and for manganese incorporation. Manganese binding to PSII was severely reduced in pam71 thylakoids, particularly in PSII supercomplexes. In cation partitioning assays with intact chloroplasts, Mn(2+) and Ca(2+) ions were differently sequestered in pam71, with Ca(2+) enriched in pam71 thylakoids relative to the wild type. The changes in Ca(2+) homeostasis were accompanied by an increased contribution of the transmembrane electrical potential to the proton motive force across the thylakoid membrane. PSII activity in pam71 plants and the corresponding Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant cgld1 was restored by supplementation with Mn(2+), but not Ca(2+) Furthermore, PAM71 suppressed the Mn(2+)-sensitive phenotype of the yeast mutant Δpmr1 Therefore, PAM71 presumably functions in Mn(2+) uptake into thylakoids to ensure optimal PSII performance. PMID:27020959

  17. A Novel C2-Domain Phospholipid-Binding Protein,OsPBP1.Is Required for Pollen Fertility in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Qiang Yang; Ying Lai; Mei-Na Li; Wen-Ying Xu; Yong-Biao Xue

    2008-01-01

    Pollen fertility is a crucial factor for successful pollination and essential for seed formation.Recent studies have suggested that a diverse range of internal and external factors,signaling components and their related pathways are likely involved in pollen fertility.Here,we reporta single C2-domain containing protein.OsPBPl.initially identified through cDNA microarray analysis.OsP8P1 is a single copy gene and preferentially expressed in pistil and pollen but downregulated by pollination.OsPBP1 had a calcium concentration-dependent phospholipid-binding activity and was localized mainly in cytoplasm and nucleus,but translocated onto the plasma membrane in response to an intracellular Ca2+increase.Pollen grains of antisense OsPBP1 transgenic Iines were largely nonviable.germinated poorly in vitro and of low fertility,OsPBP1 protein was localized in a region peripheral to pollen wall and vesicles of elongating pollen tube.and its repressed expression reduced substantially this association and led to alteration of microfilament polymerization during pollen germination.Taken together,these results indicate that OsPBP1 is a novel functional C2-domain phosphoIipids-binding protein that is required for pollen fertility likely by regulating Ca2+ and phospholipid signaling pathways.

  18. Sip1, an AP-1 accessory protein in fission yeast, is required for localization of Rho3 GTPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    Full Text Available Rho family GTPases act as molecular switches to regulate a range of physiological functions, including the regulation of the actin-based cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, cell morphology, nuclear gene expression, and cell growth. Rho function is regulated by its ability to bind GTP and by its localization. We previously demonstrated functional and physical interactions between Rho3 and the clathrin-associated adaptor protein-1 (AP-1 complex, which revealed a role of Rho3 in regulating Golgi/endosomal trafficking in fission yeast. Sip1, a conserved AP-1 accessory protein, recruits the AP-1 complex to the Golgi/endosomes through physical interaction. In this study, we showed that Sip1 is required for Rho3 localization. First, overexpression of rho3⁺ suppressed defective membrane trafficking associated with sip1-i4 mutant cells, including defects in vacuolar fusion, Golgi/endosomal trafficking and secretion. Notably, Sip1 interacted with Rho3, and GFP-Rho3, similar to Apm1-GFP, did not properly localize to the Golgi/endosomes in sip1-i4 mutant cells at 27°C. Interestingly, the C-terminal region of Sip1 is required for its localization to the Golgi/endosomes, because Sip1-i4-GFP protein failed to properly localize to Golgi/endosomes, whereas the fluorescence of Sip1ΔN mutant protein co-localized with that of FM4-64. Consistently, in the sip1-i4 mutant cells, which lack the C-terminal region of Sip1, binding between Apm1 and Rho3 was greatly impaired, presumably due to mislocalization of these proteins in the sip1-i4 mutant cells. Furthermore, the interaction between Apm1 and Rho3 as well as Rho3 localization to the Golgi/endosomes were significantly rescued in sip1-i4 mutant cells by the expression of Sip1ΔN. Taken together, these results suggest that Sip1 recruits Rho3 to the Golgi/endosomes through physical interaction and enhances the formation of the Golgi/endosome AP-1/Rho3 complex, thereby promoting crosstalk between AP-1 and Rho3 in

  19. Sip1, an AP-1 accessory protein in fission yeast, is required for localization of Rho3 GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Li, Cuifang; Kita, Ayako; Katayama, Yuta; Kubouchi, Koji; Udo, Masako; Imanaka, Yukako; Ueda, Shiho; Masuko, Takashi; Sugiura, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    Rho family GTPases act as molecular switches to regulate a range of physiological functions, including the regulation of the actin-based cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, cell morphology, nuclear gene expression, and cell growth. Rho function is regulated by its ability to bind GTP and by its localization. We previously demonstrated functional and physical interactions between Rho3 and the clathrin-associated adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) complex, which revealed a role of Rho3 in regulating Golgi/endosomal trafficking in fission yeast. Sip1, a conserved AP-1 accessory protein, recruits the AP-1 complex to the Golgi/endosomes through physical interaction. In this study, we showed that Sip1 is required for Rho3 localization. First, overexpression of rho3⁺ suppressed defective membrane trafficking associated with sip1-i4 mutant cells, including defects in vacuolar fusion, Golgi/endosomal trafficking and secretion. Notably, Sip1 interacted with Rho3, and GFP-Rho3, similar to Apm1-GFP, did not properly localize to the Golgi/endosomes in sip1-i4 mutant cells at 27°C. Interestingly, the C-terminal region of Sip1 is required for its localization to the Golgi/endosomes, because Sip1-i4-GFP protein failed to properly localize to Golgi/endosomes, whereas the fluorescence of Sip1ΔN mutant protein co-localized with that of FM4-64. Consistently, in the sip1-i4 mutant cells, which lack the C-terminal region of Sip1, binding between Apm1 and Rho3 was greatly impaired, presumably due to mislocalization of these proteins in the sip1-i4 mutant cells. Furthermore, the interaction between Apm1 and Rho3 as well as Rho3 localization to the Golgi/endosomes were significantly rescued in sip1-i4 mutant cells by the expression of Sip1ΔN. Taken together, these results suggest that Sip1 recruits Rho3 to the Golgi/endosomes through physical interaction and enhances the formation of the Golgi/endosome AP-1/Rho3 complex, thereby promoting crosstalk between AP-1 and Rho3 in the regulation of

  20. The MCM-binding protein ETG1 aids sister chromatid cohesion required for postreplicative homologous recombination repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Takahashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA replication process represents a source of DNA stress that causes potentially spontaneous genome damage. This effect might be strengthened by mutations in crucial replication factors, requiring the activation of DNA damage checkpoints to enable DNA repair before anaphase onset. Here, we demonstrate that depletion of the evolutionarily conserved minichromosome maintenance helicase-binding protein ETG1 of Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in a stringent late G2 cell cycle arrest. This arrest correlated with a partial loss of sister chromatid cohesion. The lack-of-cohesion phenotype was intensified in plants without functional CTF18, a replication fork factor needed for cohesion establishment. The synergistic effect of the etg1 and ctf18 mutants on sister chromatid cohesion strengthened the impact on plant growth of the replication stress caused by ETG1 deficiency because of inefficient DNA repair. We conclude that the ETG1 replication factor is required for efficient cohesion and that cohesion establishment is essential for proper development of plants suffering from endogenous DNA stress. Cohesion defects observed upon knockdown of its human counterpart suggest an equally important developmental role for the orthologous mammalian ETG1 protein.

  1. The Microcephaly-Associated Protein Wdr62/CG7337 Is Required to Maintain Centrosome Asymmetry in Drosophila Neuroblasts

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    Anjana Ramdas Nair

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Centrosome asymmetry has been implicated in stem cell fate maintenance in both flies and vertebrates, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we report that loss of CG7337, the fly ortholog of WDR62, compromises interphase centrosome asymmetry in fly neural stem cells (neuroblasts. Wdr62 maintains an active interphase microtubule-organizing center (MTOC by stabilizing microtubules (MTs, which are necessary for sustained recruitment of Polo/Plk1 to the pericentriolar matrix (PCM and downregulation of Pericentrin-like protein (Plp. The loss of an active MTOC in wdr62 mutants compromises centrosome positioning, spindle orientation, and biased centrosome segregation. wdr62 mutant flies also have an ∼40% reduction in brain size as a result of cell-cycle delays. We propose that CG7337/Wdr62, a microtubule-associated protein, is required for the maintenance of interphase microtubules, thereby regulating centrosomal Polo and Plp levels. Independent of this function, Wdr62 is also required for the timely mitotic entry of neural stem cells.

  2. Herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff protein requires a mammalian factor for efficient in vitro endoribonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, P; Jones, F E; Saffran, H A; Smiley, J R

    2001-02-01

    The virion host shutoff protein (vhs) of herpes simplex virus (HSV) triggers global shutoff of host protein synthesis and accelerated mRNA turnover during virus infection and induces endoribonucleolytic cleavage of exogenous RNA substrates when it is produced in a rabbit reticulocyte (RRL) in vitro translation system. Although vhs induces RNA turnover in the absence of other HSV gene products, it is not yet known whether cellular factors are required for its activity. As one approach to addressing this question, we expressed vhs in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of vhs inhibited colony formation, and the severity of this effect varied with the carbon source. The biological relevance of this effect was assessed by examining the activity of five mutant forms of vhs bearing previously characterized in-frame linker insertions. The results indicated a complete concordance between the growth inhibition phenotype in yeast and mammalian host cell shutoff. Despite these results, expression of vhs did not trigger global mRNA turnover in vivo, and cell extracts of yeast expressing vhs displayed little if any vhs-dependent endoribonuclease activity. However, activity was readily detected when such extracts were mixed with RRL. These data suggest that the vhs-dependent endoribonuclease requires one or more mammalian macromolecular factors for efficient activity.

  3. The intermediate filament network protein, vimentin, is required for parvoviral infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fay, Nikta; Panté, Nelly, E-mail: pante@zoology.ubc.ca

    2013-09-15

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) have recently been shown to serve novel roles during infection by many viruses. Here we have begun to study the role of IFs during the early steps of infection by the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM). We found that during early infection with MVM, after endosomal escape, the vimentin IF network was considerably altered, yielding collapsed immunofluorescence staining near the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, we found that vimentin plays an important role in the life cycle of MVM. The number of cells, which successfully replicated MVM, was reduced in infected cells in which the vimentin network was genetically or pharmacologically modified; viral endocytosis, however, remained unaltered. Perinuclear accumulation of MVM-containing vesicles was reduced in cells lacking vimentin. Our data suggests that vimentin is required for the MVM life cycle, presenting possibly a dual role: (1) following MVM escape from endosomes and (2) during endosomal trafficking of MVM. - Highlights: • MVM infection changes the distribution of the vimentin network to perinuclear regions. • Disrupting the vimentin network with acrylamide decreases MVM replication. • MVM replication is significantly reduced in vimentin-null cells. • Distribution of MVM-containing vesicles is affected in MVM infected vimentin-null cells.

  4. RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in human cells reveals requirements for de novo initiation and protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Tragesser, Brady; Xu, Zhili; Stein, Barry; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Kao, C Cheng

    2012-04-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a model positive-strand RNA virus whose replication has been studied in a number of surrogate hosts. In transiently transfected human cells, the BMV polymerase 2a activated signaling by the innate immune receptor RIG-I, which recognizes de novo-initiated non-self-RNAs. Active-site mutations in 2a abolished RIG-I activation, and coexpression of the BMV 1a protein stimulated 2a activity. Mutations previously shown to abolish 1a and 2a interaction prevented the 1a-dependent enhancement of 2a activity. New insights into 1a-2a interaction include the findings that helicase active site of 1a is required to enhance 2a polymerase activity and that negatively charged amino acid residues between positions 110 and 120 of 2a contribute to interaction with the 1a helicase-like domain but not to the intrinsic polymerase activity. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the BMV 1a and 2a colocalized to perinuclear region in human cells. However, no perinuclear spherule-like structures were detected in human cells by immunoelectron microscopy. Sequencing of the RNAs coimmunoprecipitated with RIG-I revealed that the 2a-synthesized short RNAs are derived from the message used to translate 2a. That is, 2a exhibits a strong cis preference for BMV RNA2. Strikingly, the 2a RNA products had initiation sequences (5'-GUAAA-3') identical to those from the 5' sequence of the BMV genomic RNA2 and RNA3. These results show that the BMV 2a polymerase does not require other BMV proteins to initiate RNA synthesis but that the 1a helicase domain, and likely helicase activity, can affect RNA synthesis by 2a.

  5. Protein kinase A regulation of P2X(4) receptors: requirement for a specific motif in the C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David A; Yule, David I

    2010-02-01

    The P2X purinergic receptor sub-family of ligand-gated ion channels are subject to protein kinase modulation. We have previously demonstrated that P2X(4)R signaling can be positively regulated by increasing intracellular cAMP levels. The molecular mechanism underlying this effect was, however, unknown. The present study initially addressed whether protein kinase A (PKA) activation was required. Subsequently a mutational approach was utilized to determine which region of the receptor was required for this potentiation. In both DT-40 3KO and HEK-293 cells transiently expressing P2X(4)R, forskolin treatment enhanced ATP-mediated signaling. Specific PKA inhibitors prevented the forskolin-induced enhancement of ATP-mediated inward currents in P2X(4)R expressing HEK-293 cells. To define which region of the P2X(4)R was required for the potentiation, mutations were generated in the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail. It was determined that a limited region of the C-terminus, consisting of a non-canonical tyrosine based sorting motif, was required for the effects of PKA. Of note, this region does not harbor any recognizable PKA phosphorylation motifs, and no direct phosphorylation of P2X(4)R was detected, suggesting that PKA phosphorylation of an accessory protein interacts with the endocytosis motif in the C-terminus of the P2X(4)R. In support of this notion, using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRF)\\ P2X(4)-EGFP was shown to accumulate at/near the plasma membrane following forskolin treatment. In addition, disrupting the endocytosis machinery using a dominant-negative dynamin construct also prevented the PKA-mediated enhancement of ATP-stimulated Ca(2+) signals. Our results are consistent with a novel mechanism of P2XR regulation, whereby PKA activity, without directly phosphorylating P2X(4)R, markedly enhances ATP-stimulated P2X(4)R currents and hence cytosolic Ca(2+) signals. This may occur at least in part, by altering the trafficking of a population of

  6. THE REQUIREMENTS OF CRUDE PROTEIN BY LARGE WHITE BREEDING SOWS AND PIGLETS IN GHANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.W.A. RHULE

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen Large White gilts at an average initial live weight of 100.39kg were distributed by completely randomized block design over three treatments. There were three cereals-based diets with three different calculated levels of crude protein (CP namely control breeder diet, Diet 1 (13.16% CP, Diet 2 (12.56% CP and Diet 3 (12.01% CP with corresponding lactation diets namely control lactation Diet 1 (LD1 (16.00% CP, Diet 2 (LD2 (14.50%CP and Diet 3 (LD3 (13.20%CP. Additionally there were three creep diets comprising control Diet 1 (CD1 with 23.01%CP, Diet 2 (CD2 with 21.46% CP and Diet 3 (CD3 with 20.00% CP. The average live litter size of sows were 8.50, 8.40 and 6.67 on Diets 1, 2, and 3 respectively (P>0.05. The number of piglets weaned decreased with decreasing CP in the diet being 7.83. 7.80 and 5.33 on Diets 1, 2 and 3 respectively but were not found to be significantly (P>0.05 different. The average birth weights of the piglets were similar at 1.45, 1.34 and 1.40 kg on Diets 1, 2 and 3 respectively (P>0.05. The milk yield by the sows at 28 days of lactation were found to be 3.06, 3.03 and 5.44kg/day on LD1, 2 and 3 and significantly (P<0.05 different being higher on the lowest CP diet. There was inconsistency with the milk yield at 42 days of lactation with significantly (P<0.05 different values of 4.87, 8.33 and 3.60kg/day on lactation with lactation diet 1, 2, and 3 respectively. It was observed that live weight gains by the sows during gestation significantly (P<0.05 increased with decreasing CP levels in the diets and were 30.3, 36.3 and 34.0 kg on Diets 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The ADGs of the piglets on the creep diets were 0.22, 0.17 and 0.19 kg/day on CD1, CD2 and CD3 respectively, and found to be significantly (P<0.05 different. The study indicated that decreasing levels of CP in the diet at gestation could affect the reproductive performance of the Sow. Decreasing CP in the lactation diet significantly affected sow performance

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinases with distinct requirements for Ste5 scaffolding influence signaling specificity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatauer, Laura J; Zadeh, Sheena F; Bardwell, Lee

    2005-03-01

    Scaffold proteins are believed to enhance specificity in cell signaling when different pathways share common components. The prototype scaffold Ste5 binds to multiple components of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating pheromone response pathway, thereby conducting the mating signal to the Fus3 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Some of the kinases that Ste5 binds to, however, are also shared with other pathways. Thus, it has been presumed that Ste5 prevents its bound kinases from transgressing into other pathways and protects them from intrusions from those pathways. Here we found that Fus3MAPK required Ste5 scaffolding to receive legitimate signals from the mating pathway as well as misdirected signals leaking from other pathways. Furthermore, increasing the cellular concentration of active Ste5 enhanced the channeling of inappropriate stimuli to Fus3. This aberrant signal crossover resulted in the erroneous induction of cell cycle arrest and mating. In contrast to Fus3, the Kss1 MAPK did not require Ste5 scaffolding to receive either authentic or leaking signals. Furthermore, the Ste11 kinase, once activated via Ste5, was able to signal to Kss1 independently of Ste5 scaffolding. These results argue that Ste5 does not act as a barrier that actively prevents signal crossover to Fus3 and that Ste5 may not effectively sequester its activated kinases away from other pathways. Rather, we suggest that specificity in this network is promoted by the selective activation of Ste5 and the distinct requirements of the MAPKs for Ste5 scaffolding. PMID:15713635

  8. Trans-translation in Helicobacter pylori: essentiality of ribosome rescue and requirement of protein tagging for stress resistance and competence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Thibonnier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ubiquitous bacterial trans-translation is one of the most studied quality control mechanisms. Trans-translation requires two specific factors, a small RNA SsrA (tmRNA and a protein co-factor SmpB, to promote the release of ribosomes stalled on defective mRNAs and to add a specific tag sequence to aberrant polypeptides to direct them to degradation pathways. Helicobacter pylori is a pathogen persistently colonizing a hostile niche, the stomach of humans. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the role of trans-translation in this bacterium well fitted to resist stressful conditions and found that both smpB and ssrA were essential genes. Five mutant versions of ssrA were generated in H. pylori in order to investigate the function of trans-translation in this organism. Mutation of the resume codon that allows the switch of template of the ribosome required for its release was essential in vivo, however a mutant in which this codon was followed by stop codons interrupting the tag sequence was viable. Therefore one round of translation is sufficient to promote the rescue of stalled ribosomes. A mutant expressing a truncated SsrA tag was viable in H. pylori, but affected in competence and tolerance to both oxidative and antibiotic stresses. This demonstrates that control of protein degradation through trans-translation is by itself central in the management of stress conditions and of competence and supports a regulatory role of trans-translation-dependent protein tagging. In addition, the expression of smpB and ssrA was found to be induced upon acid exposure of H. pylori. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude to a central role of trans-translation in H. pylori both for ribosome rescue possibly due to more severe stalling and for protein degradation to recover from stress conditions frequently encountered in the gastric environment. Finally, the essential trans-translation machinery of H. pylori is an excellent specific target for the development of

  9. A G-Protein β Subunit Required for Sexual and Vegetative Development and Maintenance of Normal Gα Protein Levels in Neurospora crassa

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Qi; Poole, Sheven I.; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2002-01-01

    The genome of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa contains a single gene encoding a heterotrimeric G-protein β subunit, gnb-1. The predicted GNB-1 protein sequence is most identical to Gβ proteins from the filamentous fungi Cryphonectria parasitica and Aspergillus nidulans. N. crassa GNB-1 is also 65% identical to the human GNB-1 protein but only 38 and 45% identical to Gβ proteins from budding and fission yeasts. Previous studies in animal and fungal systems have elucidated phenotypes o...

  10. Ref(2)P, the Drosophila melanogaster homologue of mammalian p62, is required for the formation of protein aggregates in adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezis, Ioannis P; Simonsen, Anne; Sagona, Antonia P; Finley, Kim; Gaumer, Sébastien; Contamine, Didier; Rusten, Tor Erik; Stenmark, Harald; Brech, Andreas

    2008-03-24

    P62 has been proposed to mark ubiquitinated protein bodies for autophagic degradation. We report that the Drosophila melanogaster p62 orthologue, Ref(2)P, is a regulator of protein aggregation in the adult brain. We demonstrate that Ref(2)P localizes to age-induced protein aggregates as well as to aggregates caused by reduced autophagic or proteasomal activity. A similar localization to protein aggregates is also observed in D. melanogaster models of human neurodegenerative diseases. Although atg8a autophagy mutant flies show accumulation of ubiquitin- and Ref(2)P-positive protein aggregates, this is abrogated in atg8a/ref(2)P double mutants. Both the multimerization and ubiquitin binding domains of Ref(2)P are required for aggregate formation in vivo. Our findings reveal a major role for Ref(2)P in the formation of ubiquitin-positive protein aggregates both under physiological conditions and when normal protein turnover is inhibited.

  11. Normocyte-binding protein required for human erythrocyte invasion by the zoonotic malaria parasitePlasmodium knowlesi

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Robert W.

    2016-06-15

    The dominant cause of malaria in Malaysia is now Plasmodium knowlesi, a zoonotic parasite of cynomolgus macaque monkeys found throughout South East Asia. Comparative genomic analysis of parasites adapted to in vitro growth in either cynomolgus or human RBCs identified a genomic deletion that includes the gene encoding normocyte-binding protein Xa (NBPXa) in parasites growing in cynomolgus RBCs but not in human RBCs. Experimental deletion of the NBPXa gene in parasites adapted to growth in human RBCs (which retain the ability to grow in cynomolgus RBCs) restricted them to cynomolgus RBCs, demonstrating that this gene is selectively required for parasite multiplication and growth in human RBCs. NBPXa-null parasites could bind to human RBCs, but invasion of these cells was severely impaired. Therefore, NBPXa is identified as a key mediator of P. knowlesi human infection and may be a target for vaccine development against this emerging pathogen.

  12. Three wall-associated kinases required for rice basal immunity form protein complexes in the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrol, Bastien; Delteil, Amandine; Gobbato, Enrico; Kroj, Thomas; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) play key roles in disease resistance, in particular basal immunity. They recognize patterns produced by the pathogen invasion and often work as complexes in the plasma membrane. Among these RLKs, there is increasing evidence in several plant species of the key role of Wall-associated kinases (WAKs) in disease resistance. We recently showed using rice (Oryza sativa) loss-of-function mutants of three transcriptionally co-regulated OsWAK genes that individual OsWAKs are positively required for quantitative resistance to the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. This finding was unexpected since WAK genes belong to large gene families where functional redundancy is expected. Here we provide evidence that this may be due to complex physical interaction between OsWAK proteins. PMID:26853099

  13. Slow cluster formation of purified human or rhesus T cells requires protein kinase C and LFA-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylar, E H; Molina, C; Báez, I; Kessler, M

    1996-03-01

    Homotropic T cell adhesion, as generally studied, consists of a rapid, transient binding process that is measured over a 15-120 min. period. Here we report a slow type of adhesion process occurring with human or rhesus T cells, purified from peripheral blood, that manifests itself by the formation of rounded, multi-layer clusters which may contain hundreds of cells. The maximal number and size of the clusters peak 1-2 days after the addition of phorbol ester, an absolute requirement. The number of clusters formed is proportional to phorbol ester concentration up to 1.25 ng/mL. Phorbol esters such as phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), phorbol dibutyrate (PDB), and 7-octylindolactam (OIL) induced optimal cluster formation at 1-13 ng/mL, levels slightly higher than that required to induce mitogenesis of purified T cells. Phorbol itself and the alpha-form of the ester were inactive. Both cluster formation and mitogenesis (stimulated by Con A or anti-CD3) are completely inhibited by staurosporin at 12.5 ng/mL. Even at 2.5 ng/mL, 74% of cluster formation was inhibited, which strongly implies a crucial role for protein kinase C. In the presence of accessory cells, T cell clusters were suppressed. Monoclonal Ab such as anti-CD3, mouse anti-CD3 followed by anti-mouse IgG, anti-CD4, anti-CD4A, anti-CD2, anti-CD8, and anti-CD45 did not induce cluster formation. None were inhibitory or stimulatory in the presence of PMA, except for anti-CD3 which enhanced cluster formation by 26%. However, anti-LFA-1 beta-chain (mouse monoclonal) completely blocked cluster formation over the range studied (63-1000 ng/mL) for both human and rhesus cells; rat anti-LFA-1 only blocked human cell adhesion. Anti LFA-1 only partially inhibited T cell mitogenesis. These results show that slow cluster formation shares the LFA-1 and phorbol ester requirements of the rapid adhesion of T cells requiring LFA-1 and ICAM-1. However, cluster occurs at a very low phorbol ester concentration, appears more

  14. Proteins and carbohydrates in nipple aspirate fluid predict the presence of atypia and cancer in women requiring diagnostic breast biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Wenyi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herein we present the results of two related investigations. The first study determined if concentrations in breast nipple discharge (ND of two proteins (urinary plasminogen activator, uPA and its inhibitor, PAI-1 predicted the presence of breast atypia and cancer in pre- and/or postmenopausal women requiring surgery because of a suspicious breast lesion. The second study assessed if these proteins increased the predictive ability of a carbohydrate (Thomsen Friedenreich, TF which we previously demonstrated predicted the presence of disease in postmenopausal women requiring surgery. Methods In the first study we prospectively enrolled 79 participants from whom we collected ND, measured uPA and PAI-1 and correlated expression with pathologic findings. In the second study we analyzed 35 (uPA and PAI-1 in 24, uPA in an additional 11 ND samples collected from different participants requiring breast surgery, all of whom also had TF results. Results uPA expression was higher in pre- and PAI-1 in postmenopausal women with 1 cancer (DCIS or invasive vs. either no cancer (atypia or benign pathology, p = .018 and .025, respectively, or benign pathology (p = .017 and .033, respectively; and 2 abnormal (atypia or cancer versus benign pathology (p = .018 and .052, respectively. High uPA and PAI-1 concentrations and age were independent predictors of disease in premenopausal women, with an area under the curve (AUC of 83-87% when comparing diseased vs. benign pathology. uPA, TF, and age correctly classified 35 pre- and postmenopausal women as having disease or not 84-91% of the time, whereas combining uPA+PAI-1+TF correctly classified 24 women 97-100% of the time. Conclusions uPA and PAI-1 concentrations in ND were higher in women with atypia and cancer compared to women with benign disease. Combining uPA, PAI-1 and TF in the assessment of women requiring diagnostic breast surgery maximized disease prediction. The assessment of these

  15. Microcephalin and pericentrin regulate mitotic entry via centrosome-associated Chk1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibelius, Alexandra; Marhold, Joachim; Zentgraf, Hanswalter;

    2009-01-01

    Primary microcephaly, Seckel syndrome, and microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) are disorders exhibiting marked microcephaly, with small brain sizes reflecting reduced neuron production during fetal life. Although primary microcephaly can be caused by mutations...

  16. SH-2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 is required for IL-4-induced IL-4R expression in spleen cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Xin; HUANG Zan; FAN Jingyi

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the role of SH-2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1, SHP-1, in IL-4-induced IL-4 receptor (IL-4R) expression, we examined IL-4 receptor α-chain (IL-4Rα) mRNA expression in Na3VO4-treated wild type (WT) spleen cells and measured IL-4R mRNA in IL-4-stimulated spleen cells of viable motheaten mice (mev/mev). It is found that IL-4-induced IL-4R mRNA expression was impaired in Na3VO4-treated WT spleen cells and IL-4-stimulated mev/mev spleen cells. Here we show that the impaired IL-4-induced IL-4RαmRNA expression was due to reduced expression of IL-4R that led to impaired STAT6 signaling. We further demonstrate that reduction of IL-4Rαprotein expression in mev/mev spleen cells was due to alteration in cell compositions. In mev/mev spleen, the percentages of CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cells expressing relatively high levels of IL-4R were reduced dramatically while the percentages of Mac-1+ and Gr-1+ cells with relative low levels of IL-4R increased greatly. Despite the profound effect of reduced expression of IL-4R protein, the IL-4RαmRNA expression was comparable in spleen cells of littermate control mice (+/() and mev/mev mice and no differences were found in B cells, T cells, and macrophages, suggesting cell type-specific downregulation of IL-4R expression in macrophages through a posttranscriptional mechanism. Our study suggests that SHP-1 is required for IL-4-meidated function and indirectly regulates IL-4-meidated function in spleen cells by affecting hematopoiesis.

  17. Dimerization of the DYT6 dystonia protein, THAP1, requires residues within the coiled-coil domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengel, Cem; Gavarini, Sophie; Sharma, Nutan; Ozelius, Laurie J; Bragg, D Cristopher

    2011-09-01

    Thanatos-associated [THAP] domain-containing apoptosis-associated protein 1 (THAP1) is a DNA-binding protein that has been recently associated with DYT6 dystonia, a hereditary movement disorder involving sustained, involuntary muscle contractions. A large number of dystonia-related mutations have been identified in THAP1 in diverse patient populations worldwide. Previous reports have suggested that THAP1 oligomerizes with itself via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain, raising the possibility that DYT6 mutations in this region might affect this interaction. In this study, we examined the ability of wild-type THAP1 to bind itself and the effects on this interaction of the following disease mutations: C54Y, F81L, ΔF132, T142A, I149T, Q154fs180X, and A166T. The results confirmed that wild-type THAP1 associated with itself and most of the DYT6 mutants tested, except for the Q154fs180X variant, which loses most of the coiled-coil domain because of a frameshift at position 154. However, deletion of C-terminal residues after position 166 produced a truncated variant of THAP1 that was able to bind the wild-type protein. The interaction of THAP1 with itself therefore required residues within a 13-amino acid region (aa 154-166) of the coiled-coil domain. Further inspection of this sequence revealed elements highly consistent with previous descriptions of leucine zippers, which serve as dimerization domains in other transcription factor families. Based on this similarity, a structural model was generated to predict how hydrophobic residues in this region may mediate dimerization. These observations offer additional insight into the role of the coiled-coil domain in THAP1, which may facilitate future analyses of DYT6 mutations in this region. PMID:21752024

  18. The N-terminus of murine leukaemia virus p12 protein is required for mature core stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Wight

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The murine leukaemia virus (MLV gag gene encodes a small protein called p12 that is essential for the early steps of viral replication. The N- and C-terminal regions of p12 are sequentially acting domains, both required for p12 function. Defects in the C-terminal domain can be overcome by introducing a chromatin binding motif into the protein. However, the function of the N-terminal domain remains unknown. Here, we undertook a detailed analysis of the effects of p12 mutation on incoming viral cores. We found that both reverse transcription complexes and isolated mature cores from N-terminal p12 mutants have altered capsid complexes compared to wild type virions. Electron microscopy revealed that mature N-terminal p12 mutant cores have different morphologies, although immature cores appear normal. Moreover, in immunofluorescent studies, both p12 and capsid proteins were lost rapidly from N-terminal p12 mutant viral cores after entry into target cells. Importantly, we determined that p12 binds directly to the MLV capsid lattice. However, we could not detect binding of an N-terminally altered p12 to capsid. Altogether, our data imply that p12 stabilises the mature MLV core, preventing premature loss of capsid, and that this is mediated by direct binding of p12 to the capsid shell. In this manner, p12 is also retained in the pre-integration complex where it facilitates tethering to mitotic chromosomes. These data also explain our previous observations that modifications to the N-terminus of p12 alter the ability of particles to abrogate restriction by TRIM5alpha and Fv1, factors that recognise viral capsid lattices.

  19. The N-Terminus of Murine Leukaemia Virus p12 Protein Is Required for Mature Core Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Darren J.; Boucherit, Virginie C.; Wanaguru, Madushi; Elis, Efrat; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Li, Wilson; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Bacharach, Eran; Bishop, Kate N.

    2014-01-01

    The murine leukaemia virus (MLV) gag gene encodes a small protein called p12 that is essential for the early steps of viral replication. The N- and C-terminal regions of p12 are sequentially acting domains, both required for p12 function. Defects in the C-terminal domain can be overcome by introducing a chromatin binding motif into the protein. However, the function of the N-terminal domain remains unknown. Here, we undertook a detailed analysis of the effects of p12 mutation on incoming viral cores. We found that both reverse transcription complexes and isolated mature cores from N-terminal p12 mutants have altered capsid complexes compared to wild type virions. Electron microscopy revealed that mature N-terminal p12 mutant cores have different morphologies, although immature cores appear normal. Moreover, in immunofluorescent studies, both p12 and capsid proteins were lost rapidly from N-terminal p12 mutant viral cores after entry into target cells. Importantly, we determined that p12 binds directly to the MLV capsid lattice. However, we could not detect binding of an N-terminally altered p12 to capsid. Altogether, our data imply that p12 stabilises the mature MLV core, preventing premature loss of capsid, and that this is mediated by direct binding of p12 to the capsid shell. In this manner, p12 is also retained in the pre-integration complex where it facilitates tethering to mitotic chromosomes. These data also explain our previous observations that modifications to the N-terminus of p12 alter the ability of particles to abrogate restriction by TRIM5alpha and Fv1, factors that recognise viral capsid lattices. PMID:25356837

  20. Identification of DSB-1, a protein required for initiation of meiotic recombination in Caenorhabditis elegans, illuminates a crossover assurance checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericca L Stamper

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination, an essential aspect of sexual reproduction, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. DSBs are catalyzed by the widely-conserved Spo11 enzyme; however, the activity of Spo11 is regulated by additional factors that are poorly conserved through evolution. To expand our understanding of meiotic regulation, we have characterized a novel gene, dsb-1, that is specifically required for meiotic DSB formation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. DSB-1 localizes to chromosomes during early meiotic prophase, coincident with the timing of DSB formation. DSB-1 also promotes normal protein levels and chromosome localization of DSB-2, a paralogous protein that plays a related role in initiating recombination. Mutations that disrupt crossover formation result in prolonged DSB-1 association with chromosomes, suggesting that nuclei may remain in a DSB-permissive state. Extended DSB-1 localization is seen even in mutants with defects in early recombination steps, including spo-11, suggesting that the absence of crossover precursors triggers the extension. Strikingly, failure to form a crossover precursor on a single chromosome pair is sufficient to extend the localization of DSB-1 on all chromosomes in the same nucleus. Based on these observations we propose a model for crossover assurance that acts through DSB-1 to maintain a DSB-permissive state until all chromosome pairs acquire crossover precursors. This work identifies a novel component of the DSB machinery in C. elegans, and sheds light on an important pathway that regulates DSB formation for crossover assurance.

  1. Neto1 is a novel CUB-domain NMDA receptor-interacting protein required for synaptic plasticity and learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ng

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, a major excitatory ligand-gated ion channel in the central nervous system (CNS, is a principal mediator of synaptic plasticity. Here we report that neuropilin tolloid-like 1 (Neto1, a complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1 (CUB domain-containing transmembrane protein, is a novel component of the NMDAR complex critical for maintaining the abundance of NR2A-containing NMDARs in the postsynaptic density. Neto1-null mice have depressed long-term potentiation (LTP at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, with the subunit dependency of LTP induction switching from the normal predominance of NR2A- to NR2B-NMDARs. NMDAR-dependent spatial learning and memory is depressed in Neto1-null mice, indicating that Neto1 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity and cognition. Remarkably, we also found that the deficits in LTP, learning, and memory in Neto1-null mice were rescued by the ampakine CX546 at doses without effect in wild-type. Together, our results establish the principle that auxiliary proteins are required for the normal abundance of NMDAR subunits at synapses, and demonstrate that an inherited learning defect can be rescued pharmacologically, a finding with therapeutic implications for humans.

  2. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (Srb1) Is Required for Hypoxic Adaptation and Virulence in the Dimorphic Fungus Histoplasma capsulatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Juwen C.; Smulian, A. George

    2016-01-01

    The Histoplasma capsulatum sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), Srb1 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), leucine zipper DNA binding protein family of transcription factors that possess a unique tyrosine (Y) residue instead of an arginine (R) residue in the bHLH region. We have determined that Srb1 message levels increase in a time dependent manner during growth under oxygen deprivation (hypoxia). To further understand the role of Srb1 during infection and hypoxia, we silenced the gene encoding Srb1 using RNA interference (RNAi); characterized the resulting phenotype, determined its response to hypoxia, and its ability to cause disease within an infected host. Silencing of Srb1 resulted in a strain of H. capsulatum that is incapable of surviving in vitro hypoxia. We found that without complete Srb1 expression, H. capsulatum is killed by murine macrophages and avirulent in mice given a lethal dose of yeasts. Additionally, silencing Srb1 inhibited the hypoxic upregulation of other known H. capsulatum hypoxia-responsive genes (HRG), and genes that encode ergosterol biosynthetic enzymes. Consistent with these regulatory functions, Srb1 silenced H. capsulatum cells were hypersensitive to the antifungal azole drug itraconazole. These data support the theory that the H. capsulatum SREBP is critical for hypoxic adaptation and is required for H. capsulatum virulence. PMID:27711233

  3. An essential requirement for β1 integrin in the assembly of extracellular matrix proteins within the vascular wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlo, Kirsten A; Noel, Onika D V; Vora, Roshni; LaRussa, Marie; Fassler, Reinhard; Hall-Glenn, Faith; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa

    2012-05-01

    β1 integrin has been shown to contribute to vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation, adhesion and mechanosensation in vitro. Here we showed that deletion of β1 integrin at the onset of smooth muscle differentiation resulted in interrupted aortic arch, aneurysms and failure to assemble extracellular matrix proteins. These defects result in lethality prior to birth. Our data indicates that β1 integrin is not required for the acquisition, but it is essential for the maintenance of the smooth muscle cell phenotype, as levels of critical smooth muscle proteins are gradually reduced in mutant mice. Furthermore, while deposition of extracellular matrix was not affected, its structure was disrupted. Interestingly, defects in extracellular matrix and vascular wall assembly, were restricted to the aortic arch and its branches, compromising the brachiocephalic and carotid arteries and to the exclusion of the descending aorta. Additional analysis of β1 integrin in the pharyngeal arch smooth muscle progenitors was performed using wnt1Cre. Neural crest cells deleted for β1 integrin were able to migrate to the pharyngeal arches and associate with endothelial lined arteries; but exhibited vascular remodeling defects and early lethality. This work demonstrates that β1 integrin is dispensable for migration and initiation of the smooth muscle differentiation program, however, it is essential for remodeling of the pharyngeal arch arteries and for the assembly of the vessel wall of their derivatives. It further establishes a critical role of β1 integrin in the protection against aneurysms that is particularly confined to the ascending aorta and its branches.

  4. DEAD-box protein Ddx46 is required for the development of the digestive organs and brain in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunya Hozumi

    Full Text Available Spatially and temporally controlled gene expression, including transcription, several mRNA processing steps, and the export of mature mRNA to the cytoplasm, is essential for developmental processes. It is well known that RNA helicases of the DExD/H-box protein family are involved in these gene expression processes, including transcription, pre-mRNA splicing, and rRNA biogenesis. Although one DExD/H-box protein, Prp5, a homologue of vertebrate Ddx46, has been shown to play important roles in pre-mRNA splicing in yeast, the in vivo function of Ddx46 remains to be fully elucidated in metazoans. In this study, we isolated zebrafish morendo (mor, a mutant that shows developmental defects in the digestive organs and brain, and found that it encodes Ddx46. The Ddx46 transcript is maternally supplied, and as development proceeds in zebrafish larvae, its ubiquitous expression gradually becomes restricted to those organs. The results of whole-mount in situ hybridization showed that the expression of various molecular markers in these organs is considerably reduced in the Ddx46 mutant. Furthermore, splicing status analysis with RT-PCR revealed unspliced forms of mRNAs in the digestive organ and brain tissues of the Ddx46 mutant, suggesting that Ddx46 may be required for pre-mRNA splicing during zebrafish development. Therefore, our results suggest a model in which zebrafish Ddx46 is required for the development of the digestive organs and brain, possibly through the control of pre-mRNA splicing.

  5. The DotA protein from Legionella pneumophila is secreted by a novel process that requires the Dot/Icm transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Hiroki; Roy, Craig R.

    2001-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila requires the dot/icm genes to create an organelle inside eukaryotic host cells that will support bacterial replication. The dot/icm genes are predicted to encode a type IV-related secretion apparatus. However, no proteins have been identified that require the dot/icm genes for secretion. In this study we show that the DotA protein, which was previously found to be a polytopic membrane protein, is secreted by the Dot/Icm transporter into culture supernatants. Secreted Do...

  6. Male Sterile2 Encodes a Plastid-Localized Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Required for Pollen Exine Development in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.; Shanklin, J.; Yu, X.-H.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; De Oliveira, S.; Schreiber, L.; Zhang, D.

    2011-10-01

    Male Sterile2 (MS2) is predicted to encode a fatty acid reductase required for pollen wall development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Transient expression of MS2 in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves resulted in the accumulation of significant levels of C16 and C18 fatty alcohols. Expression of MS2 fused with green fluorescent protein revealed that an amino-terminal transit peptide targets the MS2 to plastids. The plastidial localization of MS2 is biologically important because genetic complementation of MS2 in ms2 homozygous plants was dependent on the presence of its amino-terminal transit peptide or that of the Rubisco small subunit protein amino-terminal transit peptide. In addition, two domains, NAD(P)H-binding domain and sterile domain, conserved in MS2 and its homologs were also shown to be essential for MS2 function in pollen exine development by genetic complementation testing. Direct biochemical analysis revealed that purified recombinant MS2 enzyme is able to convert palmitoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein to the corresponding C16:0 alcohol with NAD(P)H as the preferred electron donor. Using optimized reaction conditions (i.e. at pH 6.0 and 30 C), MS2 exhibits a K{sub m} for 16:0-Acyl Carrier Protein of 23.3 {+-} 4.0 {mu}m, a V{sub max} of 38.3 {+-} 4.5 nmol mg{sup -1} min{sup -1}, and a catalytic efficiency/K{sub m} of 1,873 m{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Based on the high homology of MS2 to other characterized fatty acid reductases, it was surprising that MS2 showed no activity against palmitoyl- or other acyl-coenzyme A; however, this is consistent with its plastidial localization. In summary, genetic and biochemical evidence demonstrate an MS2-mediated conserved plastidial pathway for the production of fatty alcohols that are essential for pollen wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

  7. Amyloid precursor protein is required for normal function of the rod and cone pathways in the mouse retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Ho

    Full Text Available Amyloid precursor protein (APP is a transmembrane glycoprotein frequently studied for its role in Alzheimer's disease. Our recent study in APP knockout (KO mice identified an important role for APP in modulating normal neuronal development in the retina. However the role APP plays in the adult retina and whether it is required for vision is unknown. In this study we evaluated the role of APP in retinal function and morphology comparing adult wildtype (WT and APP-KO mice. APP was expressed on neuronal cells of the inner retina, including horizontal, cone bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells in WT mice. The function of the retina was assessed using the electroretinogram and although the rod photoreceptor responses were similar in APP-KO and WT mice, the post-photoreceptor, inner retinal responses of both the rod and cone pathways were reduced in APP-KO mice. These changes in inner retinal function did not translate to a substantial change in visual acuity as assessed using the optokinetic response or to changes in the gross cellular structure of the retina. These findings indicate that APP is not required for basic visual function, but that it is involved in modulating inner retinal circuitry.

  8. The conserved proteins CHE-12 and DYF-11 are required for sensory cilium function in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacaj, Taulant; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2008-02-01

    Sensory neuron cilia are evolutionarily conserved dendritic appendages that convert environmental stimuli into neuronal activity. Although several cilia components are known, the functions of many remain uncharacterized. Furthermore, the basis of morphological and functional differences between cilia remains largely unexplored. To understand the molecular basis of cilia morphogenesis and function, we studied the Caenorhabditis elegans mutants che-12 and dyf-11. These mutants fail to concentrate lipophilic dyes from their surroundings in sensory neurons and are chemotaxis defective. In che-12 mutants, sensory neuron cilia lack distal segments, while in dyf-11 animals, medial and distal segments are absent. CHE-12 and DYF-11 are conserved ciliary proteins that function cell-autonomously and are continuously required for maintenance of cilium morphology and function. CHE-12, composed primarily of HEAT repeats, may not be part of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) complex and is not required for the localization of some IFT components. DYF-11 undergoes IFT-like movement and may function at an early stage of IFT-B particle assembly. Intriguingly, while DYF-11 is expressed in all C. elegans ciliated neurons, CHE-12 expression is restricted to some amphid sensory neurons, suggesting a specific role in these neurons. Our results provide insight into general and neuron-specific aspects of cilium development and function. PMID:18245347

  9. 40 CFR 174.532 - Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab protein in corn; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab protein in corn; temporary exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.532 Section 174.532 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED...

  10. 40 CFR 174.505 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.505 Section 174.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED...

  11. 40 CFR 174.511 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.511 Section 174.511 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS...

  12. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED...

  13. 40 CFR 174.519 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ab2 protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ab2 protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.519 Section 174.519 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED...

  14. 40 CFR 174.518 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Bb1 protein in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Bb1 protein in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.518 Section 174.518 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances...

  15. 40 CFR 174.501 - Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.501 Section 174.501 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED...

  16. 40 CFR 174.510 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.510 Section 174.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS...

  17. Efficient translation of alfamovirus RNAs requires the binding of coat protein dimers to the 3' termini of the viral RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeleman, Lyda; Linthorst, Huub J M; Bol, John F

    2004-01-01

    The coat protein (CP) of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is required to initiate infection by the viral tripartite RNA genome whereas infection by the tripartite Brome mosaic virus (BMV) genome is independent of CP. AMV CP stimulates translation of AMV RNA in vivo 50- to 100-fold. The 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the AMV subgenomic CP messenger RNA 4 contains at least two CP binding sites. A CP binding site in the 3'-terminal 112 nucleotides of RNA 4 was found to be required for efficient translation of the RNA whereas an upstream binding site was not. Binding of CP to the AMV 3' UTR induces a conformational change of the RNA but this change alone was not sufficient to stimulate translation. CP mutant R17A is unable to bind to the 3' UTR and translation in vivo of RNA 4 encoding this mutant occurs at undetectable levels. Replacement of the 3' UTR of this mutant RNA 4 by the 3' UTR of BMV RNA 4 restored translation of R17A-CP to wild-type levels. Apparently, the BMV 3' UTR stimulates translation independently of CP. AMV CP mutant N199 is defective in the formation of CP dimers and did not stimulate translation of RNA 4 in vivo although the mutant CP did bind to the 3' UTR. The finding that N199-CP does not promote AMV infection corroborates the notion that the requirement of CP in the inoculum reflects its role in translation of the viral RNAs. PMID:14718638

  18. Import of frog prepropeptide GLa into microsomes requires ATP but does not involve docking protein or ribosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Schlenstedt, G.; Zimmermann, R.

    1987-01-01

    Frog prepropeptide GLa, a precursor to a secretory protein containing 64 amino acids, was processed and imported by dog pancreas microsomes. These events did not depend on either docking protein or on the presence of ribosomes. A hybrid protein between the first 60 amino acids of prepropeptide GLa and an unrelated peptide of 49 amino acids fused to the carboxy terminus, however, behaved like a typical secretory protein precursor with regard to docking protein dependence. This suggests that in...

  19. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gα) endocytosis by a cascade of ubiquitin binding domain proteins is required for sustained morphogenesis and proper mating in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Gauri; Baker, Rachael; Sacks, Carly M; Torres, Matthew P; Dohlman, Henrik G

    2014-05-23

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are well known to transmit signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effector proteins. There is growing appreciation that G proteins are also present at endomembrane compartments, where they can potentially interact with a distinct set of signaling proteins. Here, we examine the cellular trafficking function of the G protein α subunit in yeast, Gpa1. Gpa1 contains a unique 109-amino acid insert within the α-helical domain that undergoes a variety of posttranslational modifications. Among these is monoubiquitination, catalyzed by the NEDD4 family ubiquitin ligase Rsp5. Using a newly optimized method for G protein purification together with biophysical measures of structure and function, we show that the ubiquitination domain does not influence enzyme activity. By screening a panel of 39 gene deletion mutants, each lacking a different ubiquitin binding domain protein, we identify seven that are necessary to deliver Gpa1 to the vacuole compartment including four proteins (Ede1, Bul1, Ddi1, and Rup1) previously not known to be involved in this process. Finally, we show that proper endocytosis of the G protein is needed for sustained cellular morphogenesis and mating in response to pheromone stimulation. We conclude that a cascade of ubiquitin-binding proteins serves to deliver the G protein to its final destination within the cell. In this instance and in contrast to the previously characterized visual system, endocytosis from the plasma membrane is needed for proper signal transduction rather than for signal desensitization.

  20. Maintenance energy requirements of beef cows and relationship with cow and calf performance, metabolic hormones, and functional proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper-Prado, M J; Long, N M; Davis, M P; Wright, E C; Madden, R D; Dilwith, J W; Bailey, C L; Spicer, L J; Wettemann, R P

    2014-08-01

    Gestating Angus, nonlactating, spring-calving cows were used to determine variation in maintenance energy requirements (MR); to evaluate the relationship among MR and cow and calf performance, plasma concentrations of IGF-I, T4, glucose, insulin, and ruminal temperature; and to describe the LM proteome and evaluate protein abundance in cows with different MR. Cows (4 to 7 yr of age) with a BCS of 5.0 ± 0.2 and BW of 582 ± 37 kg in the second to third trimester of gestation were studied in 3 trials (trial 1, n = 23; trial 2, n = 32; trial 3, n = 38). Cows were individually fed a complete diet in amounts to meet predicted MR (Level 1 Model of NRC), and feed intake was adjusted weekly until constant BW was achieved for at least 21 d (maintenance). Cows were classified on the basis of MR as low (>0.5 SD less than mean, LMR), moderate (±0.5 SD of mean, MMR), or high (>0.5 SD more than mean, HMR) MR. Blood samples were taken at maintenance and at 2 mo postpartum in trial 2. Muscle biopsies were taken from LMR and HMR after cows consumed actual MR for 28 d (trial 2) or 21 d (trial 3). Proteins from LM were separated by 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and were identified, and abundance was quantified and compared. The greatest differences in MR between cows were 29%, 24%, and 25% in trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Daily MR (NEm, kcal·BW(-0.75)·d(-1)) averaged 89.2 ± 6.3, 93.0 ± 4.9, and 90.4 ± 4.6 in trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Postpartum BW and BCS, calf birth and weaning weights, postpartum luteal activity, and ruminal temperature were not influenced by MR of the cows. Concentrations of IGF-I were greater (P = 0.001) in plasma of MMR compared with LMR cows consuming predicted MR diets, and MR was negatively correlated with concentrations of IGF-I in plasma (r = -0.38; P = 0.05) at 2 mo postpartum. A total of 103 proteins were isolated from LM; 52 gene products were identified. Abundance of specific proteins in the LM was not influenced (P > 0

  1. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocytic stage parasites require the putative autophagy protein PfAtg7 for normal growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn M Walker

    Full Text Available Analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum genome reveals a limited number of putative autophagy genes, specifically the four genes involved in ATG8 lipidation, an essential step in formation of autophagosomes. In yeast, Atg8 lipidation requires the E1-type ligase Atg7, an E2-type ligase Atg3, and a cysteine protease Atg4. These four putative P. falciparum ATG (PfATG genes are transcribed during the parasite's erythrocytic stages. PfAtg7 has relatively low identity and similarity to yeast Atg7 (14.7% and 32.2%, respectively, due primarily to long insertions typical of P. falciparum. Excluding the insertions the identity and similarity are higher (38.0% and 70.8%, respectively. This and the fact that key residues are conserved, including the catalytic cysteine and ATP binding domain, we hypothesize that PfAtg7 is the activating enzyme of PfAtg8. To assess the role of PfAtg7 we have generated two transgenic parasite lines. In one, the PfATG7 locus was modified to introduce a C-terminal hemagglutinin tag. Western blotting reveals two distinct protein species, one migrating near the predicted 150 kDa and one at approximately 65 kDa. The second transgenic line introduces an inducible degradation domain into the PfATG7 locus, allowing us to rapidly attenuate PfAtg7 protein levels. Corresponding species are also observed in this parasite line at approximately 200 kDa and 100 kDa. Upon PfATG7 attenuation parasites exhibit a slow growth phenotype indicating the essentiality of this putative enzyme for normal growth.

  2. The Unstructured N-terminal Region of Arabidopsis Group 4 Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Proteins Is Required for Folding and for Chaperone-like Activity under Water Deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-Velazquez, Cesar L; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Reyes, José Luis; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2016-05-13

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a conserved group of proteins widely distributed in the plant kingdom that participate in the tolerance to water deficit of different plant species. In silico analyses indicate that most LEA proteins are structurally disordered. The structural plasticity of these proteins opens the question of whether water deficit modulates their conformation and whether these possible changes are related to their function. In this work, we characterized the secondary structure of Arabidopsis group 4 LEA proteins. We found that they are disordered in aqueous solution, with high intrinsic potential to fold into α-helix. We demonstrate that complete dehydration is not required for these proteins to sample ordered structures because milder water deficit and macromolecular crowding induce high α-helix levels in vitro, suggesting that prevalent conditions under water deficit modulate their conformation. We also show that the N-terminal region, conserved across all group 4 LEA proteins, is necessary and sufficient for conformational transitions and that their protective function is confined to this region, suggesting that folding into α-helix is required for chaperone-like activity under water limitation. We propose that these proteins can exist as different conformers, favoring functional diversity, a moonlighting property arising from their structural dynamics. PMID:27006402

  3. G-protein stimulatory subunit alpha and Gq/11α G-proteins are both required to maintain quiescent stem-like chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Chagin, Andrei S; Vuppalapati, Karuna K; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Guo, Jun; Hirai, Takao; Chen, Min; Offermanns, Stefan; Lee S Weinstein; Kronenberg, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    Round chondrocytes in the resting zone of the growth plate provide precursors for columnar chondrocytes and have stem-like properties. Here we demonstrate that these stem-like chondrocytes undergo apoptosis in the absence of the receptor (PPR) for parathyroid hormone-related protein. We examine the possible roles of heterotrimeric G-proteins activated by the PPR. Inactivation of the G-protein stimulatory α-subunit (Gsα) leads to accelerated differentiation of columnar chondrocytes, as seen in...

  4. Memory formation for trace fear conditioning requires ubiquitin-proteasome mediated protein degradation in the prefrontal cortex.

    OpenAIRE

    Helmstetter, Fred J.

    2013-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms supporting plasticity during memory consolidation have been a subject of considerable interest. De novo protein and mRNA synthesis in several brain areas are critical, and more recently protein degradation, mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), has been shown to be important. Previous work clearly establishes a relationship between protein synthesis and protein degradation in the amygdala, but it is unclear whether cortical mechanisms of memory consolidati...

  5. Dimerization of the Papillomavirus E2 Protein Is Required for Efficient Mitotic Chromosome Association and Brd4 Binding▿

    OpenAIRE

    Cardenas-Mora, Juan; Spindler, Jonathan E.; Jang, Moon Kyoo; Alison A McBride

    2008-01-01

    The E2 proteins of several papillomaviruses link the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes to ensure retention and the efficient partitioning of genomes into daughter cells following cell division. Bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 binds to chromosomes in a complex with Brd4, a cellular bromodomain protein. Interaction with Brd4 is also important for E2-mediated transcriptional regulation. The transactivation domain of E2 is crucial for interaction with the Brd4 protein; proteins lacking or mutat...

  6. Energy-requiring translocation of the OmpA protein and alkaline phosphatase of Escherichia coli into inner membrane vesicles.

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoads, D B; Tai, P C; Davis, B D

    1984-01-01

    In developing a reliable in vitro system for translocating bacterial proteins, we found that the least dense subfraction of the membrane of Escherichia coli was superior to the total inner membrane, both for a secreted protein (alkaline phosphatase) and for an outer membrane protein (OmpA). Compounds that eliminated the proton motive force inhibited translocation, as already observed in cells; since protein synthesis continued, the energy for translocation appears to be derived from the energ...

  7. A DNA polymerase alpha accessory protein, Mcl1, is required for propagation of centromere structures in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyoaki Natsume

    Full Text Available Specialized chromatin exists at centromeres and must be precisely transmitted during DNA replication. The mechanisms involved in the propagation of these structures remain elusive. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of two chromatin domains: the central CENP-A(Cnp1 kinetochore domain and flanking heterochromatin domains. Here we show that fission yeast Mcl1, a DNA polymerase alpha (Pol alpha accessory protein, is critical for maintenance of centromeric chromatin. In a screen for mutants that alleviate both central domain and outer repeat silencing, we isolated several cos mutants, of which cos1 is allelic to mcl1. The mcl1-101 mutation causes reduced CENP-A(Cnp1 in the central domain and an aberrant increase in histone acetylation in both domains. These phenotypes are also observed in a mutant of swi7(+, which encodes a catalytic subunit of Pol alpha. Mcl1 forms S-phase-specific nuclear foci, which colocalize with those of PCNA and Pol alpha. These results suggest that Mcl1 and Pol alpha are required for propagation of centromere chromatin structures during DNA replication.

  8. The Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Protein CLASP2 Is Required for Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Drabek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian CLASPs are microtubule plus-end tracking proteins whose essential function as regulators of microtubule behavior has been studied mainly in cultured cells. We show here that absence of murine CLASP2 in vivo results in thrombocytopenia, progressive anemia, and pancytopenia, due to defects in megakaryopoiesis, in erythropoiesis, and in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell activity. Furthermore, microtubule stability and organization are affected upon attachment of Clasp2 knockout hematopoietic stem-cell-enriched populations, and these cells do not home efficiently toward their bone marrow niche. Strikingly, CLASP2-deficient hematopoietic stem cells contain severely reduced mRNA levels of c-Mpl, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, an essential factor for megakaryopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. Our data suggest that thrombopoietin signaling is impaired in Clasp2 knockout mice. We propose that the CLASP2-mediated stabilization of microtubules is required for proper attachment, homing, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and that this is necessary to sustain c-Mpl transcription.

  9. A prefoldin-associated WD-repeat protein (WDR92) is required for the correct architectural assembly of motile cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-King, Ramila S; King, Stephen M

    2016-04-15

    WDR92 is a highly conserved WD-repeat protein that has been proposed to be involved in apoptosis and also to be part of a prefoldin-like cochaperone complex. We found that WDR92 has a phylogenetic signature that is generally compatible with it playing a role in the assembly or function of specifically motile cilia. To test this hypothesis, we performed an RNAi-based knockdown of WDR92 gene expression in the planarianSchmidtea mediterraneaand were able to achieve a robust reduction in mRNA expression to levels undetectable under our standard RT-PCR conditions. We found that this treatment resulted in a dramatic reduction in the rate of organismal movement that was caused by a switch in the mode of locomotion from smooth, cilia-driven gliding to muscle-based, peristaltic contractions. Although the knockdown animals still assembled cilia of normal length and in similar numbers to controls, these structures had reduced beat frequency and did not maintain hydrodynamic coupling. By transmission electron microscopy we observed that many cilia had pleiomorphic defects in their architecture, including partial loss of dynein arms, incomplete closure of the B-tubule, and occlusion or replacement of the central pair complex by accumulated electron-dense material. These observations suggest that WDR92 is part of a previously unrecognized cytoplasmic chaperone system that is specifically required to fold key components necessary to build motile ciliary axonemes. PMID:26912790

  10. Actin-associated protein palladin is required for migration behavior and differentiation potential of C2C12 myoblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Palladin is involved in myogenesis in vitro. • Palladin knockdown by siRNA increases myoblast proliferation, viability and differentiation. • Palladin knockdown decreases C2C12 myoblast migration ability. - Abstract: The actin-associated protein palladin has been shown to be involved in differentiation processes in non-muscle tissues. However, but its function in skeletal muscle has rarely been studied. Palladin plays important roles in the regulation of diverse actin-related signaling in a number of cell types. Since intact actin-cytoskeletal remodeling is necessary for myogenesis, in the present study, we pursue to investigate the role of actin-associated palladin in skeletal muscle differentiation. Palladin in C2C12 myoblasts is knocked-down using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results show that down-regulation of palladin decreased migratory activity of mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts. Furthermore, the depletion of palladin enhances C2C12 vitality and proliferation. Of note, the loss of palladin promotes C2C12 to express the myosin heavy chain, suggesting that palladin has a role in the modulation of C2C12 differentiation. It is thus proposed that palladin is required for normal C2C12 myogenesis in vitro

  11. Export of malaria proteins requires co-translational processing of the PEXEL motif independent of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddey, Justin A; O'Neill, Matthew T; Lopaticki, Sash; Carvalho, Teresa G; Hodder, Anthony N; Nebl, Thomas; Wawra, Stephan; van West, Pieter; Ebrahimzadeh, Zeinab; Richard, Dave; Flemming, Sven; Spielmann, Tobias; Przyborski, Jude; Babon, Jeff J; Cowman, Alan F

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins into erythrocytes using the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) motif, which is cleaved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by plasmepsin V (PMV). A recent study reported that phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) concentrated in the ER binds to PEXEL motifs and is required for export independent of PMV, and that PEXEL motifs are functionally interchangeable with RxLR motifs of oomycete effectors. Here we show that the PEXEL does not bind PI(3)P, and that this lipid is not concentrated in the ER. We find that RxLR motifs cannot mediate export in P. falciparum. Parasites expressing a mutated version of KAHRP, with the PEXEL motif repositioned near the signal sequence, prevented PMV cleavage. This mutant possessed the putative PI(3)P-binding residues but is not exported. Reinstatement of PEXEL to its original location restores processing by PMV and export. These results challenge the PI(3)P hypothesis and provide evidence that PEXEL position is conserved for co-translational processing and export. PMID:26832821

  12. A DNA polymerase alpha accessory protein, Mcl1, is required for propagation of centromere structures in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Tsutsui, Yasuhiro; Sutani, Takashi; Dunleavy, Elaine M; Pidoux, Alison L; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Allshire, Robin C; Yamao, Fumiaki

    2008-01-01

    Specialized chromatin exists at centromeres and must be precisely transmitted during DNA replication. The mechanisms involved in the propagation of these structures remain elusive. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of two chromatin domains: the central CENP-A(Cnp1) kinetochore domain and flanking heterochromatin domains. Here we show that fission yeast Mcl1, a DNA polymerase alpha (Pol alpha) accessory protein, is critical for maintenance of centromeric chromatin. In a screen for mutants that alleviate both central domain and outer repeat silencing, we isolated several cos mutants, of which cos1 is allelic to mcl1. The mcl1-101 mutation causes reduced CENP-A(Cnp1) in the central domain and an aberrant increase in histone acetylation in both domains. These phenotypes are also observed in a mutant of swi7(+), which encodes a catalytic subunit of Pol alpha. Mcl1 forms S-phase-specific nuclear foci, which colocalize with those of PCNA and Pol alpha. These results suggest that Mcl1 and Pol alpha are required for propagation of centromere chromatin structures during DNA replication. PMID:18493607

  13. Actin-associated protein palladin is required for migration behavior and differentiation potential of C2C12 myoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Uyen Nhi; Liang, Vincent Roderick; Wang, Hao-Ven, E-mail: hvwang@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Palladin is involved in myogenesis in vitro. • Palladin knockdown by siRNA increases myoblast proliferation, viability and differentiation. • Palladin knockdown decreases C2C12 myoblast migration ability. - Abstract: The actin-associated protein palladin has been shown to be involved in differentiation processes in non-muscle tissues. However, but its function in skeletal muscle has rarely been studied. Palladin plays important roles in the regulation of diverse actin-related signaling in a number of cell types. Since intact actin-cytoskeletal remodeling is necessary for myogenesis, in the present study, we pursue to investigate the role of actin-associated palladin in skeletal muscle differentiation. Palladin in C2C12 myoblasts is knocked-down using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results show that down-regulation of palladin decreased migratory activity of mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts. Furthermore, the depletion of palladin enhances C2C12 vitality and proliferation. Of note, the loss of palladin promotes C2C12 to express the myosin heavy chain, suggesting that palladin has a role in the modulation of C2C12 differentiation. It is thus proposed that palladin is required for normal C2C12 myogenesis in vitro.

  14. Residues of the UL25 protein of herpes simplex virus that are required for its stable interaction with capsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Shelley K; Huffman, Jamie B; Toropova, Katerina; Conway, James F; Homa, Fred L

    2011-05-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated recombinant viruses with either small truncations or amino acid substitutions in the UL25 N terminus. Studies of these mutants demonstrated that there are two important regions within the capsid binding domain. The first 27 amino acids are essential for capsid binding of UL25, while residues 26 to 39, which are highly conserved in the UL25 homologues of other alphaherpesviruses, were found to be critical for stable capsid binding. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of capsids containing either a small tag on the N terminus of UL25 or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused between amino acids 50 and 51 of UL25 demonstrate that residues 1 to 27 of UL25 contact the hexon adjacent to the penton. A second region, most likely centered on amino acids 26 to 39, contacts the triplex that is one removed from the penton. Importantly, both of these UL25 capsid binding regions are essential for the stable packaging of full-length viral genomes.

  15. A prefoldin-associated WD-repeat protein (WDR92) is required for the correct architectural assembly of motile cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; King, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    WDR92 is a highly conserved WD-repeat protein that has been proposed to be involved in apoptosis and also to be part of a prefoldin-like cochaperone complex. We found that WDR92 has a phylogenetic signature that is generally compatible with it playing a role in the assembly or function of specifically motile cilia. To test this hypothesis, we performed an RNAi-based knockdown of WDR92 gene expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and were able to achieve a robust reduction in mRNA expression to levels undetectable under our standard RT-PCR conditions. We found that this treatment resulted in a dramatic reduction in the rate of organismal movement that was caused by a switch in the mode of locomotion from smooth, cilia-driven gliding to muscle-based, peristaltic contractions. Although the knockdown animals still assembled cilia of normal length and in similar numbers to controls, these structures had reduced beat frequency and did not maintain hydrodynamic coupling. By transmission electron microscopy we observed that many cilia had pleiomorphic defects in their architecture, including partial loss of dynein arms, incomplete closure of the B-tubule, and occlusion or replacement of the central pair complex by accumulated electron-dense material. These observations suggest that WDR92 is part of a previously unrecognized cytoplasmic chaperone system that is specifically required to fold key components necessary to build motile ciliary axonemes. PMID:26912790

  16. PIAS-like protein Zimp7 is required for the restriction of the zebrafish organizer and mesoderm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Ayala, Roberto; Schnabel, Denhí; Salas-Vidal, Enrique; Lomelí, Hilda

    2015-07-01

    The Zmiz2 (Zimp7) protein and its homolog Zmiz1 (Zimp10) were initially identified in humans as androgen receptor co-activators. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of an SP-RING/Miz domain, which is highly conserved in members of the PIAS family and confers SUMO-conjugating activity. Zimp7 has been shown to interact with components of the Wnt/β-Catenin signaling pathway and with Brg1 and BAF57, components of the ATP-dependent mammalian SWI/SNF-like BAF chromatin-remodeling complexes. In this work, we analyze the role of zygotic Zimp7 in zebrafish development. We describe evidence indicating that Zimp7 is required for mesoderm development and dorsoventral patterning. Morpholino-mediated reduction of zygotic Zimp7 produced axial mesodermal defects that were preceded by up-regulation of organizer genes such as bozozok, goosecoid and floating head at the onset of gastrulation and by down-regulation of the ventral markers vox, vent and eve1 indicating loss of the ventrolateral mesoderm. Consistently, embryos overexpressing zimp7 RNA exhibited midline defects such as loss of forebrain and cyclopia accompanied by transcriptional changes directly opposite of those found in the morphants. In addition, the patterning of ventralized embryos produced by the overexpression of vox and vent was restored by a reduction of Zimp7 activity. Altogether, our findings indicate that Zimp7 is involved in transcriptional regulation of factors that are essential for patterning in the dorsoventral axis.

  17. Metabolizable energy requirement for starting barrow pigs (15 to 30 kg fed on the ideal protein concept based diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Cristina de Oliveira

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the metabolizable energy (ME requirement for starting barrow pigs. Forty-three animals, selected for their high lean gain, were allotted in a completely randomized block design, divided in four treatments with five blocks and two animals in each experimental unit. The diet in Treatment 1 consisted of 3,264 kcal of ME/kg containing 0.96% of digestible lysine, 0.55% of digestible methionine+cystine, 0.60% of digestible threonine, and 0.188% of digestible tryptophan reaching the ideal protein pattern. The diets in Treatments 2, 3, and 4 were similar to the diet in Treatment 1; nevertheless, the levels of ME in Treatments 2, 3, and 4 were 2, 4, and 6% higher than those in Treatment 1. The lysine:ME ratio, was mantained the same (2.82 g in all treatments. The daily feed intake (DFI and the feed:gain ratio (F:G were not affected by the levels of ME. There was a linear increase of daily weight gain (DWG and of daily energy intake (DEI. Later, a linear reduction in carcass protein percentage (CPP and a linear increase of fat content and daily fat accretion (DFA occurred. Results suggested that the required ME was of 3,264 kcal/kg or less for improved barrows (15 to 30 kg, of the dam line, fed with diets containing 0.96% of digestible lysine, formulated according to the ideal protein concept.A exigência de energia metabolizável (EM para suínos machos castrados foi determinada no presente experimento. Foram utilizados 43 suínos geneticamente melhorados, distribuídos em delineamento experimental de blocos inteiramente casualizados, com quatro tratamentos, cinco blocos e dois animais por unidade experimental. Tratamento 1 constituiu-se de uma dieta contendo 3.264 kcal de EM/kg contendo 0,96% de lisina digestível, 0,55% de metionina + cistina digestíveis, 0,60% de treonina digestível e 0,188% de triptofano digestível, atendendo ao conceito de proteína ideal. Tratamentos 2, 3 e 4 foram semelhantes à do

  18. Infectious bronchitis coronavirus limits interferon production by inducing a host shutoff that requires accessory protein 5b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kint, Joeri; Langereis, Martijn A.; Maier, Helena J.; Britton, Paul; Kuppeveld, van Frank J.; Koumans, Joseph; Wiegertjes, Geert F.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    During infection of their host cells, viruses often inhibit the production of host proteins, a process that is referred to as host shutoff. By doing this, viruses limit the production of antiviral proteins and increase production capacity for viral proteins. Coronaviruses from the genera Alphacor

  19. Reactive oxygen species decrease cAMP response element binding protein expression in cardiomyocytes via a protein kinase D1-dependent mechanism that does not require Ser133 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgen, Nazira; Guo, Jianfen; Gertsberg, Zoya; Danilo, Peter; Rosen, Michael R; Steinberg, Susan F

    2009-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) exert pleiotropic effects on a wide array of signaling proteins that regulate cellular growth and apoptosis. This study shows that long-term treatment with a low concentration of H2O2 leads to the activation of signaling pathways involving extracellular signal-regulated kinase, ribosomal protein S6 kinase, and protein kinase D (PKD) that increase cAMP binding response element protein (CREB) phosphorylation at Ser(133) in cardiomyocytes. Although CREB-Ser(133) phosphorylation typically mediates cAMP-dependent increases in CREB target gene expression, the H2O2-dependent increase in CREB-Ser(133) phosphorylation is accompanied by a decrease in CREB protein abundance and no change in Cre-luciferase reporter activity. Mutagenesis studies indicate that H2O2 decreases CREB protein abundance via a mechanism that does not require CREB-Ser(133) phosphorylation. Rather, the H2O2-dependent decrease in CREB protein is prevented by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin, by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase or protein kinase C activity, or by adenoviral-mediated delivery of a small interfering RNA that decreases PKD1 expression. A PKD1-dependent mechanism that links oxidative stress to decreased CREB protein abundance is predicted to contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure by influencing cardiac growth and apoptosis responses.

  20. Membrane topology and mutational analysis of the TolQ protein of Escherichia coli required for the uptake of macromolecules and cell envelope integrity.

    OpenAIRE

    Vianney, A; Lewin, T M; Beyer, W F; Lazzaroni, J C; Portalier, R; Webster, R E

    1994-01-01

    TolQ is a 230-amino-acid protein required to maintain the integrity of the bacterial envelope and to facilitate the import of both filamentous bacteriophage and group A colicins. Cellular fractionation experiments showed TolQ to be localized to the cytoplasmic membrane. Bacteria expressing a series of TolQ-beta-galactosidase and TolQ-alkaline phosphatase fusion proteins were analyzed for the appropriate enzyme activity, membrane location, and sensitivity to exogenously added protease. The res...

  1. Adaptor protein complexes AP-1 and AP-3 are required by the HHV-7 Immunoevasin U21 for rerouting of class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Kimpler

    Full Text Available The human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7 U21 gene product binds to class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules and reroutes them to a lysosomal compartment. Trafficking of integral membrane proteins to lysosomes is mediated through cytoplasmic sorting signals that recruit heterotetrameric clathrin adaptor protein (AP complexes, which in turn mediate protein sorting in post-Golgi vesicular transport. Since U21 can mediate rerouting of class I molecules to lysosomes even when lacking its cytoplasmic tail, we hypothesize the existence of a cellular protein that contains the lysosomal sorting information required to escort class I molecules to the lysosomal compartment. If such a protein exists, we expect that it might recruit clathrin adaptor protein complexes as a means of lysosomal sorting. Here we describe experiments demonstrating that the μ adaptins from AP-1 and AP-3 are involved in U21-mediated trafficking of class I molecules to lysosomes. These experiments support the idea that a cellular protein(s is necessary for U21-mediated lysosomal sorting of class I molecules. We also examine the impact of transient versus chronic knockdown of these adaptor protein complexes, and show that the few remaining μ subunits in the cells are eventually able to reroute class I molecules to lysosomes.

  2. Repair of DNA double-strand breaks in Escherichia coli cells requires synthesis of proteins that can be induced by UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks in Escherichia coli cells irradiated with γ rays occurs only after new proteins are synthesized in response to damage introduced in the genome DNA. One protein whose synthesis is thus induced is the recA protein, and previous work has shown that recA- cells do not repair double-strand breaks. However, inducing recA protein by treating cells with nalidixic acid does not induce repair of double-strand breaks, so this repair requires more than the presence of the recA protein. When repair of double-strand breaks is blocked, the genome DNA is degraded by an endonuclease-like action. Evidence is presented to show that the inducible inhibition of DNA degradation after x-irradiation [Pollard, E.C. and Randall, E.P. (1973) Radiat. Res. 55, 265] is probably caused by the inducible repair of DNA double-strand breaks

  3. Scaffold-Assisted Catalysis: A Novel Domain In the Ste5 Scaffold Protein is Required to Unlock the MAPK Fus3 for Phosphorylation by the MAPKK Ste7

    OpenAIRE

    Good, Matthew; Tang, Grace; Singleton, Julie; Remenyi, Attila; Lim, Wendell A.

    2009-01-01

    The scaffold protein Ste5 is required to properly direct signaling through the yeast mating pathway to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Fus3. Scaffolds are thought to function by tethering kinase and substrate in proximity. We find, however, that the previously identified Fus3-binding site on Ste5 is not required for signaling, suggesting an alternative mechanism controls Fus3’s activation by the MAPKK Ste7. Reconstituting MAPK signaling in vitro, we find that Fus3 is an intrinsic...

  4. Vaccinia protein F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain and contains a motor binding motif required for virion export.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W Morgan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV uses microtubules for export of virions to the cell surface and this process requires the viral protein F12. Here we show that F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain (KLC, a subunit of the kinesin-1 motor that binds cargo. F12 and KLC share similar size, pI, hydropathy and cargo-binding tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs. Moreover, molecular modeling of F12 TPRs upon the crystal structure of KLC2 TPRs showed a striking conservation of structure. We also identified multiple TPRs in VACV proteins E2 and A36. Data presented demonstrate that F12 is critical for recruitment of kinesin-1 to virions and that a conserved tryptophan and aspartic acid (WD motif, which is conserved in the kinesin-1-binding sequence (KBS of the neuronal protein calsyntenin/alcadein and several other cellular kinesin-1 binding proteins, is essential for kinesin-1 recruitment and virion transport. In contrast, mutation of WD motifs in protein A36 revealed they were not required for kinesin-1 recruitment or IEV transport. This report of a viral KLC-like protein containing a KBS that is conserved in several cellular proteins advances our understanding of how VACV recruits the kinesin motor to virions, and exemplifies how viruses use molecular mimicry of cellular components to their advantage.

  5. Rotavirus structural proteins and dsRNA are required for the human primary plasmacytoid dendritic cell IFNalpha response.

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    Emily M Deal

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses are the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea in children worldwide. Rotavirus-induced immune responses, especially the T and B cell responses, have been extensively characterized; however, little is known about innate immune mechanisms involved in the control of rotavirus infection. Although increased levels of systemic type I interferon (IFNalpha and beta correlate with accelerated resolution of rotavirus disease, multiple rotavirus strains, including rhesus rotavirus (RRV, have been demonstrated to antagonize type I IFN production in a variety of epithelial and fibroblast cell types through several mechanisms, including degradation of multiple interferon regulatory factors by a viral nonstructural protein. This report demonstrates that stimulation of highly purified primary human peripheral plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs with either live or inactivated RRV induces substantial IFNalpha production by a subset of pDCs in which RRV does not replicate. Characterization of pDC responses to viral stimulus by flow cytometry and Luminex revealed that RRV replicates in a small subset of human primary pDCs and, in this RRV-permissive small subset, IFNalpha production is diminished. pDC activation and maturation were observed independently of viral replication and were enhanced in cells in which virus replicates. Production of IFNalpha by pDCs following RRV exposure required viral dsRNA and surface proteins, but neither viral replication nor activation by trypsin cleavage of VP4. These results demonstrate that a minor subset of purified primary human peripheral pDCs are permissive to RRV infection, and that pDCs retain functionality following RRV stimulus. Additionally, this study demonstrates trypsin-independent infection of primary peripheral cells by rotavirus, which may allow for the establishment of extraintestinal viremia and antigenemia. Importantly, these data provide the first evidence of IFNalpha induction in primary

  6. Protein requirements of man: comparative nitrogen balance response within the submaintenance-to-maintenance range of intakes of wheat and beef proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, V R; Fajardo, L; Murray, E; Rand, W M; Scrimshaw, N S

    1975-05-01

    Sixteen young male students participated in two studies designed to determine the nitrogen balance response to beef or stone-ground, whole wheat protein over the submaintenance-to-maintenance range of protein intake. The objective of the studies was to evaluate the relative capacities of these proteins to meet the minimum protein needs in young adult males. A modified Latin-square design was used to allocate subjects to the four 15-day metabolic balance diet periods in each study. The last 10 days were used for fecal nitrogen determination and the last 5 days for evaluation of urinary nitrogen excretion. The diet periods were separated by a 4-day break period and began with 1 day on a "protein-free" diet. The levels of protien (N times 6.25) intake tested were 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 g/kg body weight/day in the beef study. The results have been compared with those obtained in a previous similar study with egg protein. The regression of estimated "true" nitrogen balance (Y) (mg N/kg/day) on nitrogen intake (X) (mg N/kg/day) was: Y equals 0.51(plus or minus 0.08)X minus 41.9(plus or minus 4.6) for beef and Y equals 0.27(plus or minus 0.06)X minus 33.6(plus or minus 5.0) for whole wheat protein. The amounts of beef and wheat proteins estimated to be requried to support body nitrogen balance in 97.5% of the population supplied 96 and 178 mg N/kg/day, respectively. The relative protein value of beef and wheat proteins, in comparison with egg protein, was 78 plus or minus 12 and 41 plus or minus 10, respectively. It is concluded that the variations in dietary protein quality should be taken into account in assessing the protein adequacy of diets for individuals and population groups.

  7. PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH is required for localising GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE to starch granules and for normal amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Seung

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The domestication of starch crops underpinned the development of human civilisation, yet we still do not fully understand how plants make starch. Starch is composed of glucose polymers that are branched (amylopectin or linear (amylose. The amount of amylose strongly influences the physico-chemical behaviour of starchy foods during cooking and of starch mixtures in non-food manufacturing processes. The GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE (GBSS is the glucosyltransferase specifically responsible for elongating amylose polymers and was the only protein known to be required for its biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH (PTST is also specifically required for amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis. PTST is a plastidial protein possessing an N-terminal coiled coil domain and a C-terminal carbohydrate binding module (CBM. We discovered that Arabidopsis ptst mutants synthesise amylose-free starch and are phenotypically similar to mutants lacking GBSS. Analysis of granule-bound proteins showed a dramatic reduction of GBSS protein in ptst mutant starch granules. Pull-down assays with recombinant proteins in vitro, as well as immunoprecipitation assays in planta, revealed that GBSS physically interacts with PTST via a coiled coil. Furthermore, we show that the CBM domain of PTST, which mediates its interaction with starch granules, is also required for correct GBSS localisation. Fluorescently tagged Arabidopsis GBSS, expressed either in tobacco or Arabidopsis leaves, required the presence of Arabidopsis PTST to localise to starch granules. Mutation of the CBM of PTST caused GBSS to remain in the plastid stroma. PTST fulfils a previously unknown function in targeting GBSS to starch. This sheds new light on the importance of targeting biosynthetic enzymes to sub-cellular sites where their action is required. Importantly, PTST represents a promising new gene target for the biotechnological modification of starch composition, as it is

  8. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein cannot differentiate bacterial or viral infection in COPD exacerbation requiring emergency department visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang CH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Hao Chang,1 Kuo-Chien Tsao,2,3 Han-Chung Hu,1,4 Chung-Chi Huang,1,4 Kuo-Chin Kao,1,4 Ning-Hung Chen,1,4 Cheng-Ta Yang,1,4 Ying-Huang Tsai,4,5 Meng-Jer Hsieh4,51Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Linkou Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung Medical Foundation, Chang-Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Linkou Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung Medical Foundation; 3Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 4Department of Respiratory Therapy, Chang-Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 5Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Chiayi Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung Medical Foundation, Puzi City, TaiwanBackground: Viral and bacterial infections are the most common causes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations. Whether serum inflammatory markers can differentiate bacterial from virus infection in patients with COPD exacerbation requiring emergency department (ED visits remains controversial.Methods: Viral culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were used to identify the viruses in the oropharynx of patients with COPD exacerbations. The bacteria were identified by the semiquantitative culture of the expectorated sputum. The peripheral blood white blood cell (WBC counts, serum C-reactive protein (CRP, procalcitonin (PCT, and clinical symptoms were compared among patients with different types of infections.Results: Viruses were isolated from 16 (22.2% of the 72 patients enrolled. The most commonly identified viruses were parainfluenza type 3, influenza A, and rhinovirus. A total of 30 (41.7% patients had positive bacterial cultures, with the most commonly found bacteria being Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. Five patients (6.9% had both positive sputum cultures and virus identification. The WBC, CRP, and PCT levels of the bacteria-positive and bacteria

  9. Knickkopf and retroactive proteins are required for formation of laminar serosal procuticle during embryonic development of Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Sujata S; Noh, Mi Young; Moussian, Bernard; Specht, Charles A; Kramer, Karl J; Beeman, Richard W; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2015-05-01

    Chitin, a homopolymer of β-1-4-linked N-acetylglucosamine synthesized by chitin synthase A (Chs-A), is organized in the procuticle of the postembryonic cuticle or exoskeleton, which is composed of laminae stacked parallel to the cell surface to give stability and integrity to the underlying insect epidermal and other tissues. Our previous work has revealed an important role for two proteins from Tribolium castaneum named Knickkopf (TcKnk) and Retroactive (TcRtv) in postembryonic cuticular chitin maintenance. TcKnk and TcRtv were shown to be required for protection and organization of newly synthesized procuticular chitin. To study the functions of TcKnk and TcRtv in serosal and larval cuticles produced during embryogenesis in T. castaneum, dsRNAs specific for these two genes were injected into two week-old adult females. The effects of dsRNA treatment on ovarial integrity, oviposition, egg hatching and adult survival were determined. Insects treated with dsRNA for chitin synthase-A (TcChs-A) and tryptophan oxygenase (TcVer) were used as positive and negative controls for these experiments, respectively. Like TcChs-A RNAi, injection of dsRNA for TcKnk or TcRtv into adult females exhibited no adult lethality and oviposition was normal. However, a vast majority of the embryos did not hatch. The remaining (∼10%) of the embryos hatched into first instar larvae that died without molting to the second instar. Chitin content analysis following TcKnk and TcRtv parental RNAi revealed approximately 50% reduction in chitin content of eggs in comparison with control TcVer RNAi, whereas TcChs-A dsRNA-treatment led to >90% loss of chitin. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis of serosal cuticle from TcChs-A, TcKnk and TcRtv dsRNA-treated insects revealed a complete absence of laminar organization of serosal (and larval) procuticle in comparison with TcVer dsRNA-treated controls, which exhibited normal laminar organization of procuticular chitin. The

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2623 regulates bacillary growth by ATP-Binding: requirement for establishing chronic persistent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua E Drumm

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosisuniversal stress protein (USP homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-A-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection.

  11. Ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress are required for unfolded protein response activation and steatosis in zebrafish with alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsedensodnom, Orkhontuya; Vacaru, Ana M.; Howarth, Deanna L.; Yin, Chunyue; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Secretory pathway dysfunction and lipid accumulation (steatosis) are the two most common responses of hepatocytes to ethanol exposure and are major factors in the pathophysiology of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). However, the mechanisms by which ethanol elicits these cellular responses are not fully understood. Recent data indicates that activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in response to secretory pathway dysfunction can cause steatosis. Here, we examined the relationship between alcohol metabolism, oxidative stress, secretory pathway stress and steatosis using zebrafish larvae. We found that ethanol was immediately internalized and metabolized by larvae, such that the internal ethanol concentration in 4-day-old larvae equilibrated to 160 mM after 1 hour of exposure to 350 mM ethanol, with an average ethanol metabolism rate of 56 μmol/larva/hour over 32 hours. Blocking alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) and cytochrome P450 2E1 (Cyp2e1), the major enzymes that metabolize ethanol, prevented alcohol-induced steatosis and reduced induction of the UPR in the liver. Thus, we conclude that ethanol metabolism causes ALD in zebrafish. Oxidative stress generated by Cyp2e1-mediated ethanol metabolism is proposed to be a major culprit in ALD pathology. We found that production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased in larvae exposed to ethanol, whereas inhibition of the zebrafish CYP2E1 homolog or administration of antioxidants reduced ROS levels. Importantly, these treatments also blocked ethanol-induced steatosis and reduced UPR activation, whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) acted as a pro-oxidant that synergized with low doses of ethanol to induce the UPR. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress are conserved mechanisms required for the development of steatosis and hepatic dysfunction in ALD, and that these processes contribute to ethanol-induced UPR activation and secretory pathway stress in hepatocytes. PMID

  12. Three distinct domains of SSI-1/SOCS-1/JAB protein are required for its suppression of interleukin 6 signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Narazaki, Masashi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Matsumoto, Tomoshige; Morita, Yoshiaki; SAITO, HIROSHI; Kajita, Tadahiro; Yoshizaki, Kazuyuki; Naka, Tetsuji; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    1998-01-01

    Cytokine-inducible protein SSI-1 [signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)-induced STAT inhibitor 1, also referred to as SOCS-1 (suppressor of cytokine signaling 1) or JAB (Janus kinase-binding protein)] negatively regulates cytokine receptor signaling by inhibition of JAK kinases. The SSI family of proteins includes eight members that are structurally characterized by an SH2 domain and a C-terminal conserved region that we have called the SC-motif. In this study, we investig...

  13. Viral protein requirements for assembly and release of human parainfluenza virus type 3 virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Megan K; Hayes, Brandon C; Kandel, Suresh R; Scott-Shemon, Deja; Ackerson, Larissa; Hoffman, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    To understand the roles of human parainfluenza virus 3 (HPIV3) proteins in assembly and release, viral proteins were expressed individually and in combination in 293T cells. Expression of the matrix (M) protein triggered release of enveloped, matrix-containing virus-like particles (VLPs) from cells. When M was co-expressed with the nucleocapsid (N), fusion (F) or haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) proteins, VLPs that contained M+N, M+F and M+HN, respectively, were generated, suggesting that M can independently interact with each protein to facilitate assembly and release. Additionally, expression of N protein enabled incorporation of the phosphoprotein (P) into VLPs, likely due to known N-P interactions. Finally, the HPIV3 C protein did not enhance VLP release, in contrast to observations with the related Sendai virus. These findings reinforce the central importance of the M protein in virus assembly and release, but also illustrate the variable roles of other paramyxovirus proteins during these processes. PMID:26960133

  14. Loss of function of the Drosophila Ninein-related centrosomal protein Bsg25D causes mitotic defects and impairs embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowanda, Michelle; Bergalet, Julie; Wieczorek, Michal; Brouhard, Gary; Lécuyer, Éric; Lasko, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The centrosome-associated proteins Ninein (Nin) and Ninein-like protein (Nlp) play significant roles in microtubule stability, nucleation and anchoring at the centrosome in mammalian cells. Here, we investigate Blastoderm specific gene 25D (Bsg25D), which encodes the only Drosophila protein that is closely related to Nin and Nlp. In early embryos, we find that Bsg25D mRNA and Bsg25D protein are closely associated with centrosomes and astral microtubules. We show that sequences within the coding region and 3'UTR of Bsg25D mRNAs are important for proper localization of this transcript in oogenesis and embryogenesis. Ectopic expression of eGFP-Bsg25D from an unlocalized mRNA disrupts microtubule polarity in mid-oogenesis and compromises the distribution of the axis polarity determinant Gurken. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we show that an N-terminal fragment of Bsg25D can bind microtubules in vitro and can move along them, predominantly toward minus-ends. While flies homozygous for a Bsg25D null mutation are viable and fertile, 70% of embryos lacking maternal and zygotic Bsg25D do not hatch and exhibit chromosome segregation defects, as well as detachment of centrosomes from mitotic spindles. We conclude that Bsg25D is a centrosomal protein that, while dispensable for viability, nevertheless helps ensure the integrity of mitotic divisions in Drosophila. PMID:27422905

  15. A novel RNA-recognition-motif protein is required for premeiotic G1/S-phase transition in rice (Oryza sativa L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-Ichi Nonomura

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism for meiotic entry remains largely elusive in flowering plants. Only Arabidopsis SWI1/DYAD and maize AM1, both of which are the coiled-coil protein, are known to be required for the initiation of plant meiosis. The mechanism underlying the synchrony of male meiosis, characteristic to flowering plants, has also been unclear in the plant kingdom. In other eukaryotes, RNA-recognition-motif (RRM proteins are known to play essential roles in germ-cell development and meiosis progression. Rice MEL2 protein discovered in this study shows partial similarity with human proline-rich RRM protein, deleted in Azoospermia-Associated Protein1 (DAZAP1, though MEL2 also possesses ankyrin repeats and a RING finger motif. Expression analyses of several cell-cycle markers revealed that, in mel2 mutant anthers, most germ cells failed to enter premeiotic S-phase and meiosis, and a part escaped from the defect and underwent meiosis with a significant delay or continued mitotic cycles. Immunofluorescent detection revealed that T7 peptide-tagged MEL2 localized at cytoplasmic perinuclear region of germ cells during premeiotic interphase in transgenic rice plants. This study is the first report of the plant RRM protein, which is required for regulating the premeiotic G1/S-phase transition of male and female germ cells and also establishing synchrony of male meiosis. This study will contribute to elucidation of similarities and diversities in reproduction system between plants and other species.

  16. Aspergillus parasiticus CrzA, Which Encodes a Calcineurin Response Zinc-Finger Protein, is Required for Aflatoxin Production Under Calcium Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium has been reported to be required for aflatoxin production. Calcium, like cAMP, is a second messenger. Cacineurin, a calmodulin-dependent serine/threonine protein phosphatase, is an important component of the calcium signaling pathway. The control of calcineurin-dependent gene expression is v...

  17. Co-factor insertion and disulfide bond requirements for twin-arginine translocase-dependent export of the Bacillus subtilis Rieske protein QcrA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goosens, Vivianne J; Monteferrante, Carmine G; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Rieske protein QcrA was recently shown to be exported by twin-arginine translocation (Tat) in Bacillus subtilis. Results: QcrA has disulfide bond and co-factor requirements for effective Tat-dependent translocation. Conclusion: A hierarchy exists between disulfide bonding and co-fact

  18. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated stimulation of adipocyte differentiation requires the synergistic action of Epac- and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller;

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent processes are pivotal during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. We show that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, was required for c...

  19. Protein adsorption is required for stealth effect of poly(ethylene glycol)- and poly(phosphoester)-coated nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöttler, Susanne; Becker, Greta; Winzen, Svenja; Steinbach, Tobias; Mohr, Kristin; Landfester, Katharina; Mailänder, Volker; Wurm, Frederik R.

    2016-04-01

    The current gold standard to reduce non-specific cellular uptake of drug delivery vehicles is by covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). It is thought that PEG can reduce protein adsorption and thereby confer a stealth effect. Here, we show that polystyrene nanocarriers that have been modified with PEG or poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) (PEEP) and exposed to plasma proteins exhibit a low cellular uptake, whereas those not exposed to plasma proteins show high non-specific uptake. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that exposed nanocarriers formed a protein corona that contains an abundance of clusterin proteins (also known as apolipoprotein J). When the polymer-modified nanocarriers were incubated with clusterin, non-specific cellular uptake could be reduced. Our results show that in addition to reducing protein adsorption, PEG, and now PEEPs, can affect the composition of the protein corona that forms around nanocarriers, and the presence of distinct proteins is necessary to prevent non-specific cellular uptake.

  20. Trafficking of the myrosinase-associated protein GLL23 requires NUC/MVP1/GOLD36/ERMO3 and the p24 protein CYB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancowski, Sylwia; Catching, Amanda; Pighin, Jamie; Kudo, Takamasa; Foissner, Ilse; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2014-02-01

    Proteins detrimental to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology need to be efficiently exported. Here, we identify two mechanisms that control trafficking of Arabidopsis thalianaGLL23, a 43 kDa GDSL-like lipase implicated in glucosinolate metabolism through its association with the β-glucosidase myrosinase. Using immunofluorescence, we identified two mutants that showed aberrant accumulation of GLL23: large perinuclear ER aggregates in the nuclear cage (nuc) mutant; and small compartments contiguous with the peripheral ER in the cytoplasmic bodies (cyb) mutant. Live imaging of fluorescently tagged GLL23 confirmed its presence in the nuc and cyb compartments, but lack of fluorescent signals in the wild-type plants suggested that GLL23 is normally post-translationally modified for ER export. NUC encodes the MVP1/GOLD36/ERMO3 myrosinase-associated protein, previously shown to have vacuolar distribution. CYB is an ER and Golgi-localized p24 type I membrane protein component of coat protein complex (COP) vesicles, animal and yeast homologues of which are known to be involved in selective cargo sorting for ER-Golgi export. Without NUC, GLL23 accumulates in the ER this situation suggests that NUC is in fact active in the ER. Without CYB, both GLL23 and NUC were found to accumulate in cyb compartments, consistent with a role for NUC in GLL23 processing and indicated that GLL23 is the likely sorting target of the CYB p24 protein.

  1. DNA damage-processing in E. coli: on-going protein synthesis is required for fixation of UV-induced lethality and mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Amanda; Raymer, Jenny; Bockrath, R

    2002-10-01

    UV irradiation of E. coli produces photoproducts in the DNA genome. In consequence, some bacteria lose viability (colony-forming ability) or remain viable as mutant cells. However, the end-points of viability inactivation (lethality) or mutation are determined by cellular processes that act on the UV-damaged DNA. We have investigated the in vivo time course for processes that deal with cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) which can be specifically removed by photoreactivation (PR). At different times during post-UV incubation, samples were challenged with PR and assayed for viability or mutation. We used excision-defective E. coli B/r cells and worked under yellow light to avoid background PR. During post-UV incubation (0-100min) in fully supplemented defined medium, inactivation and mutation were initially significantly reversed by PR but the extent of this reversal decreased during continued incubation defining "fixation" of lethality or mutation, respectively. In contrast, if protein synthesis was restricted during the post-UV incubation, no fixation developed. When chloramphenicol was added to inhibit protein synthesis after 30min of supplemented post-UV incubation, at a time sufficient for expression of UV-induced protein(s), fixation of lethality or mutation was still annulled (no change in the effectiveness of PR developed). Lethality fixation did progress when protein synthesis was restricted and the cells were incubated in the presence of puromycin or were either clpP or clpX defective. We discuss these and related results to suggest (1) on-going protein synthesis is required in the fixation process for lethality and mutation to sustain an effective level of a hypothetical protein sensitive to ClpXP proteolysis and (2) this protein plays a critical role in the process leading to exchange between Pol III activity and alternative polymerase activities required as each cell deals with damage in template DNA.

  2. Analysis of virion-incorporated host proteins required for herpes simplex virus type 1 infection through a RNA interference screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Stegen

    Full Text Available Viruses are strictly dependent on cells to propagate and many incorporate host proteins in their viral particles, but the significance of this incorporation is poorly understood. Recently, we performed the first comprehensive characterization of the mature herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in which up to 49 distinct cellular proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. In the present study, we sought to identify if these cellular factors are relevant for the HSV-1 life cycle. To this end, we performed a small interfering RNA functional screen and found that 15 of these host proteins altered HSV-1 proliferation in cell culture, without any significant effect on cell viability. Moreover, the siRNA used had no negative consequences for Adenovirus type 5 propagation (with one exception indicating that the modulation was specific for HSV-1 and not merely due to unhealthy cells. The positive host proteins include several Rab GTPases and other intracellular transport components as well as proteins involved in signal transduction, gene regulation and immunity. Remarkably, in most cases when virions were depleted for one of the above proteins, they replicated more poorly in subsequent infections in wild type cells. This highlights for the first time that both the cellular and virion-associated pools of many of these proteins actively contribute to viral propagation. Altogether, these findings underscore the power and biological relevance of combining proteomics and RNA interference to identify novel host-pathogen interactions.

  3. Inhibition of cellular protein secretion by norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 requires a mimic of an endoplasmic reticulum export signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler M Sharp

    Full Text Available Protein trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi apparatus is central to cellular homeostasis. ER export signals are utilized by a subset of proteins to rapidly exit the ER by direct uptake into COPII vesicles for transport to the Golgi. Norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 contains a YXΦESDG motif that mimics a di-acidic ER export signal in both sequence and function. However, unlike normal ER export signals, the ER export signal mimic of p22 is necessary for apparent inhibition of normal COPII vesicle trafficking, which leads to Golgi disassembly and antagonism of Golgi-dependent cellular protein secretion. This is the first reported function for p22. Disassembly of the Golgi apparatus was also observed in cells replicating Norwalk virus, which may contribute to pathogenesis by interfering with cellular processes that are dependent on an intact secretory pathway. These results indicate that the ER export signal mimic is critical to the antagonistic function of p22, shown herein to be a novel antagonist of ER/Golgi trafficking. This unique and well-conserved human norovirus motif is therefore an appealing target for antiviral drug development.

  4. Complexes of Usher proteins preassemble at the endoplasmic reticulum and are required for trafficking and ER homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Blanco-Sánchez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH, the leading cause of hereditary combined hearing and vision loss, is characterized by sensorineural deafness and progressive retinal degeneration. Mutations in several different genes produce USH, but the proximal cause of sensory cell death remains mysterious. We adapted a proximity ligation assay to analyze associations among three of the USH proteins, Cdh23, Harmonin and Myo7aa, and the microtubule-based transporter Ift88 in zebrafish inner ear mechanosensory hair cells. We found that the proteins are in close enough proximity to form complexes and that these complexes preassemble at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Defects in any one of the three USH proteins disrupt formation and trafficking of the complex and result in diminished levels of the other proteins, generalized trafficking defects and ER stress that triggers apoptosis. ER stress, thus, contributes to sensory hair cell loss and provides a new target to explore for protective therapies for USH.

  5. Pluripotency transcription factor Sox2 is strongly adsorbed by heparin but requires a protein transduction domain for cell internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albayrak, Cem [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, 381 North-South Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Yang, William C. [Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Swartz, James R., E-mail: jswartz@stanford.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, 381 North-South Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Both R9Sox2 and Sox2 bind heparin with comparable affinity. ► Both R9Sox2 and Sox2 bind to fibroblasts, but only R9Sox2 is internalized. ► Internalization efficiency of R9Sox2 is 0.3% of the administered protein. ► Heparan sulfate adsorption may be part of a mechanism for managing cell death. -- Abstract: The binding of protein transduction domain (PTD)-conjugated proteins to heparan sulfate is an important step in cellular internalization of macromolecules. Here, we studied the pluripotency transcription factor Sox2, with or without the nonaarginine (R9) PTD. Unexpectedly, we observed that Sox2 is strongly adsorbed by heparin and by the fibroblasts without the R9 PTD. However, only the R9Sox2 fusion protein is internalized by the cells. These results collectively show that binding to heparan sulfate is not sufficient for cellular uptake, thereby supporting a recent hypothesis that other proteins play a role in cell internalization of PTD-conjugated proteins.

  6. Hormonal activation of a kinase cascade localized at the mitochondria is required for StAR protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poderoso, Cecilia; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2009-03-01

    It is known that ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 participate in the regulation of Star gene transcription. However, their role in StAR protein post-transcriptional regulation is not described yet. In this study we analyzed the relationship between the MAPK cascade and StAR protein phosphorylation and function. We have demonstrated that (a) steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells depends on the specific of ERK1/2 activation at the mitochondria; (b) ERK1/2 phosphorylation is driven by mitochondrial PKA and constitutive MEK1/2 in this organelle; (c) active ERK1/2 interacts with StAR protein, leads to StAR protein phosphorylation at Ser(232) only in the presence of cholesterol; (d) directed mutagenesis of Ser(232) (S232A) inhibited in vitro StAR protein phosphorylation by ERK1; (e) transient transfection of MA-10 cells with StAR S232A cDNA markedly reduced the yield of progesterone production. We show that StAR protein is a substrate of ERK1/2, and that mitochondrial ERK1/2 is part of a multimeric complex that regulates cholesterol transport.

  7. Daple is a novel non-receptor GEF required for trimeric G protein activation in Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Nicolas; Midde, Krishna K; Dunkel, Ying; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Pavlova, Yelena; Marivin, Arthur; Barbazán, Jorge; Murray, Fiona; Nitsche, Ulrich; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Willert, Karl; Goel, Ajay; Abal, Miguel; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    Wnt signaling is essential for tissue homeostasis and its dysregulation causes cancer. Wnt ligands trigger signaling by activating Frizzled receptors (FZDRs), which belong to the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. However, the mechanisms of G protein activation in Wnt signaling remain controversial. In this study, we demonstrate that FZDRs activate G proteins and trigger non-canonical Wnt signaling via the Dishevelled-binding protein, Daple. Daple contains a Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif, which activates Gαi proteins and an adjacent domain that directly binds FZDRs, thereby linking Wnt stimulation to G protein activation. This triggers non-canonical Wnt responses, that is, suppresses the β-catenin/TCF/LEF pathway and tumorigenesis, but enhances PI3K-Akt and Rac1 signals and tumor cell invasiveness. In colorectal cancers, Daple is suppressed during adenoma-to-carcinoma transformation and expressed later in metastasized tumor cells. Thus, Daple activates Gαi and enhances non-canonical Wnt signaling by FZDRs, and its dysregulation can impact both tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. PMID:26126266

  8. DNA cleavage by CgII and NgoAVII requires interaction between N- and R-proteins and extensive nucleotide hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremba, Mindaugas; Toliusis, Paulius; Grigaitis, Rokas; Manakova, Elena; Silanskas, Arunas; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Szczelkun, Mark D; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-12-16

    The stress-sensitive restriction-modification (RM) system CglI from Corynebacterium glutamicum and the homologous NgoAVII RM system from Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 are composed of three genes: a DNA methyltransferase (M.CglI and M.NgoAVII), a putative restriction endonuclease (R.CglI and R.NgoAVII, or R-proteins) and a predicted DEAD-family helicase/ATPase (N.CglI and N.NgoAVII or N-proteins). Here we report a biochemical characterization of the R- and N-proteins. Size-exclusion chromatography and SAXS experiments reveal that the isolated R.CglI, R.NgoAVII and N.CglI proteins form homodimers, while N.NgoAVII is a monomer in solution. Moreover, the R.CglI and N.CglI proteins assemble in a complex with R2N2 stoichiometry. Next, we show that N-proteins have ATPase activity that is dependent on double-stranded DNA and is stimulated by the R-proteins. Functional ATPase activity and extensive ATP hydrolysis (∼170 ATP/s/monomer) are required for site-specific DNA cleavage by R-proteins. We show that ATP-dependent DNA cleavage by R-proteins occurs at fixed positions (6-7 nucleotides) downstream of the asymmetric recognition sequence 5'-GCCGC-3'. Despite similarities to both Type I and II restriction endonucleases, the CglI and NgoAVII enzymes may employ a unique catalytic mechanism for DNA cleavage. PMID:25429977

  9. Memory formation for trace fear conditioning requires ubiquitin-proteasome mediated protein degradation in the prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Reis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The cellular mechanisms supporting plasticity during memory consolidation have been a subject of considerable interest. De novo protein and mRNA synthesis in several brain areas are critical, and more recently protein degradation, mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS, has been shown to be important. Previous work clearly establishes a relationship between protein synthesis and protein degradation in the amygdala, but it is unclear whether cortical mechanisms of memory consolidation are similar to those in the amygdala. Recent work demonstrating a critical role for prefrontal cortex (PFC in the acquisition and consolidation of fear memory allows us to address this question. Here we use a PFC-dependent fear conditioning protocol to determine whether UPS mediated protein degradation is necessary for memory consolidation in PFC. Groups of rats were trained with auditory delay or trace fear conditioning and sacrificed 60 min after training. PFC tissue was then analyzed to quantify the amount of polyubiquinated protein. Other animals were trained with similar procedures but were infused with either a proteasome inhibitor (clasto-lactacystin β-lactone or a translation inhibitor (anisomycin in the PFC immediately after training. Our results show increased UPS-mediated protein degradation in the PFC following trace but not delay fear conditioning. Additionally, post-training proteasome or translation inhibition significantly impaired trace but not delay fear memory when tested the next day. Our results further support the idea that the PFC is critical for trace but not delay fear conditioning highlight the role of UPS-mediated degradation as critical for synaptic plasticity.

  10. Flavodoxin cofactor binding induces structural changes that are required for protein-protein interactions with NADP(+) oxidoreductase and pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Adam V; Broderick, Joan B

    2013-12-01

    Flavodoxin (Fld) conformational changes, thermal stability, and cofactor binding were studied using circular dichroism (CD), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and limited proteolysis. Thermodynamics of apo and holo-Fld folding were examined to discern the features of this important electron transfer protein and to provide data on apo-Fld. With the exception of fluorescence and UV-vis binding experiments with its cofactor flavin mononucleotide (FMN), apo-Fld is almost completely uncharacterized in Escherichia coli. Fld is more structured when the FMN cofactor is bound; the association is tight and driven by enthalpy of binding. Surface plasmon resonance binding experiments were carried out under anaerobic conditions for both apo- and holo-Fld and demonstrate the importance of structure and conformation for the interaction with binding partners. Holo-Fld is capable of associating with NADP(+)-dependent flavodoxin oxidoreductase (FNR) and pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) whereas there is no detectable interaction between apo-Fld and either protein. Limited proteolysis experiments were analyzed by LC-MS to identify the regions in Fld that are involved in conformation changes upon cofactor binding. Docking software was used to model the Fld/PFL-AE complex to understand the interactions between these two proteins and gain insight into electron transfer reactions from Fld to PFL-AE.

  11. Molecular characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi SAP proteins with host-cell lysosome exocytosis-inducing activity required for parasite invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamiris Zanforlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To invade target cells, Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic forms engage distinct sets of surface and secreted molecules that interact with host components. Serine-, alanine-, and proline-rich proteins (SAP comprise a multigene family constituted of molecules with a high serine, alanine and proline residue content. SAP proteins have a central domain (SAP-CD responsible for interaction with and invasion of mammalian cells by metacyclic forms. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a 513 bp sequence from SAP-CD in blastn analysis, we identified 39 full-length SAP genes in the genome of T. cruzi. Although most of these genes were mapped in the T. cruzi in silico chromosome TcChr41, several SAP sequences were spread out across the genome. The level of SAP transcripts was twice as high in metacyclic forms as in epimastigotes. Monoclonal (MAb-SAP and polyclonal (anti-SAP antibodies produced against the recombinant protein SAP-CD were used to investigate the expression and localization of SAP proteins. MAb-SAP reacted with a 55 kDa SAP protein released by epimastigotes and metacyclic forms and with distinct sets of SAP variants expressed in amastigotes and tissue culture-derived trypomastigotes (TCTs. Anti-SAP antibodies reacted with components located in the anterior region of epimastigotes and between the nucleus and the kinetoplast in metacyclic trypomastigotes. In contrast, anti-SAP recognized surface components of amastigotes and TCTs, suggesting that SAP proteins are directed to different cellular compartments. Ten SAP peptides were identified by mass spectrometry in vesicle and soluble-protein fractions obtained from parasite conditioned medium. Using overlapping sequences from SAP-CD, we identified a 54-aa peptide (SAP-CE that was able to induce host-cell lysosome exocytosis and inhibit parasite internalization by 52%. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides novel information about the genomic organization, expression and cellular localization of SAP

  12. Adjuvant requirement for successful immunization with recombinant derivatives of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 delivered via the intranasal route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Y Bargieri

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we generated two bacterial recombinant proteins expressing 89 amino acids of the C-terminal domain of the Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 and the hexa-histidine tag (His6MSP1(19. One of these recombinant proteins contained also the amino acid sequence of the universal pan allelic T-cell epitope (His6MSP1(19-PADRE. In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenic properties of these antigens when administered via the intra-nasal route in the presence of distinct adjuvant formulations. We found that C57BL/6 mice immunized with either recombinant proteins in the presence of the adjuvants cholera toxin (CT or the Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (LT developed high and long lasting titers of specific serum antibodies. The induced immune responses reached maximum levels after three immunizing doses with a prevailing IgG1 subclass response. In contrast, mice immunized by intranasal route with His6MSP1(19-PADRE in the presence of the synthetic oligonucleotides adjuvant CpG ODN 1826 developed lower antibody titers but when combined to CT, CpG addition resulted in enhanced IgG responses characterized by lower IgG1 levels. Considering the limitations of antigens formulations that can be used in humans, mucosal adjuvants can be a reliable alternative for the development of new strategies of immunization using recombinant proteins of P. vivax.

  13. Kip-related protein 3 is required for control of endoreduplication in the shoot apical meristem and leaves of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Sang Eun; Okushima, Yoko; Nam, Jaesung; Umeda, Masaaki; Kim, Gyung-Tae

    2013-01-01

    The cell cycle plays an important role in the development and adaptation of multicellular organisms; specifically, it allows them to optimally adjust their architecture in response to environmental changes. Kip-related proteins (KRPs) are important negative regulators of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which positively control the cell cycle during plant development. The Arabidopsis genome possesses seven KRP genes with low sequence similarity and distinct expression patterns; however, why Arabidopsis needs seven KRP genes and how these genes function in cell cycle regulation are unknown. Here, we focused on the characterization of KRP3, which was found to have unique functions in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and leaves. KRP3 protein was localized to the SAM, including the ground meristem and vascular tissues in the ground part of the SAM and cotyledons. In addition, KRP3 protein was stabilized when treated with MG132, an inhibitor of the 26S proteasome, indicating that the protein may be regulated by 26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation. KRP3-overexpressing (KRP3 OE) transgenic plants showed reduced organ size, serrated leaves, and reduced fertility. Interestingly, the KRP3 OE transgenic plants showed a significant reduction in the size of the SAM with alterations in cell arrangement. In addition, compared to the wild type, the KRP3 OE transgenic plants had a higher DNA ploidy level in the SAM and leaves. Taken together, our data suggest that KRP3 plays important regulatory roles in the cell cycle and endoreduplication in the SAM and leaves. PMID:23314608

  14. The Legionella pneumophila major secretory protein, a protease, is not required for intracellular growth or cell killing.

    OpenAIRE

    Szeto, L.; Shuman, H A

    1990-01-01

    The Legionella pneumophila major secretory protein (Msp) is a Zn2+ metalloprotease whose function in pathogenesis is unknown. The structural gene for the Msp protease, mspA, was isolated from an L. pneumophila genomic library. In Escherichia coli which contain plasmids with the mspA gene, Msp protein and activity are found in the periplasmic space and the cytoplasm. Transposon mutagenesis with Tn9 of an mspA-containing plasmid in E. coli yielded mutants which no longer expressed protease acti...

  15. Functional diversification of hsp40: distinct j-protein functional requirements for two prions allow for chaperone-dependent prion selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Julia M; Nguyen, Phil P; Patel, Milan J; Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2014-07-01

    Yeast prions are heritable amyloid aggregates of functional yeast proteins; their propagation to subsequent cell generations is dependent upon fragmentation of prion protein aggregates by molecular chaperone proteins. Mounting evidence indicates the J-protein Sis1 may act as an amyloid specificity factor, recognizing prion and other amyloid aggregates and enabling Ssa and Hsp104 to act in prion fragmentation. Chaperone interactions with prions, however, can be affected by variations in amyloid-core structure resulting in distinct prion variants or 'strains'. Our genetic analysis revealed that Sis1 domain requirements by distinct variants of [PSI+] are strongly dependent upon overall variant stability. Notably, multiple strong [PSI+] variants can be maintained by a minimal construct of Sis1 consisting of only the J-domain and glycine/phenylalanine-rich (G/F) region that was previously shown to be sufficient for cell viability and [RNQ+] prion propagation. In contrast, weak [PSI+] variants are lost under the same conditions but maintained by the expression of an Sis1 construct that lacks only the G/F region and cannot support [RNQ+] propagation, revealing mutually exclusive requirements for Sis1 function between these two prions. Prion loss is not due to [PSI+]-dependent toxicity or dependent upon a particular yeast genetic background. These observations necessitate that Sis1 must have at least two distinct functional roles that individual prions differentially require for propagation and which are localized to the glycine-rich domains of the Sis1. Based on these distinctions, Sis1 plasmid-shuffling in a [PSI+]/[RNQ+] strain permitted J-protein-dependent prion selection for either prion. We also found that, despite an initial report to the contrary, the human homolog of Sis1, Hdj1, is capable of [PSI+] prion propagation in place of Sis1. This conservation of function is also prion-variant dependent, indicating that only one of the two Sis1-prion functions may have

  16. Nutritional requirements of energy, protein and macrominerals for maintenance and weight gain of young crossbred Nellore × Holstein bulls on pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlos Oliveira Porto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate requirements of energy, protein and macrominerals of young Nellore/Holstein crossbreds bulls supplemented on pastures of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf. Thirty-five young bulls, at 8.53±0.18 months of age and with initial body weight of 230.6±6.1 kg were used. Ten animals were slaughtered as reference, in different weight range, and the other animals were slaughtered at the end of the experimental period. For estimate of net energy requirements for weight, a regression equation between log of retained energy (RE and log of empty body weight gain (EBWG was constructed. Net requirements of Ca, P, Mg, Na and K were determined by the equation Y' = a.b.Xb-1, in which a and b represent the intercept and the coefficient of equation of prediction of macrominerals in body content, respectively. Requirements of metabolizable energy for maintenance (MEm were obtained from retained energy in function of metabolizable energy intake (MEI. The requirements of MEm of Nellore/Holstein crossbreds young bulls on pasture was 125 kcal/EBW0.75/day. The efficiency of ME utilization for maintenance (k of grazing Nellore/Holstein crossbred young mbulls was 0.58 and 0.24 for gain. The total metabolizable protein requirements for an animal with 400 kg and with average daily gain of 1.0 kg, were 638.36 g/day. The dietetic requirements of Ca and P for an animal with 400 kg BW were 0.49 and 0.21% of DM, respectively. Daily metabolizable energy requirement for maintenance of grazing Nellore/Holstein crossbred young bulls was 11.6% greater than the values found for cattle in feedlot in Brazil (112 kcal/kg EBW0.75.

  17. The Scaffold Protein Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein β Orchestrates Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophic Signaling Required for the Development of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritzer, Michael D.; Li, Jinliang; Passariello, Catherine L.; Gayanilo, Marjorie; Thakur, Hrishikesh; Dayan, Joseph; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac myocyte hypertrophy is regulated by an extensive intracellular signal transduction network. In vitro evidence suggests that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein β (mAKAPβ) serves as a nodal organizer of hypertrophic signaling. However, the relevance of mAKAPβ signalosomes to pathological remodeling and heart failure in vivo remains unknown. Methods and Results Using conditional, cardiac myocyte–specific gene deletion, we now demonstrate that mAKAPβ expression in mice is important for the cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload and catecholamine toxicity. mAKAPβ targeting prevented the development of heart failure associated with long-term transverse aortic constriction, conferring a survival benefit. In contrast to 29% of control mice (n=24), only 6% of mAKAPβ knockout mice (n=31) died in the 16 weeks of pressure overload (P=0.02). Accordingly, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited myocardial apoptosis and the development of interstitial fibrosis, left atrial hypertrophy, and pulmonary edema. This improvement in cardiac status correlated with the attenuated activation of signaling pathways coordinated by the mAKAPβ scaffold, including the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase D1 and histone deacetylase 4 that we reveal to participate in a new mAKAP signaling module. Furthermore, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited pathological gene expression directed by myocyte-enhancer factor-2 and nuclear factor of activated T-cell transcription factors that associate with the scaffold. Conclusions mAKAPβ orchestrates signaling that regulates pathological cardiac remodeling in mice. Targeting of the underlying physical architecture of signaling networks, including mAKAPβ signalosome formation, may constitute an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of pathological remodeling and heart failure. PMID:24812305

  18. Induction of p53-Independent Apoptosis by the Adenovirus E4orf4 Protein Requires Binding to the Bα Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    OpenAIRE

    Marcellus, Richard C.; Chan, Helen; Paquette, Denis; Thirlwell, Sarah; Boivin, Dominique; Branton, Philip E.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the E4orf4 protein of human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) induces p53-independent apoptosis. We believe that this process may play a role in cell death and viral spread at the final stages of productive infection. E4orf4 may also be of therapeutic value in treating some diseases, including cancer, through its ability to induce apoptosis when expressed individually. The only previously identified biochemical function of E4orf4 is its ability to associate with the...

  19. Phospholipid translocation and miltefosine potency require both L. donovani miltefosine transporter and the new protein LdRos3 in Leishmania parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Victoria, F Javier; Sánchez-Cañete, María P; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco

    2006-08-18

    The antitumor drug miltefosine has been recently approved as the first oral drug active against visceral leishmaniasis. We have previously identified the L. donovani miltefosine transporter (LdMT) as a P-type ATPase involved in phospholipid translocation at the plasma membrane of Leishmania parasites. Here we show that this protein is essential but not sufficient for the phospholipid translocation activity and, thus, for the potency of the drug. Based on recent findings in yeast, we have identified the putative beta subunit of LdMT, named LdRos3, as another protein factor required for the translocation activity. LdRos3 belongs to the CDC50/Lem3 family, proposed as likely beta subunits for P4-ATPases. The phenotype of LdRos3-defective parasites was identical to that of the LdMT-/-, including a defect in the uptake of 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl-amino)-phosphatidylserine, generally considered as not affected in Lem3p-deficient yeast. Both LdMT and LdRos3 normally localized to the plasma membrane but were retained inside the endoplasmic reticulum in the absence of the other protein or when inactivating point mutations were introduced in LdMT. Modulating the expression levels of either protein independently, we show that any one of them could behave as the protein limiting the level of flippase activity. Thus, LdMT and LdRos3 seem to form part of the same translocation machinery that determines flippase activity and miltefosine sensitivity in Leishmania, further supporting the consideration of CDC50/Lem3 proteins as beta subunits required for the normal functioning of P4-ATPases. PMID:16785229

  20. Membrane targeting of cGMP-dependent protein kinase is required for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); A. Smolenski; B.C. Tilly (Bernard); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); E.M.E. Ehlert (Ehrich); A.G. Bot (Alice); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); W.E. Boomaars (Wendy); S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractA recently cloned isoform of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK), designated type II, was implicated as the mediator of cGMP-provoked intestinal Cl- secretion based on its localization in the apical membrane of enterocytes and on its capacity to activate cys

  1. Non-structural protein NS3/NS3a is required for propagation of bluetongue virus in Culicoides sonorensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, Femke; Drolet, B.S.; Boonstra, Jan; Rijn, Van P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes non-contagious haemorrhagic disease in ruminants and is transmitted by Culicoides spp. biting midges. BTV encodes four non-structural proteins of which NS3/NS3a is functional in virus release. NS3/NS3a is not essential for in vitro virus replication. Howe

  2. Non-structural protein NS3/NS3a is required for propagation of bluetongue virus in Culicoides sonorensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes non-contagious haemorrhagic disease in ruminants and is transmitted by Culicoides spp. biting midges. BTV encodes four non-structural proteins of which NS3/NS3a is functional in virus release. NS3/NS3a is not essential for in vitro virus replication. However...

  3. The nucleolar GTP-binding proteins Gnl2 and nucleostemin are required for retinal neurogenesis in developing zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paridaen, J.T.M.; Janson, E.; Utami, K.H.; Pereboom, T.C.; Essers, P.; van Rooijen, C.R.; Zivkovic, D.; MacInnes, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleostemin (NS), a member of a family of nucleolar GTP-binding proteins, is highly expressed in proliferating cells such as stem and cancer cells and is involved in the control of cell cycle progression. Both depletion and overexpression of NS result in stabilization of the tumor suppressor p53 pr

  4. MavN is a Legionella pneumophila vacuole-associated protein required for efficient iron acquisition during intracellular growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Dervla T.; Laguna, Rita K.; Valtz, Nicole; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and virulence of most intravacuolar pathogens. The mechanisms by which microbes bypass host iron restriction to gain access to this metal across the host vacuolar membrane are poorly characterized. In this work, we identify a unique intracellular iron acquisition strategy used by Legionella pneumophila. The bacterial Icm/Dot (intracellular multiplication/defect in organelle trafficking) type IV secretion system targets the bacterial-derived MavN (more regions allowing vacuolar colocalization N) protein to the surface of the Legionella-containing vacuole where this putative transmembrane protein facilitates intravacuolar iron acquisition. The ΔmavN mutant exhibits a transcriptional iron-starvation signature before its growth is arrested during the very early stages of macrophage infection. This intracellular growth defect is rescued only by the addition of excess exogenous iron to the culture medium and not a variety of other metals. Consistent with MavN being a translocated substrate that plays an exclusive role during intracellular growth, the mutant shows no defect for growth in broth culture, even under severe iron-limiting conditions. Putative iron-binding residues within the MavN protein were identified, and point mutations in these residues resulted in defects specific for intracellular growth that are indistinguishable from the ΔmavN mutant. This model of a bacterial protein inserting into host membranes to mediate iron transport provides a paradigm for how intravacuolar pathogens can use virulence-associated secretion systems to manipulate and acquire host iron. PMID:26330609

  5. CD1d-mediated presentation of endogenous lipid antigens by adipocytes requires microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Gijzel, Sanne M W; Siersbæk, Rasmus;

    2014-01-01

    microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), which we show is also under the transcriptional regulation of C/EBPβ and -δ, as a novel player in the presentation of endogenous lipid antigens by adipocytes. Overall, our findings indicate that adipocytes can function as non-professional lipid antigen...

  6. The APP-Interacting Protein FE65 is Required for Hippocampus-Dependent Learning and Long-Term Potentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Moon, Changjong; Hu, Qubai; Wang, Baiping; Martin, George; Sun, Zhongsheng; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    FE65 is expressed predominantly in the brain and interacts with the C-terminal domain of [beta]-amyloid precursor protein (APP). We examined hippocampus-dependent memory and in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) at the CA1 synapses with isoform-specific FE65 knockout (p97FE65[superscript -/-]) mice. When examined using the Morris water maze,…

  7. In Entamoeba histolytica, a BspA family protein is required for chemotaxis toward tumour necrosis factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Silvestre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Entamoeba histolytica cell migration is essential for the development of human amoebiasis (an infectious disease characterized by tissue invasion and destruction. The tissue inflammation associated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF secretion by host cells is a well-documented feature of amoebiasis. Tumour necrosis factor is a chemoattractant for E. histolytica, and the parasite may have a TNF receptor at its cell surface. Methods: confocal microscopy, RNA Sequencing, bioinformatics, RNA antisense techniques and histological analysis of human colon explants were used to characterize the interplay between TNF and E. histolytica. Results: an antibody against human TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1 stained the E. histolytica trophozoite surface and (on immunoblots binds to a 150-kDa protein. Proteome screening with the TNFR1 sequence revealed a BspA family protein in E. histolytica that carries a TNFR signature domain and six leucine-rich repeats (named here as "cell surface protein", CSP, in view of its cellular location. Cell surface protein shares structural homologies with Toll-Like receptors, colocalizes with TNF and is internalized in TNF-containing vesicles. Reduction of cellular CSP levels abolished chemotaxis toward TNF and blocked parasite invasion of human colon. Conclusions: there is a clear link between TNF chemotaxis, CSP and pathogenesis.

  8. Type I J-domain NbMIP1 proteins are required for both Tobacco mosaic virus infection and plant innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Du

    Full Text Available Tm-2² is a coiled coil-nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat resistance protein that confers durable extreme resistance against Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV by recognizing the viral movement protein (MP. Here we report that the Nicotiana benthamiana J-domain MIP1 proteins (NbMIP1s associate with tobamovirus MP, Tm-2² and SGT1. Silencing of NbMIP1s reduced TMV movement and compromised Tm-2²-mediated resistance against TMV and ToMV. Furthermore, silencing of NbMIP1s reduced the steady-state protein levels of ToMV MP and Tm-2². Moreover, NbMIP1s are required for plant resistance induced by other R genes and the nonhost pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000. In addition, we found that SGT1 associates with Tm-2² and is required for Tm-2²-mediated resistance against TMV. These results suggest that NbMIP1s function as co-chaperones during virus infection and plant immunity.

  9. JC virus small T antigen binds phosphatase PP2A and Rb family proteins and is required for efficient viral DNA replication activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Bollag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human polyomavirus, JC virus (JCV produces five tumor proteins encoded by transcripts alternatively spliced from one precursor messenger RNA. Significant attention has been given to replication and transforming activities of JCV's large tumor antigen (TAg and three T' proteins, but little is known about small tumor antigen (tAg functions. Amino-terminal sequences of tAg overlap with those of the other tumor proteins, but the carboxy half of tAg is unique. These latter sequences are the least conserved among the early coding regions of primate polyomaviruses. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We investigated the ability of wild type and mutant forms of JCV tAg to interact with cellular proteins involved in regulating cell proliferation and survival. The JCV P99A tAg is mutated at a conserved proline, which in the SV40 tAg is required for efficient interaction with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, and the C157A mutant tAg is altered at one of two newly recognized LxCxE motifs. Relative to wild type and C157A tAgs, P99A tAg interacts inefficiently with PP2A in vivo. Unlike SV40 tAg, JCV tAg binds to the Rb family of tumor suppressor proteins. Viral DNAs expressing mutant t proteins replicated less efficiently than did the intact JCV genome. A JCV construct incapable of expressing tAg was replication-incompetent, a defect not complemented in trans using a tAg-expressing vector. CONCLUSIONS: JCV tAg possesses unique properties among the polyomavirus small t proteins. It contributes significantly to viral DNA replication in vivo; a tAg null mutant failed to display detectable DNA replication activity, and a tAg substitution mutant, reduced in PP2A binding, was replication-defective. Our observation that JCV tAg binds Rb proteins, indicates all five JCV tumor proteins have the potential to influence cell cycle progression in infected and transformed cells. It remains unclear how these proteins coordinate their unique and overlapping functions.

  10. Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB6 protein participates in formation of VirB7 and VirB9 complexes required for type IV secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Simon J; Krishnamoorthy, Vidhya; Christie, Peter J

    2003-05-01

    This study characterized the contribution of Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB6, a polytopic inner membrane protein, to the formation of outer membrane VirB7 lipoprotein and VirB9 protein multimers required for type IV secretion. VirB7 assembles as a disulfide cross-linked homodimer that associates with the T pilus and a VirB7-VirB9 heterodimer that stabilizes other VirB proteins during biogenesis of the secretion machine. Two presumptive VirB protein complexes, composed of VirB6, VirB7, and VirB9 and of VirB7, VirB9, and VirB10, were isolated by immunoprecipitation or glutathione S-transferase pulldown assays from detergent-solubilized membrane extracts of wild-type A348 and a strain producing only VirB6 through VirB10 among the VirB proteins. To examine the biological importance of VirB6 complex formation for type IV secretion, we monitored the effects of nonstoichiometric VirB6 production and the synthesis of VirB6 derivatives with 4-residue insertions (VirB6.i4) on VirB7 and VirB9 multimerization, T-pilus assembly, and substrate transfer. A virB6 gene deletion mutant accumulated VirB7 dimers at diminished steady-state levels, whereas complementation with a plasmid bearing wild-type virB6 partially restored accumulation of the dimers. VirB6 overproduction was correlated with formation of higher-order VirB9 complexes or aggregates and also blocked substrate transfer without a detectable disruption of T-pilus production; these phenotypes were displayed by cells grown at 28 degrees C, a temperature that favors VirB protein turnover, but not by cells grown at 20 degrees C. Strains producing several VirB6.i4 mutant proteins assembled novel VirB7 and VirB9 complexes detectable by nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and two strains producing the D60.i4 and L191.i4 mutant proteins translocated IncQ plasmid and VirE2 effector protein substrates in the absence of a detectable T pilus. Our findings support a model that VirB6 mediates

  11. A structural comparison of Listeria monocytogenes protein chaperones PrsA1 and PrsA2 reveals molecular features required for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, Laty A; Freitag, Nancy E; Prehna, Gerd

    2016-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive environmental bacterium that lives within soil but transitions into a pathogen upon contact with a mammalian host. The transition of L. monocytogenes from soil dweller to cytosolic pathogen is dependent upon secreted virulence factors that mediate cell invasion and intracellular growth. PrsA1 and PrsA2 are secreted bacterial lipoprotein chaperones that contribute to the folding of proteins translocated across the bacterial membrane; PrsA2 is required for L. monocytogenes virulence, whereas the function of PrsA1 remains to be determined. We have solved an X-ray crystal structure of PrsA1 and have used this model to guide comparison structure-based mutagenesis studies with PrsA2. Targeted mutagenesis of PrsA2 demonstrates that oligomerization of PrsA2 as well as molecular features of the foldase domain are required for protein secretion and virulence, whereas a functional role was uncovered for PrsA1 in bacterial resistance to alcohol. Interestingly, PrsA2 membrane localization is not required for all PrsA2-dependent activities, suggesting that the lipoprotein retains function when released from the bacterial cell. PrsA chaperones are thus multifaceted proteins with distinct domains adapted to accommodate the functional needs of a diverse array of secreted substrates. PMID:27007641

  12. Seed germination of GA-insensitive sleepy1 mutants does not require RGL2 protein disappearance in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed germination is a complex developmental process regulated by phytohormones. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits seed germination, whereas gibberellin (GA) stimulates seed germination. In tomato and Arabidopsis, GA is clearly required for seed germination. Recent evidence suggests tha...

  13. The stress granule protein Vgl1 and poly(A)-binding protein Pab1 are required for doxorubicin resistance in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

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    Morita, Takahiro [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Umeda, Nanae; Kita, Ayako [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko, E-mail: sugiurar@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stress granules (SGs) as a mechanism of doxorubicin tolerance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize the role of stress granules in doxorubicin tolerance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deletion of components of SGs enhances doxorubicin sensitivity in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxorubicin promotes SG formation when combined with heat shock. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxorubicin regulates stress granule assembly independent of eIF2{alpha} phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Doxorubicin is an anthracycline antibiotic widely used for chemotherapy. Although doxorubicin is effective in the treatment of several cancers, including solid tumors and leukemias, the basis of its mechanism of action is not completely understood. Here, we describe the effects of doxorubicin and its relationship with stress granules formation in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that disruption of genes encoding the components of stress granules, including vgl1{sup +}, which encodes a multi-KH type RNA-binding protein, and pab1{sup +}, which encodes a poly(A)-binding protein, resulted in greater sensitivity to doxorubicin than seen in wild-type cells. Disruption of the vgl1{sup +} and pab1{sup +} genes did not confer sensitivity to other anti-cancer drugs such as cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel. We also showed that doxorubicin treatment promoted stress granule formation when combined with heat shock. Notably, doxorubicin treatment did not induce hyperphosphorylation of eIF2{alpha}, suggesting that doxorubicin is involved in stress granule assembly independent of eIF2{alpha} phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of fission yeast for elucidating the molecular targets of doxorubicin toxicity and suggest a novel drug-resistance mechanism involving stress granule assembly.

  14. InvA protein is a Nudix hydrolase required for infection by pathogenic Leptospira in cell lines and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yihui; Liu, Yan; Sun, Dexter; Ojcius, David M; Zhao, Jinfang; Lin, Xuai; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Rongguang; Chen, Ming; Li, Lanjuan; Yan, Jie

    2011-10-21

    Leptospirosis caused by pathogenic species of the genus Leptospira is a re-emerging zoonotic disease, which affects a wide variety of host species and is transmitted by contaminated water. The genomes of several pathogenic Leptospira species contain a gene named invA, which contains a Nudix domain. However, the function of this gene has never been characterized. Here, we demonstrated that the invA gene was highly conserved in protein sequence and present in all tested pathogenic Leptospira species. The recombinant InvA protein of pathogenic L. interrogans strain Lai hydrolyzed several specific dinucleoside oligophosphate substrates, reflecting the enzymatic activity of Nudix in Leptospira species. Pathogenic leptospires did not express this protein in media but temporarily expressed it at early stages (within 60 min) of infection of macrophages and nephric epithelial cells. Comparing with the wild type, the invA-deficient mutant displayed much lower infectivity and a significantly reduced survival rate in macrophages and nephric epithelial cells. Moreover, the invA-deficient leptospires presented an attenuated virulence in hamsters, caused mild histopathological damage, and were transmitted in lower numbers in the urine, compared with the wild-type strain. The invA revertant, made by complementing the invA-deficient mutant with the invA gene, reacquired virulence similar to the wild type in vitro and in vivo. The LD(50) in hamsters was 1000-fold higher for the invA-deficient mutant than for the invA revertant and wild type. These results demonstrate that the InvA protein is a Nudix hydrolase, and the invA gene is essential for virulence in pathogenic Leptospira species.

  15. A specific sorting signal is not required for the polarized secretion of newly synthesized proteins from cultured intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler, M J; Traber, M G

    1988-08-01

    Caco-2 cells, derived from human colon, have the morphological, functional, and biochemical properties of small intestinal epithelial cells. After infection with enveloped viruses, influenza virions assembled at the apical plasma membrane while vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) particles appeared exclusively at the basolateral membrane, similar to the pattern observed in virus-infected Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK). When grown in Millicell filter chamber devices and labeled with [35S]methionine, Caco-2 monolayers released all of their radiolabeled secretory products preferentially into the basal chamber. Among the proteins identified were apolipoproteins AI and E, transferrin, and alpha-fetoprotein. No proteins were observed to be secreted preferentially from the apical cell surface. The lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase was also secreted primarily from the basolateral surface of the cells in the presence or absence of lysosomotropic drugs or tunicamycin, which inhibit the targetting of lysosomal enzymes to lysosomes. Neither of these drug treatments significantly affected the polarized secretion of other nonlysosomal proteins. In addition, growth hormone (GH), which is released in a nonpolar fashion from MDCK cells, was secreted exclusively from the basolateral membrane after transfection of Caco-2 cells with GH cDNA in a pSV2-based expression vector. Similar results were obtained in transient expression experiments and after selection of permanently transformed Caco-2 cells expressing GH. Since both beta-hexosaminidase and GH would be expected to lack sorting signals for polarized exocytosis in epithelial cells, these results indicate that in intestinal cells, proteins transported via the basolateral secretory pathway need not have specific sorting signals.

  16. Sip1, an AP-1 Accessory Protein in Fission Yeast, Is Required for Localization of Rho3 GTPase

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Yu; Cuifang Li; Ayako Kita; Yuta Katayama; Koji Kubouchi; Masako Udo; Yukako Imanaka; Shiho Ueda; Takashi Masuko; Reiko Sugiura

    2013-01-01

    Rho family GTPases act as molecular switches to regulate a range of physiological functions, including the regulation of the actin-based cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, cell morphology, nuclear gene expression, and cell growth. Rho function is regulated by its ability to bind GTP and by its localization. We previously demonstrated functional and physical interactions between Rho3 and the clathrin-associated adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) complex, which revealed a role of Rho3 in regulating Golg...

  17. Rhodococcus equi Virulence-Associated Protein A Is Required for Diversion of Phagosome Biogenesis but Not for Cytotoxicity▿

    OpenAIRE

    von Bargen, Kristine; Polidori, Marco; Becken, Ulrike; Huth, Gitta; Prescott, John F.; Haas, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause severe bronchopneumonia in foals and AIDS patients. Virulence is plasmid regulated and is accompanied by phagosome maturation arrest and host cell necrosis. A replacement mutant in the gene for VapA (virulence-associated protein A), a major virulence factor of R. equi, was tested for its activities during macrophage infection. Early in infection, phagosomes containing the vapA mutant did not fuse with lysoso...

  18. The ciliary proteins Meckelin and Jouberin are required for retinoic acid-dependent neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Sveva; Illi, Barbara; De Mori, Roberta; Savino, Mauro; Gleeson, Joseph G; Valente, Enza Maria

    2014-01-01

    The dysfunction of the primary cilium, a complex, evolutionarily conserved, organelle playing an important role in sensing and transducing cell signals, is the unifying pathogenetic mechanism of a growing number of diseases collectively termed "ciliopathies", typically characterized by multiorgan involvement. Developmental defects of the central nervous system (CNS) characterize a subset of ciliopathies showing clinical and genetic overlap, such as Joubert syndrome (JS) and Meckel syndrome (MS). Although several knock-out mice lacking a variety of ciliary proteins have shown the importance of primary cilia in the development of the brain and CNS-derived structures, developmental in vitro studies, extremely useful to unravel the role of primary cilia along the course of neural differentiation, are still missing. Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) have been recently proven to mimic brain development, giving the unique opportunity to dissect the CNS differentiation process along its sequential steps. In the present study we show that mESCs express the ciliary proteins Meckelin and Jouberin in a developmentally-regulated manner, and that these proteins co-localize with acetylated tubulin labeled cilia located at the outer embryonic layer. Further, mESCs differentiating along the neuronal lineage activate the cilia-dependent sonic hedgehog signaling machinery, which is impaired in Meckelin knock-out cells but results unaffected in Jouberin-deficient mESCs. However, both lose the ability to acquire a neuronal phenotype. Altogether, these results demonstrate a pivotal role of Meckelin and Jouberin during embryonic neural specification and indicate mESCs as a suitable tool to investigate the developmental impact of ciliary proteins dysfunction.

  19. Induction of alternative lengthening of telomeres-associated PML bodies by p53/p21 requires HP1 proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Wei-Qin; Zhong, Ze-Huai; Nguyen, Akira; Henson, Jeremy D.; Toouli, Christian D.; Braithwaite, Antony W.; Reddel, Roger R

    2009-01-01

    Alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) is a recombination-mediated process that maintains telomeres in telomerase-negative cancer cells. In asynchronously dividing ALT-positive cell populations, a small fraction of the cells have ALT-associated promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (APBs), which contain (TTAGGG)n DNA and telomere-binding proteins. We found that restoring p53 function in ALT cells caused p21 up-regulation, growth arrest/senescence, and a large increase in cells containing ...

  20. The insulator protein Suppressor of Hairy wing is required for proper ring canal development during oogenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Jui; Plata, Maria P; Ernest, Ben; Asgarifar, Saghi; Labrador, Mariano

    2015-07-01

    Chromatin insulators orchestrate gene transcription during embryo development and cell differentiation by stabilizing interactions between distant genomic sites. Mutations in genes encoding insulator proteins are generally lethal, making in vivo functional analyses of insulator proteins difficult. In Drosophila, however, mutations in the gene encoding the Suppressor of Hairy wing insulator protein [Su(Hw)] are viable and female sterile, providing an opportunity to study insulator function during oocyte development. Whereas previous reports suggest that the function of Su(Hw) in oogenesis is independent of its insulator activity, many aspects of the role of Su(Hw) in Drosophila oogenesis remain unexplored. Here we show that mutations in su(Hw) result in smaller ring canal lumens and smaller outer ring diameters, which likely obstruct molecular and vesicle passage from nurse cells to the oocyte. Fluorescence microscopy reveals that lack of Su(Hw) leads to excess accumulation of Kelch (Kel) and Filament-actin (F-actin) proteins in the ring canal structures of developing egg chambers. Furthermore, we found that misexpression of the Src oncogene at 64B (Src64B) may cause ring canal development defects as microarray analysis and real-time RT-PCR revealed there is a three fold decrease in Src64B expression in su(Hw) mutant ovaries. Restoration of Src64B expression in su(Hw) mutant female germ cells rescued the ring phenotype but did not restore fertility. We conclude that loss of su(Hw) affects expression of many oogenesis related genes and down-regulates Src64B, resulting in ring canal defects potentially contributing to obstruction of molecular flow and an eventual failure of egg chamber organization.

  1. Efficient extraction of proteins from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues requires higher concentration of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane

    OpenAIRE

    KAWASHIMA, Yusuke; Kodera, Yoshio; Singh, Anil; Matsumoto, Masaomi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous formaldehyde-fixed and paraffin-embedded clinical tissues have been created in the past decades and stored in pathological depositories at hospitals as well as in clinical laboratories worldwide. In addition to the archived tissues, formaldehyde-fixation is also mandatory for preparing proteomics samples from diseased patients or animal models in order to inactivate contagious agents. Protein extraction from formaldehyde-fixed tissues is hampered by the Schiff base formati...

  2. Fatal Hepatitis Mediated by TNFα Requires Caspase-8 and Involves the BH3-only Proteins Bid and Bim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Thomas; Jost, Philipp J; Pellegrini, Marc; Puthalakath, Hamsa; Gugasyan, Raffi; Gerondakis, Steve; Cretney, Erika; Smyth, Mark J; Silke, John; Hakem, Razq; Bouillet, Philippe; Mak, Tak W; Dixit, Vishva M; Strasser, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Apoptotic death of hepatocytes, a feature and contributing factor of many chronic and acute liver diseases, can be a consequence of over-activation of the immune system. Injection with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus the transcriptional inhibitor D(+)-galactosamine (GalN) or mitogenic T cell activation cause fatal hepatocyte apoptosis in mice. In both settings hepatocyte killing is mediated by TNFα/TNF-R signaling but the effector mechanisms remain unclear. Our analysis of gene-targeted mice showed that caspase-8 is essential for hepatocyte killing in both settings. Loss of Bid, the pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein activated by caspase-8, and essential for Fas ligand-induced hepatocyte killing, resulted only in a minor reduction of liver damage. However, combined loss of Bid and another BH3-only protein, Bim, activated by JNK, protected mice from LPS+GalN-induced hepatitis. These observations identify caspase-8 and the BH3-only proteins Bid and Bim as potential therapeutic targets for treatment of inflammatory liver diseases. PMID:19119023

  3. An ABC transporter B family protein, ABCB19, is required for cytoplasmic streaming and gravitropism of the inflorescence stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Keishi; Ueda, Haruko; Shimada, Tomoo; Tamura, Kentaro; Koumoto, Yasuko; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    A significant feature of plant cells is the extensive motility of organelles and the cytosol, which was originally defined as cytoplasmic streaming. We suggested previously that a three-way interaction between plant-specific motor proteins myosin XIs, actin filaments, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was responsible for cytoplasmic streaming. (1) Currently, however, there are no reports of molecular components for cytoplasmic streaming other than the actin-myosin-cytoskeleton and ER-related proteins. In the present study, we found that elongated cells of inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit vigorous cytoplasmic streaming. Statistical analysis showed that the maximal velocity of plastid movements is 7.26 µm/s, which is much faster than the previously reported velocities of organelles. Surprisingly, the maximal velocity of streaming in the inflorescence stem cells was significantly reduced to 1.11 µm/s in an Arabidopsis mutant, abcb19-101, which lacks ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUBFAMILY B19 (ABCB19) that mediates the polar transport of the phytohormone auxin together with PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Polar auxin transport establishes the auxin concentration gradient essential for plant development and tropisms. Deficiency of ABCB19 activity eventually caused enhanced gravitropic responses of the inflorescence stems and abnormally flexed inflorescence stems. These results suggest that ABCB19-mediated auxin transport plays a role not only in tropism regulation, but also in cytoplasmic streaming.

  4. A DEAD box protein is required for formation of a hidden break in Arabidopsis chloroplast 23S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kenji; Ashida, Hiroki; Ogawa, Taro; Yokota, Akiho

    2010-09-01

    In plant chloroplasts, the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the large subunit of the ribosome undergoes post-maturation fragmentation processing. This processing consists of site-specific cleavage that generates gapped, discontinuous rRNA molecules. However, the molecular mechanism underlying introduction of the gap structure (the 'hidden break') is poorly understood. Here, we found that the DEAD box protein RH39 plays a key role in introduction of the hidden break into the 23S rRNA in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Genetic screening for an Arabidopsis plant with a drastically reduced level of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase identified an RH39 mutant. The levels of other chloroplast-encoded photosynthetic proteins were also severely reduced. The reductions were not due to a failure of transcription, but rather inefficiency in translation. RNA gel blotting revealed incomplete fragmentation of 23S rRNA in chloroplasts during maturation. In vitro analysis with recombinant RH39 suggested that the protein binds to the adjacent sequence upstream of the hidden break site to exert its function. We propose a molecular mechanism for the RH39-mediated fragmentation processing of 23S rRNA in chloroplasts.

  5. Human Cytomegalovirus UL97 Kinase Activity Is Required for the Hyperphosphorylation of Retinoblastoma Protein and Inhibits the Formation of Nuclear Aggresomes

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    Prichard, Mark N.; Sztul, Elizabeth; Daily, Shannon L.; Perry, Amie L.; Frederick, Samuel L.; Gill, Rachel B.; Hartline, Caroll B.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Varnum, Susan M.; Smith, Richard D.; Kern, Earl R.

    2008-05-01

    Cells infected with human cytomegalovirus in the absence of UL97 kinase activity produce large nuclear aggregates that sequester considerable quantities of viral proteins. A transient expression assay suggested that pp71 and IE1 were also involved in this process, and this suggestion was significant, since both proteins have been reported to interact with components of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies (ND10) and also interact functionally with retinoblastoma pocket proteins (RB). PML bodies have been linked to the formation of nuclear aggresomes, and colocalization studies suggested that viral proteins were recruited to these structures and that UL97 kinase activity inhibited their formation. Proteins associated with PML bodies were examined by Western blot analysis, and pUL97 appeared to specifically affect the phosphorylation of RB in a kinasedependent manner. Three consensus RB binding motifs were identified in the UL97 kinase, and recombinant viruses were constructed in which each was mutated to assess a potential role in the phosphorylation of RB and the inhibition of nuclear aggresome formation. The mutation of either the conserved LxCxE RB binding moti for the lysine required for kinase activity impaired the ability of the virus to stabilize and phosphorylate RB. We concluded from these studies that both UL97 kinase activity and the LxCxE RB binding motif are required for the phosphorylation and stabilization of RB in infected cells and that this effect can be antagonized by the antiviral drug maribavir. These data also suggest a potential link between RB function and the formation of aggresomes.

  6. echinus, required for interommatidial cell sorting and cell death in the Drosophila pupal retina, encodes a protein with homology to ubiquitin-specific proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorski Sharon M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed cell death is used to remove excess cells between ommatidia in the Drosophila pupal retina. This death is required to establish the crystalline, hexagonal packing of ommatidia that characterizes the adult fly eye. In previously described echinus mutants, interommatidial cell sorting, which precedes cell death, occurred relatively normally. Interommatidial cell death was partially suppressed, resulting in adult eyes that contained excess pigment cells, and in which ommatidia were mildly disordered. These results have suggested that echinus functions in the pupal retina primarily to promote interommatidial cell death. Results We generated a number of new echinus alleles, some likely null mutants. Analysis of these alleles provides evidence that echinus has roles in cell sorting as well as cell death. echinus encodes a protein with homology to ubiquitin-specific proteases. These proteins cleave ubiquitin-conjugated proteins at the ubiquitin C-terminus. The echinus locus encodes multiple splice forms, including two proteins that lack residues thought to be critical for deubiquitination activity. Surprisingly, ubiquitous expression in the eye of versions of Echinus that lack residues critical for ubiquitin specific protease activity, as well as a version predicted to be functional, rescue the echinus loss-of-function phenotype. Finally, genetic interactions were not detected between echinus loss and gain-of-function and a number of known apoptotic regulators. These include Notch, EGFR, the caspases Dronc, Drice, Dcp-1, Dream, the caspase activators, Rpr, Hid, and Grim, the caspase inhibitor DIAP1, and Lozenge or Klumpfuss. Conclusion The echinus locus encodes multiple splice forms of a protein with homology to ubiquitin-specific proteases, but protease activity is unlikely to be required for echinus function, at least when echinus is overexpressed. Characterization of likely echinus null alleles and genetic interactions

  7. Activation of the unfolded protein response is required for defenses against bacterial pore-forming toxin in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry J Bischof

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Pore-forming toxins (PFTs constitute the single largest class of proteinaceous bacterial virulence factors and are made by many of the most important bacterial pathogens. Host responses to these toxins are complex and poorly understood. We find that the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR is activated upon exposure to PFTs both in Caenorhabditis elegans and in mammalian cells. Activation of the UPR is protective in vivo against PFTs since animals that lack either the ire-1-xbp-1 or the atf-6 arms of the UPR are more sensitive to PFT than wild-type animals. The UPR acts directly in the cells targeted by the PFT. Loss of the UPR leads to a normal response against unrelated toxins or a pathogenic bacterium, indicating its PFT-protective role is specific. The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAPK kinase pathway has been previously shown to be important for cellular defenses against PFTs. We find here that the UPR is one of the key downstream targets of the p38 MAPK pathway in response to PFT since loss of a functional p38 MAPK pathway leads to a failure of PFT to properly activate the ire-1-xbp-1 arm of the UPR. The UPR-mediated activation and response to PFTs is distinct from the canonical UPR-mediated response to unfolded proteins both in terms of its activation and functional sensitivities. These data demonstrate that the UPR, a fundamental intracellular pathway, can operate in intrinsic cellular defenses against bacterial attack.

  8. DNA cross-link-dependent RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 subnuclear assembly requires the Fanconi anemia C protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichierri, Pietro; Averbeck, Dietrich; Rosselli, Filippo

    2002-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer-predisposition syndrome characterized by hypersensitivity to interstrand-cross-link (ICL) inducers. FA hypersensitivity to ICL has been correlated with alterations in homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining, telomere maintenance, DNA-damage assessment and checkpoint regulation, processes in which the components of the RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 (RMN) complex are involved. To better characterize the mechanisms by which ICL are processed in human cells and to gain insight into their toxicity in FA, we examined (i). the RMN complex assembling in response to the ICL inducers mitomycin C (MMC) and photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen and (ii). the proficiency of FA cells to perform RMN activation in response to ICL inducers. We show here that ICL activates the assembly of the RMN proteins into subnuclear foci, and that their formation proceeds independently of ICL incision, a step mainly dependent on XP-F/ERCC1 heterodimer activity. Interestingly, FA cells were unable to form RMN foci in response to either ICL inducer. Analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and single-cell gel electrophoresis of MMC-treated cells showed that FA cells from complementation group C (FA-C cells, defective in the FANCC gene) form double-strand breaks and unhook MMC-induced ICL similarly to FANCC wild-type cells. These observations imply that the absence of RMN assembly in FA-C cells is not simply due to the absence of DNA ends produced as intermediates of ICL processing, and indicates a direct role for FANCC in RMN focus assembly in response to ICL inducers. Moreover, we show that the formation of foci, including BRCA1 and/or RAD51 proteins, is significantly delayed in FA cells. These alterations in the assembly of DNA-repair proteins in FA provide an interpretation for the DNA-damage processing anomalies observed in FA cells and for the genetic instability and the cancer predisposition of the syndrome.

  9. The yeast actin-related protein Arp2p is required for the internalization step of endocytosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, V; Galan, J M; Devilliers, G; Haguenauer-Tsapis, R; Winsor, B

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-related protein Arp2p is an essential component of the actin cytoskeleton. We have tested its potential role in the endocytic and exocytic pathways by using a temperature-sensitive allele, arp2-1. The fate of the plasma membrane transporter uracil permease was followed to determine whether Arp2p plays a role in the endocytic pathway. Inhibition of normal endocytosis as revealed by maintenance of active uracil permease at the plasma membrane and strong protec...

  10. Cdc42 Effector Protein 2 (XCEP2 is required for normal gastrulation and contributes to cellular adhesion in Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Richard W

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rho GTPases and their downstream effector proteins regulate a diverse array of cellular processes during embryonic development, including reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture, cell adhesion, and transcription. Changes in the activation state of Rho GTPases are converted into changes in cellular behavior by a diversity of effector proteins, which are activated in response to changes in the GTP binding state of Rho GTPases. In this study we characterize the expression and function of one such effector, XCEP2, that is present during gastrulation stages in Xenopus laevis. Results In a search for genes whose expression is regulated during early stages of embryonic development in Xenopus laevis, a gene encoding a Rho GTPase effector protein (Xenopus Cdc42 effector protein 2, or XCEP2 was isolated, and found to be highly homologous, but not identical, to a Xenopus sequence previously submitted to the Genbank database. These two gene sequences are likely pseudoalleles. XCEP2 mRNA is expressed at constant levels until mid- to late- gastrula stages, and then strongly down-regulated at late gastrula/early neurula stages. Injection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed at one or both pseudoalleles resulted in a significant delay in blastopore closure and interfered with normal embryonic elongation, suggesting a role for XCEP2 in regulating gastrulation movements. The morpholino antisense effect could be rescued by co-injection with a morpholino-insensitive version of the XCEP2 mRNA. Antisense morpholino oligonucleotides were found to have no effect on mesodermal induction, suggesting that the observed effects were due to changes in the behavior of involuting cells, rather than alterations in their identity. XCEP2 antisense morpholino oligonucleotides were also observed to cause complete disaggregation of cells composing animal cap explants, suggesting a specific role of XCEP2 in maintenance or regulation of cell

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase is required for the anti-adipogenic effects of alpha-linolenic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xihong; Wu, Weiche; Chen, Jingqing; Wang, Xinxia; Wang, Yizhen

    2015-01-01

    Background n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LC PUFA) increases β-oxidation and limits lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The current study was conducted to determine whether their precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) could also exert the above effects and how AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was involved. Methods AMPKα1−/−, AMPKα2−/− mice and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or HFD with ALA. Body weight was recorded weekly and serum was collected. Adipocytes ...

  12. Nitrogenase switch-off by ammonium ions in Azospirillum brasilense requires the GlnB nitrogen signal-transducing protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Giseli; Souza, Emanuel M; Yates, M Geoffrey; Rigo, Liu Un; Costa, Roberta M; Inaba, Juliana; Pedrosa, Fábio O

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogenase activity in several diazotrophs is switched off by ammonium and reactivated after consumption. The signaling pathway to this system in Azospirillum brasilense is not understood. We show that ammonium-dependent switch-off through ADP-ribosylation of Fe protein was partial in a glnB mutant of A. brasilense but absent in a glnB glnZ double mutant. Triggering of inactivation by anaerobic conditions was not affected in either mutant. The results suggest that glnB is necessary for full ammonium-dependent nitrogenase switch-off in A. brasilense.

  13. The evolutionarily conserved protein PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 is required for efficient manganese uptake at the thylakoid membrane in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Anja; Steinberger, Iris; Herdean, Andrei;

    2016-01-01

    In plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-driven oxidation of water. The oxygen-evolving complex of PSII is a Mn4CaO5 cluster embedded in a well-defined protein environment in the thylakoid membrane. However, transport of manganese and calcium into the thylakoid...... by oxygen evolution rates) and for manganese incorporation. Manganese binding to PSII was severely reduced in pam71 thylakoids, particularly in PSII supercomplexes. In cation partitioning assays with intact chloroplasts, Mn2+ and Ca2+ ions were differently sequestered in pam71, with Ca2+ enriched in pam71...

  14. Mutagenesis of the Agrobacterium VirE2 single-stranded DNA-binding protein identifies regions required for self-association and interaction with VirE1 and a permissive site for hybrid protein construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X R; Christie, P J

    1999-07-01

    The VirE2 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) of Agrobacterium tumefaciens is required for delivery of T-DNA to the nuclei of susceptible plant cells. By yeast two-hybrid and immunoprecipitation analyses, VirE2 was shown to self-associate and to interact with VirE1. VirE2 mutants with small deletions or insertions of a 31-residue oligopeptide (i31) at the N or C terminus or with an i31 peptide insertion at Leu236 retained the capacity to form homomultimers. By contrast, VirE2 mutants with modifications outside a central region located between residues 320 and 390 retained the capacity to interact with VirE1. These findings suggest the tertiary structure of VirE2 is important for homomultimer formation whereas a central domain mediates formation of a complex with VirE1. The capacity of VirE2 mutants to interact with full-length VirE2 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae correlated with the abundance of the mutant proteins in A. tumefaciens, suggesting that VirE2 is stabilized by homomultimerization in the bacterium. We further characterized the promoter and N- and C-terminal sequence requirements for synthesis of functional VirE2. A PvirB::virE2 construct yielded functional VirE2 protein as defined by complementation of a virE2 null mutation. By contrast, PvirE or Plac promoter constructs yielded functional VirE2 only if virE1 was coexpressed with virE2. Deletion of 10 or 9 residues from the N or C terminus of VirE2, respectively, or addition of heterologous peptides or proteins to either terminus resulted in a loss of protein function. However, an i31 peptide insertion at Tyr39 had no effect on protein function as defined by the capacity of the mutant protein to (i) interact with native VirE2, (ii) interact with VirE1, (iii) accumulate at abundant levels in A. tumefaciens, and (iv) restore wild-type virulence to a virE2 null mutant. We propose that Tyr39 of VirE2 corresponds to a permissive site for insertion of heterologous peptides or proteins of interest

  15. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP-3) and VAMP-8 are present in human platelets and are required for granule secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, János; Chung, Sul-Hee; Reed, Guy L

    2002-08-01

    Secretion of platelet granules is necessary for normal hemostasis. Platelet secretion requires soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptor (SNARE) complex formation between different members of the syntaxin, SNAP-25, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) gene families. Using microcapillary reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we identified VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 as VAMP isoforms coimmunoprecipitated from platelets with syntaxin 4. Immunoblotting experiments confirmed the presence of VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 but not VAMP-1 or VAMP-2 in platelets. To examine the effect of VAMP proteins on platelet secretion, soluble recombinant (r) VAMP-2, rVAMP-3, and rVAMP-8 were incubated with streptolysin O-permeabilized platelets. Secretion of alpha granules (monitored by flow cytometric measurement of P-selectin) was blocked, and dense-granule secretion (assessed by release of carbon 14-serotonin) was almost completely inhibited by rVAMP-3, whereas rVAMP-8 inhibited secretion of dense granules but not alpha granules. In contrast, rVAMP-2, which formed SNARE complexes in vitro, had no effect on platelet exocytosis. We conclude that VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 form SNARE complexes with platelet syntaxin 4 and are required for platelet granule secretion.

  16. Idas, a novel phylogenetically conserved geminin-related protein, binds to geminin and is required for cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefani, Dafni-Eleutheria; Dimaki, Maria; Spella, Magda; Karantzelis, Nickolas; Mitsiki, Eirini; Kyrousi, Christina; Symeonidou, Ioanna-Eleni; Perrakis, Anastassis; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi

    2011-07-01

    Development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms relies on an intricate balance between cell proliferation and differentiation. Geminin regulates the cell cycle by directly binding and inhibiting the DNA replication licensing factor Cdt1. Geminin also interacts with transcriptional regulators of differentiation and chromatin remodelling factors, and its balanced interactions are implicated in proliferation-differentiation decisions during development. Here, we describe Idas (Idas being a cousin of the Gemini in Ancient Greek Mythology), a previously uncharacterised coiled-coil protein related to Geminin. We show that human Idas localizes to the nucleus, forms a complex with Geminin both in cells and in vitro through coiled-coil mediated interactions, and can change Geminin subcellular localization. Idas does not associate with Cdt1 and prevents Geminin from binding to Cdt1 in vitro. Idas depletion from cells affects cell cycle progression; cells accumulate in S phase and are unable to efficiently progress to mitosis. Idas protein levels decrease in anaphase, whereas its overexpression causes mitotic defects. During development, we show that Idas exhibits high level expression in the choroid plexus and the cortical hem of the mouse telencephalon. Our data highlight Idas as a novel Geminin binding partner, implicated in cell cycle progression, and a putative regulator of proliferation-differentiation decisions during development. PMID:21543332

  17. Phosphorylation of Beet black scorch virus coat protein by PKA is required for assembly and stability of virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofei; Wang, Xiaoling; Dong, Kai; Zhang, Yongliang; Hu, Yue; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Yanmei; Wang, Xianbing; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin; Li, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Plant virus coat proteins (CPs) play a fundamental role in protection of genomic RNAs, virion assembly, and viral movement. Although phosphorylation of several CPs during virus infection have been reported, little information is available about CP phosphorylation of the spherical RNA plant viruses. Here, we demonstrate that the CP of Beet black scorch virus (BBSV), a member of the genus Necrovirus, can be phosphorylated at threonine-41 (T41) by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-like kinase in vivo and in vitro. Mutant viruses containing a T41A non-phosphorylatable alanine substitution, and a T41E glutamic acid substitution to mimic threonine phosphorylation were able to replicate but were unable to move systemically in Nicotiana benthamiana. Interestingly, the T41A and T41E mutants generated unstable 17 nm virus-like particles that failed to package viral genomic (g) RNA, compared with wild-type BBSV with 30 nm virions during viral infection in N. benthamiana. Further analyses showed that the T41 mutations had little effect on the gRNA-binding activity of the CP. Therefore, we propose a model whereby CP phosphorylation plays an essential role in long-distance movement of BBSV that involves formation of stable virions.

  18. Phosphorylation of Beet black scorch virus coat protein by PKA is required for assembly and stability of virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofei; Wang, Xiaoling; Dong, Kai; Zhang, Yongliang; Hu, Yue; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Yanmei; Wang, Xianbing; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin; Li, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Plant virus coat proteins (CPs) play a fundamental role in protection of genomic RNAs, virion assembly, and viral movement. Although phosphorylation of several CPs during virus infection have been reported, little information is available about CP phosphorylation of the spherical RNA plant viruses. Here, we demonstrate that the CP of Beet black scorch virus (BBSV), a member of the genus Necrovirus, can be phosphorylated at threonine-41 (T41) by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-like kinase in vivo and in vitro. Mutant viruses containing a T41A non-phosphorylatable alanine substitution, and a T41E glutamic acid substitution to mimic threonine phosphorylation were able to replicate but were unable to move systemically in Nicotiana benthamiana. Interestingly, the T41A and T41E mutants generated unstable 17 nm virus-like particles that failed to package viral genomic (g) RNA, compared with wild-type BBSV with 30 nm virions during viral infection in N. benthamiana. Further analyses showed that the T41 mutations had little effect on the gRNA-binding activity of the CP. Therefore, we propose a model whereby CP phosphorylation plays an essential role in long-distance movement of BBSV that involves formation of stable virions. PMID:26108567

  19. The MYST-containing protein Chameau is required for proper sensory organ specification during Drosophila thorax morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Hainaut

    Full Text Available The adult thorax of Drosophila melanogaster is covered by a stereotyped pattern of mechanosensory bristles called macrochaetes. Here, we report that the MYST containing protein Chameau (Chm contributes to the establishment of this pattern in the most dorsal part of the thorax. Chm mutant pupae present extra-dorsocentral (DC and scutellar (SC macrochaetes, but a normal number of the other macrochaetes. We provide evidences that chm restricts the singling out of sensory organ precursors from proneural clusters and genetically interacts with transcriptional regulators involved in the regulation of achaete and scute in the DC and SC proneural cluster. This function of chm likely relies on chromatin structure regulation since a protein with a mutation in the conserved catalytic site fails to rescue the formation of supernumerary DC and SC bristles in chm mutant flies. This is further supported by the finding that mutations in genes encoding chromatin modifiers and remodeling factors, including Polycomb group (PcG and Trithorax group (TrxG members, dominantly modulate the penetrance of chm extra bristle phenotype. These data support a critical role for chromatin structure modulation in the establishment of the stereotyped sensory bristle pattern in the fly thorax.

  20. Pep1, a secreted effector protein of Ustilago maydis, is required for successful invasion of plant cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunther Doehlemann

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The basidiomycete Ustilago maydis causes smut disease in maize. Colonization of the host plant is initiated by direct penetration of cuticle and cell wall of maize epidermis cells. The invading hyphae are surrounded by the plant plasma membrane and proliferate within the plant tissue. We identified a novel secreted protein, termed Pep1, that is essential for penetration. Disruption mutants of pep1 are not affected in saprophytic growth and develop normal infection structures. However, Deltapep1 mutants arrest during penetration of the epidermal cell and elicit a strong plant defense response. Using Affymetrix maize arrays, we identified 116 plant genes which are differentially regulated in Deltapep1 compared to wild type infections. Most of these genes are related to plant defense. By in vivo immunolocalization, live-cell imaging and plasmolysis approaches, we detected Pep1 in the apoplastic space as well as its accumulation at sites of cell-to-cell passages. Site-directed mutagenesis identified two of the four cysteine residues in Pep1 as essential for function, suggesting that the formation of disulfide bridges is crucial for proper protein folding. The barley covered smut fungus Ustilago hordei contains an ortholog of pep1 which is needed for penetration of barley and which is able to complement the U. maydis Deltapep1 mutant. Based on these results, we conclude that Pep1 has a conserved function essential for establishing compatibility that is not restricted to the U. maydis / maize interaction.

  1. The actin-related protein Sac1 is required for morphogenesis and cell wall integrity in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Yu, Qilin; Jia, Chang; Wang, Yuzhou; Xiao, Chenpeng; Dong, Yijie; Xu, Ning; Wang, Lei; Li, Mingchun

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is a common pathogenic fungus and has aroused widespread attention recently. Actin cytoskeleton, an important player in polarized growth, protein secretion and organization of cell shape, displays irreplaceable role in hyphal development and cell integrity. In this study, we demonstrated a homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sac1, in C. albicans. It is a potential PIP phosphatase with Sac domain which is related to actin organization, hyphal development, biofilm formation and cell wall integrity. Deletion of SAC1 did not lead to insitiol-auxotroph phenotype in C. albicans, but this gene rescued the growth defect of S. cerevisiae sac1Δ in the insitiol-free medium. Hyphal induction further revealed the deficiency of sac1Δ/Δ in hyphal development and biofilm formation. Fluorescence observation and real time PCR (RT-PCR) analysis suggested both actin and the hyphal cell wall protein Hwp1 were overexpressed and mislocated in this mutant. Furthermore, cell wall integrity (CWI) was largely affected by deletion of SAC1, due to the hypersensitivity to cell wall stress, changed content and distribution of chitin in the mutant. As a result, the virulence of sac1Δ/Δ was seriously attenuated. Taken together, this study provides evidence that Sac1, as a potential PIP phosphatase, is essential for actin organization, hyphal development, CWI and pathogenicity in C. albicans.

  2. PGC-1{alpha} is required for AICAR induced expression of GLUT4 and mitochondrial proteins in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lotte; Fentz, Joachim; Biensø, Rasmus S;

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that repeated activation of AMPK induces mitochondrial and glucose membrane transporter gene/protein expression via a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor Upsilon co-activator (PGC)-1alpha dependent mechanism. Whole body PGC-1alpha knockout (KO) and littermate wild...... GLUT4, cytochrome c oxidase (COX)I and cytochrome (cyt) c protein expression ~10-40% relative to saline in white muscles of the WT mice, but not of the PGC-1alpha KO mice. In line, GLUT4 and cyt c mRNA content increased 30-60% 4h after a single AICAR injection relative to saline only in WT mice. One......, the hexokinase (HK)II expression response was similar in muscles of WT and PGC-1alpha mice both after single and repeated AICAR treatments. This confirms that the HKII gene is regulated independently of PGC-1alpha and importantly that the effect of AICAR was maintained with repeated AICAR treatments in both WT...

  3. The N-terminal extension domain of the C. elegans half-molecule ABC transporter, HMT-1, is required for protein-protein interactions and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungjin Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Members of the HMT-1 (heavy metal tolerance factor 1 subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter superfamily detoxify heavy metals and have unique topology: they are half-molecule ABC transporters that, in addition to a single transmembrane domain (TMD1 and a single nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1, possess a hydrophobic NH2-terminal extension (NTE. These structural features distinguish HMTs from other ABC transporters in different species including Drosophila and humans. Functional ABC transporters, however, are comprised of at least four-domains (two TMDs and two NDBs formed from either a single polypeptide or by the association of two or four separate subunits. Whether HMTs act as oligomers and what role the NTE domain plays in their function have not been determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we examined the oligomeric status of Caenorhabditis elegans HMT-1 and the functional significance of its NTE using gel-filtration chromatography in combination with the mating-based split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid system (mbSUS and functional in vivo assays. We found that HMT-1 exists in a protein complex in C. elegans. Studies in S. cerevisiae showed that HMT-1 at a minimum homodimerizes and that oligomerization is essential for HMT-1 to confer cadmium tolerance. We also established that the NTE domain plays an important structural and functional role: it is essential for HMT-1 oligomerization and Cd-detoxification function. However, the NTE itself was not sufficient for oligomerization suggesting that multiple structural features of HMT-1 must associate to form a functional transporter. CONCLUSIONS: The prominence of heavy metals as environmental toxins and the remarkable conservation of HMT-1 structural architecture and function in different species reinforce the value of continued studies of HMT-1 in model systems for identifying functional domains in HMT1 of humans.

  4. Whole-body protein turnover and energy expenditure in post-viral hepatocirrhotic patients. A study using multiple stable isotope tracers to estimate protein and energy requirements and the efficacy of a new diet therapy based on Chinese food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L-[1-13C]-leucine and 15N-glycine doubly-labelled tracer experiments revealed accelerated kinetics of leucine, glycine and whole-body protein in post-viral hepatocirrhotic patients. Together with the results of nitrogen balance measurement, the daily protein requirement of these patients was estimated to be higher than 1.2 g/kg/d. Doubly labelled water experiments and NaH13CO3 experiments revealed that the freely living and basal energy expenditure of post-viral hepatocirrhotic patients was not different from that in normal subjects with comparable physical and mental activities. For those freely living in hospital, the energy requirements is estimated to be 150-160 kJ/kg/d. According to the above results, a therapeutic diet formulation based on Chinese food was designed for the patients which contained 1.5 g/kg/d of protein and 150-160 kJ/kg/d. 60-70% of the dietary protein was of vegetable origin, with a branched chain amino acid/aromatic amino acid ratio slightly but significantly higher than the common hospital diet. Patients with compensated post-viral hepatocirrhosis adapted to the diet rapidly. After two months' therapy, the negative nitrogen balance turned positive along with an increase of body weight and urinary creatinine, indicating and improvement of general nutritional status, probably with accumulation of muscle protein. The diet is relatively cheap, can be easily handled by the patients themselves, and hence is also applicable to outpatients. 54 refs, 8 tabs

  5. Vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP)-7 and VAMP-8, but not VAMP-2 or VAMP-3, are required for activation-induced degranulation of mature human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Leif E; Frank, Simon P C; Bolat, Seza; Blank, Ulrich; Galli, Thierry; Bigalke, Hans; Bischoff, Stephan C; Lorentz, Axel

    2008-03-01

    Mediator release from mast cells (MC) is a crucial step in allergic and non-allergic inflammatory disorders. However, the final events in response to activation leading to membrane fusion and thereby facilitating degranulation have hitherto not been analyzed in human MC. Soluble N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE) represent a highly conserved family of proteins that have been shown to mediate intracellular membrane fusion events. Here, we show that mature MC isolated from human intestinal tissue express soluble N-ethylmaleide sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP)-23, Syntaxin (STX)-1B, STX-2, STX-3, STX-4, and STX-6 but not SNAP-25. Furthermore, we found that primary human MC express substantial amounts of vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP)-3, VAMP-7 and VAMP-8 and, in contrast to previous reports about rodent MC, only low levels of VAMP-2. Furthermore, VAMP-7 and VAMP-8 were found to translocate to the plasma membrane and interact with SNAP-23 and STX-4 upon activation. Inhibition of SNAP-23, STX-4, VAMP-7 or VAMP-8, but not VAMP-2 or VAMP-3, resulted in a markedly reduced high-affinity IgE receptor-mediated histamine release. In summary, our data show that mature human MC express a specific pattern of SNARE and that VAMP-7 and VAMP-8, but not VAMP-2, are required for rapid degranulation.

  6. DIETARY PROTEIN REQUIREMENT FOR JUVENILE SPINIBARBUS SINENSIS%中华倒刺鲃幼鱼饲料蛋白质需求量的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林小植; 谢小军; 罗毅平

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the dietary protein requirement of the juvenile Spinibarbus sinensis and determine effects of dietary protein levels on feed intake, growth and nutrition utilization. White fish meal was used as the dietary protein source, and six isocaloric experimental diets were formulated to contain different protein levels of 20.49% , 26.48% , 34. 20% , 41.02% , 49. 94% and 55.86% (referred to as D1, D2, D3, D4, D5 and D6 respectively). Each treatment had four replicates and 12 fish (initial weight of (10. 36 ± 1.40) g (mean ± S. D.)) of each replicate were reared in a circulated filtered system for 10 weeks at (27.5 ±0. 5)℃ in a circulated filtered rearing system. Fish were hand fed to satiation once daily at 18:00. Feces were collected from the second week by siphoning and washed immediately everyday. A sample of 9 fish at the start of feeding experiment and 4 fish per group at the end of experiment were sampled and stored frozen at -26℃ for proximate composition analysis. Fish were weighted individually after 48h starvation at the end of the experiment.The results showed that as dietary protein increased, the feeding rate of dry matter (FRdm) decreased gradually from D1 to D4 firstly, and then leveled off. However, a positive correlation between the feeding rate of protein (FRF) and dietary protein levels was found (r = 0. 982 ,p < 0. 01). Apparent digestibility of diet dry matter significantly decreased from (73. 12 ± 1.07) to (55.02 s0. 95)% from D1 to D6 (p <0. 05), whereas, there was no significant difference in the apparent digestibility of dietary protein among all treatments. Specific growth rates of weight (SGRw), specific growth rates of energy (SGRe) and feed efficiency (FE) were significantly increased from D1 up to D4 (p <0. 05) , and D4 group obtained the highest values of these three indices. Then SGRw, SGRe and FE reached a plateau and did not differ significantly among D4, D5 and D6. Protein

  7. Yeast spore germination: a requirement for Ras protein activity during re-entry into the cell cycle.

    OpenAIRE

    Herman, P K; Rine, J.

    1997-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae spore germination is a process in which quiescent, non-dividing spores become competent for mitotic cell division. Using a novel assay for spore uncoating, we found that spore germination was a multi-step process whose nutritional requirements differed from those for mitotic division. Although both processes were controlled by nutrient availability, efficient spore germination occurred in conditions that did not support cell division. In addition, germination did not ...

  8. Multiple activities of the plant pathogen type III effector proteins WtsE and AvrE require WxxxE motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Jong Hyun; Majerczak, Doris R; Nomura, Kinya; Mecey, Christy; Uribe, Francisco; He, Sheng-Yang; Mackey, David; Coplin, David L

    2009-06-01

    The broadly conserved AvrE-family of type III effectors from gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria includes important virulence factors, yet little is known about the mechanisms by which these effectors function inside plant cells to promote disease. We have identified two conserved motifs in AvrE-family effectors: a WxxxE motif and a putative C-terminal endoplasmic reticulum membrane retention/retrieval signal (ERMRS). The WxxxE and ERMRS motifs are both required for the virulence activities of WtsE and AvrE, which are major virulence factors of the corn pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii and the tomato or Arabidopsis pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, respectively. The WxxxE and the predicted ERMRS motifs are also required for other biological activities of WtsE, including elicitation of the hypersensitive response in nonhost plants and suppression of defense responses in Arabidopsis. A family of type III effectors from mammalian bacterial pathogens requires WxxxE and subcellular targeting motifs for virulence functions that involve their ability to mimic activated G-proteins. The conservation of related motifs and their necessity for the function of type III effectors from plant pathogens indicates that disturbing host pathways by mimicking activated host G-proteins may be a virulence mechanism employed by plant pathogens as well. PMID:19445595

  9. Characterization of 47 Cys2 -His2 zinc finger proteins required for the development and pathogenicity of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Huang, Pengyun; Zhang, Lilin; Shi, Yongkai; Sun, Dandan; Yan, Yuxin; Liu, Xiaohong; Dong, Bo; Chen, Guoqing; Snyder, John Hugh; Lin, Fucheng; Lu, Jianping

    2016-08-01

    The Cys2 -His2 (C2H2) zinc finger protein family is the second-largest family of transcription factors (TFs) in Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal fungus responsible for the destructive rice blast disease. However, little is known about the roles of most C2H2 TFs in the development and pathogenicity of M. oryzae. The roles of 47 C2H2 genes in development and pathogenicity were investigated by gene deletion in M. oryzae. The TF-dependent genes in mycelia or appressoria were analyzed with RNA sequencing and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Forty-four C2H2 genes are involved in growth (20 genes), conidiation (28 genes), appressorium formation (four genes) and pathogenicity (22 genes) in M. oryzae. Of these, MGG_14931, named as VRF1, is required for pathogenicity, specifically controlling appressorium maturation by affecting the expression of genes related to appressorial structure and function, including melanin biosynthesis, chitin catabolism, lipid metabolism, proteolysis, transmembrane transport, and response to oxidative stress; MGG_01776, named as VRF2, is required for plant penetration and invasive growth; conidiation-related gene CON7 is required for conidial differentiation; and MoCREA, encoding a carbon catabolite repression protein, is a novel repressor of lipid catabolism when glucose obtainable in M. oryzae. This study provides many insights into the regulation of growth, asexual development, appressorium formation, and pathogenicity by C2H2 TFs in M. oryzae. PMID:27041000

  10. Negative selection of semimature CD4+8-HSA+ thymocytes requires the BH3-only protein Bim but is independent of death receptor signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villunger, Andreas; Marsden, Vanessa S.; Zhan, Yifan; Erlacher, Miriam; Lew, Andrew M.; Bouillet, Philippe; Berzins, Stuart; Godfrey, Dale I.; Heath, William R.; Strasser, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    T cell receptor/CD3 ligation induces apoptosis in semimature CD4+8-HSA+ thymocytes, and this helps establish immunological tolerance and constitutes one of the safeguards against autoimmune disease. We analyzed several knockout and transgenic mouse lines and found that T cell receptor/CD3-ligation-induced killing of semimature thymocytes occurred independently of Fas and “death receptor” signaling in general but required the proapoptotic BH3-only protein Bim and could be inhibited by Bcl-2. Loss of Apaf-1 or caspase-9, which act downstream of the Bcl-2 family protein family, provided only minor protection, indicating that the “apoptosome” functions as an amplifier rather than as an essential initiator of this death program. These results reveal the mechanisms of apoptosis in negative selection of semimature thymocytes and have implications for immunological tolerance and autoimmunity. PMID:15118096

  11. Energy and protein requirements of non-descript breed hair lambs of different sex classes in the semiarid region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rafael Torres de Souza; Chizzotti, Mario Luiz; Martins, Samara Rodrigues; da Silva, Ivonete Ferreira; Queiroz, Mário Adriano Ávila; Silva, Tiago Santos; Busato, Karina Costa; Silva, Aderbal Marcos de Azevêdo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the energy and protein requirements of non-descript breed hair lambs (NDB) reared under Brazilian semiarid conditions. Sixty animals from three sex classes (20 intact males, 20 castrated males, and 20 females) with an average initial body weight of 18.1 ± 0.4 kg and an average age of 5 months were used. The nutritional requirements were estimated using the comparative slaughter. The animals in the final slaughter group were distributed in a completely randomized design with a 3 × 3 factorial scheme (three sex classes and three feeding levels: ad libitum feeding (positive energy balance), 70% feed restriction (maintenance level), and 80% feed restriction (negative energy balance)). The net energy requirement for maintenance (NEm) did not differ between sex classes (P > 0.05) and it was 68 kcal/kg of metabolic empty body weight (EBW(0.75))/day (P  0.05). The net energy requirement for weight gain (NEg) was estimated by NEg (Mcal/day) = 0.29 × EBW(0.75) × EBWG(0.86) for all sex classes (P < 0.05). The net protein requirement for weight gain (NPg) was estimated by NPg (g/day) = 224.45 × EBWG - 0.025 × RE for all sex classes (P < 0.05). The NEg increased and the NPg decreased with the increase in body weight of NDB lambs. PMID:26431709

  12. Energy and protein requirements of non-descript breed hair lambs of different sex classes in the semiarid region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rafael Torres de Souza; Chizzotti, Mario Luiz; Martins, Samara Rodrigues; da Silva, Ivonete Ferreira; Queiroz, Mário Adriano Ávila; Silva, Tiago Santos; Busato, Karina Costa; Silva, Aderbal Marcos de Azevêdo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the energy and protein requirements of non-descript breed hair lambs (NDB) reared under Brazilian semiarid conditions. Sixty animals from three sex classes (20 intact males, 20 castrated males, and 20 females) with an average initial body weight of 18.1 ± 0.4 kg and an average age of 5 months were used. The nutritional requirements were estimated using the comparative slaughter. The animals in the final slaughter group were distributed in a completely randomized design with a 3 × 3 factorial scheme (three sex classes and three feeding levels: ad libitum feeding (positive energy balance), 70% feed restriction (maintenance level), and 80% feed restriction (negative energy balance)). The net energy requirement for maintenance (NEm) did not differ between sex classes (P > 0.05) and it was 68 kcal/kg of metabolic empty body weight (EBW(0.75))/day (P  0.05). The net energy requirement for weight gain (NEg) was estimated by NEg (Mcal/day) = 0.29 × EBW(0.75) × EBWG(0.86) for all sex classes (P < 0.05). The net protein requirement for weight gain (NPg) was estimated by NPg (g/day) = 224.45 × EBWG - 0.025 × RE for all sex classes (P < 0.05). The NEg increased and the NPg decreased with the increase in body weight of NDB lambs.

  13. Multimerization of the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4 is required for its ability to activate protein kinase C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oh, E S; Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    The transmembrane proteoglycan syndecan-4, which is a coreceptor with integrins in cytoskeleton-matrix interactions, appears to be multimerized in vivo. Both purified and recombinant core proteins form sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant oligomers, and we now report that a synthetic peptide......, potentiated the activity of PKCalpha, and only oligomeric syndecan-4 cytoplasmic peptides were active. Changes in peptide sequence caused parallel loss of stable oligomeric status and ability to regulate a mixture of PKCalphabetagamma activity. A synthetic peptide encompassing the whole cytoplasmic domain...... of syndecan-4 (4L) containing a membrane-proximal basic sequence did not form higher order oligomers and could not regulate the activity of PKCalphabetagamma unless induced to aggregate by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Oligomerization and PKC regulatory activity of the 4V peptide were both increased...

  14. Requirement of Fra proteins for communication channels between cells in the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omairi-Nasser, Amin; Mariscal, Vicente; Austin, Jotham R; Haselkorn, Robert

    2015-08-11

    The filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 differentiates specialized cells, heterocysts, that fix atmospheric nitrogen and transfer the fixed nitrogen to adjacent vegetative cells. Reciprocally, vegetative cells transfer fixed carbon to heterocysts. Several routes have been described for metabolite exchange within the filament, one of which involves communicating channels that penetrate the septum between adjacent cells. Several fra gene mutants were isolated 25 y ago on the basis of their phenotypes: inability to fix nitrogen and fragmentation of filaments upon transfer from N+ to N- media. Cryopreservation combined with electron tomography were used to investigate the role of three fra gene products in channel formation. FraC and FraG are clearly involved in channel formation, whereas FraD has a minor part. Additionally, FraG was located close to the cytoplasmic membrane and in the heterocyst neck, using immunogold labeling with antibody raised to the N-terminal domain of the FraG protein.

  15. Environmental pH and the Requirement for the Extrinsic Proteins of Photosystem II in the Function of Cyanobacterial Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jaz N; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Summerfield, Tina C

    2016-01-01

    In one of the final stages of cyanobacterial Photosystem II (PS II) assembly, binding of up to four extrinsic proteins to PS II stabilizes the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Growth of cyanobacterial mutants deficient in certain combinations of these thylakoid-lumen-associated polypeptides is sensitive to changes in environmental pH, despite the physical separation of the membrane-embedded PS II complex from the external environment. In this perspective we discuss the effect of environmental pH on OEC function and photoautotrophic growth in cyanobacteria with reference to pH-sensitive PS II mutants lacking extrinsic proteins. We consider the possibilities that, compared to pH 10.0, pH 7.5 increases susceptibility to PS II-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) causing photoinhibition and reducing PS II assembly in some mutants, and that perturbations to channels in the lumenal regions of PS II might alter the accessibility of water to the active site as well as egress of oxygen and protons to the thylakoid lumen. Reduced levels of PS II in these mutants, and reduced OEC activity arising from the disruption of substrate/product channels, could reduce the trans-thylakoid pH gradient (ΔpH), leading to the impairment of photosynthesis. Growth of some PS II mutants at pH 7.5 can be rescued by elevating CO2 levels, suggesting that the pH-sensitive phenotype might primarily be an indirect result of back-pressure in the electron transport chain that results in heightened production of ROS by the impaired photosystem. PMID:27555848

  16. Environmental pH and the requirement for the extrinsic proteins of Photosystem II in the function of cyanobacterial photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaz N Morris

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In one of the final stages of cyanobacterial Photosystem II (PS II assembly, binding of up to four extrinsic proteins to PS II stabilizes the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC. Growth of cyanobacterial mutants deficient in certain combinations of these thylakoid-lumen-associated polypeptides is sensitive to changes in environmental pH, despite the physical separation of the membrane-embedded PS II complex from the external environment. In this perspective, we discuss the effect of environmental pH on OEC function and photoautotrophic growth in cyanobacteria, with reference to pH-sensitive PS II mutants lacking extrinsic proteins. We consider the possibilities that, compared to pH 10.0, pH 7.5 increases susceptibility to PS II-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS, causing photoinhibition and reducing PS II assembly in some mutants and that perturbations to channels in the lumenal regions of PS II might alter the accessibility of water to the active site, and egress of oxygen and protons to the thylakoid lumen. Reduced levels of PS II in these mutants and reduced OEC activity arising from the disruption of substrate/product channels could reduce the trans-thylakoid pH gradient (ΔpH, leading to the impairement of photosynthesis. Growth of some PS II mutants at pH 7.5 can be rescued by elevating CO2 levels, suggesting that the pH-sensitive phenotype might primarily be an indirect result of back-pressure in the electron transport chain that results in heightened production of ROS by the impaired photosystem.

  17. Environmental pH and the Requirement for the Extrinsic Proteins of Photosystem II in the Function of Cyanobacterial Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jaz N.; Eaton-Rye, Julian J.; Summerfield, Tina C.

    2016-01-01

    In one of the final stages of cyanobacterial Photosystem II (PS II) assembly, binding of up to four extrinsic proteins to PS II stabilizes the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Growth of cyanobacterial mutants deficient in certain combinations of these thylakoid-lumen-associated polypeptides is sensitive to changes in environmental pH, despite the physical separation of the membrane-embedded PS II complex from the external environment. In this perspective we discuss the effect of environmental pH on OEC function and photoautotrophic growth in cyanobacteria with reference to pH-sensitive PS II mutants lacking extrinsic proteins. We consider the possibilities that, compared to pH 10.0, pH 7.5 increases susceptibility to PS II-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) causing photoinhibition and reducing PS II assembly in some mutants, and that perturbations to channels in the lumenal regions of PS II might alter the accessibility of water to the active site as well as egress of oxygen and protons to the thylakoid lumen. Reduced levels of PS II in these mutants, and reduced OEC activity arising from the disruption of substrate/product channels, could reduce the trans-thylakoid pH gradient (ΔpH), leading to the impairment of photosynthesis. Growth of some PS II mutants at pH 7.5 can be rescued by elevating CO2 levels, suggesting that the pH-sensitive phenotype might primarily be an indirect result of back-pressure in the electron transport chain that results in heightened production of ROS by the impaired photosystem. PMID:27555848

  18. Identification of the promoter region required for human adiponectin gene transcription: Association with CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-β and tumor necrosis factor-α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adiponectin, an adipose tissue-specific plasma protein, is involved in insulin sensitizing and has anti-atherosclerotic properties. Plasma levels of adiponectin are decreased in obese individuals and patients with type 2 diabetes with insulin resistance. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) decreases the expression of adiponectin in adipocytes. The aims of the present study were: (1) to identify the promoter region responsible for basal transcription of the human adiponectin gene, and (2) to investigate the mechanism by which adiponectin was regulated by TNF-α. The human adiponectin promoter (2.1 kb) was isolated and used for luciferase reporter analysis by transient transfection into 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the promoter region from -676 to +41 was sufficient for basal transcriptional activity. Mutation analysis of putative response elements for sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) (-431 to -423) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) (-230 to -224) showed that both elements were required for basal promoter activity. Adiponectin transcription was increased 3-fold in cells that over-expressed constitutively active C/EBP-β. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, using nuclear extract from 3T3-L1 cells and the -258 to -199 region as a probe, demonstrated specific DNA-protein binding, which was abolished by TNF-α treatment. The present data indicate that the putative response elements for SREBP and C/EBP are required for human adiponectin promoter activity, and that suppression by TNF-α may, at least in part, be associated with inactivation of C/EBP-β

  19. Functional diversification of hsp40: distinct j-protein functional requirements for two prions allow for chaperone-dependent prion selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M Harris

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yeast prions are heritable amyloid aggregates of functional yeast proteins; their propagation to subsequent cell generations is dependent upon fragmentation of prion protein aggregates by molecular chaperone proteins. Mounting evidence indicates the J-protein Sis1 may act as an amyloid specificity factor, recognizing prion and other amyloid aggregates and enabling Ssa and Hsp104 to act in prion fragmentation. Chaperone interactions with prions, however, can be affected by variations in amyloid-core structure resulting in distinct prion variants or 'strains'. Our genetic analysis revealed that Sis1 domain requirements by distinct variants of [PSI+] are strongly dependent upon overall variant stability. Notably, multiple strong [PSI+] variants can be maintained by a minimal construct of Sis1 consisting of only the J-domain and glycine/phenylalanine-rich (G/F region that was previously shown to be sufficient for cell viability and [RNQ+] prion propagation. In contrast, weak [PSI+] variants are lost under the same conditions but maintained by the expression of an Sis1 construct that lacks only the G/F region and cannot support [RNQ+] propagation, revealing mutually exclusive requirements for Sis1 function between these two prions. Prion loss is not due to [PSI+]-dependent toxicity or dependent upon a particular yeast genetic background. These observations necessitate that Sis1 must have at least two distinct functional roles that individual prions differentially require for propagation and which are localized to the glycine-rich domains of the Sis1. Based on these distinctions, Sis1 plasmid-shuffling in a [PSI+]/[RNQ+] strain permitted J-protein-dependent prion selection for either prion. We also found that, despite an initial report to the contrary, the human homolog of Sis1, Hdj1, is capable of [PSI+] prion propagation in place of Sis1. This conservation of function is also prion-variant dependent, indicating that only one of the two Sis1-prion

  20. Mcp6, a meiosis-specific coiled-coil protein of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, localizes to the spindle pole body and is required for horsetail movement and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takamune T; Tougan, Takahiro; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Kasama, Takashi; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2005-01-15

    We report here that a meiosis-specific gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe denoted mcp6+ (meiotic coiled-coil protein) encodes a protein that is required for the horsetail movement of chromosomes at meiosis I. The mcp6+ gene is specifically transcribed during the horsetail phase. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Mcp6 appears at the start of karyogamy, localizes to the spindle-pole body (SPB) and then disappears before chromosome segregation at meiosis I. In the mcp6Delta strain, the horsetail movement was either hampered (zygotic meiosis) or abolished (azygotic meiosis) and the pairing of homologous chromosomes was impaired. Accordingly, the allelic recombination rates of the mcp6Delta strain were only 10-40% of the wild-type rates. By contrast, the ectopic recombination rate of the mcp6Delta strain was twice the wild-type rate. This is probably caused by abnormal homologous pairing in mcp6Delta cells because of aberrant horsetail movement. Fluorescent microscopy indicates that SPB components such as Sad1, Kms1 and Spo15 localize normally in mcp6Delta cells. Because Taz1 and Swi6 also localized with Sad1 in mcp6Delta cells, Mcp6 is not required for telomere clustering. In a taz1Delta strain, which does not display telomere clustering, and the dhc1-d3 mutant, which lacks horsetail movement, Mcp6 localized with Sad1 normally. However, we observed abnormal astral microtubule organization in mcp6Delta cells. From these results, we conclude that Mcp6 is necessary for neither SPB organization nor telomere clustering, but is required for proper astral microtubule positioning to maintain horsetail movement. PMID:15654021

  1. Activation of p38 and JNK MAPK pathways abrogates requirement for new protein synthesis for phorbol ester mediated induction of select MMP and TIMP genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Clara L; Nuttall, Robert K; Young, David A; Goldspink, Deborah; Clark, Ian M; Edwards, Dylan R

    2008-03-01

    The human matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) gene family includes 24 genes whose regulated expression, together with that of four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), is essential in tissue remodelling and cell signalling. Quantitative real-time-PCR (qPCR) analysis was used to evaluate the shared and unique patterns of control of these two gene families in human MRC-5 and WI-38 fibroblasts in response to the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). The requirement for ongoing translation was analysed using three protein synthesis inhibitors, anisomycin, cycloheximide and emetine. PMA induced MMP1, 3, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14 and TIMP1 and TIMP3 RNAs after 4-8 h, and induction of all except MMP9 and TIMP3 was blocked by all protein synthesis inhibitors. However, even though all inhibitors effectively blocked translation, PMA-induction of MMP9 and TIMP3 was blocked by emetine but was insensitive to cycloheximide and anisomycin. Anisomycin alone induced MMP9 and TIMP3, along with MMP25 and MMP19. The extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs)-1/2 were strongly activated by PMA, while anisomycin activated the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways, and cycloheximide activated p38, but emetine had no effect on the stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. The involvement of the p38 and JNK pathways in the selective effects of anisomycin and cycloheximide on MMP/TIMP expression was supported by use of pharmacological inhibitors. These data confirm that most inducible MMPs and TIMP1 behave as "late" activated, protein synthesis-dependent genes in fibroblasts. However, the requirement of protein synthesis for PMA-induction of MMPs and TIMPs is not universal, since it is abrogated for MMP9 and TIMP3 by stimulation of the stress-activated MAPK pathways. The definition of clusters of co-regulated genes among the two gene families will aid in bioinformatic dissection of control mechanisms.

  2. The HhH2/NDD domain of the Drosophila Nod chromokinesin-like protein is required for binding to chromosomes in the oocyte nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wei; Hawley, R Scott

    2005-12-01

    Nod is a chromokinesin-like protein that plays a critical role in segregating achiasmate chromosomes during female meiosis. The C-terminal half of the Nod protein contains two putative DNA-binding domains. The first of these domains, known as the HMGN domain, consists of three tandemly repeated high-mobility group N motifs. This domain was previously shown to be both necessary and sufficient for binding of the C-terminal half of Nod to mitotic chromosomes in embryos. The second putative DNA-binding domain, denoted HhH(2)/NDD, is a helix-hairpin-helix(2)/Nod-like DNA-binding domain. Although the HhH(2)/NDD domain is not required or sufficient for chromosome binding in embryos, several well-characterized nod mutations have been mapped in this domain. To characterize the role of the HhH(2)/NDD domain in mediating Nod function, we created a series of UAS-driven transgene constructs capable of expressing either a wild-type Nod-GFP fusion protein or proteins in which the HhH(2)/NDD domain had been altered by site-directed mutagenesis. Although wild-type Nod-GFP localizes to the oocyte chromosomes and rescues the segregation defect in nod mutant oocytes, two of three proteins carrying mutants in the HhH(2)/NDD domain fail to either rescue the nod mutant phenotype or bind to oocyte chromosomes. However, these mutant proteins do bind to the polytene chromosomes in nurse-cell nuclei and enter the oocyte nucleus. Thus, even though the HhH(2)/NDD domain is not essential for chromosome binding in other cell types, it is required for chromosome binding in the oocyte. These HhH(2)/NDD mutants also block the localization of Nod to the posterior pole of stage 9-10A oocytes, a process that is thought to facilitate the interaction of Nod with the plus ends of microtubules (Cui et al. 2005). This observation suggests that the Nod HhH2/NDD domain may play other roles in addition to binding Nod to meiotic chromosomes.

  3. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase activity is required for the G2/M transition of the cell cycle in mammalian fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Jocelyn H.; Munar, Erlynda; Jameson, Damon R; Andreassen, Paul R.; Margolis, Robert L.; Seger, Rony; Krebs, Edwin G.

    1999-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is required for mitogenesis in somatic mammalian cells and is activated by a wide variety of oncogenic stimuli. Specific roles for this signaling module in growth were dissected by inhibiting MAPK kinase 1 (MAPKK1) activity in highly synchronized NIH 3T3 cells. In addition to the known role of this kinase in cell-cycle entry from G0, the level of MAPKK activity was observed to affect the kinetics of progression through both the G1 and G2 pha...

  4. Vitamin D receptor interaction with specific DNA requires a nuclear protein and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, J.; Ozono, K; Sone, T.; McDonnell, D P; Pike, J W

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of osteocalcin gene expression by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is mediated by the vitamin D receptor and a cis-acting DNA response element that has been identified within the 5' region of the osteocalcin promoter. In this report, we show that vitamin D receptors derived from nuclear extracts of mammalian cells bind directly to this cis-acting element in vitro and do so in a manner requiring hormone. Vitamin D receptors derived from reticulocyte lysate translations in vitro or from ...

  5. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Processing of N-linked carbohydrate is not required for surface expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Erik Michael; Cowell, G M

    1986-01-01

    microvillar enzymes, it does not receive post-translational O-linked carbohydrate. Castanospermine suppressed the synthesis of the four enzymes, but did not block their transport to the microvillar membrane, showing that processing of N-linked carbohydrate is not required for microvillar expression......Castanospermine, an inhibitor of glucosidase I, the initial enzyme in the trimming of N-linked carbohydrate, was used to study the importance of carbohydrate processing in the biosynthesis of microvillar enzymes in organ-cultured pig intestinal explants. For aminopeptidase N (EC 3...

  6. Residues of the UL25 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus That Are Required for Its Stable Interaction with Capsids ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Cockrell, Shelley K.; Huffman, Jamie B.; Toropova, Katerina; James F Conway; Homa, Fred L.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated reco...

  7. Fulvestrant-induced cell death and proteasomal degradation of estrogen receptor α protein in MCF-7 cells require the CSK c-Src tyrosine kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lan Yeh

    Full Text Available Fulvestrant is a representative pure antiestrogen and a Selective Estrogen Receptor Down-regulator (SERD. In contrast to the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs such as 4-hydroxytamoxifen that bind to estrogen receptor α (ERα as antagonists or partial agonists, fulvestrant causes proteasomal degradation of ERα protein, shutting down the estrogen signaling to induce proliferation arrest and apoptosis of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells. We performed genome-wide RNAi knockdown screenings for protein kinases required for fulvestrant-induced apoptosis of the MCF-7 estrogen-dependent human breast caner cells and identified the c-Src tyrosine kinase (CSK, a negative regulator of the oncoprotein c-Src and related protein tyrosine kinases, as one of the necessary molecules. Whereas RNAi knockdown of CSK in MCF-7 cells by shRNA-expressing lentiviruses strongly suppressed fulvestrant-induced cell death, CSK knockdown did not affect cytocidal actions of 4-hydroxytamoxifen or paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent. In the absence of CSK, fulvestrant-induced proteasomal degradation of ERα protein was suppressed in both MCF-7 and T47D estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells whereas the TP53-mutated T47D cells were resistant to the cytocidal action of fulvestrant in the presence or absence of CSK. MCF-7 cell sensitivities to fulvestrant-induced cell death or ERα protein degradation was not affected by small-molecular-weight inhibitors of the tyrosine kinase activity of c-Src, suggesting possible involvement of other signaling molecules in CSK-dependent MCF-7 cell death induced by fulvestrant. Our observations suggest the importance of CSK in the determination of cellular sensitivity to the cytocidal action of fulvestrant.

  8. Structure of the cytoplasmic domain of TcpE, the inner membrane core protein required for assembly of the Vibrio cholerae toxin-coregulated pilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Craig, Lisa

    2013-04-01

    Type IV pili are long thin surface-displayed polymers of the pilin subunit that are present in a diverse group of bacteria. These multifunctional filaments are critical to virulence for pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, which use them to form microcolonies and to secrete the colonization factor TcpF. The type IV pili are assembled from pilin subunits by a complex inner membrane machinery. The core component of the type IV pilus-assembly platform is an integral inner membrane protein belonging to the GspF superfamily of secretion proteins. These proteins somehow convert chemical energy from ATP hydrolysis by an assembly ATPase on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane to mechanical energy for extrusion of the growing pilus filament out of the inner membrane. Most GspF-family inner membrane core proteins are predicted to have N-terminal and central cytoplasmic domains, cyto1 and cyto2, and three transmembrane segments, TM1, TM2 and TM3. Cyto2 and TM3 represent an internal repeat of cyto1 and TM1. Here, the 1.88 Å resolution crystal structure of the cyto1 domain of V. cholerae TcpE, which is required for assembly of the toxin-coregulated pilus, is reported. This domain folds as a monomeric six-helix bundle with a positively charged membrane-interaction face at one end and a hydrophobic groove at the other end that may serve as a binding site for partner proteins in the pilus-assembly complex.

  9. WtsE, an AvrE-family effector protein from Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, causes disease-associated cell death in corn and requires a chaperone protein for stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Jong Hyun; Majerczak, Doris R; Arroyo-Rodriguez, Angel S; Mackey, David M; Coplin, David L

    2006-10-01

    The pathogenicity of Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii to sweet corn and maize requires a Hrp type III secretion system. In this study, we genetically and functionally characterized a disease-specific (Dsp) effector locus, composed of wtsE and wtsF, that is adjacent to the hrp gene cluster. WtsE, a member of the AvrE family of effector proteins, was essential for pathogenesis on corn and was complemented by DspA/E from Erwinia amylovora. An intact C-terminus of WtsE, which contained a putative endoplasmic reticulum membrane retention signal, was important for function of WtsE. Delivery of WtsE into sweet corn leaves by an Escherichia coli strain carrying the hrp cluster of Erwinia chrysanthemi caused water-soaking and necrosis. WtsE-induced cell death was not inhibited by cycloheximide treatment, unlike the hypersensitive response caused by a known Avr protein, AvrRxol. WtsF, the putative chaperone of WtsE, was not required for secretion of WtsE from P. stewartii, and the virulence of wtsF mutants was reduced only at low inoculum concentrations. However, WtsF was required for full accumulation of WtsE within the bacteria at low temperatures. In contrast, WtsF was needed for efficient delivery of WtsE from E. coli via the Erwinia chrysanthemi Hrp system. PMID:17022173

  10. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1 negatively regulates Dictyostelium STATa and is required for proper cell-type proportioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, A; Gamper, M; Moniakis, J; Kim, E; Hunter, T; Williams, J G; Firtel, R A

    2001-04-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1, which mediates reversible phosphorylation on tyrosine, has been shown to play an important regulatory role during Dictyostelium development. Mutants lacking PTP1 develop more rapidly than normal, while strains that overexpress PTP1 display aberrant morphology. However, the signalling pathways involved have not been characterised. In reexamining these strains, we have found that there is an inverse correlation between levels of PTP1 activity, the extent of tyrosine phosphorylation on Dictyostelium STATa after treatment with cAMP, and the proportion of the slug population exhibiting STATa nuclear enrichment in vivo. This suggests that PTP1 acts to attenuate the tyrosine phosphorylation of STATa and downstream STATa-mediated pathways. Consistent with this, we show that when PTP1 is overexpressed, there is increased expression of a prestalk cell marker at the slug posterior, a phenocopy of STATa null slugs. In ptp1 null strains, STATa tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear enrichment in the slug anterior is increased. There is also a change in the prestalk to prespore cell ratio. Synergy experiments suggest that this is due to a cell-autonomous defect in forming the subset of prespore cells that are located in the anterior prespore region.

  11. Requirement for the POZ/BTB protein NAC1 in acute but not chronic psychomotor stimulant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackler, Scott; Pacchioni, Alejandra; Degnan, Ryan; Homan, Ying; Conti, Alana C; Kalivas, Peter; Blendy, Julie A

    2008-02-11

    NAC1 is a novel member of the POZ/BTB (Pox virus and Zinc finger/Bric-a-bracTramtrack Broad complex) but varies from other proteins of this class in that it lacks the characteristic DNA-binding motif, suggesting a novel role. We have employed constitutive gene deletion to elucidate the role of NAC1 in vivo. Nac1 mutant mice are viable with no obvious developmental or physiological impairments. Previous studies suggest a role for NAC1 in cocaine-mediated behaviors. Therefore, we evaluated a variety of behaviors associated with psychomotor stimulant effects in Nac1 mutant mice. Acute locomotor activating effects of cocaine or amphetamine are absent in Nac1 mutant mice, however longer exposure to these psychomotor stimulants result in the development of behavioral sensitization. Acute rewarding properties of cocaine and amphetamine are also blunted in mutant mice, yet repeated exposure resulted in conditioned place preference similar to that observed in wild-type mice. Lastly, increases in extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, which accompany acute cocaine administration, are blunted in mutant mice, but following chronic cocaine extracellular dopamine levels are increased to the same extent as in wild-type mice. Together these data indicate involvement of NAC1 in the acute behavioral and neurochemical responses to psychomotor stimulants.

  12. Bst1 is required for Candida albicans infecting host via facilitating cell wall anchorage of Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zou, Zui; Huang, Xin; Shen, Hui; He, Li Juan; Chen, Si Min; Li, Li Ping; Yan, Lan; Zhang, Shi Qun; Zhang, Jun Dong; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on fungal cell wall are essential for invasive infections. While the function of inositol deacylation of GPI-APs in mammalian cells has been previously characterized the impact of inositol deacylation in fungi and implications to host infection remains largely unexplored. Herein we describe our identification of BST1, an inositol deacylase of GPI-Aps in Candida albicans, was critical for GPI-APs cell wall attachment and host infection. BST1-deficient C. albicans (bst1Δ/Δ) was associated with severely impaired cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs and subsequen unmasked β-(1,3)-glucan. Consistent with the aberrant cell wall structures, bst1Δ/Δ strain did not display an invasive ability and could be recognized more efficiently by host immune systems. Moreover, BST1 null mutants or those expressing Bst1 variants did not display inositol deacylation activity and exhibited severely attenuated virulence and reduced organic colonization in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Thus, Bst1 can facilitate cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs in C. albicans by inositol deacylation, and is critical for host invasion and immune escape. PMID:27708385

  13. Slack sodium-activated potassium channel membrane expression requires p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururaj, Sushmitha; Fleites, John; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2016-04-01

    p38 MAPK has long been understood as an inducible kinase under conditions of cellular stress, but there is now increasing evidence to support its role in the regulation of neuronal function. Several phosphorylation targets have been identified, an appreciable number of which are ion channels, implicating the possible involvement of p38 MAPK in neuronal excitability. The KNa channel Slack is an important protein to be studied as it is highly and ubiquitously expressed in DRG neurons and is important in the maintenance of their firing accommodation. We sought to examine if the Slack channel could be a substrate of p38 MAPK activity. First, we found that the Slack C-terminus contains two putative p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites that are highly conserved across species. Second, we show via electrophysiology experiments that KNa currents and further, Slack currents, are subject to tonic modulation by p38 MAPK. Third, biochemical approaches revealed that Slack channel regulation by p38 MAPK occurs through direct phosphorylation at the two putative sites of interaction, and mutating both sites prevented surface expression of Slack channels. Based on these results, we conclude that p38 MAPK is an obligate regulator of Slack channel function via the trafficking of channels into the membrane. The present study identifies Slack KNa channels as p38 MAPK substrates. PMID:26721627

  14. Carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is required to modulate cardiac hypertrophy and attenuate autophagy during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Monte S; Min, Jin-Na; Wang, Shaobin; McDonough, Holly; Lockyer, Pamela; Wadosky, Kristine M; Patterson, Cam

    2013-12-01

    The carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is a ubiquitin ligase/cochaperone critical for the maintenance of cardiac function. Mice lacking CHIP (CHIP-/-) suffer decreased survival, enhanced myocardial injury and increased arrhythmias compared with wild-type controls following challenge with cardiac ischaemia reperfusion injury. Recent evidence implicates a role for CHIP in chaperone-assisted selective autophagy, a process that is associated with exercise-induced cardioprotection. To determine whether CHIP is involved in cardiac autophagy, we challenged CHIP-/- mice with voluntary exercise. CHIP-/- mice respond to exercise with an enhanced autophagic response that is associated with an exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy phenotype. No impairment of function was identified in the CHIP-/- mice by serial echocardiography over the 5 weeks of running, indicating that the cardiac hypertrophy was physiologic not pathologic in nature. It was further determined that CHIP plays a role in inhibiting Akt signalling and autophagy determined by autophagic flux in cardiomyocytes and in the intact heart. Taken together, cardiac CHIP appears to play a role in regulating autophagy during the development of cardiac hypertrophy, possibly by its role in supporting Akt signalling, induced by voluntary running in vivo.

  15. MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 is required for mouse meiotic spindle assembly and kinetochore-microtubule attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Yuan

    Full Text Available MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2, a direct substrate of p38 MAPK, plays key roles in multiple physiological functions in mitosis. Here, we show for the first time the unique distribution pattern of MK2 in meiosis. Phospho-MK2 was localized on bipolar spindle minus ends and along the interstitial axes of homologous chromosomes extending over centromere regions and arm regions at metaphase of first meiosis (MI stage in mouse oocytes. At metaphase of second meiosis (MII stage, p-MK2 was localized on the bipolar spindle minus ends and at the inner centromere region of sister chromatids as dots. Knockdown or inhibition of MK2 resulted in spindle defects. Spindles were surrounded by irregular nondisjunction chromosomes, which were arranged in an amphitelic or syntelic/monotelic manner, or chromosomes detached from the spindles. Kinetochore-microtubule attachments were impaired in MK2-deficient oocytes because spindle microtubules became unstable in response to cold treatment. In addition, homologous chromosome segregation and meiosis progression were inhibited in these oocytes. Our data suggest that MK2 may be essential for functional meiotic bipolar spindle formation, chromosome segregation and proper kinetochore-microtubule attachments.

  16. Defective Pollen Wall is Required for Anther and Microspore Development in Rice and Encodes a Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, J.; Shanklin, J.; Tan, H.; Yu, X.-H.; Liu, Y.; Liang, W.; Ranathunge, K.; Franke, R. B.; Schreiber, L.; Wang, Y.; Kai, G.; Ma, H.; Zhang, D.

    2011-06-01

    Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots.

  17. CRL6, a member of the CHD protein family, is required for crown root development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihua; Wang, Di; Gan, Ting; Liu, Linglong; Long, Wuhua; Wang, Yunlong; Niu, Mei; Li, Xiaohui; Zheng, Ming; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-08-01

    The root system in monocotyledonous plants is largely composed of postembryonic shoot-borne roots named crown roots, which are important for nutrients and water uptake. The molecular mechanism underlying regulation of crown root development is not fully explored. In this study, we characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant defective in crown root formation, designated as crown rootless6 (crl6). Histological analysis showed that CRL6 influences crown root formation by regulating primordial initiation and development. Map-based cloning and subsequent complementation tests verified that the CRL6 gene encodes a member of the large chromodomain, helicase/ATPase, and DNA-binding domain (CHD) family protein. Realtime RT-PCR analysis showed that CRL6 was most highly expressed in the stem base region where crown roots initiated. In addition, auxin-action inhibited phenotype was observed during crl6 development. The expressions of OsIAA genes were down-regulated in crl6. Our results provide evidence that CRL6 plays an important role in crown root development in rice via auxin-related signaling pathway. PMID:27108205

  18. Inhibitor of apoptosis-stimulating protein of p53 (iASPP is required for neuronal survival after axonal injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel M Wilson

    Full Text Available The transcription factor p53 mediates the apoptosis of post-mitotic neurons exposed to a wide range of stress stimuli. The apoptotic activity of p53 is tightly regulated by the apoptosis-stimulating proteins of p53 (ASPP family members: ASPP1, ASPP2 and iASPP. We previously showed that the pro-apoptotic members ASPP1 and ASPP2 contribute to p53-dependent death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. However, the role of the p53 inhibitor iASPP in the central nervous system (CNS remains to be elucidated. To address this, we asked whether iASPP contributes to the survival of RGCs in an in vivo model of acute optic nerve damage. We demonstrate that iASPP is expressed by injured RGCs and that iASPP phosphorylation at serine residues, which increase iASPP affinity towards p53, is significantly reduced following axotomy. We show that short interference RNA (siRNA-induced iASPP knockdown exacerbates RGC death, whereas adeno-associated virus (AAV-mediated iASPP expression promotes RGC survival. Importantly, our data also demonstrate that increasing iASPP expression in RGCs downregulates p53 activity and blocks the expression of pro-apoptotic targets PUMA and Fas/CD95. This study demonstrates a novel role for iASPP in the survival of RGCs, and provides further evidence of the importance of the ASPP family in the regulation of neuronal loss after axonal injury.

  19. Killing of p53-deficient hepatoma cells by parvovirus H-1 and chemotherapeutics requires promyelocytic leukemia protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maike Sieben; Markus Moehler; Kerstin Herzer; Maja Zeidler; Vera Heinrichs; Barbara Leuchs; Martin Schuler; Jan J Cornelis; Peter R Galle; Jean Rommelaere

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the synergistic targeting and killing of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells lacking p53 by the oncolytic autonomous parvovirus (PV) H-1 and chemotherapeutic agents and its dependence on functional promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML).METHODS: The role of p53 and PML in regulating cytotoxicity and gene transfer mediated by wild-type (wt)PV H-1 were explored in two pairs of isogenic human hepatoma cell lines with different p53 status.Furthermore,H-1 PV infection was combined with cytostatic drug treatment.RESULTS: While the HCC cells with different p53 status studied were all susceptible to H-1 PV-induced apoptosis,the cytotoxicity of H-1 PV was more pronounced in p53-negative than in p53-positive cells.Apoptosis rates in p53-negative cell lines treated by genotoxic drugs were further enhanced by a treatment with H-1 PV.In flow cytometric analyses,H-1 PV infection resulted in a reduction of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential.In addition,H-1 PV cells showed a significant increase in PML expression.Knocking down PML expression resulted in a striking reduction of the level of H-1 PV infected tumor cell death.CONCLUSION: H-1 PV is a suitable agent to circumvent the resistance of p53-negative HCC cells to genotoxic agents,and it enhances the apoptotic process which is dependent on functional PML.Thus,H-1 PV and its oncolytic vector derivatives may be considered as therapeutic options for HCC,particularly for p53-negative tumors.

  20. cAMP response element binding protein is required for differentiation of respiratory epithelium during murine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Daniel Bird

    Full Text Available The cAMP response element binding protein 1 (Creb1 transcription factor regulates cellular gene expression in response to elevated levels of intracellular cAMP. Creb1(-/- fetal mice are phenotypically smaller than wildtype littermates, predominantly die in utero and do not survive after birth due to respiratory failure. We have further investigated the respiratory defect of Creb1(-/- fetal mice during development. Lungs of Creb1(-/- fetal mice were pale in colour and smaller than wildtype controls in proportion to their reduced body size. Creb1(-/- lungs also did not mature morphologically beyond E16.5 with little or no expansion of airway luminal spaces, a phenotype also observed with the Creb1(-/- lung on a Crem(-/- genetic background. Creb1 was highly expressed throughout the lung at all stages examined, however activation of Creb1 was detected primarily in distal lung epithelium. Cell differentiation of E17.5 Creb1(-/- lung distal epithelium was analysed by electron microscopy and showed markedly reduced numbers of type-I and type-II alveolar epithelial cells. Furthermore, immunomarkers for specific lineages of proximal epithelium including ciliated, non-ciliated (Clara, and neuroendocrine cells showed delayed onset of expression in the Creb1(-/- lung. Finally, gene expression analyses of the E17.5 Creb1(-/- lung using whole genome microarray and qPCR collectively identified respiratory marker gene profiles and provide potential novel Creb1-regulated genes. Together, these results demonstrate a crucial role for Creb1 activity for the development and differentiation of the conducting and distal lung epithelium.

  1. Signaling of chloroquine-induced stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the Hog1 and Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranwal, Shivani; Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Singh, Vikash; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2014-09-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) has been under clinical use for several decades, and yet little is known about CQ sensing and signaling mechanisms or about their impact on various biological pathways. We employed the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study the pathways targeted by CQ. Our screening with yeast mutants revealed that it targets histone proteins and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we also describe the novel role of mitogen-activated protein kinases Hog1 and Slt2, which aid in survival in the presence of CQ. Cells deficient in Hog1 or Slt2 are found to be CQ hypersensitive, and both proteins were phosphorylated in response to CQ exposure. CQ-activated Hog1p is translocated to the nucleus and facilitates the expression of GPD1 (glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), which is required for the synthesis of glycerol (one of the major osmolytes). Moreover, cells treated with CQ exhibited an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and the effects were rescued by addition of reduced glutathione to the medium. The deletion of SOD1, the superoxide dismutase in yeast, resulted in hypersensitivity to CQ. We have also observed P38 as well as P42/44 phosphorylation in HEK293T human cells upon exposure to CQ, indicating that the kinds of responses generated in yeast and human cells are similar. In summary, our findings define the multiple biological pathways targeted by CQ that might be useful for understanding the toxicity modulated by this pharmacologically important molecule.

  2. Independent regions of adenovirus E1A are required for binding to and dissociation of E2F-protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattaey, A R; Harlow, E; Helin, K

    1993-01-01

    The transcription factor E2F is present in independent complexes with the product of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene, pRB, and a related gene product, p107, in association with the cyclin A-cdk2 or the cyclin E-cdk2 kinase complex. pRB and p107 can negatively regulate E2F activity, since...... overexpression of pRB or p107 in cells lacking a functional pRB leads to the repression of E2F activity. The products of the adenovirus E1A gene can disrupt E2F complexes and result in free and presumably active E2F transcription factor. The regions of E1A required for this function are also essential...... for binding to a number of cellular proteins, including pRB and p107. Through the use of a number of glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins representing different regions of E1A, as well as in vivo expression of E1A proteins containing deletions of either conserved region 1 (CR1) or CR2, we find that CR2...

  3. Exploring the structural requirements for inhibition of the ubiquitin E3 ligase breast cancer associated protein 2 (BCA2) as a treatment for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahemi, Ghali; Kona, Fathima R; Fiasella, Annalisa; Buac, Daniela; Soukupová, Jitka; Brancale, Andrea; Burger, Angelika M; Westwell, Andrew D

    2010-04-01

    The zinc-ejecting aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) inhibitory drug disulfiram (DSF) was found to be a breast cancer-associated protein 2 (BCA2) inhibitor with potent antitumor activity. We herein describe our work in the synthesis and evaluation of new series of zinc-affinic molecules to explore the structural requirements for selective BCA2-inhibitory antitumor activity. An N(C=S)S-S motif was found to be required, based on selective activity in BCA2-expressing breast cancer cell lines and against recombinant BCA2 protein. Notably, the DSF analogs (3a and 3c) and dithio(peroxo)thioate compounds (5d and 5f) were found to have potent activity (submicromolar IC(50)) in BCA2 positive MCF-7 and T47D cells but were inactive (IC(50) > 10 microM) in BCA2 negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. Testing in the isogenic BCA2 +ve MDA-MB-231/ER cell line restored antitumor activity for compounds that were inactive in the BCA2 -ve MDA-MB-231 cell line. In contrast, structurally related dithiocarbamates and benzisothiazolones (lacking the disulfide bond) were all inactive. Compounds 5d and 5f were additionally found to lack ALDH-inhibitory activity, suggestive of selective E3 ligase-inhibitory activity and worthy of further development. PMID:20222671

  4. Epidermal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (E-FABP) Is Not Required for the Generation or Maintenance of Effector and Memory T Cells following Infection with Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Schmidt, Nathan W

    2016-01-01

    Following activation of naïve T cells there are dynamic changes in the metabolic pathways used by T cells to support both the energetic needs of the cell and the macromolecules required for growth and proliferation. Among other changes, lipid metabolism undergoes dynamic transitions between fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid synthesis as cells progress from naïve to effector and effector to memory T cells. The hydrophobic nature of lipids requires that they be bound to protein chaperones within a cell. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) represent a large class of lipid chaperones, with epidermal FABP (E-FABP) expressed in T cells. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of E-FABP in antigen-specific T cell responses. Following infection with Listeria monocytogenes, we observed similar clonal expansion, contraction and formation of memory CD8 T cells in WT and E-FABP-/- mice, which also exhibited similar phenotypic and functional characteristics. Analysis of Listeria-specific CD4 T cells also revealed no defect in the expansion, contraction, and formation of memory CD4 T cells in E-FABP-/- mice. These data demonstrate that E-FABP is dispensable for antigen-specific T cell responses following a bacterial infection. PMID:27588422

  5. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D M; Pevsner, J; Scullion, M A; Vaughn, M; Kaplan, J

    2000-07-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome-lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome-lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome-lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages.

  6. Transcriptional activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} requires activation of both protein kinase A and Akt during adipocyte differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-pil [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Pusan National University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Eun Kyoung [MRC for Ischemic Tissue Regeneration, Medical Research Institute, and Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sung Woon [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Pusan National University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae [MRC for Ischemic Tissue Regeneration, Medical Research Institute, and Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sun Sik, E-mail: sunsik@pusan.ac.kr [MRC for Ischemic Tissue Regeneration, Medical Research Institute, and Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} Elevated cAMP activates both PKA and Epac. {yields} PKA activates CREB transcriptional factor and Epac activates PI3K/Akt pathway via Rap1. {yields} Akt modulates PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in concert with CREB. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) is required for the conversion of pre-adipocytes. However, the mechanism underlying activation of PPAR-{gamma} is unclear. Here we showed that cAMP-induced activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and Akt is essential for the transcriptional activation of PPAR-{gamma}. Hormonal induction of adipogenesis was blocked by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002), by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (H89), and by a Rap1 inhibitor (GGTI-298). Transcriptional activity of PPAR-{gamma} was markedly enhanced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), but not insulin and dexamethasone. In addition, IBMX-induced PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity was blocked by PI3K/Akt, PKA, or Rap1 inhibitors. 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl-cAMP (8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP) which is a specific agonist for exchanger protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) significantly induced the activation of Akt. Furthermore, knock-down of Akt1 markedly attenuated PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity. These results indicate that both PKA and Akt signaling pathways are required for transcriptional activation of PPAR-{gamma}, suggesting post-translational activation of PPAR-{gamma} might be critical step for adipogenic gene expression.

  7. Subunit architecture of the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, S Julie-Ann; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2013-07-19

    The membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors regulate lipogenesis in mammalian cells and are activated through sequential cleavage by the Golgi-localized Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. The mechanism of fission yeast SREBP cleavage is less well defined and, in contrast, requires the Golgi-localized Dsc E3 ligase complex. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane subunits, Dsc1 through Dsc5, and resembles membrane E3 ligases that function in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Using immunoprecipitation assays and blue native electrophoresis, we determined the subunit architecture for the complex of Dsc1 through Dsc5, showing that the Dsc proteins form subcomplexes and display defined connectivity. Dsc2 is a rhomboid pseudoprotease family member homologous to mammalian UBAC2 and a central component of the Dsc E3 ligase. We identified conservation in the architecture of the Dsc E3 ligase and the multisubunit E3 ligase gp78 in mammals. Specifically, Dsc1-Dsc2-Dsc5 forms a complex resembling gp78-UBAC2-UBXD8. Further characterization of Dsc2 revealed that its C-terminal UBA domain can bind to ubiquitin chains but that the Dsc2 UBA domain is not essential for yeast SREBP cleavage. Based on the ability of rhomboid superfamily members to bind transmembrane proteins, we speculate that Dsc2 functions in SREBP recognition and binding. Homologs of Dsc1 through Dsc4 are required for SREBP cleavage and virulence in the human opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, these studies advance our organizational understanding of multisubunit E3 ligases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and fungal pathogenesis.

  8. Transcriptional activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ requires activation of both protein kinase A and Akt during adipocyte differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Elevated cAMP activates both PKA and Epac. → PKA activates CREB transcriptional factor and Epac activates PI3K/Akt pathway via Rap1. → Akt modulates PPAR-γ transcriptional activity in concert with CREB. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) is required for the conversion of pre-adipocytes. However, the mechanism underlying activation of PPAR-γ is unclear. Here we showed that cAMP-induced activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and Akt is essential for the transcriptional activation of PPAR-γ. Hormonal induction of adipogenesis was blocked by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002), by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (H89), and by a Rap1 inhibitor (GGTI-298). Transcriptional activity of PPAR-γ was markedly enhanced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), but not insulin and dexamethasone. In addition, IBMX-induced PPAR-γ transcriptional activity was blocked by PI3K/Akt, PKA, or Rap1 inhibitors. 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl-cAMP (8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP) which is a specific agonist for exchanger protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) significantly induced the activation of Akt. Furthermore, knock-down of Akt1 markedly attenuated PPAR-γ transcriptional activity. These results indicate that both PKA and Akt signaling pathways are required for transcriptional activation of PPAR-γ, suggesting post-translational activation of PPAR-γ might be critical step for adipogenic gene expression.

  9. TtsI, a key regulator of Rhizobium species NGR234 is required for type III-dependent protein secretion and synthesis of rhamnose-rich polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Corinne; Deakin, William J; Ojanen-Reuhs, Tuula; Diallo, Ericka; Reuhs, Brad; Broughton, William J; Perret, Xavier

    2004-09-01

    Formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on legume roots by Rhizobium sp. NGR234 requires an array of bacterial factors, including nodulation outer proteins (Nops) secreted through a type III secretion system (TTSS). Secretion of Nops is abolished upon inactivation of ttsI (formerly y4xI), a protein with characteristics of two-component response regulators that was predicted to activate transcription of TTSS-related genes. During the symbiotic interaction, the phenotype of NGR omega ttsI differs from that of a mutant with a nonfunctional secretion machine, however. This indicated that TtsI regulates the synthesis of other symbiotic factors as well. Conserved sequences, called tts boxes, proposed to act as binding sites for TtsI, were identified not only within the TTSS cluster but also in the promoter regions of i) genes predicted to encode homologs of virulence factors secreted by pathogenic bacteria, ii) loci involved in the synthesis of a rhamnose-rich component (rhamnan) of the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and iii) open reading frames that play roles in plasmid partitioning. Transcription studies showed that TtsI and tts boxes are required for the activation of TTSS-related genes and those involved in rhamnose synthesis. Furthermore, extraction of polysaccharides revealed that inactivation of ttsI abolishes the synthesis of the rhamnan component of the LPS. The phenotypes of mutants impaired in TTSS-dependent protein secretion, rhamnan synthesis, or in both functions were compared to assess the roles of some of the TtsI-controlled factors during symbiosis.

  10. Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is required for bone calcification in MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kaya; Okamura, Hirohiko; Amorim, Bruna Rabelo; Ozaki, Akiko; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2005-11-15

    In this study, we demonstrated that double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is required for the calcification of osteoblasts via the signal transducers and activators of transcription 1alpha (STAT1alpha) signaling in vitro. A dominant-negative mutant PKR cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine and which does not have catalytic activity, was transfected into mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells; thereby, we established cells that stably expressed the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the mutant cells. The PKR-K/R mutant cells exhibited up-regulated cell growth and had low alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. The PKR-K/R mutant cells were not able to form bone nodules in vitro. In the PKR-K/R mutant cells, runt-related gene 2 (Runx2)-mediated transcription decreased compared with the levels in the control cells. The expression of STAT1alpha protein increased and the protein was translocated to the nucleus in the PKR-K/R mutant cells. When the expression of STAT1alpha protein in PKR mutant cells was suppressed using RNAi, the activity of Runx2-mediated transcription recovered to the control level. Our results indicate that PKR is a stimulator of Runx2 transcription and is a negative modulator of STAT1alpha expression. Our findings also suggest that PKR plays important roles in the differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts by modulating STAT1alpha and/or Runx2 expression. PMID:16216244

  11. Retinoblastoma protein (pRb), but not p107 or p130, is required for maintenance of enterocyte quiescence and differentiation in small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Longshore, Shannon; Nair, Rajalakshmi; Warner, Brad W

    2009-01-01

    The function of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in the regulation of small intestine epithelial cell homeostasis has been challenged by several groups using various promoter-based Cre transgenic mouse lines. Interestingly, different pRb deletion systems yield dramatically disparate small intestinal phenotypes. These findings confound the function of pRb in this dynamic tissue. In this study, Villin-Cre transgenic mice were crossed with Rb (flox/flox) mice to conditionally delete pRb protein in small intestine enterocytes. We discovered a novel hyperplasia phenotype as well as ectopic cell cycle reentry within villus enterocytes in the small intestine. This phenotype was not seen in other pRb family member (p107 or p130) null mice. Using a newly developed crypt/villus isolation method, we uncovered that expression of pRb was undetectable, whereas proliferating cell nuclear antigen, p107, cyclin E, cyclin D3, Cdk2, and Cdc2 were dramatically increased in pRb-deficient villus cells. Cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin D2, and Cdk4/6 expression was not affected by absent pRb expression. pRb-deficient villus cells appeared capable of progressing to mitosis but with higher rates of apoptosis. However, the cycling villus enterocytes were not completely differentiated as gauged by significant reduction of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein expression. In summary, pRb, but not p107 or p130, is required for maintaining the postmitotic villus cell in quiescence, governing the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, and completing of absorptive enterocyte differentiation in the small intestine.

  12. The MTL1 Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Required for Both Translation and Splicing of the Mitochondrial NADH DEHYDROGENASE SUBUNIT7 mRNA in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïli, Nawel; Planchard, Noelya; Arnal, Nadège; Quadrado, Martine; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Dahan, Jennifer; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; Mireau, Hakim

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial translation involves a complex interplay of ancient bacteria-like features and host-derived functionalities. Although the basic components of the mitochondrial translation apparatus have been recognized, very few protein factors aiding in recruiting ribosomes on mitochondria-encoded messenger RNA (mRNAs) have been identified in higher plants. In this study, we describe the identification of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MITOCHONDRIAL TRANSLATION FACTOR1 (MTL1) protein, a new member of the Pentatricopeptide Repeat family, and show that it is essential for the translation of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit7 (nad7) mRNA. We demonstrate that mtl1 mutant plants fail to accumulate the Nad7 protein, even though the nad7 mature mRNA is produced and bears the same 5' and 3' extremities as in wild-type plants. We next observed that polysome association of nad7 mature mRNA is specifically disrupted in mtl1 mutants, indicating that the absence of Nad7 results from a lack of translation of nad7 mRNA. These findings illustrate that mitochondrial translation requires the intervention of gene-specific nucleus-encoded PPR trans-factors and that their action does not necessarily involve the 5' processing of their target mRNA, as observed previously. Interestingly, a partial decrease in nad7 intron 2 splicing was also detected in mtl1 mutants, suggesting that MTL1 is also involved in group II intron splicing. However, this second function appears to be less essential for nad7 expression than its role in translation. MTL1 will be instrumental to understand the multifunctionality of PPR proteins and the mechanisms governing mRNA translation and intron splicing in plant mitochondria. PMID:26537562

  13. Optimum dietary crude protein requirement for juvenile cachama Piaractus brachypomus Exigência ótima de proteína bruta para juvenis de pirapitinga, Piaractus brachypomus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wálter Vásquez-Torres

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A growth experiment was conducted to determine the optimal dietary protein requirement for juvenile cachama, Piaractus brachypomus. Six semi-purified isoenergetic experimental diets using casein and gelatin as protein sources were formulated to contain graded levels of protein (16, 20, 24, 28, 32 and 36%. Fish initially averaging 15.52±0.33g (mean±SD were randomly distributed into the tanks (500L as groups of 20 fish and fed to apparent satiation twice daily for 60 days. The results showed that feed consumption, feed conversion ratio, fish weight gain, specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio and protein productive value were affected by dietary protein level (PO presente experimento foi realizado para determinar o requerimento ótimo de proteína em dietas para juvenis de pirapitinga, Piaractus brachypomus. Foram formuladas seis dietas experimentais semi-purificadas, iso-energéticas e com diferentes níveis de proteína (16, 20, 24, 28, 32 e 36% de PB usando caseína e gelatina como fontes de proteína. Os peixes com peso inicial 15,52±0,33g (média±SD foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em grupos de 20 animais por tanque; foram alimentados durante 60 dias, duas vezes/dia até aparente saciedade. Os resultados mostraram que o consumo de alimento, taxa de conversão de alimento, ganho de peso, taxa de crescimento específico, taxa de eficiência de proteína e valores produtivos da proteína e da energia foram significativamente afetados pelos níveis de proteína das dietas (P<0,05. Não foram observadas diferenças significativas na composição proximal da carcaça (P<0,05 entre tratamentos. A análise do ganho de peso em função dos níveis de proteína da dieta, realizada utilizando regressão polinomial de segundo grau, deu um requerimento de 31,6% de proteína para ótimo crescimento de juvenis de pirapitinga.

  14. Loss of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP3K4 reveals a requirement for MAPK signalling in mouse sex determination.

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    Debora Bogani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination in mammals is controlled by the presence or absence of the Y-linked gene SRY. In the developing male (XY gonad, sex-determining region of the Y (SRY protein acts to up-regulate expression of the related gene, SOX9, a transcriptional regulator that in turn initiates a downstream pathway of testis development, whilst also suppressing ovary development. Despite the requirement for a number of transcription factors and secreted signalling molecules in sex determination, intracellular signalling components functioning in this process have not been defined. Here we report a role for the phylogenetically ancient mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signalling pathway in mouse sex determination. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified the recessive boygirl (byg mutation. On the C57BL/6J background, embryos homozygous for byg exhibit consistent XY gonadal sex reversal. The byg mutation is an A to T transversion causing a premature stop codon in the gene encoding MAP3K4 (also known as MEKK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase. Analysis of XY byg/byg gonads at 11.5 d post coitum reveals a growth deficit and a failure to support mesonephric cell migration, both early cellular processes normally associated with testis development. Expression analysis of mutant XY gonads at the same stage also reveals a dramatic reduction in Sox9 and, crucially, Sry at the transcript and protein levels. Moreover, we describe experiments showing the presence of activated MKK4, a direct target of MAP3K4, and activated p38 in the coelomic region of the XY gonad at 11.5 d post coitum, establishing a link between MAPK signalling in proliferating gonadal somatic cells and regulation of Sry expression. Finally, we provide evidence that haploinsufficiency for Map3k4 accounts for T-associated sex reversal (Tas. These data demonstrate that MAP3K4-dependent signalling events are required for normal expression of Sry during testis development, and

  15. Simultaneous mutations in multi-viral proteins are required for soybean mosaic virus to gain virulence on soybean genotypes carrying different R genes.

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    R V Chowda-Reddy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic resistance is the most effective and sustainable approach to the control of plant pathogens that are a major constraint to agriculture worldwide. In soybean, three dominant R genes, i.e., Rsv1, Rsv3 and Rsv4, have been identified and deployed against Soybean mosaic virus (SMV with strain-specificities. Molecular identification of virulent determinants of SMV on these resistance genes will provide essential information for the proper utilization of these resistance genes to protect soybean against SMV, and advance knowledge of virus-host interactions in general. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study the gain and loss of SMV virulence on all the three resistance loci, SMV strains G7 and two G2 isolates L and LRB were used as parental viruses. SMV chimeras and mutants were created by partial genome swapping and point mutagenesis and then assessed for virulence on soybean cultivars PI96983 (Rsv1, L-29 (Rsv3, V94-5152 (Rsv4 and Williams 82 (rsv. It was found that P3 played an essential role in virulence determination on all three resistance loci and CI was required for virulence on Rsv1- and Rsv3-genotype soybeans. In addition, essential mutations in HC-Pro were also required for the gain of virulence on Rsv1-genotype soybean. To our best knowledge, this is the first report that CI and P3 are involved in virulence on Rsv1- and Rsv3-mediated resistance, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Multiple viral proteins, i.e., HC-Pro, P3 and CI, are involved in virulence on the three resistance loci and simultaneous mutations at essential positions of different viral proteins are required for an avirulent SMV strain to gain virulence on all three resistance loci. The likelihood of such mutations occurring naturally and concurrently on multiple viral proteins is low. Thus, incorporation of all three resistance genes in a soybean cultivar through gene pyramiding may provide durable resistance to SMV.

  16. Feasibility and efficacy of an isocaloric high-protein vs. standard diet on insulin requirement, body weight and metabolic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes on insulin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luger, M; Holstein, B; Schindler, K;

    2013-01-01

    To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a high-protein diet compared with a standard diet aiming for weight maintenance in insulin treated type-2 diabetic patients on insulin requirement, body weight and metabolic parameters over 12 weeks.......To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a high-protein diet compared with a standard diet aiming for weight maintenance in insulin treated type-2 diabetic patients on insulin requirement, body weight and metabolic parameters over 12 weeks....

  17. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Issatchenkia orientalis GPI-Anchored Protein, IoGas1, Required for Resistance to Low pH and Salt Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Negi, Kanako; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    The use of yeasts tolerant to acid (low pH) and salt stress is of industrial importance for several bioproduction processes. To identify new candidate genes having potential roles in low-pH tolerance, we screened an expression genomic DNA library of a multiple-stress-tolerant yeast, Issatchenkia orientalis (Pichia kudriavzevii), for clones that allowed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to grow under highly acidic conditions (pH 2.0). A genomic DNA clone containing two putative open reading frames was obtained, of which the putative protein-coding gene comprising 1629 bp was retransformed into the host. This transformant grew significantly at pH 2.0, and at pH 2.5 in the presence of 7.5% Na2SO4. The predicted amino acid sequence of this new gene, named I. orientalis GAS1 (IoGAS1), was 60% identical to the S. cerevisiae Gas1 protein, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein essential for maintaining cell wall integrity, and 58-59% identical to Candida albicans Phr1 and Phr2, pH-responsive proteins implicated in cell wall assembly and virulence. Northern hybridization analyses indicated that, as for the C. albicans homologs, IoGAS1 expression was pH-dependent, with expression increasing with decreasing pH (from 4.0 to 2.0) of the medium. These results suggest that IoGAS1 represents a novel pH-regulated system required for the adaptation of I. orientalis to environments of diverse pH. Heterologous expression of IoGAS1 complemented the growth and morphological defects of a S. cerevisiae gas1Δ mutant, demonstrating that IoGAS1 and the corresponding S. cerevisiae gene play similar roles in cell wall biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that two conserved glutamate residues (E161 and E262) in the IoGas1 protein play a crucial role in yeast morphogenesis and tolerance to low pH and salt stress. Furthermore, overexpression of IoGAS1 in S. cerevisiae remarkably improved the ethanol fermentation ability at pH 2.5, and at pH 2.0 in the presence of

  18. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Issatchenkia orientalis GPI-Anchored Protein, IoGas1, Required for Resistance to Low pH and Salt Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Negi, Kanako; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    The use of yeasts tolerant to acid (low pH) and salt stress is of industrial importance for several bioproduction processes. To identify new candidate genes having potential roles in low-pH tolerance, we screened an expression genomic DNA library of a multiple-stress-tolerant yeast, Issatchenkia orientalis (Pichia kudriavzevii), for clones that allowed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to grow under highly acidic conditions (pH 2.0). A genomic DNA clone containing two putative open reading frames was obtained, of which the putative protein-coding gene comprising 1629 bp was retransformed into the host. This transformant grew significantly at pH 2.0, and at pH 2.5 in the presence of 7.5% Na2SO4. The predicted amino acid sequence of this new gene, named I. orientalis GAS1 (IoGAS1), was 60% identical to the S. cerevisiae Gas1 protein, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein essential for maintaining cell wall integrity, and 58–59% identical to Candida albicans Phr1 and Phr2, pH-responsive proteins implicated in cell wall assembly and virulence. Northern hybridization analyses indicated that, as for the C. albicans homologs, IoGAS1 expression was pH-dependent, with expression increasing with decreasing pH (from 4.0 to 2.0) of the medium. These results suggest that IoGAS1 represents a novel pH-regulated system required for the adaptation of I. orientalis to environments of diverse pH. Heterologous expression of IoGAS1 complemented the growth and morphological defects of a S. cerevisiae gas1Δ mutant, demonstrating that IoGAS1 and the corresponding S. cerevisiae gene play similar roles in cell wall biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that two conserved glutamate residues (E161 and E262) in the IoGas1 protein play a crucial role in yeast morphogenesis and tolerance to low pH and salt stress. Furthermore, overexpression of IoGAS1 in S. cerevisiae remarkably improved the ethanol fermentation ability at pH 2.5, and at pH 2.0 in the presence of

  19. 陕北白绒山羊羯羊能量和蛋白质需要量%Energy and Protein Requirements of Shanbei White Cashmere Wether Goats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高晔; 李碧波; 黄帅; 王荣斌; 王冬; 李琴芳; 屈雷

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the requirements of energy and protein of Shanbei white cashmere wether goats so as to provide data for establishing them.Thirty-six healthy one-year-old Shan-bei white cashmere wether goats with similar body weight were randomly divided into 9 groups according to a 3×3 ( energy×protein) completely random experiment design, and each group had 4 replicates with 1 goat per replicate.digestible energy (DE) level in diet was formulated at 100%, 110%and 120%of NRC (1981) rec-ommendation, respectively; and crude protein ( CP) level was formulated at 90%, 110%and 130%of NRC (1981) recommendation, respectively.The pretest lasted for 7 days, and the test lasted for 46 days.The re-sults showed as follows:1) energy level in diet had extremely significant effects on dry matter intake ( DMI) and average daily gain ( ADG) ( P<0.01) , and protein level significantly affected DMI ( P<0.05);there was significant interaction on DMI between energy and protein levels in diet ( P<0.05).2) Digestible nitrogen ( N) in low energy group was significantly lower than that in medium and high energy groups ( P<0.05); N intake, digestible N, retained N, N apparent digestibility in low protein group were extremely lower than those of medium and high protein groups ( P<0.01) .3) Gross energy ( GE) digestibility and metabolic rate were extremely significantly increased with energy level improving ( P<0.01 ); metabolic rates of GE and DE in high protein group were significantly lower than these in low protein group ( P<0.05); There was significant interactions of energy×protein on GE digestibility, GE metabolic rate and DE metabolic rate ( P<0.05 or P<0.01) .We establish regression equations of energy and protein requirement of one-year-old Shanbei white cashmere wether goats, the proper range of DE and ME levels in diet are 8.80 to 10.61 MJ/kg and 7.34 to 8.76 MJ/kg, respectively, and the appropriate CP and digestible CP levels are 10.00%and 7

  20. The coiled-coil domain containing protein CCDC151 is required for the function of IFT-dependent motile cilia in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerber, Julie; Baas, Dominique; Soulavie, Fabien; Chhin, Brigitte; Cortier, Elisabeth; Vesque, Christine; Thomas, Joëlle; Durand, Bénédicte

    2014-02-01

    Cilia are evolutionarily conserved organelles endowed with essential physiological and developmental functions. In humans, disruption of cilia motility or signaling leads to complex pleiotropic genetic disorders called ciliopathies. Cilia motility requires the assembly of multi-subunit motile components such as dynein arms, but mechanisms underlying their assembly pathway and transport into the axoneme are still largely unknown. We identified a previously uncharacterized coiled-coil domain containing protein CCDC151, which is evolutionarily conserved in motile ciliated species and shares ancient features with the outer dynein arm-docking complex 2 of Chlamydomonas. In Drosophila, we show that CG14127/CCDC151 is associated with motile intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent cilia and required for geotaxis behavior of adult flies. In zebrafish, Ccdc151 is expressed in tissues with motile cilia, and morpholino-induced depletion of Ccdc151 leads to left-right asymmetry defects and kidney cysts. We demonstrate that Ccdc151 is required for proper motile function of cilia in the Kupffer's vesicle and in the pronephros by controlling dynein arm assembly, showing that Ccdc151 is a novel player in the control of IFT-dependent dynein arm assembly in animals. However, we observed that CCDC151 is also implicated in other cellular functions in vertebrates. In zebrafish, ccdc151 is involved in proper orientation of cell divisions in the pronephros and genetically interacts with prickle1 in this process. Furthermore, knockdown experiments in mammalian cells demonstrate that CCDC151 is implicated in the regulation of primary cilium length. Hence, CCDC151 is required for motile cilia function in animals but has acquired additional non-motile functions in vertebrates.

  1. Sperm surface protein PH-20 is bifunctional: one activity is a hyaluronidase and a second, distinct activity is required in secondary sperm-zona binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, G R; Primakoff, P; Myles, D G

    1996-07-01

    In previous studies, we have found that the sperm membrane protein PH-20 acts during two different stages of fertilization. On acrosome-intact sperm, PH-20 has a hyaluronidase activity that is required for sperm penetration through the cumulus cell layer that surrounds the oocyte. On acrosome-reacted sperm, PH-20 has a required function in sperm-zona binding (secondary binding). Because hyaluronic acid (HA) has been detected in the zona pellucida, secondary sperm-zona adhesion could depend on repetitive binding and hydrolysis of HA by PH-20 acting as a hyaluronidase. Alternatively, PH-20 may be bifunctional and have a second, different activity required for secondary binding. To distinguish between these two possibilities, in this study we used reagents that inhibit either PH-20's function in sperm-zona binding or its hyaluronidase activity. We found that an anti-PH-20 monoclonal antibody that inhibited sperm-zona binding (approximately 90%) had no effect on hyaluronidase activity. Conversely, apigenin, a hyaluronidase inhibitor, blocked PH-20 hyaluronidase activity 93% without inhibiting sperm-zona binding. Similarly, another anti-PH-20 monoclonal antibody that inhibited hyaluronidase activity 95% only partially inhibited sperm-zona binding (approximately 45%). We also extensively pretreated oocytes with hyaluronidase to remove all accessible HA on or in the zona pellucida and found little or no effect on secondary sperm-zona binding. Our results suggest that PH-20 is bifunctional and has two activities: a hyaluronidase activity and a second, separate activity required for secondary sperm-zona binding. PMID:8793062

  2. The pepper GNA-related lectin and PAN domain protein gene, CaGLP1, is required for plant cell death and defense signaling during bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-12-01

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins, commonly referred to as lectins or agglutinins, function in defense responses to microbial pathogens. Pepper (Capsicum annuum) GNA-related lectin and PAN-domain protein gene CaGLP1 was isolated and functionally characterized from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaGLP1 contained an amine-terminus prokaryotic membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site, a Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin domain responsible for the recognition of high-mannose N-glycans, and a carboxyl-terminus PAN/apple domain. RNA gel blot and immunoblot analyses determined that CaGLP1 was strongly induced in pepper by compatible and incompatible Xcv infection. CaGLP1 protein localized primarily to the plasma membrane and exhibited mannose-binding specificity. CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants were more susceptible to compatible or incompatible Xcv infection compared with that of non-silenced control plants. CaGLP1 silencing in pepper leaves did not accumulate H2O2 and induce cell death during incompatible Xcv infection. Defense-related CaDEF1 (defensin) gene expression was significantly reduced in CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants. CaGLP1-overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Defense-related AtPDF1.2 expression was elevated in CaGLP1-overexpression lines. Together, these results suggest that CaGLP1 is required for plant cell death and defense responses through the reactive oxygen species burst and downstream defense-related gene expression in response to bacterial pathogen challenge.

  3. Two major cuticular proteins are required for assembly of horizontal laminae and vertical pore canals in rigid cuticle of Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Mi Young; Kramer, Karl J; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Kanost, Michael R; Beeman, Richard W; Arakane, Yasuyuki

    2014-10-01

    The insect exoskeleton is composed of cuticle primarily formed from structural cuticular proteins (CPs) and the polysaccharide chitin. Two CPs, TcCPR27 and TcCPR18, are major proteins present in the elytron (highly sclerotized and pigmented modified forewing) as well as the pronotum (dorsal sclerite of the prothorax) and ventral abdominal cuticle of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Both CPs belong to the CPR family, which includes proteins that have an amino acid sequence motif known as the Rebers & Riddiford (R&R) consensus sequence. Injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for TcCPR27 and TcCPR18 resulted in insects with shorter, wrinkled, warped and less rigid elytra than those from control insects. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the roles of CPs in cuticle assembly, we analyzed for the precise localization of TcCPR27 and the ultrastructural architecture of cuticle in TcCPR27- and TcCPR18-deficient elytra. Transmission electron microscopic analysis combined with immunodetection using gold-labeled secondary antibody revealed that TcCPR27 is present in dorsal elytral procuticle both in the horizontal laminae and in vertical pore canals. dsRNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) of TcCPR27 resulted in abnormal electron-lucent laminae and pore canals in elytra except for the boundary between these two structures in which electron-dense molecule(s) apparently accumulated. Insects subjected to RNAi for TcCPR18 also had disorganized laminae and pore canals in the procuticle of elytra. Similar ultrastructural defects were also observed in other body wall regions with rigid cuticle such as the thorax and legs of adult T. castaneum. TcCPR27 and TcCPR18 are required for proper formation of the horizontal chitinous laminae and vertical pore canals that are critical for formation and stabilization of rigid adult cuticle.

  4. A viral nuclear noncoding RNA binds re-localized poly(A binding protein and is required for late KSHV gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Borah

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available During the lytic phase of infection, the gamma herpesvirus Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV expresses a highly abundant, 1.1 kb nuclear noncoding RNA of unknown function. We observe that this polyadenylated nuclear (PAN RNA avidly binds host poly(A-binding protein C1 (PABPC1, which normally functions in the cytoplasm to bind the poly(A tails of mRNAs, regulating mRNA stability and translation efficiency. During the lytic phase of KSHV infection, PABPC1 is re-localized to the nucleus as a consequence of expression of the viral shutoff exonuclease (SOX protein; SOX also mediates the host shutoff effect in which host mRNAs are downregulated while viral mRNAs are selectively expressed. We show that whereas PAN RNA is not required for the host shutoff effect or for PABPC1 re-localization, SOX strongly upregulates the levels of PAN RNA in transient transfection experiments. This upregulation is destroyed by the same SOX mutation that ablates the host shutoff effect and PABPC1 nuclear re-localization or by removal of the poly(A tail of PAN. In cells induced into the KSHV lytic phase, depletion of PAN RNA using RNase H-targeting antisense oligonucleotides reveals that it is necessary for the production of late viral proteins from mRNAs that are themselves polyadenylated. Our results add to the repertoire of functions ascribed to long noncoding RNAs and suggest a mechanism of action for nuclear noncoding RNAs in gamma herpesvirus infection.

  5. Intravital Imaging of Vascular Transmigration by the Lyme Spirochete: Requirement for the Integrin Binding Residues of the B. burgdorferi P66 Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vascular extravasation, a key step in systemic infection by hematogenous microbial pathogens, is poorly understood, but has been postulated to encompass features similar to vascular transmigration by leukocytes. The Lyme disease spirochete can cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including arthritis, upon hematogenous dissemination. This pathogen encodes numerous surface adhesive proteins (adhesins that may promote extravasation, but none have yet been implicated in this process. In this work we report the novel use of intravital microscopy of the peripheral knee vasculature to study transmigration of the Lyme spirochete in living Cd1d-/-mice. In the absence of iNKT cells, major immune modulators in the mouse joint, spirochetes that have extravasated into joint-proximal tissue remain in the local milieu and can be enumerated accurately. We show that BBK32, a fibronectin and glycosaminoglycan adhesin of B. burgdorferi involved in early steps of endothelial adhesion, is not required for extravasation from the peripheral knee vasculature. In contrast, almost no transmigration occurs in the absence of P66, an outer membrane protein that has porin and integrin adhesin functions. Importantly, P66 mutants specifically defective in integrin binding were incapable of promoting extravasation. P66 itself does not promote detectable microvascular interactions, suggesting that vascular adhesion of B. burgdorferi mediated by other adhesins, sets the stage for P66-integrin interactions leading to transmigration. Although integrin-binding proteins with diverse functions are encoded by a variety of bacterial pathogens, P66 is the first to have a documented and direct role in vascular transmigration. The emerging picture of vascular escape by the Lyme spirochete shows similarities, but distinct differences from leukocyte transmigration.

  6. Detection of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport in Entamoeba histolytica and Characterization of the EhVps4 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel López-Reyes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic endocytosis involves multivesicular bodies formation, which is driven by endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT. Here, we showed the presence and expression of homologous ESCRT genes in Entamoeba histolytica. We cloned and expressed the Ehvps4 gene, an ESCRT member, to obtain the recombinant EhVps4 and generate specific antibodies, which immunodetected EhVps4 in cytoplasm of trophozoites. Bioinformatics and biochemical studies evidenced that rEhVps4 is an ATPase, whose activity depends on the conserved E211 residue. Next, we generated trophozoites overexpressing EhVps4 and mutant EhVps4-E211Q FLAG-tagged proteins. The EhVps4-FLAG was located in cytosol and at plasma membrane, whereas the EhVps4-E211Q-FLAG was detected as abundant cytoplasmic dots in trophozoites. Erythrophagocytosis, cytopathic activity, and hepatic damage in hamsters were not improved in trophozoites overexpressing EhVps4-FLAG. In contrast, EhVps4-E211Q-FLAG protein overexpression impaired these properties. The localization of EhVps4-FLAG around ingested erythrocytes, together with our previous results, strengthens the role for EhVps4 in E. histolytica phagocytosis and virulence.

  7. Autophagy-Associated Protein SmATG12 Is Required for Fruiting-Body Formation in the Filamentous Ascomycete Sordaria macrospora.

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    Antonia Werner

    Full Text Available In filamentous fungi, autophagy functions as a catabolic mechanism to overcome starvation and to control diverse developmental processes under normal nutritional conditions. Autophagy involves the formation of double-membrane vesicles, termed autophagosomes that engulf cellular components and bring about their degradation via fusion with vacuoles. Two ubiquitin-like (UBL conjugation systems are essential for the expansion of the autophagosomal membrane: the UBL protein ATG8 is conjugated to the lipid phosphatidylethanolamine and the UBL protein ATG12 is coupled to ATG5. We recently showed that in the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria macrospora autophagy-related genes encoding components of the conjugation systems are required for fruiting-body development and/or are essential for viability. In the present work, we cloned and characterized the S. macrospora (Smatg12 gene. Two-hybrid analysis revealed that SmATG12 can interact with SmATG7 and SmATG3. To examine its role in S. macrospora, we replaced the open reading frame of Smatg12 with a hygromycin resistance cassette and generated a homokaryotic ΔSmatg12 knockout strain, which displayed slower vegetative growth under nutrient starvation conditions and was unable to form fruiting bodies. In the hyphae of S. macrospora EGFP-labeled SmATG12 was detected in the cytoplasm and as punctate structures presumed to be phagophores or phagophore assembly sites. Delivery of EGFP-labelled SmATG8 to the vacuole was entirely dependent on SmATG12.

  8. VPS29 is not an active metallo-phosphatase but is a rigid scaffold required for retromer interaction with accessory proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Swarbrick

    Full Text Available VPS29 is a key component of the cargo-binding core complex of retromer, a protein assembly with diverse roles in transport of receptors within the endosomal system. VPS29 has a fold related to metal-binding phosphatases and mediates interactions between retromer and other regulatory proteins. In this study we examine the functional interactions of mammalian VPS29, using X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. We find that although VPS29 can coordinate metal ions Mn(2+ and Zn(2+ in both the putative active site and at other locations, the affinity for metals is low, and lack of activity in phosphatase assays using a putative peptide substrate support the conclusion that VPS29 is not a functional metalloenzyme. There is evidence that structural elements of VPS29 critical for binding the retromer subunit VPS35 may undergo both metal-dependent and independent conformational changes regulating complex formation, however studies using ITC and NMR residual dipolar coupling (RDC measurements show that this is not the case. Finally, NMR chemical shift mapping indicates that VPS29 is able to associate with SNX1 via a conserved hydrophobic surface, but with a low affinity that suggests additional interactions will be required to stabilise the complex in vivo. Our conclusion is that VPS29 is a metal ion-independent, rigid scaffolding domain, which is essential but not sufficient for incorporation of retromer into functional endosomal transport assemblies.

  9. Cleavage of the HPV16 Minor Capsid Protein L2 during Virion Morphogenesis Ablates the Requirement for Cellular Furin during De Novo Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Cruz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Infections by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV are the causative agents for the development of cervical cancer. As with other non-enveloped viruses, HPVs are taken up by the cell through endocytosis following primary attachment to the host cell. Through studies using recombinant pseudovirus particles (PsV, many host cellular proteins have been implicated in the process. The proprotein convertase furin has been demonstrated to cleave the minor capsid protein, L2, post-attachment to host cells and is required for infectious entry by HPV16 PsV. In contrast, using biochemical inhibition by a furin inhibitor and furin-negative cells, we show that tissue-derived HPV16 native virus (NV initiates infection independent of cellular furin. We show that HPV16 L2 is cleaved during virion morphogenesis in differentiated tissue. In addition, HPV45 is also not dependent on cellular furin, but two other alpha papillomaviruses, HPV18 and HPV31, are dependent on the activity of cellular furin for infection.

  10. Attenuation of the suppressive activity of cellular splicing factor SRSF3 by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is required for RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Lu, Mathew; Li, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator essential for viral gene expression during KSHV lytic infection. ORF57 requires interactions with various cellular proteins for its function. Here, we identified serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3, formerly known as SRp20) as a cellular cofactor involved in ORF57-mediated splicing of KSHV K8β RNA. In the absence of ORF57, SRSF3 binds to a suboptimal K8β intron and inhibits K8β splicing. Knockdown of SRSF3 promotes K8β splicing, mimicking the effect of ORF57. The N-terminal half of ORF57 binds to the RNA recognition motif of SRSF3, which prevents SRSF3 from associating with the K8β intron RNA and therefore attenuates the suppressive effect of SRSF3 on K8β splicing. ORF57 also promotes splicing of heterologous non-KSHV transcripts that are negatively regulated by SRSF3, indicating that the effect of ORF57 on SRSF3 activity is independent of RNA target. SPEN proteins, previously identified as ORF57-interacting partners, suppress ORF57 splicing activity by displacing ORF57 from SRSF3-RNA complexes. In summary, we have identified modulation of SRSF3 activity as the molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes RNA splicing.

  11. Interaction between Escherichia coli DNA polymerase IV and single-stranded DNA-binding protein is required for DNA synthesis on SSB-coated DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukohri, Asako; Nishikawa, Yoshito; Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi; Maki, Hisaji

    2012-07-01

    DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) is one of three translesion polymerases in Escherichia coli. A mass spectrometry study revealed that single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) in lysates prepared from exponentially-growing cells has a strong affinity for column-immobilized Pol IV. We found that purified SSB binds directly to Pol IV in a pull-down assay, whereas SSBΔC8, a mutant protein lacking the C-terminal tail, failed to interact with Pol IV. These results show that the interaction between Pol IV and SSB is mediated by the C-terminal tail of SSB. When polymerase activity was tested on an SSBΔC8-coated template, we observed a strong inhibition of Pol IV activity. Competition experiments using a synthetic peptide containing the amino acid sequence of SSB tail revealed that the chain-elongating capacity of Pol IV was greatly impaired when the interaction between Pol IV and SSB tail was inhibited. These results demonstrate that Pol IV requires the interaction with the C-terminal tail of SSB to replicate DNA efficiently when the template ssDNA is covered with SSB. We speculate that at the primer/template junction, Pol IV interacts with the tail of the nearest SSB tetramer on the template, and that this interaction allows the polymerase to travel along the template while disassembling SSB.

  12. Autophagy-Associated Protein SmATG12 Is Required for Fruiting-Body Formation in the Filamentous Ascomycete Sordaria macrospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Antonia; Herzog, Britta; Frey, Stefan; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    In filamentous fungi, autophagy functions as a catabolic mechanism to overcome starvation and to control diverse developmental processes under normal nutritional conditions. Autophagy involves the formation of double-membrane vesicles, termed autophagosomes that engulf cellular components and bring about their degradation via fusion with vacuoles. Two ubiquitin-like (UBL) conjugation systems are essential for the expansion of the autophagosomal membrane: the UBL protein ATG8 is conjugated to the lipid phosphatidylethanolamine and the UBL protein ATG12 is coupled to ATG5. We recently showed that in the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria macrospora autophagy-related genes encoding components of the conjugation systems are required for fruiting-body development and/or are essential for viability. In the present work, we cloned and characterized the S. macrospora (Sm)atg12 gene. Two-hybrid analysis revealed that SmATG12 can interact with SmATG7 and SmATG3. To examine its role in S. macrospora, we replaced the open reading frame of Smatg12 with a hygromycin resistance cassette and generated a homokaryotic ΔSmatg12 knockout strain, which displayed slower vegetative growth under nutrient starvation conditions and was unable to form fruiting bodies. In the hyphae of S. macrospora EGFP-labeled SmATG12 was detected in the cytoplasm and as punctate structures presumed to be phagophores or phagophore assembly sites. Delivery of EGFP-labelled SmATG8 to the vacuole was entirely dependent on SmATG12. PMID:27309377

  13. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide–sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptors Required for Late Endosome–Lysosome and Homotypic Lysosome Fusion in Alveolar Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Diane McVey; Pevsner, Jonathan; Scullion, Matthew A.; Vaughn, Michael; Kaplan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome–lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome–lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome–lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome–lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages. PMID:10888671

  14. Suppression of RNA silencing by a plant DNA virus satellite requires a host calmodulin-like protein to repress RDR6 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, RNA silencing plays a key role in antiviral defense. To counteract host defense, plant viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs that target different effector molecules in the RNA silencing pathway. Evidence has shown that plants also encode endogenous suppressors of RNA silencing (ESRs that function in proper regulation of RNA silencing. The possibility that these cellular proteins can be subverted by viruses to thwart host defense is intriguing but has not been fully explored. Here we report that the Nicotiana benthamiana calmodulin-like protein Nbrgs-CaM is required for the functions of the VSR βC1, the sole protein encoded by the DNA satellite associated with the geminivirus Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV. Nbrgs-CaM expression is up-regulated by the βC1. Transgenic plants over-expressing Nbrgs-CaM displayed developmental abnormities reminiscent of βC1-associated morphological alterations. Nbrgs-CaM suppressed RNA silencing in an Agrobacterium infiltration assay and, when over-expressed, blocked TYLCCNV-induced gene silencing. Genetic evidence showed that Nbrgs-CaM mediated the βC1 functions in silencing suppression and symptom modulation, and was required for efficient virus infection. Moreover, the tobacco and tomato orthologs of Nbrgs-CaM also possessed ESR activity, and were induced by betasatellite to promote virus infection in these Solanaceae hosts. We further demonstrated that βC1-induced Nbrgs-CaM suppressed the production of secondary siRNAs, likely through repressing RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 (RDR6 expression. RDR6-deficient N. benthamiana plants were defective in antiviral response and were hypersensitive to TYLCCNV infection. More significantly, TYLCCNV could overcome host range restrictions to infect Arabidopsis thaliana when the plants carried a RDR6 mutation. These findings demonstrate a distinct mechanism of VSR for suppressing PTGS through usurpation of a host ESR, and

  15. 海南黑山羊生长期的能量与蛋白质需要量%Energy and Protein Requirements of Growing Hainan Black Goats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周汉林; 李茂; 字学娟; 徐铁山; 蒋昌顺

    2009-01-01

    Twelve growing waning Hainan Black goats at the age of 4 months were selected for experiments and fed by using the feeding and digestion methods to observe their requirements for energy and protein,and their metabolism. The goats were divided into 4 groups and a 4×4 Latin design was arranged. Diets with 4 ratios of energy to nitrogen,i.e. high energy high N,low energy high N,high energy low N,low energy low N,were prepared according to Keral I.C. (1982) who recommended the nutrient requirements of goats in developing countries. The prediction equations of nutritional requirements for dry matter(DM),Gross energy(GE),digestible energy(DE),crude protein(CP) and digestible crude protein (DCP) by stall-feeding growing Hainan Black goats were: ZM//(g/d)=27.181W~(0.75)+0.83AJF+210.76(r=0.891 6),GEI(MJ/d)=0.82W~(0.75)+0.028△W+3.76(r=0.780 4),DEI(MJ/d)=0.59W~(0.75)+0.021 △W-0.24(r=0.665 1),CPI(g/d) =2.45W~(0.75)+0.26△W+22.14(r=0.5712),DCP(g/d)=2.69W~(0.75)+0.03 △W-0.38(r=0.660 5). For the stall-feeding growing Hainan Black goats,metabolic rate of gross energy of the diets was 58.88%,digestibility of crude protein 57.08%,and the total availability of protein 35.25%. The protein requirement of per unit live weight gain of meat goats is 0.37 g PD/g gain(PD,protein deposited).%试验选用12只海南黑山羊断奶羔羊(约4月龄),采用饲养试验和消化代谢试验,研究生长期海南黑山羊的能量和蛋白质需要量及其代谢规律.试验羊分成4组,采用4x4拉丁方设计.按照Keral(1982)适宜于发展中国家的山羊饲养标准为参考设计了高能高氮、低能高氮、高能低氮、低能低氮4种能氮比的日粮.结果表明:舍饲海南黑山羊生长期干物质采食量与代谢体重和日增重的关系为DMI(g/d)=27.18W0.75+0.83△W+210.76(r=0.8916);总能、消化能、粗蛋白质和可消化蛋白质需要量的估测模型分别为GEI(MJId)=0.82W~(0.75)+0.028△W+3.76(r=0.7804).DEI(MJ/d)=0.59W~(0.75)+0.021 △W-0.24(r=0

  16. The molecular, temporal and region-specific requirements of the beta isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 2 (CAMK2B) in mouse locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Martijn J; van de Bree, Jolet E; Bodde, Hanna E; Elgersma, Ype; van Woerden, Geeske M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic approaches using temporal and brain region-specific restricted gene deletions have provided a wealth of insight in the brain regions and temporal aspects underlying spatial and associative learning. However, for locomotion such extensive studies are still scarce. Previous studies demonstrated that Camk2b(-/-) mice, which lack the β isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2B), show very severe locomotion deficits. However, where these locomotion deficits originate is unknown. Here we made use of novel Camk2b mutants (Camk2b(f/f) and Camk2b(T287A)), to explore the molecular, temporal and brain region-specific requirements of CAMK2B for locomotion. At the molecular level we found that normal locomotion requires Calcium/Calmodulin mediated activation of CAMK2B, but CAMK2B autonomous activity is largely dispensable. At a systems level, we found that global deletion of Camk2b in the adult mouse causes only mild locomotion deficits, suggesting that the severe locomotion deficits of Camk2b(-/-) mice are largely of developmental origin. However, early onset deletion of Camk2b in cerebellum, striatum or forebrain did not recapitulate the locomotion deficits, suggesting that these deficits cannot be attributed to a single brain area. Taken together, these results provide the first insights into the molecular, temporal and region-specific role of CAMK2B in locomotion. PMID:27244486

  17. Dopamine D4 receptors linked to protein kinase G are required for changes in dopamine release followed by locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Dong Kun; Shim, Yoon-Bo; Ryu, In Soo; Seo, Su Yeon; Kim, Jieun; Yang, Ju Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Wook; Choe, Eun Sang

    2015-05-01

    We previously found that the dopamine D2-type receptors (D2 and D3 receptors), coupled to protein kinase G (PKG), upregulate locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. In this study, D4 receptors, another type of D2 receptor also coupled to PKG, were examined to determine their requirement in the regulation of locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. The results demonstrated that repeated injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg), given once a day for seven consecutive days, significantly increased extracellular dopamine concentrations. Intra-caudate infusion of the D4 receptor agonist, PD168077 (10 nmol), and the PKG inhibitor, KT5823 (2 nmol), significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine levels and locomotor activity. However, intra-caudate infusion of KT5823, but not PD168077, decreased ∆FosB immunoreactivity elevated by repeated cocaine administration. These findings suggest that D4 receptors linked to PKG could be a key modulator for dopamine release required for changes in locomotor activity caused by repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:25702161

  18. Gonadotropin-dependent oocyte maturational competence requires activation of the protein kinase A pathway and synthesis of RNA and protein in ovarian follicles of Nibe, Nibea mitsukurii (Teleostei, Sciaenidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, G.; Shusa, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Patino, R.

    2002-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone- (LH)-dependent ovarian follicle maturation has been recently described in two stages for teleost fishes. The oocyte's ability to respond to the steroidal maturation-inducing hormone (MIH), also known as oocyte maturational competence (OMC), is acquired during the first stage; whereas the MIH-dependent resumption of meiosis occurs during the second stage. However, studies directly addressing OMC have been performed with a limited number of species and therefore the general relevance of the two-stage model and its mechanisms remain uncertain. In this study, we examined the hormonal regulation of OMC and its basic transduction mechanisms in ovarian follicles of the sciaenid teleost, Nibe (Nibea mitsukurii). Exposure to MIH [17,20??-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one or 17,20??,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one] stimulated germinal vesicle breakdown (index of meiotic resumption) in full-grown follicles primed with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG, an LH-like gonadotropin) but not in those pre-cultured in plain incubation medium. The induction of OMC by HCG was mimicked by protein kinase A (PKA) activators (forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP), and blocked by specific inhibitors of PKA (H89 and H8) as well as inhibitors of RNA (actinomycin D) and protein (cycloheximide) synthesis. Forskolin-induced OMC was also inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide. A strong activator of protein kinase C, PMA, inhibited HCG-dependent OMC. In conclusion, OMC in Nibe ovarian follicles is gonadotropin-dependent and requires activation of the PKA pathway followed by gene transcription and translation events. These observations are consistent with the two-stage model of ovarian follicle maturation proposed for other teleosts, and suggest that Nibe can be used as new model species for mechanistic studies of ovarian follicle differentiation and maturation in fishes.

  19. Neuron class-specific requirements for Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in critical period development of calcium signaling in learning and memory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Caleb A; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-05-01

    Neural circuit optimization occurs through sensory activity-dependent mechanisms that refine synaptic connectivity and information processing during early-use developmental critical periods. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), the gene product lost in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), acts as an activity sensor during critical period development, both as an RNA-binding translation regulator and channel-binding excitability regulator. Here, we employ a Drosophila FXS disease model to assay calcium signaling dynamics with a targeted transgenic GCaMP reporter during critical period development of the mushroom body (MB) learning/memory circuit. We find FMRP regulates depolarization-induced calcium signaling in a neuron-specific manner within this circuit, suppressing activity-dependent calcium transients in excitatory cholinergic MB input projection neurons and enhancing calcium signals in inhibitory GABAergic MB output neurons. Both changes are restricted to the developmental critical period and rectified at maturity. Importantly, conditional genetic (dfmr1) rescue of null mutants during the critical period corrects calcium signaling defects in both neuron classes, indicating a temporally restricted FMRP requirement. Likewise, conditional dfmr1 knockdown (RNAi) during the critical period replicates constitutive null mutant defects in both neuron classes, confirming cell-autonomous requirements for FMRP in developmental regulation of calcium signaling dynamics. Optogenetic stimulation during the critical period enhances depolarization-induced calcium signaling in both neuron classes, but this developmental change is eliminated in dfmr1 null mutants, indicating the activity-dependent regulation requires FMRP. These results show FMRP shapes neuron class-specific calcium signaling in excitatory vs. inhibitory neurons in developing learning/memory circuitry, and that FMRP mediates activity-dependent regulation of calcium signaling specifically during the early

  20. Neuron class-specific requirements for Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in critical period development of calcium signaling in learning and memory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Caleb A; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-05-01

    Neural circuit optimization occurs through sensory activity-dependent mechanisms that refine synaptic connectivity and information processing during early-use developmental critical periods. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), the gene product lost in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), acts as an activity sensor during critical period development, both as an RNA-binding translation regulator and channel-binding excitability regulator. Here, we employ a Drosophila FXS disease model to assay calcium signaling dynamics with a targeted transgenic GCaMP reporter during critical period development of the mushroom body (MB) learning/memory circuit. We find FMRP regulates depolarization-induced calcium signaling in a neuron-specific manner within this circuit, suppressing activity-dependent calcium transients in excitatory cholinergic MB input projection neurons and enhancing calcium signals in inhibitory GABAergic MB output neurons. Both changes are restricted to the developmental critical period and rectified at maturity. Importantly, conditional genetic (dfmr1) rescue of null mutants during the critical period corrects calcium signaling defects in both neuron classes, indicating a temporally restricted FMRP requirement. Likewise, conditional dfmr1 knockdown (RNAi) during the critical period replicates constitutive null mutant defects in both neuron classes, confirming cell-autonomous requirements for FMRP in developmental regulation of calcium signaling dynamics. Optogenetic stimulation during the critical period enhances depolarization-induced calcium signaling in both neuron classes, but this developmental change is eliminated in dfmr1 null mutants, indicating the activity-dependent regulation requires FMRP. These results show FMRP shapes neuron class-specific calcium signaling in excitatory vs. inhibitory neurons in developing learning/memory circuitry, and that FMRP mediates activity-dependent regulation of calcium signaling specifically during the early

  1. Sla1p Is a Functionally Modular Component of the Yeast Cortical Actin Cytoskeleton Required for Correct Localization of Both Rho1p-GTPase and Sla2p, a Protein with Talin Homology

    OpenAIRE

    Ayscough, Kathryn R.; Eby, Jennifer J.; Lila, Thomas; Dewar, Hilary; Kozminski, Keith G.; Drubin, David G.

    1999-01-01

    SLA1 was identified previously in budding yeast in a genetic screen for mutations that caused a requirement for the actin-binding protein Abp1p and was shown to be required for normal cortical actin patch structure and organization. Here, we show that Sla1p, like Abp1p, localizes to cortical actin patches. Furthermore, Sla1p is required for the correct localization of Sla2p, an actin-binding protein with homology to talin implicated in endocytosis, and the Rho1p-GTPase, which is associated wi...

  2. Dietary protein and energy requirements of juvenile freshwater angelfish Exigências nutricionais de proteína e energia em juvenis de acará-bandeira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jener Alexandre Sampaio Zuanon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Dietary protein and energy requirements of juvenile freshwater angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare were evaluated. A 3 × 2 factorial design was used, with three dietary crude protein levels being tested (26, 30, and 34% of CP combined with two digestible energy levels (3,100 and 3,300 kcal DE/kg of diet in three replicates. Juveniles averaging 2.33 ± 0.26 g were reared in a 25L-aquarium with controlled temperature (26 ± 1ºC, biological filter and stocking density of six fish/aquarium. Fish were fed ad libitum at 09:00 a.m., 2:00 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. The following performance parameters were evaluated: final weight, final length, weight gain, feed intake, feed conversion ratio, specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio and condition factor. Fish fed diets with 26% CP showed greater protein efficiency values when compared to those fed diets with 34% CP. Diets with 26% of CP and 3100 kcal DE/kg could meet the nutritional requirements of juvenile freshwater angelfish.Avaliaram-se as exigências nutricionais de proteína e energia em juvenis de acará-bandeira (Pterophyllum scalare. Utilizou-se delineamento inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial 3 × 2, com três níveis de proteína bruta (26, 30 e 34%, dois de energia digestível (3.100 e 3.300 kcal/kg de ração e três repetições. Juvenis com peso médio de 2,33 ± 0,26 g foram distribuídos em aquários contendo 25 litros de água, temperatura controlada (26 ± 1ºC e filtro biológico, na densidade de estocagem de seis animais por aquário. Os peixes foram alimentados à vontade às 9, 14 e 16h30. Na análise do desempenho produtivo, foram avaliados o peso final, o comprimento final, o ganho de peso, o consumo de ração, a conversão alimentar, a taxa de crescimento específico, a taxa de eficiência protéica e o fator de condição. As dietas contendo 26% PB proporcionaram maiores valores para taxa de eficiência protéica apenas em relação às dietas contendo 34% PB. As exig

  3. Bbs8, together with the planar cell polarity protein Vangl2, is required to establish left-right asymmetry in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May-Simera, Helen L; Kai, Masatake; Hernandez, Victor; Osborn, Daniel P S; Tada, Masazumi; Beales, Philip L

    2010-09-15

    Laterality defects such as situs inversus are not uncommonly encountered in humans, either in isolation or as part of another syndrome, but can have devastating developmental consequences. The events that break symmetry during early embryogenesis are highly conserved amongst vertebrates and involve the establishment of unidirectional flow by cilia within an organising centre such as the node in mammals or Kupffer's vesicle (KV) in teleosts. Disruption of this flow can lead to the failure to successfully establish left-right asymmetry. The correct apical-posterior cellular position of each node/KV cilium is critical for its optimal radial movement which serves to sweep fluid (and morphogens) in the same direction as its neighbours. Planar cell polarity (PCP) is an important conserved process that governs ciliary position and posterior tilt; however the underlying mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. Here we show that Bbs8, a ciliary/basal body protein important for intraciliary/flagellar transport and the core PCP protein Vangl2 interact and are required for establishment and maintenance of left-right asymmetry during early embryogenesis in zebrafish. We discovered that loss of bbs8 and vangl2 results in laterality defects due to cilia disruption at the KV. We showed that perturbation of cell polarity following abrogation of vangl2 causes nuclear mislocalisation, implying defective centrosome/basal body migration and apical docking. Moreover, upon loss of bbs8 and vangl2, we observed defective actin organisation. These data suggest that bbs8 and vangl2 act synergistically on cell polarization to establish and maintain the appropriate length and number of cilia in the KV and thereby facilitate correct LR asymmetry. PMID:20643117

  4. TmpL, a transmembrane protein required for intracellular redox homeostasis and virulence in a plant and an animal fungal pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Hyung Kim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS is critical for developmental differentiation and virulence of many pathogenic fungi. In this report we demonstrate that a novel transmembrane protein, TmpL, is necessary for regulation of intracellular ROS levels and tolerance to external ROS, and is required for infection of plants by the necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola and for infection of mammals by the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. In both fungi, tmpL encodes a predicted hybrid membrane protein containing an AMP-binding domain, six putative transmembrane domains, and an experimentally-validated FAD/NAD(P-binding domain. Localization and gene expression analyses in A. brassicicola indicated that TmpL is associated with the Woronin body, a specialized peroxisome, and strongly expressed during conidiation and initial invasive growth in planta. A. brassicicola and A. fumigatus DeltatmpL strains exhibited abnormal conidiogenesis, accelerated aging, enhanced oxidative burst during conidiation, and hypersensitivity to oxidative stress when compared to wild-type or reconstituted strains. Moreover, A. brassicicola DeltatmpL strains, although capable of initial penetration, exhibited dramatically reduced invasive growth on Brassicas and Arabidopsis. Similarly, an A. fumigatus DeltatmpL mutant was dramatically less virulent than the wild-type and reconstituted strains in a murine model of invasive aspergillosis. Constitutive expression of the A. brassicicola yap1 ortholog in an A. brassicicola DeltatmpL strain resulted in high expression levels of genes associated with oxidative stress tolerance. Overexpression of yap1 in the DeltatmpL background complemented the majority of observed developmental phenotypic changes and partially restored virulence on plants. Yap1-GFP fusion strains utilizing the native yap1 promoter exhibited constitutive nuclear localization in the A. brassicicola DeltatmpL background. Collectively, we

  5. Activation of HIV transcription by the viral Tat protein requires a demethylation step mediated by lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Sakane

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The essential transactivator function of the HIV Tat protein is regulated by multiple posttranslational modifications. Although individual modifications are well characterized, their crosstalk and dynamics of occurrence during the HIV transcription cycle remain unclear.We examine interactions between two critical modifications within the RNA-binding domain of Tat: monomethylation of lysine 51 (K51 mediated by Set7/9/KMT7, an early event in the Tat transactivation cycle that strengthens the interaction of Tat with TAR RNA, and acetylation of lysine 50 (K50 mediated by p300/KAT3B, a later process that dissociates the complex formed by Tat, TAR RNA and the cyclin T1 subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb. We find K51 monomethylation inhibited in synthetic Tat peptides carrying an acetyl group at K50 while acetylation can occur in methylated peptides, albeit at a reduced rate. To examine whether Tat is subject to sequential monomethylation and acetylation in cells, we performed mass spectrometry on immunoprecipitated Tat proteins and generated new modification-specific Tat antibodies against monomethylated/acetylated Tat. No bimodified Tat protein was detected in cells pointing to a demethylation step during the Tat transactivation cycle. We identify lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1 as a Tat K51-specific demethylase, which is required for the activation of HIV transcription in latently infected T cells. LSD1/KDM1 and its cofactor CoREST associates with the HIV promoter in vivo and activate Tat transcriptional activity in a K51-dependent manner. In addition, small hairpin RNAs directed against LSD1/KDM1 or inhibition of its activity with the monoamine oxidase inhibitor phenelzine suppresses the activation of HIV transcription in latently infected T cells.Our data support the model that a LSD1/KDM1/CoREST complex, normally known as a transcriptional suppressor, acts as a novel activator of HIV transcription through

  6. Genes encoding putative effector proteins of the type III secretion system of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 are required for bacterial virulence and proliferation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, M; Shea, J E; Waterman, S R; Mundy, R; Nikolaus, T; Banks, G; Vazquez-Torres, A; Gleeson, C; Fang, F C; Holden, D W

    1998-10-01

    The type III secretion system of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) is required for systemic infection of this pathogen in mice. Cloning and sequencing of a central region of SPI-2 revealed the presence of genes encoding putative chaperones and effector proteins of the secretion system. The predicted products of the sseB, sseC and sseD genes display weak but significant similarity to amino acid sequences of EspA, EspD and EspB, which are secreted by the type III secretion system encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. The transcriptional activity of an sseA::luc fusion gene was shown to be dependent on ssrA, which is required for the expression of genes encoding components of the secretion system apparatus. Strains carrying nonpolar mutations in sseA, sseB or sseC were severely attenuated in virulence, strains carrying mutations in sseF or sseG were weakly attenuated, and a strain with a mutation in sseE had no detectable virulence defect. These phenotypes were reflected in the ability of mutant strains to grow within a variety of macrophage cell types: strains carrying mutations in sseA, sseB or sseC failed to accumulate, whereas the growth rates of strains carrying mutations in sseE, sseF or sseG were only modestly reduced. These data suggest that, in vivo, one of the functions of the SPI-2 secretion system is to enable intracellular bacterial proliferation.

  7. Cytoplasmic anchoring of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) by A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs) is required for meiotic arrest of porcine full-grown and growing oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takanori; Fujii, Wataru; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian growing oocytes (GOs) lack the ability to resume meiosis, although the molecular mechanism of this limitation is not fully understood. We previously hypothesized that the meiotic incompetence of porcine GOs was attributed to complex spatial-temporal regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) by A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs), but found that AKAP1 is not involved in the meiotic incompetence of porcine GOs. In the present study, we cloned porcine cDNAs of AKAP5 and AKAP7alpha, and found that inhibiting the expression of these AKAPs induced PKA translocation into the nucleus and promoted meiotic resumption of porcine GOs without affecting the total PKA activity of GOs, whereas overexpressing these AKAPs had no effect. Because AKAPs regulate PKA localization through binding with regulatory subunits of PKA (PKA-Rs), PKA-R binding with AKAPs was inhibited by AKAP-binding inhibition peptides or PKA-R expression inhibition by antisense RNAs. We found that the expression inhibition and binding inhibition of PRKAR1A, an isoform of mammalian PKA-R, promoted meiotic resumption of porcine GOs, whereas these inhibitions of PRKAR2A, another PKA-R isoform, had no effect. In contrast, the expression inhibition and binding inhibition of PRKAR2A had higher effects than those of PRKAR1A on meiotic resumption of porcine full-grown oocytes. These results suggest that cytoplasmic anchoring of PKA by AKAPs is required for meiotic arrest of oocytes and that the PKA-R isoform working for the maintenance of meiotic arrest changed from PRKAR1A to PRKAR2A during the acquisition of meiotic competence. PMID:24501172

  8. Zygotic Expression of the Double-Stranded RNA Binding Motif Protein Drb2p Is Required for DNA Elimination in the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Motl, Jason A.; Chalker, Douglas L.

    2011-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA binding motif (DSRM)-containing proteins play many roles in the regulation of gene transcription and translation, including some with tandem DSRMs that act in small RNA biogenesis. We report the characterization of the genes for double-stranded RNA binding proteins 1 and 2 (DRB1 and DRB2), two genes encoding nuclear proteins with tandem DSRMs in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. Both proteins are expressed throughout growth and development but exhibit distinct peaks of ...

  9. A dPIP5K dependent pool of phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2 is required for G-protein coupled signal transduction in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purbani Chakrabarti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple PIP2 dependent molecular processes including receptor activated phospholipase C activity occur at the neuronal plasma membranes, yet levels of this lipid at the plasma membrane are remarkably stable. Although the existence of unique pools of PIP2 supporting these events has been proposed, the mechanism by which they are generated is unclear. In Drosophila photoreceptors, the hydrolysis of PIP2 by G-protein coupled phospholipase C activity is essential for sensory transduction of photons. We identify dPIP5K as an enzyme essential for PIP2 re-synthesis in photoreceptors. Loss of dPIP5K causes profound defects in the electrical response to light and light-induced PIP2 dynamics at the photoreceptor membrane. Overexpression of dPIP5K was able to accelerate the rate of PIP2 synthesis following light induced PIP2 depletion. Other PIP2 dependent processes such as endocytosis and cytoskeletal function were unaffected in photoreceptors lacking dPIP5K function. These results provide evidence for the existence of a unique dPIP5K dependent pool of PIP2 required for normal Drosophila phototransduction. Our results define the existence of multiple pools of PIP2 in photoreceptors generated by distinct lipid kinases and supporting specific molecular processes at neuronal membranes.

  10. Sequence characteristics required for cooperative binding and efficient in vivo titration of the replication initiator protein DnaA in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming G.; Christensen, Bjarke Bak; Atlung, Tove

    2007-01-01

    Plasmids carrying the mioC promoter region, which contains two DnaA boxes, R5 and R6 with one misfit to the consensus TT(A)/(T)TNCACA, are as efficient in in vivo titration of the DnaA protein as plasmids carrying a replication-inactivated oriC region with its eight DnaA boxes. Three additional Dna......A boxes around the promoter proximal R5 DnaA box were identified and shown by mutational analysis to be necessary for the cooperative binding of DnaA required for titration. These four DnaA boxes are located in the same orientation and with a spacing of two or three base-pairs. The cooperative binding...... was eliminated by insertion of half a helical turn between any of the DnaA boxes. Titration strongly depends on the presence and orientation of the promoter distal R6 DnaA box located 104 bp upstream of the R5 box as well as neighbouring sequences downstream of R6. Titration depends on the integrity of a 43 bp...

  11. The Seckel syndrome and centrosomal protein Ninein localizes asymmetrically to stem cell centrosomes but is not required for normal development, behavior, or DNA damage response in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiming; Mennella, Vito; Marks, Steven; Wildonger, Jill; Elnagdi, Esraa; Agard, David; Megraw, Timothy L

    2016-06-01

    Ninein (Nin) is a centrosomal protein whose gene is mutated in Seckel syndrome (SCKL, MIM 210600), an inherited recessive disease that results in primordial dwarfism, cognitive deficiencies, and increased sensitivity to genotoxic stress. Nin regulates neural stem cell self-renewal, interkinetic nuclear migration, and microtubule assembly in mammals. Nin is evolutionarily conserved, yet its role in cell division and development has not been investigated in a model organism. Here we characterize the single Nin orthologue in Drosophila Drosophila Nin localizes to the periphery of the centrosome but not at centriolar structures as in mammals. However, Nin shares the property of its mammalian orthologue of promoting microtubule assembly. In neural and germline stem cells, Nin localizes asymmetrically to the younger (daughter) centrosome, yet it is not required for the asymmetric division of stem cells. In wing epithelia and muscle, Nin localizes to noncentrosomal microtubule-organizing centers. Surprisingly, loss of nin expression from a nin mutant does not significantly affect embryonic and brain development, fertility, or locomotor performance of mutant flies or their survival upon exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Although it is not essential, our data suggest that Nin plays a supportive role in centrosomal and extracentrosomal microtubule organization and asymmetric stem cell division. PMID:27053665

  12. A NASP (N1/N2)-related protein, Sim3, binds CENP-A and is required for its deposition at fission yeast centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Elaine M; Pidoux, Alison L; Monet, Marie; Bonilla, Carolina; Richardson, William; Hamilton, Georgina L; Ekwall, Karl; McLaughlin, Paul J; Allshire, Robin C

    2007-12-28

    A defining feature of centromeres is the presence of the histone H3 variant CENP-A(Cnp1). It is not known how CENP-A(Cnp1) is specifically delivered to, and assembled into, centromeric chromatin. Through a screen for factors involved in kinetochore integrity in fission yeast, we identified Sim3. Sim3 is homologous to known histone binding proteins NASP(Human) and N1/N2(Xenopus) and aligns with Hif1(S. cerevisiae), defining the SHNi-TPR family. Sim3 is distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, yet it associates with CENP-A(Cnp1) and also binds H3. Cells defective in Sim3 function have reduced levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) at centromeres (and increased H3) and display chromosome segregation defects. Sim3 is required to allow newly synthesized CENP-A(Cnp1) to accumulate at centromeres in S and G2 phase-arrested cells in a replication-independent mechanism. We propose that one function of Sim3 is to act as an escort that hands off CENP-A(Cnp1) to chromatin assembly factors, allowing its incorporation into centromeric chromatin. PMID:18158900

  13. EZH2 is required for mouse oocyte meiotic maturation by interacting with and stabilizing spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yi; Lu, Danyu; Jiang, Hao; Chi, Xiaochun; Zhang, Hongquan

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) trimethylates histone H3 Lys 27 and plays key roles in a variety of biological processes. Stability of spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubR1 is essential for mitosis in somatic cells and for meiosis in oocytes. However, the role of EZH2 in oocyte meiotic maturation was unknown. Here, we presented a mechanism underlying EZH2 control of BubR1 stability in the meiosis of mouse oocytes. We identified a methyltransferase activity-independent function of EZH2 by demonstrating that EZH2 regulates spindle assembly and the polar body I extrusion. EZH2 was increased with the oocyte progression from GVBD to MII, while EZH2 was concentrated on the chromosomes. Interestingly, inhibition of EZH2 methyltranferase activity by DZNep or GSK343 did not affect oocyte meiotic maturation. However, depletion of EZH2 by morpholino led to chromosome misalignment and abnormal spindle assembly. Furthermore, ectopic expression of EZH2 led to oocyte meiotic maturation arrested at the MI stage followed by chromosome misalignment and aneuploidy. Mechanistically, EZH2 directly interacted with and stabilized BubR1, an effect driving EZH2 into the concert of meiosis regulation. Collectively, we provided a paradigm that EZH2 is required for mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:27226494

  14. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, David M.; Nannas, Natalie J.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation. PMID:27610117

  15. Evidence that the Dictyostelium Dd-STATa protein is a repressor that regulates commitment to stalk cell differentiation and is also required for efficient chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, S; Jermyn, K A; Early, A; Kawata, T; Aubry, L; Ceccarelli, A; Schaap, P; Williams, J G; Firtel, R A

    1999-08-01

    Dd-STATa is a structural and functional homologue of the metazoan STAT (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) proteins. We show that Dd-STATa null cells exhibit several distinct developmental phenotypes. The aggregation of Dd-STATa null cells is delayed and they chemotax slowly to a cyclic AMP source, suggesting a role for Dd-STATa in these early processes. In Dd-STATa null strains, slug-like structures are formed but they have an aberrant pattern of gene expression. In such slugs, ecmB/lacZ, a marker that is normally specific for cells on the stalk cell differentiation pathway, is expressed throughout the prestalk region. Stalk cell differentiation in Dictyostelium has been proposed to be under negative control, mediated by repressor elements present in the promoters of stalk cell-specific genes. Dd-STATa binds these repressor elements in vitro and the ectopic expression of ecmB/lacZ in the null strain provides in vivo evidence that Dd-STATa is the repressor protein that regulates commitment to stalk cell differentiation. Dd-STATa null cells display aberrant behavior in a monolayer assay wherein stalk cell differentiation is induced using the stalk cell morphogen DIF. The ecmB gene, a general marker for stalk cell differentiation, is greatly overinduced by DIF in Dd-STATa null cells. Also, Dd-STATa null cells are hypersensitive to DIF for expression of ST/lacZ, a marker for the earliest stages in the differentiation of one of the stalk cell sub-types. We suggest that both these manifestations of DIF hypersensitivity in the null strain result from the balance between activation and repression of the promoter elements being tipped in favor of activation when the repressor is absent. Paradoxically, although Dd-STATa null cells are hypersensitive to the inducing effects of DIF and readily form stalk cells in monolayer assay, the Dd-STATa null cells show little or no terminal stalk cell differentiation within the slug. Dd-STATa null slugs remain

  16. Early host cell reactivation of an oxidatively damaged adenovirus-encoded reporter gene requires the Cockayne syndrome proteins CSA and CSB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Derrik M; Rainbow, Andrew J

    2011-03-01

    Reduced host cell reactivation (HCR) of a reporter gene containing 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesions in Cockayne syndrome (CS) fibroblasts has previously been attributed to increased 8-oxoG-mediated inhibition of transcription resulting from a deficiency in repair. This interpretation has been challenged by a report suggesting reduced expression from an 8-oxoG containing reporter gene occurs in all cells by a mechanism involving gene inactivation by 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase and this inactivation is strongly enhanced in the absence of the CS group B (CSB) protein. The observation of reduced gene expression in the absence of CSB protein led to speculation that decreased HCR in CS cells results from enhanced gene inactivation rather than reduced gene reactivation. Using an adenovirus-based β-galactosidase (β-gal) reporter gene assay, we have examined the effect of methylene blue plus visible light (MB + VL)-induced 8-oxoG lesions on the time course of gene expression in normal and CSA and CSB mutant human SV40-transformed fibroblasts, repair proficient and CSB mutant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and normal mouse embryo fibroblasts. We demonstrate that MB + VL treatment of the reporter leads to reduced expression of the damaged β-gal reporter relative to control at early time points following infection in all cells, consistent with in vivo inhibition of RNA polII-mediated transcription. In addition, we have demonstrated HCR of reporter gene expression occurs in all cell types examined. A significant reduction in the rate of gene reactivation in human SV40-transformed cells lacking functional CSA or CSB compared to normal cells was found. Similarly, a significant reduction in the rate of reactivation in CHO cells lacking functional CSB (CHO-UV61) was observed compared to the wild-type parental counterpart (CHO-AA8). The data presented demonstrate that expression of an oxidatively damaged reporter gene is reactivated over time and that CSA and CSB are required for

  17. Exigência Protéica e Relação Energia/Proteína para Alevinos de Piracanjuba (Brycon orbignyanus Dietary Protein Requirement and Energy to Protein Ratio for Piracanjuba (Brycon orbignyanus Fingerlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Vinícius do Carmo e Sá

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi determinar a exigência protéica e correspondente relação energia/proteína em dietas para alevinos de piracanjuba, Brycon orbignyanus. Seis dietas semi-purificadas isocalóricas foram formuladas para conter 3.000 kcal de energia metabolizável (EM/kg e concentrações de proteína bruta (PB de 24, 26, 29, 32, 36 e 42%. Para essas concentrações, as relações E/P das dietas foram de 12,3; 11,6; 10,4; 9,2; 8,5 e 7,1 kcal EM/g PB, respectivamente. As fontes de proteína, lipídios e carboidratos digestíveis foram, respectivamente, caseína/gelatina, óleo de fígado de bacalhau/óleo de soja e dextrina. Após condicionamento de cinco dias, as dietas foram fornecidas, até a saciedade, em duas alimentações diárias, a 162 alevinos (27 peixes/dieta, que apresentaram 8,38 ± 0,09 g de peso médio inicial, distribuídos em 18 tanques de fibra-de-vidro de 100 L, conectados a um sistema de recirculação de água. A temperatura média da água foi de 26,3°C, com extremos de 23,7 e 30,2°C. Após 90 dias, a concentração de proteína na dieta que proporcionou ganho em peso máximo aos peixes foi 29% PB, com relação E/P igual a 10,4 kcal EM/g PB. As dietas com concentrações de PB iguais a 32, 36 e 42% não se mostraram superiores para conversão alimentar, taxa de eficiência protéica, valor produtivo da proteína e retenção de energia bruta. A deposição corporal de proteína e gordura não sofreu influência da concentração de PB da dietaThe aim of this study was to determine the dietary protein requirement and associated energy to protein (E/P ratio for "Piracanjuba", Brycon orbignyanus, fingerlings. Casein-gelatin semipurified diets were formulated to contain six crude protein (CP concentrations: 24, 26, 29, 32, 36 e 42% at one energy level, 3,000 kcal metabolizable energy (ME/kg. These diets resulted in E/P ratios of 12.3, 11.6, 10.4, 9.2, 8.5 and 7.1 kcal ME/g CP, respectively. The protein, lipid

  18. Luv1p/Rki1p/Tcs3p/Vps54p, a Yeast Protein That Localizes to the Late Golgi and Early Endosome, Is Required for Normal Vacuolar Morphology.

    OpenAIRE

    Conboy, Michael J; Martha S Cyert

    2000-01-01

    We have characterized LUV1/RKI1/TCS3/VPS54, a novel yeast gene required to maintain normal vacuolar morphology. The luv1 mutant was identified in a genetic screen for mutants requiring the phosphatase calcineurin for vegetative growth. luv1 mutants lack a morphologically intact vacuole and instead accumulate small vesicles that are acidified and contain the vacuolar proteins alkaline phosphatase and carboxypeptidase Y and the vacuolar membrane H+-ATPase. Endocytosis appears qualitatively norm...

  19. Potentiation of growth factor signaling by insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in breast epithelial cells requires sphingosine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Janet L; Lin, Mike Z; McGowan, Eileen M; Baxter, Robert C

    2009-09-18

    We have investigated the mechanism underlying potentiation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR1) signaling by IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, focusing on a possible involvement of the sphingosine kinase (SphK) system. IGFBP-3 potentiated EGF-stimulated EGF receptor activation and DNA synthesis, and this was blocked by inhibitors of SphK activity or small interference RNA-mediated silencing of SphK1, but not SphK2, expression. Similarly, IGFR1 phosphorylation and DNA synthesis stimulated by LR3-IGF-I (an IGF-I analog not bound by IGFBP-3), were enhanced by IGFBP-3, and this was blocked by SphK1 silencing. SphK1 expression and activity were stimulated by IGFBP-3 approximately 2-fold over 24 h. Silencing of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) or S1P3, but not S1P2, abolished the effect of IGFBP-3 on EGF-stimulated EGFR activation. The effects of IGFBP-3 could be reproduced with exogenous S1P or medium conditioned by cells treated with IGFBP-3, and this was also blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P3. These data indicate that potentiation of growth factor signaling by IGFBP-3 in MCF-10A cells requires SphK1 activity and S1P1/S1P3, suggesting that S1P, the product of SphK activity and ligand for S1P1 and S1P3, is the "missing link" mediating IGF and EGFR transactivation and cell growth stimulation by IGFBP-3. PMID:19633297

  20. Potentiation of growth factor signaling by insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in breast epithelial cells requires sphingosine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Janet L; Lin, Mike Z; McGowan, Eileen M; Baxter, Robert C

    2009-09-18

    We have investigated the mechanism underlying potentiation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR1) signaling by IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, focusing on a possible involvement of the sphingosine kinase (SphK) system. IGFBP-3 potentiated EGF-stimulated EGF receptor activation and DNA synthesis, and this was blocked by inhibitors of SphK activity or small interference RNA-mediated silencing of SphK1, but not SphK2, expression. Similarly, IGFR1 phosphorylation and DNA synthesis stimulated by LR3-IGF-I (an IGF-I analog not bound by IGFBP-3), were enhanced by IGFBP-3, and this was blocked by SphK1 silencing. SphK1 expression and activity were stimulated by IGFBP-3 approximately 2-fold over 24 h. Silencing of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) or S1P3, but not S1P2, abolished the effect of IGFBP-3 on EGF-stimulated EGFR activation. The effects of IGFBP-3 could be reproduced with exogenous S1P or medium conditioned by cells treated with IGFBP-3, and this was also blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P3. These data indicate that potentiation of growth factor signaling by IGFBP-3 in MCF-10A cells requires SphK1 activity and S1P1/S1P3, suggesting that S1P, the product of SphK activity and ligand for S1P1 and S1P3, is the "missing link" mediating IGF and EGFR transactivation and cell growth stimulation by IGFBP-3.

  1. Arabidopsis Raf-Like Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Gene Raf43 Is Required for Tolerance to Multiple Abiotic Stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasar Virk

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are critical signaling modules that mediate the transduction of extracellular stimuli into intracellular response. A relatively large number of MAPKKKs have been identified in a variety of plant genomes but only a few of them have been studied for their biological function. In the present study, we identified an Arabidopsis Raf-like MAPKKK gene Raf43 and studied its function in biotic and abiotic stress response using a T-DNA insertion mutant raf43-1 and two Raf43-overexpressing lines Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13. Expression of Raf43 was induced by multiple abiotic and biotic stresses including treatments with drought, mannitol and oxidative stress or defense signaling molecule salicylic acid and infection with necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Seed germination and seedling root growth of raf43-1 were significantly inhibited on MS medium containing mannitol, NaCl, H2O2 or methyl viologen (MV while seed germination and seedling root growth of the Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13 lines was similar to wild type Col-0 under the above stress conditions. Soil-grown raf43-1 plants exhibited reduced tolerance to MV, drought and salt stress. Abscisic acid inhibited significantly seed germination and seedling root growth of the raf43-1 line but had no effect on the two Raf43-overexpressing lines. Expression of stress-responsive RD17 and DREB2A genes was significantly down-regulated in raf43-1 plants. However, the raf43-1 and Raf43-overexpressing plants showed similar disease phenotype to the wild type plants after infection with B. cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Our results demonstrate that Raf43, encoding for a Raf-like MAPKKK, is required for tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis.

  2. G1 cell cycle arrest due to the inhibition of erbB family receptor tyrosine kinases does not require the retinoblastoma protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The erbB receptor family (EGFr, erbB-2, erbB-3, and erbB-4) consists of transmembrane glycoproteins that transduce extracellular signals to the nucleus when activated. erbB family members are widely expressed in epithelial, mesenchymal, and neuronal cells and contribute to the proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival of these cell types. The present study evaluates the effects of erbB family signaling on cell cycle progression and the role that pRB plays in regulating this process. ErbB family RTK activity was inhibited by PD 158780 in the breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. PD 158780 (0.5 μM) inhibited EGF-stimulated and heregulin-stimulated autophosphorylation and caused a G1 cell cycle arrest within 24 h, which correlated with hypophosporylation of pRB. MCF10A cells lacking functional pRB retained the ability to arrest in G1 when treated with PD 158780. Both cell lines showed induction of p27KIP1 protein when treated with PD 158780 and increased association of p27KIP1 with cyclin E-CDK2. Furthermore, CDK2 kinase activity was dramatically inhibited with drug treatment. Changes in other pRB family members were noted with drug treatment, namely a decrease in p107 and an increase in p130. These findings show that the G1 arrest induced through inhibition of erbB family RTK activity does not require functional pRB

  3. Nuclear receptor ecdysone-induced protein 75 is required for larval-pupal metamorphosis in the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, W-C; Liu, X-P; Fu, K-Y; Shi, J-F; Lü, F-G; Li, G-Q

    2016-02-01

    20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH) are key regulators of insect development. In this study, three Leptinotarsa decemlineata Ecdysone-induced protein 75 (LdE75) cDNAs (LdE75A, B and C) were cloned from L. decemlineata. The three LdE75 isoforms were highly expressed just before or right after each moult. Within the fourth larval instar, they showed a small rise and a big peak 40 and 80 h after ecdysis. The expression peaks of the three LdE75s coincided with the peaks of circulating 20E levels. In vitro midgut culture and in vivo bioassay revealed that 20E and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide (Hal) enhanced LdE75 expression in the day 1 final larval instars. Conversely, a decrease in 20E by feeding a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against an ecdysteroidogenesis gene, Shade (LdSHD), repressed the expression of LdE75. Moreover, Hal upregulated the expression of the three LdE75s in LdSHD-silenced larvae. Thus, 20E pulses activate the transcription of LdE75s. Furthermore, ingesting dsE75-1 and dsE75-2 from a common fragment of the three isoforms successfully knocked down these LdE75s, and caused developmental arrest. Finally, knocking down LdE75s significantly repressed the transcription of three ecdysteroidogenesis genes, lowered the 20E titre and affected the expression of two 20E-response genes. Silencing LdE75s also induced the expression of a JH biosynthesis gene, increased JH titre and activated the transcription of a JH early-inducible gene. Thus, Ld E75s are required for larval-pupal metamorphosis and act mainly by modulating 20E and JH titres and mediating their signalling pathways. PMID:26542892

  4. TaCPK2-A, a calcium-dependent protein kinase gene that is required for wheat powdery mildew resistance enhances bacterial blight resistance in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shuaifeng; Li, Aili; Tang, Lichuan; Yin, Lingjie; Wu, Liang; Lei, Cailin; Guo, Xiuping; Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Guanghuai; Zhai, Wenxue; Wei, Yuming; Zheng, Youliang; Lan, Xiujin; Mao, Long

    2013-08-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are important Ca2+ signalling components involved in complex immune and stress signalling networks; but the knowledge of CPK gene functions in the hexaploid wheat is limited. Previously, TaCPK2 was shown to be inducible by powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis tritici, Bgt) infection in wheat. Here, its functions in disease resistance are characterized further. This study shows the presence of defence-response and cold-response cis-elements on the promoters of the A subgenome homoeologue (TaCPK2-A) and D subgenome homoeologue (TaCPK2-D), respectively. Their expression patterns were then confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) using genome-specific primers, where TaCPK2-A was induced by Bgt treatment while TaCPK2-D mainly responded to cold treatment. Downregulation of TaCPK2-A by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) causes loss of resistance to Bgt in resistant wheat lines, indicating that TaCPK2-A is required for powdery mildew resistance. Furthermore, overexpression of TaCPK2-A in rice enhanced bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Xoo) resistance. qRT-PCR analysis showed that overexpression of TaCPK2-A in rice promoted the expression of OsWRKY45-1, a transcription factor involved in both fungal and bacterial resistance by regulating jasmonic acid and salicylic acid signalling genes. The opposite effect was found in wheat TaCPK2-A VIGS plants, where the homologue of OsWRKY45-1 was significantly repressed. These data suggest that modulation of WRKY45-1 and associated defence-response genes by CPK2 genes may be the common mechanism for multiple disease resistance in grass species, which may have undergone subfunctionalization in promoters before the formation of hexaploid wheat. PMID:23918959

  5. ApcD, ApcF and ApcE are not required for the Orange Carotenoid Protein related phycobilisome fluorescence quenching in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallet, Denis; Gwizdala, Michal; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2012-08-01

    In cyanobacteria, strong blue-green light induces a photoprotective mechanism involving an increase of energy thermal dissipation at the level of phycobilisome (PB), the cyanobacterial antenna. This leads to a decrease of the energy arriving to the reaction centers. The photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) has an essential role in this mechanism. The binding of the red photoactivated OCP to the core of the PB triggers energy and PB fluorescence quenching. The core of PBs is constituted of allophycocyanin trimers emitting at 660 or 680nm. ApcD, ApcF and ApcE are the responsible of the 680nm emission. In this work, the role of these terminal emitters in the photoprotective mechanism was studied. Single and double Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutants, in which the apcD or/and apcF genes were absent, were constructed. The Cys190 of ApcE which binds the phycocyanobilin was replaced by a Ser. The mutated ApcE attached an unusual chromophore emitting at 710nm. The activated OCP was able to induce the photoprotective mechanism in all the mutants. Moreover, in vitro reconstitution experiments showed similar amplitude and rates of fluorescence quenching. Our results demonstrated that ApcD, ApcF and ApcE are not required for the OCP-related fluorescence quenching and they strongly suggested that the site of quenching is one of the APC trimers emitting at 660nm. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. PMID:22172739

  6. The J-protein AtDjB1 is required for mitochondrial complex I activity and regulates growth and development through ROS-mediated auxin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ning; Lv, Ting-Ting; Li, Mi-Xin; Wei, Shan-Shan; Li, Yan-Yi; Zhao, Chun-Lan; Li, Bing

    2016-05-01

    AtDjB1 is a mitochondria-located J-protein in Arabidopsis thaliana It is involved in the regulation of plant growth and development; however, the exact mechanisms remain to be determined. We performed comparison analyses of phenotypes, auxin signalling, redox status, mitochondrial structure and function using wild-type plants, AtDjB1 mutants, rescued AtDjB1 mutants by AtDjB1 or YUCCA2 (an auxin synthesis gene), and AtDjB1 overexpression plants. AtDjB1 mutants (atj1-1 or atj1-4) exhibited inhibition of growth and development and reductions in the level of IAA and the expression of YUCCA genes compared to wild-type plants. The introduction of AtDjB1 or YUCCA2 into atj1-1 largely rescued phenotypic defects and the IAA level, indicating that AtDjB1 probably regulates growth and development via auxin. Furthermore, atj1-1 plants displayed a significant reduction in amount/activity of mitochondrial complex I compared to wild-type plants; this resulted in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, exogenous H2O2 markedly inhibited the expression of YUCCA genes in wild-type plants. In contrast, the reducing agent ascorbate increased the expression of YUCCA genes and IAA level in atj1-1 plants, indicating that the low auxin level observed in atj1-1 was probably due to the high oxidation status. Overall, the data presented here suggest that AtDjB1 is required for mitochondrial complex I activity and regulates growth and development through ROS-mediated auxin signalling in Arabidopsis. PMID:27117341

  7. Recombinant Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin Proteins Are Required To Interact To Inhibit Human Cell Cycle Progression and To Stimulate Human Leukocyte Cytokine Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Akifusa, Sumio; Poole, Stephen; Lewthwaite, Jo; Henderson, Brian; Nair, Sean P

    2001-01-01

    It has recently been discovered that Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium causing periodontitis, produces cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), a cell cycle-modulating toxin that has three protein subunits: CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC. In this study, we have cloned and expressed each toxin gene from A. actinomycetemcomitans in Escherichia coli and purified the recombinant Cdt proteins to homogeneity. Individual Cdt proteins failed to induce cell cycle arrest of the human epithelial c...

  8. Acyl-CoA-binding protein, Acb1p, is required for normal vacuole function and ceramide synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Feddersen, Søren; Christiansen, Janne K;

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we show that depletion of acyl-CoA-binding protein, Acb1p, in yeast affects ceramide levels, protein trafficking, vacuole fusion and structure. Vacuoles in Acb1p-depleted cells are multi-lobed, contain significantly less of the SNAREs (soluble N -ethylmaleimide......-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors) Nyv1p, Vam3p and Vti1p, and are unable to fuse in vitro. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed a dramatic reduction in the content of ceramides in whole-cell lipids and in vacuoles isolated from Acb1p-depleted cells. Maturation of yeast aminopeptidase I and...

  9. Association between receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha and the Grb2 adaptor. Dual Src homology (SH) 2/SH3 domain requirement and functional consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Yang, L T; Sap, J

    1996-01-01

    Receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha is found associated in vivo with the adaptor protein Grb2. Formation of this complex, which contains no detectable levels of Sos, is known to depend on a C-terminal phosphorylated tyrosine residue (Tyr798) in RPTPalpha and on the Src homology (SH) 2...

  10. The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is an F-box protein required for normal patterning and growth in the floral meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samach, A; Klenz, J E; Kohalmi, S E; Risseeuw, E; Haughn, G W; Crosby, W L

    1999-11-01

    Genetic and molecular studies have suggested that the UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene, from Arabidopsis thaliana, is expressed in all shoot apical meristems, and is involved in the regulation of a complex set of developmental events during floral development, including floral meristem and floral organ identity. Results from in situ hybridization using genes expressed early in floral development as probes indicate that UFO controls growth of young floral primordia. Transgenic constructs were used to provide evidence that UFO regulates floral organ identity by activating or maintaining transcription of the class B organ-identity gene APETALA 3, but not PISTILLATA. In an attempt to understand the biochemical mode of action of the UFO gene product, we show here that UFO is an F-box protein that interacts with Arabidopsis SKP1-like proteins, both in the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro. In yeast and other organisms both F-box proteins and SKP1 homologues are subunits of specific ubiquitin E3 enzyme complexes that target specific proteins for degradation. The protein selected for degradation by the complex is specified by the F-box proteins. It is therefore possible that the role of UFO is to target for degradation specific proteins controlling normal growth patterns in the floral primordia, as well as proteins that negatively regulate APETALA 3 transcription.

  11. Anchorage-independent growth of pocket protein-deficient murine fibroblasts requires bypass of G2 arrest and can be accomplished by expression of TBX2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vormer, Tinke L; Foijer, Floris; Wielders, Camiel L C; te Riele, Hein

    2008-01-01

    Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for pocket proteins (i.e., pRB/p107-, pRB/p130-, or pRB/p107/p130-deficient MEFs) have lost proper G(1) control and are refractory to Ras(V12)-induced senescence. However, pocket protein-deficient MEFs expressing Ras(V12) were unable to exhibit anchorage-

  12. Genetic Complementation Studies of Human Pin1 in Azotobacter vinelandii Revealed that it Requires Amino Terminus of the NifM to Deliver PPIase Effect to the Fe-protein of Nitrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaraguru Raja; Lakshmi Pulakat; Narayanan Gavini

    2006-01-01

    The NifM is a peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase and is required for the maturation and activation of the Fe protein of Nitrogenase. Since the carboxyl terminus of NifM is similar to the Human Pin1, we expressed the Human Pin1 in A. vinelandii BG98, a nifM mutant strain containing a kanamycin insertion and found that it could not complement the function of nifM. It was hypothesized that the amino terminus of the NifM might be required for the Pin1 to bind to NifH similar to requirement of th...

  13. IdiA, a 34 kDa protein in the cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. strains PCC 6301 and PCC 7942, is required for growth under iron and manganese limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, K P; Thole, H H; Pistorius, E K

    1996-09-01

    In the cyanobacteria Synechococcus PCC 6301 and PCC 7942 a protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 34 kDa (called IdiA for iron-deficiency-induced protein A) accumulates under iron and managanese limitation. IdiA from Synechococcus PCC 6301 was partially sequenced, showing that the N-terminal amino acid is an alanine. Moreover,