WorldWideScience

Sample records for centromeres

  1. Premature centromere division and other centromeric misbehavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, P.H. [Christchurch School of Medicine (New Zealand)

    1993-12-31

    Premature centromere division was initially described for the X chromosome. In an otherwise typical metaphase cell, one chromosome showed no primary constriction and appeared to have no centromere. G-banding analysis indicated that this apparent acentric fragment was an entire X chromosome. Because its centromere was divided when the centromeres of all other chromosomes of the metaphase cell were entire, the condition was described as premature centromere division (PCD). The importance of PCD lies in its being a mechanism on non-disjunction, as was indicated by the strong association of X chromosome aneuploidy with PCD,X. We can infer that the affected chromosome failed to take part in the normal distribution of chromosomes at mitoses. The centromere, it its widest sense, is generally believed to have a role in the correct orientation of chromosomes at the metaphase plate and the distribution of chromatids to the spindle poles. The failure of these functions implies a major centromeric dysfunction. What do we know of this complex region of the chromosome that might help us understand its dysfunction?

  2. Inbreeding drives maize centromere evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Kevin L.; Xie, Zidian; Wolfgruber, Thomas K.; Presting, Gernot G

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of centromere-specific DNA repeats in different species (centromere paradox) and the seemingly parallel rapid evolution of the cenH3 histone protein have previously been interpreted to be related to evolutionary pressures acting on both molecules based on their interaction (centromere drive hypothesis). Here we describe the detailed mechanism and chronology of centromere repeat replacement, and identify inbreeding as a major driver of centromeric DNA replacement that ultimately ...

  3. Plant centromere compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mach; Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL), Zieler; Helge (Del Mar, CA), Jin; RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO), Keith; Kevin (Three Forks, MT), Copenhaver; Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC), Preuss; Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2011-11-22

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  4. Plant centromere compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2007-06-05

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  5. Plant centromere compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mach, Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Del Mar, CA); Jin, RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO); Keith, Kevin (Three Forks, MT); Copenhaver, Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2011-08-02

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  6. Centromeric nucleosomes induce positive supercoils

    OpenAIRE

    Furuyama, Takehito; Henikoff, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Centromeres of higher eukaryotes are epigenetically maintained, however, the mechanism that underlies centromere inheritance is unknown. Centromere identity and inheritance require the assembly of nucleosomes containing the CenH3 histone variant in place of canonical H3. Whereas H3 nucleosomes wrap DNA in a left-handed manner and induce negative supercoils, we show here that CenH3 nucleosomes that are reconstituted from Drosophila histones induce positive supercoils. Furthermore, we show that...

  7. Inbreeding drives maize centromere evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kevin L; Xie, Zidian; Wolfgruber, Thomas K; Presting, Gernot G

    2016-02-23

    Functional centromeres, the chromosomal sites of spindle attachment during cell division, are marked epigenetically by the centromere-specific histone H3 variant cenH3 and typically contain long stretches of centromere-specific tandem DNA repeats (∼1.8 Mb in maize). In 23 inbreds of domesticated maize chosen to represent the genetic diversity of maize germplasm, partial or nearly complete loss of the tandem DNA repeat CentC precedes 57 independent cenH3 relocation events that result in neocentromere formation. Chromosomal regions with newly acquired cenH3 are colonized by the centromere-specific retrotransposon CR2 at a rate that would result in centromere-sized CR2 clusters in 20,000-95,000 y. Three lines of evidence indicate that CentC loss is linked to inbreeding, including (i) CEN10 of temperate lineages, presumed to have experienced a genetic bottleneck, contain less CentC than their tropical relatives; (ii) strong selection for centromere-linked genes in domesticated maize reduced diversity at seven of the ten maize centromeres to only one or two postdomestication haplotypes; and (iii) the centromere with the largest number of haplotypes in domesticated maize (CEN7) has the highest CentC levels in nearly all domesticated lines. Rare recombinations introduced one (CEN2) or more (CEN5) alternate CEN haplotypes while retaining a single haplotype at domestication loci linked to these centromeres. Taken together, this evidence strongly suggests that inbreeding, favored by postdomestication selection for centromere-linked genes affecting key domestication or agricultural traits, drives replacement of the tandem centromere repeats in maize and other crop plants. Similar forces may act during speciation in natural systems. PMID:26858403

  8. The telomere bouquet regulates meiotic centromere assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klutstein, Michael; Fennell, Alex; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Cooper, Julia Promisel

    2015-04-01

    The role of the conserved meiotic telomere bouquet has been enigmatic for over a century. We showed previously that disruption of the fission yeast bouquet impairs spindle formation in approximately half of meiotic cells. Surprisingly, bouquet-deficient meiocytes with functional spindles harbour chromosomes that fail to achieve spindle attachment. Kinetochore proteins and the centromeric histone H3 variant Cnp1 fail to localize to those centromeres that exhibit spindle attachment defects in the bouquet's absence. The HP1 orthologue Swi6 also fails to bind these centromeres, suggesting that compromised pericentromeric heterochromatin underlies the kinetochore defects. We find that centromeres are prone to disassembly during meiosis, but this is reversed by localization of centromeres to the telomere-proximal microenvironment, which is conducive to heterochromatin formation and centromere reassembly. Accordingly, artificially tethering a centromere to a telomere rescues the tethered centromere but not other centromeres. These results reveal an unanticipated level of control of centromeres by telomeres. PMID:25774833

  9. “Point” Centromeres of Saccharomyces Harbor Single Centromere-Specific Nucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Henikoff, Steven; Henikoff, Jorja G.

    2012-01-01

    The “point” centromere of budding yeast is genetically defined by an ∼125-bp sequence. Recent fluorescence measurements of kinetochore clusters have suggested that this sequence specifies multiple centromere histone 3 (CenH3) nucleosomes. However, high-resolution mapping demonstrates that there is only one CenH3 nucleosome per centromere, providing biochemical confirmation of the point centromere model.

  10. The unconventional structure of centromeric nucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Henikoff, Steven; Furuyama, Takehito

    2012-01-01

    The centromere is a defining feature of the eukaryotic chromosome, required for attachment to spindle microtubules and segregation to the poles at both mitosis and meiosis. The fundamental unit of centromere identity is the centromere-specific nucleosome, in which the centromeric histone 3 (cenH3) variant takes the place of H3. The structure of the cenH3 nucleosome has been the subject of controversy, as mutually exclusive models have been proposed, including conventional and unconventional l...

  11. Structure, dynamics, and evolution of centromeric nucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Dalal, Yamini; Furuyama, Takehito; Vermaak, Danielle; Henikoff, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Centromeres are defining features of eukaryotic chromosomes, providing sites of attachment for segregation during mitosis and meiosis. The fundamental unit of centromere structure is the centromeric nucleosome, which differs from the conventional nucleosome by the presence of a centromere-specific histone variant (CenH3) in place of canonical H3. We have shown that the CenH3 nucleosome core found in interphase Drosophila cells is a heterotypic tetramer, a “hemisome” consisting of one molecule...

  12. Centromere domain organization and histone modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjerling P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Centromere function requires the proper coordination of several subfunctions, such as kinetochore assembly, sister chromatid cohesion, binding of kinetochore microtubules, orientation of sister kinetochores to opposite spindle poles, and their movement towards the spindle poles. Centromere structure appears to be organized in different, separable domains in order to accomplish these functions. Despite the conserved nature of centromere functions, the molecular genetic definition of the DNA sequences that form a centromere in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and in humans has revealed little conservation at the level of centromere DNA sequences. Also at the protein level few centromere proteins are conserved in all of these four organisms and many are unique to the different organisms. The recent analysis of the centromere structure in the yeast S. pombe by electron microscopy and detailed immunofluorescence microscopy of Drosophila centromeres have brought to light striking similarities at the overall structural level between these centromeres and the human centromere. The structural organization of the centromere is generally multilayered with a heterochromatin domain and a central core/inner plate region, which harbors the outer plate structures of the kinetochore. It is becoming increasingly clear that the key factors for assembly and function of the centromere structure are the specialized histones and modified histones which are present in the centromeric heterochromatin and in the chromatin of the central core. Thus, despite the differences in the DNA sequences and the proteins that define a centromere, there is an overall structural similarity between centromeres in evolutionarily diverse eukaryotes.

  13. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Rice Centromeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiming

    2010-02-04

    The centromere is the most characteristic landmark of eukaryotic chromosomes. Centromeres function as the site for kinetochore assembly and spindle attachment, allowing for the faithful pairing and segregation of sister chromatids during cell division. Characterization of centromeric DNA is not only essential to understand the structure and organization of plant genomes, but it is also a critical step in the development of plant artificial chromosomes. The centromeres of most model eukaryotic species, consist predominantly of long arrays of satellite DNA. Determining the precise DNA boundary of a centromere has proven to be a difficult task in multicellular eukaryotes. We have successfully cloned and sequenced the centromere of rice chromosome 8 (Cen8), representing the first fully sequenced centromere from any multicellular eukaryotes. The functional core of Cen8 spans ~800 kb of DNA, which was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody against the rice centromere-specific H3 histone. We discovered 16 actively transcribed genes distributed throughout the Cen8 region. In addition to Cen8, we have characterized eight additional rice centromeres using the next generation sequencing technology. We discovered four subfamilies of the CRR retrotransposon that is highly enriched in rice centromeres. CRR elements are constitutively transcribed and different CRR subfamilies are differentially processed by RNAi. These results suggest that different CRR subfamilies may play different roles in the RNAi-mediated pathway for formation and maintenance of centromeric chromatin.

  14. Diversity in the organization of centromeric chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Florian A; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Centromeric chromatin is distinguished primarily by nucleosomes containing the histone variant cenH3, which organizes the kinetochore that links the chromosome to the spindle apparatus. Whereas budding yeast have simple 'point' centromeres with single cenH3 nucleosomes, and fission yeast have 'regional' centromeres without obvious sequence specificity, the centromeres of most organisms are embedded in highly repetitive 'satellite' DNA. Recent studies have revealed a remarkable diversity in centromere chromatin organization among different lineages, including some that have lost cenH3 altogether. We review recent progress in understanding point, regional and satellite centromeres, as well as less well-studied centromere types, such as holocentromeres. We also discuss the formation of neocentromeres, the role of pericentric heterochromatin, and the structure and composition of the cenH3 nucleosome. PMID:25956076

  15. Synaptonemal complex components persist at centromeres and are required for homologous centromere pairing in mouse spermatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Gaston Bisig

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in simple model organisms have shown that centromere pairing is important for ensuring high-fidelity meiotic chromosome segregation. However, this process and the mechanisms regulating it in higher eukaryotes are unknown. Here we present the first detailed study of meiotic centromere pairing in mouse spermatogenesis and link it with key events of the G2/metaphase I transition. In mouse we observed no evidence of the persistent coupling of centromeres that has been observed in several model organisms. We do however find that telomeres associate in non-homologous pairs or small groups in B type spermatogonia and pre-leptotene spermatocytes, and this association is disrupted by deletion of the synaptonemal complex component SYCP3. Intriguingly, we found that, in mid prophase, chromosome synapsis is not initiated at centromeres, and centromeric regions are the last to pair in the zygotene-pachytene transition. In late prophase, we first identified the proteins that reside at paired centromeres. We found that components of the central and lateral element and transverse filaments of the synaptonemal complex are retained at paired centromeres after disassembly of the synaptonemal complex along diplotene chromosome arms. The absence of SYCP1 prevents centromere pairing in knockout mouse spermatocytes. The localization dynamics of SYCP1 and SYCP3 suggest that they play different roles in promoting homologous centromere pairing. SYCP1 remains only at paired centromeres coincident with the time at which some kinetochore proteins begin loading at centromeres, consistent with a role in assembly of meiosis-specific kinetochores. After removal of SYCP1 from centromeres, SYCP3 then accumulates at paired centromeres where it may promote bi-orientation of homologous centromeres. We propose that, in addition to their roles as synaptonemal complex components, SYCP1 and SYCP3 act at the centromeres to promote the establishment and/or maintenance of

  16. De Novo Centromere Formation and Centromeric Sequence Expansion in Wheat and its Wide Hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang Guo; Handong Su; Qinghua Shi; Shulan Fu; Jing Wang; Xiangqi Zhang; Zanmin Hu; Fangpu Han

    2016-01-01

    Centromeres typically contain tandem repeat sequences, but centromere function does not necessarily depend on these sequences. We identified functional centromeres with significant quantitative changes in the centromeric retrotransposons of wheat (CRW) contents in wheat aneuploids (Triticum aestivum) and the offspring of wheat wide hybrids. The CRW signals were strongly reduced or essentially lost in some wheat ditelosomic lines and in the addition lines from the wide hybrids. The total loss ...

  17. Centromeric chromatin and its dynamics in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lermontova, Inna; Sandmann, Michael; Mascher, Martin; Schmit, Anne-Catherine; Chabouté, Marie-Edith

    2015-07-01

    Centromeres are chromatin structures that are required for proper separation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. The centromere is composed of centromeric DNA, often enriched in satellite repeats, and kinetochore complex proteins. To date, over 100 kinetochore components have been identified in various eukaryotes. Kinetochore assembly begins with incorporation of centromeric histone H3 variant CENH3 into centromeric nucleosomes. Protein components of the kinetochore are either present at centromeres throughout the cell cycle or localize to centromeres transiently, prior to attachment of microtubules to each kinetochore in prometaphase of mitotic cells. This is the case for the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) proteins in animal cells. The SAC complex ensures equal separation of chromosomes between daughter nuclei by preventing anaphase onset before metaphase is complete, i.e. the sister kinetochores of all chromosomes are attached to spindle fibers from opposite poles. In this review, we focus on the organization of centromeric DNA and the kinetochore assembly in plants. We summarize recent advances regarding loading of CENH3 into the centromere, and the subcellular localization and protein-protein interactions of Arabidopsis thaliana proteins involved in kinetochore assembly and function. We describe the transcriptional activity of corresponding genes based on in silico analysis of their promoters and cell cycle-dependent expression. Additionally, barley homologs of all selected A. thaliana proteins have been identified in silico, and their sequences and domain structures are presented. PMID:25976696

  18. Chaperone-mediated assembly of centromeric chromatin in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Furuyama, Takehito; Dalal, Yamini; Henikoff, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Every eukaryotic chromosome requires a centromere for attachment to spindle microtubules for chromosome segregation. Although centromeric DNA sequences vary greatly among species, centromeres are universally marked by the presence of a centromeric histone variant, centromeric histone 3 (CenH3), which replaces canonical histone H3 in centromeric nucleosomes. Conventional chromatin is maintained in part by histone chaperone complexes, which deposit the S phase-limited (H3) and constitutive (H3....

  19. Precise Centromere Positioning on Chicken Chromosome 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlotina, A.; Galkina, S.A.; Krasikova, A.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Gaginskaya, E.; Deryusheva, S.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the progress of the chicken (Gallus gallus) genome sequencing project, the centromeric sequences of most macrochromosomes remain unknown. This makes it difficult to determine centromere positions in the genome sequence assembly. Using giant lampbrush chromosomes from growing oocytes, we anal

  20. De Novo Centromere Formation and Centromeric Sequence Expansion in Wheat and its Wide Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiang; Su, Handong; Shi, Qinghua; Fu, Shulan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xiangqi; Hu, Zanmin; Han, Fangpu

    2016-04-01

    Centromeres typically contain tandem repeat sequences, but centromere function does not necessarily depend on these sequences. We identified functional centromeres with significant quantitative changes in the centromeric retrotransposons of wheat (CRW) contents in wheat aneuploids (Triticum aestivum) and the offspring of wheat wide hybrids. The CRW signals were strongly reduced or essentially lost in some wheat ditelosomic lines and in the addition lines from the wide hybrids. The total loss of the CRW sequences but the presence of CENH3 in these lines suggests that the centromeres were formed de novo. In wheat and its wide hybrids, which carry large complex genomes or no sequenced genome, we performed CENH3-ChIP-dot-blot methods alone or in combination with CENH3-ChIP-seq and identified the ectopic genomic sequences present at the new centromeres. In adcdition, the transcription of the identified DNA sequences was remarkably increased at the new centromere, suggesting that the transcription of the corresponding sequences may be associated with de novo centromere formation. Stable alien chromosomes with two and three regions containing CRW sequences induced by centromere breakage were observed in the wheat-Th. elongatum hybrid derivatives, but only one was a functional centromere. In wheat-rye (Secale cereale) hybrids, the rye centromere-specific sequences spread along the chromosome arms and may have caused centromere expansion. Frequent and significant quantitative alterations in the centromere sequence via chromosomal rearrangement have been systematically described in wheat wide hybridizations, which may affect the retention or loss of the alien chromosomes in the hybrids. Thus, the centromere behavior in wide crosses likely has an important impact on the generation of biodiversity, which ultimately has implications for speciation. PMID:27110907

  1. Sunflower centromeres consist of a centromere-specific LINE and a chromosome-specific tandem repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaki, Kiyotaka; Tanaka, Keisuke; Yamaji, Naoki; Kobayashi, Hisato; Murata, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    The kinetochore is a protein complex including kinetochore-specific proteins that plays a role in chromatid segregation during mitosis and meiosis. The complex associates with centromeric DNA sequences that are usually species-specific. In plant species, tandem repeats including satellite DNA sequences and retrotransposons have been reported as centromeric DNA sequences. In this study on sunflowers, a cDNA-encoding centromere-specific histone H3 (CENH3) was isolated from a cDNA pool from a seedling, and an antibody was raised against a peptide synthesized from the deduced cDNA. The antibody specifically recognized the sunflower CENH3 (HaCENH3) and showed centromeric signals by immunostaining and immunohistochemical staining analysis. The antibody was also applied in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-Seq to isolate centromeric DNA sequences and two different types of repetitive DNA sequences were identified. One was a long interspersed nuclear element (LINE)-like sequence, which showed centromere-specific signals on almost all chromosomes in sunflowers. This is the first report of a centromeric LINE sequence, suggesting possible centromere targeting ability. Another type of identified repetitive DNA was a tandem repeat sequence with a 187-bp unit that was found only on a pair of chromosomes. The HaCENH3 content of the tandem repeats was estimated to be much higher than that of the LINE, which implies centromere evolution from LINE-based centromeres to more stable tandem-repeat-based centromeres. In addition, the epigenetic status of the sunflower centromeres was investigated by immunohistochemical staining and ChIP, and it was found that centromeres were heterochromatic. PMID:26583020

  2. The molecular basis for centromere identity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Kara L; Cheeseman, Iain M

    2016-01-01

    The centromere is the region of the chromosome that directs its segregation in mitosis and meiosis. Although the functional importance of the centromere has been appreciated for more than 130 years, elucidating the molecular features and properties that enable centromeres to orchestrate chromosome segregation is an ongoing challenge. Most eukaryotic centromeres are defined epigenetically and require the presence of nucleosomes containing the histone H3 variant centromere protein A (CENP-A; also known as CENH3). Ongoing work is providing important molecular insights into the central requirements for centromere identity and propagation, and the mechanisms by which centromeres recruit kinetochores to connect to spindle microtubules. PMID:26601620

  3. Dicentric Chromosome Formation and Epigenetics of Centromere Formation in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shulan Fu; Zhi Gao; James Birchler; Fangpu Han

    2012-01-01

    Plant centromeres are generally composed of tandem arrays of simple repeats that form a complex chromosome locus where the kinetochore forms and microtubules attach during mitosis and meiosis.Each chromosome has one centromere region,which is essential for accurate division of the genetic material.Recently,chromosomes containing two centromere regions (called dicentric chromosomes)have been found in maize and wheat.Interestingly,some dicentric chromosomes are stable because only one centromere is active and the other one is inactivated.Because such arrays maintain their typical structure for both active and inactive centromeres,the specification of centromere activity has an epigenetic component independent of the DNA sequence.Under some circumstances,the inactive centromeres may recover centromere function,which is called centromere reactivation.Recent studies have highlighted the important changes,such as DNA methylation and histone modification,that occur during centromere inactivation and reactivation.

  4. Adaptive evolution of centromere proteins in plants and animals

    OpenAIRE

    Henikoff Steven; Bryson Terri D; Talbert Paul B

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Centromeres represent the last frontiers of plant and animal genomics. Although they perform a conserved function in chromosome segregation, centromeres are typically composed of repetitive satellite sequences that are rapidly evolving. The nucleosomes of centromeres are characterized by a special H3-like histone (CenH3), which evolves rapidly and adaptively in Drosophila and Arabidopsis. Most plant, animal and fungal centromeres also bind a large protein, centromere prote...

  5. Centromere protein B of African green monkey cells: gene structure, cellular expression, and centromeric localization.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoda, K; Nakamura, T.; Masumoto, H; Suzuki, N.; Kitagawa, K; M. Nakano; Shinjo, A; Okazaki, T.

    1996-01-01

    Centromere protein B (CENP-B) is a centromeric DNA-binding protein which recognizes a 17-bp sequence (CENP-B box) in human and mouse centromeric satellite DNA. The African green monkey (AGM) is phylogenetically closer to humans than mice and is known to contain large amounts of alpha-satellite DNA, but there has been no report of CENP-B boxes or CENP-B in the centromere domains of its chromosomes. To elucidate the AGM CENP-B-CENP-B box interaction, we have analyzed the gene structure, express...

  6. The centromeric nucleosome of budding yeast is perfectly positioned and covers the entire centromere

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Hope A.; Howard, Bruce H.; David J Clark

    2011-01-01

    The centromeres of budding yeast are ∼120 bp in size and contain three functional elements: an AT-rich region flanked by binding sites for Cbf1 and CBF3. A specialized nucleosome containing the H3 variant Cse4 (CenH3) is formed at the centromere. Our genome-wide paired-end sequencing of nucleosomal DNA reveals that the centromeric nucleosome contains a micrococcal nuclease-resistant kernel of 123–135 bp, depending on the centromere, and is therefore significantly shorter than the canonical nu...

  7. Atypical centromeres in plants—what they can tell us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuacos, Maria; H. Franklin, F. Chris; Heckmann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The centromere, visible as the primary constriction of condensed metaphase chromosomes, is a defined chromosomal locus essential for genome stability. It mediates transient assembly of a multi-protein complex, the kinetochore, which enables interaction with spindle fibers and thus faithful segregation of the genetic information during nuclear divisions. Centromeric DNA varies in extent and sequence composition among organisms, but a common feature of almost all active eukaryotic centromeres is the presence of the centromeric histone H3 variant cenH3 (a.k.a. CENP-A). These typical centromere features apply to most studied species. However, a number of species display “atypical” centromeres, such as holocentromeres (centromere extension along almost the entire chromatid length) or neocentromeres (ectopic centromere activity). In this review, we provide an overview of different atypical centromere types found in plants including holocentromeres, de novo formed centromeres and terminal neocentromeres as well as di-, tri- and metapolycentromeres (more than one centromere per chromosomes). We discuss their specific and common features and compare them to centromere types found in other eukaryotic species. We also highlight new insights into centromere biology gained in plants with atypical centromeres such as distinct mechanisms to define a holocentromere, specific adaptations in species with holocentromeres during meiosis or various scenarios leading to neocentromere formation. PMID:26579160

  8. DNA topoisomerase III localizes to centromeres and affects centromeric CENP-A levels in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Prasad, Punit; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized chromatin regions marked by the presence of nucleosomes containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes is intimately linked to DNA topology, and DNA topoisomerases have previously been implicated in the dynamics of canonical H3 nucleosomes. Here we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Top3 and its partner Rqh1 are involved in controlling the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) at centromeres. Both top3 and rqh1 mutants display defects in chromosome segregation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarrays, we show that Top3, unlike Top1 and Top2, is highly enriched at centromeric central domains, demonstrating that Top3 is the major topoisomerase in this region. Moreover, centromeric Top3 occupancy positively correlates with CENP-A(Cnp1) occupancy. Intriguingly, both top3 and rqh1 mutants display increased relative enrichment of CENP-A(Cnp1) at centromeric central domains. Thus, Top3 and Rqh1 normally limit the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) in this region. This new role is independent of the established function of Top3 and Rqh1 in homologous recombination downstream of Rad51. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Top3-Rqh1 complex has an important role in controlling centromere DNA topology, which in turn affects the dynamics of CENP-A(Cnp1) nucleosomes. PMID:23516381

  9. DNA topoisomerase III localizes to centromeres and affects centromeric CENP-A levels in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Norman-Axelsson

    Full Text Available Centromeres are specialized chromatin regions marked by the presence of nucleosomes containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes is intimately linked to DNA topology, and DNA topoisomerases have previously been implicated in the dynamics of canonical H3 nucleosomes. Here we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Top3 and its partner Rqh1 are involved in controlling the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1 at centromeres. Both top3 and rqh1 mutants display defects in chromosome segregation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarrays, we show that Top3, unlike Top1 and Top2, is highly enriched at centromeric central domains, demonstrating that Top3 is the major topoisomerase in this region. Moreover, centromeric Top3 occupancy positively correlates with CENP-A(Cnp1 occupancy. Intriguingly, both top3 and rqh1 mutants display increased relative enrichment of CENP-A(Cnp1 at centromeric central domains. Thus, Top3 and Rqh1 normally limit the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1 in this region. This new role is independent of the established function of Top3 and Rqh1 in homologous recombination downstream of Rad51. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Top3-Rqh1 complex has an important role in controlling centromere DNA topology, which in turn affects the dynamics of CENP-A(Cnp1 nucleosomes.

  10. Stretching the Rules: Monocentric Chromosomes with Multiple Centromere Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Pavel; Navratilova, Alice; Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Koblizkova, Andrea; Steinbauerova, Veronika; Chocholova, Eva; Novak, Petr; Wanner, Gerhard; Macas, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    The centromere is a functional chromosome domain that is essential for faithful chromosome segregation during cell division and that can be reliably identified by the presence of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CenH3. In monocentric chromosomes, the centromere is characterized by a single CenH3-containing region within a morphologically distinct primary constriction. This region usually spans up to a few Mbp composed mainly of centromere-specific satellite DNA common to all chromos...

  11. DNA deletion as a mechanism for developmentally programmed centromere loss

    OpenAIRE

    Lhuillier-Akakpo, Maoussi; Guérin, Frédéric; Frapporti, Andrea; Duharcourt, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of active centromeres is the presence of the histone H3 variant CenH3 in the centromeric chromatin, which ensures faithful genome distribution at each cell division. A functional centromere can be inactivated, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of centromere inactivation remain largely unknown. Here, we describe the loss of CenH3 protein as part of a developmental program leading to the formation of the somatic nucleus in the eukaryote Paramecium. We identify two p...

  12. RNAi and heterochromatin repress centromeric meiotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermeier, Chad; Higuchi, Emily C; Phadnis, Naina;

    2010-01-01

    During meiosis, the formation of viable haploid gametes from diploid precursors requires that each homologous chromosome pair be properly segregated to produce an exact haploid set of chromosomes. Genetic recombination, which provides a physical connection between homologous chromosomes, is....... Surprisingly, one mutant derepressed for recombination in the heterochromatic mating-type region during meiosis and several mutants derepressed for centromeric gene expression during mitotic growth are not derepressed for centromeric recombination during meiosis. These results reveal a complex relation between...... types of repression by heterochromatin. Our results also reveal a previously undemonstrated role for RNAi and heterochromatin in the repression of meiotic centromeric recombination and, potentially, in the prevention of birth defects by maintenance of proper chromosome segregation during meiosis....

  13. Gene Expression and Chromatin Modifications Associated with Maize Centromeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hainan Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are defined by the presence of CENH3, a variant of histone H3. Centromeres in most plant species contain exclusively highly repetitive DNA sequences, which has hindered research on structure and function of centromeric chromatin. Several maize centromeres have been nearly completely sequenced, providing a sequence-based platform for genomic and epigenomic research of plant centromeres. Here we report a high resolution map of CENH3 nucleosomes in the maize genome. Although CENH3 nucleosomes are spaced ∼190 bp on average, CENH3 nucleosomes that occupied CentC, a 156-bp centromeric satellite repeat, showed clear positioning aligning with CentC monomers. Maize centromeres contain alternating CENH3-enriched and CENH3-depleted subdomains, which account for 87% and 13% of the centromeres, respectively. A number of annotated genes were identified in the centromeres, including 11 active genes that were located exclusively in CENH3-depleted subdomains. The euchromatic histone modification marks, including H3K4me3, H3K36me3 and H3K9ac, detected in maize centromeres were associated mainly with the active genes. Interestingly, maize centromeres also have lower levels of the heterochromatin histone modification mark H3K27me2 relative to pericentromeric regions. We conclude that neither H3K27me2 nor the three euchromatic histone modifications are likely to serve as functionally important epigenetic marks of centromere identity in maize.

  14. Gene Expression and Chromatin Modifications Associated with Maize Centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hainan; Zhu, Xiaobiao; Wang, Kai; Gent, Jonathan I; Zhang, Wenli; Dawe, R Kelly; Jiang, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Centromeres are defined by the presence of CENH3, a variant of histone H3. Centromeres in most plant species contain exclusively highly repetitive DNA sequences, which has hindered research on structure and function of centromeric chromatin. Several maize centromeres have been nearly completely sequenced, providing a sequence-based platform for genomic and epigenomic research of plant centromeres. Here we report a high resolution map of CENH3 nucleosomes in the maize genome. Although CENH3 nucleosomes are spaced ∼190 bp on average, CENH3 nucleosomes that occupied CentC, a 156-bp centromeric satellite repeat, showed clear positioning aligning with CentC monomers. Maize centromeres contain alternating CENH3-enriched and CENH3-depleted subdomains, which account for 87% and 13% of the centromeres, respectively. A number of annotated genes were identified in the centromeres, including 11 active genes that were located exclusively in CENH3-depleted subdomains. The euchromatic histone modification marks, including H3K4me3, H3K36me3 and H3K9ac, detected in maize centromeres were associated mainly with the active genes. Interestingly, maize centromeres also have lower levels of the heterochromatin histone modification mark H3K27me2 relative to pericentromeric regions. We conclude that neither H3K27me2 nor the three euchromatic histone modifications are likely to serve as functionally important epigenetic marks of centromere identity in maize. PMID:26564952

  15. Centromere licensing: Mis18 is required to Polo-ver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart-Dailey, Meghan C; Foltz, Daniel R

    2014-09-01

    The Mis18 complex is a critical player in determining when and where centromeres are built. A new study identifies Polo-like kinase (Plk1) as a positive regulator required for the localization of Mis18 to centromeres. This is a critical step that is essential for proper centromere function and maintaining the integrity of the genome. PMID:25202874

  16. Absence of Positive Selection on Centromeric Histones in Tetrahymena Suggests Unsuppressed Centromere-Drive in Lineages Lacking Male Meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Elde, Nels C.; Kevin C Roach; Yao, Meng-Chao; Harmit S Malik

    2011-01-01

    Centromere-drive is a process where centromeres compete for transmission through asymmetric "female" meiosis for inclusion into the oocyte. In symmetric "male" meiosis, all meiotic products form viable germ cells. Therefore, the primary incentive for centromere-drive, a potential transmission bias, is believed to be missing from male meiosis. In this article, we consider whether male meiosis also bears the primary cost of centromere-drive. Because different taxa carry out different combinatio...

  17. Synthetic heterochromatin bypasses RNAi and centromeric repeats to establish functional centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagansky, Alexander; Folco, Hernan Diego; Almeida, Ricardo; Pidoux, Alison L; Boukaba, Abdelhalim; Simmer, Femke; Urano, Takeshi; Hamilton, Georgina L; Allshire, Robin C

    2009-06-26

    In the central domain of fission yeast centromeres, the kinetochore is assembled on CENP-A(Cnp1) nucleosomes. Normally, small interfering RNAs generated from flanking outer repeat transcripts direct histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase Clr4 to homologous loci to form heterochromatin. Outer repeats, RNA interference (RNAi), and centromeric heterochromatin are required to establish CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin. We demonstrated that tethering Clr4 via DNA-binding sites at euchromatic loci induces heterochromatin assembly, with or without active RNAi. This synthetic heterochromatin completely substitutes for outer repeats on plasmid-based minichromosomes, promoting de novo CENP-A(Cnp1) and kinetochore assembly, to allow their mitotic segregation, even with RNAi inactive. Thus, the role of outer repeats in centromere establishment is simply the provision of RNAi substrates to direct heterochromatin formation; H3K9 methylation-dependent heterochromatin is alone sufficient to form functional centromeres. PMID:19556509

  18. Synthetic heterochromatin bypasses RNAi and centromeric repeats to establish functional centromeres

    OpenAIRE

    Kagansky, Alexander; Folco, Hernan Diego; Almeida, Ricardo; Pidoux, Alison L.; Boukaba, Abdelhalim; Simmer, Femke; Urano, Takeshi; Hamilton, Georgina L.; Allshire, Robin C.

    2009-01-01

    In the central domain of fission yeast centromeres, the kinetochore is assembled on CENP-A(Cnp1) nucleosomes. Normally, small interfering RNAs generated from flanking outer repeat transcripts direct histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase Clr4 to homologous loci to form heterochromatin. Outer repeats, RNA interference (RNAi), and centromeric heterochromatin are required to establish CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin. We demonstrated that tethering Clr4 via DNA-binding sites at euchromatic loci induces het...

  19. Centromere synteny among Brachypodium, wheat, and rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, wheat and Brachypodium are plant genetic models with variable genome complexity and basic chromosome numbers, representing two subfamilies of the Poaceae. Centromeres are prominent chromosome landmarks, but their fate during this convoluted chromosome evolution has been more difficult to deter...

  20. Centromeric Transcription Regulates Aurora-B Localization and Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Blower

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Centromeric transcription is widely conserved; however, it is not clear what role centromere transcription plays during mitosis. Here, I find that centromeres are transcribed in Xenopus egg extracts into a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA; cen-RNA that localizes to mitotic centromeres, chromatin, and spindles. cen-RNAs bind to the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC in vitro and in vivo. Blocking transcription or antisense inhibition of cen-RNA leads to a reduction of CPC localization to the inner centromere and misregulation of CPC component Aurora-B activation independently of known centromere recruitment pathways. Additionally, transcription is required for normal bipolar attachment of kinetochores to the mitotic spindle, consistent with a role for cen-RNA in CPC regulation. This work demonstrates that cen-RNAs promote normal kinetochore function through regulation of the localization and activation of the CPC and confirm that lncRNAs are components of the centromere.

  1. Mediator promotes CENP-a incorporation at fission yeast centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Jonas O; Szilagyi, Zsolt; Liu, Beidong; Lopez, Marcela Davila; Szászi, Erzsébet; Djupedal, Ingela; Nyström, Thomas; Ekwall, Karl; Gustafsson, Claes M; Zhu, Xuefeng

    2012-10-01

    At Schizosaccharomyces pombe centromeres, heterochromatin formation is required for de novo incorporation of the histone H3 variant CENP-A(Cnp1), which in turn directs kinetochore assembly and ultimately chromosome segregation during mitosis. Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) transcribed by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) directs heterochromatin formation through not only the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery but also RNAi-independent RNA processing factors. Control of centromeric ncRNA transcription is therefore a key factor for proper centromere function. We here demonstrate that Mediator directs ncRNA transcription and regulates centromeric heterochromatin formation in fission yeast. Mediator colocalizes with Pol II at centromeres, and loss of the Mediator subunit Med20 causes a dramatic increase in pericentromeric transcription and desilencing of the core centromere. As a consequence, heterochromatin formation is impaired via both the RNAi-dependent and -independent pathways, resulting in loss of CENP-A(Cnp1) from the core centromere, a defect in kinetochore function, and a severe chromosome segregation defect. Interestingly, the increased centromeric transcription observed in med20Δ cells appears to directly block CENP-A(Cnp1) incorporation since inhibition of Pol II transcription can suppress the observed phenotypes. Our data thus identify Mediator as a crucial regulator of ncRNA transcription at fission yeast centromeres and add another crucial layer of regulation to centromere function. PMID:22851695

  2. Stretching the rules: monocentric chromosomes with multiple centromere domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Neumann

    Full Text Available The centromere is a functional chromosome domain that is essential for faithful chromosome segregation during cell division and that can be reliably identified by the presence of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CenH3. In monocentric chromosomes, the centromere is characterized by a single CenH3-containing region within a morphologically distinct primary constriction. This region usually spans up to a few Mbp composed mainly of centromere-specific satellite DNA common to all chromosomes of a given species. In holocentric chromosomes, there is no primary constriction; the centromere is composed of many CenH3 loci distributed along the entire length of a chromosome. Using correlative fluorescence light microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy, we show that pea (Pisum sativum chromosomes exhibit remarkably long primary constrictions that contain 3-5 explicit CenH3-containing regions, a novelty in centromere organization. In addition, we estimate that the size of the chromosome segment delimited by two outermost domains varies between 69 Mbp and 107 Mbp, several factors larger than any known centromere length. These domains are almost entirely composed of repetitive DNA sequences belonging to 13 distinct families of satellite DNA and one family of centromeric retrotransposons, all of which are unevenly distributed among pea chromosomes. We present the centromeres of Pisum as novel "meta-polycentric" functional domains. Our results demonstrate that the organization and DNA composition of functional centromere domains can be far more complex than previously thought, do not require single repetitive elements, and do not require single centromere domains in order to segregate properly. Based on these findings, we propose Pisum as a useful model for investigation of centromere architecture and the still poorly understood role of repetitive DNA in centromere evolution, determination, and function.

  3. Stretching the rules: monocentric chromosomes with multiple centromere domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Pavel; Navrátilová, Alice; Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Koblížková, Andrea; Steinbauerová, Veronika; Chocholová, Eva; Novák, Petr; Wanner, Gerhard; Macas, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    The centromere is a functional chromosome domain that is essential for faithful chromosome segregation during cell division and that can be reliably identified by the presence of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CenH3. In monocentric chromosomes, the centromere is characterized by a single CenH3-containing region within a morphologically distinct primary constriction. This region usually spans up to a few Mbp composed mainly of centromere-specific satellite DNA common to all chromosomes of a given species. In holocentric chromosomes, there is no primary constriction; the centromere is composed of many CenH3 loci distributed along the entire length of a chromosome. Using correlative fluorescence light microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy, we show that pea (Pisum sativum) chromosomes exhibit remarkably long primary constrictions that contain 3-5 explicit CenH3-containing regions, a novelty in centromere organization. In addition, we estimate that the size of the chromosome segment delimited by two outermost domains varies between 69 Mbp and 107 Mbp, several factors larger than any known centromere length. These domains are almost entirely composed of repetitive DNA sequences belonging to 13 distinct families of satellite DNA and one family of centromeric retrotransposons, all of which are unevenly distributed among pea chromosomes. We present the centromeres of Pisum as novel "meta-polycentric" functional domains. Our results demonstrate that the organization and DNA composition of functional centromere domains can be far more complex than previously thought, do not require single repetitive elements, and do not require single centromere domains in order to segregate properly. Based on these findings, we propose Pisum as a useful model for investigation of centromere architecture and the still poorly understood role of repetitive DNA in centromere evolution, determination, and function. PMID:22737088

  4. Holocentromeres are dispersed point centromeres localized at transcription factor hotspots

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner, Florian A; Henikoff, Steven

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest During cell division, the chromosomes in the original cell must be replicated and these ‘sister chromosomes’ must then be divided equally between the two new daughter cells. At first, the sister chromosomes are held together near a region called the centromere, which is important because the microtubules that pull the sister chromosomes apart attach themselves to the centromere. In many cases, the centromere is a small region near the middle of the chromosomes, which produces a c...

  5. Atypical centromeres in plants—what they can tell us

    OpenAIRE

    Cuacos, Maria; H. Franklin, F. Chris; Heckmann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The centromere, visible as the primary constriction of condensed metaphase chromosomes, is a defined chromosomal locus essential for genome stability. It mediates transient assembly of a multi-protein complex, the kinetochore, which enables interaction with spindle fibers and thus faithful segregation of the genetic information during nuclear divisions. Centromeric DNA varies in extent and sequence composition among organisms, but a common feature of almost all active eukaryotic centromeres i...

  6. Inner Kinetochore Protein Interactions with Regional Centromeres of Fission Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur, Jitendra; Talbert, Paul B; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Centromeres of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lack the highly repetitive sequences that make most other "regional" centromeres refractory to analysis. To map fission yeast centromeres, we applied H4S47C-anchored cleavage mapping and native and cross-linked chromatin immunoprecipitation with paired-end sequencing. H3 nucleosomes are nearly absent from the central domain, which is occupied by centromere-specific H3 (cenH3 or CENP-A) nucleosomes with two H4s per particle that are mo...

  7. Tripartite organization of centromeric chromatin in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Krassovsky, Kristina; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Henikoff, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The centromere is the genetic locus that organizes the proteinaceous kinetochore and is responsible for attachment of the chromosome to the spindle at mitosis and meiosis. In most eukaryotes, the centromere consists of highly repetitive DNA sequences that are occupied by nucleosomes containing the CenH3 histone variant, whereas in budding yeast, a ∼120-bp centromere DNA element (CDE) that is sufficient for centromere function is occupied by a single right-handed histone variant CenH3 (Cse4) n...

  8. An inverse relationship to germline transcription defines centromeric chromatin in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Gassmann, Reto; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Yuen, Karen W.; Muroyama, Andrew; Egelhofer, Thea; Gaydos, Laura; Barron, Francie; Maddox, Paul; Essex, Anthony; Monen, Joost; Ercan, Sevinc; Lieb, Jason D; Oegema, Karen; Strome, Susan; Desai, Arshad

    2012-01-01

    Centromeres are chromosomal loci that direct segregation of the genome during cell division. The histone H3 variant CENP-A (also known as CenH3) defines centromeres in monocentric organisms, which confine centromere activity to a discrete chromosomal region, and holocentric organisms, which distribute centromere activity along the chromosome length1–3. Because the highly repetitive DNA found at most centromeres is neither necessary nor sufficient for centromere function, stable inheritance of...

  9. Repeatless and Repeat-Based Centromeres in Potato: Implications for Centromere Evolution[C][W

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gong, Z.; Wu, Y.; Koblížková, Andrea; Torres, G.A.; Wang, K.; Iovene, M.; Neumann, Pavel; Zhang, W.; Novák, Petr; Buell, C.R.; Macas, Jiří; Jiang, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 9 (2012), s. 3559-3574. ISSN 1040-4651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : repetitive sequences * plant satellite repeats * Arabidopsis thaliana * rice centromere * wild potatoes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.251, year: 2012

  10. HJURP is involved in the expansion of centromeric chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpelescu, Marinela; Hori, Tetsuya; Toyoda, Atsushi; Misu, Sadahiko; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Obuse, Chikashi; Fujiyama, Asao; Fukagawa, Tatsuo

    2015-08-01

    The CENP-A-specific chaperone HJURP mediates CENP-A deposition at centromeres. The N-terminal region of HJURP is responsible for binding to soluble CENP-A. However, it is unclear whether other regions of HJURP have additional functions for centromere formation and maintenance. In this study, we generated chicken DT40 knockout cell lines and gene replacement constructs for HJURP to assess the additional functions of HJURP in vivo. Our analysis revealed that the middle region of HJURP associates with the Mis18 complex protein M18BP1/KNL2 and that the HJURP-M18BP1 association is required for HJURP function. In addition, on the basis of the analysis of artificial centromeres induced by ectopic HJURP localization, we demonstrate that HJURP exhibits a centromere expansion activity that is separable from its CENP-A-binding activity. We also observed centromere expansion surrounding natural centromeres after HJURP overexpression. We propose that this centromere expansion activity reflects the functional properties of HJURP, which uses this activity to contribute to the plastic establishment of a centromeric chromatin structure. PMID:26063729

  11. Holocentromeres are dispersed point centromeres localized at transcription factor hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Florian A; Henikoff, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Centromeres vary greatly in size and sequence composition, ranging from 'point' centromeres with a single cenH3-containing nucleosome to 'regional' centromeres embedded in tandemly repeated sequences to holocentromeres that extend along the length of entire chromosomes. Point centromeres are defined by sequence, whereas regional and holocentromeres are epigenetically defined by the location of cenH3-containing nucleosomes. In this study, we show that Caenorhabditis elegans holocentromeres are organized as dispersed but discretely localized point centromeres, each forming a single cenH3-containing nucleosome. These centromeric sites co-localize with kinetochore components, and their occupancy is dependent on the cenH3 loading machinery. These sites coincide with non-specific binding sites for multiple transcription factors ('HOT' sites), which become occupied when cenH3 is lost. Our results show that the point centromere is the basic unit of holocentric organization in support of the classical polycentric model for holocentromeres, and provide a mechanistic basis for understanding how centromeric chromatin might be maintained. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02025.001. PMID:24714495

  12. The Past, Present, and Future of Human Centromere Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E. Aldrup-MacDonald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The centromere is the chromosomal locus essential for chromosome inheritance and genome stability. Human centromeres are located at repetitive alpha satellite DNA arrays that compose approximately 5% of the genome. Contiguous alpha satellite DNA sequence is absent from the assembled reference genome, limiting current understanding of centromere organization and function. Here, we review the progress in centromere genomics spanning the discovery of the sequence to its molecular characterization and the work done during the Human Genome Project era to elucidate alpha satellite structure and sequence variation. We discuss exciting recent advances in alpha satellite sequence assembly that have provided important insight into the abundance and complex organization of this sequence on human chromosomes. In light of these new findings, we offer perspectives for future studies of human centromere assembly and function.

  13. DNA deletion as a mechanism for developmentally programmed centromere loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhuillier-Akakpo, Maoussi; Guérin, Frédéric; Frapporti, Andrea; Duharcourt, Sandra

    2016-02-29

    A hallmark of active centromeres is the presence of the histone H3 variant CenH3 in the centromeric chromatin, which ensures faithful genome distribution at each cell division. A functional centromere can be inactivated, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of centromere inactivation remain largely unknown. Here, we describe the loss of CenH3 protein as part of a developmental program leading to the formation of the somatic nucleus in the eukaryote Paramecium. We identify two proteins whose depletion prevents developmental loss of CenH3: the domesticated transposase Pgm involved in the formation of DNA double strand cleavages and the Polycomb-like lysine methyltransferase Ezl1 necessary for trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 9 and lysine 27. Taken together, our data support a model in which developmentally programmed centromere loss is caused by the elimination of DNA sequences associated with CenH3. PMID:26503246

  14. Centromere-targeted de novo integrations of an LTR retrotransposon of Arabidopsis lyrata

    OpenAIRE

    Tsukahara, Sayuri; Kawabe, Akira; Kobayashi, Akie; Ito, Tasuku; Aizu, Tomoyuki; Shin-I, Tadasu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Tarutani, Yoshiaki; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2012-01-01

    Transposons contribute to heterochromatin formation, cohesion, and chromosomal segregation. Centromeres in many eukaryotes—including vertebrates, insects, and plants—contain a high proportion of repeats and transposons, suggesting targeted integration of these transposons to centromeres. However, no transposons targeted to centromeres have been identified. In this study, Kakutani and colleagues demonstrate that a mobile LTR retrotransposon, Tal1, integrates almost exclusively into centromeres...

  15. Generation of a Maize B Centromere Minimal Map Containing the Central Core Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Nathanael A; Douglas, Ryan N; Jackson, Caroline E; Birchler, James A; Dawe, R Kelly

    2015-12-01

    The maize B centromere has been used as a model for centromere epigenetics and as the basis for building artificial chromosomes. However, there are no sequence resources for this important centromere. Here we used transposon display for the centromere-specific retroelement CRM2 to identify a collection of 40 sequence tags that flank CRM2 insertion points on the B chromosome. These were confirmed to lie within the centromere by assaying deletion breakpoints from centromere misdivision derivatives (intracentromere breakages caused by centromere fission). Markers were grouped together on the basis of their association with other markers in the misdivision series and assembled into a pseudocontig containing 10.1 kb of sequence. To identify sequences that interact directly with centromere proteins, we carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation using antibodies to centromeric histone H3 (CENH3), a defining feature of functional centromeric sequences. The CENH3 chromatin immunoprecipitation map was interpreted relative to the known transmission rates of centromere misdivision derivatives to identify a centromere core domain spanning 33 markers. A subset of seven markers was mapped in additional B centromere misdivision derivatives with the use of unique primer pairs. A derivative previously shown to have no canonical centromere sequences (Telo3-3) lacks these core markers. Our results provide a molecular map of the B chromosome centromere and identify key sequences within the map that interact directly with centromeric histone H3. PMID:26511496

  16. Centromere identity is specified by a single centromeric nucleosome in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Furuyama, Suzanne; Biggins, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Chromosome segregation ensures that DNA is equally divided between daughter cells during each round of cell division. The centromere (CEN) is the specific locus on each chromosome that directs formation of the kinetochore, the multiprotein complex that interacts with the spindle microtubules to promote proper chromosomal alignment and segregation during mitosis. CENs are organized into a specialized chromatin structure due to the incorporation of an essential CEN-specific histone H3 variant (...

  17. Recombination patterns reveal information about centromere location on linkage maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Morten T.; McKinney, Garrett J.; Seeb, Lisa W.;

    2016-01-01

    , approximate centromere placement is possible by phasing the same data used to generate linkage maps. Assuming one obligate crossover per chromosome arm, information about centromere location can be revealed by tracking the accumulated recombination frequency along linkage groups, similar to half....... mykiss) characterized by low and unevenly distributed recombination – a general feature of male meiosis in many species. Further, a high frequency of double crossovers along chromosome arms in barley reduced resolution for locating centromeric regions on most linkage groups. Despite these limitations...

  18. Rad51-Rad52 Mediated Maintenance of Centromeric Chromatin in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, Sreyoshi; Gomez-Raja, Jonathan; Larriba, German; Dubey, Dharani Dhar; Sanyal, Kaustuv

    2014-01-01

    Specification of the centromere location in most eukaryotes is not solely dependent on the DNA sequence. However, the non-genetic determinants of centromere identity are not clearly defined. While multiple mechanisms, individually or in concert, may specify centromeres epigenetically, most studies in this area are focused on a universal factor, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, often considered as the epigenetic determinant of centromere identity. In spite of variable timing of...

  19. SWI/SNF-like chromatin remodeling factor Fun30 supports point centromere function in S. cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Will, William Ryan; Petrini, Edoardo; Theodorou, Delphine; Harris, Rachael R.; Crawford, Margaret R.; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Krueger, Felix; Correra, Rosa Maria; Vetter, Anna T.; Miller, J. Ross; Kent, Nicholas A.; Varga-Weisz, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Centromeres are essential to chromatin structures, providing a binding platform for the mitotic spindle. Defects in centromere structure or function can lead to chromosome missegregation or chromosome breakage. This, in turn, can cause cancer in metazoans. Centromeres are defined by specialized chromatin that contains the histone H3 variant CENP-A (also called CenH3, or Cse4 in budding yeast), and transcription over centromeres is tightly controlled. Budding yeast centromeres a...

  20. Rad51–Rad52 Mediated Maintenance of Centromeric Chromatin in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Sreyoshi Mitra; Jonathan Gómez-Raja; Germán Larriba; Dharani Dhar Dubey; Kaustuv Sanyal

    2014-01-01

    Specification of the centromere location in most eukaryotes is not solely dependent on the DNA sequence. However, the non-genetic determinants of centromere identity are not clearly defined. While multiple mechanisms, individually or in concert, may specify centromeres epigenetically, most studies in this area are focused on a universal factor, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, often considered as the epigenetic determinant of centromere identity. In spite of variable timing of...

  1. CENP-C facilitates the recruitment of M18BP1 to centromeric chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Dambacher, Silvia; Deng, Wen; Hahn, Matthias; Sadic, Dennis; Fröhlich, Jonathan; Nuber, Alexander; Hoischen, Christian; Diekmann, Stephan; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Schotta, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Centromeres are important structural constituents of chromosomes that ensure proper chromosome segregation during mitosis by providing defined sites for kinetochore attachment. In higher eukaryotes, centromeres have no specific DNA sequence and thus, they are rather determined through epigenetic mechanisms. A fundamental process in centromere establishment is the incorporation of the histone variant CENP-A into centromeric chromatin, which provides a binding platform for the other centromeric...

  2. Tetrameric Structure of Centromeric Nucleosomes in Interphase Drosophila Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dalal, Yamini; Wang, Hongda; Lindsay, Stuart; Henikoff, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Author Summary The octameric structure of eukaryotic nucleosomes is universally accepted as the basic unit of chromatin. This is certainly the case for the vast bulk of nucleosomes; however, there have been no reports of the in vivo structure of nucleosomes associated with centromeres. Though centromeres make up only a minute fraction of the genomic landscape, their role in segregating chromosomes during mitosis is essential for maintaining genomic integrity. We report the characterization of...

  3. Ectopic centromere nucleation by CENP--a in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Marlyn; He, Haijin; Dong, Qianhua; Sun, Siyu; Li, Fei

    2014-12-01

    The centromere is a specific chromosomal locus that organizes the assembly of the kinetochore. It plays a fundamental role in accurate chromosome segregation. In most eukaryotic organisms, each chromosome contains a single centromere the position and function of which are epigenetically specified. Occasionally, centromeres form at ectopic loci, which can be detrimental to the cell. However, the mechanisms that protect the cell against ectopic centromeres (neocentromeres) remain poorly understood. Centromere protein-A (CENP-A), a centromere-specific histone 3 (H3) variant, is found in all centromeres and is indispensable for centromere function. Here we report that the overexpression of CENP-A(Cnp1) in fission yeast results in the assembly of CENP-A(Cnp1) at noncentromeric chromatin during mitosis and meiosis. The noncentromeric CENP-A preferentially assembles near heterochromatin and is capable of recruiting kinetochore components. Consistent with this, cells overexpressing CENP-A(Cnp1) exhibit severe chromosome missegregation and spindle microtubule disorganization. In addition, pulse induction of CENP-A(Cnp1) overexpression reveals that ectopic CENP-A chromatin can persist for multiple generations. Intriguingly, ectopic assembly of CENP-A(cnp1) is suppressed by overexpression of histone H3 or H4. Finally, we demonstrate that deletion of the N-terminal domain of CENP-A(cnp1) results in an increase in the number of ectopic CENP-A sites and provide evidence that the N-terminal domain of CENP-A prevents CENP-A assembly at ectopic loci via the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. These studies expand our current understanding of how noncentromeric chromatin is protected from mistakenly assembling CENP-A. PMID:25298518

  4. HJURP is involved in the expansion of centromeric chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Perpelescu, Marinela; Hori, Tetsuya; Toyoda, Atsushi; Misu, Sadahiko; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Obuse, Chikashi; Fujiyama, Asao; Fukagawa, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    The CENP-A–specific chaperone HJURP mediates CENP-A deposition at centromeres. The N-terminal region of HJURP is responsible for binding to soluble CENP-A. However, it is unclear whether other regions of HJURP have additional functions for centromere formation and maintenance. In this study, we generated chicken DT40 knockout cell lines and gene replacement constructs for HJURP to assess the additional functions of HJURP in vivo. Our analysis revealed that the middle region of HJURP associate...

  5. Inner Kinetochore Protein Interactions with Regional Centromeres of Fission Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Jitendra; Talbert, Paul B; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Centromeres of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lack the highly repetitive sequences that make most other "regional" centromeres refractory to analysis. To map fission yeast centromeres, we applied H4S47C-anchored cleavage mapping and native and cross-linked chromatin immunoprecipitation with paired-end sequencing. H3 nucleosomes are nearly absent from the central domain, which is occupied by centromere-specific H3 (cenH3 or CENP-A) nucleosomes with two H4s per particle that are mostly unpositioned and are more widely spaced than nucleosomes elsewhere. Inner kinetochore proteins CENP-A, CENP-C, CENP-T, CENP-I, and Scm3 are highly enriched throughout the central domain except at tRNA genes, with no evidence for preferred kinetochore assembly sites. These proteins are weakly enriched and less stably incorporated in H3-rich heterochromatin. CENP-A nucleosomes protect less DNA from nuclease digestion than H3 nucleosomes, while CENP-T protects a range of fragment sizes. Our results suggest that CENP-T particles occupy linkers between CENP-A nucleosomes and that classical regional centromeres differ from other centromeres by the absence of CENP-A nucleosome positioning. PMID:26275423

  6. Kinetochore and heterochromatin domains of the fission yeast centromere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidoux, Alison L; Allshire, Robin C

    2004-01-01

    Fission yeast centromeres are composed of two distinctive chromatin domains. The central domain nucleosomes contain the histone H3-like protein CENP-A(Cnp1). In contrast, the flanking repeats are coated with silent chromatin in which Swi6 (HP1) binds histone H3 methylated on lysine 9 that is induced by the action of the RNA interference pathway on non-coding centromeric transcripts. The overall structure is similar to that of metazoan centromeres where the kinetochore is embedded in surrounding heterochromatin. Kinetochore specific proteins associate with the central domain and affect silencing in that region. The flanking heterochromatin is required to recruit cohesin and mediate tight physical cohesion between sister centromeres. The loss of silencing that accompanies defects in heterochromatin has been invaluable as a tool in the investigation of centromere function. Both the heterochromatin and kinetochore regions are required for the de novo assembly of a functional centromere on DNA constructs, suggesting that heterochromatin may provide an environment that promotes kinetochore assembly within the central domain. The process is clearly epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast kinetochores associate with 2-4 microtubules, and flanking heterochromatin may be required to promote the orientation of multiple microtubule binding sites on one kinetochore towards the same pole and thus prevent merotelic orientation. PMID:15289660

  7. Centromeric barrier disruption leads to mitotic defects in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Terilyn L; Merrett, Stephanie L; Pun, Matthew J; Scott, Kristin C

    2014-04-01

    Centromeres are cis-acting chromosomal domains that direct kinetochore formation, enabling faithful chromosome segregation and preserving genome stability. The centromeres of most eukaryotic organisms are structurally complex, composed of nonoverlapping, structurally and functionally distinct chromatin subdomains, including the specialized core chromatin that underlies the kinetochore and pericentromeric heterochromatin. The genomic and epigenetic features that specify and preserve the adjacent chromatin subdomains critical to centromere identity are currently unknown. Here we demonstrate that chromatin barriers regulate this process in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Reduced fitness and mitotic chromosome segregation defects occur in strains that carry exogenous DNA inserted at centromere 1 chromatin barriers. Abnormal phenotypes are accompanied by changes in the structural integrity of both the centromeric core chromatin domain, containing the conserved CENP-A(Cnp1) protein, and the flanking pericentric heterochromatin domain. Barrier mutant cells can revert to wild-type growth and centromere structure at a high frequency after the spontaneous excision of integrated exogenous DNA. Our results reveal a previously undemonstrated role for chromatin barriers in chromosome segregation and in the prevention of genome instability. PMID:24531725

  8. Adaptive evolution of centromere proteins in plants and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henikoff Steven

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Centromeres represent the last frontiers of plant and animal genomics. Although they perform a conserved function in chromosome segregation, centromeres are typically composed of repetitive satellite sequences that are rapidly evolving. The nucleosomes of centromeres are characterized by a special H3-like histone (CenH3, which evolves rapidly and adaptively in Drosophila and Arabidopsis. Most plant, animal and fungal centromeres also bind a large protein, centromere protein C (CENP-C, that is characterized by a single 24 amino-acid motif (CENPC motif. Results Whereas we find no evidence that mammalian CenH3 (CENP-A has been evolving adaptively, mammalian CENP-C proteins contain adaptively evolving regions that overlap with regions of DNA-binding activity. In plants we find that CENP-C proteins have complex duplicated regions, with conserved amino and carboxyl termini that are dissimilar in sequence to their counterparts in animals and fungi. Comparisons of Cenpc genes from Arabidopsis species and from grasses revealed multiple regions that are under positive selection, including duplicated exons in some grasses. In contrast to plants and animals, yeast CENP-C (Mif2p is under negative selection. Conclusions CENP-Cs in all plant and animal lineages examined have regions that are rapidly and adaptively evolving. To explain these remarkable evolutionary features for a single-copy gene that is needed at every mitosis, we propose that CENP-Cs, like some CenH3s, suppress meiotic drive of centromeres during female meiosis. This process can account for the rapid evolution and the complexity of centromeric DNA in plants and animals as compared to fungi.

  9. DNA Topology and Global Architecture of Point Centromeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofelia Díaz-Ingelmo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA is wrapped in a left-handed fashion around histone octasomes containing the centromeric histone H3 variant CENP-A. However, DNA topology studies have suggested that DNA is wrapped in a right-handed manner around the CENP-A nucleosome that occupies the yeast point centromere. Here, we determine the DNA linking number difference (ΔLk stabilized by the yeast centromere and the contribution of the centromere determining elements (CDEI, CDEII, and CDEIII. We show that the intrinsic architecture of the yeast centromere stabilizes +0.6 units of ΔLk. This topology depends on the integrity of CDEII and CDEIII, but it is independent of cbf1 binding to CDEI and of the variable length of CDEII. These findings suggest that the interaction of the CBF3 complex with CDEIII and a distal CDEII segment configures a right-handed DNA loop that excludes CDEI. This loop is then occupied by a CENP-A histone complex, which does not have to be inherently right-handed.

  10. Stable Patterns of CENH3 Occupancy Through Maize Lineages Containing Genetically Similar Centromeres

    OpenAIRE

    Gent, Jonathan I.; Kai WANG; Jiang, Jiming; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2015-01-01

    While the approximate chromosomal position of centromeres has been identified in many species, little is known about the dynamics and diversity of centromere positions within species. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that DNA sequence has little or no impact in specifying centromeres in maize and in most multicellular organisms. Given that epigenetically defined boundaries are expected to be dynamic, we hypothesized that centromere positions would change rapidly over time, which would resu...

  11. Polo-like kinase 1 licenses CENP-A deposition at centromeres

    OpenAIRE

    McKinley, Kara L.; Cheeseman, Iain M.

    2014-01-01

    To ensure the stable transmission of the genome during vertebrate cell division, the mitotic spindle must attach to a single locus on each chromosome, termed the centromere. The fundamental requirement for faithful centromere inheritance is the controlled deposition of the centromere-specifying histone, CENP-A. However, the regulatory mechanisms that ensure the precise control of CENP-A deposition have proved elusive. Here, we identify Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) as a centromere-localized regul...

  12. Arabidopsis MZT1 homologs GIP1 and GIP2 are essential for centromere architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzenschlager, Morgane; Lermontova, Inna; Schubert, Veit; Fuchs, Jörg; Berr, Alexandre; Koini, Maria A; Houlné, Guy; Herzog, Etienne; Rutten, Twan; Alioua, Abdelmalek; Fransz, Paul; Schmit, Anne-Catherine; Chabouté, Marie-Edith

    2015-07-14

    Centromeres play a pivotal role in maintaining genome integrity by facilitating the recruitment of kinetochore and sister-chromatid cohesion proteins, both required for correct chromosome segregation. Centromeres are epigenetically specified by the presence of the histone H3 variant (CENH3). In this study, we investigate the role of the highly conserved γ-tubulin complex protein 3-interacting proteins (GIPs) in Arabidopsis centromere regulation. We show that GIPs form a complex with CENH3 in cycling cells. GIP depletion in the gip1gip2 knockdown mutant leads to a decreased CENH3 level at centromeres, despite a higher level of Mis18BP1/KNL2 present at both centromeric and ectopic sites. We thus postulate that GIPs are required to ensure CENH3 deposition and/or maintenance at centromeres. In addition, the recruitment at the centromere of other proteins such as the CENP-C kinetochore component and the cohesin subunit SMC3 is impaired in gip1gip2. These defects in centromere architecture result in aneuploidy due to severely altered centromeric cohesion. Altogether, we ascribe a central function to GIPs for the proper recruitment and/or stabilization of centromeric proteins essential in the specification of the centromere identity, as well as for centromeric cohesion in somatic cells. PMID:26124146

  13. Sequence conservation of an avian centromeric repeated DNA component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, C S; Brooks, J E; de Kloet, E; de Kloet, S R

    1994-06-01

    The approximately 190-bp centromeric repeat monomers of the spur-winged lapwing (Vanellus spinosus, Charadriidae), the Chilean flamingo (Phoenicopterus chilensis, Phoenicopteridae), the sarus crane (Grus antigone, Gruidae), parrots (Psittacidae), waterfowl (Anatidae), and the merlin (Falco columbarius, Falconidae) contain elements that are interspecifically highly variable, as well as elements (trinucleotides and higher order oligonucleotides) that are highly conserved in sequence and relative location within the repeat. Such conservation suggests that the centromeric repeats of these avian species have evolved from a common ancestral sequence that may date from very early stages of avian radiation. PMID:8034177

  14. Phylogenetic Analysis of Fungal Centromere H3 Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Richard E.; Rogers, Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Centromere H3 proteins (CenH3's) are variants of histone H3 specialized for packaging centromere DNA. Unlike canonical H3, which is among the most conserved of eukaryotic proteins, CenH3's are rapidly evolving, raising questions about orthology and conservation of function across species. To gain insight on CenH3 evolution and function, a phylogenetic analysis was undertaken on CenH3 proteins drawn from a single, ancient lineage, the Fungi. Using maximum-likelihood methods, a credible phyloge...

  15. Reconstitution of hemisomes on budding yeast centromeric DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Furuyama, Takehito; Codomo, Christine A.; Henikoff, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The structure of nucleosomes that contain the cenH3 histone variant has been controversial. In budding yeast, a single right-handed cenH3/H4/H2A/H2B tetramer wraps the ∼80-bp Centromere DNA Element II (CDE II) sequence of each centromere into a ‘hemisome’. However, attempts to reconstitute cenH3 particles in vitro have yielded exclusively ‘octasomes’, which are observed in vivo on chromosome arms only when Cse4 (yeast cenH3) is overproduced. Here, we show that Cse4 octamers remain intact unde...

  16. Dynamics of a novel centromeric histone variant CenH3 reveals the evolutionary ancestral timing of centromere biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Dubin, Manu; Fuchs, Jörg; Gräf, Ralph; Schubert, Ingo; Nellen, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The centromeric histone H3 variant (CenH3) serves to target the kinetochore to the centromeres and thus ensures correct chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. The Dictyostelium H3-like variant H3v1 was identified as the CenH3 ortholog. Dictyostelium CenH3 has an extended N-terminal domain with no similarity to any other known proteins and a histone fold domain at its C-terminus. Within the histone fold, α-helix 2 (α2) and an extended loop 1 (L1) have been shown to be required for ...

  17. Centromeres Off the Hook: Massive Changes in Centromere Size and Structure Following Duplication of CenH3 Gene in Fabeae Species

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Pavel; Pavlíková, Zuzana; Koblížková, Andrea; FUKOVÁ, Iva; Jedličková, Veronika; Novák, Petr; Macas, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, centromere is determined by the presence of the centromere-specific histone variant CenH3. Two types of chromosome morphology are generally recognized with respect to centromere organization. Monocentric chromosomes possess a single CenH3-containing domain in primary constriction, whereas holocentric chromosomes lack the primary constriction and display dispersed distribution of CenH3. Recently, metapolycentric chromosomes have been reported in Pisum sativum, representing ...

  18. Haploid plants produced by centromere-mediated genome elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Chan, Simon W L

    2010-03-25

    Production of haploid plants that inherit chromosomes from only one parent can greatly accelerate plant breeding. Haploids generated from a heterozygous individual and converted to diploid create instant homozygous lines, bypassing generations of inbreeding. Two methods are generally used to produce haploids. First, cultured gametophyte cells may be regenerated into haploid plants, but many species and genotypes are recalcitrant to this process. Second, haploids can be induced from rare interspecific crosses, in which one parental genome is eliminated after fertilization. The molecular basis for genome elimination is not understood, but one theory posits that centromeres from the two parent species interact unequally with the mitotic spindle, causing selective chromosome loss. Here we show that haploid Arabidopsis thaliana plants can be easily generated through seeds by manipulating a single centromere protein, the centromere-specific histone CENH3 (called CENP-A in human). When cenh3 null mutants expressing altered CENH3 proteins are crossed to wild type, chromosomes from the mutant are eliminated, producing haploid progeny. Haploids are spontaneously converted into fertile diploids through meiotic non-reduction, allowing their genotype to be perpetuated. Maternal and paternal haploids can be generated through reciprocal crosses. We have also exploited centromere-mediated genome elimination to convert a natural tetraploid Arabidopsis into a diploid, reducing its ploidy to simplify breeding. As CENH3 is universal in eukaryotes, our method may be extended to produce haploids in any plant species. PMID:20336146

  19. CENP-C facilitates the recruitment of M18BP1 to centromeric chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambacher, Silvia; Deng, Wen; Hahn, Matthias; Sadic, Dennis; Fröhlich, Jonathan; Nuber, Alexander; Hoischen, Christian; Diekmann, Stephan; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Schotta, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Centromeres are important structural constituents of chromosomes that ensure proper chromosome segregation during mitosis by providing defined sites for kinetochore attachment. In higher eukaryotes, centromeres have no specific DNA sequence and thus, they are rather determined through epigenetic mechanisms. A fundamental process in centromere establishment is the incorporation of the histone variant CENP-A into centromeric chromatin, which provides a binding platform for the other centromeric proteins. The Mis18 complex, and, in particular, its member M18BP1 was shown to be essential for both incorporation and maintenance of CENP-A. Here we show that M18BP1 displays a cell cycle-regulated association with centromeric chromatin in mouse embryonic stem cells. M18BP1 is highly enriched at centromeric regions from late anaphase through to G1 phase. An interaction screen against 16 core centromeric proteins revealed a novel interaction of M18BP1 with CENP-C. We mapped the interaction domain in M18BP1 to a central region containing a conserved SANT domain and in CENP-C to the C-terminus. Knock-down of CENP-C leads to reduced M18BP1 association and lower CENP-A levels at centromeres, suggesting that CENP-C works as an important factor for centromeric M18BP1 recruitment and thus for maintaining centromeric CENP-A. PMID:22540025

  20. Stable Patterns of CENH3 Occupancy Through Maize Lineages Containing Genetically Similar Centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Jonathan I; Wang, Kai; Jiang, Jiming; Dawe, R Kelly

    2015-08-01

    While the approximate chromosomal position of centromeres has been identified in many species, little is known about the dynamics and diversity of centromere positions within species. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that DNA sequence has little or no impact in specifying centromeres in maize and in most multicellular organisms. Given that epigenetically defined boundaries are expected to be dynamic, we hypothesized that centromere positions would change rapidly over time, which would result in a diversity of centromere positions in isolated populations. To test this hypothesis, we used CENP-A/cenH3 (CENH3 in maize) chromatin immunoprecipitation to define centromeres in breeding pedigrees that included the B73 inbred as a common parent. While we found a diversity of CENH3 profiles for centromeres with divergent sequences that were not inherited from B73, the CENH3 profiles from centromeres that were inherited from B73 were indistinguishable from each other. We propose that specific genetic elements in centromeric regions favor or inhibit CENH3 accumulation, leading to reproducible patterns of CENH3 occupancy. These data also indicate that dramatic shifts in centromere position normally originate from accumulated or large-scale genetic changes rather than from epigenetic positional drift. PMID:26063660

  1. Genome-wide characterization of centromeric satellites from multiple mammalian genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Can; Cardone, Maria Francesca; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Antonacci, Francesca; O'Brien, Stephen J; Ryder, Oliver A; Purgato, Stefania; Zoli, Monica; Della Valle, Giuliano; Eichler, Evan E; Ventura, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Despite its importance in cell biology and evolution, the centromere has remained the final frontier in genome assembly and annotation due to its complex repeat structure. However, isolation and characterization of the centromeric repeats from newly sequenced species are necessary for a complete understanding of genome evolution and function. In recent years, various genomes have been sequenced, but the characterization of the corresponding centromeric DNA has lagged behind. Here, we present a computational method (RepeatNet) to systematically identify higher-order repeat structures from unassembled whole-genome shotgun sequence and test whether these sequence elements correspond to functional centromeric sequences. We analyzed genome datasets from six species of mammals representing the diversity of the mammalian lineage, namely, horse, dog, elephant, armadillo, opossum, and platypus. We define candidate monomer satellite repeats and demonstrate centromeric localization for five of the six genomes. Our analysis revealed the greatest diversity of centromeric sequences in horse and dog in contrast to elephant and armadillo, which showed high-centromeric sequence homogeneity. We could not isolate centromeric sequences within the platypus genome, suggesting that centromeres in platypus are not enriched in satellite DNA. Our method can be applied to the characterization of thousands of other vertebrate genomes anticipated for sequencing in the near future, providing an important tool for annotation of centromeres. PMID:21081712

  2. Epigenetically-inherited centromere and neocentromere DNA replicates earliest in S-phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon Koren

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic centromeres are maintained at specific chromosomal sites over many generations. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, centromeres are genetic elements defined by a DNA sequence that is both necessary and sufficient for function; whereas, in most other eukaryotes, centromeres are maintained by poorly characterized epigenetic mechanisms in which DNA has a less definitive role. Here we use the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans as a model organism to study the DNA replication properties of centromeric DNA. By determining the genome-wide replication timing program of the C. albicans genome, we discovered that each centromere is associated with a replication origin that is the first to fire on its respective chromosome. Importantly, epigenetic formation of new ectopic centromeres (neocentromeres was accompanied by shifts in replication timing, such that a neocentromere became the first to replicate and became associated with origin recognition complex (ORC components. Furthermore, changing the level of the centromere-specific histone H3 isoform led to a concomitant change in levels of ORC association with centromere regions, further supporting the idea that centromere proteins determine origin activity. Finally, analysis of centromere-associated DNA revealed a replication-dependent sequence pattern characteristic of constitutively active replication origins. This strand-biased pattern is conserved, together with centromere position, among related strains and species, in a manner independent of primary DNA sequence. Thus, inheritance of centromere position is correlated with a constitutively active origin of replication that fires at a distinct early time. We suggest a model in which the distinct timing of DNA replication serves as an epigenetic mechanism for the inheritance of centromere position.

  3. Centromeres Off the Hook: Massive Changes in Centromere Size and Structure Following Duplication of CenH3 Gene in Fabeae Species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neumann, Pavel; Pavlíková, Zuzana; Koblížková, Andrea; Fuková, Iva; Jedličková, Veronika; Novák, Petr; Macas, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 7 (2015), s. 1862-1879. ISSN 0737-4038 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/1843; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11058 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Centromere * CenH3 * centromere drive * chromosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.105, year: 2014

  4. Holocentromeres in Rhynchospora are associated with genome-wide centromere-specific repeat arrays interspersed among euchromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, André; Ribeiro, Tiago; Neumann, Pavel; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Schubert, Veit; Pellino, Marco; Fuchs, Jörg; Ma, Wei; Kuhlmann, Markus; Brandt, Ronny; Vanzela, André L L; Beseda, Tomáš; Šimková, Hana; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea; Houben, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Holocentric chromosomes lack a primary constriction, in contrast to monocentrics. They form kinetochores distributed along almost the entire poleward surface of the chromatids, to which spindle fibers attach. No centromere-specific DNA sequence has been found for any holocentric organism studied so far. It was proposed that centromeric repeats, typical for many monocentric species, could not occur in holocentrics, most likely because of differences in the centromere organization. Here we show that the holokinetic centromeres of the Cyperaceae Rhynchospora pubera are highly enriched by a centromeric histone H3 variant-interacting centromere-specific satellite family designated "Tyba" and by centromeric retrotransposons (i.e., CRRh) occurring as genome-wide interspersed arrays. Centromeric arrays vary in length from 3 to 16 kb and are intermingled with gene-coding sequences and transposable elements. We show that holocentromeres of metaphase chromosomes are composed of multiple centromeric units rather than possessing a diffuse organization, thus favoring the polycentric model. A cell-cycle-dependent shuffling of multiple centromeric units results in the formation of functional (poly)centromeres during mitosis. The genome-wide distribution of centromeric repeat arrays interspersing the euchromatin provides a previously unidentified type of centromeric chromatin organization among eukaryotes. Thus, different types of holocentromeres exist in different species, namely with and without centromeric repetitive sequences. PMID:26489653

  5. Cdk Activity Couples Epigenetic Centromere Inheritance to Cell Cycle Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Mariana C.C.; Bodor, Dani L.; Stellfox, Madison E.; Martins, Nuno M.C.; Hochegger, Helfrid; Foltz, Daniel R.; Jansen, Lars E.T.

    2012-01-01

    Centromeres form the site of chromosome attachment to microtubules during mitosis. Identity of these loci is maintained epigenetically by nucleosomes containing the histone H3 variant CENP-A. Propagation of CENP-A chromatin is uncoupled from DNA replication initiating only during mitotic exit. We now demonstrate that inhibition of Cdk1 and Cdk2 activities is sufficient to trigger CENP-A assembly throughout the cell cycle in a manner dependent on the canonical CENP-A assembly machinery. We fur...

  6. Progressive proximal expansion of the primate X chromosome centromere

    OpenAIRE

    Schueler, Mary G; Dunn, John M.; Bird, Christine P; Ross, Mark T.; Viggiano, Luigi; Rocchi, Mariano; Willard, Huntington F.; Green, Eric D

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies of the pericentromeric region of the human X chromosome short arm (Xp) revealed an age gradient from ancient DNA that contains expressed genes to recent human-specific DNA at the functional centromere. We analyzed the finished sequence of this human genomic region to investigate its evolutionary history. Phylogenetic analysis of >1,500 alpha-satellite monomers from the region revealed the presence of five physical domains, each containing monomers from a distinct phylogenetic...

  7. Comparative mapping of human alphoid centromeric sequences in great apes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archidiacono, N.; Antonacci, R.; Marzella, R. [Instituto di Genetica, Bari (Italy)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Metaphase spreads from chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes and Pan paniscus) and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) have been hybridized in situ with 27 alphoid DNA probes specific for the centromere of human chromosomes, to investigate the evolutionary relationship between centromeric regions of human and great apes. The results showed that most human probes do not recognize their corresponding homologs in great apes. Chromosome X is the only chromosome showing localization consistency in all the four species. Each suprachromosomal family (SCF) exhibits a distinct and peculiar evolutionary history. SCF1 (chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 7, 19, 12, 16) is very heterogeneous: some probes gave intense signals, but always on non-homologous chromosomes; others did not produce any hybridization signal. All probes localized on SCF2 (chromosomes 2, 4, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 18, 20, 21, and 22) recognize a single chromosome: chromosome 11 (phylogenetic IX) in PTR and PPA; chromosome 4 (phylogenetic V) in GGO. SCF3 subsets (chromosomes 1, 11, 17, X) are substantially conserved in PTR and PPA, but not in GGO, with the exception restricted to chromosome X. No signals have been detected on PPA chromosomes I, III, IV, V, VI and in PTR chromosomes V, suggesting that the centromeric region of some chromsomes have probably lost homology with human alphoid sequences.

  8. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae centromere protein Slk19p is required for two successive divisions during meiosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, X.; Saunders, W S

    2000-01-01

    Meiotic cell division includes two separate and distinct types of chromosome segregation. In the first segregational event the sister chromatids remain attached at the centromere; in the second the chromatids are separated. The factors that control the order of chromosome segregation during meiosis have not yet been identified but are thought to be confined to the centromere region. We showed that the centromere protein Slk19p is required for the proper execution of meiosis in Saccharomyces c...

  9. Biophysical Characterization of the Centromere-specific Nucleosome from Budding Yeast*

    OpenAIRE

    Kingston, Isabel J.; Yung, Jasmine S. Y.; Singleton, Martin R

    2010-01-01

    The centromeric DNA of all eukaryotes is assembled upon a specialized nucleosome containing a histone H3 variant known as CenH3. Despite the importance and conserved nature of this protein, the characteristics of the centromeric nucleosome are still poorly understood. In particular, the stoichiometry and DNA-binding properties of the CenH3 nucleosome have been the subject of some debate. We have characterized the budding yeast centromeric nucleosome by biochemical and biophysical methods and ...

  10. New clues to understand how CENP-A maintains centromere identity

    OpenAIRE

    Losada Ana; Sánchez Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that directs the formation of the kinetochore, a huge protein assembly that acts as the attachment site for spindle microtubules and carries out chromosome movement during cell division. Centromere loss or the presence of extra centromeres adversely affect chromosome segregation and may result in aneuploidy, a condition found in many human tumors and a major cause of miscarriages and birth defects. Consequently, understanding the bas...

  11. Structure and Function of Centromeric and Pericentromeric Heterochromatin in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Lauriane; Voisin, Maxime; Tatout, Christophe; Probst, Aline V.

    2015-01-01

    The centromere is a specific chromosomal region where the kinetochore assembles to ensure the faithful segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. Centromeres are defined by a local enrichment of the specific histone variant CenH3 mostly at repetitive satellite sequences. A larger pericentromeric region containing repetitive sequences and transposable elements surrounds the centromere that adopts a particular chromatin state characterized by specific histone variants and post...

  12. Chromatin immunoprecipitation cloning reveals rapid evolutionary patterns of centromeric DNA in Oryza species

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hye-Ran; Zhang, Wenli; Langdon, Tim; Jin, Weiwei; Yan, Huihuang; Cheng, Zhukuan; Jiang, Jiming

    2005-01-01

    The functional centromeres of rice (Oryza sativa, AA genome) chromosomes contain two key DNA components: the CRR centromeric retrotransposons and a 155-bp satellite repeat, CentO. However, several wild Oryza species lack the CentO repeat. We developed a chromatin immunoprecipitation-based technique to clone DNA fragments derived from chromatin containing the centromeric histone H3 variant CenH3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation cloning was carried out in the CentO-less species Oryza rhizomatis (...

  13. Cell cycle dynamics of histone variants at the centromere, a model for chromosomal landmarks.

    OpenAIRE

    Boyarchuk, Ekaterina; Montes De Oca, Rocío; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2011-01-01

    Classical heterochromatin chromosomal landmarks, such as centromeres and telomeres, are characterized by specific chromatin signatures. Among these, the incorporation of histone variants has recently emerged as an important feature. Using the centromere as a paradigm, we consider the role of histone variant dynamics in locus-specific chromatin organization. We describe the distinct location and dynamics of CenH3, H3.3, and H2AZ at the centromere during the cell cycle. This leads us to present...

  14. A high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning on a fission yeast centromere

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Jun S.; Liu, Xingkun; Liu, X. Shirley; He, Xiangwei

    2008-01-01

    A key element for defining the centromere identity is the incorporation of a specific histone H3, CENPA, known as Cnp1p in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Previous studies have suggested that functional S. pombe centromeres lack regularly positioned nucleosomes and may involve chromatin remodeling as a key step of kinetochore assembly. We used tiling microarrays to show that nucleosomes are, in fact, positioned in regular intervals in the core of centromere 2, providing the first high-resolution m...

  15. Genome-wide characterization of centromeric satellites from multiple mammalian genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Alkan, Can; Cardone, Maria Francesca; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Antonacci, Francesca; O'Brien, Stephen J; Ryder, Oliver A.; Purgato, Stefania; Zoli, Monica; Della Valle, Giuliano; Eichler, Evan E; Ventura, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Despite its importance in cell biology and evolution, the centromere has remained the final frontier in genome assembly and annotation due to its complex repeat structure. However, isolation and characterization of the centromeric repeats from newly sequenced species are necessary for a complete understanding of genome evolution and function. In recent years, various genomes have been sequenced, but the characterization of the corresponding centromeric DNA has lagged behind. Here, we present ...

  16. The AAA-ATPase molecular chaperone Cdc48/p97 disassembles sumoylated centromeres, decondenses heterochromatin, and activates ribosomal RNA genes

    OpenAIRE

    Mérai, Zsuzsanna; Chumak, Nina; García-Aguilar, Marcelina; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Nishimura, Toshiro; Schoft, Vera K.; Bindics, János; Ślusarz, Lucyna; Arnoux, Stéphanie; Opravil, Susanne; Mechtler, Karl; Zilberman, Daniel; Fischer, Robert L.; Tamaru, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Centromeres are the fundamental unit required for segregation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis, and they are defined by the centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CenH3)/centromere protein A (CENP-A). In contrast to the relatively well-known process of de novo assembly of CenH3 at centromeres, little is known of how CenH3 is actively removed, leading to centromere disassembly, an essential biological process during the life of a cell. This study describes the process of centromere d...

  17. Licensing of Centromeric Chromatin Assembly through the Mis18α-Mis18β Heterotetramer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Isaac K; Zasadzińska, Ewelina; Stellfox, Madison E; Knippler, Christina M; Foltz, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    Centromeres are specialized chromatin domains specified by the centromere-specific CENP-A nucleosome. The stable inheritance of vertebrate centromeres is an epigenetic process requiring deposition of new CENP-A nucleosomes by HJURP. We show HJURP is recruited to centromeres through a direct interaction between the HJURP centromere targeting domain and the Mis18α-β C-terminal coiled-coil domains. We demonstrate Mis18α and Mis18β form a heterotetramer through their C-terminal coiled-coil domains. Mis18α-β heterotetramer formation is required for Mis18BP1 binding and centromere recognition. S. pombe contains a single Mis18 isoform that forms a homotetramer, showing tetrameric Mis18 is conserved from fission yeast to humans. HJURP binding disrupts the Mis18α-β heterotetramer and removes Mis18α from centromeres. We propose stable binding of Mis18 to centromeres in telophase licenses them for CENP-A deposition. Binding of HJURP deposits CENP-A at centromeres and facilitates the removal of Mis18, restricting CENP-A deposition to a single event per cell cycle. PMID:26942680

  18. New clues to understand how CENP-A maintains centromere identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Losada Ana

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that directs the formation of the kinetochore, a huge protein assembly that acts as the attachment site for spindle microtubules and carries out chromosome movement during cell division. Centromere loss or the presence of extra centromeres adversely affect chromosome segregation and may result in aneuploidy, a condition found in many human tumors and a major cause of miscarriages and birth defects. Consequently, understanding the basis of centromere determination and propagation is of great relevance to both fundamental and clinical research. In recent years, it has become clear that centromeres are defined by the presence of a histone H3 variant known as Centromere Protein A, CENP-A, or CenH3. Much effort has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms that drive the assembly of CENP-A containing nucleosomes exclusively onto centromeric DNA, as well as the peculiar structure of these nucleosomes. We have recently developed an immunofluorescence-based assay that measures CENP-A incorporation in the centromeres of chromosomes assembled in Xenopus egg extracts. The spatial and temporal specificity of CENP-A deposition observed in human cells can be recapitulated in this in vitro system, making it suitable to dissect the precise role of the different factors that contribute to this pathway. Here, we discuss our results together with other recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that mediate centromere inheritance.

  19. Fission yeast Scm3 mediates stable assembly of Cnp1/CENP-A into centromeric chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jessica S; Hayashi, Takeshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Russell, Paul

    2009-02-13

    Mis16 and Mis18 are subunits of a protein complex required for incorporation of the histone H3 variant CenH3 (Cnp1/CENP-A) into centromeric chromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammals. How the Mis16-Mis18 complex performs this function is unknown. Here, we report that the Mis16-Mis18 complex is required for centromere localization of Scm3(Sp), a Cnp1-binding protein related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scm3. Scm3(Sp) is required for centromeric localization of Cnp1, while Scm3(Sp) localizes at centromeres independently of Cnp1. Like the Mis16-Mis18 complex but unlike Cnp1, Scm3(Sp) dissociates from centromeres during mitosis. Inactivation of Scm3(Sp) or Mis18 increases centromere localization of histones H3 and H2A/H2B, which are largely absent from centromeres in wild-type cells. Whereas S. cerevisiae Scm3 is proposed to replace histone H2A/H2B in centromeric nucleosomes, the dynamic behavior of S. pombe Scm3 suggests that it acts as a Cnp1 assembly/maintenance factor that directly mediates the stable deposition of Cnp1 into centromeric chromatin. PMID:19217403

  20. Fission Yeast Scm3 Mediates Stable Assembly of Cnp1 (CENP-A) into Centromeric Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jessica S.; Hayashi, Takeshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Russell, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Summary Mis16 and Mis18 are subunits of a protein complex required for incorporation of the histone H3 variant CenH3 (Cnp1/CENP-A) into centromeric chromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammals. How the Mis16-Mis18 complex performs this function is unknown. Here we report that the Mis16-Mis18 complex is required for centromere localization of Scm3Sp, a Cnp1-binding protein related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scm3. Scm3Sp is required for centromeric localization of Cnp1, whilst Scm3Sp localizes at centromeres independently of Cnp1. Like the Mis16-Mis18 complex but unlike Cnp1, Scm3Sp dissociates from centromeres during mitosis. Inactivation of Scm3Sp or Mis18 increases centromere localization of histones H3 and H2A/H2B, which are largely absent from centromeres in wild type cells. Whereas S. cerevisiae Scm3 is proposed to replace histone H2A/H2B in centromeric nucleosomes, the dynamic behavior of S. pombe Scm3 suggests that it acts as a Cnp1 assembly/maintenance factor that directly mediates the stable deposition of Cnp1 into centromeric chromatin. PMID:19217403

  1. The Overexpression of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Centromeric Histone H3 Variant Mutant Protein Leads to a Defect in Kinetochore Biorientation

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Kimberly A.; Camahort, Raymond; Seidel, Chris; Gerton, Jennifer L.; Biggins, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Chromosomes segregate using their kinetochores, the specialized protein structures that are assembled on centromeric DNA and mediate attachment to the mitotic spindle. Because centromeric sequences are not conserved, centromere identity is propagated by an epigenetic mechanism. All eukaryotes contain an essential histone H3 variant (CenH3) that localizes exclusively to centromeres. Because CenH3 is required for kinetochore assembly and is likely to be the epigenetic mark that specifies centro...

  2. Premature segregation of centromeres in persons exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study analyzed the frequency of premature centromeric division (PCD) in the metaphase in medical personnel occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation who had positive results of chromosome aberrations. The analysis included 30 exposed subjects , and 23 control subjects not exposed to familiar genotoxic agents. Chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes were analyzed according to a standard protocol (IAEA, 1986). Application of FISH for the analysis of PCD of chromosome 18 in interphase nuclei and methaphasis. FISH method was used for the analysis of premature segregation of centromeric regions. The assay of pL1. 84 αrepetitive DNA for chromosome 18 was used for detection of centromeric region. One-way ANOVA test and Mann-Whitney U test revealed that frequencies for eight variables: chromatid and chromosome breaks, acentrics, dicentrics,frequency of metaphase cells with PCD on any chromosome (MPCD), total number of chromosomes with PCD (TPCD), frequency of metaphase cells with PCd on acrocentric chromosomes (MAPCD),and total number of acrocentric chromosomes with PCD (TAPCD) were significantly higher in exposed group (P0.05). Our study shows high and statistically significant relative risk factors (RR) for five variables (chromatid break, chromosome break, acentric, MAPCD and TAPCD) regarding to radiation exposure (control versus exposed group). Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that there was significant difference of percentage of metaphases with PCD and percentage of interphase nuclei PCD between the exposed and control group. Given that PCD may be observed as phenomenon representing the manifestation of genome instability which is caused by karyotype changes, our studies suggest that PCD should be reviewed as probable cytogenetic biomarker for individuals occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

  3. Organization and evolution of Gorilla centromeric DNA from old strategies to new approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catacchio, C R; Ragone, R; Chiatante, G; Ventura, M

    2015-01-01

    The centromere/kinetochore interaction is responsible for the pairing and segregation of replicated chromosomes in eukaryotes. Centromere DNA is portrayed as scarcely conserved, repetitive in nature, quickly evolving and protein-binding competent. Among primates, the major class of centromeric DNA is the pancentromeric α-satellite, made of arrays of 171 bp monomers, repeated in a head-to-tail pattern. α-satellite sequences can either form tandem heterogeneous monomeric arrays or assemble in higher-order repeats (HORs). Gorilla centromere DNA has barely been characterized, and data are mainly based on hybridizations of human alphoid sequences. We isolated and finely characterized gorilla α-satellite sequences and revealed relevant structure and chromosomal distribution similarities with other great apes as well as gorilla-specific features, such as the uniquely octameric structure of the suprachromosomal family-2 (SF2). We demonstrated for the first time the orthologous localization of alphoid suprachromosomal families-1 and -2 (SF1 and SF2) between human and gorilla in contrast to chimpanzee centromeres. Finally, the discovery of a new 189 bp monomer type in gorilla centromeres unravels clues to the role of the centromere protein B, paving the way to solve the significance of the centromere DNA's essential repetitive nature in association with its function and the peculiar evolution of the α-satellite sequence. PMID:26387916

  4. The KAT's Out of the Bag: Histone Acetylation Promotes Centromere Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Jason; Mellone, Barbara G

    2016-06-01

    Heterochromatin is incompatible with centromeric chromatin assembly and propagation. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Ohzeki et al. (2016) reveal that a critical role of the Mis18 complex is to transiently recruit the lysine acetyltransferase KAT7 to centromeres to facilitate the removal of H3K9me3 and the deposition of CENP-A. PMID:27270035

  5. Diaphanous formin mDia2 regulates CENP-A levels at centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenshu; Mao, Yinghui

    2016-05-23

    Centromeres of higher eukaryotes are epigenetically defined by centromere protein A (CENP-A), a centromere-specific histone H3 variant. The incorporation of new CENP-A into centromeres to maintain the epigenetic marker after genome replication in S phase occurs in G1 phase; however, how new CENP-A is loaded and stabilized remains poorly understood. Here, we identify the formin mDia2 as essential for stable replenishment of new CENP-A at centromeres. Quantitative imaging, pulse-chase analysis, and high-resolution ratiometric live-cell studies demonstrate that mDia2 and its nuclear localization are required to maintain CENP-A levels at centromeres. Depletion of mDia2 results in a prolonged centromere association of holiday junction recognition protein (HJURP), the chaperone required for CENP-A loading. A constitutively active form of mDia2 rescues the defect in new CENP-A loading caused by depletion of male germ cell Rac GTPase-activating protein (MgcRacGAP), a component of the small GTPase pathway essential for CENP-A maintenance. Thus, the formin mDia2 functions downstream of the MgcRacGAP-dependent pathway in regulating assembly of new CENP-A containing nucleosomes at centromeres. PMID:27185834

  6. Structure and Function of Centromeric and Pericentromeric Heterochromatin in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Lauriane; Voisin, Maxime; Tatout, Christophe; Probst, Aline V.

    2015-01-01

    The centromere is a specific chromosomal region where the kinetochore assembles to ensure the faithful segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. Centromeres are defined by a local enrichment of the specific histone variant CenH3 mostly at repetitive satellite sequences. A larger pericentromeric region containing repetitive sequences and transposable elements surrounds the centromere that adopts a particular chromatin state characterized by specific histone variants and post-translational modifications and forms a transcriptionally repressive chromosomal environment. In the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana centromeric and pericentromeric domains form conspicuous heterochromatin clusters called chromocenters in interphase. Here we discuss, using Arabidopsis as example, recent insight into mechanisms involved in maintenance and establishment of centromeric and pericentromeric chromatin signatures as well as in chromocenter formation. PMID:26648952

  7. The roles of histone modifications and small RNA in centromere function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwall, Karl

    2004-01-01

    Here, epigenetic regulation of centromeric chromatin in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is reviewed, focussing on the role of histone modifications and the link to RNA interference (RNAi). Fission yeast centromeres are organized into two structurally and functionally distinct domains, both of which are required for centromere function. The central core domain anchors the kinetochore structure while the flanking heterochromatin domain is important for sister centromere cohesion. The chromatin structure of both domains is regulated epigenetically. In the central core domain, the histone H3 variant Cnp1(CENP-A) plays a key role. In the flanking heterochromatin domain, histones are kept underacetylated by the histone deacetylases (HDACs) Clr3, Clr6 and Sir2, and methylated by Clr4 methyltransferase (HMTase) to create a specific binding site for the Swi6 protein. Swi6 then directly mediates cohesin binding to the centromeric heterochromatin. Recently, a surprising link was made between heterochromatin formation and RNAi. PMID:15289661

  8. Identification of noncoding transcripts from within CENP-A chromatin at fission yeast centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Shik; Strålfors, Annelie; Castillo, Araceli G; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Ekwall, Karl; Allshire, Robin C

    2011-07-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A is the most favored candidate for an epigenetic mark that specifies the centromere. In fission yeast, adjacent heterochromatin can direct CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin establishment, but the underlying features governing where CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin assembles are unknown. We show that, in addition to centromeric regions, a low level of CENP-A(Cnp1) associates with gene promoters where histone H3 is depleted by the activity of the Hrp1(Chd1) chromatin-remodeling factor. Moreover, we demonstrate that noncoding RNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) from CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin at centromeres. These analyses reveal a similarity between centromeres and a subset of RNAPII genes and suggest a role for remodeling at RNAPII promoters within centromeres that influences the replacement of histone H3 with CENP-A(Cnp1). PMID:21531710

  9. Holokinetic centromeres and efficient telomere healing enable rapid karyotype evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Maja; Fuchs, Jörg; Klocke, Evelyn; Fojtová, Miloslava; Polanská, Pavla; Fajkus, Jiří; Schubert, Veit; Houben, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Species with holocentric chromosomes are often characterized by a rapid karyotype evolution. In contrast to species with monocentric chromosomes where acentric fragments are lost during cell division, breakage of holocentric chromosomes creates fragments with normal centromere activity. To decipher the mechanism that allows holocentric species an accelerated karyotype evolution via chromosome breakage, we analyzed the chromosome complements of irradiated Luzula elegans plants. The resulting chromosomal fragments and rearranged chromosomes revealed holocentromere-typical CENH3 and histone H2AThr120ph signals as well as the same mitotic mobility like unfragmented chromosomes. Newly synthesized telomeres at break points become detectable 3 weeks after irradiation. The presence of active telomerase suggests a telomerase-based mechanism of chromosome healing. A successful transmission of holocentric chromosome fragments across different generations was found for most offspring of irradiated plants. Hence, a combination of holokinetic centromere activity and the fast formation of new telomeres at break points enables holocentric species a rapid karyotype evolution involving chromosome fissions and rearrangements. PMID:26062516

  10. Distinct centromere domain structures with separate functions demonstrated in live fission yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelgren, Henrik; Kniola, Barbara; Ekwall, Karl

    2003-10-01

    Fission yeast (Saccharomyces pombe) centromere DNA is organized in a central core region flanked on either side by a region of outer repeat (otr) sequences. The otr region is known to be heterochromatic and bound by the Swi6 protein whereas the central core region contains an unusual chromatin structure involving the histone H3 variant Cnp1 (S. pombe CENP-A). The central core is the base for formation of the kinetochore structure whereas the flanking region is important for sister centromere cohesion. We have previously shown that the ultrastructural domain structure of S. pombe centromeres in interphase is similar to that of human centromeres. Here we demonstrate that S. pombe centromeres are organized in cytologically distinct domains even in mitosis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of fixed metaphase cells revealed that the otr regions of the centromere were still held together by cohesion even after the sister kinetochores had separated. In live cells, the central cores and kinetochores of sister chromosomes could be distinguished from one another when they were subjected to mitotic tension. The function of the different centromeric domains was addressed. Transacting mutations affecting the kinetochore (nuf2) central core domain (mis6) and the heterochromatin domain (rik1) were analyzed in live cells. In interphase, both nuf2 and mis6 caused declustering of centromeres from the spindle pole body whereas centromere clustering was normal in rik1 despite an apparent decondensation defect. The declustering of centromeres in mis6 cells correlated with loss the Ndc80 kinetochore marker protein from the centromeres. Interestingly the declustered centromeres were still restricted to the nuclear periphery thus revealing a kinetochore-independent peripheral localization mechanism for heterochromatin. Time-lapse microscopy of live mis6 and nuf2-1 mutant cells in mitosis showed similar severe misaggregation phenotypes whereas the rik1 mutants showed a mild cohesion

  11. Roles of Mis18α in epigenetic regulation of centromeric chromatin and CENP-A loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ik Soo; Lee, Minkyoung; Park, Koog Chan; Jeon, Yoon; Park, Joo Hyeon; Hwang, Eun Ju; Jeon, Tae Im; Ko, Seoyoung; Lee, Ho; Baek, Sung Hee; Kim, Keun Il

    2012-05-11

    The Mis18 complex has been identified as a critical factor for the centromeric localization of a histone H3 variant, centromeric protein A (CENP-A), which is responsible for the specification of centromere identity in the chromosome. However, the functional role of Mis18 complex is largely unknown. Here, we generated Mis18α conditional knockout mice and found that Mis18α deficiency resulted in lethality at early embryonic stage with severe defects in chromosome segregation caused by mislocalization of CENP-A. Further, we demonstrate Mis18α's crucial role for epigenetic regulation of centromeric chromatin by reinforcing centromeric localization of DNMT3A/3B. Mis18α interacts with DNMT3A/3B, and this interaction is critical for maintaining DNA methylation and hence regulating epigenetic states of centromeric chromatin. Mis18α deficiency led to reduced DNA methylation, altered histone modifications, and uncontrolled noncoding transcripts in centromere region by decreased DNMT3A/3B enrichment. Together, our findings uncover the functional mechanism of Mis18α and its pivotal role in mammalian cell cycle. PMID:22516971

  12. Analysis of centromeres in radiation-induced micronuclei in human peripheral lymphocytes by means of Fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The micronucleus assay is frequently used in mutagenicity testing. Micronuclei can arise either from acentric fragments that fail to be incorporated into daughter nuclei or from whole chromosomes that lag in anaphase due to centromere dysfunction, defective spindle apparatus or complex chromosomal rearrangements. Several studies have shown that many micronuclei which arise spontaneously contain whole chromosomes. Relatively few data are available on the frequency of centromere positive micronuclei following exposure to ionizing radiation. In the present study we have analyzed the occurrence of centromere positive micronuclei in human peripheral lymphocytes of three donors following irradiation with X-rays. The centromeres were made visible with commercially available alpha-satellite probes labelled with biotin and detected with FITC-labelled avidin. Additionally, the micronucleus frequencies per bi-nucleated cells were estimated in Giemsa-stained slides. Our results show that the majority of control micronuclei contain whole chromosomes. With increasing dose the fraction of centromere positive micronuclei decreases indicating that the micronuclei contain predominantly acentric fragments. Individual differences in frequencies of centromere containing micronuclei were observed between the donors. There appears to be a negative correlation between the frequency of micronuclei and centromere within them. Further experiments with more donors are presently being carried out to substantiate this result. (authors)

  13. The Ku70 DNA-repair protein is involved in centromere function in a grasshopper species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero, Josefa; Bakkali, Mohammed; Navarro-Domínguez, Beatriz; Ruíz-Ruano, Francisco J; Martín-Blázquez, Rubén; López-León, María Dolores; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2013-06-25

    The Ku70 protein is involved in numerous cell functions, the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway being the best known. Here, we report a novel function for this protein in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans. We observed the presence of large Ku70 foci on the centromeres of meiotic and mitotic chromosomes during the cell cycle stages showing the highest centromeric activity (i.e., metaphase and anaphase). The fact that colchicine treatment prevented centromeric location of Ku70, suggests a microtubule-dependent centromeric function for Ku70. Likewise, the absence of Ku70 at metaphase-anaphase centromeres from three males whose Ku70 gene had been knocked down using interference RNA, and the dramatic increase in the frequency of polyploid spermatids observed in these males, suggest that the centromeric presence of Ku70 is required for normal cytokinesis in this species. The centromeric function of Ku70 was not observed in 14 other grasshopper and locust species, or in the mouse, thus suggesting that it is an autapomorphy in E. plorans. PMID:23797468

  14. Centromeres Off the Hook: Massive Changes in Centromere Size and Structure Following Duplication of CenH3 Gene in Fabeae Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Pavel; Pavlíková, Zuzana; Koblížková, Andrea; Fuková, Iva; Jedličková, Veronika; Novák, Petr; Macas, Jiří

    2015-07-01

    In most eukaryotes, centromere is determined by the presence of the centromere-specific histone variant CenH3. Two types of chromosome morphology are generally recognized with respect to centromere organization. Monocentric chromosomes possess a single CenH3-containing domain in primary constriction, whereas holocentric chromosomes lack the primary constriction and display dispersed distribution of CenH3. Recently, metapolycentric chromosomes have been reported in Pisum sativum, representing an intermediate type of centromere organization characterized by multiple CenH3-containing domains distributed across large parts of chromosomes that still form a single constriction. In this work, we show that this type of centromere is also found in other Pisum and closely related Lathyrus species, whereas Vicia and Lens genera, which belong to the same legume tribe Fabeae, possess only monocentric chromosomes. We observed extensive variability in the size of primary constriction and the arrangement of CenH3 domains both between and within individual Pisum and Lathyrus species, with no obvious correlation to genome or chromosome size. Search for CenH3 gene sequences revealed two paralogous variants, CenH3-1 and CenH3-2, which originated from a duplication event in the common ancestor of Fabeae species. The CenH3-1 gene was subsequently lost or silenced in the lineage leading to Vicia and Lens, whereas both genes are retained in Pisum and Lathyrus. Both of these genes appear to have evolved under purifying selection and produce functional CenH3 proteins which are fully colocalized. The findings described here provide the first evidence for a highly dynamic centromere structure within a group of closely related species, challenging previous concepts of centromere evolution. PMID:25771197

  15. Centromere plasmid: a new genetic tool for the study of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiroh Iwanaga

    Full Text Available The introduction of transgenes into Plasmodium falciparum, a highly virulent human malaria parasite, has been conducted either by single crossover recombination or by using episomal plasmids. However, these techniques remain insufficient because of the low transfection efficiency and the low frequency of recombination. To improve the genetic manipulation of P. falciparum, we developed the centromere plasmid as a new genetic tool. First, we attempted to clone all of the predicted centromeres from P. falciparum into E. coli cells but failed because of the high A/T contents of these sequences. To overcome this difficulty, we identified the common sequence features of the centromere of Plasmodium spp. and designed a small centromere that retained those features. The centromere plasmid constructed with the small centromere sequence, pFCEN, segregated into daughter parasites with approximately 99% efficiency, resulting in the stable maintenance of this plasmid in P. falciparum even in the absence of drug selection. This result demonstrated that the small centromere sequence harboured in pFCEN could function as an actual centromere in P. falciparum. In addition, transgenic parasites were more rapidly generated when using pFCEN than when using the control plasmid, which did not contain the centromere sequence. Furthermore, in contrast to the control plasmid, pFCEN did not form concatemers and, thus, was maintained as a single copy over multiple cell divisions. These unique properties of the pFCEN plasmid will solve the current technical limitations of the genetic manipulation of P. falciparum, and thus, this plasmid will become a standard genetic tool for the study of this parasite.

  16. Association of a centromere specific nucleosome with the yeast plasmid partitioning locus: Implications beyond plasmid partitioning

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaram, Makkuni

    2011-01-01

    The genetically defined point centromeres of budding yeasts and the epigenetically specified regional centromeres of all other eukaryotes harbor a common epigenetic mark in the form of a non-standard nucleosome. Although, the composition of the protein core of the centromere specific nucleosome and the nature of the DNA wrap around it are at present controversial, there is no doubt that this specialized nucleosome harbors a variant of the standard histone H3 (cenH3). The association of cenH3,...

  17. Recurrent evolution of DNA-binding motifs in the Drosophila centromeric histone

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, Harmit S.; Vermaak, Danielle; Henikoff, Steven

    2002-01-01

    All eukaryotes contain centromere-specific histone H3 variants (CenH3s), which replace H3 in centromeric chromatin. We have previously documented the adaptive evolution of the Drosophila CenH3 (Cid) in comparisons of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans, a divergence of ≈2.5 million years. We have proposed that rapidly changing centromeric DNA may be driving CenH3's altered DNA-binding specificity. Here, we compare Cid sequences from a phylogenetically broader group of Drosophila s...

  18. Fission Yeast Scm3 Mediates Stable Assembly of Cnp1 (CENP-A) into Centromeric Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Jessica S.; Hayashi, Takeshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Russell, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Mis16 and Mis18 are subunits of a protein complex required for incorporation of the histone H3 variant CenH3 (Cnp1/CENP-A) into centromeric chromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammals. How the Mis16-Mis18 complex performs this function is unknown. Here we report that the Mis16-Mis18 complex is required for centromere localization of Scm3Sp, a Cnp1-binding protein related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scm3. Scm3Sp is required for centromeric localization of Cnp1, whilst Scm3Sp localizes a...

  19. Identifying Centromeric RNAs Involved in Histone Dynamics In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quénet, D; Sturgill, D; Dalal, Y

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, the long accepted dogma that heterochromatin is silent has been challenged by increasing evidence of active transcription in these apocryphally annotated quiescent regions of the genome. The recent discovery of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) originating from, or localizing to, centromeres, pericentromeres, and telomeres (ie, constitutive heterochromatin) suggest a potential role for ncRNAs in genome integrity. This new paradigm suggests that ncRNAs may recruit chromatin-binding factors, stabilize the higher order folded state of the chromatin fiber, and participate in regulation of processes such as transcription-mediated nucleosome assembly. Thus, identifying, purifying, and elucidating the function of ncRNAs has the potential to provide key insights into genome organization and is currently a topic of intense experimental investigation. PMID:27372766

  20. Duplication and Adaptive Evolution of a Key Centromeric Protein in Mimulus, a Genus with Female Meiotic Drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finseth, Findley R; Dong, Yuzhu; Saunders, Arpiar; Fishman, Lila

    2015-10-01

    The fundamental asymmetry of female meiosis creates an arena for genetic elements to compete for inclusion in the egg, promoting the selfish evolution of centromere variants that maximize their transmission to the future egg. Such "female meiotic drive" has been hypothesized to explain the paradoxically complex and rapidly evolving nature of centromeric DNA and proteins. Although theoretically widespread, few cases of active drive have been observed, thereby limiting the opportunities to directly assess the impact of centromeric drive on molecular variation at centromeres and binding proteins. Here, we characterize the molecular evolutionary patterns of CENH3, the centromere-defining histone variant, in Mimulus monkeyflowers, a genus with one of the few known cases of active centromere-associated female meiotic drive. First, we identify a novel duplication of CENH3 in diploid Mimulus, including in lineages with actively driving centromeres. Second, we demonstrate long-term adaptive evolution at several sites in the N-terminus of CENH3, a region with some meiosis-specific functions that putatively interacts with centromeric DNA. Finally, we infer that the paralogs evolve under different selective regimes; some sites in the N-terminus evolve under positive selection in the pro-orthologs or only one paralog (CENH3_B) and the paralogs exhibit significantly different patterns of polymorphism within populations. Our finding of long-term, adaptive evolution at CENH3 in the context of centromere-associated meiotic drive supports an antagonistic, coevolutionary battle for evolutionary dominance between centromeric DNA and binding proteins. PMID:26104011

  1. Mislocalization of the Drosophila centromere-specific histone CIDpromotes formation of functional ectopic kinetochores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heun, Patrick; Erhardt, Sylvia; Blower, Michael D.; Weiss,Samara; Skora, Andrew D.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2006-01-30

    The centromere-specific histone variant CENP-A (CID in Drosophila) is a structural and functional foundation for kinetochore formation and chromosome segregation. Here, we show that overexpressed CID is mislocalized into normally non-centromeric regions in Drosophila tissue culture cells and animals. Analysis of mitoses in living and fixed cells reveals that mitotic delays, anaphase bridges, chromosome fragmentation, and cell and organismal lethality are all direct consequences of CID mislocalization. In addition, proteins that are normally restricted to endogenous kinetochores assemble at a subset of ectopic CID incorporation regions. The presence of microtubule motors and binding proteins, spindle attachments, and aberrant chromosome morphologies demonstrate that these ectopic kinetochores are functional. We conclude that CID mislocalization promotes formation of ectopic centromeres and multicentric chromosomes, which causes chromosome missegregation, aneuploidy, and growth defects. Thus, CENP-A mislocalization is one possible mechanism for genome instability during cancer progression, as well as centromere plasticity during evolution.

  2. Centromere and telomere sequence alterations reflect the rapid genome evolution within the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tran, T.D.; Cao, H.X.; Jovtchev, G.; Neumann, Pavel; Novák, Petr; Fojtová, M.; Vu, G.T.H.; Macas, Jiří; Fajkus, Jiří; Schubert, I.; Fuchs, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 6 (2015), s. 1087-1099. ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA ČR GA13-06943S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : Centromeric tandem repeat * centromeric retrotransposons * Genlisea nigrocaulis, hispidula Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; BO - Biophysics (BFU-R) Impact factor: 5.972, year: 2014

  3. Organization and Evolution of Primate Centromeric DNA from Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequence Data

    OpenAIRE

    Alkan, Can; Eichler, Evan E.; Ventura, Mario; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Rocchi, Mariano; Sahinalp, S Cenk

    2007-01-01

    Author Summary Centromeric DNA has been described as the last frontier of genomic sequencing; such regions are typically poorly assembled during the whole-genome shotgun sequence assembly process due to their repetitive complexity. This paper develops a computational algorithm to systematically extract data regarding primate centromeric DNA structure and organization from that ∼5% of sequence that is not included as part of standard genome sequence assemblies. Using this computational approac...

  4. SAGA DUB-Ubp8 Deubiquitylates Centromeric Histone Variant Cse4

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Canzonetta; Stefano Vernarecci; Michele Iuliani; Cristina Marracino; Claudia Belloni; Paola Ballario; Patrizia Filetici

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy, the unbalanced segregation of chromosomes during cell division, is recurrent in many tumors and the cause of birth defects and genetic diseases. Centromeric chromatin represents the chromosome attachment site to the mitotic spindle, marked by specialized nucleosomes containing a specific histone variant, CEN-H3/Cse4, in yeast. Mislocalization of Cse4 outside the centromere is deleterious and may cause aberrant chromosome behavior and mitotic loss. For this reason, ubiquitylation b...

  5. Focus on the centre: the role of chromatin on the regulation of centromere identity and function

    OpenAIRE

    Torras-Llort, Mònica; Moreno-Moreno, Olga; Azorín, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    The centromere is a specialised chromosomal structure that regulates faithful chromosome segregation during cell division, as it dictates the site of assembly of the kinetochore, a critical structure that mediates binding of chromosomes to the spindle, monitors bipolar attachment and pulls chromosomes to the poles during anaphase. Identified more than a century ago as the primary constriction of condensed metaphase chromosomes, the centromere remained elusive to molecular characterisation for...

  6. Premitotic Assembly of Human CENPs -T and -W Switches Centromeric Chromatin to a Mitotic State

    OpenAIRE

    Prendergast, Lisa; van Vuuren, Chelly; Kaczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Doering, Volker; Hellwig, Daniela; Quinn, Nadine; Hoischen, Christian; Diekmann, Stephan; Sullivan, Kevin F.

    2011-01-01

    Centromeres are differentiated chromatin domains, present once per chromosome, that direct segregation of the genome in mitosis and meiosis by specifying assembly of the kinetochore. They are distinct genetic loci in that their identity in most organisms is determined not by the DNA sequences they are associated with, but through specific chromatin composition and context. The core nucleosomal protein CENP-A/cenH3 plays a primary role in centromere determination in all species and directs ass...

  7. Phosphorylation of centromeric histone H3 variant regulates chromosome segregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Boeckmann, Lars; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Au, Wei-Chun; Prashant K. Mishra; Choy, John S.; Dawson, Anthony R.; Szeto, May Y.; Waybright, Timothy J.; Heger, Christopher; McAndrew, Christopher; Goldsmith, Paul K.; VEENSTRA, TIMOTHY D.; Baker, Richard E.; Basrai, Munira A.

    2013-01-01

    The centromeric histone H3 variant (CenH3) is essential for chromosome segregation in eukaryotes. We identify posttranslational modifications of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CenH3, Cse4. Functional characterization of cse4 phosphorylation mutants shows growth and chromosome segregation defects when combined with kinetochore mutants okp1 and ame1. Using a phosphoserine-specific antibody, we show that the association of phosphorylated Cse4 with centromeres increases in response to defective microtu...

  8. The Domain Structure of Centromeres Is Conserved from Fission Yeast to Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Kniola, Barbara; O'Toole, Eileen; McIntosh, J. Richard; Mellone, Barbara; Allshire, Robin; Mengarelli, Silwa; Hultenby, Kjell; Ekwall, Karl

    2001-01-01

    The centromeric DNA of fission yeast is arranged with a central core flanked by repeated sequences. The centromere-associated proteins, Mis6p and Cnp1p (SpCENP-A), associate exclusively with central core DNA, whereas the Swi6 protein binds the surrounding repeats. Here, electron microscopy and immunofluorescence light microscopy reveal that the central core and flanking regions occupy distinct positions within a heterochromatic domain. An “anchor” structure containing ...

  9. The CHD remodeling factor Hrp1 stimulates CENP-A loading to centromeres

    OpenAIRE

    Walfridsson, Julian; Bjerling, Pernilla; Thalen, Maria; Yoo, Eung-Jae; Park, Sang Dai; Ekwall, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Centromeres of fission yeast are arranged with a central core DNA sequence flanked by repeated sequences. The centromere-associated histone H3 variant Cnp1 (SpCENP-A) binds exclusively to central core DNA, while the heterochromatin proteins and cohesins bind the surrounding outer repeats. CHD (chromo-helicase/ATPase DNA binding) chromatin remodeling factors were recently shown to affect chromatin assembly in vitro. Here, we report that the CHD protein Hrp1 plays a key role at fission yeast ce...

  10. Chromosomal G-dark Bands Determine the Spatial Organization of Centromeric Heterochromatin in the Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Célia; Pereira, Henrique M.; Ferreira, João; Pina, Cristina; Mendonça, Denise; Rosa, Agostinho C.; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Gene expression can be silenced by proximity to heterochromatin blocks containing centromeric α-satellite DNA. This has been shown experimentally through cis-acting chromosome rearrangements resulting in linear genomic proximity, or through trans-acting changes resulting in intranuclear spatial proximity. Although it has long been been established that centromeres are nonrandomly distributed during interphase, little is known of what determines the three-dimensional organization of these sile...

  11. Immunodeficiency, centromeric heterochromatin instability of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16, and facial anomalies: the ICF syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Maraschio, P; Zuffardi, O; Dalla Fior, T; Tiepolo, L

    1988-01-01

    Instability of the heterochromatic centromeric regions of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16 associated with immunodeficiency was found in a four year old girl. Similar phenotypic and chromosomal abnormalities were described in a previous patient studied by us and in four other published cases. All these patients have facial anomalies in addition to combined immunodeficiency and chromosomal instability. Stretching of the heterochromatic centromeric regions of chromosomes 1, 16, and to a lesser extent, ...

  12. Point mutation impairs centromeric CENH3 loading and induces haploid plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi-Ashtiyani, Raheleh; Ishii, Takayoshi; Niessen, Markus; Stein, Nils; Heckmann, Stefan; Gurushidze, Maia; Banaei-Moghaddam, Ali Mohammad; Fuchs, Jörg; Schubert, Veit; Koch, Kerstin; Weiss, Oda; Demidov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Klaus; Kumlehn, Jochen; Houben, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    The chromosomal position of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENH3 (also called "CENP-A") is the assembly site for the kinetochore complex of active centromeres. Any error in transcription, translation, modification, or incorporation can affect the ability to assemble intact CENH3 chromatin and can cause centromere inactivation [Allshire RC, Karpen GH (2008) Nat Rev Genet 9 (12):923-937]. Here we show that a single-point amino acid exchange in the centromere-targeting domain of CENH3 leads to reduced centromere loading of CENH3 in barley, sugar beet, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Haploids were obtained after cenh3 L130F-complemented cenh3-null mutant plants were crossed with wild-type A. thaliana. In contrast, in a noncompeting situation (i.e., centromeres possessing only mutated or only wild-type CENH3), no uniparental chromosome elimination occurs during early embryogenesis. The high degree of evolutionary conservation of the identified mutation site offers promising opportunities for application in a wide range of crop species in which haploid technology is of interest. PMID:26294252

  13. A high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning on a fission yeast centromere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun S; Liu, Xingkun; Liu, X Shirley; He, Xiangwei

    2008-07-01

    A key element for defining the centromere identity is the incorporation of a specific histone H3, CENPA, known as Cnp1p in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Previous studies have suggested that functional S. pombe centromeres lack regularly positioned nucleosomes and may involve chromatin remodeling as a key step of kinetochore assembly. We used tiling microarrays to show that nucleosomes are, in fact, positioned in regular intervals in the core of centromere 2, providing the first high-resolution map of regional centromere chromatin. Nucleosome locations are not disrupted by mutations in kinetochore protein genes cnp1, mis18, mis12, nuf2, mal2; overexpression of cnp1; or the deletion of ams2, which encodes a GATA-like factor participating in CENPA incorporation. Bioinformatics analysis of the centromere sequence indicates certain enriched motifs in linker regions between nucleosomes and reveals a sequence bias in nucleosome positioning. In addition, sequence analysis of nucleosome-free regions identifies novel binding sites of Ams2p. We conclude that centromeric nucleosome positions are stable and may be derived from the underlying DNA sequence. PMID:18411404

  14. The CHD remodeling factor Hrp1 stimulates CENP-A loading to centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walfridsson, Julian; Bjerling, Pernilla; Thalen, Maria; Yoo, Eung-Jae; Park, Sang Dai; Ekwall, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Centromeres of fission yeast are arranged with a central core DNA sequence flanked by repeated sequences. The centromere-associated histone H3 variant Cnp1 (SpCENP-A) binds exclusively to central core DNA, while the heterochromatin proteins and cohesins bind the surrounding outer repeats. CHD (chromo-helicase/ATPase DNA binding) chromatin remodeling factors were recently shown to affect chromatin assembly in vitro. Here, we report that the CHD protein Hrp1 plays a key role at fission yeast centromeres. The hrp1Delta mutant disrupts silencing of the outer repeats and central core regions of the centromere and displays chromosome segregation defects characteristic for dysfunction of both regions. Importantly, Hrp1 is required to maintain high levels of Cnp1 and low levels of histone H3 and H4 acetylation at the central core region. Hrp1 interacts directly with the centromere in early S-phase when centromeres are replicated, suggesting that Hrp1 plays a direct role in chromatin assembly during DNA replication. PMID:15908586

  15. A cell cycle-regulated GATA factor promotes centromeric localization of CENP-A in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ee Sin; Saitoh, Shigeaki; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Kohta

    2003-01-01

    CENP-A, the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, plays a crucial role in organizing kinetochore chromatin for precise chromosome segregation. We have isolated Ams2, a Daxx-like motif-containing GATA factor, and histone H4, as multicopy suppressors of cnp1-1, an S. pombe CENP-A mutant. While depletion of Ams2 results in the reduction of CENP-A binding to the centromere and chromosome missegregation, increasing its dosage restores association of a CENP-A mutant protein with centromeres. Conversely, overexpression of CENP-A or histone H4 suppresses an ams2 disruptant. The intracellular amount of Ams2 thus affects centromeric nucleosomal constituents. Ams2 is abundant in S phase and associates with chromatin, including the central centromeres through binding to GATA-core sequences. Ams2 is thus a cell cycle-regulated GATA factor that is required for centromere function. PMID:12535531

  16. The Aurora kinase Ipl1 maintains the centromeric localization of PP2A to protect cohesin during meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hong-Guo; Koshland, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Homologue segregation during the first meiotic division requires the proper spatial regulation of sister chromatid cohesion and its dissolution along chromosome arms, but its protection at centromeric regions. This protection requires the conserved MEI-S332/Sgo1 proteins that localize to centromeric regions and also recruit the PP2A phosphatase by binding its regulatory subunit, Rts1. Centromeric Rts1/PP2A then locally prevents cohesion dissolution possibly by dephosphorylating the protein co...

  17. CENP-C recruits M18BP1 to centromeres to promote CENP-A chromatin assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Moree, Ben; Meyer, Corey B.; Fuller, Colin J.; Straight, Aaron F.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomes segregate by attaching to microtubules of the mitotic spindle through a chromosomal microtubule binding site called the kinetochore. Kinetochores assemble on a specialized chromosomal locus termed the centromere, which is characterized by the replacement of histone H3 in centromeric nucleosomes with the essential histone H3 variant CENP-A (centromere protein A). Understanding how CENP-A chromatin is assembled and maintained is central to understanding chromosome segrega...

  18. The CentO satellite confers translational and rotational phasing on cenH3 nucleosomes in rice centromeres

    OpenAIRE

    Tao ZHANG; Talbert, Paul B; Zhang, Wenli; Wu, Yufeng; Yang, Zujun; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Henikoff, Steven; Jiang, Jiming

    2013-01-01

    Centromeres are sites on chromosomes that mediate attachment to microtubules for chromosome segregation and often comprise tandemly repeated “satellite” sequences. The function of these repeats is unclear because centromeres can be formed on single-copy DNA by the presence of nucleosomes containing a centromere-specific variant of histone H3 (cenH3). Rice has centromeres composed of both the 155-bp CentO satellite repeat and single-copy non-CentO sequences. This study shows that rice cenH3 nu...

  19. Boom-Bust Turnovers of Megabase-Sized Centromeric DNA in Solanum Species: Rapid Evolution of DNA Sequences Associated with Centromeres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, H.Q.; Koblížková, Andrea; Wang, K.; Gong, Z.Y.; Oliveira, L.; Torres, G.A.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, W.; Novák, Petr; Buell, C.R.; Macas, Jiří; Jiang, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2014), s. 1436-1447. ISSN 1040-4651 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Alpha-satellite DNA * repetitive sequences * rice centromeres Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.338, year: 2014

  20. Genome-Wide Sequence Comparison of Centromeric Regions and BAC-Landing on Chromosomes Provide New Insights into Centromere Evolution Among Wheat, Brachypodium, and Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    As an emerging model system, the nearly finished sequence of Brachypodium distachyon will provide new insights into comparative and functional genomics of grass species. However, centromeres of B. distachyon are unlikely to be sequenced and assembled precisely similar to many other sequenced organis...

  1. Molecular architecture of classical cytological landmarks: Centromeres and telomeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyne, J.

    1994-11-01

    Both the human telomere repeat and the pericentromeric repeat sequence (GGAAT)n were isolated based on evolutionary conservation. Their isolation was based on the premise that chromosomal features as structurally and functionally important as telomeres and centromeres should be highly conserved. Both sequences were isolated by high stringency screening of a human repetitive DNA library with rodent repetitive DNA. The pHuR library (plasmid Human Repeat) used for this project was enriched for repetitive DNA by using a modification of the standard DNA library preparation method. Usually DNA for a library is cut with restriction enzymes, packaged, infected, and the library is screened. A problem with this approach is that many tandem repeats don`t have any (or many) common restriction sites. Therefore, many of the repeat sequences will not be represented in the library because they are not restricted to a viable length for the vector used. To prepare the pHuR library, human DNA was mechanically sheared to a small size. These relatively short DNA fragments were denatured and then renatured to C{sub o}t 50. Theoretically only repetitive DNA sequences should renature under C{sub o}t 50 conditions. The single-stranded regions were digested using S1 nuclease, leaving the double-stranded, renatured repeat sequences.

  2. Differential Regulation of Strand-Specific Transcripts from Arabidopsis Centromeric Satellite Repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres interact with the spindle apparatus to enable chromosome disjunction and typically contain thousands of tandemly arranged satellite repeats interspersed with retrotransposons. While their role has been obscure, centromeric repeats are epigenetically modified and centromere specification has a strong epigenetic component. In the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, long heterochromatic repeats are transcribed and contribute to centromere function via RNA interference (RNAi. In the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana, as in mammalian cells, centromeric satellite repeats are short (180 base pairs, are found in thousands of tandem copies, and are methylated. We have found transcripts from both strands of canonical, bulk Arabidopsis repeats. At least one subfamily of 180-base pair repeats is transcribed from only one strand and regulated by RNAi and histone modification. A second subfamily of repeats is also silenced, but silencing is lost on both strands in mutants in the CpG DNA methyltransferase MET1, the histone deacetylase HDA6/SIL1, or the chromatin remodeling ATPase DDM1. This regulation is due to transcription from Athila2 retrotransposons, which integrate in both orientations relative to the repeats, and differs between strains of Arabidopsis. Silencing lost in met1 or hda6 is reestablished in backcrosses to wild-type, but silencing lost in RNAi mutants and ddm1 is not. Twenty-four-nucleotide small interfering RNAs from centromeric repeats are retained in met1 and hda6, but not in ddm1, and may have a role in this epigenetic inheritance. Histone H3 lysine-9 dimethylation is associated with both classes of repeats. We propose roles for transcribed repeats in the epigenetic inheritance and evolution of centromeres.

  3. Shugoshin prevents dissociation of cohesin from centromeres during mitosis in vertebrate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry E McGuinness

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Cohesion between sister chromatids is essential for their bi-orientation on mitotic spindles. It is mediated by a multisubunit complex called cohesin. In yeast, proteolytic cleavage of cohesin's alpha kleisin subunit at the onset of anaphase removes cohesin from both centromeres and chromosome arms and thus triggers sister chromatid separation. In animal cells, most cohesin is removed from chromosome arms during prophase via a separase-independent pathway involving phosphorylation of its Scc3-SA1/2 subunits. Cohesin at centromeres is refractory to this process and persists until metaphase, whereupon its alpha kleisin subunit is cleaved by separase, which is thought to trigger anaphase. What protects centromeric cohesin from the prophase pathway? Potential candidates are proteins, known as shugoshins, that are homologous to Drosophila MEI-S332 and yeast Sgo1 proteins, which prevent removal of meiotic cohesin complexes from centromeres at the first meiotic division. A vertebrate shugoshin-like protein associates with centromeres during prophase and disappears at the onset of anaphase. Its depletion by RNA interference causes HeLa cells to arrest in mitosis. Most chromosomes bi-orient on a metaphase plate, but precocious loss of centromeric cohesin from chromosomes is accompanied by loss of all sister chromatid cohesion, the departure of individual chromatids from the metaphase plate, and a permanent cell cycle arrest, presumably due to activation of the spindle checkpoint. Remarkably, expression of a version of Scc3-SA2 whose mitotic phosphorylation sites have been mutated to alanine alleviates the precocious loss of sister chromatid cohesion and the mitotic arrest of cells lacking shugoshin. These data suggest that shugoshin prevents phosphorylation of cohesin's Scc3-SA2 subunit at centromeres during mitosis. This ensures that cohesin persists at centromeres until activation of separase causes cleavage of its alpha kleisin subunit. Centromeric

  4. The Role of Dicentric Chromosome Formation and Secondary Centromere Deletion in the Evolution of Myeloid Malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Ruth N.; Campbell, Lynda J.

    2011-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes have been identified as instigators of the genome instability associated with cancer, but this instability is often resolved by one of a number of different secondary events. These include centromere inactivation, inversion, and intercentromeric deletion. Deletion or excision of one of the centromeres may be a significant occurrence in myeloid malignancy and other malignancies but has not previously been widely recognized, and our reports are the first describing centromere deletion in cancer cells. We review what is known about dicentric chromosomes and the mechanisms by which they can undergo stabilization in both constitutional and cancer genomes. The failure to identify centromere deletion in cancer cells until recently can be partly explained by the standard approaches to routine diagnostic cancer genome analysis, which do not identify centromeres in the context of chromosome organization. This hitherto hidden group of primary dicentric, secondary monocentric chromosomes, together with other unrecognized dicentric chromosomes, points to a greater role for dicentric chromosomes in cancer initiation and progression than is generally acknowledged. We present a model that predicts and explains a significant role for dicentric chromosomes in the formation of unbalanced translocations in malignancy. PMID:22567363

  5. Replicating centromeric chromatin: Spatial and temporal control of CENP-A assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The centromere is the fundamental unit for insuring chromosome inheritance. This complex region has a distinct type of chromatin in which histone H3 is replaced by a structurally different homologue identified in humans as CENP-A. In metazoans, specific DNA sequences are neither required nor sufficient for centromere identity. Rather, an epigenetic mark comprised of CENP-A containing chromatin is thought to be the major determinant of centromere identity. In this view, CENP-A deposition and chromatin assembly are fundamental processes for the maintenance of centromeric identity across mitotic and meiotic divisions. Several lines of evidence support CENP-A deposition in metazoans occurring at only one time in the cell cycle. Such cell cycle-dependent loading of CENP-A is found in divergent species from human to fission yeast, albeit with differences in the cell cycle point at which CENP-A is assembled. Cell cycle dependent CENP-A deposition requires multiple assembly factors for its deposition and maintenance. This review discusses the regulation of new CENP-A deposition and its relevance to centromere identity and inheritance.

  6. Myb-domain protein Teb1 controls histone levels and centromere assembly in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Luis P; Dehé, Pierre-Marie; Klutstein, Michael; Aligianni, Sofia; Watt, Stephen; Bähler, Jürg; Cooper, Julia Promisel

    2013-02-01

    The TTAGGG motif is common to two seemingly unrelated dimensions of chromatin function-the vertebrate telomere repeat and the promoter regions of many Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes, including all of those encoding canonical histones. The essential S. pombe protein Teb1 contains two Myb-like DNA binding domains related to those found in telomere proteins and binds the human telomere repeat sequence TTAGGG. Here, we analyse Teb1 binding throughout the genome and the consequences of reduced Teb1 function. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip analysis reveals robust Teb1 binding at many promoters, notably including all of those controlling canonical histone gene expression. A hypomorphic allele, teb1-1, confers reduced binding and reduced levels of histone transcripts. Prompted by previously suggested connections between histone expression and centromere identity, we examined localization of the centromeric histone H3 variant Cnp1 and found reduced centromeric binding along with reduced centromeric silencing. These data identify Teb1 as a master regulator of histone levels and centromere identity. PMID:23314747

  7. Transposons play an important role in the evolution and diversification of centromeres among closely related species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eJackson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are important chromosomal regions necessary for eukaryotic cell segregation and replication. Due to high amounts of tandem repeats and transposons, centromeres have been difficult to sequence in most multicellular organisms, thus their sequence structure and evolution are poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed transposons in the centromere 8 (Cen8 from the African cultivated rice (O. glaberrima and two subspecies of the Asian cultivated rice (O. sativa, indica and japonica. We detected much higher transposon contents (>69% in centromere regions than in the whole genomes of O. sativa ssp japonica and O. glaberrima (~35%. We compared the three Cen8s and identified numerous recent insertions of transposons that were frequently organized into multiple-layer nested blocks, similar to nested transposons in maize. Except for the Hopi retrotransposon, all LTR retrotransposons were shared but exhibit different abundances amongst the three Cen8s. Even though a majority of the transposons were located in intergenic regions, some gene-related transposons were found and may be involved in gene diversification. Chromatin immunoprecipitated (ChIP data analysis revealed that 165 families from both Class I and Class II transposons were found in CENH3-associated chromatin sequences. These results indicate essential roles for transposons in centromeres and that the rapid divergence of the Cen8 sequences between the two cultivated rice species was primarily caused by recent transposon insertions.

  8. H3.3 is deposited at centromeres in S phase as a placeholder for newly assembled CENP-A in G₁ phase.

    OpenAIRE

    Dunleavy, Elaine M; Almouzni, Geneviève; Karpen, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    Centromeres are key regions of eukaryotic chromosomes that ensure proper chromosome segregation at cell division. In most eukaryotes, centromere identity is defined epigenetically by the presence of a centromeric histone H3 variant CenH3, called CENP-A in humans. How CENP-A is incorporated and reproducibly transmitted during the cell cycle is at the heart of this fundamental epigenetic mechanism. Centromeric DNA is replicated during S phase; however unlike replication-coupled assembly of cano...

  9. H3.3 is deposited at centromeres in S phase as a placeholder for newly assembled CENP-A in G1 phase

    OpenAIRE

    Dunleavy, Elaine M; Almouzni, Geneviève; Karpen, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    Centromeres are key regions of eukaryotic chromosomes that ensure proper chromosome segregation at cell division. In most eukaryotes, centromere identity is defined epigenetically by the presence of a centromeric histone H3 variant CenH3, called CENP-A in humans. How CENP-A is incorporated and reproducibly transmitted during the cell cycle is at the heart of this fundamental epigenetic mechanism. Centromeric DNA is replicated during S phase; however unlike replication-coupled assembly of cano...

  10. Phosphorylation and DNA Binding of HJURP Determine Its Centromeric Recruitment and Function in CenH3CENP-A Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Müller; Rocio Montes de Oca; Nicolas Lacoste; Florent Dingli; Damarys Loew; Geneviève Almouzni

    2014-01-01

    Centromeres, epigenetically defined by the presence of the histone H3 variant CenH3, are essential for ensuring proper chromosome segregation. In mammals, centromeric CenH3CENP-A deposition requires its dedicated chaperone HJURP and occurs during telophase/early G1. We find that the cell-cycle-dependent recruitment of HJURP to centromeres depends on its timely phosphorylation controlled via cyclin-dependent kinases. A nonphosphorylatable HJURP mutant localizes prematurely to centromeres in S ...

  11. Characterization of the centromere and pericentromere retrotransposons in Brassica rapa and their distribution in related Brassica species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, K.B.; Yang, T.J.; Hwang, Y.J.; Kim, J.S.; Park, J.Y.; Kwon, S.J.; Kim, J.A.; Choi, B.S.; Lim, M.H.; Jin, M.; Kim, H.I.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Bancroft, I.; Lim, Y.P.; Park, B.S.

    2007-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of the major repeats in the centromeric and peri-centromeric heterochromatin of Brassica rapa. The analysis involved the characterization of 88 629 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) end sequences and the complete sequences of two BAC clones. We

  12. Co-evolving CENP-A and CAL1 Domains Mediate Centromeric CENP-A Deposition across Drosophila Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, Leah; Mellone, Barbara G

    2016-04-18

    Centromeres mediate the conserved process of chromosome segregation, yet centromeric DNA and the centromeric histone, CENP-A, are rapidly evolving. The rapid evolution of Drosophila CENP-A loop 1 (L1) is thought to modulate the DNA-binding preferences of CENP-A to counteract centromere drive, the preferential transmission of chromosomes with expanded centromeric satellites. Consistent with this model, CENP-A from Drosophila bipectinata (bip) cannot localize to Drosophila melanogaster (mel) centromeres. We show that this result is due to the inability of the mel CENP-A chaperone, CAL1, to deposit bip CENP-A into chromatin. Co-expression of bip CENP-A and bip CAL1 in mel cells restores centromeric localization, and similar findings apply to other Drosophila species. We identify two co-evolving regions, CENP-A L1 and the CAL1 N terminus, as critical for lineage-specific CENP-A incorporation. Collectively, our data show that the rapid evolution of L1 modulates CAL1-mediated CENP-A assembly, suggesting an alternative mechanism for the suppression of centromere drive. PMID:27093083

  13. Meiosis-specific loading of the centromere-specific histone CENH3 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Shibata, Fukashi; Ramahi, Joseph S; Nagaki, Kiyotaka; Chen, Changbin; Murata, Minoru; Chan, Simon W L

    2011-06-01

    Centromere behavior is specialized in meiosis I, so that sister chromatids of homologous chromosomes are pulled toward the same side of the spindle (through kinetochore mono-orientation) and chromosome number is reduced. Factors required for mono-orientation have been identified in yeast. However, comparatively little is known about how meiotic centromere behavior is specialized in animals and plants that typically have large tandem repeat centromeres. Kinetochores are nucleated by the centromere-specific histone CENH3. Unlike conventional histone H3s, CENH3 is rapidly evolving, particularly in its N-terminal tail domain. Here we describe chimeric variants of CENH3 with alterations in the N-terminal tail that are specifically defective in meiosis. Arabidopsis thaliana cenh3 mutants expressing a GFP-tagged chimeric protein containing the H3 N-terminal tail and the CENH3 C-terminus (termed GFP-tailswap) are sterile because of random meiotic chromosome segregation. These defects result from the specific depletion of GFP-tailswap protein from meiotic kinetochores, which contrasts with its normal localization in mitotic cells. Loss of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant in meiosis affects recruitment of the essential kinetochore protein MIS12. Our findings suggest that CENH3 loading dynamics might be regulated differently in mitosis and meiosis. As further support for our hypothesis, we show that GFP-tailswap protein is recruited back to centromeres in a subset of pollen grains in GFP-tailswap once they resume haploid mitosis. Meiotic recruitment of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant is not restored by removal of the meiosis-specific cohesin subunit REC8. Our results reveal the existence of a specialized loading pathway for CENH3 during meiosis that is likely to involve the hypervariable N-terminal tail. Meiosis-specific CENH3 dynamics may play a role in modulating meiotic centromere behavior. PMID:21695238

  14. Meiosis-specific loading of the centromere-specific histone CENH3 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruthachalam Ravi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Centromere behavior is specialized in meiosis I, so that sister chromatids of homologous chromosomes are pulled toward the same side of the spindle (through kinetochore mono-orientation and chromosome number is reduced. Factors required for mono-orientation have been identified in yeast. However, comparatively little is known about how meiotic centromere behavior is specialized in animals and plants that typically have large tandem repeat centromeres. Kinetochores are nucleated by the centromere-specific histone CENH3. Unlike conventional histone H3s, CENH3 is rapidly evolving, particularly in its N-terminal tail domain. Here we describe chimeric variants of CENH3 with alterations in the N-terminal tail that are specifically defective in meiosis. Arabidopsis thaliana cenh3 mutants expressing a GFP-tagged chimeric protein containing the H3 N-terminal tail and the CENH3 C-terminus (termed GFP-tailswap are sterile because of random meiotic chromosome segregation. These defects result from the specific depletion of GFP-tailswap protein from meiotic kinetochores, which contrasts with its normal localization in mitotic cells. Loss of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant in meiosis affects recruitment of the essential kinetochore protein MIS12. Our findings suggest that CENH3 loading dynamics might be regulated differently in mitosis and meiosis. As further support for our hypothesis, we show that GFP-tailswap protein is recruited back to centromeres in a subset of pollen grains in GFP-tailswap once they resume haploid mitosis. Meiotic recruitment of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant is not restored by removal of the meiosis-specific cohesin subunit REC8. Our results reveal the existence of a specialized loading pathway for CENH3 during meiosis that is likely to involve the hypervariable N-terminal tail. Meiosis-specific CENH3 dynamics may play a role in modulating meiotic centromere behavior.

  15. Physical Characterization of human centromeric regions using transformation-associated recombination cloning technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir Larionov, Ph D

    2007-06-05

    A special interest in the organization of human centromeric DNA was stimulated a few years ago when two independent groups succeeded in reconstituting a functional human centromere, using constructs carrying centromere-specific alphoid DNA arrays. This work demonstrated the importance of DNA components in mammalian centromeres and opened a way for studying the structural requirements for de novo kinetochore formation and for construction of human artificial chromosomes (HACs) with therapeutic potential. To elucidate the structural requirements for formation of HACs with a functional kinetochore, we developed a new method for cloning of large DNA fragments for human centromeric regions that can be used as a substrate for HAC formation. This method exploits in vivo recombination in yeast (TAR cloning). In addition, a new strategy for the construction of alphoid DNA arrays was developed in our lab. The strategy involves the construction of uniform or hybrid synthetic alphoid DNA arrays by the RCA-TAR technique. This technique comprises two steps: rolling circle amplification of an alphoid DNA dimer and subsequent assembling of the amplified fragments by in vivo homologous recombination in yeast (Figure 1). Using this system, we constructed a set of different synthetic alphoid DNA arrays with a predetermined sequence varying in size from 30 to 140 kb and demonstrated that some of the arrays are competent in HAC formation. Because any nucleotide can be changed in a dimer before its amplification, this new technique is optimal for identifying the structural requirements for de novo kinetochore formation in HACs. Moreover, the technique makes possible to introduce into alphoid DNA arrays recognition sites for DNA-binding proteins. We have made the following progress on the studying of human centromeric regions using transformation-associated recombination cloning technology: i) minimal size of alphoid DNA array required for de novo kinetochore formation was estimated; ii

  16. Genetic and physical mapping of two centromere-proximal regions of chromosome IV in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleksenko, Alexei Y.; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Clutterbuck, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    revision of the genetic map of the chromosome, including the position of the centromere, Comparison of physical and genetic maps indicates that meiotic recombination is low in subcentromeric DNA, its frequency being reduced from 1 crossover per 0.8 Mb to approximately 1 crossover per 5 Mb per meiosis, The...

  17. Survivin mediates targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex to the centromere and midbody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, G; Kauw, JJW; Medema, RH; Lens, SMA

    2006-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) coordinates chromosomal and cytoskeletal events of mitosis. The enzymatic core of this complex (Aurora-B) is guided through the mitotic cell by its companion chromosomal passenger proteins, inner centromere protein (INCENP), Survivin and Borealin/Dasra-B, ther

  18. Correlation between centromere protein-F autoantibodies and cancer analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Simon; Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Morten Frisch, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    Centromere protein-F (CENP-F) is a large nuclear protein of 367 kDa, which is involved in multiple mitosis-related events such as proper assembly of the kinetochores, stabilization of heterochromatin, chromosome alignment and mitotic checkpoint signaling. Several studies have shown a correlation...

  19. Inter-domain Cooperation in INCENP Promotes Aurora B Relocation from Centromeres to Microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando van der Horst

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosomal passenger complex is essential for error-free chromosome segregation and proper execution of cytokinesis. To coordinate nuclear division with cytoplasmic division, its enzymatic subunit, Aurora B, relocalizes from centromeres in metaphase to the spindle midzone in anaphase. In budding yeast, this requires dephosphorylation of the microtubule-binding (MTB domain of the INCENP analog Sli15. The mechanistic basis for this relocalization in metazoans is incompletely understood. We demonstrate that the putative coiled-coil domain within INCENP drives midzone localization of Aurora B via a direct, electrostatic interaction with microtubules. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the CPC multimerizes via INCENP’s centromere-targeting domain (CEN box, which increases the MTB affinity of INCENP. In (prometaphase, the MTB affinity of INCENP is outcompeted by the affinity of its CEN box for centromeres, while at anaphase onset—when the histone mark H2AT120 is dephosphorylated—INCENP and Aurora B switch from centromere to microtubule localization.

  20. Epigenetic Histone Marks of Extended Meta-Polycentric Centromeres of Lathyrus and Pisum Chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neumann, Pavel; Schubert, V.; Fuková, Iva; Manning, Jasper Eugene; Houben, A.; Macas, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 234 (2016). ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/1843 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Centromere structure * epigenetic modifications * histone phosphorylation * histone methylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.948, year: 2014

  1. Centromere localization and function of Mis18 requires Yippee-like domain-mediated oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Lakxmi; Medina-Pritchard, Bethan; Barton, Rachael; Spiller, Frances; Kulasegaran-Shylini, Raghavendran; Radaviciute, Guoda; Allshire, Robin C; Arockia Jeyaprakash, A

    2016-04-01

    Mis18 is a key regulator responsible for the centromere localization of the CENP-A chaperone Scm3 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and HJURP in humans, which establishes CENP-A chromatin that defines centromeres. The molecular and structural determinants of Mis18 centromere targeting remain elusive. Here, by combining structural, biochemical, and yeast genetic studies, we show that the oligomerization of S. pombe Mis18, mediated via its conserved N-terminal Yippee-like domain, is crucial for its centromere localization and function. The crystal structure of the N-terminal Yippee-like domain reveals a fold containing a cradle-shaped pocket that is implicated in protein/nucleic acid binding, which we show is required for Mis18 function. While the N-terminal Yippee-like domain forms a homodimer in vitro and in vivo, full-length Mis18, including the C-terminal α-helical domain, forms a homotetramer in vitro We also show that the Yippee-like domains of human Mis18α/Mis18β interact to form a heterodimer, implying a conserved structural theme for Mis18 regulation. PMID:26921242

  2. Polo-like kinase 1 licenses CENP-A deposition at centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Kara L; Cheeseman, Iain M

    2014-07-17

    To ensure the stable transmission of the genome during vertebrate cell division, the mitotic spindle must attach to a single locus on each chromosome, termed the centromere. The fundamental requirement for faithful centromere inheritance is the controlled deposition of the centromere-specifying histone, CENP-A. However, the regulatory mechanisms that ensure the precise control of CENP-A deposition have proven elusive. Here, we identify polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) as a centromere-localized regulator required to initiate CENP-A deposition in human cells. We demonstrate that faithful CENP-A deposition requires integrated signals from Plk1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), with Plk1 promoting the localization of the key CENP-A deposition factor, the Mis18 complex, and CDK inhibiting Mis18 complex assembly. By bypassing these regulated steps, we uncoupled CENP-A deposition from cell-cycle progression, resulting in mitotic defects. Thus, CENP-A deposition is controlled by a two-step regulatory paradigm comprised of Plk1 and CDK that is crucial for genomic integrity. PMID:25036634

  3. Mitotic regulator Mis18β interacts with and specifies the centromeric assembly of molecular chaperone holliday junction recognition protein (HJURP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyu; Liu, Xing; Dou, Zhen; Chen, Liang; Jiang, Hao; Fu, Chuanhai; Fu, Guosheng; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Jiancun; Zhu, Tongge; Fang, Jingwen; Zang, Jianye; Cheng, Jinke; Teng, Maikun; Ding, Xia; Yao, Xuebiao

    2014-03-21

    The centromere is essential for precise and equal segregation of the parental genome into two daughter cells during mitosis. CENP-A is a unique histone H3 variant conserved in eukaryotic centromeres. The assembly of CENP-A to the centromere is mediated by Holliday junction recognition protein (HJURP) in early G1 phase. However, it remains elusive how HJURP governs CENP-A incorporation into the centromere. Here we show that human HJURP directly binds to Mis18β, a component of the Mis18 complex conserved in the eukaryotic kingdom. A minimal region of HJURP for Mis18β binding was mapped to residues 437-460. Depletion of Mis18β by RNA interference dramatically impaired HJURP recruitment to the centromere, indicating the importance of Mis18β in HJURP loading. Interestingly, phosphorylation of HJURP by CDK1 weakens its interaction with Mis18β, consistent with the notion that assembly of CENP-A to the centromere is achieved after mitosis. Taken together, these data define a novel molecular mechanism underlying the temporal regulation of CENP-A incorporation into the centromere by accurate Mis18β-HJURP interaction. PMID:24519934

  4. Mitotic Regulator Mis18β Interacts with and Specifies the Centromeric Assembly of Molecular Chaperone Holliday Junction Recognition Protein (HJURP)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyu; Liu, Xing; Dou, Zhen; Chen, Liang; Jiang, Hao; Fu, Chuanhai; Fu, Guosheng; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Jiancun; Zhu, Tongge; Fang, Jingwen; Zang, Jianye; Cheng, Jinke; Teng, Maikun; Ding, Xia; Yao, Xuebiao

    2014-01-01

    The centromere is essential for precise and equal segregation of the parental genome into two daughter cells during mitosis. CENP-A is a unique histone H3 variant conserved in eukaryotic centromeres. The assembly of CENP-A to the centromere is mediated by Holliday junction recognition protein (HJURP) in early G1 phase. However, it remains elusive how HJURP governs CENP-A incorporation into the centromere. Here we show that human HJURP directly binds to Mis18β, a component of the Mis18 complex conserved in the eukaryotic kingdom. A minimal region of HJURP for Mis18β binding was mapped to residues 437–460. Depletion of Mis18β by RNA interference dramatically impaired HJURP recruitment to the centromere, indicating the importance of Mis18β in HJURP loading. Interestingly, phosphorylation of HJURP by CDK1 weakens its interaction with Mis18β, consistent with the notion that assembly of CENP-A to the centromere is achieved after mitosis. Taken together, these data define a novel molecular mechanism underlying the temporal regulation of CENP-A incorporation into the centromere by accurate Mis18β-HJURP interaction. PMID:24519934

  5. Transgenerational propagation and quantitative maintenance of paternal centromeres depends on Cid/Cenp-A presence in Drosophila sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, Nitika; Dubruille, Raphaelle; Orsi, Guillermo A; Bagheri, Homayoun C; Loppin, Benjamin; Lehner, Christian F

    2012-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, as in many animal and plant species, centromere identity is specified epigenetically. In proliferating cells, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CenH3), named Cid in Drosophila and Cenp-A in humans, is a crucial component of the epigenetic centromere mark. Hence, maintenance of the amount and chromosomal location of CenH3 during mitotic proliferation is important. Interestingly, CenH3 may have different roles during meiosis and the onset of embryogenesis. In gametes of Caenorhabditis elegans, and possibly in plants, centromere marking is independent of CenH3. Moreover, male gamete differentiation in animals often includes global nucleosome for protamine exchange that potentially could remove CenH3 nucleosomes. Here we demonstrate that the control of Cid loading during male meiosis is distinct from the regulation observed during the mitotic cycles of early embryogenesis. But Cid is present in mature sperm. After strong Cid depletion in sperm, paternal centromeres fail to integrate into the gonomeric spindle of the first mitosis, resulting in gynogenetic haploid embryos. Furthermore, after moderate depletion, paternal centromeres are unable to re-acquire normal Cid levels in the next generation. We conclude that Cid in sperm is an essential component of the epigenetic centromere mark on paternal chromosomes and it exerts quantitative control over centromeric Cid levels throughout development. Hence, the amount of Cid that is loaded during each cell cycle appears to be determined primarily by the preexisting centromeric Cid, with little flexibility for compensation of accidental losses. PMID:23300376

  6. Transgenerational propagation and quantitative maintenance of paternal centromeres depends on Cid/Cenp-A presence in Drosophila sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitika Raychaudhuri

    Full Text Available In Drosophila melanogaster, as in many animal and plant species, centromere identity is specified epigenetically. In proliferating cells, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CenH3, named Cid in Drosophila and Cenp-A in humans, is a crucial component of the epigenetic centromere mark. Hence, maintenance of the amount and chromosomal location of CenH3 during mitotic proliferation is important. Interestingly, CenH3 may have different roles during meiosis and the onset of embryogenesis. In gametes of Caenorhabditis elegans, and possibly in plants, centromere marking is independent of CenH3. Moreover, male gamete differentiation in animals often includes global nucleosome for protamine exchange that potentially could remove CenH3 nucleosomes. Here we demonstrate that the control of Cid loading during male meiosis is distinct from the regulation observed during the mitotic cycles of early embryogenesis. But Cid is present in mature sperm. After strong Cid depletion in sperm, paternal centromeres fail to integrate into the gonomeric spindle of the first mitosis, resulting in gynogenetic haploid embryos. Furthermore, after moderate depletion, paternal centromeres are unable to re-acquire normal Cid levels in the next generation. We conclude that Cid in sperm is an essential component of the epigenetic centromere mark on paternal chromosomes and it exerts quantitative control over centromeric Cid levels throughout development. Hence, the amount of Cid that is loaded during each cell cycle appears to be determined primarily by the preexisting centromeric Cid, with little flexibility for compensation of accidental losses.

  7. Characterization of Centromeric Histone H3 (CENH3) Variants in Cultivated and Wild Carrots (Daucus sp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunemann, Frank; Schrader, Otto; Budahn, Holger; Houben, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, centromeres are the assembly sites for the kinetochore, a multi-protein complex to which spindle microtubules are attached at mitosis and meiosis, thereby ensuring segregation of chromosomes during cell division. They are specified by incorporation of CENH3, a centromere specific histone H3 variant which replaces canonical histone H3 in the nucleosomes of functional centromeres. To lay a first foundation of a putative alternative haploidization strategy based on centromere-mediated genome elimination in cultivated carrots, in the presented research we aimed at the identification and cloning of functional CENH3 genes in Daucus carota and three distantly related wild species of genus Daucus varying in basic chromosome numbers. Based on mining the carrot transcriptome followed by a subsequent PCR-based cloning, homologous coding sequences for CENH3s of the four Daucus species were identified. The ORFs of the CENH3 variants were very similar, and an amino acid sequence length of 146 aa was found in three out of the four species. Comparison of Daucus CENH3 amino acid sequences with those of other plant CENH3s as well as their phylogenetic arrangement among other dicot CENH3s suggest that the identified genes are authentic CENH3 homologs. To verify the location of the CENH3 protein in the kinetochore regions of the Daucus chromosomes, a polyclonal antibody based on a peptide corresponding to the N-terminus of DcCENH3 was developed and used for anti-CENH3 immunostaining of mitotic root cells. The chromosomal location of CENH3 proteins in the centromere regions of the chromosomes could be confirmed. For genetic localization of the CENH3 gene in the carrot genome, a previously constructed linkage map for carrot was used for mapping a CENH3-specific simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker, and the CENH3 locus was mapped on the carrot chromosome 9. PMID:24887084

  8. Characterization of centromeric histone H3 (CENH3 variants in cultivated and wild carrots (Daucus sp..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Dunemann

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, centromeres are the assembly sites for the kinetochore, a multi-protein complex to which spindle microtubules are attached at mitosis and meiosis, thereby ensuring segregation of chromosomes during cell division. They are specified by incorporation of CENH3, a centromere specific histone H3 variant which replaces canonical histone H3 in the nucleosomes of functional centromeres. To lay a first foundation of a putative alternative haploidization strategy based on centromere-mediated genome elimination in cultivated carrots, in the presented research we aimed at the identification and cloning of functional CENH3 genes in Daucus carota and three distantly related wild species of genus Daucus varying in basic chromosome numbers. Based on mining the carrot transcriptome followed by a subsequent PCR-based cloning, homologous coding sequences for CENH3s of the four Daucus species were identified. The ORFs of the CENH3 variants were very similar, and an amino acid sequence length of 146 aa was found in three out of the four species. Comparison of Daucus CENH3 amino acid sequences with those of other plant CENH3s as well as their phylogenetic arrangement among other dicot CENH3s suggest that the identified genes are authentic CENH3 homologs. To verify the location of the CENH3 protein in the kinetochore regions of the Daucus chromosomes, a polyclonal antibody based on a peptide corresponding to the N-terminus of DcCENH3 was developed and used for anti-CENH3 immunostaining of mitotic root cells. The chromosomal location of CENH3 proteins in the centromere regions of the chromosomes could be confirmed. For genetic localization of the CENH3 gene in the carrot genome, a previously constructed linkage map for carrot was used for mapping a CENH3-specific simple sequence repeat (SSR marker, and the CENH3 locus was mapped on the carrot chromosome 9.

  9. Structural basis for recognition of centromere histone variant CenH3 by the chaperone Scm3

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zheng; Feng, Hanqiao; Zhou, Bing-Rui; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Hu, Kaifeng; Zwolak, Adam; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Xiao, Hua; Tjandra, Nico; Wu, Carl; Bai, Yawen

    2011-01-01

    The centromere is a unique chromosomal locus that ensures accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division by directing the assembly of a multiprotein complex, the kinetochore1. The centromere is marked by a conserved variant of conventional histone H3 termed CenH3 or CENP-A2. A conserved motif of CenH3, the CATD, defined by loop 1 and helix 2 of the histone fold, is necessary and sufficient for specifying centromere functions of CenH33, 4. The structural basis of this specification i...

  10. Transgenerational propagation and quantitative maintenance of paternal centromeres depends on Cid/Cenp-A presence in Drosophila sperm

    OpenAIRE

    Raychaudhuri, Nitika; Dubruille, Raphaelle; Orsi, Guillermo A.; Bagheri, Homayoun C.; Loppin, Benjamin; Lehner, Christian F.

    2012-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, as in many animal and plant species, centromere identity is specified epigenetically. In proliferating cells, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CenH3), named Cid in Drosophila and Cenp-A in humans, is a crucial component of the epigenetic centromere mark. Hence, maintenance of the amount and chromosomal location of CenH3 during mitotic proliferation is important. Interestingly, CenH3 may have different roles during meiosis and the onset of embryogenesis. In...

  11. Esperanto for histones: CENP-A, not CenH3, is the centromeric histone H3 variant

    OpenAIRE

    Earnshaw, W C; Allshire, R C; Black, B. E.; Bloom, K.; Brinkley, B. R.; Brown, W.; Cheeseman, I. M.; Choo, K.H.A.; Copenhaver, G. P.; DeLuca, J. G.; Desai, A.; Diekmann, S.; Erhardt, S; Fitzgerald-Hayes, M; Foltz, D.

    2013-01-01

    The first centromeric protein identified in any species was CENP-A, a divergent member of the histone H3 family that was recognised by autoantibodies from patients with scleroderma-spectrum disease. It has recently been suggested to rename this protein CenH3. Here, we argue that the original name should be maintained both because it is the basis of a long established nomenclature for centromere proteins and because it avoids confusion due to the presence of canonical histone H3 at centromeres.

  12. Scm3, an essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae centromere protein required for G2/M progression and Cse4 localization

    OpenAIRE

    Stoler, Sam; Rogers, Kelly; Weitze, Scott; Morey, Lisa; Fitzgerald-Hayes, Molly; Baker, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    A universal mark of centromeric chromatin is its packaging by a variant of histone H3 known as centromeric H3 (CenH3). The mechanism by which CenH3s are incorporated specifically into centromere DNA or the specialized function they serve there is not known. In a genetic approach to identify factors involved in CenH3 deposition, we screened for dosage suppressors of a temperature-sensitive cse4 allele in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Cse4 is the S. cerevisiae CenH3). Independent screens yielded OR...

  13. Two distinct pathways responsible for the loading of CENP-A to centromeres in the fission yeast cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Kohta; Takayama, Yuko; Masuda, Fumie; Kobayashi, Yasuyo; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2005-01-01

    CENP-A is a centromere-specific histone H3 variant that is- essential for faithful chromosome segregation in all eukaryotes thus far investigated. We genetically identified two factors, Ams2 and Mis6, each of which is required for the correct centromere localization of SpCENP-A (Cnp1), the fission yeast homologue of CENP-A. Ams2 is a cell-cycle-regulated GATA factor that localizes on the nuclear chromatin, including on centromeres, during the S phase. Ams2 may be responsible for the replicati...

  14. The differential loading of two barley CENH3 variants into distinct centromeric substructures is cell type- and development-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takayoshi; Karimi-Ashtiyani, Raheleh; Banaei-Moghaddam, Ali Mohammad; Schubert, Veit; Fuchs, Jörg; Houben, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    The organization of centromeric chromatin of diploid barley (Hordeum vulgare) encoding two (α and β) CENH3 variants was analysed by super-resolution microscopy. Antibody staining revealed that both CENH3 variants are organized in distinct but intermingled subdomains in interphase, mitotic and meiotic centromeres. Artificially extended chromatin fibres illustrate that these subdomains are formed by polynucleosome clusters. Thus, a CENH3 variant-specific loading followed by the arrangement into specific intermingling subdomains forming the centromere region appears. The CENH3 composition and transcription vary among different tissues. In young embryos, most interphase centromeres are composed of both CENH3 variants, while in meristematic root cells, a high number of nuclei contain βCENH3 mainly dispersed within the nucleoplasm. A similar distribution and no preferential arrangement of the two CENH3 variants in relationship to the spindle poles suggest that both homologs meet the same function in metaphase cells. PMID:25688006

  15. Cloning of human centromeres by transformation-associated recombination in yeast and generation of functional human artificial chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Kouprina, N.; Ebersole, T.; Koriabine, M.; Pak, E; Rogozin, I. B.; Katoh, M; Oshimura, M; Ogi, K; Peredelchuk, M.; Solomon, G; Brown, W.; Barrett, J. C.; Larionov, V

    2003-01-01

    Human centromeres remain poorly characterized regions of the human genome despite their importance for the maintenance of chromosomes. In part this is due to the difficulty of cloning of highly repetitive DNA fragments and distinguishing chromosome-specific clones in a genomic library. In this work we report the highly selective isolation of human centromeric DNA using transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning. A TAR vector with alphoid DNA monomers as targeting sequences was used...

  16. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy Hoggard; Ivan Liachko; Cassaundra Burt; Troy Meikle; Katherine Jiang; Gheorghe Craciun; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chrom...

  17. Immunodeficiency, Centromeric instability, Facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome, due to ZBTB24 mutations, presenting with large cerebral cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Cerbone, Manuela; Wang, Jun; van der Maarel, Silvère M.; D’Amico, Alessandra; d’Agostino, Antonio; Romano, Alfonso; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The Immunodeficiency, Centromeric instability, Facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease presenting with immunodeficiency secondary to hypo- or agammaglobulinemia, developmental delay, and facial anomalies. Centromeric instability is the cytogenetic hallmark of the disorder which results from targeted chromosomal rearrangements related to a genomic methylation defect. We describe a patient carrying a homozygous mutation of the ZBTB24 gene, which has been recently shown...

  18. CENP-B box, a nucleotide motif involved in centromere formation, occurs in a New World monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntronpong, Aorarat; Kugou, Kazuto; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Ohshima, Kazuhiko; Hirai, Hirohisa; Koga, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    Centromere protein B (CENP-B) is one of the major proteins involved in centromere formation, binding to centromeric repetitive DNA by recognizing a 17 bp motif called the CENP-B box. Hominids (humans and great apes) carry large numbers of CENP-B boxes in alpha satellite DNA (AS, the major centromeric repetitive DNA of simian primates). Only negative results have been reported regarding the presence of the CENP-B box in other primate taxa. Consequently, it is widely believed that the CENP-B box is confined, within primates, to the hominids. We report here that the common marmoset, a New World monkey, contains an abundance of CENP-B boxes in its AS. First, in a long contig sequence we constructed and analysed, we identified the motif in 17 of the 38 alpha satellite repeat units. We then sequenced terminal regions of additional clones and found the motif in many of them. Immunostaining of marmoset cells demonstrated that CENP-B binds to DNA in the centromeric regions of chromosomes. Therefore, functional CENP-B boxes are not confined to hominids. Our results indicate that the efficiency of identification of the CENP-B box may depend largely on the sequencing methods used, and that the CENP-B box in centromeric repetitive DNA may be more common than researchers previously thought. PMID:27029836

  19. CENP-C recruits M18BP1 to centromeres to promote CENP-A chromatin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moree, Ben; Meyer, Corey B; Fuller, Colin J; Straight, Aaron F

    2011-09-19

    Eukaryotic chromosomes segregate by attaching to microtubules of the mitotic spindle through a chromosomal microtubule binding site called the kinetochore. Kinetochores assemble on a specialized chromosomal locus termed the centromere, which is characterized by the replacement of histone H3 in centromeric nucleosomes with the essential histone H3 variant CENP-A (centromere protein A). Understanding how CENP-A chromatin is assembled and maintained is central to understanding chromosome segregation mechanisms. CENP-A nucleosome assembly requires the Mis18 complex and the CENP-A chaperone HJURP. These factors localize to centromeres in telophase/G1, when new CENP-A chromatin is assembled. The mechanisms that control their targeting are unknown. In this paper, we identify a mechanism for recruiting the Mis18 complex protein M18BP1 to centromeres. We show that depletion of CENP-C prevents M18BP1 targeting to metaphase centromeres and inhibits CENP-A chromatin assembly. We find that M18BP1 directly binds CENP-C through conserved domains in the CENP-C protein. Thus, CENP-C provides a link between existing CENP-A chromatin and the proteins required for new CENP-A nucleosome assembly. PMID:21911481

  20. Epigenetic Histone Marks of Extended Meta-Polycentric Centromeres of Lathyrus and Pisum Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Pavel; Schubert, Veit; FUKOVÁ, Iva; Manning, Jasper E.; Houben, Andreas; Macas, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Species of the legume genera Lathyrus and Pisum possess chromosomes that exhibit a unique structure of their centromeric regions, which is clearly apparent during metaphase by the formation of extended primary constrictions which span up to a third of the length of the chromosome. In addition, these species express two different variants of the CenH3 protein which are co-localized in multiple domains along the poleward surface of the primary constrictions. Here, we show that the constrictions...

  1. Heterochromatin and RNAi Are Required to Establish CENP-A Chromatin at Centromeres

    OpenAIRE

    Folco, Hernan Diego; Pidoux, Alison L.; Urano, Takeshi; Allshire, Robin C.

    2008-01-01

    Heterochromatin is defined by distinct posttranslational modifications on histones, such as methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9), which allows heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1)-related chromodomain proteins to bind. Heterochromatin is frequently found near CENP-A chromatin, which is the key determinant of kinetochore assembly. We have discovered that the RNA interference (RNAi)-directed heterochromatin flanking the central kinetochore domain at fission yeast centromeres is required to p...

  2. CENP-A exceeds microtubule attachment sites in centromere clusters of both budding and fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Coffman, Valerie C.; Wu, Pengcheng; Parthun, Mark R.; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2011-01-01

    The stoichiometries of kinetochores and their constituent proteins in yeast and vertebrate cells were determined using the histone H3 variant CENP-A, known as Cse4 in budding yeast, as a counting standard. One Cse4-containing nucleosome exists in the centromere (CEN) of each chromosome, so it has been assumed that each anaphase CEN/kinetochore cluster contains 32 Cse4 molecules. We report that anaphase CEN clusters instead contained approximately fourfold more Cse4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  3. Mutations in CDCA7 and HELLS cause immunodeficiency–centromeric instability–facial anomalies syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Thijssen, Peter E.; Ito, Yuya; Grillo, Giacomo; Wang, Jun; Velasco, Guillaume; Nitta, Hirohisa; Unoki, Motoko; Yoshihara, Minako; Suyama, Mikita; Sun, Yu; Lemmers, Richard J L F; de Greef, Jessica C.; Gennery, Andrew; Picco, Paolo; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The life-threatening Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability and Facial Anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder. Twenty percent of patients cannot be explained by mutations in the known ICF genes DNA methyltransferase 3B or zinc-finger and BTB domain containing 24. Here we report mutations in the cell division cycle associated 7 and the helicase, lymphoid-specific genes in 10 unexplained ICF cases. Our data highlight the genetic heterogeneity of ...

  4. Mutations in ZBTB24 Are Associated with Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability, and Facial Anomalies Syndrome Type 2

    OpenAIRE

    de Greef, Jessica C.; Wang, Jun; Balog, Judit; den Dunnen, Johan T; Frants, Rune R.; Straasheijm, Kirsten R.; Aytekin, Caner; van der Burg, Mirjam; Duprez, Laurence; Ferster, Alina; Gennery, Andrew R.; Gimelli, Giorgio; Reisli, Ismail; Schuetz, Catharina; Schulz, Ansgar

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is mainly characterized by recurrent, often fatal, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. About 50% of patients carry mutations in the DNA methyltransferase 3B gene (DNMT3B) (ICF1). The remaining patients carry unknown genetic defects (ICF2) but share with ICF1 patients the same immunological and epigenetic features, including hypomethylation of juxtacentromeric repeat sequences. We perfor...

  5. A Cohesin-Based Partitioning Mechanism Revealed upon Transcriptional Inactivation of Centromere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsabar, Michael; Haase, Julian; Harrison, Benjamin; Snider, Chloe E.; Kaminsky, Lila; Hine, Rebecca M.; Haber, James E.; Bloom, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional inactivation of the budding yeast centromere has been a widely used tool in studies of chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. In haploid cells when an essential chromosome contains a single conditionally inactivated centromere (GAL-CEN), cell growth rate is slowed and segregation fidelity is reduced; but colony formation is nearly 100%. Pedigree analysis revealed that only 30% of the time both mother and daughter cell inherit the GAL-CEN chromosome. The reduced segregation capacity of the GAL-CEN chromosome is further compromised upon reduction of pericentric cohesin (mcm21∆), as reflected in a further diminishment of the Mif2 kinetochore protein at GAL-CEN. By redistributing cohesin from the nucleolus to the pericentromere (by deleting SIR2), there is increased presence of the kinetochore protein Mif2 at GAL-CEN and restoration of cell viability. These studies identify the ability of cohesin to promote chromosome segregation via kinetochore assembly, in a situation where the centromere has been severely compromised. PMID:27128635

  6. Shearing of the CENP-A dimerization interface mediates plasticity in the octameric centromeric nucleosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winogradoff, David; Zhao, Haiqing; Dalal, Yamini; Papoian, Garegin A.

    2015-11-01

    The centromeric nucleosome is a key epigenetic determinant of centromere identity and function. Consequently, deciphering how CENP-A containing nucleosomes contribute structurally to centromere function is a fundamental question in chromosome biology. Here, we performed microsecond timescale all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of CENP-A and H3 nucleosomes, and report that the octameric CENP-A core particles and nucleosomes display different dynamics from their canonical H3-containing counterparts. The most significant motion observed is within key interactions at the heart of the CENP-A octameric core, wherein shearing of contacts within the CENP-A:CENP-A’ dimerization interface results in a weaker four helix bundle, and an extrusion of 10-30 bp of DNA near the pseudo-dyad. Coupled to other local and global fluctuations, the CENP-A nucleosome occupies a more rugged free energy landscape than the canonical H3 nucleosome. Taken together, our data suggest that CENP-A encodes enhanced distortability to the octameric nucleosome, which may allow for enhanced flexing of the histone core in vivo.

  7. A Cohesin-Based Partitioning Mechanism Revealed upon Transcriptional Inactivation of Centromere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsabar, Michael; Haase, Julian; Harrison, Benjamin; Snider, Chloe E; Eldridge, Brittany; Kaminsky, Lila; Hine, Rebecca M; Haber, James E; Bloom, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    Transcriptional inactivation of the budding yeast centromere has been a widely used tool in studies of chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. In haploid cells when an essential chromosome contains a single conditionally inactivated centromere (GAL-CEN), cell growth rate is slowed and segregation fidelity is reduced; but colony formation is nearly 100%. Pedigree analysis revealed that only 30% of the time both mother and daughter cell inherit the GAL-CEN chromosome. The reduced segregation capacity of the GAL-CEN chromosome is further compromised upon reduction of pericentric cohesin (mcm21∆), as reflected in a further diminishment of the Mif2 kinetochore protein at GAL-CEN. By redistributing cohesin from the nucleolus to the pericentromere (by deleting SIR2), there is increased presence of the kinetochore protein Mif2 at GAL-CEN and restoration of cell viability. These studies identify the ability of cohesin to promote chromosome segregation via kinetochore assembly, in a situation where the centromere has been severely compromised. PMID:27128635

  8. ParB Partition Proteins: Complex Formation and Spreading at Bacterial and Plasmid Centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funnell, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, active partition systems contribute to the faithful segregation of both chromosomes and low-copy-number plasmids. Each system depends on a site-specific DNA binding protein to recognize and assemble a partition complex at a centromere-like site, commonly called parS. Many plasmid, and all chromosomal centromere-binding proteins are dimeric helix-turn-helix DNA binding proteins, which are commonly named ParB. Although the overall sequence conservation among ParBs is not high, the proteins share similar domain and functional organization, and they assemble into similar higher-order complexes. In vivo, ParBs "spread," that is, DNA binding extends away from the parS site into the surrounding non-specific DNA, a feature that reflects higher-order complex assembly. ParBs bridge and pair DNA at parS and non-specific DNA sites. ParB dimers interact with each other via flexible conformations of an N-terminal region. This review will focus on the properties of the HTH centromere-binding protein, in light of recent experimental evidence and models that are adding to our understanding of how these proteins assemble into large and dynamic partition complexes at and around their specific DNA sites. PMID:27622187

  9. Centromere binding and a conserved role in chromosome stability for SUMO-dependent ubiquitin ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loes A L van de Pasch

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Slx5/8 complex is the founding member of a recently defined class of SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs. Slx5/8 has been implicated in genome stability and transcription, but the precise contribution is unclear. To characterise Slx5/8 function, we determined genome-wide changes in gene expression upon loss of either subunit. The majority of mRNA changes are part of a general stress response, also exhibited by mutants of other genome integrity pathways and therefore indicative of an indirect effect on transcription. Genome-wide binding analysis reveals a uniquely centromeric location for Slx5. Detailed phenotype analyses of slx5Δ and slx8Δ mutants show severe mitotic defects that include aneuploidy, spindle mispositioning, fish hooks and aberrant spindle kinetics. This is associated with accumulation of the PP2A regulatory subunit Rts1 at centromeres prior to entry into anaphase. Knockdown of the human STUbL orthologue RNF4 also results in chromosome segregation errors due to chromosome bridges. The study shows that STUbLs have a conserved role in maintenance of chromosome stability and links SUMO-dependent ubiquitination to a centromere-specific function during mitosis.

  10. Centromere binding and a conserved role in chromosome stability for SUMO-dependent ubiquitin ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pasch, Loes A L; Miles, Antony J; Nijenhuis, Wilco; Brabers, Nathalie A C H; van Leenen, Dik; Lijnzaad, Philip; Brown, Markus K; Ouellet, Jimmy; Barral, Yves; Kops, Geert J P L; Holstege, Frank C P

    2013-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Slx5/8 complex is the founding member of a recently defined class of SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs). Slx5/8 has been implicated in genome stability and transcription, but the precise contribution is unclear. To characterise Slx5/8 function, we determined genome-wide changes in gene expression upon loss of either subunit. The majority of mRNA changes are part of a general stress response, also exhibited by mutants of other genome integrity pathways and therefore indicative of an indirect effect on transcription. Genome-wide binding analysis reveals a uniquely centromeric location for Slx5. Detailed phenotype analyses of slx5Δ and slx8Δ mutants show severe mitotic defects that include aneuploidy, spindle mispositioning, fish hooks and aberrant spindle kinetics. This is associated with accumulation of the PP2A regulatory subunit Rts1 at centromeres prior to entry into anaphase. Knockdown of the human STUbL orthologue RNF4 also results in chromosome segregation errors due to chromosome bridges. The study shows that STUbLs have a conserved role in maintenance of chromosome stability and links SUMO-dependent ubiquitination to a centromere-specific function during mitosis. PMID:23785440

  11. KAT7/HBO1/MYST2 Regulates CENP-A Chromatin Assembly by Antagonizing Suv39h1-Mediated Centromere Inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Ohzeki, Jun-ichirou; Shono, Nobuaki; Otake, Koichiro; Martins, Nuno M. C.; Kugou, Kazuto; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nagase, Takahiro; Larionov, Vladimir; Earnshaw, William C.; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Centromere chromatin containing histone H3 variant CENP-A is required for accurate chromosome segregation as a foundation for kinetochore assembly. Human centromere chromatin assembles on a part of the long α-satellite (alphoid) DNA array, where it is flanked by pericentric heterochromatin. Heterochromatin spreads into adjacent chromatin and represses gene expression, and it can antagonize centromere function or CENP-A assembly. Here, we demonstrate an interaction between CENP-A assem...

  12. Detrimental incorporation of excess Cenp-A/Cid and Cenp-C into Drosophila centromeres is prevented by limiting amounts of the bridging factor Cal1

    OpenAIRE

    Schittenhelm, R B; F. Althoff; Heidmann, S; Lehner, C F

    2010-01-01

    Propagation of centromere identity during cell cycle progression in higher eukaryotes depends critically on the faithful incorporation of a centromere-specific histone H3 variant encoded by CENPA in humans and cid in Drosophila. Cenp-A/Cid is required for the recruitment of Cenp-C, another conserved centromere protein. With yeast three-hybrid experiments, we demonstrate that the essential Drosophila centromere protein Cal1 can link Cenp-A/Cid and Cenp-C. Cenp-A/Cid and Cenp-C interact with th...

  13. The distinct functions of CENP-C and CENP-T/W in centromere propagation and function in Xenopus egg extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Krizaic, Iva; Williams, Samantha J.; Sánchez, Patricia; Rodríguez-Corsino, Miriam; Stukenberg, P. Todd; Losada, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The centromere is the chromosomal region in which the kinetochore is assembled to orchestrate chromosome segregation. It is defined by the presence of a histone H3 variant called Centromere Protein A (CENP-A) or CenH3. Propagation of centromere identity entails deposition of new CENP-A upon exit from mitosis in vertebrate cells. A group of 16 proteins that co-immunoprecipitate with CENP-A, the Constitutive Centromere Associated Network or CCAN, contribute to kinetochore assembly and function....

  14. Separase Is Required for Homolog and Sister Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of Sister Centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattner, Ariane C; Chaurasia, Soumya; McKee, Bruce D; Lehner, Christian F

    2016-04-01

    Spatially controlled release of sister chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has also been proposed to be present within the centromeric region for the unification of sister centromeres into a single functional entity, allowing bipolar orientation of paired homologs within the meiosis I spindle. Separase-mediated removal of centromeric cohesin during exit from meiosis I might explain sister centromere individualization which is essential for subsequent biorientation of sister centromeres during meiosis II. To characterize a potential involvement of separase in sister centromere individualization before meiosis II, we have studied meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster males where homologs are not paired in the canonical manner. Meiosis does not include meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation in these males. Instead, an alternative homolog conjunction system keeps homologous chromosomes in pairs. Using independent strategies for spermatocyte-specific depletion of separase complex subunits in combination with time-lapse imaging, we demonstrate that separase is required for the inactivation of this alternative conjunction at anaphase I onset. Mutations that abolish alternative homolog conjunction therefore result in random segregation of univalents during meiosis I also after separase depletion. Interestingly, these univalents become bioriented during meiosis II, suggesting that sister centromere individualization before meiosis II does not require separase. PMID:27120695

  15. Identification and Preliminary Analysis of Several Centromere-associated Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones from a Diploid Wheat Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Although the centromeres of some plants have been investigated previously, our knowledge of the wheat centromere is still very limited. To understand the structure and function of the wheat centromere, we used two centromeric repeats (RCS1 and CCS1-5ab) to obtain some centromere-associated bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones in 32 RCS1-related BAC clones that had been screened out from a diploid wheat (Triticum boeoticum Boiss.; 2n=2x=14) BAC library. Southern hybridization results indicated that, of the 32 candidates,there were 28 RCS1-positive clones. Based on gel blot patterns, the frequency of RCS1 was approximately one copy every 69.4 kb in these 28 RCS1-positive BAC clones. More bands were detected when the same filter was probed with CCS1-5ab. Furthermore, the CCS1 bands covered all the bands detected by RCS1, which suggests that some CCS1 repeats were distributed together with RCS1. The frequency of CCS1 families was once every 35.8 kb, nearly twice that of RCS1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that the five BAC clones containing RCS1 and CCS1 sequences all detected signals at the centromeric regions in hexaploid wheat, but the signal intensities on the A-genome chromosomes were stronger than those on the B- and/or D-genome chromosomes. The FISH analysis among nine Triticeae cereals indicated that there were A-genomespecific (or rich) sequences dispersing on chromosome arms in the BAC clone TbBAC5. In addition, at the interphase cells, the centromeres of diploid species usually clustered at one pole and formed a ring-like allocation in the period before metaphase.

  16. The CENP-A N-tail confers epigenetic stability to centromeres via the CENP-T branch of the CCAN in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folco, H Diego; Campbell, Christopher S; May, Karen M; Espinoza, Celso A; Oegema, Karen; Hardwick, Kevin G; Grewal, Shiv I S; Desai, Arshad

    2015-02-01

    In most eukaryotes, centromeres are defined epigenetically by presence of the histone H3 variant CENP-A [1-3]. CENP-A-containing chromatin recruits the constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN) of proteins, which in turn directs assembly of the outer kinetochore to form microtubule attachments and ensure chromosome segregation fidelity [4-6]. Whereas the mechanisms that load CENP-A at centromeres are being elucidated, the functions of its divergent N-terminal tail remain enigmatic [7-12]. Here, we employ the well-studied fission yeast centromere [13-16] to investigate the function of the CENP-A (Cnp1) N-tail. We show that alteration of the N-tail does not affect Cnp1 loading at centromeres, outer kinetochore formation, or spindle checkpoint signaling but nevertheless elevates chromosome loss. N-tail mutants exhibited synthetic lethality with an altered centromeric DNA sequence, with rare survivors harboring chromosomal fusions in which the altered centromere was epigenetically inactivated. Elevated centromere inactivation was also observed for N-tail mutants with unaltered centromeric DNA sequences. N-tail mutants specifically reduced localization of the CCAN proteins Cnp20/CENP-T and Mis6/CENP-I, but not Cnp3/CENP-C. Overexpression of Cnp20/CENP-T suppressed defects in an N-tail mutant, suggesting a link between reduced CENP-T recruitment and the observed centromere inactivation phenotype. Thus, the Cnp1 N-tail promotes epigenetic stability of centromeres in fission yeast, at least in part via recruitment of the CENP-T branch of the CCAN. PMID:25619765

  17. Mis16 and Mis18 are required for CENP-A loading and histone deacetylation at centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Fujita, Yohta; Iwasaki, Osamu; Adachi, Yoh; Takahashi, Kohta; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2004-09-17

    Centromeres contain specialized chromatin that includes the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, spCENP-A/Cnp1. Here we report identification of five fission yeast centromere proteins, Mis14-18. Mis14 is recruited to kinetochores independently of CENP-A, and, conversely, CENP-A does not require Mis14 to associate with centromeres. In contrast, Mis15, Mis16 (strong similarity with human RbAp48 and RbAp46), Mis17, and Mis18 are all part of the CENP-A recruitment pathway. Mis15 and Mis17 form an evolutionarily conserved complex that also includes Mis6. Mis16 and Mis18 form a complex and maintain the deacetylated state of histones specifically in the central core of centromeres. Mis16 and Mis18 are the most upstream factors in kinetochore assembly as they can associate with kinetochores in all kinetochore mutants except for mis18 and mis16, respectively. RNAi knockdown in human cells shows that Mis16 function is conserved as RbAp48 and RbAp46 are both required for localization of human CENP-A. PMID:15369671

  18. A Conserved Arginine-Rich Motif within the Hypervariable N-Domain of Drosophila Centromeric Histone H3 (CenH3CID) Mediates BubR1 Recruitment

    OpenAIRE

    Torras-Llort, Mònica; Medina-Giró, Sònia; Moreno-Moreno, Olga; Azorín, Ferran

    2010-01-01

    [Background]: Centromere identity is determined epigenetically by deposition of CenH3, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant that dictates kinetochore assembly. The molecular basis of the contribution of CenH3 to centromere/kinetochore functions is, however, incompletely understood, as its interactions with the rest of centromere/kinetochore components remain largely uncharacterised at the molecular/structural level. [Principal Findings]: Here, we report on the contribution of Drosophil...

  19. Stem-loop structures of the repetitive DNA sequences located at human centromeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, G.; Garcia, A.E.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Catasti, P.; Hong, Lin; Yau, P. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Chemistry; Bradbury, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Chemistry

    1993-09-01

    The presence of the highly conserved repetitive DNA sequences in the human centromeres argues for a special role of these sequences in their biological functions - most likely achieved by the formation of unusual structures. This prompted us to carry out quantitative one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (lD/2D NMR) spectroscopy to determine the structural properties of the human centromeric repeats, d(AATGG){sub n.d}(CCATT){sub n}. The studies on centromeric DNAs reveal that the complementary sequence, d(AATGG){sub n.d}(CCATT){sub n}, adopts the usual Watson-Crick B-DNA duplex and the pyrimidine-rich d(CCATT){sub n} strand is essentially a random coil. However, the purine-rich d(AATGG){sub n} strand is shown to adopt unusual stem-loop structures for repeat lengths, n=2,3,4, and 6. In addition to normal Watson-Crick A{center_dot}T pairs, the stem-loop structures are stabilized by mismatch A{center_dot}G and G{center_dot}G pairs in the stem and G-G-A stacking in the loop. Stem-loop structures of d(AATGG)n are independently verified by gel electrophoresis and nuclease digestion studies. Thermal melting studies show that the DNA repeats, d(AATGG){sub n}, are as stable as the corresponding Watson-Crick duplex d(AATGG){sub n.d}(CCATT){sub n}. Therefore, the sequence d(AATGG){sub n} can, indeed, nucleate a stem-loop structure at little free-energy cost and if, during mitosis, they are located on the chromosome surface they can provide specific recognition sites for kinetochore function.

  20. Novel Centromeric Loci of the Wine and Beer Yeast Dekkera bruxellensis CEN1 and CEN2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishchuk, Olena P; Vojvoda Zeljko, Tanja; Schifferdecker, Anna J; Mebrahtu Wisén, Sofia; Hagström, Åsa K; Rozpędowska, Elżbieta; Rørdam Andersen, Mikael; Hellborg, Linda; Ling, Zhihao; Sibirny, Andrei A; Piškur, Jure

    2016-01-01

    The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis thrives in environments that are harsh and limiting, especially in concentrations with low oxygen and high ethanol. Its different strains' chromosomes greatly vary in number (karyotype). This study isolates two novel centromeric loci (CEN1 and CEN2), which support both the yeast's autonomous replication and the stable maintenance of plasmids. In the sequenced genome of the D. bruxellensis strain CBS 2499, CEN1 and CEN2 are each present in one copy. They differ from the known "point" CEN elements, and their biological activity is retained within ~900-1300 bp DNA segments. CEN1 and CEN2 have features of both "point" and "regional" centromeres: They contain conserved DNA elements, ARSs, short repeats, one tRNA gene, and transposon-like elements within less than 1 kb. Our discovery of a miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) next to CEN2 is the first report of such transposons in yeast. The transformants carrying circular plasmids with cloned CEN1 and CEN2 undergo a phenotypic switch: They form fluffy colonies and produce three times more biofilm. The introduction of extra copies of CEN1 and CEN2 promotes both genome rearrangements and ploidy shifts, with these effects mediated by homologous recombination (between circular plasmid and genome centromere copy) or by chromosome breakage when integrated. Also, the proximity of the MITE-like transposon to CEN2 could translocate CEN2 within the genome or cause chromosomal breaks, so promoting genome dynamics. With extra copies of CEN1 and CEN2, the yeast's enhanced capacities to rearrange its genome and to change its gene expression could increase its abilities for exploiting new and demanding niches. PMID:27560164

  1. RNA Pol II promotes transcription of centromeric satellite DNA in beetles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeljka Pezer

    Full Text Available Transcripts of centromeric satellite DNAs are known to play a role in heterochromatin formation as well as in establishment of the kinetochore. However, little is known about basic mechanisms of satellite DNA expression within constitutive heterochromatin and its regulation. Here we present comprehensive analysis of transcription of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, PRAT from beetle Palorus ratzeburgii (Coleoptera. This satellite is characterized by preservation and extreme sequence conservation among evolutionarily distant insect species. PRAT is expressed in all three developmental stages: larvae, pupae and adults at similar level. Transcripts are abundant comprising 0.033% of total RNA and are heterogeneous in size ranging from 0.5 kb up to more than 5 kb. Transcription proceeds from both strands but with 10 fold different expression intensity and transcripts are not processed into siRNAs. Most of the transcripts (80% are not polyadenylated and remain in the nucleus while a small portion is exported to the cytoplasm. Multiple, irregularly distributed transcription initiation sites as well as termination sites have been mapped within the PRAT sequence using primer extension and RLM-RACE. The presence of cap structure as well as poly(A tails in a portion of the transcripts indicate RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription and a putative polymerase II promoter site overlaps the most conserved part of the PRAT sequence. The treatment of larvae with alpha-amanitin decreases the level of PRAT transcripts at concentrations that selectively inhibit pol II activity. In conclusion, stable, RNA polymerase II dependant transcripts of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, not regulated by RNAi, have been identified and characterized. This study offers a basic understanding of expression of highly abundant heterochromatic DNA which in beetle species constitutes up to 50% of the genome.

  2. Domain architectures of the Scm3p protein provide insights into centromere function and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Aravind, L.; Lakshminarayan, M. Iyer; Wu, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Recently, Scm3p has been shown to be a nonhistone component of centromeric chromatin that binds stoichiometrically to CenH3–H4 histones, and to be required for the assembly of kinetochores in S. cerevisiae. Scm3p is conserved across fungi, and displays a remarkable variation in protein size, ranging from ~200 amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ~1300 amino acids in Neurospora crassa. This is primarily due a variable C-terminal segment that is linked to a conserved N-terminal, CenH3-int...

  3. The ultrastructure of mono- and holocentric plant centromeres: an immunological investigation by structured illumination microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Gerhard; Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Ma, Wei; Houben, Andreas; Schubert, Veit

    2015-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the three centromere-associated proteins α-tubulin, CENH3, and phosphorylated histone H2A (at threonine 120, H2AThr120ph) was analysed by indirect immunodetection at monocentric cereal chromosomes and at the holocentric chromosomes of Luzula elegans by super-resolution light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Using structured illumination microscopy (SIM) as the super-resolution technique on squashed specimens and SEM on uncoated isolated specimens, the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the proteins was visualized at the centromeres. Technical aspects of 3D SEM are explained in detail. We show that CENH3 forms curved "pads" mainly around the lateral centromeric region in the primary constriction of metacentric chromosomes. H2AThr120ph is present in both the primary constriction and in the pericentromere. α-tubulin-labeled microtubule bundles attach to CENH3-containing chromatin structures, either in single bundles with a V-shaped attachment to the centromere or in split bundles to bordering pericentromeric flanks. In holocentric L. elegans chromosomes, H2AThr120ph is located predominantly in the centromeric groove of each chromatid as proven by subsequent FIB/FESEM ablation and 3D reconstruction. α-tubulin localizes to the edges of the groove. In both holocentric and monocentric chromosomes, no additional intermediate structures between microtubules and the centromere were observed. We established models of the distribution of CENH3, H2AThr120ph and the attachment sites of microtubules for metacentric and holocentric plant chromosomes. PMID:26048589

  4. Chromosome size-correlated and chromosome size-uncorrelated homogenization of centromeric repetitive sequences in New World quails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishishita, Satoshi; Tsuruta, Yuri; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nakamura, Atsushi; Nishida, Chizuko; Griffin, Darren K; Tsudzuki, Masaoki; Ono, Tamao; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2014-04-01

    Many families of centromeric repetitive DNA sequences isolated from Struthioniformes, Galliformes, Falconiformes, and Passeriformes are localized primarily to microchromosomes. However, it is unclear whether chromosome size-correlated homogenization is a common characteristic of centromeric repetitive sequences in Aves. New World and Old World quails have the typical avian karyotype comprising chromosomes of two distinct sizes, and C-positive heterochromatin is distributed in centromeric regions of most autosomes and the whole W chromosome. We isolated six types of centromeric repetitive sequences from three New World quail species (Colinus virginianus, CVI; Callipepla californica, CCA; and Callipepla squamata, CSQ; Odontophoridae) and one Old World quail species (Alectoris chukar, ACH; Phasianidae), and characterized the sequences by nucleotide sequencing, chromosome in situ hybridization, and filter hybridization. The 385-bp CVI-MspI, 591-bp CCA-BamHI, 582-bp CSQ-BamHI, and 366-bp ACH-Sau3AI fragments exhibited tandem arrays of the monomer unit, and the 224-bp CVI-HaeIII and 135-bp CCA-HaeIII fragments were composed of minisatellite-like and microsatellite-like repeats, respectively. ACH-Sau3AI was a homolog of the chicken nuclear membrane repeat sequence, whose homologs are common in Phasianidae. CVI-MspI, CCA-BamHI, and CSQ-BamHI showed high homology and were specific to the Odontophoridae. CVI-MspI was localized to microchromosomes, whereas CVI-HaeIII, CCA-BamHI, and CSQ-BamHI were mapped to almost all chromosomes. CCA-HaeIII was localized to five pairs of macrochromosomes and most microchromosomes. ACH-Sau3AI was distributed in three pairs of macrochromosomes and all microchromosomes. Centromeric repetitive sequences may be homogenized in chromosome size-correlated and -uncorrelated manners in New World quails, although there may be a mechanism that causes homogenization of centromeric repetitive sequences primarily between microchromosomes, which is commonly

  5. Two distinct pathways responsible for the loading of CENP-A to centromeres in the fission yeast cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kohta; Takayama, Yuko; Masuda, Fumie; Kobayashi, Yasuyo; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2005-03-29

    CENP-A is a centromere-specific histone H3 variant that is- essential for faithful chromosome segregation in all eukaryotes thus far investigated. We genetically identified two factors, Ams2 and Mis6, each of which is required for the correct centromere localization of SpCENP-A (Cnp1), the fission yeast homologue of CENP-A. Ams2 is a cell-cycle-regulated GATA factor that localizes on the nuclear chromatin, including on centromeres, during the S phase. Ams2 may be responsible for the replication-coupled loading of SpCENP-A by facilitating nucleosomal formation during the S phase. Consistently, overproduction of histone H4, but not that of H3, suppressed the defect of SpCENP-A localization in Ams2-deficient cells. We demonstrated the existence of at least two distinct phases for SpCENP-A loading during the cell cycle: the S phase and the late-G2 phase. Ectopically induced SpCENP-A was efficiently loaded onto the centromeres in G2-arrested cells, indicating that SpCENP-A probably undergoes replication-uncoupled loading after the completion of S phase. This G2 loading pathway of SpCENP-A may require Mis6, a constitutive centromere-binding protein that is also implicated in the Mad2-dependent spindle attachment checkpoint response. Here, we discuss the functional relationship between the flexible loading mechanism of CENP-A and the plasticity of centromere chromatin formation in fission yeast. PMID:15897182

  6. The Histone Fold Domain of Cse4 Is Sufficient for CEN Targeting and Propagation of Active Centromeres in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Morey, Lisa; Barnes, Kelly; Chen, Yinhuai; Fitzgerald-Hayes, Molly; Baker, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Centromere-specific H3-like proteins (CenH3s) are conserved across the eukaryotic kingdom and are required for packaging centromere DNA into a specialized chromatin structure required for kinetochore assembly. Cse4 is the CenH3 protein of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Like all CenH3 proteins, Cse4 consists of a conserved histone fold domain (HFD) and a divergent N terminus (NT). The Cse4 NT contains an essential domain designated END (for essential N-terminal domain); deletion o...

  7. Identification of a high frequency of chromosomal rearrangements in the centromeric regions of prostate cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the major chromosomal aberrations (CA) like deletion, translocation,inversion and mosaic in prostate cancer patients of Tamilnadu, Southern India. Totally 45 blood samples were collected from various hospitals in Tamilnadu, Southern India. Equal numbers of normal healthy subjects were chosen after signing a consent form. Volunteers provided blood samples (5 ml) to establish leukocyte cultures. Cytogenetic studies were performed by using Giemsa-banding technique and finally the results were ensured by spectral karyotyping (SKY) technique. In the present investigation, major CA like deletion, translocation, inversion and mosaic were identified in experimental subjects. Results showed frequent CA in chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 13, 16, 18 and X. In comparison with experimental subjects, the control subjects exhibited very low levels of major CA (P<0.05). In the present study, the high frequency of centromeric rearrangements indicates a potential role for mitotic irregularities associated with the centromere in prostate cancer tumorigenesis. Identification of chromosome alterations may be helpful in understanding the molecular basis of the disease in better manner.

  8. Characterization of the oncogenic function of centromere protein F in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Yongdong; Liu, Lulu; Zeng, Tingting; Zhu, Ying-Hui [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jiangchao [Vascular Biology Research Institute, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou (China); Chen, Leilei [Department of Clinical Oncology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Li, Yan; Yuan, Yun-Fei [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Ma, Stephanie, E-mail: stefma@hku.hk [Department of Clinical Oncology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory for Liver Research, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Guan, Xin-Yuan, E-mail: xyguan@hkucc.hku.hk [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Department of Clinical Oncology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory for Liver Research, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Overexpression of CENPF is frequently detected in HCC. •Upregulation of CENPF serves as an independent prognosis factor in HCC patients. •CENPF functions as an oncogene in HCC by promoting cell G2/M transition. -- Abstract: Centromere protein F (CENPF) is an essential nuclear protein associated with the centromere-kinetochore complex and plays a critical role in chromosome segregation during mitosis. Up-regulation of CENPF expression has previously been detected in several solid tumors. In this study, we aim to study the expression and functional role of CENPF in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We found CENPF was frequently overexpressed in HCC as compared with non-tumor tissue. Up-regulated CENPF expression in HCC was positively correlated with serum AFP, venous invasion, advanced differentiation stage and a shorter overall survival. Cox regression analysis found that overexpression of CENPF was an independent prognosis factor in HCC. Functional studies found that silencing CENPF could decrease the ability of the cells to proliferate, form colonies and induce tumor formation in nude mice. Silencing CENPF also resulted in the cell cycle arrest at G2/M checkpoint by down-regulating cell cycle proteins cdc2 and cyclin B1. Our data suggest that CENPF is frequently overexpressed in HCC and plays a critical role in driving HCC tumorigenesis.

  9. Cohesin interaction with centromeric minichromosomes shows a multi-complex rod-shaped structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Surcel

    Full Text Available Cohesin is the protein complex responsible for maintaining sister chromatid cohesion. Cohesin interacts with centromeres and specific loci along chromosome arms known as Chromosome Attachment Regions (CARs. The cohesin holocomplex contains four subunits. Two of them, Smc1p (Structural maintenance of chromosome 1 protein and Smc3p, are long coiled-coil proteins, which heterodimerize with each other at one end. They are joined together at the other end by a third subunit, Scc1p, which also binds to the fourth subunit, Scc3p. How cohesin interacts with chromosomes is not known, although several models have been proposed, in part on the basis of in vitro assembly of purified cohesin proteins. To be able to observe in vivo cohesin-chromatin interactions, we have modified a Minichromosome Affinity Purification (MAP method to isolate a CAR-containing centromeric minichromosome attached to in vivo assembled cohesin. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM analysis of these minichromosomes suggests that cohesin assumes a rod shape and interacts with replicated minichromosome at one end of that rod. Additionally, our data implies that more than one cohesin molecule interacts with each pair of replicated minichromsomes. These molecules seem to be packed into a single thick rod, suggesting that the Smc1p and Smc3p subunits may interact extensively.

  10. Organization and evolution of primate centromeric DNA from whole-genome shotgun sequence data.

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    Can Alkan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The major DNA constituent of primate centromeres is alpha satellite DNA. As much as 2%-5% of sequence generated as part of primate genome sequencing projects consists of this material, which is fragmented or not assembled as part of published genome sequences due to its highly repetitive nature. Here, we develop computational methods to rapidly recover and categorize alpha-satellite sequences from previously uncharacterized whole-genome shotgun sequence data. We present an algorithm to computationally predict potential higher-order array structure based on paired-end sequence data and then experimentally validate its organization and distribution by experimental analyses. Using whole-genome shotgun data from the human, chimpanzee, and macaque genomes, we examine the phylogenetic relationship of these sequences and provide further support for a model for their evolution and mutation over the last 25 million years. Our results confirm fundamental differences in the dispersal and evolution of centromeric satellites in the Old World monkey and ape lineages of evolution.

  11. Point Mutations in Centromeric Histone Induce Post-zygotic Incompatibility and Uniparental Inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppu, Sundaram; Tan, Ek Han; Nguyen, Hanh; Rodgers, Andrea; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon W L; Britt, Anne B

    2015-09-01

    The centromeric histone 3 variant (CENH3, aka CENP-A) is essential for the segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. To better define CENH3 functional constraints, we complemented a null allele in Arabidopsis with a variety of mutant alleles, each inducing a single amino acid change in conserved residues of the histone fold domain. Many of these transgenic missense lines displayed wild-type growth and fertility on self-pollination, but exhibited frequent post-zygotic death and uniparental inheritance when crossed with wild-type plants. The failure of centromeres marked by these missense mutation in the histone fold domain of CENH3 reproduces the genome elimination syndromes described with chimeric CENH3 and CENH3 from diverged species. Additionally, evidence that a single point mutation is sufficient to generate a haploid inducer provide a simple one-step method for the identification of non-transgenic haploid inducers in existing mutagenized collections of crop species. As proof of the extreme simplicity of this approach to create haploid-inducing lines, we performed an in silico search for previously identified point mutations in CENH3 and identified an Arabidopsis line carrying the A86V substitution within the histone fold domain. This A87V non-transgenic line, while fully fertile on self-pollination, produced postzygotic death and uniparental haploids when crossed to wild type. PMID:26352591

  12. Heterochromatin and RNAi are required to establish CENP-A chromatin at centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folco, Hernan Diego; Pidoux, Alison L; Urano, Takeshi; Allshire, Robin C

    2008-01-01

    Heterochromatin is defined by distinct posttranslational modifications on histones, such as methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9), which allows heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1)-related chromodomain proteins to bind. Heterochromatin is frequently found near CENP-A chromatin, which is the key determinant of kinetochore assembly. We have discovered that the RNA interference (RNAi)-directed heterochromatin flanking the central kinetochore domain at fission yeast centromeres is required to promote CENP-A(Cnp1) and kinetochore assembly over the central domain. The H3K9 methyltransferase Clr4 (Suv39); the ribonuclease Dicer, which cleaves heterochromatic double-stranded RNA to small interfering RNA (siRNA); Chp1, a component of the RNAi effector complex (RNA-induced initiation of transcriptional gene silencing; RITS); and Swi6 (HP1) are required to establish CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin on naïve templates. Once assembled, CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin is propagated by epigenetic means in the absence of heterochromatin. Thus, another, potentially conserved, role for centromeric RNAi-directed heterochromatin has been identified. PMID:18174443

  13. Effects of sense and antisense centromere/kinetochore complex protein-B (CENP-B) in cell cycle regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Song; LIN Haiyan; QI Jianguo; WANG Yongchao

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of sense and antisense centromere/kinetochore complex protein-B (CENP-B) in cell cycle regulation. Full-length cenpb cDNA was subcloned into pBI-EGFP eukaryotic expression vector in both sense and antisense orientation. HeLa-Tet-Off cells were transfected with sense or antisense cenpb vectors. Sense transfection of HeLa-Tet-Off cells resulted in the formation of a large centromere/kinetochore complex, and apoptosis of cells following several times of cell division. A stable antisense cenpb transfected cell line, named HACPB, was obtained. The centromere/kinetochore complex of HACPB cells became smaller than control HeLa-Tet-Off cells and scattered, and the expression of CENP-B was down-regulated. In addition, delayed cell cycle progression, inhibited malignant phenotype, restrained ability of tumor formation in nude mice, and delayed entry from G2/M phase into next G1 phase were observed in HACPB cells. Furthermore, the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), cyclins, and CDK inhibitors (CKIs) were modulated during different phases of the cell cycle. CENP-B is an essential protein for the maintenance of the structure and function of centromere/kinetochore complex, and plays important roles in cell cycle regulation.

  14. Identification of novel mitosis regulators through data mining with human centromere/kinetochore proteins as group queries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tipton Aaron R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins functioning in the same biological pathway tend to be transcriptionally co-regulated or form protein-protein interactions (PPI. Multiple spatially and temporally regulated events are coordinated during mitosis to achieve faithful chromosome segregation. The molecular players participating in mitosis regulation are still being unravelled experimentally or using in silico methods. Results An extensive literature review has led to a compilation of 196 human centromere/kinetochore proteins, all with experimental evidence supporting the subcellular localization. Sixty-four were designated as “core” centromere/kinetochore components based on peak expression and/or well-characterized functions during mitosis. By interrogating and integrating online resources, we have mined for genes/proteins that display transcriptional co-expression or PPI with the core centromere/kinetochore components. Top-ranked hubs in either co-expression or PPI network are not only enriched with known mitosis regulators, but also contain candidates whose mitotic functions are not yet established. Experimental validation found that KIAA1377 is a novel centrosomal protein that also associates with microtubules and midbody; while TRIP13 is a novel kinetochore protein and directly interacts with mitotic checkpoint silencing protein p31comet. Conclusions Transcriptional co-expression and PPI network analyses with known human centromere/kinetochore proteins as a query group help identify novel potential mitosis regulators.

  15. Microsatellite-centromere mapping in Japanese scallop ( Patinopecten yessoensis) through half-tetrad analysis in gynogenetic diploid families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Qi, Mingjun; Nie, Hongtao; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Gene-centromere mapping is an essential prerequisite for understanding the composition and structure of genomes. Half-tetrad analysis is a powerful tool for mapping genes and understanding chromosomal behavior during meiosis. The Japanese scallop ( Patinopecten yessoensis), a cold-tolerant species inhabiting the northwestern Pacific coast, is a commercially important marine bivalve in Asian countries. In this study, inheritance of 32 informative microsatellite loci was examined in 70-h D-shaped larvae of three induced meiogynogenetic diploid families of P. yessoensis for centromere mapping using half-tetrad analysis. The ratio of gynogenetic diploids was proven to be 100%, 100% and 96% in the three families, respectively. Inheritance analysis in the control crosses showed that 51 of the 53 genotypic ratios observed were in accordance with Mendelian expectations at the 5% level after Bonferroni correction. Seven of the 32 microsatellite loci showed the existence of null alleles in control crosses. The second division segregation frequency ( y) of the microsatellite loci ranged from 0.07 to 0.85 with a mean of 0.38, suggesting the existence of positive interference after a single chiasma formation in some chromosomes in the scallop. Microsatellite-centromere distances ranged from 4 cM to 42 cM under the assumption of complete interference. Information on the positions of centromeres in relation to the microsatellite loci will represent a contribution towards the assembly of genetic maps in the commercially important scallop species.

  16. A DNA polymerase alpha accessory protein, Mcl1, is required for propagation of centromere structures in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyoaki Natsume

    Full Text Available Specialized chromatin exists at centromeres and must be precisely transmitted during DNA replication. The mechanisms involved in the propagation of these structures remain elusive. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of two chromatin domains: the central CENP-A(Cnp1 kinetochore domain and flanking heterochromatin domains. Here we show that fission yeast Mcl1, a DNA polymerase alpha (Pol alpha accessory protein, is critical for maintenance of centromeric chromatin. In a screen for mutants that alleviate both central domain and outer repeat silencing, we isolated several cos mutants, of which cos1 is allelic to mcl1. The mcl1-101 mutation causes reduced CENP-A(Cnp1 in the central domain and an aberrant increase in histone acetylation in both domains. These phenotypes are also observed in a mutant of swi7(+, which encodes a catalytic subunit of Pol alpha. Mcl1 forms S-phase-specific nuclear foci, which colocalize with those of PCNA and Pol alpha. These results suggest that Mcl1 and Pol alpha are required for propagation of centromere chromatin structures during DNA replication.

  17. A DNA polymerase alpha accessory protein, Mcl1, is required for propagation of centromere structures in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Tsutsui, Yasuhiro; Sutani, Takashi; Dunleavy, Elaine M; Pidoux, Alison L; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Allshire, Robin C; Yamao, Fumiaki

    2008-01-01

    Specialized chromatin exists at centromeres and must be precisely transmitted during DNA replication. The mechanisms involved in the propagation of these structures remain elusive. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of two chromatin domains: the central CENP-A(Cnp1) kinetochore domain and flanking heterochromatin domains. Here we show that fission yeast Mcl1, a DNA polymerase alpha (Pol alpha) accessory protein, is critical for maintenance of centromeric chromatin. In a screen for mutants that alleviate both central domain and outer repeat silencing, we isolated several cos mutants, of which cos1 is allelic to mcl1. The mcl1-101 mutation causes reduced CENP-A(Cnp1) in the central domain and an aberrant increase in histone acetylation in both domains. These phenotypes are also observed in a mutant of swi7(+), which encodes a catalytic subunit of Pol alpha. Mcl1 forms S-phase-specific nuclear foci, which colocalize with those of PCNA and Pol alpha. These results suggest that Mcl1 and Pol alpha are required for propagation of centromere chromatin structures during DNA replication. PMID:18493607

  18. Differential binding partners of the Mis18α/β YIPPEE domains regulates the Mis18 complex recruitment to centromeres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippler, Christina M.; Foltz, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    The Mis18 complex specifies the site of new CENP-A nucleosome assembly by recruiting the CENP-A specific assembly factor HJURP (Holliday junction recognition protein). The human Mis18 complex consists of Mis18α, Mis18β and Mis18 binding protein 1 (Mis18BP1/hsKNL2). Although Mis18α and Mis18β are highly homologous proteins, we find that their conserved YIPPEE domains mediate distinct interactions that are essential to link new CENP-A deposition to existing centromeres. We find that Mis18α directly interacts with the N-terminus of Mis18BP1; whereas, Mis18β directly interacts with CENP-C during G1 phase, revealing that these proteins have evolved to serve distinct functions in centromeres of higher eukaryotes. The N-terminus of Mis18BP1, containing both the Mis18α and CENP-C binding domains, is necessary and sufficient for centromeric localization. Therefore, the Mis18 complex contains dual CENP-C recognition motifs that are combinatorially required to generate robust centromeric localization that leads to CENP-A deposition. PMID:27239045

  19. Differential Binding Partners of the Mis18α/β YIPPEE Domains Regulate Mis18 Complex Recruitment to Centromeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison E. Stellfox

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mis18 complex specifies the site of new CENP-A nucleosome assembly by recruiting the CENP-A-specific assembly factor HJURP (Holliday junction recognition protein. The human Mis18 complex consists of Mis18α, Mis18β, and Mis18 binding protein 1 (Mis18BP1/hsKNL2. Although Mis18α and Mis18β are highly homologous proteins, we find that their conserved YIPPEE domains mediate distinct interactions that are essential to link new CENP-A deposition to existing centromeres. We find that Mis18α directly interacts with the N terminus of Mis18BP1, whereas Mis18β directly interacts with CENP-C during G1 phase, revealing that these proteins have evolved to serve distinct functions in centromeres of higher eukaryotes. The N terminus of Mis18BP1, containing both the Mis18α and CENP-C binding domains, is necessary and sufficient for centromeric localization. Therefore, the Mis18 complex contains dual CENP-C recognition motifs that are combinatorially required to generate robust centromeric localization that leads to CENP-A deposition.

  20. Differential Binding Partners of the Mis18α/β YIPPEE Domains Regulate Mis18 Complex Recruitment to Centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellfox, Madison E; Nardi, Isaac K; Knippler, Christina M; Foltz, Daniel R

    2016-06-01

    The Mis18 complex specifies the site of new CENP-A nucleosome assembly by recruiting the CENP-A-specific assembly factor HJURP (Holliday junction recognition protein). The human Mis18 complex consists of Mis18α, Mis18β, and Mis18 binding protein 1 (Mis18BP1/hsKNL2). Although Mis18α and Mis18β are highly homologous proteins, we find that their conserved YIPPEE domains mediate distinct interactions that are essential to link new CENP-A deposition to existing centromeres. We find that Mis18α directly interacts with the N terminus of Mis18BP1, whereas Mis18β directly interacts with CENP-C during G1 phase, revealing that these proteins have evolved to serve distinct functions in centromeres of higher eukaryotes. The N terminus of Mis18BP1, containing both the Mis18α and CENP-C binding domains, is necessary and sufficient for centromeric localization. Therefore, the Mis18 complex contains dual CENP-C recognition motifs that are combinatorially required to generate robust centromeric localization that leads to CENP-A deposition. PMID:27239045

  1. Search for MHC-associated genes in human: five new genes centromeric to HLA-DP with yet unknown functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janatipour, M; Naumov, Y; Ando, A; Sugimura, K; Okamoto, N; Tsuji, K; Abe, K; Inoko, H

    1992-01-01

    Taking advantage of five mouse genomic or cDNA probes [KE5(probe 14), KE4 (probe 11), KE3 (probe 7), KE2 (probe 5), and SET] mapped on the H-2K region in mouse, we have identified and localized homologues of these five genes in the human major histocompatibility complex region (HKE5, HKE4, HKE3, HKE2, and HSET, respectively). Cosmid cloning and pulsed field gel electrophoresis analyses indicated that a human homologous gene, HKE5, is located 10 kilobases (kb) centromeric of the alpha 2 (XI) collagen (COL11A2) gene followed by HKE4. HKE3, closely linked to HKE2, is located 170 kb centromeric of HKE4. Furthermore, HSET is located 50 kb centromeric of HKE2. This gene organization outside the DP subregion is completely identical to that of the mouse H-2K region centromeric of I-Pb3, a mouse homologue of the DPB gene, except the lack of genes corresponding to the H-2K and -K2 genes in human. PMID:1541487

  2. Variation in Copy Number of Ty3/Gypsy Centromeric Retrotransposons in the Genomes of Thinopyrum intermedium and Its Diploid Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divashuk, Mikhail G.; Khuat, Thi Mai L.; Kroupin, Pavel Yu.; Kirov, Ilya V.; Romanov, Dmitry V.; Kiseleva, Anna V.; Khrustaleva, Ludmila I.; Alexeev, Dmitry G.; Zelenin, Alexandr S.; Klimushina, Marina V.; Razumova, Olga V.; Karlov, Gennady I.

    2016-01-01

    Speciation and allopolyploidization in cereals may be accompanied by dramatic changes in abundance of centromeric repeated transposable elements. Here we demonstrate that the reverse transcriptase part of Ty3/gypsy centromeric retrotransposon (RT-CR) is highly conservative in the segmental hexaploid Thinopyrum intermedium (JrJvsSt) and its possible diploid progenitors Th. bessarabicum (Jb), Pseudoroegneria spicata (St) and Dasypyrum villosum (V) but the abundance of the repeats varied to a large extent. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed hybridization signals in centromeric region of all chromosomes in the studied species, although the intensity of the signals drastically differed. In Th. intermedium, the strongest signal of RT-CR probe was detected on the chromosomes of Jv, intermediate on Jr and faint on Js and St subgenome suggesting different abundance of RT-CR on the individual chromosomes rather than the sequence specificity of RT-CRs of the subgenomes. RT-CR quantification using real-time PCR revealed that its content per genome in Th. bessarabicum is ~ 2 times and P. spicata is ~ 1,5 times higher than in genome of D. villosum. The possible burst of Ty3/gypsy centromeric retrotransposon in Th. intermedium during allopolyploidization and its role in proper mitotic and meiotic chromosome behavior in a nascent allopolyploid is discussed. PMID:27119343

  3. Phosphorylation and DNA Binding of HJURP Determine Its Centromeric Recruitment and Function in CenH3CENP-A Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Müller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres, epigenetically defined by the presence of the histone H3 variant CenH3, are essential for ensuring proper chromosome segregation. In mammals, centromeric CenH3CENP-A deposition requires its dedicated chaperone HJURP and occurs during telophase/early G1. We find that the cell-cycle-dependent recruitment of HJURP to centromeres depends on its timely phosphorylation controlled via cyclin-dependent kinases. A nonphosphorylatable HJURP mutant localizes prematurely to centromeres in S and G2 phase. This unregulated targeting causes a premature loading of CenH3CENP-A at centromeres, and cell-cycle delays ensue. Once recruited to centromeres, HJURP functions to promote CenH3CENP-A deposition by a mechanism involving a unique DNA-binding domain. With our findings, we propose a model wherein (1 the phosphorylation state of HJURP controls its centromeric recruitment in a cell-cycle-dependent manner, and (2 HJURP binding to DNA is a mechanistic determinant in CenH3CENP-A loading.

  4. The CENP-A N-Tail Confers Epigenetic Stability to Centromeres via the CENP-T Branch of the CCAN in Fission Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Folco, H. Diego; Campbell, Christopher S.; May, Karen M; Espinoza, Celso A; Oegema, Karen; Hardwick, Kevin G.; Grewal, Shiv I. S.; Desai, Arshad

    2015-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, centromeres are defined epigenetically by presence of the histone H3 variant CENP-A [1-3]. CENP-A containing chromatin recruits the constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN) of proteins, which in turn directs assembly of the outer kinetochore to form microtubule attachments and ensure chromosome segregation fidelity [4-6]. While the mechanisms that load CENP-A at centromeres are being elucidated, the functions of its divergent N-terminal tail remain enigmatic [7-12...

  5. Centromere structure and chromosome number in mitosis of the colourless phytoflagellate Polytoma papillatum (Chlorophyceae, Volvocales, Chlamydomonadaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, K W

    1995-12-01

    Centromere structure is described in mitosis of the unicellular biflagellate alga Polytoma papillatum using transmission electron microscopy. The kinetochores are five-layered elements at the poleward surface of the chromosomes. The five layers consist of three dense plates interspersed by two transparent zones. The polemost dense layer serves as the attachment site for kinetochore microtubules and the innermost dense layer is intimately associated with the chromatin. The five-layered organization of the kinetochore in the alga is unusual. In animals, three-layered kinetochores are the rule. This type has also been found in some algae, while higher plants do not possess striated kinetochores. An attempt was made to determine the chromosome number of P. papillatum. Individual chromosomes could not be recognized with confidence, since there were numerous lateral contacts between the chromosomes throughout mitosis. An alternative approach, however, was successful. Counting the kinetochores in serial sections through mitotic metaphase and anaphase plates revealed a number of 15 chromosomes. PMID:18470243

  6. Immunohistochemical Assessment of Expression of Centromere Protein—A (CENPA) in Human Invasive Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abnormal cell division leading to the gain or loss of entire chromosomes and consequent genetic instability is a hallmark of cancer. Centromere protein –A (CENPA) is a centromere-specific histone-H3-like variant gene involved in regulating chromosome segregation during cell division. CENPA is one of the genes included in some of the commercially available RNA based prognostic assays for breast cancer (BCa)—the 70 gene signature MammaPrint® and the five gene Molecular Grade Index (MGISM). Our aim was to assess the immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of CENPA in normal and malignant breast tissue. Clinically annotated triplicate core tissue microarrays of 63 invasive BCa and 20 normal breast samples were stained with a monoclonal antibody against CENPA and scored for percentage of visibly stained nuclei. Survival analyses with Kaplan–Meier (KM) estimate and Cox proportional hazards regression models were applied to assess the associations between CENPA expression and disease free survival (DFS). Average percentage of nuclei visibly stained with CENPA antibody was significantly higher (p = 0.02) in BCa than normal tissue. The 3-year DFS in tumors over-expressing CENPA (>50% stained nuclei) was 79% compared to 85% in low expression tumors (<50% stained nuclei). On multivariate analysis, IHC expression of CENPA showed weak association with DFS (HR > 60.07; p = 0.06) within our small cohort. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published report evaluating the implications of increased IHC expression of CENPA in paraffin embedded breast tissue samples. Our finding that increased CENPA expression may be associated with shorter DFS in BCa supports its exploration as a potential prognostic biomarker

  7. Immunohistochemical Assessment of Expression of Centromere Protein—A (CENPA) in Human Invasive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajput, Ashish B. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Hu, Nianping [Cancer Research institute, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Varma, Sonal; Chen, Chien-Hung [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Ding, Keyue [NCIC Clinical Trials Group, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Park, Paul C. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Chapman, Judy-Anne W. [NCIC Clinical Trials Group, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); SenGupta, Sandip K. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Madarnas, Yolanda [Cancer Research institute, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, ON K7L 2V7 (Canada); Elliott, Bruce E.; Feilotter, Harriet E., E-mail: feilotth@kgh.kari.net [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2011-12-06

    Abnormal cell division leading to the gain or loss of entire chromosomes and consequent genetic instability is a hallmark of cancer. Centromere protein –A (CENPA) is a centromere-specific histone-H3-like variant gene involved in regulating chromosome segregation during cell division. CENPA is one of the genes included in some of the commercially available RNA based prognostic assays for breast cancer (BCa)—the 70 gene signature MammaPrint{sup ®} and the five gene Molecular Grade Index (MGI{sup SM}). Our aim was to assess the immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of CENPA in normal and malignant breast tissue. Clinically annotated triplicate core tissue microarrays of 63 invasive BCa and 20 normal breast samples were stained with a monoclonal antibody against CENPA and scored for percentage of visibly stained nuclei. Survival analyses with Kaplan–Meier (KM) estimate and Cox proportional hazards regression models were applied to assess the associations between CENPA expression and disease free survival (DFS). Average percentage of nuclei visibly stained with CENPA antibody was significantly higher (p = 0.02) in BCa than normal tissue. The 3-year DFS in tumors over-expressing CENPA (>50% stained nuclei) was 79% compared to 85% in low expression tumors (<50% stained nuclei). On multivariate analysis, IHC expression of CENPA showed weak association with DFS (HR > 60.07; p = 0.06) within our small cohort. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published report evaluating the implications of increased IHC expression of CENPA in paraffin embedded breast tissue samples. Our finding that increased CENPA expression may be associated with shorter DFS in BCa supports its exploration as a potential prognostic biomarker.

  8. The frequency of micronuclei and premature centromere division in persons exposed to radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper was comparative analysis of micronuclei (MN) and premature centromere division (PCD) in lymphocytes of peripheral blood in persons professionally exposed to radionuclides. Genetical monitoring was performed by CB (cytochalasin-block) micronucleus test and by conventional cytogenetical technique. The presence of PCD was confirmed by Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The L1.84 probe (specific for centromeric region of chromosome 18) was used. The analysis included 50 subjects employed in the Clinical Center of Serbia (C)(the average age of 45.24±1.18 and the average exposition time 17.96±1.15), and 40 subjects in control group (K) (the average age of 44.40±0.98 and the average years of employment 19.67 ± 0.98 years) which were not exposed to genotoxic agents in their workplaces. The results showed that frequencies of PCD and MN are statistically significantly higher in subjects exposed to radionuclides than in the control group (Mann-Whitney U test, P <001). There was no statistically significant difference in frequency of PCD and MN between smokers and nonsmokers and between males and females in both groups of patients. There was statistically significant correlation between tPCD (PCD presents in more than 10 chromosomes per metaphase) and MN (Spearman's test, r=0.30; P<0.05). FISH method showed the presence of PCD in metaphases and interphase nuclei in subjects exposed to radionuclides. Thereafter, our research suggests that PCD could be used as cytogenetical marker in persons professionally exposed to radionuclides. (author)

  9. Plasticity and epigenetic inheritance of centromere-specific histone H3 (CENP-A)-containing nucleosome positioning in the fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianhui; Liu, Xingkun; Sakuno, Takeshi; Li, Wenzhu; Xi, Yuanxin; Aravamudhan, Pavithra; Joglekar, Ajit; Li, Wei; Watanabe, Yoshinori; He, Xiangwei

    2013-06-28

    Nucleosomes containing the specific histone H3 variant CENP-A mark the centromere locus on each chromatin and initiate kinetochore assembly. For the common type of regional centromeres, little is known in molecular detail of centromeric chromatin organization, its propagation through cell division, and how distinct organization patterns may facilitate kinetochore assembly. Here, we show that in the fission yeast S. pombe, a relatively small number of CENP-A/Cnp1 nucleosomes are found within the centromeric core and that their positioning relative to underlying DNA varies among genetically homogenous cells. Consistent with the flexible positioning of Cnp1 nucleosomes, a large portion of the endogenous centromere is dispensable for its essential activity in mediating chromosome segregation. We present biochemical evidence that Cnp1 occupancy directly correlates with silencing of the underlying reporter genes. Furthermore, using a newly developed pedigree analysis assay, we demonstrated the epigenetic inheritance of Cnp1 positioning and quantified the rate of occasional repositioning of Cnp1 nucleosomes throughout cell generations. Together, our results reveal the plasticity and the epigenetically inheritable nature of centromeric chromatin organization. PMID:23661703

  10. Premature Centromere Division of Metaphase Chromosomes in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Alzheimer's Disease Patients: Relation to Gender and Age

    OpenAIRE

    Živković, Lada; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana; Plećaš-Solarović, Bosiljka; Djelić, Ninoslav; Ocić, Gordana; Smiljković, Predrag; Siedlak, Sandra L.; Smith, Mark A.; Bajić, Vladan

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal alterations are a feature of both aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study examined if premature centromere division (PCD), a chromosomal instability indicator increased in AD, is correlated with aging or, instead, represents a de novo chromosomal alteration due to accelerating aging in AD. PCD in peripheral blood lymphocytes was determined in sporadic AD patients and gender and age-matched unaffected controls. Metaphase nuclei were analyzed for chromosomes showing PCD, X ch...

  11. Holocentromeres in Rhynchospora are associated with genome-wide centromere-specific repeat arrays interspersed among euchromatin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marques, A.; Ribeiro, T.; Neumann, Pavel; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Schubert, V.; Pellino, M.; Fuchs, J.; Ma, W.; Kuhlmann, M.; Brandt, R.; Vanzela, A.L.L.; Beseda, Tomáš; Šimková, Hana; Pedrosa-Harand, A.; Houben, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 44 (2015), s. 13633-13638. ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : Centromere * satellite DNA * holokinetic * chromosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 9.674, year: 2014

  12. Combined immunodeficiency develops with age in Immunodeficiency-centromeric instability-facial anomalies syndrome 2 (ICF2)

    OpenAIRE

    von Bernuth, H; Ravindran, E.; Du, H; Froehler, S.; Strehl, K; Kraemer, N.; Issa-Jahns, L.; Amulic, B.; Ninnemann, O; Xiao, M.S.; Eirich, K.; Koelsch, U.; Hauptmann, K; John, R.; Schindler, D

    2014-01-01

    The autosomal recessive immunodeficiency-centromeric instability-facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) is characterized by immunodeficiency, developmental delay, and facial anomalies. ICF2, caused by biallelic ZBTB24 gene mutations, is acknowledged primarily as an isolated B-cell defect. Here, we extend the phenotype spectrum by describing, in particular, for the first time the development of a combined immune defect throughout the disease course as well as putative autoimmune phenomena such as gra...

  13. New tool for biological dosimetry: Reevaluation and automation of the gold standard method following telomere and centromere staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have applied telomere and centromere (TC) staining to the scoring of dicentrics. • TC staining renders the scoring of dicentrics more rapid and robust. • TC staining allows the scoring of not only dicentrics but all chromosomal anomalies. • TC staining has led to a reevaluation of the radiation dose–response curve. • TC staining allows automation of the scoring of chromosomal aberations. • Automated scoring of dicentrics after TC staining was as efficient as manual scoring. - Abstract: Purpose: The dicentric chromosome (dicentric) assay is the international gold-standard method for biological dosimetry and classification of genotoxic agents. The introduction of telomere and centromere (TC) staining offers the potential to render dicentric scoring more efficient and robust. In this study, we improved the detection of dicentrics and all unstable chromosomal aberrations (CA) leading to a significant reevaluation of the dose–effect curve and developed an automated approach following TC staining. Material and methods: Blood samples from 16 healthy donors were exposed to 137Cs at 8 doses from 0.1 to 6 Gy. CA were manually and automatically scored following uniform (Giemsa) or TC staining. The detection of centromeric regions and telomeric sequences using PNA probes allowed the detection of all unstable CA: dicentrics, centric and acentric rings, and all acentric fragments (with 2, 4 or no telomeres) leading to the precise quantification of estimated double strand breaks (DSB). Results: Manual scoring following TC staining revealed a significantly higher frequency of dicentrics (p < 10−3) (up to 30%) and estimated DSB (p < 10−4) compared to uniform staining due to improved detection of dicentrics with centromeres juxtaposed with other centromeres or telomeres. This improvement permitted the development of the software, TCScore, that detected 95% of manually scored dicentrics compared to 50% for the best currently

  14. CENP-A exceeds microtubule attachment sites in centromere clusters of both budding and fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Valerie C; Wu, Pengcheng; Parthun, Mark R; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2011-11-14

    The stoichiometries of kinetochores and their constituent proteins in yeast and vertebrate cells were determined using the histone H3 variant CENP-A, known as Cse4 in budding yeast, as a counting standard. One Cse4-containing nucleosome exists in the centromere (CEN) of each chromosome, so it has been assumed that each anaphase CEN/kinetochore cluster contains 32 Cse4 molecules. We report that anaphase CEN clusters instead contained approximately fourfold more Cse4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ~40-fold more CENP-A (Cnp1) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe than predicted. These results suggest that the number of CENP-A molecules exceeds the number of kinetochore-microtubule (MT) attachment sites on each chromosome and that CENP-A is not the sole determinant of kinetochore assembly sites in either yeast. In addition, we show that fission yeast has enough Dam1-DASH complex for ring formation around attached MTs. The results of this study suggest the need for significant revision of existing CEN/kinetochore architectural models. PMID:22084306

  15. Overexpression of centromere protein H is significantly associated with breast cancer progression and overall patient survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Ting Liao; Yan Feng; Men-Lin Li; Guang-Lin Liu; Man-Zhi Li; Mu-Sheng Zeng; Li-Bing Song

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide.This study aimed to analyze the expression of centromere protein H (CENP-H) in breast cancer and to correlate it with clinicopathologic data,including patient survival.Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Westem blotting to detect the expression of CENP-H in normal mammary epithelial cells,immortalized mammary epithelial cell lines,and breast cancer cell lines,we observed that the mRNA and protein levels of CENP-H were higher in breast cancer cell lines and in immortalized mammary epithelial cells than in normal mammary epithelial cells.We next examined CENP-H expression in 307 paraffin-embedded archived samples of clinicopathologically characterized breast cancer using immunohistochemistry,and detected high CENP-H expression in 134 (43.6%) samples.Statistical analysis showed that CENP-H expression was related with clinical stage (P = 0.001),T classification (P = 0.032),N classification (P =0.018),and Ki-67 (P<0.001).Patients with high CENP-H expression had short overall survival.Multivariate analysis showed that CENP-H expression was an independent prognostic indicator for patient survival.Our results suggest that CENP-H protein is a valuable marker of breast cancer progression and prognosis.

  16. Topology of chromosome centromeres in human sperm nuclei with high levels of DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiland, Ewa; Fraczek, Monika; Olszewska, Marta; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the 'poor' sperm DNA quality appears to be an important factor affecting male reproductive ability. In the case of sperm cells from males with the correct somatic karyotype but with deficient spermatogenesis, resulting in a high degree of sperm DNA fragmentation, we observed changes in the preferential topology of the chromosome 7, 9, 15, 18, X and Y centromeres. The changes occurred in radial localization and may have been directly linked to the sperm chromatin damage. This conclusion is mainly based on a comparison of FISH signals that were observed simultaneously in the TUNEL-positive and TUNEL-negative sperm cells. The analyzed cells originated from the same ejaculated sample and FISH was performed on the same slides, after in situ TUNEL reaction. Based on the observed changes and previous data, it appears that the sperm nucleus architecture can be disrupted by a variety of factors and has a negative influence on spermatogenesis at the same time. Often, these factors coexist (e.g. chromosomal translocations, aneuploidies, a higher DNA fragmentation, abnormal seminology), but no direct correlations between the factors were observed. PMID:27558650

  17. Different patterns of evolution in the centromeric and telomeric regions of group A and B haplotypes of the human killer cell Ig-like receptor locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Woo Pyo

    Full Text Available The fast evolving human KIR gene family encodes variable lymphocyte receptors specific for polymorphic HLA class I determinants. Nucleotide sequences for 24 representative human KIR haplotypes were determined. With three previously defined haplotypes, this gave a set of 12 group A and 15 group B haplotypes for assessment of KIR variation. The seven gene-content haplotypes are all combinations of four centromeric and two telomeric motifs. 2DL5, 2DS5 and 2DS3 can be present in centromeric and telomeric locations. With one exception, haplotypes having identical gene content differed in their combinations of KIR alleles. Sequence diversity varied between haplotype groups and between centromeric and telomeric halves of the KIR locus. The most variable A haplotype genes are in the telomeric half, whereas the most variable genes characterizing B haplotypes are in the centromeric half. Of the highly polymorphic genes, only the 3DL3 framework gene exhibits a similar diversity when carried by A and B haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates, point to the centromeric gene-content motifs that distinguish A and B haplotypes having emerged ~6 million years ago, contemporaneously with the separation of human and chimpanzee ancestors. In contrast, the telomeric motifs that distinguish A and B haplotypes emerged more recently, ~1.7 million years ago, before the emergence of Homo sapiens. Thus the centromeric and telomeric motifs that typify A and B haplotypes have likely been present throughout human evolution. The results suggest the common ancestor of A and B haplotypes combined a B-like centromeric region with an A-like telomeric region.

  18. A NASP (N1/N2)-related protein, Sim3, binds CENP-A and is required for its deposition at fission yeast centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Elaine M; Pidoux, Alison L; Monet, Marie; Bonilla, Carolina; Richardson, William; Hamilton, Georgina L; Ekwall, Karl; McLaughlin, Paul J; Allshire, Robin C

    2007-12-28

    A defining feature of centromeres is the presence of the histone H3 variant CENP-A(Cnp1). It is not known how CENP-A(Cnp1) is specifically delivered to, and assembled into, centromeric chromatin. Through a screen for factors involved in kinetochore integrity in fission yeast, we identified Sim3. Sim3 is homologous to known histone binding proteins NASP(Human) and N1/N2(Xenopus) and aligns with Hif1(S. cerevisiae), defining the SHNi-TPR family. Sim3 is distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, yet it associates with CENP-A(Cnp1) and also binds H3. Cells defective in Sim3 function have reduced levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) at centromeres (and increased H3) and display chromosome segregation defects. Sim3 is required to allow newly synthesized CENP-A(Cnp1) to accumulate at centromeres in S and G2 phase-arrested cells in a replication-independent mechanism. We propose that one function of Sim3 is to act as an escort that hands off CENP-A(Cnp1) to chromatin assembly factors, allowing its incorporation into centromeric chromatin. PMID:18158900

  19. KAT7/HBO1/MYST2 Regulates CENP-A Chromatin Assembly by Antagonizing Suv39h1-Mediated Centromere Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohzeki, Jun-Ichirou; Shono, Nobuaki; Otake, Koichiro; Martins, Nuno M C; Kugou, Kazuto; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nagase, Takahiro; Larionov, Vladimir; Earnshaw, William C; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Centromere chromatin containing histone H3 variant CENP-A is required for accurate chromosome segregation as a foundation for kinetochore assembly. Human centromere chromatin assembles on a part of the long α-satellite (alphoid) DNA array, where it is flanked by pericentric heterochromatin. Heterochromatin spreads into adjacent chromatin and represses gene expression, and it can antagonize centromere function or CENP-A assembly. Here, we demonstrate an interaction between CENP-A assembly factor M18BP1 and acetyltransferase KAT7/HBO1/MYST2. Knocking out KAT7 in HeLa cells reduced centromeric CENP-A assembly. Mitotic chromosome misalignment and micronuclei formation increased in the knockout cells and were enhanced when the histone H3-K9 trimethylase Suv39h1 was overproduced. Tethering KAT7 to an ectopic alphoid DNA integration site removed heterochromatic H3K9me3 modification and was sufficient to stimulate new CENP-A or histone H3.3 assembly. Thus, KAT7-containing acetyltransferases associating with the Mis18 complex provides competence for histone turnover/exchange activity on alphoid DNA and prevents Suv39h1-mediated heterochromatin invasion into centromeres. PMID:27270040

  20. Epigenetic Histone Marks of Extended Meta-Polycentric Centromeres of Lathyrus and Pisum Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Pavel; Schubert, Veit; Fuková, Iva; Manning, Jasper E; Houben, Andreas; Macas, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Species of the legume genera Lathyrus and Pisum possess chromosomes that exhibit a unique structure of their centromeric regions, which is clearly apparent during metaphase by the formation of extended primary constrictions which span up to a third of the length of the chromosome. In addition, these species express two different variants of the CenH3 protein which are co-localized in multiple domains along the poleward surface of the primary constrictions. Here, we show that the constrictions represent a distinct type of chromatin differing from the chromosome arms. In metaphase, histone phosphorylation patterns including H3S10ph, H3S28ph, and H3T3ph were observed along the entire constriction, in a way similar to holocentric chromosomes. On the other hand, distribution of phosphorylated H2AT120 was different from that previously reported from either, holocentric and monocentric chromosomes, occurring at chromatin surrounding but not overlapping CenH3 domains. Since some of these phosphorylations play a role in chromatid cohesion, it can be assumed that they facilitate correct chromosome segregation by ensuring that multiple separate CenH3 domains present on the same chromatid are oriented toward the same pole. The constrictions also displayed distinct patterns of histone methylation marks, being enriched in H3K9me2 and depleted in H3K4me3 and H3K27me2 compared to the chromosome arms. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy revealed that although both CenH3 protein variants are present in all CenH3 domains detected on metaphase chromosomes, they are only partially co-localized while there are chromatin subdomains which are mostly made of only one CenH3 variant. Taken together, these data revealed specific features of extended primary constrictions of Lathyrus and Pisum and support the idea that they may represent an intermediate stage between monocentric and holocentric chromosomes. PMID:26973677

  1. Epigenetic histone marks of extended meta-polycentric centromeres of Lathyrus and Pisum chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel eNeumann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Species of the legume genera Lathyrus and Pisum possess chromosomes that exhibit a unique structure of their centromeric regions, which is clearly apparent during metaphase by the formation of extended primary constrictions which span up to a third of the length of the chromosome. In addition, these species express two different variants of the CenH3 protein which are co-localized in multiple domains along the poleward surface of the primary constrictions. Here we show that the constrictions represent a distinct type of chromatin differing from the chromosome arms. In metaphase, histone phosphorylation patterns including H3S10ph, H3S28ph and H3T3ph were observed along the entire constriction, in a way similar to holocentric chromosomes. On the other hand, distribution of phosphorylated H2AT120 was different from that previously reported from either, holocentric and monocentric chromosomes, occurring at chromatin surrounding but not overlapping CenH3 domains. Since some of these phosphorylations play a role in chromatid cohesion, it can be assumed that they facilitate correct chromosome segregation by ensuring that multiple separate CenH3 domains present on the same chromatid are oriented towards the same pole. The constrictions also displayed distinct patterns of histone methylation marks, being enriched in H3K9me2 and depleted in H3K4me3 and H3K27me2 compared to the chromosome arms. High resolution fluorescence microscopy revealed that although both CenH3 protein variants are present in all CenH3 domains detected on metaphase chromosomes, they are only partially co-localized while there are chromatin subdomains which are mostly made of only one CenH3 variant. Taken together, these data revealed specific features of extended primary constrictions of Lathyrus and Pisum and support the idea that they may represent an intermediate stage between monocentric and holocentric chromosomes.

  2. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Timothy; Liachko, Ivan; Burt, Cassaundra; Meikle, Troy; Jiang, Katherine; Craciun, Gheorghe; Dunham, Maitreya J; Fox, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1) present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may function in plasmid

  3. Differential binding partners of the Mis18α/β YIPPEE domains regulates the Mis18 complex recruitment to centromeres

    OpenAIRE

    Madison E. Stellfox; Isaac K. Nardi; Christina M. Knippler; Daniel R. Foltz

    2016-01-01

    The Mis18 complex specifies the site of new CENP-A nucleosome assembly by recruiting the CENP-A-specific assembly factor HJURP (Holliday junction recognition protein). The human Mis18 complex consists of Mis18α, Mis18β, and Mis18 binding protein 1 (Mis18BP1/hsKNL2). Although Mis18α and Mis18β are highly homologous proteins, we find that their conserved YIPPEE domains mediate distinct interactions that are essential to link new CENP-A deposition to existing centromeres. We find that Mis18α dir...

  4. Loss of centromeric histone H2AT120 phosphorylation accompanies somatic chromosomes inactivation in the aberrant spermatocytes of Acricotopus lucidus (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In the germ line of the chironomid Acricotopus lucidus, two cells with quite different chromosome constitutions result from the last unequal gonial mitosis. In the male, the future primary spermatocyte receives all the germ line-limited chromosomes (=Ks) together with somatic chromosomes (=Ss), and later on undergoes meiotic divisions, while the connected aberrant spermatocyte gets only Ss and remains undivided with chromosomes inactivated in a metaphase-like condensed state. This raises the question whether the centromeres of the permanently condensed Ss of the aberrant spermatocyte remain active during meiosis of the connected regular spermatocyte. Active centromeres exhibit an epigenetic phosphorylation mark at threonine 120 of histone H2A. To visualise the centromeric H2A phosphorylation of the Ss in the aberrant spermatocyte, meiotic stages were immunostained with different anti-phospho histone H2AT120 antibodies. Clear H2AT120ph signals appear at the centromeres of the Ss during prophase, persist on the metaphase-like condensed Ss during meiosis I of the connected primary spermatocyte and disappear during transition to meiosis II. The centromeres of the Ss and Ks of the regular spermatocytes display H2AT120ph signals from prophase I to anaphase II. The loss of the H2AT120 phosphorylation detected on the centromeres of the Ss of the aberrant spermatocyte indicating their deactivation supports the idea of a programmed inactivation of the Ss to block the entry of the germ line-derived aberrant spermatocyte, lacking Ks, into meiosis, and thus to prevent the generation of sperms possessing only Ss. This mechanism would ensure the presence of the Ks in the germ line. PMID:25820679

  5. Human chromosome pellicle antibody recognizing centromere protein—C (CENP0C),the main component of the kinetochore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEYONG; ZUMEINI; 等

    1997-01-01

    Recently the antichromosome antisera from several sclerogerma patients have been found to recognize the pellicle of metaphase and anaphase chromosomes.In order to identify the pellicle components,we used these antichromosome antisera to screen a human embryonic cDNA library.The sequences of the positive clones are identical to the cDNA gene sequence of CENP-C (centromere protein C),a human centromere autoantigen.This result suggusts that CENP-C is a component of the pellicle of human metaphase and anaphase chromosomes.

  6. A NASP (N1/N2)-related protein, Sim3, binds CENP-A and is required for its deposition at fission yeast centromeres

    OpenAIRE

    Dunleavy, Elaine M; Pidoux, Alison L.; Monet, Marie; Bonilla, Carolina; Richardson, William; Hamilton, Georgina L.; Ekwall, Karl; McLaughlin, Paul J.; Allshire, Robin C.

    2007-01-01

    A defining feature of centromeres is the presence of the histone H3 variant CENP-A(Cnp1). It is not known how CENP-A(Cnp1) is specifically delivered to, and assembled into, centromeric chromatin. Through a screen for factors involved in kinetochore integrity in fission yeast, we identified Sim3. Sim3 is homologous to known histone binding proteins NASP(Human) and N1/N2(Xenopus) and aligns with Hif1(S. cerevisiae), defining the SHNi-TPR family. Sim3 is distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, y...

  7. Immunodeficiency, Centromeric instability, Facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome, due to ZBTB24 mutations, presenting with large cerebral cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbone, Manuela; Wang, Jun; Van der Maarel, Silvère M.; d’Amico, Alessandra; d’Agostino, Antonio; Romano, Alfonso; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The Immunodeficiency, Centromeric instability, Facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease presenting with immunodeficiency secondary to hypo- or agammaglobulinemia, developmental delay, and facial anomalies. Centromeric instability is the cytogenetic hallmark of the disorder which results from targeted chromosomal rearrangements related to a genomic methylation defect. We describe a patient carrying a homozygous mutation of the ZBTB24 gene, which has been recently shown to be responsible for ICF syndrome type 2. Our patient presented with intellectual disability, multiple café-au-lait spots, and a large cerebral arachnoidal cyst. Although laboratory signs of impaired immune function, such as reduced serum IgM were detected, our patient did not present clinical manifestations of immunodeficiency. Brain malformations have not been reported so far in ICF syndrome and it can be speculated that ZBTB24 mutations may alter cerebral development. Nevertheless, we cannot rule out that the presence of the cerebral cyst in the patient is coincidental. In summary, our patient illustrates that clinical evidence of immunodeficiency is not a universal feature of ICF2 syndrome type 2 and suggests that brain malformations may be present in other ICF cases. PMID:22786748

  8. Hsk1- and SCF(Pof3)-dependent proteolysis of S. pombe Ams2 ensures histone homeostasis and centromere function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Yuko; Mamnun, Yasmine M; Trickey, Michelle; Dhut, Susheela; Masuda, Fumie; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Toda, Takashi; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2010-03-16

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe GATA factor Ams2 is responsible for cell cycle-dependent transcriptional activation of all the core histone genes peaking at G1/S phase. Intriguingly, its own protein level also fluctuates concurrently. Here, we show that Ams2 is ubiquitylated and degraded through the SCF (Skp1-Cdc53/Cullin-1-F-box) ubiquitin ligase, in which F box protein Pof3 binds this protein. Ams2 is phosphorylated at multiple sites, which is required for SCF(Pof3)-dependent proteolysis. Hsk1/Cdc7 kinase physically associates with and phosphorylates Ams2. Even mild overexpression of Ams2 induces constitutive histone expression and chromosome instability, and its toxicity is exaggerated when Hsk1 function is compromised. This is partly attributable to abnormal incorporation of canonical H3 into the central CENP-A/Cnp1-rich centromere, thereby reversing specific chromatin structures to apparently normal nucleosomes. We propose that Hsk1 plays a vital role during post S phase in genome stability via SCF(Pof3)-mediated degradation of Ams2, thereby maintaining centromere integrity. PMID:20230746

  9. Quantification, by solid-phase minisequencing, of the telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene in families with spinal muscular atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, M; Sørensen, N; Hansen, F J; Hertz, Jens Michael; Nørby, S; Tranebjaerg, L; Skovby, F

    1997-01-01

    In an analysis of 30 families affected by spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) we have used the solid-phase minisequencing method to determine the ratio between the number of telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN and cBCD541 respectively) on normal and SMA chromosomes...

  10. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Radke, Brittany; Findley, Seth; Abernathy, Brian; Vallejos, C Eduardo; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2-4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species. PMID:26865698

  11. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris and Relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiko Iwata-Otsubo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus. Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2–4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species.

  12. Endogenous pararetrovirus sequences associated with 24 nt small RNAs at the centromeres of Fritillaria imperialis L. (Liliaceae), a species with a giant genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Becher, H.; Ma, L.; Kelly, L.J.; Kovařík, Aleš; Leitch, I. J.; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 5 (2014), s. 823-833. ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-10057S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : pararetrovirus * Fritillaria imperialis * centromere Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.972, year: 2014

  13. Schizosaccharomyces pombe centromere protein Mis19 links Mis16 and Mis18 to recruit CENP-A through interacting with NMD factors and the SWI/SNF complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Ebe, Masahiro; Nagao, Koji; Kokubu, Aya; Sajiki, Kenichi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2014-07-01

    CENP-A is a centromere-specific variant of histone H3 that is required for accurate chromosome segregation. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian Mis16 and Mis18 form a complex essential for CENP-A recruitment to centromeres. It is unclear, however, how the Mis16-Mis18 complex achieves this function. Here, we identified, by mass spectrometry, novel fission yeast centromere proteins Mis19 and Mis20 that directly interact with Mis16 and Mis18. Like Mis18, Mis19 and Mis20 are localized at the centromeres during interphase, but not in mitosis. Inactivation of Mis19 in a newly isolated temperature-sensitive mutant resulted in CENP-A delocalization and massive chromosome missegregation, whereas Mis20 was dispensable for proper chromosome segregation. Mis19 might be a bridge component for Mis16 and Mis18. We isolated extragenic suppressor mutants for temperature-sensitive mis18 and mis19 mutants and used whole-genome sequencing to determine the mutated sites. We identified two groups of loss-of-function suppressor mutations in non-sense-mediated mRNA decay factors (upf2 and ebs1), and in SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling components (snf5, snf22 and sol1). Our results suggest that the Mis16-Mis18-Mis19-Mis20 CENP-A-recruiting complex, which is functional in the G1-S phase, may be counteracted by the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex and non-sense-mediated mRNA decay, which may prevent CENP-A deposition at the centromere. PMID:24774534

  14. Mis17 Is a Regulatory Module of the Mis6-Mal2-Sim4 Centromere Complex That Is Required for the Recruitment of CenH3/CENP-A in Fission Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Shiroiwa, Yoshiharu; Hayashi, Takeshi; Fujita, Yohta; Villar-Briones, Alejandro; Ikai, Nobuyasu; Takeda, Kojiro; Ebe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Background The centromere is the chromosome domain on which the mitotic kinetochore forms for proper segregation. Deposition of the centromeric histone H3 (CenH3, CENP-A) is vital for the formation of centromere-specific chromatin. The Mis6-Mal2-Sim4 complex of the fission yeast S. pombe is required for the recruitment of CenH3 (Cnp1), but its function remains obscure. Methodology/Principal Findings Mass spectrometry was performed on the proteins precipitated with Mis6- and Mis17-FLAG. The re...

  15. Mis17 Is a Regulatory Module of the Mis6-Mal2-Sim4 Centromere Complex That Is Required for the Recruitment of CenH3/CENP-A in Fission Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiharu Shiroiwa; Takeshi Hayashi; Yohta Fujita; Alejandro Villar-Briones; Nobuyasu Ikai; Kojiro Takeda; Masahiro Ebe; Mitsuhiro Yanagida

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The centromere is the chromosome domain on which the mitotic kinetochore forms for proper segregation. Deposition of the centromeric histone H3 (CenH3, CENP-A) is vital for the formation of centromere-specific chromatin. The Mis6-Mal2-Sim4 complex of the fission yeast S. pombe is required for the recruitment of CenH3 (Cnp1), but its function remains obscure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mass spectrometry was performed on the proteins precipitated with Mis6- and Mis17-FLAG. The ...

  16. SGO1 maintains bovine meiotic and mitotic centromeric cohesions of sister chromatids and directly affects embryo development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Xia Yin

    Full Text Available Shugoshin (SGO is a critical factor that enforces cohesion from segregation of paired sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. It has been studied mainly in invertebrates. Knowledge of SGO(s in a mammalian system has only been reported in the mouse and Hela cells. In this study, the functions of SGO1 in bovine oocytes during meiotic maturation, early embryonic development and somatic cell mitosis were investigated. The results showed that SGO1 was expressed from germinal vesicle (GV to the metaphase II stage. SGO1 accumulated on condensed and scattered chromosomes from pre-metaphase I to metaphase II. The over-expression of SGO1 did not interfere with the process of homologous chromosome separation, although once separated they were unable to move to the opposing spindle poles. This often resulted in the formation of oocytes with 60 replicated chromosomes. Depletion of SGO1 in GV oocytes affected chromosomal separation resulting in abnormal chromosome alignment at a significantly higher proportion than in control oocytes. Knockdown of SGO1 expression significantly decreased the embryonic developmental rate and quality. To further confirm the function(s of SGO1 during mitosis, bovine embryonic fibroblast cells were transfected with SGO1 siRNAs. SGO1 depletion induced the premature dissociation of chromosomal cohesion at the centromere and along the chromosome arm giving rise to abnormal appearing mitotic patterns. The results of this study infer that SGO1 is involved in the centromeric cohesion of sister chromatids and chromosomal movement towards the spindle poles. Depletion of SGO1 causes arrestment of cell division in meiosis and mitosis.

  17. Cse4 (CenH3) Association with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Plasmid Partitioning Locus in Its Native and Chromosomally Integrated States: Implications in Centromere Evolution▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chu-Chun; Hajra, Sujata; Ghosh, Santanu Kumar; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2010-01-01

    The histone H3 variant Cse4 specifies centromere identity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by its incorporation into a special nucleosome positioned at CEN DNA and promotes the assembly of the kinetochore complex, which is required for faithful chromosome segregation. Our previous work showed that Cse4 is also associated with the partitioning locus STB of the 2μm circle—a multicopy plasmid that resides in the yeast nucleus and propagates itself stably. Cse4 is essential for the functional assembly...

  18. Recombination and Speciation: Loci Near Centromeres Are More Differentiated Than Loci Near Telomeres Between Subspecies of the European Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    OpenAIRE

    Carneiro, Miguel; Ferrand, Nuno; Nachman, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Recent empirical and theoretical studies suggest that regions of restricted recombination play an important role in the formation of new species. To test this idea, we studied nucleotide variation in two parapatric subspecies of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). We surveyed five loci near centromeres, where recombination is expected to be suppressed, and five loci near telomeres, where recombination is expected to be higher. We analyzed this multilocus data set using a divergence-w...

  19. Preferential recruitment of the maternal centromere-specific histone H3 (CENH3) in oat (Avena sativa L.) × pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.) hybrid embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takayoshi; Sunamura, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Ayaka; Eltayeb, Amin Elsadig; Tsujimoto, Hisashi

    2015-12-01

    Chromosome elimination occurs frequently in interspecific hybrids between distantly related species in Poaceae. However, chromosomes from both parents behave stably in a hybrid of female oat (Avena sativa L.) pollinated by pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.). To analyze the chromosome behavior in this hybrid, we cloned the centromere-specific histone H3 (CENH3) genes of oat and pearl millet and produced a pearl millet-specific anti-CENH3 antibody. Application of this antibody together with a grass species common anti-CENH3 antibody revealed the dynamic CENH3 composition of the hybrid cells before and after fertilization. Despite co-expression of CENH3 genes encoded by oat and pearl millet, only an oat-type CENH3 was incorporated into the centromeres of both species in the hybrid embryo. Oat CENH3 enables a functional centromere in pearl millet chromosomes in an oat genetic background. Comparison of CENH3 genes among Poaceae species that show chromosome elimination in interspecific hybrids revealed that the loop 1 regions of oat and pearl millet CENH3 exhibit exceptionally high similarity. PMID:26134441

  20. Condensin HEAT subunits required for DNA repair, kinetochore/centromere function and ploidy maintenance in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingya Xu

    Full Text Available Condensin, a central player in eukaryotic chromosomal dynamics, contains five evolutionarily-conserved subunits. Two SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes subunits contain ATPase, hinge, and coiled-coil domains. One non-SMC subunit is similar to bacterial kleisin, and two other non-SMC subunits contain HEAT (similar to armadillo repeats. Here we report isolation and characterization of 21 fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants for three non-SMC subunits, created using error-prone mutagenesis that resulted in single-amino acid substitutions. Beside condensation, segregation, and DNA repair defects, similar to those observed in previously isolated SMC and cnd2 mutants, novel phenotypes were observed for mutants of HEAT-repeats containing Cnd1 and Cnd3 subunits. cnd3-L269P is hypersensitive to the microtubule poison, thiabendazole, revealing defects in kinetochore/centromere and spindle assembly checkpoints. Three cnd1 and three cnd3 mutants increased cell size and doubled DNA content, thereby eliminating the haploid state. Five of these mutations reside in helix B of HEAT repeats. Two non-SMC condensin subunits, Cnd1 and Cnd3, are thus implicated in ploidy maintenance.

  1. Involvement of kinesin family member 2C/mitotic centromere-associated kinesin overexpression in mammary carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimo, Arata; Tanikawa, Chizu; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Lin, Meng-Lay; Matsuda, Koichi; Park, Jae-Hyun; Ueki, Tomomi; Ohta, Tomohiko; Hirata, Koichi; Fukuda, Mamoru; Nakamura, Yusuke; Katagiri, Toyomasa

    2008-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of mammary carcinogenesis and discover novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer, we previously carried out genome-wide expression profile analysis of 81 breast cancer cases by means of cDNA microarray coupled with laser microbeam microdissection of cancer cells. Among the dozens of transactivated genes, in the present study we focused on the functional significance of kinesin family member 2C (KIF2C)/mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) in the growth of breast cancer cells. Northern blot and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed KIF2C/MCAK overexpression in breast cancer cells, and showed that it is expressed at undetectable levels in normal human tissues except the testis, suggesting KIF2C/MCAK to be a cancer-testis antigen. Western blot analysis using breast cancer cell lines revealed a significant increase in the endogenous KIF2C/MCAK protein level and its phosphorylation in G(2)/M phase. Treatment of breast cancer cells with small interfering RNA against KIF2C/MCAK effectively suppressed KIF2C/MCAK expression and inhibited the growth of the breast cancer cell lines T47D and HBC5. In addition, we found that KIF2C/MCAK expression was significantly suppressed by ectopic introduction of p53. These findings suggest that overexpression of KIF2C/MCAK might be involved in breast carcinogenesis and is a promising therapeutic target for breast cancers. PMID:17944972

  2. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to 60Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw

  3. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); El Maalouf, Elie [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Terzoudi, Georgia [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems, Altlussheim (Germany); Karachristou, Ionna [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, Paris (France); Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Pantelias, Gabriel [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to {sup 60}Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw.

  4. Organization of centromeric domains in hepatocyte nuclei: rearrangement associated with de novo activation of the vitellogenin gene family in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janevski, J; Park, P C; De Boni, U

    1995-04-01

    The existence of a function-dependent, nonrandom organization of chromatin domains within interphase nuclei is supported by evidence which suggests that specific chromatin domains undergo spatial rearrangement under conditions which alter gene expression. Exposure to estrogen of male Xenopus laevis hepatocytes in vitro results in de novo activation of vitellogenin mRNA production and vitellogenin protein synthesis and provides an ideal model to study the association between chromatin organization and changes in gene expression. In a test of the hypothesis that the de novo induction of vitellogenesis in male X. laevis is associated with a spatial rearrangement of specific chromatin domains, centromeric regions were localized by immunofluorescent labeling of associated kinetochore proteins in naive and in estrogen-treated, vitellogenic cells. Analyses by confocal scanning laser microscopy of the three-dimensional spatial distribution of kinetochores in estrogen-treated male hepatocytes showed that a significantly greater proportion of signals was associated with the nuclear periphery than in non-estrogen-treated, naive male cells. In hepatocyte nuclei, quantification of kinetochore signal sizes using image analysis showed that these signals were fewer in number and showed greater variation in size than those of cells in metaphase, with larger signals exhibiting total normalized fluorescence intensities of two, three, four, and five times that associated with kinetochore signals of metaphase cells. These observations are taken to reflect the existence of clustering of kinetochores and, by extension, of centromeres in these cells. In summary, the results show that centromeric domains within interphase nuclei of Xenopus hepatocytes occur as clusters and that these domains undergo spatial rearrangement under conditions which alter the transcriptional state of the cell. PMID:7698222

  5. Lack of independent prognostic and predictive value of centromere 17 copy number changes in breast cancer patients with known HER2 and TOP2A status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Vang; Ejlertsen, Bent; Møller, Susanne;

    2011-01-01

    The clinical benefit of anthracyclines has been connected to HER2 status, TOP2A status and centromere 17 copy numbers (CEN-17). Data from a clinical trial randomizing patients to anthracyclines was used to assess whether the number of CEN-17 in breast cancers may predict incremental responsiveness...... determined in normal breast were applied to data on 767 patients with known HER2 and TOP2A status randomized to anthracyclines in the DBCG 89D trial. CEN-17 ploidy levels were in cut sections from the 767 breast cancer patients established as: Haploid: ≤1.25 (10%), diploid: 1.26-2.09 (60%), triploid: 2...

  6. Evolution of mammalian carbonic anhydrase loci by tandem duplication: close linkage of Car-1 and Car-2 to the centromere region of chromosome 3 of the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eicher, E.M. (Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME); Stern, R.H.; Womack, J.E.; Davisson, M.T.; Roderick, T.H.; Reynolds, S.C.

    1976-01-01

    Electrophoretic variants of two carbonic anhydrase enzymes, CAR-1 (CA I) and CAR-2 (CA II), have been found in the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus. These two loci are closely linked to each other and are located on chromosome 3 near its centromere. The close linkage of Car-1 and Car-2 supports the hypothesis that the present-day carbonic anhydrase loci are the result of tandem duplication of an earlier carbonic anhydrase locus with subsequent divergence. The red blood cells of mice of the subspecies M. m. casteneus have significantly reduced levels of CAR-1 and CAR-2.

  7. Genetics and biology of human ovarian teratomas. II. Molecular analysis of origin of nondisjunction and gene-centromere mapping of chromosome I markers.

    OpenAIRE

    Deka, R; Chakravarti, A; Surti, U; Hauselman, E; Reefer, J; Majumder, P P; Ferrell, R E

    1990-01-01

    Chromosomal heteromorphisms and DNA polymorphisms have been utilized to identify the mechanisms that lead to formation of human ovarian teratomas and to construct a gene-centromere map of chromosome 1 by using those teratomas that arise by meiotic nondisjunction. Of 61 genetically informative ovarian teratomas, 21.3% arose by nondisjunction at meiosis I, and 39.3% arose by meiosis II nondisjunction. Eight polymorphic marker loci on chromosome 1p and one marker on 1q were used to estimate a ge...

  8. Dicentric chromosome aberration analysis using giemsa and centromere specific fluorescence in-situ hybridization for biological dosimetry: An inter- and intra-laboratory comparison in Indian laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To facilitate efficient handling of large samples, an attempt towards networking of laboratories in India for biological dosimetry was carried out. Human peripheral blood samples were exposed to 60Co γ-radiation for ten different doses (0–5 Gy) at a dose rate of 0.7 and 2 Gy/min. The chromosomal aberrations (CA) were scored in Giemsa-stained and fluorescence in-situ hybridization with centromere-specific probes. No significant difference (p>0.05) was observed in the CA yield for given doses except 4 and 5 Gy, between the laboratories, among the scorers and also staining methods adapted suggest the reliability and validates the inter-lab comparisons exercise for triage applications. - Highlights: • This is the first report from India on Networking for Biological Dosimetry preparedness using dicentric chromosomal (DC) aberration assay. • There is no significant difference in the in vitro dose response curve (Slope, Intercept, Curvature) constructed among the two labs. • No significant variation in the scoring of DC aberrations between the scorers irrespective of labs. • The DC results obtained by the labs from the Giemsa stained metaphase preparations were confirmed with centromere specific-FISH for further reliability and validity

  9. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Piersanti

    Full Text Available Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2 are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR.

  10. Mis17 is a regulatory module of the Mis6-Mal2-Sim4 centromere complex that is required for the recruitment of CenH3/CENP-A in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiharu Shiroiwa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The centromere is the chromosome domain on which the mitotic kinetochore forms for proper segregation. Deposition of the centromeric histone H3 (CenH3, CENP-A is vital for the formation of centromere-specific chromatin. The Mis6-Mal2-Sim4 complex of the fission yeast S. pombe is required for the recruitment of CenH3 (Cnp1, but its function remains obscure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mass spectrometry was performed on the proteins precipitated with Mis6- and Mis17-FLAG. The results together with the previously identified Sim4- and Mal2-TAP precipitated proteins indicated that the complex contains 12 subunits, Mis6, Sim4, Mal2, Mis15, Mis17, Cnl2, Fta1-4, Fta6-7, nine of which have human centromeric protein (CENP counterparts. Domain dissection indicated that the carboxy-half of Mis17 is functional, while its amino-half is regulatory. Overproduction of the amino-half caused strong negative dominance, which led to massive chromosome missegregation and hypersensitivity to the histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA. Mis17 was hyperphosphorylated and overproduction-induced negative dominance was abolished in six kinase-deletion mutants, ssp2 (AMPK, ppk9 (AMPK, ppk15 (Yak1, ppk30 (Ark1, wis4 (Ssk2, and lsk1 (P-TEFb. CONCLUSIONS: Mis17 may be a regulatory module of the Mis6 complex. Negative dominance of the Mis17 fragment is exerted while the complex and CenH3 remain at the centromere, a result that differs from the mislocalization seen in the mis17-362 mutant. The known functions of the kinases suggest an unexpected link between Mis17 and control of the cortex actin, nutrition, and signal/transcription. Possible interpretations are discussed.

  11. Centromere-tethered Mps1 pombe homolog (Mph1) kinase is a sufficient marker for recruitment of the spindle checkpoint protein Bub1, but not Mad1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Saito, Yu; Matsumoto, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint delays the onset of anaphase until all of the chromosomes properly achieve bipolar attachment to the spindle. It has been shown that unattached kinetochores are the site that emits a signal for activation of the checkpoint. Although the components of the checkpoint such as Bub1, Mad1 and Mad2 selectively accumulate at unattached kinetochores, the answer to how they recognize unattached kinetochores has remained elusive. Mps1 pombe homolog (Mph1) kinase has been shown to function upstream of most of the components of the checkpoint and thus it is thought to recognize unattached kinetochores by itself and recruit other components. In this study we have expressed a fusion protein of Mph1 and Ndc80 (a kinetochore protein of the outer plate) and shown that the fusion protein arrests cell cycle progression in a spindle-checkpoint\\x{2013}dependent manner in fission yeast. When expression of Mad2 is turned off, the cells grow normally with Mph1 constitutively localized at centromeres/kinetochores. Under this condition, Bub1 can be found with Mph1 throughout the cell cycle, indicating that localization of Mph1 at centromeres/kinetochores is sufficient to recruit Bub1. In contrast, Mad1 is found to transiently localize at kinetochores, which are presumably unattached to the spindle, but soon it dissociates from kinetochores. We propose that Mph1 is a sufficient marker for recruitment of Bub1. Mad1, in contrast, requires an additional condition/component for stable association with kinetochores. PMID:22184248

  12. Elevated expression of the centromere protein-A(CENP-A)-encoding gene as a prognostic and predictive biomarker in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xia; Clermont, Pier-Luc; Jiao, Wenlin; Helgason, Cheryl D; Gout, Peter W; Wang, Yuzhuo; Qu, Sifeng

    2016-08-15

    Centromere protein-A (CENP-A), a histone-H3 variant, plays an essential role in cell division by ensuring proper formation and function of centromeres and kinetochores. Elevated CENP-A expression has been associated with cancer development. This study aimed to establish whether elevated CENP-A expression can be used as a prognostic and predictive cancer biomarker. Molecular profiling of CENP-A in human cancers was investigated using genomic, transcriptomic and patient information from databases, including COSMIC, Oncomine, Kaplan-Meier plotter and cBioPortal. A network of CENP-A co-expressed genes was derived from cBioPortal and analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and Oncomine protocols to explore the function of CENP-A and its predictive potential. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of CENP-A expression was analyzed in silico. It was found that CENP-A expression was elevated in 20 types of solid cancer compared with normal counterparts. Elevated CENP-A expression highly correlated with cancer progression and poor patient outcome. Genomic analysis indicated that the elevated CENP-A expression was not due to alterations in the sequence or copy number of the CENP-A gene. Furthermore, CENP-A can be regulated by key oncogenic proteins and tumor-suppressive microRNAs. CENP-A co-expression network analysis indicated that CENP-A function is associated with cell cycle progression. Oncomine analysis showed a strong correlation between elevated CENP-A expression and oncolytic response of breast cancer patients to taxane-based chemotherapy. In conclusion, elevated CENP-A expression is coupled to malignant progression of numerous types of cancer. It may be useful as a biomarker of poor patient prognosis and as a predictive biomarker for taxane-based chemotherapy. PMID:27062469

  13. Impact of anti-centromere antibodies on pulmonary function test results in patients with systemic sclerosis without established or suspected pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, J; Pauling, J D; McHugh, N J

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) occurs in approximately 15% of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Annual screening with pulmonary function tests (PFT) is recommended to help identify those patients at risk of PAH. We have noted that patients with SSc who carry anti-centromere autoantibodies (ACA) often have PFT abnormalities, in the absence of clinical evidence of PAH. To evaluate this further, we undertook a retrospective case-control study evaluating PFT results in patients with SSc in whom pulmonary complications have neither been diagnosed nor suspected. Patients were divided according to ACA carriage and groups compared for PFT results. The median forced vital capacity (FVC) was higher in ACA-positive patients (106 vs. 93%, p=0.004). The gas transfer factor (TLco) was significantly lower in the ACA group (62.5 vs. 71%, p=0.013). The resulting FVC:TLco was significantly higher for ACA-positive vs. ACA-negative patients with SSc (1.70 vs. 1.29, pcarrying ACA, without established or suspected pulmonary complications, have PFT abnormalities consistent with indolent increased pulmonary vascular resistance despite the majority of such patients not subsequently developing PAH. The long-term sequelae of PFT abnormalities in those patients with ACA who do not subsequently develop PAH are unknown. PMID:24752346

  14. Physical mapping 220 kb centromeric of the human MHC and DNA sequence analysis of the 43-kb segment including the RING1, HKE6, and HKE4 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuti, Y Y; Tamiya, G; Ando, A; Chen, L; Kimura, M; Ferreira, E; Tsuji, K; Trowsdale, J; Inoko, H

    1997-06-15

    A cosmid contig was constructed from a YAC clone with a 220-kb insert that spans the centromeric side of the human MHC class II region, corresponding to the mouse t complex. The gene order was identified to be HSET-HKE1.5-HKE2-HKE3-RING1-HKE6- HKE4 (RING5). The genomic sequence of a 42,801-bp long region encoded by one cosmid clone in the RING1, HKE6, and HKE4 subregions was determined by the shotgun method. The exon-intron organization of these three genes, RING1 (Ring finger protein), HKE6 (steroid dehydrogenase-like protein), and HKE4 (transmembrane protein with histidine-rich charge clusters), was determined. The previously reported RING2 gene was revealed to be identical to HKE6. Transcripts from HKE4 were detected in the placenta, lung, kidney, and pancreas. Those of HKE6 were found in the liver and pancreas. The 25-kb region proximal to the RING1 gene includes an extensive dense cluster of Alu repeats (about 1.2 Alu per kb), and no gene has been identified in this so far. The region is equivalent to part of the mouse t complex and could be of relevance to human development. PMID:9205114

  15. High resolution linkage disequilibrium and haplotype maps for the genes in the centromeric region of chromo- some 15 in Tibetans and comparisons with Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Genetic variations and their functional implications have been one of the focuses in recent genome research. With the release of the HapMap by the International Consortium, and the availability of the ultra-high-volume genotyping platform, it will soon be possible to use genome-wide association approach to identify genetic variations responsible for complex traits/diseases. While the power of this approach is generally agreed, it is a debated issue as to how much population difference should be exploited, and how best it should be applied. To address this issue we have sequenced 7 genes in the centromeric region of chromosome 15, investigated their SNPs, SNP frequencies, tagSNPs, LD structures, and haplotypes in 50 Tibetan subjects, and compared them with those from the Han population. Genetic diversities between the two populations were also quantified. Our results show that the overall genetic variation between the two populations is very little, but there are differences, primarily in allele frequencies, which is a dominating factor for haplotypes and tagSNPs. In general Tibetans have longer LD and less diversity in the region studied. These data provide genetic evidence for the close relationship between the two populations, and support the idea that all populations are fundamentally the same, but also indicate population variations, particularly in allele frequency, should be taken into account in complex traits/ diseases analysis. Data obtained in this investigation not only help us understand the genome region, but also provide road maps for variation study in the genes/ region in Tibetan population.

  16. Meiosis-specific cohesin component, Stag3 is essential for maintaining centromere chromatid cohesion, and required for DNA repair and synapsis between homologous chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hopkins

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cohesins are important for chromosome structure and chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Cohesins are composed of two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC1-SMC3 proteins that form a V-shaped heterodimer structure, which is bridged by a α-kleisin protein and a stromal antigen (STAG protein. Previous studies in mouse have shown that there is one SMC1 protein (SMC1β, two α-kleisins (RAD21L and REC8 and one STAG protein (STAG3 that are meiosis-specific. During meiosis, homologous chromosomes must recombine with one another in the context of a tripartite structure known as the synaptonemal complex (SC. From interaction studies, it has been shown that there are at least four meiosis-specific forms of cohesin, which together with the mitotic cohesin complex, are lateral components of the SC. STAG3 is the only meiosis-specific subunit that is represented within all four meiosis-specific cohesin complexes. In Stag3 mutant germ cells, the protein level of other meiosis-specific cohesin subunits (SMC1β, RAD21L and REC8 is reduced, and their localization to chromosome axes is disrupted. In contrast, the mitotic cohesin complex remains intact and localizes robustly to the meiotic chromosome axes. The instability of meiosis-specific cohesins observed in Stag3 mutants results in aberrant DNA repair processes, and disruption of synapsis between homologous chromosomes. Furthermore, mutation of Stag3 results in perturbation of pericentromeric heterochromatin clustering, and disruption of centromere cohesion between sister chromatids during meiotic prophase. These defects result in early prophase I arrest and apoptosis in both male and female germ cells. The meiotic defects observed in Stag3 mutants are more severe when compared to single mutants for Smc1β, Rec8 and Rad21l, however they are not as severe as the Rec8, Rad21l double mutants. Taken together, our study demonstrates that STAG3 is required for the stability of all meiosis

  17. Centromere cohesion: regulating the guardian

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Fang; Guowei Fang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Mitosis, a process in which duplicated chromosomes are segregated into two daughter cells, is the most spectacular event in cell cycle. In mitosis, cells undergo drastic rearrangement of cytoskeleton, lipid and chromosomes under amazingly strict temporal and spatial control so that genetic information is faithfully transmitted to daughter cells.

  18. Centromere anatomy in the multidrug-resistant pathogen Enterococcus faecium

    OpenAIRE

    Derome, Andrew; Hoischen, Christian; Bussiek, Malte; Grady, Ruth; Adamczyk, Malgorzata; Kędzierska, Barbara; Diekmann, Stephan; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant variants of the opportunistic human pathogen Enterococcus have recently emerged as leading agents of nosocomial infection. The acquisition of plasmid-borne resistance genes is a driving force in antibiotic-resistance evolution in enterococci. The segregation locus of a high-level gentamicin-resistance plasmid, pGENT, in Enterococcus faecium was identified and dissected. This locus includes overlapping genes encoding PrgP, a member of the ParA superfamily of segregation pro...

  19. Plant centromeric retrotransposons: a structural and cytogenetic perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neumann, Pavel; Navrátilová, Alice; Koblížková, Andrea; Kejnovský, Eduard; Hřibová, Eva; Hobza, Roman; Widmer, A.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Macas, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2011), s. 1-16. ISSN 1759-8753 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500960802; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004; GA ČR GA522/09/0083 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513; CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : plant chromosomes * retrotransposons * cytogenetic perspective Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  20. Stretching the Rules: Monocentric Chromosomes with Multiple Centromere Domains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neumann, Pavel; Navrátilová, Alice; Schroeder-Reiter, E.; Koblížková, Andrea; Steinbauerová, Veronika; Chocholová, Eva; Novák, Petr; Wanner, G.; Macas, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2012), e1002777. ISSN 1553-7404 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/1843; GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Pisum sativum L. * Histone H3 * plant centromers * holocentric chromosomes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.517, year: 2012

  1. A gene-protein assay for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2: brightfield tricolor visualization of HER2 protein, the HER2 gene, and chromosome 17 centromere (CEN17 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitta Hiroaki

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eligibility of breast cancer patients for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-directed therapies is determined by the HER2 gene amplification and/or HER2 protein overexpression status of the breast tumor as determined by in situ hybridization (ISH or immunohistochemistry (IHC, respectively. Our objective was to combine the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved HER2 & chromosome 17 centromere (CEN17 brightfield ISH (BISH and HER2 IHC assays into a single automated HER2 gene-protein assay allowing simultaneous detection of all three targets in a single tissue section. Methods The HER2 gene-protein assay was optimized using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE samples of the xenograft tumors MCF7 [HER2 negative (non-amplified gene, protein negative] and Calu-3 [HER2 positive (amplified gene, protein positive]. HER2 IHC was performed using a rabbit monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody (clone 4B5 and a conventional 3,3'-diaminobenzidine IHC detection. The HER2 & CEN17 BISH signals were visualized using horseradish peroxidase-based silver and alkaline phosphatase-based red detection systems, respectively with a cocktail of 2,4-dinitrophenyl-labeled HER2 and digoxigenin-labeled CEN17 probes. The performance of the gene-protein assay on tissue microarray slides containing 189 randomly selected FFPE clinical breast cancer tissue cores was compared to that of the separate HER2 IHC and HER2 & CEN17 BISH assays. Results HER2 protein detection was optimal when the HER2 IHC protocol was used before (rather than after the BISH protocol. The sequential use of HER2 IHC and HER2 & CEN17 BISH detection steps on FFPE xenograft tumor sections appropriately co-localized the HER2 protein, HER2 gene, and CEN17 signals after mitigating the silver background staining by using a naphthol phosphate-containing hybridization buffer for the hybridization step. The HER2 protein and HER2 gene status obtained using the multiplex HER2 gene

  2. Pds5B is required for cohesion establishment and Aurora B accumulation at centromeres

    OpenAIRE

    Carretero, María; Ruiz-Torres, Miguel; Rodríguez-Corsino, Miriam; Barthelemy, Isabel; Losada, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Cohesin mediates sister chromatid cohesion and contributes to the organization of interphase chromatin through DNA looping. In vertebrate somatic cells, cohesin consists of Smc1, Smc3, Rad21, and either SA1 or SA2. Three additional factors Pds5, Wapl, and Sororin bind to cohesin and modulate its dynamic association with chromatin. There are two Pds5 proteins in vertebrates, Pds5A and Pds5B, but their functional specificity remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Pds5 proteins are essential...

  3. Structure, divergence, and distribution of the CRR centromeric retrotransposon family in rice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagaki, K.; Neumann, Pavel; Zhang, D.; Ouyang, S.; Buell, C.R.; Cheng, Z.; Jiang, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 22, - (2005), s. 845-855. ISSN 0737-4038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902 Keywords : rice * chromosomes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.233, year: 2005

  4. Transcription and evolutionary dynamics of the centromeric satellite repeat CentO in rice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lee, H.; Neumann, Pavel; Macas, Jiří; Jiang, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 23, - (2006), s. 2505-2520. ISSN 0737-4038 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/04/1207 Keywords : rice * genetic modification Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.726, year: 2006

  5. Histone modifications rather than the novel regional centromeres of Zymoseptoria tritici distinguish core and accessory chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Schotanus, Klaas; Soyer, Jessica; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Grandaubert, Jonathan; Happel, Petra; Smith, Kristina M.; Freitag, Michael; Stukenbrock, Eva H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Supernumerary chromosomes have been found in many organisms. In fungi, these “accessory” or “dispensable” chromosomes are present at different frequencies in populations and are usually characterized by higher repetitive DNA content and lower gene density when compared to the core chromosomes. In the reference strain of the wheat pathogen, Zymoseptoria tritici, eight discrete accessory chromosomes have been found. So far, no functional role has been assigned to these chromosomes; h...

  6. Toxoplasma gondii sequesters centromeres to a specific nuclear region throughout the cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Carrie F; Francia, Maria E.; Gissot, Mathieu; Croken, Matthew M.; Kim, Kami; Striepen, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Members of the eukaryotic phylum Apicomplexa are the cause of important human diseases including malaria, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis. These obligate intracellular parasites produce new invasive stages through a complex budding process. The budding cycle is remarkably flexible and can produce varied numbers of progeny to adapt to different host-cell niches. How this complex process is coordinated remains poorly understood. Using Toxoplasma gondii as a genetic model, we show that a ke...

  7. Resolution of Sister Centromeres Requires RanBP2-Mediated SUMOylation of Topoisomerase IIα

    OpenAIRE

    Dawlaty, Meelad M.; Malureanu, Liviu; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Kao, Esther; Sustmann, Claudio; Tahk, Samuel; Shuai, Ke; Grosschedl, Rudolf; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2008-01-01

    RanBP2 is a nucleoporin with SUMO E3 ligase activity that functions in both nucleocytoplasmic transport and mitosis. However, the biological relevance of RanBP2 and the in vivo targets of its E3 ligase activity are unknown. Here we show that animals with low amounts of RanBP2 develop severe aneuploidy in the absence of overt transport defects. The main chromosome segregation defect in cells from these mice is anaphase-bridge formation. Topoisomerase IIα (Topo IIα), which decatenates sister ce...

  8. Myb-domain protein Teb1 controls histone levels and centromere assembly in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Valente, Luis P.; Dehé, Pierre-Marie; Klutstein, Michael; Aligianni, Sofia; Watt, Stephen; Bähler, Jürg; Promisel Cooper, Julia

    2013-01-01

    The TTAGGG motif is common to two seemingly unrelated dimensions of chromatin function—the vertebrate telomere repeat and the promoter regions of many Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes, including all of those encoding canonical histones. The essential S. pombe protein Teb1 contains two Myb-like DNA binding domains related to those found in telomere proteins and binds the human telomere repeat sequence TTAGGG. Here, we analyse Teb1 binding throughout the genome and the consequences of reduced Te...

  9. The holocentric species Luzula elegans shows interplay between centromere and large-scale genome organization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heckmann, S.; Macas, Jiří; Kumke, K.; Fuchs, J.; Schubert, V.; Ma, L.; Novák, Petr; Neumann, Pavel; Taudien, S.; Platzer, M.; Houben, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 4 (2013), s. 555-565. ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Histone H3 * Polycentric chromosomes * Repetitive sequences * DNA-Replication Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.815, year: 2013

  10. The applications of the centromere micronucleus using FISH in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The micronucleus assay is widely used both in genetic toxicology and in the radiation bio-monitoring of human population. With the development of molecular genetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), more have been known about micronuclei. FISH can be used to interpret the formation mechanism, the function and the ultrastructure of the micronucleus, as well as the genetic evaluation of radiation damage

  11. Karyotypic and fluorescent in-situ hybridization study of the centromere of chromosome 7 in secondary myeloid neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Sandra da Silva Tanizawa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Secondary myeloid neoplasms comprise a group of secondary diseases following exposure to myelotoxic agents or due to congenital diseases. The improvement of anticancer agents and immunosuppressive drugs seem to be associated with an increased incidence of secondary myeloid neoplasms. Karyotyping of bone marrow is essential for diagnosis and prognosis. Previous use of alkylating agents and radiation are associated with clonal abnormalities such as recurrent unbalanced -5/5q-, -7/7q- and complex karyotypes, whereas topoisomerase-II inhibitors lead to changes such as the balanced 11q23 rearrangement, t(8;21, t(15;17 and inv(16. OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical and cytogenetic data of patients with secondary myeloid neoplasms who took antineoplastic and/or immunosuppressive drugs or progressed from aplastic anemia. METHODS: The clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of 42 patients diagnosed with secondary myeloid neoplasms in one institution were retrospectively evaluated. Of these, 25, 11 and 6 patients had had oncological diseases, aplastic anemia and other diseases, respectively. Conventional cytogenetic and FISH analyses were performed for monosomy 7. RESULTS: The cytogenetic study was conclusive in 32 cases with 84.4% of clonal abnormalities. Monosomy 7 and complex karyotypes were present in 44.4% and 37%, respectively. A high prevalence of unbalanced abnormalities (96.3% was observed. Monosomy 7 was more prevalent in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes/myeloid neoplasms after aplastic anemia (66.6%. The median survival after diagnosis of myeloid neoplasms was only 5.7 months. Normal cytogenetics was associated to better survival (p-value = 0.03. There was a slightly worse trend of survival for patients with complex karyotypes (p-value = 0.057. Abnormal karyotype was an independent risk factor for poor survival (p-value = 0.012. CONCLUSION: This study enhances the importance of cytogenetic analysis of patients at the time of diagnosis of secondary myeloid neoplasms.

  12. Separase Is Required for Homolog and Sister Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of Sister Centromeres.

    OpenAIRE

    Blattner, Ariane C.; Soumya Chaurasia; McKee, Bruce D.; Lehner, Christian F.

    2016-01-01

    Spatially controlled release of sister chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has ...

  13. 1,2-propanediol-induced premature centromere separation in mouse oocytes and aneuploidy in one-cell zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailhes, J B; Young, D; London, S N

    1997-07-01

    Aneuploidy in germ cells results in reproductive failure and mental and physical disorders in humans. Unfortunately, little is known about the causes and mechanisms of aneuploidy induction. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that propylene glycol (1,2-propanediol; PG) induces cytogenetic aberrations in mouse metaphase II (MII) oocytes that predispose zygotes to aneuploidy. Female ICR mice received 7.5 IU eCG and 5.0 IU hCG 48 h later. PG doses of 1300, 2600, and 5200 mg/kg body weight were given 3 h post-hCG; controls received the solvent deionized water. Ovulated oocytes were collected 16 h after administration of PG and processed for cytogenetic analysis. For the one-cell zygote cytogenetic study, females were given PG and paired (1:1) with ICR males for 16 h. Females that mated were given 2 x 10(-3) M colchicine 22 h post-PG, and zygotes were collected 18 h later. PG significantly (p separation (PCS) and the proportion of aneuploid one-cell zygotes. These results support the hypothesis that PG-induced PCS in MII oocytes predisposes zygotes to aneuploidy. PMID:9209085

  14. Global sequence characterization of rice centromeric satellite based on oligomer frequency analysis in large-scale sequencing data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macas, Jiří; Neumann, Pavel; Novák, Petr; Jiang, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 1797 (2010), s. 2101-2108. ISSN 1367-4803 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500960802; GA MŠk(CZ) OC10037; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : next-generation sequencing * satellite repeats * K-mer analysis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.877, year: 2010

  15. Role of CenH3/CENP-A in the regulation of centromere function and chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Lamy, Márcia Sofia Ribeiro, 1987-

    2010-01-01

    Os centrómeros são estruturas especializadas do cromossoma, com uma composição de cromatina única, que desempenham um papel chave nos processos de segregação dos cromossomas durante a mitose e meiose para além de determinarem o local de formação do cinetócoro. A formação e propagação do centrómero é um exemplo claro de um processo epigenético, isto é, estruturas proteicas são formadas ou associadas ao DNA e depois estavelmente propagadas através de numerosas divisões celulares numa maneira qu...

  16. The budding yeast Centromere DNA Element II wraps a stable Cse4 hemisome in either orientation in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Henikoff, Steven; Ramachandran, Srinivas; Krassovsky, Kristina; Bryson, Terri D; Codomo, Christine A.; Brogaard, Kristin; Widom, Jonathan; Wang, Ji-Ping; Henikoff, Jorja G.

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest DNA is tightly packaged in cells for a variety of reasons—to allow it to fit inside the nucleus, to protect it from damage, and to help control the production of proteins from genes. The basic unit of packaged DNA is called a nucleosome, which consists of DNA wrapped around a structure formed by two pairs of four different proteins. These proteins, which are called histones, have a role that extends beyond providing structural support for DNA. When cells divide, for example, pair...

  17. Hsk1- and SCFPof3-Dependent Proteolysis of S. pombe Ams2 Ensures Histone Homeostasis and Centromere Function

    OpenAIRE

    Takayama, Yuko; Mamnun, Yasmine M.; Trickey, Michelle; Dhut, Susheela; Masuda, Fumie; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Toda, Takashi; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2010-01-01

    Summary Schizosaccharomyces pombe GATA factor Ams2 is responsible for cell cycle-dependent transcriptional activation of all the core histone genes peaking at G1/S phase. Intriguingly, its own protein level also fluctuates concurrently. Here, we show that Ams2 is ubiquitylated and degraded through the SCF (Skp1-Cdc53/Cullin-1-F-box) ubiquitin ligase, in which F box protein Pof3 binds this protein. Ams2 is phosphorylated at multiple sites, which is required for SCFPof3-dependent proteolysis. H...

  18. The human urokinase-plasminogen activator gene (PLAU) is located on chromosome 10q24 centromeric to the HOX11 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, P.M.; Stass, S.A.; Kagan, J. (Univ. of Texas, Houston (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Urokinase-plasminogen activator is one of two soluble serine proteases that are produced by humans and that convert plasminogen, an inactive proenzyme present in plasma and other extracellular fluids, to plasmin, a protease with broad substrate specificities. Its activity is involved in processes requiring localized extracellular proteolysis such as fibrinolysis, tissue remodeling, and cell migration. Increased production of urokinase has been associated with cancer metastases. The gene for urokinase-plasminogen activator, PLAU, was mapped to chromosome 10q24-qter. By employing somatic cell genetics, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and Southern blot analysis, the authors assign PLAU to chromosome 10q24. Human chromosome segment 10q23-q25 contains the genes for terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase, cytochrome P450IIC, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, and plasma retinol binding protein, which form a syntenic group on murine chromosome 19. It is therfore of interest that PLAU and glutamate dehydrogenase, which are on murine chromosome 14, also map in or close to this region of human chromosome 10.

  19. Functional mammalian homologues of the Drosophila PEV-modifier Su(var)3-9 encode centromere-associated proteins which complex with the heterochromatin component M31.

    OpenAIRE

    Aagaard, L.; Laible, G.; Selenko, P.; M. Schmid; Dorn, R.; Schotta, G; Kuhfittig, S; Wolf, A.; Lebersorger, A; Singh, P B; Reuter, G; Jenuwein, T.

    1999-01-01

    The chromo and SET domains are conserved sequence motifs present in chromosomal proteins that function in epigenetic control of gene expression, presumably by modulating higher order chromatin. Based on sequence information from the SET domain, we have isolated human (SUV39H1) and mouse (Suv39h1) homologues of the dominant Drosophila modifier of position-effect-variegation (PEV) Su(var)3-9. Mammalian homologues contain, in addition to the SET domain, the characteristic chromo domain, a combin...

  20. Functional cooperation of Dam1, Ipl1, and the inner centromere protein (INCENP)–related protein Sli15 during chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jung-seog; Cheeseman, Iain M.; Kallstrom, George; Velmurugan, Soundarapandian; Barnes, Georjana; Chan, Clarence S.M.

    2001-01-01

    We have shown previously that Ipl1 and Sli15 are required for chromosome segregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sli15 associates directly with the Ipl1 protein kinase and these two proteins colocalize to the mitotic spindle. We show here that Sli15 stimulates the in vitro, and likely in vivo, kinase activity of Ipl1, and Sli15 facilitates the association of Ipl1 with the mitotic spindle. The Ipl1-binding and -stimulating activities of Sli15 both reside within a region containing homology to...

  1. Loading of Arabidopsis centromeric histone CENH3 occurs mainly during G2 and requires the presence of the histone fold domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lermontova, L.; Schubert, V.; Fuchs, J.; Klatte, J.; Macas, Jiří; Schubert, I.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 18, - (2006), s. 2443-2451. ISSN 1040-4651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : histone CENH3 * Arabidopsis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.868, year: 2006

  2. Inherited variants in the inner centromere protein (INCENP) gene of the chromosomal passenger complex contribute to the susceptibility of ER-negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabisch, Maria; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo; Dünnebier, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cell division. Therefore, inherited CPC variability could influence tumor development. The present candidate gene approach investigates the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encodi...

  3. Comparison of BAC FISH with specific telomeres and centromere probes and chromosome painting on detection of chromosome translocation induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the efficiency of BAC FISH established in our lab and conventional chromosome painting (PAINT) on detection of radiation-induced chromosome translocation. Methods: Healthy human peripheral blood samples were irradiated with 0-5.0 Gy 60Co γ-rays. Then chromosome translocations in these samples were detected with BAC FISH and PAINT using chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. The genome translocation rates were calculated with observed chromosome translocation rates, and the dose-response curve of two methods were established. Results: The genome translocation rates induced by 0-5.0 Gy 60Co γ-rays detected by BAC FISH and PAINT were increased with absorbed doses. The observed translocation rates with BAC FISH were higher than that with PAINT at each dose level. The dose-response curve were Y=0.043D2 + 0.0008 D + 0.0048 for BAC FISH and Y=0.043 D2 + 0.006 D + 0.0027 for PAINT. Conclusions: The translocation rate detected by BAC FISH was higher than that by PAINT, and the parameters β in dose-response curve equation were same by two methods. (authors)

  4. CenH3 evolution in diploids and polyploids of three angiosperm genera

    OpenAIRE

    Masonbrink, Rick E.; Gallagher, Joseph P.; Jareczek, Josef J; Renny-Byfield, Simon; Grover, Corrinne E.; Gong, Lei; Wendel, Jonathan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Centromeric DNA sequences alone are neither necessary nor sufficient for centromere specification. The centromere specific histone, CenH3, evolves rapidly in many species, perhaps as a coevolutionary response to rapidly evolving centromeric DNA. To gain insight into CenH3 evolution, we characterized patterns of nucleotide and protein diversity among diploids and allopolyploids within three diverse angiosperm genera, Brassica, Oryza, and Gossypium (cotton), with a focus on evidence ...

  5. Methylation of CenH3 arginine 37 regulates kinetochore integrity and chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Samel, Anke; Cuomo, Alessandro; Bonaldi, Tiziana; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E

    2012-01-01

    Centromeres of eukaryotic chromosomes mark the site for kinetochore formation and microtubule attachment and are essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Although centromere identity is defined by the presence of the histone H3 variant CenH3/centromere protein A (CENP-A), little is known about how epigenetic modifications on CenH3 might regulate kinetochore assembly and centromere function. Here we show that CENP-A from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, termed Cse4, is methylated on arginine 37...

  6. Assembly and characterization of heterochromatin and euchromatin on human artificial chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Grimes, Brenda R.; Babcock, Jennifer; Rudd, M. Katharine; Chadwick, Brian; Willard, Huntington F.

    2004-01-01

    Background Human centromere regions are characterized by the presence of alpha-satellite DNA, replication late in S phase and a heterochromatic appearance. Recent models propose that the centromere is organized into conserved chromatin domains in which chromatin containing CenH3 (centromere-specific H3 variant) at the functional centromere (kinetochore) forms within regions of heterochromatin. To address these models, we assayed formation of heterochromatin and euchromatin on de novo human ar...

  7. Sim4

    OpenAIRE

    Pidoux, Alison L.; Richardson, William; Allshire, Robin C.

    2003-01-01

    Fission yeast centromeres are composed of two domains: the central core and the outer repeats. Although both regions are required for full centromere function, the central core has a distinct chromatin structure and is likely to underlie the kinetochore itself, as it is associated with centromere-specific proteins. Genes placed within either region are transcriptionally silenced, reflecting the formation of a functional kinetochore complex and flanking centromeric heterochromatin. Here, trans...

  8. Putting CENP-A in its place

    OpenAIRE

    Stellfox, Madison E.; Bailey, Aaron O.; Foltz, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    The centromere is the chromosomal region that directs kinetochore assembly during mitosis in order to facilitate the faithful segregation of sister chromatids. The location of the human centromere is epigenetically specified. The presence of nucleosomes that contain the histone H3 variant, CENP-A, are thought to be the epigenetic mark that indicates active centromeres. Maintenance of centromeric identity requires the deposition of new CENP-A nucleosomes with each cell cycle. During S-phase, e...

  9. Comparison of BAC FISH with specific telomeres and centromere probes and chromosome painting on detection of chromosome translocation induced by irradiation%BAC FISH与PAINT法检测辐射诱发染色体易位的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青杰; 陆雪; 封江彬; 王晓维; 陈德清

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficiency of BAC FISH established in our lab and conventional chromosome painting(PAINT)on detection of radiation-induced chromosome translocation.Methods Healthy human peripheral blood samples were irradiated with 0~5.0 Gy 60Co γ-rays.Then chromosome translocations in these samples were detected with BAC FISH and PAINT using chromosomes 1.2 and 4.The genome translocation rates were calculated with observed chromosome translocation rates,and the dose-response curve of two methods were established.Results The genome translocation rates induced by 0~5.0 Gy 60Co γ-rays detected by BAC FISH and PAINT were increased with absorbed doses.The observed translocation rates with BAC FISH were higher than that with PAINT at each dose level.The dose-response curve were Y=0.043 D2+0.0008D+0.0048 for BAC FISH and Y=0.043D2+0.006D+0.0027 for PAINT.Conclusions The translocation rate detected by BAC FISH was higher than that by PAINT,and the parameters β in dose-response curve equation were same by two methods.%目的 比较自行建立的BAC FISH方法和常规染色体涂染(PAINT)方法分析辐射诱发染色体易位有效性的不同.方法 对正常人外周血照射不同剂量(0~5.0 Gy)的60Co γ射线,用1、2和4号染色体特异性端粒和着丝粒探针BAC FISH及PAINT分析染色体易位,将观察到的染色体易位率换算为全基因组易位率,并建立两种方法分析辐射诱发的染色体易位率剂量-效应曲线.结果 用两种方法分析0~5.0 Gy 60Coγ射线诱发的全基因组易位率均随着吸收剂量的增加而增高;在相同的剂量点,BAC FISH染色体易位检出率高于PAINT方法.两种方法分析吸收剂量和全基因组易位率之间的剂量-效应曲线均为二次方程模式,分别为Y=0.043D2+0.0008D+0.0048(BAC FISH)和Y=0.043D2+0.006D+0.0027(PAINT).结论 自行建立的BAC FISH方法分析辐射诱发染色体易位检出率高于常规染色体涂染方法,两种方法建立的剂量-效应曲线方程的β系数相同.

  10. Cse4 is Part of an Octameric Nucleosome in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Camahort, Raymond; Shivaraju, Manjunatha; Mattingly, Mark; Li, Bing; Nakanishi, Shima; Zhu, Dongxiao; Shilatifard, Ali; Workman, Jerry L.; Gerton, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The budding yeast CenH3 histone variant Cse4 localizes to centromeric nucleosomes and is required for kinetochore assembly and chromosome segregation. The exact composition of centromeric Cse4–containing nucleosomes is a subject of debate. ChIP-chip experiments and high resolution quantitative PCR confirm that there is a single Cse4 nucleosome at each centromere, and additional regions of the genome contain Cse4 nucleosomes at low levels. Using unbiased biochemical, cell biological, and genet...

  11. Factors that promote H3 chromatin integrity during transcription prevent promiscuous deposition of CENP-A(Cnp1) in fission yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Eun Shik Choi; Annelie Strålfors; Sandra Catania; Castillo, Araceli G.; J Peter Svensson; Pidoux, Alison L.; Karl Ekwall; Allshire, Robin C.

    2012-01-01

    Specialized chromatin containing CENP-A nucleosomes instead of H3 nucleosomes is found at all centromeres. However, the mechanisms that specify the locations at which CENP-A chromatin is assembled remain elusive in organisms with regional, epigenetically regulated centromeres. It is known that normal centromeric DNA is transcribed in several systems including the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we show that factors which preserve stable histone H3 chromatin during transcriptio...

  12. Diverse origins of multiple ovarian teratomas in a single individual.

    OpenAIRE

    Carritt, B; Parrington, J M; Welch, H M; Povey, S

    1982-01-01

    Centromere heteromorphisms and enzyme markers were examined in cells cultured from seven benign ovarian teratomas arising in a single patient. Three of the teratomas were homozygous for all eight enzyme and centromere markers found to be heterozygous in the host. The other four tumors were heterozygous at the centromeres of chromosomes 1, 16, 17, and 18, as in the patient, but were homozygous for at least one of the enzyme markers. The linkage phases of the heterozygous enzyme markers phospho...

  13. Fission Yeast Scm3: A CENP-A Receptor Required for Integrity of Subkinetochore Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Pidoux, Alison L.; Choi, Eun Shik; Abbott, Johanna K.R.; Liu, Xingkun; Kagansky, Alexander; Castillo, Araceli G.; Hamilton, Georgina L.; Richardson, William; Rappsilber, Juri; He, Xiangwei; Allshire, Robin C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms ensuring specific incorporation of CENP-A at centromeres are poorly understood. Mis16 and Mis18 are required for CENP-A localization at centromeres and form a complex that is conserved from fission yeast to human. Fission yeast sim1 mutants that alleviate kinetochore domain silencing are defective in Scm3Sp, the ortholog of budding yeast Scm3Sc. Scm3Sp depends on Mis16/18 for its centromere localization and like them is recruited to centromeres in late anaphase. Importa...

  14. Chromosome Segregation: Disarming the Protector

    OpenAIRE

    Sanyal, Swastika; Kovacikova, Ines; Gregan, Juraj

    2013-01-01

    Summary One of the key features of meiosis is that shugoshin in complex with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) protects centromeric cohesin during meiosis I, but not during meiosis II. A new model suggests that a PP2A inhibitor mediates deprotection of centromeric cohesin during meiosis II.

  15. GenBank blastn search result: AK110391 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110391 002-165-E05 AL732383.1 Leptosphaeria maculans : genomic region ... surrounding the avirulen ... e AvrLm1; putative centromeric or peri-centromeric region ... clone A2 of library Lm3HLP1 from strain v23.1.3 of ...

  16. GenBank blastn search result: AK110391 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110391 002-165-E05 AL732384.1 Leptosphaeria maculans : genomic region ... surrounding the avirulen ... e AvrLm1; putative centromeric or peri-centromeric region ... clone A3 of library Lm3HLP1 from strain v23.1.3 of ...

  17. GenBank blastn search result: AK107382 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK107382 002-127-C03 AL732384.1 Leptosphaeria maculans : genomic region ... surrounding the avirulen ... e AvrLm1; putative centromeric or peri-centromeric region ... clone A3 of library Lm3HLP1 from strain v23.1.3 of ...

  18. GenBank blastn search result: AK107382 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK107382 002-127-C03 AL732383.1 Leptosphaeria maculans : genomic region ... surrounding the avirulen ... e AvrLm1; putative centromeric or peri-centromeric region ... clone A2 of library Lm3HLP1 from strain v23.1.3 of ...

  19. Molecular distinction between true centric fission and pericentric duplication-fission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perry, J; Nouri, S; La, P; Daniel, A; Wu, ZH; Purvis-Smith, S; Northrop, E; Choo, KHA; Slater, HR

    2005-01-01

    Centromere (centric) fission, also known as transverse or lateral centric misdivision, has been defined as the splitting of one functional centromere of a metacentric or submetacentric chromosome to produce two derivative centric chromosomes. It has been observed in a range of organisms and has been

  20. Karyomorphology of six taxa in Chrysanthemum sensu lato (Anthemideae) in Egypt and their genetic relationships by Giemsa C-banding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdy Hussein ABD EL-TWAB; Ahmad Mohammad M. MEKAWY; Mohammad Saad EL-KATATNY

    2012-01-01

    Giemsa C-banding was applied to the chromosome complements of six diploid species belonging to six genera in Chrysanthemum sensu lato (Anthemideae) distributed in Egypt.Four types of C-banding distribution were observed in the taxa as follows:(i) negative C-banding in Anacyclus monanthos (L.) Thell.; (ii) all bands in terminal regions in Achilleafragrantissima (Forssk.) Sch.Bip,which showed 32 bands on 18 chromosomes; (iii)all eight bands at centromeric regions on eight chromosomes in Matricaria recutita L.; and (iv) bands at terminal and centromeric regions in Brocchia cinerea Vis.(12 terminal and six centromeric bands on 12 chromosomes),Cotula barbata DC.(four terminal,six centromeric,and eight short arm bands on 16 chromosomes),and Glebionis coronaria (L.) Cass.ex Spach.(eight terminal on the short arms and four large bands in centromeric regions on 12chromosomes).

  1. Distinct influences of tandem repeats and retrotransposons on CENH3 nucleosome positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gent Jonathan I

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unique structural characteristics of centromere chromatin enable it to support assembly of the kinetochore and its associated tensions. The histone H3 variant CENH3 (centromeric histone H3 is viewed as the key element of centromere chromatin and its interaction with centromere DNA is epigenetic in that its localization to centromeres is not sequence-dependent. Results In order to investigate what influence the DNA sequence exerts on CENH3 chromatin structure, we examined CENH3 nucleosome footprints on maize centromere DNA. We found a predominant average nucleosome spacing pattern of roughly 190-bp intervals, which was also the dominant arrangement for nucleosomes genome-wide. For CENH3-containing nucleosomes, distinct modes of nucleosome positioning were evident within that general spacing constraint. Over arrays of the major ~156-bp centromeric satellite sequence (tandem repeat CentC, nucleosomes were not positioned in register with CentC monomers but in conformity with a striking ~10-bp periodicity of AA/TT dimers within the sequence. In contrast, nucleosomes on a class of centromeric retrotransposon (CRM2 lacked a detectable AA/TT periodicity but exhibited tightly phased positioning. Conclusions These data support a model in which general chromatin factors independent of both DNA sequence and CENH3 enforce roughly uniform centromeric nucleosome spacing while allowing flexibility in the mode in which nucleosomes are positioned. In the case of tandem repeat DNA, the natural bending effects related to AA/TT periodicity produce an energetically-favourable arrangement consistent with conformationally rigid nucleosomes and stable chromatin at centromeres.

  2. Cell cycle-dependent deposition of CENP-A requires the Dos1/2-Cdc20 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Marlyn; He, Haijin; Sun, Siyu; Li, Chen; Li, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Centromeric histone CENP-A, a variant of canonical histone H3, plays a central role in proper chromosome segregation. Loading of CENP-A at centromeres is cell cycle-regulated: parental CENP-A is deposited at centromeres during S phase, whereas newly synthesized CENP-A is deposited during later stages of the cell cycle. The mechanisms involved in deposition of CENP-A at centromeres during S phase remain poorly understood. In fission yeast, loading of CENP-A during S phase is regulated by the GATA-type factor, Ams2. Here we show that the Dos1/2-Cdc20 complex, previously characterized as a silencing complex essential for inheritance of H3K9 methylation during S phase, is also required for localization of CENP-A(cnp1) at centromeres at this stage. Disruption of Dos1 (also known as Raf1/Clr8/Cmc1), Dos2 (also known as Raf2/Clr7/Cmc2), or Cdc20, a DNA polymerase epsilon subunit, results in dissociation of CENP-A from centromeres and mislocalization of the protein to noncentromeric sites. All three mutants display spindle disorganization and mitotic defects. Inactivation of Dos1 or Cdc20 also results in accumulation of noncoding RNA transcripts from centromeric cores, a feature common to mutants affecting kinetochore integrity. We further find that Dos1 physically associates with Ams2 and is required for the association of Ams2 with centromeric cores during S phase. Finally, we show that Dos2 associates with centromeric cores during S phase and that its recruitment to centromeric cores depends on Cdc20. This study identifies a physical link between DNA replication and CENP-A assembly machinery and provides mechanistic insight into how CENP-A is faithfully inherited during S phase. PMID:23267073

  3. Four chromo-domain proteins of Schizosaccharomyces pombe differentially repress transcription at various chromosomal locations.

    OpenAIRE

    Thon, G.; Verhein-Hansen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Transcription is repressed in regions of the fission yeast genome close to centromeres, telomeres, or the silent mating-type cassettes mat2-P and mat3-M. The repression involves the chromo-domain proteins Swi6 and Clr4. We report that two other chromo-domain proteins, Chp1 and Chp2, are also important for these position effects. Chp1 showed a specificity for centromeric regions. Its essentiality for the transcriptional repression of centromeric markers correlates with its importance for chrom...

  4. Heterochromatin Is Required for Normal Distribution of Neurospora crassa CenH3 ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Kristina M.; Phatale, Pallavi A.; Sullivan, Christopher M.; Pomraning, Kyle R.; Freitag, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Centromeres serve as platforms for the assembly of kinetochores and are essential for nuclear division. Here we identified Neurospora crassa centromeric DNA by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) of DNA associated with tagged versions of the centromere foundation proteins CenH3 (CENP-A) and CEN-C (CENP-C) and the kinetochore protein CEN-T (CENP-T). On each chromosome we found an ∼150- to 300-kbp region of enrichment for all three proteins. These reg...

  5. AcEST: BP911923 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available : Swiss-Prot sp_hit_id Q9Y812 Definition sp|Q9Y812|CENPA_SCHPO Histone H3-like centromeric protein cnp1...A_SCHPO Histone H3-like centromeric protein cnp1 O... 74 4e-13 sp|P41353|H33_TETTH Histone H3.3 OS=Tetrahyme...p. japonica... 65 1e-10 >sp|Q9Y812|CENPA_SCHPO Histone H3-like centromeric protein cnp1 OS=Schizosaccharomyces pombe GN=cnp1

  6. HJURP is a CENP-A chromatin assembly factor sufficient to form a functional de novo kinetochore

    OpenAIRE

    Barnhart, Meghan C.; Kuich, P. Henning J. L.; Stellfox, Madison E.; Ward, Jared A.; Bassett, Emily A.; Black, Ben E.; Foltz, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Centromeres of higher eukaryotes are epigenetically marked by the centromere-specific CENP-A nucleosome. New CENP-A recruitment requires the CENP-A histone chaperone HJURP. In this paper, we show that a LacI (Lac repressor) fusion of HJURP drove the stable recruitment of CENP-A to a LacO (Lac operon) array at a noncentromeric locus. Ectopically targeted CENP-A chromatin at the LacO array was sufficient to direct the assembly of a functional centromere as indicated by the recruitment of the co...

  7. Acetylation regulates monopolar attachment at multiple levels during meiosis I in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Kagami, Ayano; Sakuno, Takeshi; Yamagishi, Yuya; Ishiguro, Tadashi; Tsukahara, Tatsuya; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Koichi; Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    This study shows that multiple acetylations are crucial for establishing and maintaining core centromere cohesion in meiosis. Eso1 establishes it during S phase, whereas Moa1 maintains cohesion after S phase.

  8. Segregation distortion in chicken and the evolutionary consequences of female meiotic drive in birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Erik Gunnar; Albrechtsen, Anders; Van, A. P.;

    2010-01-01

    rapid evolution as a result of a conflict between driving centromeres and the rest of the genome; and (2) segregation patterns should be skewed near centromeres and telomeres. To test these predictions, we first analyze the molecular evolution of seven centromere-binding proteins in nine divergent bird...... species. We find strong evidence for positive selection in two genes, lending support to the genomic conflict hypothesis. Then, to directly test for the presence of segregation distortion, we also investigate the transmission of approximately 9000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 197 chicken families....... By simulating fair Mendelian meioses, we locate chromosomal regions with statistically significant transmission ratio distortion. One region is located near the centromere on chromosome 1 and a second region is located near the telomere on the p-arm of chromosome 1. Although these observations do not provide...

  9. Variación heterocromática en Proechimys semispinosus (Rodentia: Echimyidae) de la región pacífica colombiana

    OpenAIRE

    Bueno Martha Lucía; Gómez Laverde Marcela

    1993-01-01

    The presence oftwo chromosomal races is reported in a comparative study of populatlons of Proechimys semlspinosus from the Pacific lowlands of Colombia. These races are differenciated by the constitutive heterochromatin found using the C-band technlque. The population from Nariño locality lacks centromeric heterochromatin and has large blocks of telomeric heterochromatin in several chromosomes while the population from Chocó loca lity has small blocks of centromeric heterochromatin in the maj...

  10. AcEST: DK947480 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NDC80 OS=Cand... 32 2.6 sp|O61308|PUMA_PARUN 227 kDa spindle- and centromere-associated ... 32 3.3 sp|P40460...LVKFQKYVDSMKAKSEEWPIKLSKIEDELNEKKENIKLITEEISQIQDSLQRKGLS 438 Query: 289 EEQ 297 EQ Sbjct: 439 VEQ 441 >sp|O61308|PUMA..._PARUN 227 kDa spindle- and centromere-associated protein OS=Parascaris univalens GN=PUMA

  11. Organisation of nucleosomal arrays reconstituted with repetitive African green monkey α-satellite DNA as analysed by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Bussiek, Malte; Müller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Diekmann, Stephan; Langowski, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-satellite DNA (AS) is part of centromeric DNA and could be relevant for centromeric chromatin structure: its repetitive character may generate a specifically ordered nucleosomal arrangement and thereby facilitate kinetochore protein binding and chromatin condensation. Although nucleosomal positioning on some satellite sequences had been shown, including AS from African green monkey (AGM), the sequence-dependent nucleosomal organisation of repetitive AS of this species has so far not bee...

  12. Characterisation of CenH3 nucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Miell, Matthew Daniel David

    2013-01-01

    As a centromere-specific protein complex in direct contact with the DNA, CenH3-containing nucleosomes are generally thought to act as the distinguishing epigenetic mark of active centromere location. Confusingly, seemingly disparate models have been proposed for the structure of CenH3 nucleosomes. The most widely supported model is an octameric structure that, like histone H3 nucleosomes, contains two subunits of each histone. Another more contentious, yet persistent model i...

  13. Short DNA Fragments without Sequence Similarity Are Initiation Sites for Replication in the Chromosome of the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Vernis, Laurence; Chasles, Marion; Pasero, Philippe; Lepingle, Andrée; Gaillardin, Claude; Fournier, Philippe

    1999-01-01

    We have previously shown that both a centromere (CEN) and a replication origin are necessary for plasmid maintenance in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica (Vernis et al., 1997). Because of this requirement, only a small number of centromere-proximal replication origins have been isolated from Yarrowia. We used a CEN-based plasmid to obtain noncentromeric origins, and several new fragments, some unique and some repetitive sequences, were isolated. Some of them were analyzed by two-dimensional gel e...

  14. Plasticity of Fission Yeast CENP-A Chromatin Driven by Relative Levels of Histone H3 and H4

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, Araceli G.; Mellone, Barbara G; Partridge, Janet F; William Richardson; Hamilton, Georgina L.; Allshire, Robin C.; Pidoux, Alison L.

    2007-01-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A assembles into chromatin exclusively at centromeres. The process of CENP-A chromatin assembly is epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of a central kinetochore domain on which CENP-A chromatin is assembled, and this is flanked by heterochromatin. Marker genes are silenced when placed within kinetochore or heterochromatin domains. It is not known if fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin is confined to specific sequences or whether histone...

  15. Factors that promote H3 chromatin integrity during transcription prevent promiscuous deposition of CENP-A(Cnp1 in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Shik Choi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Specialized chromatin containing CENP-A nucleosomes instead of H3 nucleosomes is found at all centromeres. However, the mechanisms that specify the locations at which CENP-A chromatin is assembled remain elusive in organisms with regional, epigenetically regulated centromeres. It is known that normal centromeric DNA is transcribed in several systems including the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we show that factors which preserve stable histone H3 chromatin during transcription also play a role in preventing promiscuous CENP-A(Cnp1 deposition in fission yeast. Mutations in the histone chaperone FACT impair the maintenance of H3 chromatin on transcribed regions and promote widespread CENP-A(Cnp1 incorporation at non-centromeric sites. FACT has little or no effect on CENP-A(Cnp1 assembly at endogenous centromeres where CENP-A(Cnp1 is normally assembled. In contrast, Clr6 complex II (Clr6-CII; equivalent to Rpd3S histone deacetylase function has a more subtle impact on the stability of transcribed H3 chromatin and acts to prevent the ectopic accumulation of CENP-A(Cnp1 at specific loci, including subtelomeric regions, where CENP-A(Cnp1 is preferentially assembled. Moreover, defective Clr6-CII function allows the de novo assembly of CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin on centromeric DNA, bypassing the normal requirement for heterochromatin. Thus, our analyses show that alterations in the process of chromatin assembly during transcription can destabilize H3 nucleosomes and thereby allow CENP-A(Cnp1 to assemble in its place. We propose that normal centromeres provide a specific chromatin context that limits reassembly of H3 chromatin during transcription and thereby promotes the establishment of CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin and associated kinetochores. These findings have important implications for genetic and epigenetic processes involved in centromere specification.

  16. Factors that promote H3 chromatin integrity during transcription prevent promiscuous deposition of CENP-A(Cnp1) in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Shik; Strålfors, Annelie; Catania, Sandra; Castillo, Araceli G; Svensson, J Peter; Pidoux, Alison L; Ekwall, Karl; Allshire, Robin C

    2012-09-01

    Specialized chromatin containing CENP-A nucleosomes instead of H3 nucleosomes is found at all centromeres. However, the mechanisms that specify the locations at which CENP-A chromatin is assembled remain elusive in organisms with regional, epigenetically regulated centromeres. It is known that normal centromeric DNA is transcribed in several systems including the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we show that factors which preserve stable histone H3 chromatin during transcription also play a role in preventing promiscuous CENP-A(Cnp1) deposition in fission yeast. Mutations in the histone chaperone FACT impair the maintenance of H3 chromatin on transcribed regions and promote widespread CENP-A(Cnp1) incorporation at non-centromeric sites. FACT has little or no effect on CENP-A(Cnp1) assembly at endogenous centromeres where CENP-A(Cnp1) is normally assembled. In contrast, Clr6 complex II (Clr6-CII; equivalent to Rpd3S) histone deacetylase function has a more subtle impact on the stability of transcribed H3 chromatin and acts to prevent the ectopic accumulation of CENP-A(Cnp1) at specific loci, including subtelomeric regions, where CENP-A(Cnp1) is preferentially assembled. Moreover, defective Clr6-CII function allows the de novo assembly of CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin on centromeric DNA, bypassing the normal requirement for heterochromatin. Thus, our analyses show that alterations in the process of chromatin assembly during transcription can destabilize H3 nucleosomes and thereby allow CENP-A(Cnp1) to assemble in its place. We propose that normal centromeres provide a specific chromatin context that limits reassembly of H3 chromatin during transcription and thereby promotes the establishment of CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin and associated kinetochores. These findings have important implications for genetic and epigenetic processes involved in centromere specification. PMID:23028377

  17. Ctf3p, the Mis6 budding yeast homolog, interacts with Mcm22p and Mcm16p at the yeast outer kinetochore

    OpenAIRE

    Measday, Vivien; Hailey, Dale W.; Pot, Isabelle; Givan, Scott A.; Hyland, Katherine M.; Cagney, Gerard; Fields, Stan; Davis, Trisha N.; Hieter, Philip

    2002-01-01

    The budding yeast kinetochore is composed of an inner and outer protein complex, which binds to centromere (CEN) DNA and attaches to microtubules. We performed a genetic synthetic dosage lethality screen to identify novel kinetochore proteins in a collection of chromosome transmission fidelity mutants. Our screen identified several new kinetochore-related proteins including YLR381Wp/Ctf3p, which is a member of a conserved family of centromere-binding proteins. Ctf3p interacts with Mcm22p, Mcm...

  18. Heterogeneous clinical presentation in ICF syndrome: correlation with underlying gene defects

    OpenAIRE

    Weemaes, Corry; van Tol, Maarten JD; Wang, Jun; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, Monique M.; van Eggermond, Marja CJA; Thijssen, Peter E.; Aytekin, Caner; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; van der Burg, Mirjam; Graham Davies, E; Ferster, Alina; Furthner, Dieter; Gimelli, Giorgio; Gennery, Andy; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficiency with centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency, predominantly characterized by agammaglobulinemia or hypoimmunoglobulinemia, centromere instability and facial anomalies. Mutations in two genes have been discovered to cause ICF syndrome: DNMT3B and ZBTB24. To characterize the clinical features of this syndrome, as well as genotype–phenotype correlations, we compared clinical and genetic data of 44 ICF patients. Of them, 23 had mu...

  19. The origin of ovarian teratomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Parrington, J M; West, L F; Povey, S

    1984-01-01

    Chromosome and enzyme markers have been studied in 21 benign ovarian teratomas from 14 patients. Markers heterozygous in the patient were completely homozygous in 52% of the teratomas and completely heterozygous in 19%. The remainder showed a mixture of the two, 10% having homozygous centromeres with some heterozygous enzyme markers and 19% having heterozygous centromeres and some homozygous enzyme markers. These results suggest that benign ovarian teratomas in the present series arise from g...

  20. Genetics and biology of human ovarian teratomas. I. Cytogenetic analysis and mechanism of origin.

    OpenAIRE

    Surti, U; Hoffner, L; Chakravarti, A; Ferrell, R E

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and two benign, mature ovarian teratomas and two immature, malignant teratomas were karyotyped and scored for centromeric heteromorphisms as part of an ongoing project to determine the chromosomal karyotype and the genetic origin of ovarian teratomas and to assess their utility for gene-centromere mapping. Karyotypic analysis of the benign cases revealed 95 46,XX teratomas and 7 chromosomally abnormal teratomas (47,XXX, 47,XX,+8 [two cases], 47,XX,+15, 48,XX,+7,+12 91,XXXX,-13 [mo...

  1. Partition locus-based classification of selected plasmids in Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica spp.: An additional tool

    OpenAIRE

    Bousquet, A.; Henquet, S.; Compain, F.; Genel, N.; Arlet, G.; Decré, D

    2015-01-01

    The dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae has been largely attributed to plasmids, circular DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication. Whereas high-copy-number plasmids primarily rely on passive diffusion for plasmid maintenance, low-copy-number plasmids utilize so-called partition (par) systems. Plasmid partition relies on three structures, i.e. a centromere like DNA site, a centromere-binding protein and an ATPase or a GTPase motor protein for plasmid p...

  2. Global Repeat Map Method for Higher Order Repeat Alpha Satellites in Human and Chimpanzee Genomes (Build 37.2 Assembly)

    OpenAIRE

    Glunčić, Matko; Rosandić, Marija; Jelovina, Denis; Dekanić, Krešimir; Vlahović, Ines; Paar, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Alpha satellites are tandemly repeated sequences found in all human centromeres. In addition to the functional and structural role within centromere they are also a suitable model for evolutionary stud-ies, because of being subject to concerted evolution. The Global Repeat Map (GRM) algorithm is a convenient computational tool to determine consensus repeat units and their exact size within a given genomic sequence, both of monomeric and higher-order (HOR) type. Using GRM, we identify in Build...

  3. Chromatin Assembly at Kinetochores Is Uncoupled from DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Richard D.; Monier, Karine; Sullivan, Kevin F.

    2000-01-01

    The specification of metazoan centromeres does not depend strictly on centromeric DNA sequences, but also requires epigenetic factors. The mechanistic basis for establishing a centromeric “state” on the DNA remains unclear. In this work, we have directly examined replication timing of the prekinetochore domain of human chromosomes. Kinetochores were labeled by expression of epitope-tagged CENP-A, which stably marks prekinetochore domains in human cells. By immunoprecipitating CENP-A mononucleosomes from synchronized cells pulsed with [3H]thymidine we demonstrate that CENP-A–associated DNA is replicated in mid-to-late S phase. Cytological analysis of DNA replication further demonstrated that centromeres replicate asynchronously in parallel with numerous other genomic regions. In contrast, quantitative Western blot analysis demonstrates that CENP-A protein synthesis occurs later, in G2. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy and transient transfection in the presence of aphidicolin, an inhibitor of DNA replication, show that CENP-A can assemble into centromeres in the absence of DNA replication. Thus, unlike most genomic chromatin, histone synthesis and assembly are uncoupled from DNA replication at the kinetochore. Uncoupling DNA replication from CENP-A synthesis suggests that regulated chromatin assembly or remodeling could play a role in epigenetic centromere propagation. PMID:11086012

  4. Ctf3p, the Mis6 budding yeast homolog, interacts with Mcm22p and Mcm16p at the yeast outer kinetochore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measday, Vivien; Hailey, Dale W; Pot, Isabelle; Givan, Scott A; Hyland, Katherine M; Cagney, Gerard; Fields, Stan; Davis, Trisha N; Hieter, Philip

    2002-01-01

    The budding yeast kinetochore is composed of an inner and outer protein complex, which binds to centromere (CEN) DNA and attaches to microtubules. We performed a genetic synthetic dosage lethality screen to identify novel kinetochore proteins in a collection of chromosome transmission fidelity mutants. Our screen identified several new kinetochore-related proteins including YLR381Wp/Ctf3p, which is a member of a conserved family of centromere-binding proteins. Ctf3p interacts with Mcm22p, Mcm16p, and the outer kinetochore protein Ctf19p. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that Ctf3p, Mcm22p, and Mcm16p bind to CEN DNA in a Ctf19p-dependent manner. In addition, Ctf3p, Mcm22p, and Mcm16p have a localization pattern similar to other kinetochore proteins. The fission yeast Ctf3p homolog, Mis6, is required for loading of a CENP-A centromere specific histone, Cnp1, onto centromere DNA. We find however that Ctf3p is not required for loading of the budding yeast CENP-A homolog, Cse4p, onto CEN DNA. In contrast, Ctf3p and Ctf19p fail to bind properly to the centromere in a cse4-1 mutant strain. We conclude that the requirements for CENP-A loading onto centromere DNA differ in fission versus budding yeast. PMID:11782448

  5. HJURP is a CENP-A chromatin assembly factor sufficient to form a functional de novo kinetochore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Meghan C; Kuich, P Henning J L; Stellfox, Madison E; Ward, Jared A; Bassett, Emily A; Black, Ben E; Foltz, Daniel R

    2011-07-25

    Centromeres of higher eukaryotes are epigenetically marked by the centromere-specific CENP-A nucleosome. New CENP-A recruitment requires the CENP-A histone chaperone HJURP. In this paper, we show that a LacI (Lac repressor) fusion of HJURP drove the stable recruitment of CENP-A to a LacO (Lac operon) array at a noncentromeric locus. Ectopically targeted CENP-A chromatin at the LacO array was sufficient to direct the assembly of a functional centromere as indicated by the recruitment of the constitutive centromere-associated network proteins, the microtubule-binding protein NDC80, and the formation of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments. An amino-terminal fragment of HJURP was able to assemble CENP-A nucleosomes in vitro, demonstrating that HJURP is a chromatin assembly factor. Furthermore, HJURP recruitment to endogenous centromeres required the Mis18 complex. Together, these data suggest that the role of the Mis18 complex in CENP-A deposition is to recruit HJURP and that the CENP-A nucleosome assembly activity of HJURP is responsible for centromeric chromatin assembly to maintain the epigenetic mark. PMID:21768289

  6. Putting CENP-A in its place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellfox, Madison E; Bailey, Aaron O; Foltz, Daniel R

    2013-02-01

    The centromere is the chromosomal region that directs kinetochore assembly during mitosis in order to facilitate the faithful segregation of sister chromatids. The location of the human centromere is epigenetically specified. The presence of nucleosomes that contain the histone H3 variant, CENP-A, are thought to be the epigenetic mark that indicates active centromeres. Maintenance of centromeric identity requires the deposition of new CENP-A nucleosomes with each cell cycle. During S-phase, existing CENP-A nucleosomes are divided among the daughter chromosomes, while new CENP-A nucleosomes are deposited during early G1. The specific assembly of CENP-A nucleosomes at centromeres requires the Mis18 complex, which recruits the CENP-A assembly factor, HJURP. We will review the unique features of centromeric chromatin as well as the mechanism of CENP-A nucleosome deposition. We will also highlight a few recent discoveries that begin to elucidate the factors that temporally and spatially control CENP-A deposition. PMID:22729156

  7. Clusters of alpha satellite on human chromosome 21 are dispersed far onto the short arm and lack ancient layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziccardi, William; Zhao, Chongjian; Shepelev, Valery; Uralsky, Lev; Alexandrov, Ivan; Andreeva, Tatyana; Rogaev, Evgeny; Bun, Christopher; Miller, Emily; Putonti, Catherine; Doering, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    Human alpha satellite (AS) sequence domains that currently function as centromeres are typically flanked by layers of evolutionarily older AS that presumably represent the remnants of earlier primate centromeres. Studies on several human chromosomes reveal that these older AS arrays are arranged in an age gradient, with the oldest arrays farthest from the functional centromere and arrays progressively closer to the centromere being progressively younger. The organization of AS on human chromosome 21 (HC21) has not been well-characterized. We have used newly available HC21 sequence data and an HC21p YAC map to determine the size, organization, and location of the AS arrays, and compared them to AS arrays found on other chromosomes. We find that the majority of the HC21 AS sequences are present on the p-arm of the chromosome and are organized into at least five distinct isolated clusters which are distributed over a larger distance from the functional centromere than that typically seen for AS on other chromosomes. Using both phylogenetic and L1 element age estimations, we found that all of the HC21 AS clusters outside the functional centromere are of a similar relatively recent evolutionary origin. HC21 contains none of the ancient AS layers associated with early primate evolution which is present on other chromosomes, possibly due to the fact that the p-arm of HC21 and the other acrocentric chromosomes underwent substantial reorganization about 20 million years ago. PMID:27430641

  8. The Kinetochore Interaction Network (KIN) of ascomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome segregation relies on coordinated activity of a large assembly of proteins, the “Kinetochore Interaction Network” (KIN). How conserved the underlying mechanisms driving the epigenetic phenomenon of centromere and kinetochore assembly and maintenance are remains unclear, even though various eukaryotic models have been studied. More than 50 different proteins, many in multiple copies, comprise the KIN or are associated with fungal centromeres and kinetochores. Proteins isolated from immune sera recognized centromeric regions on chromosomes and were thus named centromere proteins (“CENPs”). CENP-A, sometimes called “centromere-specific H3” (CenH3), is incorporated into nucleosomes within or near centromeres. The “constitutive centromere-associated network” (CCAN) assembles on this specialized chromatin, likely based on specific interactions with and requiring presence of CENP-C. The outer kinetochore comprises the Knl1-Mis12-Ndc80 (“KMN”) protein complexes that connect the CCAN to spindles, accomplished by binding and stabilizing microtubules (MTs) and in the process generating load-bearing assemblies for chromatid segregation. In most fungi the Dam1/DASH complex connects the KMN complexes to MTs. Fungi present a rich resource to investigate mechanistic commonalities but also differences in kinetochore architecture. While ascomycetes have sets of CCAN and KMN proteins that are conserved with those of either budding yeast or metazoans, searching other major branches of the fungal kingdom revealed that CCAN proteins are poorly conserved at the primary sequence level. Several conserved binding motifs or domains within KMN complexes have been described recently, and these features of ascomycete KIN proteins are shared with most metazoan proteins. In addition, several ascomycete-specific domains have been identified here. PMID:26908646

  9. The kinetochore interaction network (KIN) of ascomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Chromosome segregation relies on coordinated activity of a large assembly of proteins, the kinetochore interaction network (KIN). How conserved the underlying mechanisms driving the epigenetic phenomenon of centromere and kinetochore assembly and maintenance are remains unclear, even though various eukaryotic models have been studied. More than 50 different proteins, many in multiple copies, comprise the KIN or are associated with fungal centromeres and kinetochores. Proteins isolated from immune sera recognized centromeric regions on chromosomes and thus were named centromere proteins (CENPs). CENP-A, sometimes called centromere-specific H3 (CenH3), is incorporated into nucleosomes within or near centromeres. The constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN) assembles on this specialized chromatin, likely based on specific interactions with and requiring presence of CENP-C. The outer kinetochore comprises the Knl1-Mis12-Ndc80 (KMN) protein complexes that connect CCAN to spindles, accomplished by binding and stabilizing microtubules (MTs) and in the process generating load-bearing assemblies for chromatid segregation. In most fungi the Dam1/DASH complex connects the KMN complexes to MTs. Fungi present a rich resource to investigate mechanistic commonalities but also differences in kinetochore architecture. While ascomycetes have sets of CCAN and KMN proteins that are conserved with those of budding yeast or metazoans, searching other major branches of the fungal kingdom revealed that CCAN proteins are poorly conserved at the primary sequence level. Several conserved binding motifs or domains within KMN complexes have been described recently, and these features of ascomycete KIN proteins are shared with most metazoan proteins. In addition, several ascomycete-specific domains have been identified here. PMID:26908646

  10. Mechanisms of Chromosome Number Evolution in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jonathan L.; Byrne, Kevin P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

    2011-01-01

    The whole-genome duplication (WGD) that occurred during yeast evolution changed the basal number of chromosomes from 8 to 16. However, the number of chromosomes in post-WGD species now ranges between 10 and 16, and the number in non-WGD species (Zygosaccharomyces, Kluyveromyces, Lachancea, and Ashbya) ranges between 6 and 8. To study the mechanism by which chromosome number changes, we traced the ancestry of centromeres and telomeres in each species. We observe only two mechanisms by which the number of chromosomes has decreased, as indicated by the loss of a centromere. The most frequent mechanism, seen 8 times, is telomere-to-telomere fusion between two chromosomes with the concomitant death of one centromere. The other mechanism, seen once, involves the breakage of a chromosome at its centromere, followed by the fusion of the two arms to the telomeres of two other chromosomes. The only mechanism by which chromosome number has increased in these species is WGD. Translocations and inversions have cycled telomere locations, internalizing some previously telomeric genes and creating novel telomeric locations. Comparison of centromere structures shows that the length of the CDEII region is variable between species but uniform within species. We trace the complete rearrangement history of the Lachancea kluyveri genome since its common ancestor with Saccharomyces and propose that its exceptionally low level of rearrangement is a consequence of the loss of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway in this species. PMID:21811419

  11. Telomeric repeats facilitate CENP-A(Cnp1) incorporation via telomere binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Araceli G; Pidoux, Alison L; Catania, Sandra; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Choi, Eun Shik; Hamilton, Georgina; Ekwall, Karl; Allshire, Robin C

    2013-01-01

    The histone H3 variant, CENP-A, is normally assembled upon canonical centromeric sequences, but there is no apparent obligate coupling of sequence and assembly, suggesting that centromere location can be epigenetically determined. To explore the tolerances and constraints on CENP-A deposition we investigated whether certain locations are favoured when additional CENP-A(Cnp1) is present in fission yeast cells. Our analyses show that additional CENP-A(Cnp1) accumulates within and close to heterochromatic centromeric outer repeats, and over regions adjacent to rDNA and telomeres. The use of minichromosome derivatives with unique DNA sequences internal to chromosome ends shows that telomeres are sufficient to direct CENP-A(Cnp1) deposition. However, chromosome ends are not required as CENP-A(Cnp1) deposition also occurs at telomere repeats inserted at an internal locus and correlates with the presence of H3K9 methylation near these repeats. The Ccq1 protein, which is known to bind telomere repeats and recruit telomerase, was found to be required to induce H3K9 methylation and thus promote the incorporation of CENP-A(Cnp1) near telomere repeats. These analyses demonstrate that at non-centromeric chromosomal locations the presence of heterochromatin influences the sites at which CENP-A is incorporated into chromatin and, thus, potentially the location of centromeres. PMID:23936074

  12. Fission yeast Scm3: A CENP-A receptor required for integrity of subkinetochore chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidoux, Alison L; Choi, Eun Shik; Abbott, Johanna K R; Liu, Xingkun; Kagansky, Alexander; Castillo, Araceli G; Hamilton, Georgina L; Richardson, William; Rappsilber, Juri; He, Xiangwei; Allshire, Robin C

    2009-02-13

    The mechanisms ensuring specific incorporation of CENP-A at centromeres are poorly understood. Mis16 and Mis18 are required for CENP-A localization at centromeres and form a complex that is conserved from fission yeast to human. Fission yeast sim1 mutants that alleviate kinetochore domain silencing are defective in Scm3(Sp), the ortholog of budding yeast Scm3(Sc). Scm3(Sp) depends on Mis16/18 for its centromere localization and like them is recruited to centromeres in late anaphase. Importantly, Scm3(Sp) coaffinity purifies with CENP-A(Cnp1) and associates with CENP-A(Cnp1) in vitro, yet localizes independently of intact CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin and is differentially released from chromatin. While Scm3(Sc) has been proposed to form a unique hexameric nucleosome with CENP-A(Cse4) and histone H4 at budding yeast point centromeres, we favor a model in which Scm3(Sp) acts as a CENP-A(Cnp1) receptor/assembly factor, cooperating with Mis16 and Mis18 to receive CENP-A(Cnp1) from the Sim3 escort and mediate assembly of CENP-A(Cnp1) into subkinetochore chromatin. PMID:19217404

  13. Telomeric repeats facilitate CENP-A(Cnp1 incorporation via telomere binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli G Castillo

    Full Text Available The histone H3 variant, CENP-A, is normally assembled upon canonical centromeric sequences, but there is no apparent obligate coupling of sequence and assembly, suggesting that centromere location can be epigenetically determined. To explore the tolerances and constraints on CENP-A deposition we investigated whether certain locations are favoured when additional CENP-A(Cnp1 is present in fission yeast cells. Our analyses show that additional CENP-A(Cnp1 accumulates within and close to heterochromatic centromeric outer repeats, and over regions adjacent to rDNA and telomeres. The use of minichromosome derivatives with unique DNA sequences internal to chromosome ends shows that telomeres are sufficient to direct CENP-A(Cnp1 deposition. However, chromosome ends are not required as CENP-A(Cnp1 deposition also occurs at telomere repeats inserted at an internal locus and correlates with the presence of H3K9 methylation near these repeats. The Ccq1 protein, which is known to bind telomere repeats and recruit telomerase, was found to be required to induce H3K9 methylation and thus promote the incorporation of CENP-A(Cnp1 near telomere repeats. These analyses demonstrate that at non-centromeric chromosomal locations the presence of heterochromatin influences the sites at which CENP-A is incorporated into chromatin and, thus, potentially the location of centromeres.

  14. Mutation of histone H3 serine 86 disrupts GATA factor Ams2 expression and precise chromosome segregation in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kim Kiat; Ong, Terenze Yao Rui; Tan, Yue Rong; Yang, Eugene Guorong; Ren, Bingbing; Seah, Kwi Shan; Yang, Zhe; Tan, Tsu Soo; Dymock, Brian W; Chen, Ee Sin

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into discrete units, referred to as nucleosomes, by organizing around scaffolding histone proteins. The interplay between these histones and the DNA can dynamically regulate the function of the chromosomal domain. Here, we interrogated the function of a pair of juxtaposing serine residues (S86 and S87) that reside within the histone fold of histone H3. We show that fission yeast cells expressing a mutant histone H3 disrupted at S86 and S87 (hht2-S86AS87A) exhibited unequal chromosome segregation, disrupted transcriptional silencing of centromeric chromatin, and reduced expression of Ams2, a GATA-factor that regulates localization of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A. We found that overexpression of ams2(+) could suppress the chromosome missegregation phenotype that arose in the hht2-S86AS87A mutant. We further demonstrate that centromeric localization of SpCENP-A(cnp1-1) was significantly compromised in hht2-S86AS87A, suggesting synergism between histone H3 and the centromere-targeting domain of SpCENP-A. Taken together, our work presents evidence for an uncharacterized serine residue in fission yeast histone H3 that affects centromeric integrity via regulating the expression of the SpCENP-A-localizing Ams2 protein. [173/200 words]. PMID:26369364

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of satellite DNA sequences from constitutive heterochromatin of the habu snake (Protobothrops flavoviridis, Viperidae) and the Burmese python (Python bivittatus, Pythonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kazumi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Seki, Risako; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2015-12-01

    Highly repetitive DNA sequences of the centromeric heterochromatin provide valuable molecular cytogenetic markers for the investigation of genomic compartmentalization in the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes of sauropsids. Here, the relationship between centromeric heterochromatin and karyotype evolution was examined using cloned repetitive DNA sequences from two snake species, the habu snake (Protobothrops flavoviridis, Crotalinae, Viperidae) and Burmese python (Python bivittatus, Pythonidae). Three satellite DNA (stDNA) families were isolated from the heterochromatin of these snakes: 168-bp PFL-MspI from P. flavoviridis and 196-bp PBI-DdeI and 174-bp PBI-MspI from P. bivittatus. The PFL-MspI and PBI-DdeI sequences were localized to the centromeric regions of most chromosomes in the respective species, suggesting that the two sequences were the major components of the centromeric heterochromatin in these organisms. The PBI-MspI sequence was localized to the pericentromeric region of four chromosome pairs. The PFL-MspI and the PBI-DdeI sequences were conserved only in the genome of closely related species, Gloydius blomhoffii (Crotalinae) and Python molurus, respectively, although their locations on the chromosomes were slightly different. In contrast, the PBI-MspI sequence was also in the genomes of P. molurus and Boa constrictor (Boidae), and additionally localized to the centromeric regions of eight chromosome pairs in B. constrictor, suggesting that this sequence originated in the genome of a common ancestor of Pythonidae and Boidae, approximately 86 million years ago. The three stDNA sequences showed no genomic compartmentalization between the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes, suggesting that homogenization of the centromeric and/or pericentromeric stDNA sequences occurred in the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes of these snakes. PMID:26205503

  16. Single-epitope recognition imaging of native chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hongda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct visualization of chromatin has the potential to provide important insights into epigenetic processes. In particular, atomic force microscopy (AFM can visualize single nucleosomes under physiological ionic conditions. However, AFM has mostly been applied to chromatin that has been reconstituted in vitro, and its potential as a tool for the dissection of native nucleosomes has not been explored. Recently we applied AFM to native Drosophila chromatin containing the centromere-specific histone 3 (CenH3, showing that it is greatly enriched in smaller particles. Taken together with biochemical analyses of CenH3 nucleosomes, we propose that centromeric nucleosomes are hemisomes, with one turn of DNA wrapped around a particle consisting of one molecule each of centromere-specific CenH3, H4, H2A and H2B. Results Here we apply a recognition mode of AFM imaging to directly identify CenH3 within histone core particles released from native centromeric chromatin. More than 90% of these particles were found to be tetrameric in height. The specificity of recognition was confirmed by blocking with a CenH3 peptide, and the strength of the interaction was quantified by force measurements. These results imply that the particles imaged by AFM are indeed mature CenH3-containing hemisomes. Conclusion Efficient and highly specific recognition of CenH3 in histone core particles isolated from native centromeric chromatin demonstrates that tetramers are the predominant form of centromeric nucleosomes in mature tetramers. Our findings provide proof of principle that this approach can yield insights into chromatin biology using direct and rapid detection of native nucleosomes in physiological salt concentrations.

  17. Misregulation of Scm3p/HJURP causes chromosome instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant K Mishra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The kinetochore (centromeric DNA and associated proteins is a key determinant for high fidelity chromosome transmission. Evolutionarily conserved Scm3p is an essential component of centromeric chromatin and is required for assembly and function of kinetochores in humans, fission yeast, and budding yeast. Overexpression of HJURP, the mammalian homolog of budding yeast Scm3p, has been observed in lung and breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis; however, the physiological relevance of these observations is not well understood. We overexpressed SCM3 and HJURP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and HJURP in human cells and defined domains within Scm3p that mediate its chromosome loss phenotype. Our results showed that the overexpression of SCM3 (GALSCM3 or HJURP (GALHJURP caused chromosome loss in a wild-type yeast strain, and overexpression of HJURP led to mitotic defects in human cells. GALSCM3 resulted in reduced viability in kinetochore mutants, premature separation of sister chromatids, and reduction in Cse4p and histone H4 at centromeres. Overexpression of CSE4 or histone H4 suppressed chromosome loss and restored levels of Cse4p at centromeres in GALSCM3 strains. Using mutant alleles of scm3, we identified a domain in the N-terminus of Scm3p that mediates its interaction with CEN DNA and determined that the chromosome loss phenotype of GALSCM3 is due to centromeric association of Scm3p devoid of Cse4p/H4. Furthermore, we determined that similar to other systems the centromeric association of Scm3p is cell cycle regulated. Our results show that altered stoichiometry of Scm3p/HJURP, Cse4p, and histone H4 lead to defects in chromosome segregation. We conclude that stringent regulation of HJURP and SCM3 expression are critical for genome stability.

  18. Modified C-band technique for the analysis of chromosome abnormalities in irradiated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified C-band technique was developed in order to analyze more accurately dicentric, tricentric, and ring chromosomes in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes. Instead of the original method relying on treatment with barium hydroxide Ba(OH)2, C-bands were obtained using a modified form of heat treatment in formamide followed with DAPI staining. This method was tentatively applied to the analysis of dicentric chromosomes in irradiated human lymphocytes to examine its availability. The frequency of dicentric chromosome was almost the same with conventional Giemsa staining and the modified C-band technique. In the analysis using Giemsa staining, it is relatively difficult to identify the centromere on the elongated chromosomes, over-condensed chromosomes, fragment, and acentric ring. However, the modified C-band method used in this study makes it easier to identify the centromere on such chromosomes than with the use of Giemsa staining alone. Thus, the modified C-band method may give more information about the location of the centromere. Therefore, this method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation due to the analysis of the dicentric chromosome in human lymphocytes exposed to the radiation. Furthermore, this method is simpler and faster than the original C-band protocol and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method with the centromeric DNA probe. - Highlights: → The dicentric (dic) assay is the most effective for the radiation biodosimetry. → It is important to recognize the centromere of the dic. → We improved a C-band technique based on heat denaturation. → This technique enables the accurate detection of a centromere. → This method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation.

  19. The fission yeast heterochromatin protein Rik1 is required for telomere clustering during meiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuzon, Creighton T; Borgstrøm, Britta; Weilguny, Dietmar;

    2004-01-01

    Telomeres share the ability to silence nearby transcription with heterochromatin, but the requirement of heterochromatin proteins for most telomere functions is unknown. The fission yeast Rik1 protein is required for heterochromatin formation at centromeres and the mating-type locus, as it recrui...... meiosis. However, Rik1 is dispensable for the protective roles of telomeres in preventing chromosome end-fusion. Thus, a Swi6-independent heterochromatin function distinct from that at centromeres and the mating-type locus operates at telomeres during sexual differentiation....

  20. AcEST: BP915100 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t : Swiss-Prot sp_hit_id O61308 Definition sp|O61308|PUMA_PARUN 227 kDa spindle- and centromere-associated p....done Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|O61308|PUMA_PARUN 227 kDa spindle-...Paramyosin OS=Brugia malayi PE=2 SV=2 37 0.083 >sp|O61308|PUMA_PARUN 227 kDa spin...dle- and centromere-associated protein OS=Parascaris univalens GN=PUMA1 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 1955 Score = 44.7

  1. The Clr7 and Clr8 Directionality Factors and the Pcu4 Cullin Mediate Heterochromatin Formation in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thon, G.; Hansen, Klavs R.; Altes, Susagna Padrissa;

    2005-01-01

    Fission yeast heterochromatin is formed at centromeres, telomeres, and in the mating-type region where it mediates the transcriptional silencing of the mat2-P and mat3-M donor loci and the directionality of mating-type switching. We conducted a genetic screen for directionality mutants. This screen...... centromeric transcripts that are normally processed into siRNA by the RNAi machinery in wild-type cells are easily detected in cells lacking Clr7, Clr8, or Pcu4. Another physical interaction, between the nucleoporin Nup189 and Clr8, suggests that Clr8 might be involved in tethering heterochromatic regions...

  2. Increase in dicentric chromosome formation after a single CT scan in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Abe; Tomisato Miura; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A.; Risa Ujiie; Yumiko Kurosu; Nagisa Kato; Atsushi Katafuchi; Naohiro Tsuyama; Takashi Ohba; Tomoko Inamasu; Fumio Shishido; Hideyoshi Noji; Kazuei Ogawa; Hiroshi Yokouchi; Kenya Kanazawa

    2015-01-01

    Excess risk of leukemia and brain tumors after CT scans in children has been reported. We performed dicentric chromosome assay (DCAs) before and after CT scan to assess effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on chromosomes. Peripheral blood (PB) lymphocytes were collected from 10 patients before and after a CT scan. DCA was performed by analyzing either 1,000 or 2,000 metaphases using both Giemsa staining and centromere-fluorescence in situ hybridization (Centromere-FISH). The increment of DI...

  3. Identification of Functionally Conserved Regions in the Structure of the Chaperone/CenH3/H4Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Jingjun; Feng, Hanqiao; Zhou, Zheng; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Bai, Yawen

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, a variant of conventional histone H3 termed CenH3 epigenetically marks the centromere. The conserved CenH3 chaperone specifically recognizes CenH3 and is required for CenH3 deposition at the centromere. Recently, the structures of the chaperone/CenH3/H4 complexes have been determined for H. sapiens (Hs) and the budding yeasts S. cerevisiae (Sc) and K. lactis (Kl). Surprisingly, the three structures are very different, leading to different proposed structural bases for chaperone...

  4. HJURP Involvement in De Novo CenH3CENP-A and CENP-C Recruitment

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroaki Tachiwana; Sebastian Müller; Julia Blümer; Kerstin Klare; Andrea Musacchio; Geneviève Almouzni

    2015-01-01

    Although our understanding of centromere maintenance, marked by the histone H3 variant CenH3CENP-A in most eukaryotes, has progressed, the mechanism underlying the de novo formation of centromeres remains unclear. We used a synthetic system to dissect how CenH3CENP-A contributes to the accumulation of CENP-C and CENP-T, two key components that are necessary for the formation of functional kinetochores. We find that de novo CENP-T accumulation depends on CENP-C and that recruitment of these fa...

  5. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL139C, YGL153W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL139C SCM3 Nonhistone component of centromeric chromatin that binds stoichiometri... YDL139C Bait gene name SCM3 Bait description Nonhistone component of centromeric chromatin that binds stoichiometri...e peroxisomal protein import machinery; interacts with both PTS1 (Pex5p) and PTS2 (Pex7p), peroxisomal matri...153W Prey gene name PEX14 Prey description Peroxisomal membrane peroxin that is a central component of the p...eroxisomal protein import machinery; interacts with both PTS1 (Pex5p) and PTS2 (Pex7p), peroxisomal matrix p

  6. Eic1 links Mis18 with the CCAN/Mis6/Ctf19 complex to promote CENP-A assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Subramanian, Lakxmi; Toda, Nicholas R. T.; Rappsilber, Juri; Allshire, Robin C.

    2014-01-01

    CENP-A chromatin forms the foundation for kinetochore assembly. Replication-independent incorporation of CENP-A at centromeres depends on its chaperone HJURPScm3, and Mis18 in vertebrates and fission yeast. The recruitment of Mis18 and HJURPScm3 to centromeres is cell cycle regulated. Vertebrate Mis18 associates with Mis18BP1KNL2, which is critical for the recruitment of Mis18 and HJURPScm3. We identify two novel fission yeast Mis18-interacting proteins (Eic1 and Eic2), components of the Mis1...

  7. Chromosome segregation: learning to let go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Jonathan M G

    2013-10-01

    To ensure accurate chromosome segregation, cohesion between sister chromatids must be released in a controlled manner during mitosis. A new study reveals how distinct centromere populations of the cohesin protector Sgo1 are regulated by microtubule attachments, cyclin-dependent kinases, and the kinetochore kinase Bub1. PMID:24112985

  8. Genetic mapping of the ecotropic virus-inducing locus Akv-2 of the AKR mouse

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    A combination of somatic cell hybridization and standard mendelian breeding techniques was used to map the AKR ecotropic virus inducibility locus Akv-2 to the centromeric end of chromosome 16. This assignment of Akv-2 further emphasizes the endogenous ecotropic retroviruses are inserted at multiple sites in mouse chromosomes.

  9. Multiple sex chromosomes in the light of female meiotic drive in amniote vertebrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Martina; Altmanová, M.; Kratochvíl, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2014), s. 35-44. ISSN 0967-3849 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/10/0718 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : amniota * centromere * heterogamety * neo-sex chromosomes * reptiles Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.478, year: 2014

  10. The molecular mechanism underlying Roberts syndrome involves loss of ESCO2 acetyltransferase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordillo, M.; Vega, H.; Trainer, A.H.;

    2008-01-01

    Roberts syndrome/SC phocomelia (RBS) is an autosomal recessive disorder with growth retardation, craniofacial abnormalities and limb reduction. Cellular alterations in RBS include lack of cohesion at the heterochromatic regions around centromeres and the long arm of the Y chromosome, reduced grow...

  11. Topoisomerase-1 gene copy aberrations are frequent in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Balslev, Eva; Poulsen, Tim S.; Nielsen, Signe Lykke; Nygård, Sune Boris; Rømer, Maria Unni; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Høgdall, Estrid; Moreira, José; Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Brünner, Nils; Stenvang, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerase-1 (Top1) targeting drugs have shown promising efficacy in patients with metastatic breast cancer (BC). However, these drugs are rather toxic calling for development and validation of predictive biomarkers to increase the therapeutic index. As these drugs are targeting the Top1 prote....../centromere ratio. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  12. An Alpha Motif at Tas3C Terminus Mediates RITS Cis Spreading and Promotes Heterochromatic Gene Silencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Motamedi, M; Yip, C; Wang, Z; Walz, T; Patel, D; Moazed, D

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) plays a pivotal role in the formation of heterochromatin at the fission yeast centromeres. The RNA-induced transcriptional silencing (RITS) complex, composed of heterochromatic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), the siRNA-binding protein Ago1, the chromodomain protein Chp1, and the Ago1/Chp1-interacting protein Tas3, provides a physical tether between the RNAi and heterochromatin assembly pathways. Here, we report the structural and functional characterization of a C-terminal Tas3 {alpha}-helical motif (TAM), which self-associates into a helical polymer and is required for cis spreading of RITS in centromeric DNA regions. Site-directed mutations of key residues within the hydrophobic monomer-monomer interface disrupt Tas3-TAM polymeric self-association in vitro and result in loss of gene silencing, spreading of RITS, and a dramatic reduction in centromeric siRNAs in vivo. These results demonstrate that, in addition to the chromodomain of Chp1 and siRNA-loaded Ago1, Tas3 self-association is required for RITS spreading and efficient heterochromatic gene silencing at centromeric repeat regions.

  13. 45,X/46,XY Turner Syndrome: A Psu dic(y) can appear normal by G-banding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, J.V.; Gutai, J.; Shreeve, J.

    1994-09-01

    Mosaic Turner syndrome is a common finding with 50% of the individuals with Turner syndrome having a second cell line. In rare cases, the additional chromosome is reported to be a Y or variant of the Y chromosome. We report a female with Turner Syndrome, who has a mosaic pattern, with the Y chromosome by GTL-banding appearing entirely normal, about the length of chromosome 22. Quinicrine-banding revealed no heterochromatic region. The father of the girl was unavailable for analysis. C-banding resulted in the determination of two centromeric regions, one active at the primary constriction and the second was inactive. The Y centromeric probe (Oncor) showed both the active and inactive centromeres to be of Y origin. Painting using whole chromosome Y paint (Imagenetics) revealed only Y material. In cases of males and females where 45,X/46,X,dic(Y) has been reported, a mosaic pattern has resulted from both centromeres being active in early embryogenesis. In this case the resulting chromosome looks to be a normal Y in both shape and size but with a mosaic pattern. Clearly, G-banding is not always adequate to determine a dic(Y). This suggests that any 45,X/46,SY mosaic pattern in either males or females should be evaluated for a possible dicentric Y chromosome.

  14. Looping in on Ndc80 - how does a protein loop at the kinetochore control chromosome segregation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Segregation of chromosomes during mitosis requires the interaction of dynamic microtubules with the kinetochore, a large protein structure established on the centromere region of sister chromatids. The core microtubule-binding activity of the kinetochore resides in the KMN network, an outer...

  15. Ndc10 is a platform for inner kinetochore assembly in budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med)

    2012-01-10

    Kinetochores link centromeric DNA to spindle microtubules and ensure faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In point-centromere yeasts, the CBF3 complex Skp1-Ctf13-(Cep3){sub 2}-(Ndc10){sub 2} recognizes a conserved centromeric DNA element through contacts made by Cep3 and Ndc10. We describe here the five-domain organization of Kluyveromyces lactis Ndc10 and the structure at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution of domains I-II (residues 1-402) bound to DNA. The structure resembles tyrosine DNA recombinases, although it lacks both endonuclease and ligase activities. Structural and biochemical data demonstrate that each subunit of the Ndc10 dimer binds a separate fragment of DNA, suggesting that Ndc10 stabilizes a DNA loop at the centromere. We describe in vitro association experiments showing that specific domains of Ndc10 interact with each of the known inner-kinetochore proteins or protein complexes in budding yeast. We propose that Ndc10 provides a central platform for inner-kinetochore assembly.

  16. Dicty_cDB: SFJ673 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SF (Link to library) SFJ673 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16569-1 SFJ673F (Link to Original ... 124 2e-27 AY129008_1( AY129008 |pid:none) Zea mays CRM ... centromeric retrotran... 124 2e-27 AY334361_3( AY3 ...

  17. Dicty_cDB: SFJ625 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SF (Link to library) SFJ625 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16569-1 SFJ625E (Link to Original ... 132 2e-29 AY129008_1( AY129008 |pid:none) Zea mays CRM ... centromeric retrotran... 132 3e-29 protein update ...

  18. Nondisjunction in Favor of a Chromosome: The Mechanism of Rye B Chromosome Drive during Pollen Mitosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Banaei-Moghaddam, A.M.; Schubert, V.; Kumke, K.; Weiβ, O.; Klemme, S.; Nagaki, K.; Macas, Jiří; González-Sánchez, M.; Heredia, V.; Gómez-Revilla, D.; González-García, M.; Vega, J.M.; Puertas, M.J.; Houben, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 10 (2012), s. 4124-4134. ISSN 1040-4651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : chromosomes * centromere * repeats Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.251, year: 2012

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14026-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U14026-1 no gap 615 2 3980439 3979824 MINUS 6 8 U14026 3 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show C ... 1 ( AY183918 ) Drosophila melanogaster centromeric satellite ... seq... 50 0.094 1 ( AL034397 ) Human DNA sequence ...

  20. Not para-, not peri-, but centric inversion of chromosome 12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silahtaroglu, A N; Hacihanefioglu, S; Güven, G S; Cenani, A; Wirth, J; Tommerup, Niels; Tümer, Z

    1998-01-01

    A 39 year old male with primary infertility was diagnosed as having Klinefelter syndrome by conventional cytogenetic analysis, which also showed an abnormal chromosome 12. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis of the aberrant chromosome using a 12 specific centromeric probe showed a...

  1. Chromosome and genome size variation in Luzula (Juncaceae), a genus with holocentric chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bozek, M.; Leitch, A. R.; Leitch, I. J.; Záveská Drábková, Lenka; Kuta, E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 4 (2012), s. 529-541. ISSN 0024-4074 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/07/P147 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : chromosomal evolution * endopolyploidy * holokinetic chromosome * karyotype evolution * tetraploides * centromeres * TRNF intergenic spacer Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.589, year: 2012

  2. DNA gains at 8q23.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Veiga, Luciana Caricati; Bérgamo, Nádia Aparecida; dos Reis, Patrícia Pintor;

    2003-01-01

    Gains or amplifications involving chromosome arm 8q are one of the most recurrent chromosomal alterations in head and neck tumors. To characterize previously reported gains, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the sequences BAC RP1179E1 and 8-centromere PMJ 128 as probes....

  3. Probing CENP-E function in chromosome dynamics using small molecule inhibitor syntelin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Ding; Tongge Zhu; Jiancun Zhang; Zhen Dou; Xuebiao Yao; Feng Yan; Phil Yao; Zhihong Yang; Weihong Wan; Xiwei Wang; Jing Liu; Xinjiao Gao; Ariane Abrieu

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Chromosome movements during mitosis are orchestrated primarily by the interaction of spindle microtubules with the kinetochore [1], the site for attachment of spindle microtubules to the centromere. The kinetochore has an active function in chromosomal segregation through microtubule-based motors located at or near it [1-2].

  4. Generating of rice OsCENH3-GFP transgenic plants and their genetic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU HengXiu; WANG Xin; GONG ZhiYun; TANG Ding; GU MingHong; CHENG ZhuKuan

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate rice functional centromeres, OsCENH3-GFP chimeric gene was constructed and transformed into the indica rice variety, Zhongxian 3037, mediated by Agrobacturium. The integration of the exogenous genes in the transgenic plants was confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting. The transgenic plants grow normally during their whole life time, just like Zhongxian 3037. No significant defects were detected in either mitosis or meiosis of the transgenic plants. The overlapping of GFP signals and anti-CENH3 foci in both mitotic and meiotic cells from To and T1 generation plants indicated that GFP had been successfully fused with CENH3, so the GFP signals can well represent the CENH3 locations on each chromosome. To evaluate the applicability of the transgenic plants to other genetic studies, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using rice centromeric tandem repetitive sequence CentO as the probe was conducted on the zygotene chromosomes of pollen mother cells (PMCs). It has been revealed that the GFP signals are overlapping with CentO FISH signals, showing that CentO is one of the key elements constituting rice functional centromeres. Immunofluorescent staining using anti-α-tublin antibody and anti-PAIR2 antibody on the chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis stages of the transgenic plants further reveals that OsCENH3-GFP transgenic plants can be widely used for studying rice molecular biology, especially for tagging functional centromeres in both living cells and tissues.

  5. Global analysis of core histones reveals nucleosomal surfaces required for chromosome bi-orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Kawashima, Satoshi; Nakabayashi, Yu; Matsubara, Kazuko; Sano, Norihiko; Enomoto, Takemi; Tanaka, Kozo; Seki, Masayuki; Horikoshi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Kinetochore assembly requires centromere-specific nucleosomes that contain the histone H3 variant CenH3, but less is known about the role of canonical histones in this process. This study reports on the function of histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 in chromosome segregation.

  6. A high-resolution physical map integrating an anchored chromosome with the BAC physical maps of wheat chromosome 6B

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kobayashi, F.; Wu, J.Z.; Kanamori, H.; Tanaka, T.; Katagiri, S.; Karasawa, W.; Kaneko, S.; Watanabe, S.; Sakaguchi, T.; Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Mukai, Y.; Hamada, M.; Saito, M.; Hayakawa, K.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Nasuda, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Handa, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, AUG 12 (2015), s. 595. ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Centromere * Chromosomal rearrangement * Chromosome 6B Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.986, year: 2014

  7. Mis16 Independently Recognizes Histone H4 and the CENP-ACnp1-Specific Chaperone Scm3sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sojin; Kim, Hanseong; Cho, Uhn-Soo

    2015-10-01

    CENP-A is a centromere-specific histone H3 variant that is required for kinetochore assembly and accurate chromosome segregation. For it to function properly, CENP-A must be specifically localized to centromeres. In fission yeast, Scm3sp and the Mis18 complex, composed of Mis16, Eic1, and Mis18, function as a CENP-A(Cnp1)-specific chaperone and a recruiting factor, respectively, and together ensure accurate delivery of CENP-A(Cnp1) to centromeres. Although how Scm3sp specifically recognizes CENP-A(Cnp1) has been revealed recently, the recruiting mechanism of CENP-A(Cnp1) via the Mis18 complex remains unknown. In this study, we have determined crystal structures of Schizosaccharomyces japonicus Mis16 alone and in complex with the helix 1 of histone H4 (H4α1). Crystal structures followed by mutant analysis and affinity pull-downs have revealed that Mis16 recognizes both H4α1 and Scm3sp independently within the CENP-A(Cnp1)/H4:Scm3sp complex. This observation suggests that Mis16 gains CENP-A(Cnp1) specificity by recognizing both Scm3sp and histone H4. Our studies provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying specific recruitment of CENP-A(Cnp1)/H4:Scm3sp into centromeres. PMID:26343758

  8. CENP-A targeting moves a step back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard E

    2009-02-27

    In a recent issue of Molecular Cell, Pidoux et al. (2009) and Williams et al. (2009) identify S. pombe Scm3 as the proximate factor in the Cnp1/CENP-A deposition pathway, providing a direct connection to centromere-localized Mis16-Mis18. PMID:19250900

  9. Effects of 60Co γ-ray partial radiation on chromosome aberration in human peripheral blood in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effects of 60Co γ-ray partial radiation on chromosome aberration in human peripheral blood in vitro. Methods: The samples of heparinized peripheral whole blood from 3 healthy persons were exposed to 60Co γ-rays at the doses between 0 and 8 Gy with the dose rate of 0.35 Gy/min at the temperature of 37 ℃ ,and then mixed with the unirradiated blood samples of the Microscopy was used to observe the chromosome aberration double (centromere + centromere) and the biological dose was estimated thereby. Results: The amounts of double centromere + centromere were increased along with the dose of irradiation in all groups. The estimated biological dose was higher than the 1/3 of the irradiation dose when the dose was between 0.5 to 2 Gy, and was close to the 1/3 of the irradiation dose when the dose was between 4 to 8 Gy. Conclusion: Chromosome aberration can be used as a biomarker in estimation of uneven irradiation. (authors)

  10. Germline genes hypomethylation and expression define a molecular signature in peripheral blood of ICF patients: implications for diagnosis and etiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco, Guillaume; Walton, Emma; Sterlin, Delphine; Hédouin, Sabrine; Nitta, Hirohisa; Ito, Yuya; Fouyssac, Fanny; Mégarbané, André; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Picard, Capucine; Francastel, Claire

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunodeficiency Centromeric Instability and Facial anomalies (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by reduction in serum immunoglobulins with severe recurrent infections, facial dysmorphism, and more variable symptoms including mental retardation. ICF is directly related to a genomic methylation defect that mainly affects juxtacentromeric heterochromatin regions of certain chromosomes, leading to chromosomal rearrangements that constitute a hallmark of this sy...

  11. The Karyotypes,C-banding Patterns and AgNORs of Epinephelus malabaricus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zou Jixing(邹记兴); Hu Chaoqun; Xiang Wenzhou; Yu Qixing; Zhou Fei

    2004-01-01

    The chromosome specimens of Epinephelus malabaricus (Bloch & Schneider, 1801) are obtained from metaphase of kindney cell by vivi-injection of PHA and culture of colchicines, hypatoic-air drying technique, and then by studying their Giemsa stain, C-bands and AgNORs. The results are as follows: (1)E. malabaricus has a diploid chromosome number of 48 and its karyotype formula is 48t, NF=48, sex chromosome is not found. (2) There is a pair of chromosomes with secondary constriction near the centromere of chromosome t24. (3) 1~4 nucleoli appear in the nucleus of interphase, 55% nuclei has 1 nucleolus and only 2% for 4 nucleoli. (4) AgNORs appear in the chromosome t24 of 50% metaphase, sometimes in the chromosome t5, but not in other chromosomes. (5) The AgNORs polymorphisms are individually specific, 1~4 pairs of the number, and the frequency of 4 AgNORs are lowest. (6) The secondary constrictions and positive C-bands are coincident, close to the centromere of the chromosome, and mass constrictive heterochromatins appear in that region. (7) All the centromeres of chromosomes are darkly stained C-bands, and the whole arm of chromosome t24 and its centromere are same positive C-bands. (8) The evolutive regulation of the karyotype and the developing mechanism of AgNORs and C-bands are discussed.

  12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of old G-banded and mounted chromosome preparations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, A M; Pandis, N; Bomme, L;

    1997-01-01

    An improved method for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) investigation of old, previously G-banded, mounted chromosome preparations with chromosome specific painting probes and centromere-specific probes is described. Before hybridization, the slides are incubated in xylene until the cove...

  13. A mathematical model of Aurora B activity in prophase and metaphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Kevin; Meere, Martin; Piiroinen, Petri T

    2016-07-01

    Aurora B kinase is a protein that controls several processes in mitosis when it is found associated with INCENP, Survivin and Borealin in a complex known as the Chromosomal Passenger Complex. Aurora B in complex with INCENP is phosphorylated on three sites, resulting in the full activation of Aurora B. In prophase and metaphase, Aurora B is activated at centromeres, the region of chromatin linking sister chromatids, due to an autophosphorylation mechanism, and it has been hypothesised that Aurora B is activated throughout the cytoplasm due to its concentration at centromeres. In this article, we first develop a time-dependent model of Aurora B activation that does not incorporate spatial variation. This model is used to demonstrate the various qualitative behaviours that the activation of Aurora B is capable of displaying for different model parameters. Next, we develop a spatio-temporal model of Aurora B activation that includes diffusion of soluble Aurora B and binding of Aurora B to immobile centromeric binding sites. This model describes the activation of Aurora B throughout the cytoplasm due to its concentration-dependent activation at centromeres. The models demonstrate the effects that a soluble phosphatase concentration, multisite phosphorylation and diffusion have on the activation of Aurora B. PMID:27155569

  14. Insights from the reconstitution of the divergent outer kinetochore of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahui; Petrovic, Arsen; Rombaut, Pascaline; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Keller, Jenny; Raunser, Stefan; Herzog, Franz; Musacchio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis is crucial for cellular and organismal viability. Kinetochores connect chromosomes with spindle microtubules and are essential for chromosome segregation. These large protein scaffolds emerge from the centromere, a specialized region of the chromosome enriched with the histone H3 variant CENP-A. In most eukaryotes, the kinetochore core consists of the centromere-proximal constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN), which binds CENP-A and contains 16 subunits, and of the centromere-distal Knl1 complex, Mis12 complex, Ndc80 complex (KMN) network, which binds microtubules and contains 10 subunits. In the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, the kinetochore underwent remarkable simplifications. All CCAN subunits, with the exception of centromeric protein C (CENP-C), and two KMN subunits, Dsn1 and Zwint, cannot be identified in this organism. In addition, two paralogues of the KMN subunit Nnf1 (Nnf1a and Nnf1b) are present. Finally, the Spc105R subunit, homologous to human Knl1/CASC5, underwent considerable sequence changes in comparison with other organisms. We combined biochemical reconstitution with biophysical and structural methods to investigate how these changes reflect on the organization of the Drosophila KMN network. We demonstrate that the Nnf1a and Nnf1b paralogues are subunits of distinct complexes, both of which interact directly with Spc105R and with CENP-C, for the latter of which we identify a binding site on the Mis12 subunit. Our studies shed light on the structural and functional organization of a highly divergent kinetochore particle. PMID:26911624

  15. Are ribosomal DNA clusters rearrangement hotspots? A case study in the genus Mus (Rodentia, Muridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douzery Emmanuel JP

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in comparative genomics have considerably improved our knowledge of the evolution of mammalian karyotype architecture. One of the breakthroughs was the preferential localization of evolutionary breakpoints in regions enriched in repetitive sequences (segmental duplications, telomeres and centromeres. In this context, we investigated the contribution of ribosomal genes to genome reshuffling since they are generally located in pericentromeric or subtelomeric regions, and form repeat clusters on different chromosomes. The target model was the genus Mus which exhibits a high rate of karyotypic change, a large fraction of which involves centromeres. Results The chromosomal distribution of rDNA clusters was determined by in situ hybridization of mouse probes in 19 species. Using a molecular-based reference tree, the phylogenetic distribution of clusters within the genus was reconstructed, and the temporal association between rDNA clusters, breakpoints and centromeres was tested by maximum likelihood analyses. Our results highlighted the following features of rDNA cluster dynamics in the genus Mus: i rDNA clusters showed extensive diversity in number between species and an almost exclusive pericentromeric location, ii a strong association between rDNA sites and centromeres was retrieved which may be related to their shared constraint of concerted evolution, iii 24% of the observed breakpoints mapped near an rDNA cluster, and iv a substantial rate of rDNA cluster change (insertion, deletion also occurred in the absence of chromosomal rearrangements. Conclusions This study on the dynamics of rDNA clusters within the genus Mus has revealed a strong evolutionary relationship between rDNA clusters and centromeres. Both of these genomic structures coincide with breakpoints in the genus Mus, suggesting that the accumulation of a large number of repeats in the centromeric region may contribute to the high level of chromosome

  16. Small chromosomes among Danish Candida glabrata isolates originated through different mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Khadija Mohamed; Ishchuk, Olena P.; Hellborg, Linda;

    2013-01-01

    participate in their origin: (i) through a segmental duplication which covered the centromeric region, or (ii) by a translocation event moving a larger chromosome arm to another chromosome that leaves the centromere part with the shorter arm. The first type of small chromosomes carrying duplicated genes...... chromosomes, which were smaller than 0.5 Mb. Regarding the year, patient and hospital, these C. glabrata strains had independent origin and the analyzed small chromosomes were structurally not related to each other (i.e. they contained different sets of genes). We suggest that at least two mechanisms could...... exhibited mitotic instability, while the second type, which contained the corresponding genes in only one copy in the genome, was mitotically stable. Apparently, in patients C. glabrata chromosomes are frequently reshuffled resulting in new genetic configurations, including appearance of small chromosomes...

  17. Mini-chromosomes among danish Candida glabrata isolates originated through two different mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, K. M.; Ishchuk, O.; Hellborg, L.;

    2012-01-01

    ) through a segmental duplication which covered the centromeric region, and (ii) by a translocation event moving a larger chromosome arm to another chromosome that leaves the centromere part with the shorter arm. The first type of mini-chromosomes carrying duplicated genes exhibited mitotic instability......We analyzed 201 strains of the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata from patients, mainly suffering from systemic infection, at Danish hospitals during 1985 – 1999. Our analysis showed that these strains were closely related but exhibited large karyotype polymorphism. Nine strains contained mini-chromosomes......, which were smaller than 0.5 Mb. Regarding the year, patient and hospital, C. glabrata strains had independent origin and the analyzed mini-chromosomes were struc- turally not related to each other (i.e., they contained different sets o genes). We inferred two mechanisms involved in their origin: (i...

  18. Relationship of Extreme Chromosomal Instability with Long-term Survival in a Retrospective Analysis of Primary Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roylance, Rebecca; Endesfelder, David; Gorman, Patricia;

    2011-01-01

    reflect tumor CIN status, efficiently delineate outcome in estrogen receptor ER-positive reast cancer in contrast to ERnegative breast cancer, suggesting that the relationship of CIN with prognosis differs in these two breast cancer subtypes. Methods: Direct assessment of CIN requires single-cell analysis...... methods, such as centromeric FISH, aimed at determining the variation around the modal number of two or more chromosomes within individual tumor nuclei. Here, we document the frequency of tumor CIN by dual centromeric FISH analysis in a retrospective primary breast cancer cohort of 246 patients with...... in multivariate analysis. In contrast, a linear relationship of increasing CIN with poorer prognosis in ER-positive breast cancer was observed, using three independent measures of CIN. Conclusions: The paradoxical relationship between extreme CIN and cancer outcome in the ER-negative cohorts may...

  19. The distribution of α-kleisin during meiosis in the holocentromeric plant Luzula elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Schubert, Veit; Martis, Mihaela Maria; Hause, Gerd; Liu, Zhaojun; Shen, Yi; Conrad, Udo; Shi, Wenqing; Scholz, Uwe; Taudien, Stefan; Cheng, Zhukuan; Houben, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Holocentric chromosomes occur in a number of independent eukaryotic lineages, and they form holokinetic kinetochores along the entire poleward chromatid surfaces. Due to this alternative chromosome structure, Luzula elegans sister chromatids segregate already in anaphase I followed by the segregation of the homologues in anaphase II. However, not yet known is the localization and dynamics of cohesin and the structure of the synaptonemal complex (SC) during meiosis. We show here that the α-kleisin subunit of cohesin localizes at the centromeres of both mitotic and meiotic metaphase chromosomes and that it, thus, may contribute to assemble the centromere in L. elegans. This localization and the formation of a tripartite SC structure indicate that the prophase I behaviour of L. elegans is similar as in monocentric species. PMID:27294972

  20. The Aurora B kinase in chromosome biorientation and spindle checkpoint signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eKrenn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aurora B, a member of the Aurora family of serine/threonine protein kinases, is a key player in chromosome segregation. As part of a macromolecular complex known as the chromosome passenger complex, Aurora B concentrates early during mitosis in the proximity of centromeres and kinetochores, the sites of attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules. There, it contributes to a number of processes that impart fidelity to cell division, including kinetochore stabilization, kinetochore-microtubule attachment, and the regulation of a surveillance mechanism named the spindle assembly checkpoint. In the regulation of these processes, Aurora B is the fulcrum of a remarkably complex network of interactions that feed back on its localization and activation state. In this review we discuss the multiple roles of Aurora B during mitosis, focusing in particular on its role at centromeres and kinetochores. Many details of the network of interactions at these locations remain poorly understood, and we focus here on several crucial outstanding questions.

  1. Modulation of the Chromatin Phosphoproteome by the Haspin Protein Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiolica, Alessio; de Medina-Redondo, Maria; Schoof, Erwin;

    2014-01-01

    protein- protein interaction network. We determined the Haspin consensus motif and the co-crystal structure of the kinase with the histone H3 tail. The structure revealed a unique bent substrate binding mode positioning the histone H3 residues Arg2 and Lys4 adjacent to the Haspin phosphorylated threonine......Recent discoveries have highlighted the importance of Haspin kinase activity for the correct positioning of the kinase Aurora B at the centromere. Haspin phosphorylates Thr3 of the histone H3 (H3), which provides a signal for Aurora B to localize to the centromere of mitotic chromosomes. To date......, histone H3 is the only confirmed Haspin substrate. We used a combination of biochemical, pharmacological, and mass spectrometric approaches to study the consequences of Haspin inhibition in mitotic cells. We quantified 3964 phosphorylation sites on chromatin- associated proteins and identified a Haspin...

  2. Two siblings with immunodeficiency, facial abnormalities and chromosomal instability without mutation in DNMT3B gene but liability towards malignancy; a new chromatin disorder delineation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neitzel Heidemarie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ICF syndrome (standing for Immunodeficiency, Centromere instability and Facial anomalies syndrome is a very rare autosomal recessive immune disorder caused by mutations of the gene de novo DNA-methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B. However, in the literature similar clinical cases without such mutations are reported, as well. Results We report on a family in which the unrelated spouses had two female siblings sharing similar phenotypic features resembling ICF-syndrome, i.e. congenital abnormalities, immunodeficiency, developmental delay and high level of chromosomal instability, including high frequency of centromeric/pericentromeric rearrangements and breaks, chromosomal fragments despiralization or pulverization. However, mutations in DNMT3B could not be detected. Conclusion The discovery of a new so-called 'chromatin disorder' is suggested. Clinical, molecular genetic and cytogenetic characteristics are reported and compared to other 'chromatin disorders'.

  3. Meiosis in untreated and irradiated cyperus eragrostis vahl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cytological investigation of meiosis is seed irradiated Cyperus eragrostis has shown that the diffuse centromeric type of chromosome organisation leads to the formation of inviable chromosome complements, in which complex configurations resulting from stickiness as well as pairing of homologous regions, and numerous fragments, persist to the formation of pollen grains. At the higher doses, however, there is complete sterility, and low fertility even at the lower doses. The small numbers of M2 and M3 plants produced at lower doses show much reduced chromosomal abnormalities, indicating severe selection among the gametes and zygotes formed. There is little advantage in terms of survival from radiation damage, resulting from the possession of the diffuse centromere. (auth.)

  4. The characteristics of the spindle fiber attachments(SFAs) enriched fraction from mouse nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIZUMEI; NINGYI; 等

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of the particulate mouse centromere enriched fraction from isolated nuclei obtained in our laboratory were investigated by indirect immunofluorescence,test of the activity of microtubule organizing center(MTOC),SDS-PAGE,and fluorescence in situ hybridization.Most of the particles of the fraction are complexes of DNA and kinetochore proteins and show MTOC activity.The DNA isolated from the fraction can hybridize with DNA in the regions of the primary constrictions of all chromosomes of ascions of the primary constrictions of all chromosomes of ascites cells.The kinetochore proteins isolated from the fraction are mainly those with molecular weight of 55 KD and 59 KD.Results suggested that the fraction obtained is a centromere enriched nuclear fraction as indicated in our previous report.

  5. Chromosomal mutation by fission neutrons and X-rays in higher plants. A review on results of the joint research program utilizing Kinki University reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the efficiency of fission neutrons from the nuclear reactor of Kinki University (UTR-KINKI) and X-rays to chromosomes of higher plants for over 20 years. In this review, we described the development of bio-dosimeter using hyper-sensibility of germinating onion roots for irradiation, the analysis of chromosome structure in Haplopappus gracilis (Asteraceae), with the special reference of latent centromeres and survived telomeres throughout chromosomal evolution, the experimental studies on the induction of chromosomal rearrangement in Zebrina pendula (Commelinaceae), the behavior of chromosome fragments with non-localized centromeres in Carex and Eleocharis (Cyperaceae), and the possibility as a bio-dosimeter of pollen mother cells of Tradescantia paludosa (Commelinaceae) for the detection of low-dose radiation. (author)

  6. Partition-associated incompatibility caused by random assortment of pure plasmid clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Sherratt, David J; Gerdes, Kenn;

    2005-01-01

    Summary Bacterial plasmids and chromosomes encode centromere-like partition loci that actively segregate DNA before cell division. The molecular mechanism behind DNA segregation in bacteria is largely unknown. Here we analyse the mechanism of partition-associated incompatibility for plasmid pB171......, a phenotype associated with all known plasmid-encoded centromere loci. An R1 plasmid carrying par2 from plasmid pB171 was destabilized by the presence of an F plasmid carrying parC1, parC2 or the entire par2 locus of pB171. Strikingly, cytological double-labelling experiments revealed no evidence of long......-lived pairing of plasmids. Instead, pure R1 and F foci were positioned along the length of the cell, and in a random order. Thus, our results raise the possibility that partition-mediated plasmid incompatibility is not caused by pairing of heterologous plasmids but instead by random positioning of pure plasmid...

  7. Plasmid and chromosome partitioning: surprises from phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    Plasmids encode partitioning genes (par) that are required for faithful plasmid segregation at cell division. Initially, par loci were identified on plasmids, but more recently they were also found on bacterial chromosomes. We present here a phylogenetic analysis of par loci from plasmids...... and chromosomes from prokaryotic organisms. All known plasmid-encoded par loci specify three components: a cis-acting centromere-like site and two trans-acting proteins that form a nucleoprotein complex at the centromere (i.e. the partition complex). The proteins are encoded by two genes in an operon...... that is autoregulated by the par-encoded proteins. In all cases, the upstream gene encodes an ATPase that is essential for partitioning. Recent cytological analyses indicate that the ATPases function as adaptors between a host-encoded component and the partition complex and thereby tether plasmids and chromosomal...

  8. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko; Omori, Hiroko; Ueda, Keiji

    2016-09-01

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy-electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. PMID:27254595

  9. Expression of a possible constitutional hot spot in sperm chromosomes of a patient treated for Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperm chromosomes were studied in a man who was treated for Wilms' tumor with radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) 18 years ago. Human pronuclear sperm chromosomes were obtained after penetration of zona-free hamster eggs. Eighty-nine sperm chromosome complements were analyzed; 12.4% of them showed structural anomalies. This percentage was statistically different from the one found in our laboratory for controls (p less than 0.05). Five of eleven structurally abnormal metaphases had the same aberration: fission of chromosome number1 with the breakpoint at or near the centromere. Breaks and rearrangements of chromosome number1, often involving the centromere region, are among the most frequent anomalies found in Wilms' tumor cells

  10. Expression of regulators of mitotic fidelity are associated with intercellular heterogeneity and chromosomal instability in primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roylance, Rebecca; Endesfelder, David; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Burrell, Rebecca A.; Gorman, Patricia; Sander, Jil; Murphy, Niamh; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Hanby, Andrew M.; Speirs, Valerie; Johnston, Stephen R. D.; Kschischo, Maik; Swanton, Charles

    2014-01-01

    SURVIVIN increased expression were significantly associated with breast cancer grade. There was a significant association between increased CIN and both increased AURKA and SURVIVIN expression. AURKA gene amplification was also associated with increased CIN. To our knowledge this is the largest study...... quantified CIN, and their prognostic utility in breast cancer. The expression of SURVIVIN and AURKA was determined by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 426 patients with primary breast cancer. The association between protein expression and histopathological characteristics, clinical outcome and CIN status......, as determined by centromeric FISH and defined by modal centromere deviation, was analysed. Significantly poorer clinical outcome was observed in patients with high AURKA expression levels. Expression of SURVIVIN was elevated in ER-negative relative to ER-positive breast cancer. Both AURKA and...

  11. Sklerodermi--systemisk sklerose. Serologi, lungefunktion og overlevelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullman, S; Halberg, P; Wiik, A; Jacobsen, Søren

    1999-01-01

    %, anti-Scl-70 antibodies in 13% and anti-U1-RNP antibodies in 6.5%. These serological groups were associated with limited SSc, diffuse SSc, and myositis/arthritis, respectively. The most prevalent finding at first lung function test was isolated reduction of diffusion capacity (47%). Further......Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) were studied with regard to the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and their clinical correlates (n = 230), pulmonary function (n = 176), and mortality and causes of death (n = 344). ANA were found in 85%. Anti-centromere antibodies were found in 34...... deterioration of diffusion capacity was related to the presence of anti-centromere antibodies and increased sedimentation rate. The standardized mortality rate (SMR) was 2.9, higher in young patients (SMR = 13) and patients with diffuse SSc (SMR = 4.5)....

  12. Real-time multiprocessing of slit scan chromosome profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuse, P; Hauser, R; Männer, R; Hausmann, M; Cremer, C

    1990-01-01

    The multiprocessor NERV and its application to slit scan flow cytometry is described. Up to 320 processors and 640 MBytes of RAM may be used in one VME crate, providing a computing power of less than or equal to 1300 MIPS. The multiprocessor is controlled by a host computer that provides a friendly user interface and comfortable program development tools. All hardware and software has been tested on a prototype NERV system with 5 processors. For a real-time classification/detection of normal and aberrant chromosomes, the centromeric index or the number of centromeres are computed or specifically labeled DNA sequences are detected. The program is partitioned into 60 tasks that can be executed concurrently. A total analysis time of less than 600 microseconds including system overhead will be achieved according to timing measurements which have been done for all individual tasks. PMID:2286080

  13. A comparison of the chromosome G-banding pattern in two Sorex species, S. satunini and S. araneus (Mammalia, Insectivora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Borisov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The G-banded karyotype of S. satunini was compared with the karyotype of Sorex araneus. Extensive homology was revealed. The major chromosomal rearrangements involved in the evolutionary divergence of these species have been identified as centric fusions and centromeric shifts. From the known palaeontological age of S. satunini it is obvious that the vast chromosomal polymorphism of the S. araneus group originated during the middle Pleistocene.

  14. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  15. Protocols for Pachytene Chromosome and DNA Fiber FISH in Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Ren-hai; LING Jian; WANG Kun-bo; WANG Chun-ying; SONG Guo-li; LIU Fang

    2008-01-01

    @@ Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become the most important technique in plant molecular cytogenetics research.FISH-based physical mapping provides a valuable complementary approach in genome sequeneing to measure the physical distances between adjacent BAC contigs and delineating the structure and DNA composition of genomic regions of centromere and telomere.The accuracy and precision of the FISH-base physical maps depend on the resolution power of FISH.

  16. Use of the fluorescent micronucleus assay to detect the genotoxic effects of radiation and arsenic exposure in exfoliated human epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exfoliated cell micronucleus (MN) assay using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a centromeric probe is a rapid method for determining the mechanism of MN formation in epithelial tissues exposed to carcinogenic agents. Here, we describe the use of this assay to detect the presence or absence of centromeric DNA in MN induced in vivo by radiation therapy and chronic arsenic (As) ingestion. We examined the buccal cells of an individual receiving 6,500 rads of photon radiation to the head and neck. Exfoliated cells were collected before, during, and after treatment. After radiation exposure a 16.6-fold increase in buccal cell MN frequency was seen. All induced MN were centromere negative (MN-) resulting from chromosome breakage. This finding is consistent with the clastogenic action of radiation and confirmed the reliability of the method. Three weeks post-therapy, MN frequencies returned to baseline. The assay was used on 18 people chronically exposed to high levels of inorganic arsenic (In-As) in drinking water (average level, 1,312 μg As/L) and 18 matched controls (average level, 16 μg As/L). The combined increase in MN frequency was 1.8-fold (P = 0.001, Fisher's exact test). Frequencies of micronuclei containing acentric fragments (MN-) and those containing whole chromosomes (MN+) both increased, suggesting that arsenic may have both clastogenic and weak aneuploidogenic properties in vivo. After stratification on sex, the effect was stronger in male than in female bladder cells. In males the MN-frequency increased 2.06-fold (P =0.07) while the frequency of MN+ increased 1.86-fold (P = 0.08). In addition, the frequencies of MN and MN+ were positively associated with urinary arsenic and its metabolites. The association was stronger for micronuclei containing acentric fragments. By using FISH with centromeric probes, the mechanism of chemically induced genotoxicity can not be determined in epithelial tissues. 35 refs., 4 tabs

  17. Normal psychomotor development in a child with mosaic trisomy and pericentric inversion of chromosome 9.

    OpenAIRE

    Frydman, M; Shabtal, F; Halbrecht, I; Elian, E

    1981-01-01

    A female infant with trisomy 9 in 58% of her cells is reported. Multiple congenital malformations were present, but she had normal psychomotor development. A pericentric inversion involving a portion of the centromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 9 was identified in the patient and her mother. This variant chromosome 9 was present in duplicate in the trisomic line. Since similar variants of 9qh have been found repeatedly in this syndrome, we feel that this association may be a non-random one.

  18. CENP-E combines a slow, processive motor and a flexible coiled coil to produce an essential motile kinetochore tether

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yumi; Heuser, John E.; Waterman, Clare M.; Cleveland, Don W.

    2008-01-01

    The mitotic kinesin centromere protein E (CENP-E) is an essential kinetochore component that directly contributes to the capture and stabilization of spindle microtubules by kinetochores. Although reduction in CENP-E leads to high rates of whole chromosome missegregation, neither its properties as a microtubule-dependent motor nor how it contributes to the dynamic linkage between kinetochores and microtubules is known. Using single-molecule assays, we demonstrate that CENP-E is a very slow, h...

  19. A high-density rice genetic linkage map with 2275 markers using a single F2 population.

    OpenAIRE

    Harushima, Y; Yano, M; Shomura, A; Sato, M.; Shimano, T; Kuboki, Y; Yamamoto, T.; S. Y. Lin; Antonio, B A; Parco, A; Kajiya, H; Huang, N; K. Yamamoto; Nagamura, Y.; Kurata, N

    1998-01-01

    A 2275-marker genetic map of rice (Oryza sativa L.) covering 1521.6 cM in the Kosambi function has been constructed using 186 F2 plants from a single cross between the japonica variety Nipponbare and the indica variety Kasalath. The map provides the most detailed and informative genetic map of any plant. Centromere locations on 12 linkage groups were determined by dosage analysis of secondary and telotrisomics using > 130 DNA markers located on respective chromosome arms. A limited influence ...

  20. Differential recombination dynamics within the MHC of macaque species

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, Nanine; Doxiadis, Gaby G. M.; Otting, Nel; de Vos-Rouweler, Annemiek J. M.; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2014-01-01

    A panel of 15 carefully selected microsatellites (short tandem repeats, STRs) has allowed us to study segregation and haplotype stability in various macaque species. The STRs span the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region and map in more detail from the centromeric part of the Mhc-A to the DR region. Two large panels of Indian rhesus and Indonesian/Indochinese cynomolgus macaques have been subjected to pedigree analysis, allowing the definition of 161 and 36 different haplotypes and t...

  1. Reconstruction of the Kinetochore during Meiosis in Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Aki; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2006-01-01

    During the transition from mitosis to meiosis, the kinetochore undergoes significant reorganization, switching from a bipolar to a monopolar orientation. To examine the centromere proteins that are involved in fundamental reorganization in meiosis, we observed the localization of 22 mitotic and 2 meiotic protein components of the kinetochore during meiosis in living cells of the fission yeast. We found that the 22 mitotic proteins can be classified into three groups: the Mis6-like group, the ...

  2. Sgo1 is required for co-segregation of sister chromatids during achiasmate meiosis I

    OpenAIRE

    Dudas, Andrej; Ahmad, Shazia; Gregan, Juraj

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of chromosome number during meiosis is achieved by two successive rounds of chromosome segregation, called meiosis I and meiosis II. While meiosis II is similar to mitosis in that sister kinetochores are bi-oriented and segregate to opposite poles, recombined homologous chromosomes segregate during the first meiotic division. Formation of chiasmata, mono-orientation of sister kinetochores and protection of centromeric cohesion are three major features of meiosis I chromosomes wh...

  3. Premature dyad separation in meiosis II is the major segregation error with maternal age in mouse oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Y.; Lane, SIR; Jones, KT

    2014-01-01

    As women get older their oocytes become susceptible to chromosome mis-segregation. This generates aneuploid embryos, leading to increased infertility and birth defects. Here we examined the provenance of aneuploidy by tracking chromosomes and their kinetochores in oocytes from young and aged mice. Changes consistent with chromosome cohesion deterioration were found with age, including increased interkinetochore distance and loss of the centromeric protector of cohesion SGO2 in metaphase II ar...

  4. The Clr7 and Clr8 Directionality Factors and the Pcu4 Cullin Mediate Heterochromatin Formation in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    OpenAIRE

    Thon, Geneviève; Hansen, Klavs R.; Altes, Susagna Padrissa; Sidhu, Deepak; Singh, Gurjeet; Verhein-Hansen, Janne; Bonaduce, Michael J.; Klar, Amar J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Fission yeast heterochromatin is formed at centromeres, telomeres, and in the mating-type region where it mediates the transcriptional silencing of the mat2-P and mat3-M donor loci and the directionality of mating-type switching. We conducted a genetic screen for directionality mutants. This screen revealed the essential role of two previously uncharacterized factors, Clr7 and Clr8, in heterochromatin formation. Clr7 and Clr8 are required for localization of the Swi6 chromodomain protein and ...

  5. Structure-Function Analysis of SUV39H1 Reveals a Dominant Role in Heterochromatin Organization, Chromosome Segregation, and Mitotic Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Melcher, Martin; Schmid, Manfred; Aagaard, Louise; Selenko, Philipp; Laible, Götz; Jenuwein, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    SUV39H1, a human homologue of the Drosophila position effect variegation modifier Su(var)3-9 and of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe silencing factor clr4, encodes a novel heterochromatic protein that transiently accumulates at centromeric positions during mitosis. Using a detailed structure-function analysis of SUV39H1 mutant proteins in transfected cells, we now show that deregulated SUV39H1 interferes at multiple levels with mammalian higher-order chromatin organization. First, forced express...

  6. Whole-genome bisulfite DNA sequencing of a DNMT3B mutant patient

    OpenAIRE

    Heyn, Holger; Vidal, Enrique; Sayols, Sergi; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V.; Moran, Sebastian; Medina, Ignacio; Sandoval, Juan; Simó-Riudalbas, Laia; Szczesna, Karolina; Huertas, Dori; Gatto, Sole; Matarazzo, Maria R.; Dopazo, Joaquin; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    The immunodeficiency, centromere instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is associated to mutations of the DNA methyl-transferase DNMT3B, resulting in a reduction of enzyme activity. Aberrant expression of immune system genes and hypomethylation of pericentromeric regions accompanied by chromosomal instability were determined as alterations driving the disease phenotype. However, so far only technologies capable to analyze single loci were applied to determine epigenetic alterations i...

  7. Integrated bioinformatics analysis of epigenomic and transcriptomic data from ICF syndrome patient's cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gatto, Sole

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficiency, Centromeric region instability, Facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome (OMIM 242860), is a human autosomic recessive disease due to mutations in the Dnmt3b gene, characterized by inheritance of aberrant patterns of DNA methylation and heterochromatin defects. How mutations in Dnmt3B and the resulting deficiency in DNA methyltransferase activity result mainly in immunodeficiency has not been clarified yet. It is already known that the expression of several genes and microRNAs is der...

  8. Observações citológicas em Coffea: XVI - Microsporogênese em Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândida H. T. Mendes

    1950-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of cytological observations on microsporogenesis in the self-sterile species Coffea canephora. It was found difficult to study chromosome structure in the first stages of meiosis because the chromosomes do not stain well with aceto carmine and could be seen only as long faintly threads with some heteropycnotic regions. In many observations of the pachytene stage it was possible to observe and study a chromosome attached to the nucleolus. This chromosome characteristically had a visible centromere which divided it into two arms of different sizes. The short arm was attached to the nucleolus and had several heteropycnotic regions. In the long arm the heteropycnotic regions were observed to be close to the centromere ; the distal portion of this arm was only faintly stained. Other chromosomes in the pachytene stage were found to have a conspicuous centromere located between two highly heteropycnotic regions. The heteropycnotic regions in some chromosomes were located near the centromere while in others they were observed to be scattered throughout the chromosome. In diakinesis the chiasmata were counted and there were found seven chromosomes with one chiasma, three chromosomes with two chiasmata and one chromosome with three chiasmata. The average number of chiasmata per cell was 15.88. In metaphase the average number of chiasmata per cell was found to be 14.57, which is less than the average per cell in diakinesis. Anaphase I appeared normal as did all subsequent phases of meiosis, that resulted finally in the development of four microspores with eleven chromosomes each. Very few pollen mother cells with abnormal numbers of chromosomes were observed. On the basis of this study, it is concluded that microsporogenesis in Coffea canephora is normal.

  9. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume XLVII, Part 1. Structures of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings for the 47th Annual Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology are presented. This symposium focused on the Structure of DNA. Topics presented covered research in the handedness of DNA, conformational analysis, chemically modified DNA, chemical synthesis of DNA, DNA-protein interactions, DNA within nucleosomes, DNA methylation, DNA replication, gyrases and topoisomerases, recombining and mutating DNA, transcription of DNA and its regulation, the organization of genes along DNA, repetitive DNA and pseudogenes, and origins of replication, centromeres, and teleomeres

  10. Methods for generating or increasing revenues from crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Keith, Kevin; Preuss, Daphne

    2007-03-20

    The present invention provides methods of doing business and providing services. For example, methods of increasing the revenue of crops are provided. To this end, the method includes the use of a nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and mini chromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  11. Chromosome analysis of Endochironomus albipennis Meigen, 1830 and morphologically similar Endochironomus sp. (Diptera, Chironomidae) from water bodies of the Volga region, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnova, Natalya; Sigareva, Ludmila; Sinichkina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Based upon the detailed chromosome map of polytene chromosomes of the eurybiont species Endochironomus albipennis Meigen, 1830, the localization of the centromere regions using a C-banding technique is defined. Chromosomal polymorphism in populations from two water bodies in the Volga region has been studied, 17 sequences are described. Polytene chromosomes of Endochironomus sp. (2n=6), having larvae morphologically similar to those of Endochironomus albipennis Meigen, 1830 (2n=6) are described for the first time. PMID:26752268

  12. Remarkable diversity of intron-1 of the para voltage-gated sodium channel gene in an Anopheles gambiae/Anopheles coluzzii hybrid zone.

    OpenAIRE

    Santolamazza, F.; Caputo, B.; Nwakanma, DC; Fanello, C.; Petrarca, V.; Conway, DJ; Weetman, D; J. Pinto; Mancini, E.; della Torre, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genomic differentiation between Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii - the major malaria vectors in sub-Saharan Africa - is localized into large “islands” toward the centromeres of chromosome-X and the two autosomes. Linkage disequilibrium between these genomic islands was first detected between species-specific polymorphisms within ribosomal DNA genes (IGS-rDNA) on the X-chromosome and a single variant at position 702 of intron 1 (Int-1702) of the para Voltage-Gated Sodium Cha...

  13. AcEST: BP919431 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ts) Value sp|Q7Z7B0|FLIP1_HUMAN Filamin-A-interacting protein 1 OS=Homo sa... 46 1e-04 sp|O61308|PUMA_PARUN ...E+ S+ +EC + E EK + L E+ V+ +R+ ELE SR Sbjct: 435 LEKLEEAFSKSKSECTQ-LHLNLEKEKNL------TKDLLNELEVVKSRVKELECSESR 486 >sp|O61308|PUMA..._PARUN 227 kDa spindle- and centromere-associated protein OS=Parascaris univalens GN=PUMA

  14. AcEST: DK958572 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |O76463|NFT1_CAEEL Nitrilase and fragile histidine triad fusio... 34 0.83 sp|O61308|PUMA_PARUN 227 kDa spind...S NDL NF +++ AG Sbjct: 8 RTMATGRHF-IAVCQMTSDNDLEKNFQAAKNMIERAG 43 >sp|O61308|PUMA_PARUN 227 kDa spindle- and... centromere-associated protein OS=Parascaris univalens GN=PUMA1 PE=2 SV=1 Length

  15. AcEST: DK961336 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .. 37 0.069 sp|Q9PW73|SOJO_XENLA Cytoskeletal protein Sojo OS=Xenopus laevis... 37 0.090 sp|O61308|PUMA_PARU...LEAKADAQENALRTTEDQLEHSRHILAEKERILQMFKDEMKAL 215 Query: 546 KEEL 557 KEEL Sbjct: 216 KEEL 219 >sp|O61308|PUMA..._PARUN 227 kDa spindle- and centromere-associated protein OS=Parascaris univalens GN=PUMA1 PE=2 SV=1 Length

  16. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of recently evolved Tragopogon (Asteraceae) allopolyploids reveal a karyotype that is additive of the diploid progenitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pires, J. C.; Lim, K. Y.; Kovařík, Aleš; Matyášek, Roman; Boyd, A.; Leitch, A. R.; Leitch, I. J.; Bennet, M. D.; Soltis, P. S.; Soltis, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 7 (2004), s. 1022-1035. ISSN 0002-9122 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/01/0313; GA ČR GA521/01/0037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : centromere * chromosomal evolution * fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.438, year: 2004

  17. Plasticity of fission yeast CENP-A chromatin driven by relative levels of histone H3 and H4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli G Castillo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The histone H3 variant CENP-A assembles into chromatin exclusively at centromeres. The process of CENP-A chromatin assembly is epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of a central kinetochore domain on which CENP-A chromatin is assembled, and this is flanked by heterochromatin. Marker genes are silenced when placed within kinetochore or heterochromatin domains. It is not known if fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin is confined to specific sequences or whether histone H3 is actively excluded. Here, we show that fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1 can assemble on noncentromeric DNA when it is inserted within the central kinetochore domain, suggesting that in fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin assembly is driven by the context of a sequence rather than the underlying DNA sequence itself. Silencing in the central domain is correlated with the amount of CENP-A(Cnp1 associated with the marker gene and is also affected by the relative level of histone H3. Our analyses indicate that kinetochore integrity is dependent on maintaining the normal ratio of H3 and H4. Excess H3 competes with CENP-A(Cnp1 for assembly into central domain chromatin, resulting in less CENP-A(Cnp1 and other kinetochore proteins at centromeres causing defective kinetochore function, which is manifest as aberrant mitotic chromosome segregation. Alterations in the levels of H3 relative to H4 and CENP-A(Cnp1 influence the extent of DNA at centromeres that is packaged in CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin and the composition of this chromatin. Thus, CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin assembly in fission yeast exhibits plasticity with respect to the underlying sequences and is sensitive to the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1 and other core histones.

  18. Loss of ATRX or DAXX expression and concomitant acquisition of the alternative lengthening of telomeres phenotype are late events in a small subset of MEN-1 syndrome pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    OpenAIRE

    de Wilde, Roeland F.; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Maitra, Anirban; Meeker, Alan K.; Barish H Edil; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Ellison, Trevor A.; Schulick, Richard D; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Valk, Gerlof D.; Vriens, Menno R.; Rinkes, Inne HM Borel; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Ralph H. Hruban; Matsukuma, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 45% of sporadic well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors harbor mutations in either ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked) or DAXX (death domain-associated protein). These novel tumor suppressor genes encode nuclear proteins that interact with one another and function in chromatin remodeling at telomeric and peri-centromeric regions. Mutations in these genes are associated with loss of their protein expression and correlate with the alternative lengthen...

  19. Spindle positioning in human cells relies on proper centriole formation and on the microcephaly proteins CPAP and STIL

    OpenAIRE

    Kitagawa, D.; Kohlmaier, G.; Keller, D.; Strnad, P.; Balestra, F. R.; Fluckiger, I.; Gonczy, P.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with MCPH (autosomal recessive primary microcephaly) exhibit impaired brain development, presumably due to the compromised function of neuronal progenitors. Seven MCPH loci have been identified, including one that encodes centrosome protein 4.1 associated protein (CPAP; also known as centromere protein J, CENPJ). CPAP is a large coiled-coil protein enriched at the centrosome, a structure that comprises two centrioles and surrounding pericentriolar material (PCM). CPAP depletion impai...

  20. Karyotype variability in neotropical catfishes of the family Pimelodidae (Teleostei: Siluriformes)

    OpenAIRE

    Américo Moraes Neto; Maelin da Silva; Daniele Aparecida Matoso; Marcelo Ricardo Vicari; Mara Cristina de Almeida; Maria João Collares-Pereira; Roberto Ferreira Artoni

    2011-01-01

    Karyotypic data are presented for four species of fish belonging to the Pimelodidae family. These species show a conserved diploid number, 2n = 56 chromosomes, with different karyotypic formulae. The analyzed species showed little amount of heterochromatin located preferentially in the centromeric and telomeric regions of some chromosomes. The nucleolus organizer regions activity (Ag-NORs) and the chromosomal location of ribosomal genes by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), with 18S an...

  1. Automating dicentric chromosome detection from cytogenetic bio-dosimetry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a prototype software system with sufficient capacity and speed to estimate radiation exposures in a mass casualty event by counting dicentric chromosomes (DCs) in metaphase cells from many individuals. Top-ranked metaphase cell images are segmented by classifying and defining chromosomes with an active contour gradient vector field (GVF) and by determining centromere locations along the centreline. The centreline is extracted by discrete curve evolution (DCE) skeleton branch pruning and curve interpolation. Centromere detection minimises the global width and DAPI-staining intensity profiles along the centreline. A second centromere is identified by reapplying this procedure after masking the first. Dicentrics can be identified from features that capture width and intensity profile characteristics as well as local shape features of the object contour at candidate pixel locations. The correct location of the centromere is also refined in chromosomes with sister chromatid separation. The overall algorithm has both high sensitivity (85 %) and specificity (94 %). Results are independent of the shape and structure of chromosomes in different cells, or the laboratory preparation protocol followed. The prototype software was re-coded in C++/OpenCV; image processing was accelerated by data and task parallelization with Message Passaging Interface and Intel Threading Building Blocks and an asynchronous non-blocking I/O strategy. Relative to a serial process, metaphase ranking, GVF and DCE are, respectively, 100 and 300-fold faster on an 8-core desktop and 64-core cluster computers. The software was then ported to a 1024-core supercomputer, which processed 200 metaphase images each from 1025 specimens in 1.4 h. (authors)

  2. A chromodomain protein, Chp1, is required for the establishment of heterochromatin in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Sadaie, Mahito; Iida, Tetsushi; URANO, TAKESHI; Nakayama, Jun-ichi

    2004-01-01

    The chromodomain is a conserved motif that functions in the epigenetic control of gene expression. Here, we report the functional characterization of a chromodomain protein, Chp1, in the heterochromatin assembly in fission yeast. We show that Chp1 is a structural component of three heterochromatic regions—centromeres, the mating-type region, and telomeres—and that its localization in these regions is dependent on the histone methyltransferase Clr4. Although deletion of the chp1+ gene causes c...

  3. csi2p modulates microtubule dynamics and organizes the bipolar spindle for chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Judite; Fu, Chuanhai; Khare, V. Mohini; Tran, Phong T.

    2014-01-01

    Proper chromosome segregation is of paramount importance for proper genetic inheritance. Defects in chromosome segregation can lead to aneuploidy, which is a hallmark of cancer cells. Eukaryotic chromosome segregation is accomplished by the bipolar spindle. Additional mechanisms, such as the spindle assembly checkpoint and centromere positioning, further help to ensure complete segregation fidelity. Here we present the fission yeast csi2 +. csi2p localizes to the spindle poles, where it regul...

  4. Automating dicentric chromosome detection from cytogenetic biodosimetry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Peter K; Li, Yanxin; Wickramasinghe, Asanka; Subasinghe, Akila; Caminsky, Natasha; Khan, Wahab; Samarabandu, Jagath; Wilkins, Ruth; Flegal, Farrah; Knoll, Joan H

    2014-06-01

    We present a prototype software system with sufficient capacity and speed to estimate radiation exposures in a mass casualty event by counting dicentric chromosomes (DCs) in metaphase cells from many individuals. Top-ranked metaphase cell images are segmented by classifying and defining chromosomes with an active contour gradient vector field (GVF) and by determining centromere locations along the centreline. The centreline is extracted by discrete curve evolution (DCE) skeleton branch pruning and curve interpolation. Centromere detection minimises the global width and DAPI-staining intensity profiles along the centreline. A second centromere is identified by reapplying this procedure after masking the first. Dicentrics can be identified from features that capture width and intensity profile characteristics as well as local shape features of the object contour at candidate pixel locations. The correct location of the centromere is also refined in chromosomes with sister chromatid separation. The overall algorithm has both high sensitivity (85 %) and specificity (94 %). Results are independent of the shape and structure of chromosomes in different cells, or the laboratory preparation protocol followed. The prototype software was recoded in C++/OpenCV; image processing was accelerated by data and task parallelisation with Message Passaging Interface and Intel Threading Building Blocks and an asynchronous non-blocking I/O strategy. Relative to a serial process, metaphase ranking, GVF and DCE are, respectively, 100 and 300-fold faster on an 8-core desktop and 64-core cluster computers. The software was then ported to a 1024-core supercomputer, which processed 200 metaphase images each from 1025 specimens in 1.4 h. PMID:24757176

  5. Evolutionarily different alphoid repeat DNA on homologous chromosomes in human and chimpanzee.

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, A L; Laursen, H B; Jones, C; Bak, A L

    1992-01-01

    Centromeric alphoid DNA in primates represents a class of evolving repeat DNA. In humans, chromosomes 13 and 21 share one subfamily of alphoid DNA while chromosomes 14 and 22 share another subfamily. We show that similar pairwise homogenizations occur in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), where chromosomes 14 and 22, homologous to human chromosomes 13 and 21, share one partially homogenized alphoid DNA subfamily and chromosomes 15 and 23, homologous to human chromosomes 14 and 22, share anothe...

  6. Effect of Chromosome Tethering on Nuclear Organization in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Avşaroğlu, Barış; Bronk, Gabriel; Gordon-Messer, Susannah; Ham, Jungoh; Bressan, Debra A.; Haber, James E; Kondev, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Interphase chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are tethered to the nuclear envelope at their telomeres and to the spindle pole body (SPB) at their centromeres. Using a polymer model of yeast chromosomes that includes these interactions, we show theoretically that telomere attachment to the nuclear envelope is a major determinant of gene positioning within the nucleus only for genes within 10 kb of the telomeres. We test this prediction by measuring the distance between the SPB and the sil...

  7. Overlapping Regulation of CenH3 Localization and Histone H3 Turnover by CAF-1 and HIR Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Jessica Lopes da; Holik, John; Green, Erin M.; Rando, Oliver J.; Kaufman, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation is dependent on the centromere-specific histone H3 isoform known generally as CenH3, or as Cse4 in budding yeast. Cytological experiments have shown that Cse4 appears at extracentromeric loci in yeast cells deficient for both the CAF-1 and HIR histone H3/H4 deposition complexes, consistent with increased nondisjunction in these double mutant cells. Here, we examined molecular aspects of this Cse4 mislocalization. Genome-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation analy...

  8. A Novel Role of the N Terminus of Budding Yeast Histone H3 Variant Cse4 in Ubiquitin-Mediated Proteolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Au, Wei Chun; Dawson, Anthony R.; Rawson, David W.; Taylor, Sara B.; Baker, Richard E.; Basrai, Munira A.

    2013-01-01

    Regulating levels of centromeric histone H3 (CenH3) variant is crucial for genome stability. Interaction of Psh1, an E3 ligase, with the C terminus of Cse4 has been shown to contribute to its proteolysis. Here, we demonstrate a role for ubiquitination of the N terminus of Cse4 in regulating Cse4 proteolysis for faithful chromosome segregation and a role for Doa1 in ubiquitination of Cse4.

  9. Histone H3 Variants in Trichomonas vaginalis

    OpenAIRE

    Zubáčová, Zuzana; Hostomská, Jitka; Tachezy, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The parabasalid protist Trichomonas vaginalis is a widespread parasite that affects humans, frequently causing vaginitis in infected women. Trichomonad mitosis is marked by the persistence of the nuclear membrane and the presence of an asymmetric extranuclear spindle with no obvious direct connection to the chromosomes. No centromeric markers have been described in T. vaginalis, which has prevented a detailed analysis of mitotic events in this organism. In other eukaryotes, nucleosomes of cen...

  10. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity of alpha satellite repetitive DNA: a survey of alphoid sequences from different human chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Waye, J S; Willard, H F

    1987-01-01

    The human alpha satellite DNA family is composed of diverse, tandemly reiterated monomer units of approximately 171 basepairs localized to the centromeric region of each chromosome. These sequences are organized in a highly chromosome-specific manner with many, if not all human chromosomes being characterized by individually distinct alphoid subsets. Here, we compare the nucleotide sequences of 153 monomer units, representing alphoid components of at least 12 different human chromosomes. Base...

  11. The genomic organization of a human creatine transporter (CRTR) gene located in Xq28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, N.; Bauer, D.; Brenner, V. [Institute fuer Molekulare Biotechnologie, Jena (Germany)] [and others

    1996-07-15

    During the course of a large-scale sequencing project in Xq28, a human creatine transporter (CRTR) gene was discovered. The gene is located approximately 36 kb centromeric to ALD. The gene contains 13 exons and spans about 8.5 kb of genomic DNA. Since the creatine transporter has a prominent function in muscular physiology, it is a candidate gene for Barth syndrome and infantile cardiomyopathy mapped to Xq28. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Cytogenetics and sperm ultrastructure of Atelopus spumarius (Anura, Bufonidae) from the Brazilian Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    Sérgio Siqueira; Odair Aguiar Junior; Albertina Pimentel Lima; Shirlei Maria Recco-Pimentel

    2013-01-01

    The current taxonomy of most Atelopus species is based on morphological and color data only. Recent studies suggest that A. spumarius may represent a species complex assigned under the same name. Karyotypic data and description of sperm ultrastructure for 13 specimens of A. spumarius are presented here for the first time. A chromosomal analysis revealed 2n = 22 chromosomes, with centromeric heterochromatin in all pairs and a nucleolar organizer region (NOR) on the telomere of pair 7. The sper...

  13. New Insights into Nested Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposons in Brassica Species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijuan Wei; Meili Xiao; Zeshan An; Bi Ma; Annaliese S.Mason; Wei Qian; Jiana Li

    2013-01-01

    Long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons,one of the foremost types of transposons,continually change or modify gene function and reorganize the genome through bursts of dramatic proliferation.Many LTR-TEs preferentially insert within other LTR-TEs,but the cause and evolutionary significance of these nested LTR-TEs are not well understood.In this study,a total of 1.52 Gb of Brassica sequence containing 2020 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) was scanned,and six bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones with extremely nested LTR-TEs (LTR-TEs density:7.24/kb)were selected for further analysis.The majority of the LTR-TEs in four of the six BACs were found to be derived from the rapid proliferation of retrotransposons originating within the BAC regions,with only a few LTR-TEs originating from the proliferation and insertion of retrotransposons from outside the BAC regions approximately 5-23 Mya.LTR-TEs also preferably inserted into TA-rich repeat regions.Gene prediction by Genescan identified 207 genes in the 0.84 Mb of total BAC sequences.Only a few genes (3/207) could be matched to the Brassica expressed sequence tag (EST) database,indicating that most genes were inactive after retrotransposon insertion.Five of the six BACs were putatively centromeric.Hence,nested LTR-TEs in centromere regions are rapidly duplicated,repeatedly inserted,and act to suppress activity of genes and to reshuffle the structure of the centromeric sequences.Our results suggest that LTR-TEs burst and proliferate on a local scale to create nested LTR-TE regions,and that these nested LTR-TEs play a role in the formation of centromeres.

  14. Plasticity of fission yeast CENP-A chromatin driven by relative levels of histone H3 and H4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Araceli G; Mellone, Barbara G; Partridge, Janet F; Richardson, William; Hamilton, Georgina L; Allshire, Robin C; Pidoux, Alison L

    2007-07-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A assembles into chromatin exclusively at centromeres. The process of CENP-A chromatin assembly is epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of a central kinetochore domain on which CENP-A chromatin is assembled, and this is flanked by heterochromatin. Marker genes are silenced when placed within kinetochore or heterochromatin domains. It is not known if fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin is confined to specific sequences or whether histone H3 is actively excluded. Here, we show that fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) can assemble on noncentromeric DNA when it is inserted within the central kinetochore domain, suggesting that in fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin assembly is driven by the context of a sequence rather than the underlying DNA sequence itself. Silencing in the central domain is correlated with the amount of CENP-A(Cnp1) associated with the marker gene and is also affected by the relative level of histone H3. Our analyses indicate that kinetochore integrity is dependent on maintaining the normal ratio of H3 and H4. Excess H3 competes with CENP-A(Cnp1) for assembly into central domain chromatin, resulting in less CENP-A(Cnp1) and other kinetochore proteins at centromeres causing defective kinetochore function, which is manifest as aberrant mitotic chromosome segregation. Alterations in the levels of H3 relative to H4 and CENP-A(Cnp1) influence the extent of DNA at centromeres that is packaged in CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin and the composition of this chromatin. Thus, CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin assembly in fission yeast exhibits plasticity with respect to the underlying sequences and is sensitive to the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) and other core histones. PMID:17677001

  15. Quantitative single-molecule microscopy reveals that CENP-A(Cnp1) deposition occurs during G2 in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Lando, David; Endesfelder, Ulrike; Berger, Harald; Subramanian, Lakxmi; Dunne, Paul D; McColl, James; Klenerman, David; Carr, Antony M.; Sauer, Markus; Allshire, Robin C.; Heilemann, Mike; Laue, Ernest D.

    2012-01-01

    The inheritance of the histone H3 variant CENP-A in nucleosomes at centromeres following DNA replication is mediated by an epigenetic mechanism. To understand the process of epigenetic inheritance, or propagation of histones and histone variants, as nucleosomes are disassembled and reassembled in living eukaryotic cells, we have explored the feasibility of exploiting photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM). PALM of single molecules in living cells has the potential to reveal new concep...

  16. Breaking the HAC Barrier: Histone H3K9 acetyl/methyl balance regulates CENP-A assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Ohzeki, J.-I.; M. Nakano; Masumoto, H; Kouprina, N.; Noskov, V. N.; Larionov, V; Bergmann, J H; Earnshaw, W C; Kimura, H.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetochore is responsible for accurate chromosome segregation. However, the mechanism by which kinetochores assemble and are maintained remains unclear. Here we report that de novo CENP-A assembly and kinetochore formation on human centromeric alphoid DNA arrays is regulated by a histone H3K9 acetyl/methyl balance. Tethering of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) to alphoid DNA arrays breaks a cell type-specific barrier for de novo stable CENP-A assembly and induces assembly of other kinet...

  17. The Mps1 Kinase Modulates the Recruitment and Activity of Cnn1CENP-T at Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kinetochores

    OpenAIRE

    Thapa, Kriti Shrestha; Oldani, Amanda; Pagliuca, Cinzia; De Wulf, Peter; Hazbun, Tony R.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetochores are conserved protein complexes that bind the replicated chromosomes to the mitotic spindle and then direct their segregation. To better comprehend Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinetochore function, we dissected the phospho-regulated dynamic interaction between conserved kinetochore protein Cnn1CENP-T, the centromere region, and the Ndc80 complex through the cell cycle. Cnn1 localizes to kinetochores at basal levels from G1 through metaphase but accumulates abruptly at anaphase onset...

  18. Characterization of New Polyol/H+ Symporters in Debaryomyces hansenii

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Iliana; Madeira, Ana; Prista, Catarina; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C.; Leandro, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a halotolerant yeast that produces and assimilates a wide variety of polyols. In this work we evaluate polyol transport in D. hansenii CBS 767, detecting the occurrence of polyol/H+ (and sugar/H+) symporter activity, through the transient extracellular alkalinization of unbuffered starved cell suspensions. From the D. hansenii genome database, we selected nine ORFs encoding putative transporter proteins to clone in a centromeric plasmid with C-terminal GFP tagging and...

  19. Nature of telomere dimers and chromosome looping in human spermatozoa

    OpenAIRE

    Solov'eva, Lyudmila; Svetlova, Maria; Bodinski, Dawn; Zalensky, Andrei O.

    2004-01-01

    Specific and well-organized chromosome architecture in human sperm cells is supported by the prominent interactions between centromeres and between telomeres. The telomere-telomere interactions result in telomere dimers that are positioned at the nuclear periphery. It is unknown whether composition of sperm telomere dimers is random or specific. We now report that telomere dimers result from specific interactions between the two ends of each chromosome. FISH using pairs of subtelomeric DNA pr...

  20. Characterization of plasmid burden and copy number in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for optimization of metabolic engineering applications

    OpenAIRE

    Karim, Ashty S.; Curran, Kathleen A.; Alper, Hal S.

    2012-01-01

    Many metabolic engineering and genetic engineering applications in yeast rely on the use of plasmids. Despite their pervasive use and the diverse collections available, there is a fundamental lack of understanding of how commonly used DNA plasmids affect the cell’s ability to grow and how the choice of plasmid components can influence plasmid load and burden. In this study, we characterized the major attributes of the 2μ and centromeric plasmids typically used in yeast by examining the impact...

  1. The genetics of folate metabolism and maternal risk of birth of a child with Down syndrome and associated congenital heart defects

    OpenAIRE

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Almost 15 years ago it was hypothesized that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes involved in folate metabolism could lead to aberrant methylation of peri-centromeric regions of chromosome 21, favoring its abnormal segregation during maternal meiosis. Subsequently, more than 50 small case-control studies investigated whether or not maternal polymorphisms of folate pathway genes could be risk factors for the birth of a child with Down syndrome (DS), yielding conflicting and inconclusive res...

  2. Discrimination of uranium chemo-toxic and radio-toxic effects: definition of biological markers for evaluating professional risks in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium (U) is a heavy metal that is also considered as an alpha emitter. Thus the origin of U toxicity is both chemical and radiological. The identification of bio-markers to discriminate chemical and radiological toxicity for a given U compound is required to assess accurately the health effects of isotopic mixtures such as depleted U in 235U with a low specific activity. Data from the literature show that the best candidates are cytogenetic markers. In the present work, the assessment of bio-markers of U contamination was performed on three cellular models (mouse fibroblasts, rat lymphocytes and human lymphocytes) that were exposed to different isotopic mixtures of U. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) centromere assay was performed to discriminate the chemo-toxic and radio-toxic effects of U. This study showed that the evaluation of micronuclei in bi-nucleated cells could not assess U genotoxicity accurately. Instead, the assessment of centromere-negative micronuclei and nucleo-plasmic bridges correlated with the radio-toxic effects of U. The evaluation of centromere-positive micronuclei and micronuclei in mono-nucleated cells correlated with the chemo-toxic effects of U. These cytogenetic markers should be validated on different biological models and could be proposed to discriminate radiological and chemical toxicity of a given isotopic mixture of U. These four cytogenetic markers could be a useful complement of the classical dosimetric bio-markers for the assessment of internal uranium contamination. (author)

  3. Studies on the mitotic chromosome scaffold of Allium sativum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOJIAN; SHAOBOJIN; 等

    1995-01-01

    An argentophilic structure is present in the metaphase chromosomes of garlic(Allium sativum),Cytochemical studies indicate that the main component of the structure is non-histone proteins(NHPs).The results of light and electron microscopic observations reveal that the chromosme NHP scaffold is a network which is composed of fibres and granules and distributed throughout the chromosomes.In the NHP network,there are many condensed regions that are connected by redlatively looser regions.The distribution of the condensed regions varies in individual chromosomes.In some of the chromosomes the condensed regions are lognitudinally situsted in the central part of a chromatid while in others these regions appear as coillike transverse bands.At early metaphase.scaffolds of the sister chromatids of a chromosome are linked to each other in the centromeric region,meanwhile,they are connected by scafold materials along the whole length of the chromosome.At late metaphase,however,the connective scaffold materials between the two sister chromatids disappear gradually and the chromatids begin to separate from one another at their ends.but the chromatids are linked together in the centromeric region until anaphase.This connection seems to be related to the special structure of the NHP scaffold formed in the centromeric region.The morphological features and dynamic changes of the chromosome scaffold are discussed.

  4. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Chromosome Evolution in African Cichlid Fish: Contributions from the Physical Mapping of Repeated DNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, I.A.; Poletto, A.B.; Kocher, T.D.; Mota-Velasco, J.C.; Penman, D.J.; Martins, C.

    2010-01-01

    Cichlid fishes have been the subject of increasing scientific interest because of their rapid adaptive radiation that has led to extensive ecological diversity and because of their enormous importance to tropical and subtropical aquaculture. To further understanding of chromosome evolution among cichlid species, we have comparatively mapped the SATA satellite DNA, the transposable element ROn-1, and repeated sequences in the bacterial artificial chromosome clone BAC-C4E09 on the chromosomes of a range of African species of Cichlidae, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The SATA satellite DNA was mapped in almost all the centromeres of all tilapiine and haplochromine species studied. The maintenance and centromeric distribution of the SATA satellite DNA in African cichlids suggest that this sequence plays an important role in the organization and function of the centromere in these species. Furthermore, analysis of SATA element distribution clarifies that chromosome fusions occurred independently in Oreochromis and Tilapia genera, and led to the reduced chromosome number detected in O. karongae and T. mariae. The comparative chromosome mapping of the ROn-1 SINE-like element and BAC-C4E09 shows that the repeated sequences have been maintained among tilapiine, haplochromine and hemichromine fishes and has demonstrated the homology of the largest chromosomes among these groups. Furthermore, the mapping of ROn-1 suggested that different chromosomal rearrangements could have occurred in the origin of the largest chromosome pairs of tilapiines and non-tilapiines. PMID:20606399

  6. HJURP involvement in de novo CenH3(CENP-A) and CENP-C recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Müller, Sebastian; Blümer, Julia; Klare, Kerstin; Musacchio, Andrea; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2015-04-01

    Although our understanding of centromere maintenance, marked by the histone H3 variant CenH3(CENP-A) in most eukaryotes, has progressed, the mechanism underlying the de novo formation of centromeres remains unclear. We used a synthetic system to dissect how CenH3(CENP-A) contributes to the accumulation of CENP-C and CENP-T, two key components that are necessary for the formation of functional kinetochores. We find that de novo CENP-T accumulation depends on CENP-C and that recruitment of these factors requires two domains in CenH3(CENP-A): the HJURP-binding region (CATD) and the CENP-C-binding region (CAC). Notably, HJURP interacts directly with CENP-C and is critical for de novo accumulation of CENP-C at synthetic centromeres. On the basis of our findings, we propose that HJURP serves a dual chaperone function in coordinating CenH3(CENP-A) and CENP-C recruitment. PMID:25843710

  7. Msc1 acts through histone H2A.Z to promote chromosome stability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shakil; Dul, Barbara; Qiu, Xinxing; Walworth, Nancy C

    2007-11-01

    As a central component of the DNA damage checkpoint pathway, the conserved protein kinase Chk1 mediates cell cycle progression when DNA damage is generated. Msc1 was identified as a multicopy suppressor capable of facilitating survival in response to DNA damage of cells mutant for chk1. We demonstrate that loss of msc1 function results in an increased rate of chromosome loss and that an msc1 null allele exhibits genetic interactions with mutants in key kinetochore components. Multicopy expression of msc1 robustly suppresses a temperature-sensitive mutant (cnp1-1) in the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, and localization of CENP-A to the centromere is compromised in msc1 null cells. We present several lines of evidence to suggest that Msc1 carries out its function through the histone H2A variant H2A.Z, encoded by pht1 in fission yeast. Like an msc1 mutant, a pht1 mutant also exhibits chromosome instability and genetic interactions with kinetochore mutants. Suppression of cnp1-1 by multicopy msc1 requires pht1. Likewise, suppression of the DNA damage sensitivity of a chk1 mutant by multicopy msc1 also requires pht1. We present the first genetic evidence that histone H2A.Z may participate in centromere function in fission yeast and propose that Msc1 acts through H2A.Z to promote chromosome stability and cell survival following DNA damage. PMID:17947424

  8. Quantitative single-molecule microscopy reveals that CENP-A(Cnp1) deposition occurs during G2 in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lando, David; Endesfelder, Ulrike; Berger, Harald; Subramanian, Lakxmi; Dunne, Paul D; McColl, James; Klenerman, David; Carr, Antony M; Sauer, Markus; Allshire, Robin C; Heilemann, Mike; Laue, Ernest D

    2012-07-01

    The inheritance of the histone H3 variant CENP-A in nucleosomes at centromeres following DNA replication is mediated by an epigenetic mechanism. To understand the process of epigenetic inheritance, or propagation of histones and histone variants, as nucleosomes are disassembled and reassembled in living eukaryotic cells, we have explored the feasibility of exploiting photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM). PALM of single molecules in living cells has the potential to reveal new concepts in cell biology, providing insights into stochastic variation in cellular states. However, thus far, its use has been limited to studies in bacteria or to processes occurring near the surface of eukaryotic cells. With PALM, one literally observes and 'counts' individual molecules in cells one-by-one and this allows the recording of images with a resolution higher than that determined by the diffraction of light (the so-called super-resolution microscopy). Here, we investigate the use of different fluorophores and develop procedures to count the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A(Cnp1) with single-molecule sensitivity in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe). The results obtained are validated by and compared with ChIP-seq analyses. Using this approach, CENP-A(Cnp1) levels at fission yeast (S. pombe) centromeres were followed as they change during the cell cycle. Our measurements show that CENP-A(Cnp1) is deposited solely during the G2 phase of the cell cycle. PMID:22870388

  9. The CNA1 Histone of the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila Is Essential for Chromosome Segregation in the Germline MicronucleusD⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Marcella D.; Xi, Xiaohui; Vermaak, Danielle; Yao, Meng-Chao; Malik, Harmit S.

    2006-01-01

    Ciliated protozoans present several features of chromosome segregation that are unique among eukaryotes, including their maintenance of two nuclei: a germline micronucleus, which undergoes conventional mitosis and meiosis, and a somatic macronucleus that divides by an amitotic process. To study ciliate chromosome segregation, we have identified the centromeric histone gene in the Tetrahymena thermophila genome (CNA1). CNA1p specifically localizes to peripheral centromeres in the micronucleus but is absent in the macronucleus during vegetative growth. During meiotic prophase of the micronucleus, when chromosomes are stretched to twice the length of the cell, CNA1p is found localized in punctate spots throughout the length of the chromosomes. As conjugation proceeds, CNA1p appears initially diffuse, but quickly reverts to discrete dots in those nuclei destined to become micronuclei, whereas it remains diffuse and is gradually lost in developing macronuclei. In progeny of germline CNA1 knockouts, we see no defects in macronuclear division or viability of the progeny cells immediately following the knockout. However, within a few divisions, progeny show abnormal mitotic segregation of their micronucleus, with most cells eventually losing their micronucleus entirely. This study reveals a strong dependence of the germline micronucleus on centromeric histones for proper chromosome segregation. PMID:16251352

  10. Naturally occurring differences in CENH3 affect chromosome segregation in zygotic mitosis of hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Shamoni; Tan, Ek Han; West, Allan; Franklin, F Chris H; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon W L

    2015-01-01

    The point of attachment of spindle microtubules to metaphase chromosomes is known as the centromere. Plant and animal centromeres are epigenetically specified by a centromere-specific variant of Histone H3, CENH3 (a.k.a. CENP-A). Unlike canonical histones that are invariant, CENH3 proteins are accumulating substitutions at an accelerated rate. This diversification of CENH3 is a conundrum since its role as the key determinant of centromere identity remains a constant across species. Here, we ask whether naturally occurring divergence in CENH3 has functional consequences. We performed functional complementation assays on cenh3-1, a null mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana, using untagged CENH3s from increasingly distant relatives. Contrary to previous results using GFP-tagged CENH3, we find that the essential functions of CENH3 are conserved across a broad evolutionary landscape. CENH3 from a species as distant as the monocot Zea mays can functionally replace A. thaliana CENH3. Plants expressing variant CENH3s that are fertile when selfed show dramatic segregation errors when crossed to a wild-type individual. The progeny of this cross include hybrid diploids, aneuploids with novel genetic rearrangements and haploids that inherit only the genome of the wild-type parent. Importantly, it is always chromosomes from the plant expressing the divergent CENH3 that missegregate. Using chimeras, we show that it is divergence in the fast-evolving N-terminal tail of CENH3 that is causing segregation errors and genome elimination. Furthermore, we analyzed N-terminal tail sequences from plant CENH3s and discovered a modular pattern of sequence conservation. From this we hypothesize that while the essential functions of CENH3 are largely conserved, the N-terminal tail is evolving to adapt to lineage-specific centromeric constraints. Our results demonstrate that this lineage-specific evolution of CENH3 causes inviability and sterility of progeny in crosses, at the same time producing

  11. Expanded conserved linkage group between human 16p13 and the Scid region of the mouse chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z.M.; Siciliano, M.J. [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Davisson, M.T. [Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Knowledge of homologies between human and mouse chromosomes is essential for understanding chromosomal evolution and the development of experimental models for human disease. We have reported the identification of a conserved linkage group between human 16p13 and the centromeric portion of the mouse 16. Defining the extent of this linkage conservation has significant biomedical implications since that region of mouse genome contains the Scid mutation and the human 16p13 contains genes that are involved in DNA repair and certain types of human leukemia as well as other diseases such as Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome. Here, this conserved linkage group has been defined and expanded. It now contains 5 genetic loci and spans more than 3 Mb in human and 23 cM in mouse. The 5 loci are PRM1,2 (protamine 1 and 2), NOP3 (a subclone of D16S237), GSPT1 (a gene involved in the regulation of G1 to S phase transition), MYH11 (a human smooth muscle myosin heavy chain gene) and MRP (multi-drug resistant-associated protein gene). Using a panel of human-rodent hybrids that are informative for different portions of human 16, we have established the following order on human 16p: telomere-NOP3-PRM1,2-GSPT1-(MYH11,MRP)-centromere. The genes were assigned to the mouse chromosome 16 by a mouse-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrid panel informative for mouse chromosomes. Linkage analysis using backcross mice informative for the Scid mutation indicated the following order and genetic distance (in cM) in mouse: centromere-Nop3-11.7-Prm1-1.4-Gspt1-8.2-(Myh11,Mrp)-1.4-Scid-telomere.

  12. A cytogenetic approach to the effects of low levels of ionizing radiation (IR on the exposed Tunisian hospital workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Bouraoui

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study is to assess chromosomal damage in Tunisian hospital workers occupationally exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation (IR. Materials and Methods: The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN assay in the peripheral lymphocytes of 67 exposed workers compared to 43 controls matched for gender, age and smoking habits was used. The clastogenic/aneugenic effect of IR was evaluated using the CBMN assay in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization with human pan-centromeric DNA in all the exposed subjects and controls. Results: The study showed a signifi cant increase of the micronucleus (MN frequency in the lymphocytes of the exposed workers compared to the control group (13.63±4.9‰ vs. 6.52±4.21‰, p < 0.05. The centromere analysis performed in our study showed that MNs in hospital staff were predominantly centromere negative (72% and the mean negative labeled micronucleus (C–MN frequency was signifi cantly higher in the exposed subjects than in the controls (9.04±4.57‰ vs. 1.17±0.77‰. The multivariate regression analysis, taking into account all confounding factors, showed that only the time of exposure to IR had a signifi cant effect on the level of MNs and C–MN. Conclusion: The present study shows that chromosomal damage leading to the formation of micronucleated lymphocytes is more frequent in the hospital workers exposed to IR than in the controls, despite the low levels of exposure. The results of the study confi rm the well-known clastogenic properties of ionizing radiation. In regards to health monitoring, detection of early genotoxic effects may allow for the adoption of preventive biological control measures, such as hygienic improvements in the workplace or reduction of hours of occupational exposure.

  13. Characterization of two CENH3 genes and their roles in wheat evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Guo, Xiang; Hu, Jing; Lv, Zhenling; Han, Fangpu

    2015-04-01

    Wheat evolution is complex as a result of successive rounds of allopolyploidization and continuous selection during domestication. Diploid and tetraploid wheat species (Triticum spp.) were used as model systems in which to study the role of centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CENH3) in wheat evolution. We characterized two types of CENH3 genes, named αCENH3 and βCENH3, each of which has three slightly different copies derived from the AA, BB and DD genomes. Specific antibodies were raised against the two CENH3 proteins and were co-localized to centromeres with subtle differences. In most tetraploid wheat species, CENH3 genes are more highly expressed from the AA genome. In wild tetraploids, βCENH3 has a much lower expression level than αCENH3, while in cultivated tetraploids βCENH3 transcripts are enhanced to near αCENH3 levels. Comparison of the CENH3 proteins in wild and cultivated tetraploids revealed that the histone folding domain (HFD) of only βCENH3 is under positive selection, especially in the region responsible for targeting of CENH3 to the centromere. Taken together, positive selection of βCENH3 and its increased expression in tetraploid cultivars are indicative of adaptive evolution. Furthermore, the differences in localization between αCENH3 and βCENH3 observed using fiber fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunodetection and in developmental phenotypes resulting from virus-reduced gene silencing imply their functional diversification during wheat evolution. PMID:25557089

  14. Integration of Lupinus angustifolius L. (narrow-leafed lupin) genome maps and comparative mapping within legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrwa, Katarzyna; Książkiewicz, Michał; Szczepaniak, Anna; Susek, Karolina; Podkowiński, Jan; Naganowska, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    Narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) has recently been considered a reference genome for the Lupinus genus. In the present work, genetic and cytogenetic maps of L. angustifolius were supplemented with 30 new molecular markers representing lupin genome regions, harboring genes involved in nitrogen fixation during the symbiotic interaction of legumes and soil bacteria (Rhizobiaceae). Our studies resulted in the precise localization of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) carrying sequence variants for early nodulin 40, nodulin 26, nodulin 45, aspartate aminotransferase P2, asparagine synthetase, cytosolic glutamine synthetase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. Together with previously mapped chromosomes, the integrated L. angustifolius map encompasses 73 chromosome markers, including 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and 45S rDNA, and anchors 20 L. angustifolius linkage groups to corresponding chromosomes. Chromosomal identification using BAC fluorescence in situ hybridization identified two BAC clones as narrow-leafed lupin centromere-specific markers, which served as templates for preliminary studies of centromere composition within the genus. Bioinformatic analysis of these two BACs revealed that centromeric/pericentromeric regions of narrow-leafed lupin chromosomes consisted of simple sequence repeats ordered into tandem repeats containing the trinucleotide and pentanucleotide simple sequence repeats AGG and GATAC, structured into long arrays. Moreover, cross-genus microsynteny analysis revealed syntenic patterns of 31 single-locus BAC clones among several legume species. The gene and chromosome level findings provide evidence of ancient duplication events that must have occurred very early in the divergence of papilionoid lineages. This work provides a strong foundation for future comparative mapping among legumes and may facilitate understanding of mechanisms involved in shaping legume chromosomes. PMID:27168155

  15. Origin of nuclear buds and micronuclei in normal and folate-deprived human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micronuclei are formed from chromosomes and chromosomal fragments that lag behind in anaphase and are left outside daughter nuclei in telophase. They may also be derived from broken anaphase bridges. Nuclear buds, micronucleus-like bodies attached to the nucleus by a thin nucleoplasmic connection, have been proposed to be generated similarly to micronuclei during nuclear division or in S-phase as a stage in the extrusion of extra DNA, possibly giving rise to micronuclei. To better understand these phenomena, we have characterized the contents of 894 nuclear buds and 1392 micronuclei in normal and folate-deprived 9-day cultures of human lymphocytes using fluorescence in situ hybridization with pancentromeric and pantelomeric DNA probes. Such information has not earlier been available for human primary cells. Surprisingly, there appears to be no previous data on the occurrence of telomeres in micronuclei (or buds) of normal human cells in general. Our results suggest that nuclear buds and micronuclei have partly different mechanistic origin. Interstitial DNA without centromere or telomere label was clearly more prevalent in nuclear buds (43%) than in micronuclei (13%). DNA with only telomere label or with both centromere and telomere label was more frequent in micronuclei (62% and 22%, respectively) than in nuclear buds (44% and 10%, respectively). Folate deprivation especially increased the frequency of nuclear buds and micronuclei harboring telomeric DNA and nuclear buds harboring interstitial DNA but also buds and micronuclei with both centromeric and telomeric DNA. According to the model we propose, that micronuclei in binucleate lymphocytes primarily derive from lagging chromosomes and terminal acentric fragments during mitosis. Most nuclear buds, however, are suggested to originate from interstitial or terminal acentric fragments, possibly representing nuclear membrane entrapment of DNA that has been left in cytoplasm after nuclear division or excess DNA that

  16. Eic1 links Mis18 with the CCAN/Mis6/Ctf19 complex to promote CENP-A assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Lakxmi; Toda, Nicholas R T; Rappsilber, Juri; Allshire, Robin C

    2014-01-01

    CENP-A chromatin forms the foundation for kinetochore assembly. Replication-independent incorporation of CENP-A at centromeres depends on its chaperone HJURP(Scm3), and Mis18 in vertebrates and fission yeast. The recruitment of Mis18 and HJURP(Scm3) to centromeres is cell cycle regulated. Vertebrate Mis18 associates with Mis18BP1(KNL2), which is critical for the recruitment of Mis18 and HJURP(Scm3). We identify two novel fission yeast Mis18-interacting proteins (Eic1 and Eic2), components of the Mis18 complex. Eic1 is essential to maintain Cnp1(CENP-A) at centromeres and is crucial for kinetochore integrity; Eic2 is dispensable. Eic1 also associates with Fta7(CENP-Q/Okp1), Cnl2(Nkp2) and Mal2(CENP-O/Mcm21), components of the constitutive CCAN/Mis6/Ctf19 complex. No Mis18BP1(KNL2) orthologue has been identified in fission yeast, consequently it remains unknown how the key Cnp1(CENP-A) loading factor Mis18 is recruited. Our findings suggest that Eic1 serves a function analogous to that of Mis18BP1(KNL2), thus representing the functional counterpart of Mis18BP1(KNL2) in fission yeast that connects with a module within the CCAN/Mis6/Ctf19 complex to allow the temporally regulated recruitment of the Mis18/Scm3(HJURP) Cnp1(CENP-A) loading factors. The novel interactions identified between CENP-A loading factors and the CCAN/Mis6/Ctf19 complex are likely to also contribute to CENP-A maintenance in other organisms. PMID:24789708

  17. Comparative Study of Domoic Acid and Okadaic Acid Induced - Chromosomal Abnormalities in the CACO-2 Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond E. Creppy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Okadaic Acid (OA the major diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP toxin is known as a tumor promoter and seems likely implicated in the genesis of digestive cancer. Little is known regarding genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Domoic Acid (DA, the major Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP toxin. Both OA and DA occur in seafood and are of human health concerns. Micronuclei (MN arise from abnormalities in nuclear division during mitosis due to a failure of the mitotic spindle or by complex chromosomal configurations that pose problems during anaphase. In order to evaluate the ability of okadaic acid (OA and domoic acid (DA to induce DNA damage we performed the micronucleus assay using the Caco-2 cell line. To discriminate between a clastogenic or aneugenic effect of OA and DA, the micronucleus assay was conducted by cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay using cytochalasin B with Giemsa staining and/or acridine orange staining, in parallel to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH using a concentrated human pan-centromeric chromosome paint probe. Our results showed that OA and DA significantly increased the frequency of MN in Caco-2 cells. The MN caused by OA are found in mononucleated cells and binucleated cells, whereas those caused by DA are mainly in binucleated cells. The results of FISH analysis showed that OA induced centromere-positive micronuclei and DA increased the percentage of MN without a centromeric signal. In conclusion, both OA and DA bear mutagenic potential as revealed in Caco-2 cells by induction of MN formation. Moreover, OA induced whole chromosome loss suggesting a specific aneugenic potential, whereas DA seems simply clastogenic. At present, one cannot rule out possible DNA damage of intestinal cells if concentrations studied are reached in vivo, since this may happen with concentrations of toxins just below regulatory limits in case of frequent consumption of contaminated shell fishes.

  18. LINE retrotransposon RNA is an essential structural and functional epigenetic component of a core neocentromeric chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderly C Chueh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously identified and characterized the phenomenon of ectopic human centromeres, known as neocentromeres. Human neocentromeres form epigenetically at euchromatic chromosomal sites and are structurally and functionally similar to normal human centromeres. Recent studies have indicated that neocentromere formation provides a major mechanism for centromere repositioning, karyotype evolution, and speciation. Using a marker chromosome mardel(10 containing a neocentromere formed at the normal chromosomal 10q25 region, we have previously mapped a 330-kb CENP-A-binding domain and described an increased prevalence of L1 retrotransposons in the underlying DNA sequences of the CENP-A-binding clusters. Here, we investigated the potential role of the L1 retrotransposons in the regulation of neocentromere activity. Determination of the transcriptional activity of a panel of full-length L1s (FL-L1s across a 6-Mb region spanning the 10q25 neocentromere chromatin identified one of the FL-L1 retrotransposons, designated FL-L1b and residing centrally within the CENP-A-binding clusters, to be transcriptionally active. We demonstrated the direct incorporation of the FL-L1b RNA transcripts into the CENP-A-associated chromatin. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the FL-L1b RNA transcripts led to a reduction in CENP-A binding and an impaired mitotic function of the 10q25 neocentromere. These results indicate that LINE retrotransposon RNA is a previously undescribed essential structural and functional component of the neocentromeric chromatin and that retrotransposable elements may serve as a critical epigenetic determinant in the chromatin remodelling events leading to neocentromere formation.

  19. Unique small RNA signatures uncovered in the tammar wallaby genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay James

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small RNAs have proven to be essential regulatory molecules encoded within eukaryotic genomes. These short RNAs participate in a diverse array of cellular processes including gene regulation, chromatin dynamics and genome defense. The tammar wallaby, a marsupial mammal, is a powerful comparative model for studying the evolution of regulatory networks. As part of the genome sequencing initiative for the tammar, we have explored the evolution of each of the major classes of mammalian small RNAs in an Australian marsupial for the first time, including the first genome-scale analysis of the newest class of small RNAs, centromere repeat associated short interacting RNAs (crasiRNAs. Results Using next generation sequencing, we have characterized the major classes of small RNAs, micro (mi RNAs, piwi interacting (pi RNAs, and the centromere repeat associated short interacting (crasi RNAs in the tammar. We examined each of these small RNA classes with respect to the newly assembled tammar wallaby genome for gene and repeat features, salient features that define their canonical sequences, and the constitution of both highly conserved and species-specific members. Using a combination of miRNA hairpin predictions and co-mapping with miRBase entries, we identified a highly conserved cluster of miRNA genes on the X chromosome in the tammar and a total of 94 other predicted miRNA producing genes. Mapping all miRNAs to the tammar genome and comparing target genes among tammar, mouse and human, we identified 163 conserved target genes. An additional nine genes were identified in tammar that do not have an orthologous miRNA target in human and likely represent novel miRNA-regulated genes in the tammar. A survey of the tammar gonadal piRNAs shows that these small RNAs are enriched in retroelements and carry members from both marsupial and tammar-specific repeat classes. Lastly, this study includes the first in-depth analyses of the newly

  20. Location of a High-Lysine Gene and the DDT-Resistance Gene on Barley Chromosome 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.

    1979-01-01

    mutants, nos 1508.18, and 19. Linkage studies with translocations locate the Lys3 locus in the centromere region ofchromosome 7. A linkage study involving the loci lys3 and ddt (resistance to DDT) together with the marker locifi (fragile stem), s(short rachilla hairs), and r (smooth awn) show that the...... order of the five loci on chromosome 7 from the long to the short chromosome arm is Y, s,fi, lys3, ddt. The distance from locus I to locus ddt is about 100 centimorgans....

  1. Chromosome numbers, meiotic behavior, and pollen viability of species of Vriesea and Aechmea genera (Bromeliaceae) native to Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Silva, Clarisse; Dos Santos, Daniel G; Kaltchuk-Santos, Eliane; Bodanese-Zanettini, Maria H

    2004-06-01

    Chromosome number, meiotic behavior, and pollen viability were analyzed in 15 species of two genera, Vriesea and Aechmea, native to Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This study is the first cytogenetic analysis of these taxa. The chromosome numbers are all n = 25, consistent with the proposed base number of x = 25 for Bromeliaceae. All examined taxa displayed regular bivalent pairing and chromosome segregation at meiosis. Observed meiotic abnormalities include univalents in metaphase I; missing or extra chromosomes and precocious division of centromeres in metaphase II; laggards in telophase I and anaphase II/telophase II. The high pollen viability (>88%) reflects a regular meiosis. PMID:21653435

  2. Incomplete chromosome exchanges are not fingerprints of high LET neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) technique combining whole chromosome specific DNA libraries with pan-centromeric DNA and telomeric PNA probes was introduced to investigate the induction of chromosome exchanges in human lymphocytes after exposure to low (4 Gy X rays) and high (1 Gy neutrons) linear energy transfer radiation. This combination of probes allowed accurate detection of exchange aberrations involving the painted chromosomes and an unambiguous discrimination between complete and incomplete exchanges, as well as terminal and interstitial deletions. Data obtained in the present study using combined FISH assay with telomeres detection showed no differences between two types of radiation regarding the induction of incomplete exchanges. (author)

  3. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Haplotypes in Yucatan Miniature Pigs Used as Biomedical Model Animal

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Nu-Ri; Seo, Dong-Won; Choi, Ki-Myung; Ko, Na-Young; Kim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Il; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2016-01-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is called swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), which controls immune responses and transplantation reactions. The SLA is mapped on pig chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the centromere. In this study, 3 class I (SLA-1, SLA-3, and SLA-2) and 3 class II (DRB1, DQB1, and DQA) genes were used for investigation of SLA haplotypes in Yucatan miniature pigs in Korea. This pig breed is a well-known model organism for biomedical research worldwide. The current study i...

  4. Phospholipase C Is Involved in Kinetochore Function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hongyu; Choi, Jae H.; Hasek, Jiri; DeLillo, Nicholas; Lou, Willard; Vancura, Ales

    2000-01-01

    The budding yeast PLC1 gene encodes a homolog of the δ isoform of mammalian phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. Here, we present evidence that Plc1p associates with the kinetochore complex CBF3. This association is mediated through interactions with two established kinetochore proteins, Ndc10p and Cep3p. We show by chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments that Plc1p resides at centromeric loci in vivo. Deletion of PLC1, as well as plc1 mutations which abrogate the interaction of Plc1p...

  5. Novel karyotype in the Ullrich-Turner syndrome - 45,X/46,X,r(X)/46,X,dic(X) - investigated with fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, L.; Jackson, J.; Cowell, C.; Sillence, D.; Smith, A. [Children`s Hospital, Camperdown (Australia)

    1994-04-15

    A 10-year-old girl with Ullrich-Turner syndrome was found to have the novel karyotype 45,X/46,X,r(X)(p11q11)/46,X,dic(X)(p11). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the {alpha} satellite X centromere probe established the origin of the small ring chromosome. Scanning a large number of cells by interphase FISH showed that the dicentric (X) was the least prevalent cell line. The common breakpoint of Xp11 suggests a sequence of errors as the mechanism whereby these 3 distinct cell lines have arisen. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The karyotype analysis of Pistacia vera L. from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Emine; Namli, Süreyya

    2009-01-01

    A detailed karyotype analysis was developed for Pistacia vera L. grown in Turkey. In vitro roots obtained from mature seeds were used as plant material. The chromosome number of P. vera L. was found to be 2n = 30 at c-metaphase of mitosis cell investigated for all of the materials. Centromere type of all chromosomes were determinated as median, submedian, subtelocentric, telocentric and total lengths of chromosome pairs were found between 35.4 and 5.97 microm. An idiogram was constructed from the average chromosome length, arm ratio and centomere type for each of the chromosome pairs. PMID:19488926

  7. AcEST: BP914944 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iss-Prot sp_hit_id O61308 Definition sp|O61308|PUMA_PARUN 227 kDa spindle- and ce... Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|O61308|PUMA_...|CE290_MOUSE Centrosomal protein of 290 kDa OS=Mus musc... 41 0.002 >sp|O61308|PUMA_PARUN 227 kDa spindle- a...nd centromere-associated protein OS=Parascaris univalens GN=PUMA1 PE=2 SV=1 Lengt

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13423-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e) DNA centromeric region sequence f... 171 6e-41 AY351262_1( AY351262 |pid:none) Chlamydomonas reinhardtii putati...e) Nitrobacter hamburgensis X14, c... 50 1e-04 CP000089_1694( CP000089 |pid:none) Dechloromonas aromati...e) Mycobacterium smegmatis str. MC... 37 1.9 CP000440_2519( CP000440 |pid:non...0826_2887( CP000826 |pid:none) Serratia proteamaculans 568, co... 36 2.5 CP001614_942( CP001614 |pid:non...e) Mesorhizobium sp. BNC1, complet... 119 2e-25 CP000248_3067( CP000248 |pid:none) Novosphingobium aromati

  9. A new locus for Seckel syndrome on chromosome 18p11.31-q11.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børglum, Anders; Balslev, Thomas; Haagerup, Annette;

    2001-01-01

    Seckel syndrome (MIM 210600) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with a heterogeneous appearance. Key features are growth retardation, microcephaly with mental retardation, and a characteristic 'bird-headed' facial appearance. We have performed a genome-wide linkage scan in a consanguineous...... family of Iraqi descent. By homozygosity mapping a new locus for the syndrome was assigned to a approximately 30 cM interval between markers D18S78 and D18S866 with a maximum multipoint lod score of 3.1, corresponding to a trans-centromeric region on chromosome 18p11.31-q11.2. This second locus for...

  10. Targeting of SUMO substrates to a Cdc48-Ufd1-Npl4 segregase and STUbL pathway in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Julie Bonne; Tammsalu, Triin; Jørgensen, Maria Louise Mønster;

    2015-01-01

    48/p97-Ufd1-Npl4 facilitates this process. However, the extent to which the two pathways overlap, and how substrates are selected, remains unknown. Here we address these questions in fission yeast through proteome-wide analyses of SUMO modification sites. We identify over a thousand sumoylated...... lysines in a total of 468 proteins and quantify changes occurring in the SUMO modification status when the STUbL or Ufd1 pathways are compromised by mutations. The data suggest the coordinated processing of several classes of SUMO conjugates, many dynamically associated with centromeres or telomeres...

  11. Direct Cloning of Yeast Genes from an Ordered Set of Lambda Clones in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae by Recombination in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, J. R.; Johnston, M

    1993-01-01

    We describe a technique that facilitates the isolation of yeast genes that are difficult to clone. This technique utilizes a plasmid vector that rescues lambda clones as yeast centromere plasmids. The source of these lambda clones is a set of clones whose location in the yeast genome has been determined by L. Riles et al. in 1993. The Esherichia coli-yeast shuttle plasmid carries URA3, ARS4 and CEN6, and contains DNA fragments from the lambda vector that flank the cloned yeast insert. When ye...

  12. Phylogenetic and functional conservation of the NKR-P1F and NKR-P1G receptors in rat and mouse.

    OpenAIRE

    Kveberg, Lise; Dai, Ke-Zheng; Inngjerdingen, Marit; Brooks, Colin G.; Fossum, Sigbjørn; Vaage, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Two clusters of rat Nkrp1 genes can be distinguished based on phylogenetic relationships and functional characteristics. The proximal (centromeric) cluster encodes the well-studied NKR-P1A and NKR-P1B receptors and the distal cluster, the largely uncharacterized, NKR-P1F and NKR-P1G receptors. The inhibitory NKR-P1G receptor is expressed only by the Ly49s3+ NK cell subset as detected by RT-PCR, while the activating NKR-P1F receptor is detected in both Ly49s3+ and NKR-P1B+ NK cells. The mouse ...

  13. A New Approach to Dissect Nuclear Organization: TALE-Mediated Genome Visualization (TGV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanari, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal organization of chromatin within the nucleus has so far remained elusive. Live visualization of nuclear remodeling could be a promising approach to understand its functional relevance in genome functions and mechanisms regulating genome architecture. Recent technological advances in live imaging of chromosomes begun to explore the biological roles of the movement of the chromatin within the nucleus. Here I describe a new technique, called TALE-mediated genome visualization (TGV), which allows us to visualize endogenous repetitive sequence including centromeric, pericentromeric, and telomeric repeats in living cells. PMID:26443216

  14. Developmental characterization and chromosomal mapping of the 5-azacytidine-sensitive fluF locus of Aspergillus nidulans.

    OpenAIRE

    Tamame, M; Antequera, F; Santos, E.

    1988-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, a fungus that possesses negligible, if any, levels of methylation in its genome, low concentrations of 5-azacytidine (5-AC) convert a high percentage of the cell population to fluffy phenotypic variants through a heritable modification of a single nuclear gene (M. Tamame, F. Antequera, J. R. Villanueva, and T. Santos, Mol. Cell. Biol. 3:2287-2297, 1983). This new 5-AC-altered locus, designated here fluF1, was mapped as the closest marker to the centromere that has bee...

  15. The Chp1-Tas3 core is a multifunctional platform critical for gene silencing by RITS

    OpenAIRE

    Schalch, Thomas; Job, Godwin; Shanker, Sreenath; Partridge, Janet F.; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is critical for the assembly of heterochromatin at fission yeast centromeres. Central to this process is the RNA-induced Initiation of Transcriptional gene Silencing (RITS) complex, which physically anchors small non-coding RNAs to chromatin. RITS includes Ago1, the chromodomain protein Chp1, and Tas3, which bridges between Chp1 and Ago1. Chp1 is a large protein with, apart from its chromodomain, no recognizable domains. Here we describe how the structured C-terminal h...

  16. Karyological studies in ten different populations of desert lily aloe vera from pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To enhance theoretical basis of Aloe feeding and provide cytological basement, the karyotype and morphology of mitotic chromosomes, ten different populations of Aloe vera collected from various geographical locations of Karachi, Pakistan were studied by aceto-orcein staining technique. The results showed that chromosome number of Aloe vera is 2n=14. The karyotype is bimodal and consists of 14 chromosomes (8 large and 6 small) predominantly with submedian, median and subterminal centromere. Average chromosome lengths among populations ranged from 7.95-2.36 micro m. (author)

  17. CenH3/CID Incorporation Is Not Dependent on the Chromatin Assembly Factor CHD1 in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Podhraski, Valerie; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Wörle, Hildegard; Piatti, Paolo; Niederegger, Harald; Böck, Günther; Fyodorov, Dmitry V.; Lusser, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    CHD1 is a SNF2-related ATPase that is required for the genome-wide incorporation of variant histone H3.3 in the paternal pronucleus as well as in transcriptionally active nuclei in Drosophila embryos. The S. pombe and vertebrate orthologs of CHD1 have been implicated in the assembly of the centromeric histone H3 variant CenH3CENP-A, which occurs in a DNA replication-independent manner. Here, we examined whether CHD1 participates in the assembly of CenH3CID in Drosophila. In contrast to the fi...

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL139C, YCR077C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d for G2/M progression and localization of Cse4p Rows with this bait as bait (2) Rows with this bait as prey...ing factor; also required for faithful chromosome transmission, maintenance of rDNA locus stability, and pro...tection of mRNA 3'-UTRs from trimming; functionally linked to Pab1p Rows with this prey as prey (4) Rows with this prey as bait... (0) 3 12 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 11 - Show YDL139C Bait ORF YDL139C Bait... gene name SCM3 Bait description Nonhistone component of centromeric chromatin that binds sto

  19. Narrowing of the Hailey-Hailey disease gene region on chromosome 3q and identification of one kindred with a deletion in this region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peluso, A.M.; Bonifas, J.M.; Ikeda, S.; Hu, Z. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Hailey-Hailey disease is a cutaneous abnormality transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait in which impaired interkeratinocyte adhesion produces recurrent blisters in characteristic skin sites. We report here a confirmation of the initial mapping of the mutant gene to chromosome 3q in an additional seven kindreds, narrowing of the candidate region to the sequences flanked by D3S1589 and D3S1541, and the finding in one family of a genomic DNA deletion whose centromeric end is located between these two flanking markers. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  20. A cloned DNA segment from the telomeric region of human chromosome 4p is not detectably rearranged in Huntington disease patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Pritchard, C; Casher, D; Bull, L; Cox, D R; Myers, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Genetic linkage studies have mapped the Huntington disease (HD) mutation to the distal region of the short arm of human chromosome 4. Analysis of recombination events in this region has produced contradictory locations for HD. One possible location is in the region distal to the D4S90 marker, which is located within 300 kilobases of the telomere. Other crossover events predict a more centromeric position for HD. Here we analyze the telomeric region of 4p in detail. Cloned DNA segments were de...