WorldWideScience

Sample records for centripetal force

  1. THE MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD: A CENTRIFUGAL OR CENTRIPETAL FORCE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athina Lampridi-Kemou

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Before the third Egyptian revolution in early 2011, the Muslim Brotherhood was considered the only real opposition capable of challenging the hegemonic government of the Egyptian regime, owing to the popular support the organisation enjoyed; much greater than that of the opposition parties. However, change has not come through the Brotherhood, but through the Egyptian people themselves. In all these years that the Brotherhood has existed on the Egyptian political stage, neither its significant logistic and economic resources nor its dominant role in opposition politics have contributed to any change in the country’s power structure. The aim of this article is to show that the policies adopted by the Muslim Brotherhood in their interaction with the Hosni Mubarak government – both when they were in confrontation and in phases of accommodation – have only helped to maintain the status quo, and that they have, therefore, constituted a centripetal force with respect to the regime. This analysis may also offer a few clues as to the organisation’s future behaviour.

  2. Universality of Centripetal Force Law for a Particle Moving on a Hypersurface

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, L D; Liu, Q H

    2016-01-01

    For a particle moves on a hypersurface embedded in $N$ dimensional Euclidean space, the centripetal force law $a=v^{2}/r$ holds true, which can be made explicit after it is reformulated into a generalized form within frameworks of Hamiltonian mechanics and differential geometry.

  3. Center of mass correction to an error-prone undergraduate centripetal force experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronhovde, Peter; Sirochman, Rudy

    2003-02-01

    In this undergraduate laboratory experiment we measure the centripetal force acting on a bob in uniform circular motion. As the experiment was originally designed, it consistently yielded large errors due to a subtle twist of the bob as the mass was increased incrementally. This error is due to the fact that the center of mass changes relative position as the mass is incremented; therefore, the spring that provides the centripetal force for the apparatus causes an unintended torque on the bob. A solution to the problem consists of positioning the incremental masses so that the center of mass does not change position. This simple correction provides a useful lesson on redesigning an undergraduate laboratory experiment to obtain better agreement with theory.

  4. Centripetal focusing of gyrotactic phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencini, M; Franchino, M; Santamaria, F; Boffetta, G

    2016-06-21

    A suspension of gyrotactic microalgae Chlamydomonas augustae swimming in a cylindrical water vessel in solid-body rotation is studied. Our experiments show that swimming algae form an aggregate around the axis of rotation, whose intensity increases with the rotation speed. We explain this phenomenon by the centripetal orientation of the swimming direction towards the axis of rotation. This centripetal focusing is contrasted by diffusive fluxes due to stochastic reorientation of the cells. The competition of the two effects lead to a stationary distribution, which we analytically derive from a refined mathematical model of gyrotactic swimmers. The temporal evolution of the cell distribution, obtained via numerical simulations of the stochastic model, is in quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements in the range of parameters explored. PMID:27060672

  5. Centripetal Acceleration: Often Forgotten or Misinterpreted

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Acceleration is a fundamental concept in physics which is taught in mechanics at all levels. Here, we discuss some challenges in teaching this concept effectively when the path along which the object is moving has a curvature and centripetal acceleration is present. We discuss examples illustrating that both physics teachers and students have difficulty with this concept. We conclude with instructional strategies that may help students with this challenging concept.

  6. Centripetal Acceleration Reaction: An Effective and Robust Mechanism for Flapping Flight in Insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    Full Text Available Despite intense study by physicists and biologists, we do not fully understand the unsteady aerodynamics that relate insect wing morphology and kinematics to lift generation. Here, we formulate a force partitioning method (FPM and implement it within a computational fluid dynamic model to provide an unambiguous and physically insightful division of aerodynamic force into components associated with wing kinematics, vorticity, and viscosity. Application of the FPM to hawkmoth and fruit fly flight shows that the leading-edge vortex is the dominant mechanism for lift generation for both these insects and contributes between 72-85% of the net lift. However, there is another, previously unidentified mechanism, the centripetal acceleration reaction, which generates up to 17% of the net lift. The centripetal acceleration reaction is similar to the classical inviscid added-mass in that it depends only on the kinematics (i.e. accelerations of the body, but is different in that it requires the satisfaction of the no-slip condition, and a combination of tangential motion and rotation of the wing surface. Furthermore, the classical added-mass force is identically zero for cyclic motion but this is not true of the centripetal acceleration reaction. Furthermore, unlike the lift due to vorticity, centripetal acceleration reaction lift is insensitive to Reynolds number and to environmental flow perturbations, making it an important contributor to insect flight stability and miniaturization. This force mechanism also has broad implications for flow-induced deformation and vibration, underwater locomotion and flows involving bubbles and droplets.

  7. Angular velocity and centripetal acceleration relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Martín; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2014-05-01

    During the last few years, the growing boom of smartphones has given rise to a considerable number of applications exploiting the functionality of the sensors incorporated in these devices. A sector that has unexpectedly taken advantage of the power of these tools is physics teaching, as reflected in several recent papers. In effect, the use of smartphones has been proposed in several physics experiments spanning mechanics, electromagnetism, optics, oscillations, and waves, among other subjects. Although mechanical experiments have received considerable attention, most of them are based on the use of the accelerometer. An aspect that has received less attention is the use of rotation sensors or gyroscopes. An additional advance in the use of these devices is given by the possibility of obtaining data using the accelerometer and the gyroscope simultaneously. The aim of this paper is to consider the relation between the centripetal acceleration and the angular velocity. Instead of using a formal laboratory setup, in this experiment a smartphone is attached to the floor of a merry-go-round, found in many playgrounds. Several experiments were performed with the roundabout rotating in both directions and with the smart-phone at different distances from the center. The coherence of the measurements is shown.

  8. Gamow on Newton: Another Look at Centripetal Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrao, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Presented here is an adaptation of George Gamow's derivation of the centripetal acceleration formula as it applies to Earth's orbiting Moon. The derivation appears in Gamows short but engaging book "Gravity", first published in 1962, and is essentially a distillation of Newton's work. While "TPT" contributors have offered several insightful…

  9. Centripetal focusing of gyrotactic phytoplankton in solid-body rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Cencini, M; Santamaria, F; Boffetta, G

    2015-01-01

    A suspension of gyrotactic microalgae Chlamydomonas augustae swimming in a cylindrical water vessel in solid-body rotation is studied. Our experiments show that swimming algae form an aggregate around the axis of rotation, whose intensity increases with the rotation speed. We explain this phenomenon by the centripetal orientation of the swimming direction towards the axis of rotation. This centripetal focusing is contrasted by diffusive fluxes due to stochastic reorientation of the cells. The competition of the two effects lead to a stationary distribution, which we analytically derive from a refined mathematical model of gyrotactic swimmers. The temporal evolution of the cell distribution, obtained via numerical simulations of the stochastic model, is in quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements in the range of parameters explored.

  10. Centripetal versus centrifugal bias in visual line bisection: focusing attention on two hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, M E; Garlinghouse, M; Slater, J

    2000-01-01

    A variety of stimulus factors have been shown to influence the degree of leftward displacement of perceived line midpoint (i.e., pseudoneglect), which typifies the performance of normal subjects in line bisection tasks [M.E. McCourt & G. Jewell: Neuropsychologia 37, 843-855 (1999); G. Jewell & M.E. McCourt: Neuropsychologia 38, 93-110 (2000)]. One such factor is the position of lines within the visual field, where two conflicting patterns of bisection error have been reported. Some authors report a centrifugal pattern of error, where perceived line midpoint shifts away from the vertical midline, regardless of line position, i.e., relatively leftward for leftward displaced lines and vice versa. Others have reported a centripetal pattern of bisection error, where perceived line midpoint is always displaced centrally, toward the vertical midline, regardless of line position. There is no satisfactory explanation for these discrepant findings. An experiment using a tachistoscopic forced-choice line bisection protocol is described which discloses that neurologically normal right-handed subjects (N=82) typically display a centrifugal pattern of bisection error when lines are azimuthally displaced over a relatively small range, whereas a centripetal pattern is observed when lines are displaced over a wider range. Results from ancillary control experiments, in which eye position was measured during testing, confirm that systematic differences in gaze direction do not occur as a function of line position, and thus cannot account for the different patterns of bisection error. We conclude that stimulus context significantly modulates the strategy with which observers deploy spatial attention. When line position is constant, or varies over a narrow range, observers hold attention steady and widen its aperture to accommodate the relevant range of spatial location. Centrifugal bisection error is thus produced by the asymmetric cueing effect of laterally displaced lines, according

  11. Numerical and experimental investigation of a single stage centripetal pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantar, T. [Envita, d.o.o., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sekavcnik, M.; Mori, M. [Ljubljana Univ. (Slovenia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2008-03-15

    In the present paper a numerical and experimental investigation of a single stage centripetal pump (SSCP) is presented. The SSCP was designed using CAD and CFD tools. The performance curves of the SSCP were measured in a test facility with water involved as the working media and compared with the calculated ones. The measured performance curves are characterised by the region of hysteresis since the throttle closing performance curves do not correspond completely to the throttle opening performance curves. The delivery head and efficiency are abruptly decreased when reducing the flow rate from the point of the maximum delivery head. Due to the evident analogy of the SSCP and the axial-flow compressors performance curves and similarities in the rotor design it can be anticipated that such an operating behaviour of the SSCP is caused by the rotating stall phenomenon. CFD simulations confirm that the stalling of the rotor passages causes the steep delivery head drop when decreasing the flow rate from the point of maximum head. (orig.)

  12. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  13. DETECTION OF CENTRIPETAL HEAT-ISLAND CIRCULATIONS FROM TOWER DATA IN ST. LOUIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourly averaged meteorological data gathered by a 25-tower network about St. Louis during 1976 are used in a search for centripetal circulations generated by the urban heat island. Considering data collected when the network resultant speed was less than 1.5 m/s, two data classes...

  14. Self-organized centripetal movement of corneal epithelium in the absence of external cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Erwin P.; Delic, Naomi C.; Richardson, Alex; Raviraj, Vanisri; Halliday, Gary M.; di Girolamo, Nick; Myerscough, Mary R.; Lyons, J. Guy

    2016-08-01

    Maintaining the structure of the cornea is essential for high-quality vision. In adult mammals, corneal epithelial cells emanate from stem cells in the limbus, driven by an unknown mechanism towards the centre of the cornea as cohesive clonal groups. Here we use complementary mathematical and biological models to show that corneal epithelial cells can self-organize into a cohesive, centripetal growth pattern in the absence of external physiological cues. Three conditions are required: a circumferential location of stem cells, a limited number of cell divisions and mobility in response to population pressure. We have used these complementary models to provide explanations for the increased rate of centripetal migration caused by wounding and the potential for stem cell leakage to account for stable transplants derived from central corneal tissue, despite the predominantly limbal location of stem cells.

  15. Centrifugal and centripetal forces in the discourse of early years reading instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Christopher George

    2010-01-01

    This thesis reports on a research project investigating how a sample of eight teachers of P2 children in Scotland encouraged dialogic interaction in their reading groups while following prescriptive policy. The research is based on a detailed analysis of the discourse of reading sessions conducted by the eight teachers, and is informed by previous research on oral language development, the role of dialogue in children’s learning, and the relationships between reading developmen...

  16. Vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation with centripetal acceleration along the naso-occipital axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) are determined not only by angular acceleration, but also by the presence of gravity and linear acceleration. This phenomenon was studied by measuring three-dimensional nystagmic eye movements, with implanted search coils, in four male squirrel monkeys. Monkeys were rotated in the dark at 200 degrees/s, centrally or 79 cm off-axis, with the axis of rotation always aligned with gravity and the spinal axis of the upright monkeys. The monkey's position relative to the centripetal acceleration (facing center or back to center) had a dramatic influence on the VOR. These studies show that a torsional response was always elicited that acted to shift the axis of eye rotation toward alignment with gravito-inertial force. On the other hand, a slow phase downward vertical response usually existed, which shifted the axis of eye rotation away from the gravito-inertial force. These findings were consistent across all monkeys. In another set of tests, the same monkeys were rapidly tilted about their interaural (pitch) axis. Tilt orientations of 45 degrees and 90 degrees were maintained for 1 min. Other than a compensatory angular VOR during the rotation, no consistent eye velocity response was ever observed during or following the tilt. The absence of any response following tilt proves that the observed torsional and vertical responses were not a positional nystagmus. Model simulations qualitatively predict all components of these eccentric rotation and tilt responses. These simulations support the conclusion that the VOR during eccentric rotation may consist of two components: a linear VOR and a rotational VOR. The model predicts a slow phase downward, vertical, linear VOR during eccentric rotation even though there was never a change in the force aligned with monkey's spinal (Z) axis. The model also predicts the torsional components of the response that shift the rotation axis of the angular VOR toward alignment with gravito-inertial force.

  17. Experimental investigation on a one-step centripetal blower as a model of a blower to ventilate cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model tests were performed on a one-step centripetal blower (impeller external diameter of 1 m) whose aim was to clarify whether this kind of blower is suitable to ventilate a cooling tower. Aside from the investigation of the general operational behaviour, it was above all important in the tests to investigate the sensitivity of the centripetal blower to rotating tearing with regular flow as well as with side wind, as the main difficulty was suspected in controlling the blower with side wind. (orig./LN)

  18. Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  19. Discovery of Candidate H$_2$O Disk Masers in AGN and Estimations of Centripetal Accelerations

    CERN Document Server

    Greenhill, Lincoln J; Moran, James M; Tilak, Avanti

    2009-01-01

    Based on spectroscopic signatures, about one-third of known H$_2$O maser sources in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to arise in highly inclined accretion disks around central engines. These "disk maser candidates" are of interest primarily because angular structure and rotation curves can be resolved with interferometers, enabling dynamical study. We identify five new disk maser candidates in studies with the Green Bank Telescope, bringing the total number published to 30. We discovered two (NGC1320, NGC17) in a survey of 40 inclined active galaxies (v_{sys}< 20000 kms^{-1}). The remaining three disk maser candidates were identified in monitoring of known sources: NGC449, NGC2979, NGC3735. We also confirm a previously marginal case in UGC4203. For the disk maser candidates reported here, inferred rotation speeds are 130-500 kms^{-1}. Monitoring of three more rapidly rotating candidate disks (CG211, NGC6264, VV340A) has enabled measurement of likely orbital centripetal acceleration, and estimation...

  20. Conveyor belt biomantles: Centripetal bioturbation coupled with erosional downwasting -- an explanatory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Johnson, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    specifically, and in summary, we present a model that displays how semi-continuous biomechanical and centripetally driven constructional soil-sediment biotransfers to raised animal-produced point centers are concomitantly leveled by physical-erosional centrifugally driven, lateral-radial downwasting processes. The model is analogous to a cyclical conveyor belt system of soil-sediment biotransfers to, then erosionally away, from innumerably raised point centers, the "activity centers" of burrowing animals. Career-spanning fieldwork across many tropical, subtropical, and mid-latitude environments strongly support the overall validity of the model. Apart from microbes, animals represent the most diverse organismic group on the planet, with plants and fungi distant seconds. Moreover, many if not most spend at least part of their existence living on and/or in soil and sediment, which includes both the subaerial and subaqueous realms of Earth (that is, all of it, except extreme polar areas). Animals bioturbate, vertically and laterally, and likely have done so since pre-Cambrian time. The fundamental conveyor belt process, where ongoing centripetal bioturbations are coupled with ongoing erosional wasting and spreading, joined by subsidiary processes, drives biomantle formation.

  1. Blade rim of the centripetal stage of a turbine, preferably for a high-performance steam turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundlach, W.; Porochnicki, J.; Prywer, J.; Karewicz, B.; Potapczyk, A.; Zielenow, K.

    1975-10-23

    The blade rim consists of a series of radial blades and one (on one side) or two (on two sides) rows of axial blades, which each form a unit along with the side covers and the rotor wheel. Such a blade rim changes the radial steam stream-in direction under small energy losses, and transfers the axial steam current with a well-balanced speed field to an axial stage connected in series. The basically better efficiency of a centripetal turbine benefits the efficiency of the axial stage and so the whole turbine. The well-balanced speed field in the current to the first axial stage produces hardly any power which might cause vibrations at the blade rim. This becomes even more efficient through the suppression power on the side cover during blade rim rotation. The efficiency of the first axial stage is increased by at least 5% and the length of the rotors and the housings is shortened by the possible reduction of the number of blade rims.

  2. Estimating the angular velocity of a rigid body moving in the plane from tangential and centripetal acceleration measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardou, Philippe, E-mail: pcardou@cim.mcgill.ca; Angeles, Jorge [McGill University, Macdonald Engineering Building, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Centre for Intelligent Machines (Canada)

    2008-05-15

    Two methods are available for the estimation of the angular velocity of a rigid body from point-acceleration measurements: (i) the time-integration of the angular acceleration and (ii) the square-rooting of the centripetal acceleration. The inaccuracy of the first method is due mainly to the accumulation of the error on the angular acceleration throughout the time-integration process, which does not prevent that it be used successfully in crash tests with dummies, since these experiments never last more than one second. On the other hand, the error resulting from the second method is stable through time, but becomes inaccurate whenever the rigid body angular velocity approaches zero, which occurs in many applications. In order to take advantage of the complementarity of these two methods, a fusion of their estimates is proposed. To this end, the accelerometer measurements are modeled as exact signals contaminated with bias errors and Gaussian white noise. The relations between the variables at stake are written in the form of a nonlinear state-space system in which the angular velocity and the angular acceleration are state variables. Consequently, a minimum-variance-error estimate of the state vector is obtained by means of extended Kalman filtering. The performance of the proposed estimation method is assessed by means of simulation. Apparently, the resulting estimation method is more robust than the existing accelerometer-only methods and competitive with gyroscope measurements. Moreover, it allows the identification and the compensation of any bias error in the accelerometer measurements, which is a significant advantage over gyroscopes.

  3. DISCOVERY OF CANDIDATE H2O DISK MASERS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND ESTIMATIONS OF CENTRIPETAL ACCELERATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on spectroscopic signatures, about one-third of known H2O maser sources in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are believed to arise in highly inclined accretion disks around central engines. These 'disk maser candidates' are of interest primarily because angular structure and rotation curves can be resolved with interferometers, enabling dynamical study. We identify five new disk maser candidates in studies with the Green Bank Telescope, bringing the total number published to 30. We discovered two (NGC 1320, NGC 17) in a survey of 40 inclined active galaxies (v sys -1). The remaining three disk maser candidates were identified in monitoring of known sources: NGC 449, NGC 2979, and NGC 3735. We also confirm a previously marginal case in UGC 4203. For the disk maser candidates reported here, inferred rotation speeds are 130-500 km s-1. Monitoring of three more rapidly rotating candidate disks (CG 211, NGC 6264, VV 340A) has enabled measurement of likely orbital centripetal acceleration, and estimation of central masses ((2-7) x107 M sun) and mean disk radii (0.2-0.4 pc). Accelerations may ultimately permit estimation of distances when combined with interferometer data. This is notable because the three AGNs are relatively distant (10,000 km s-1 sys -1), and fractional error in a derived Hubble constant, due to peculiar motion of the galaxies, would be small. As signposts of highly inclined geometries at galactocentric radii of ∼0.1-1 pc, disk masers also provide robust orientation references that allow analysis of (mis)alignment between AGNs and surrounding galactic stellar disks, even without extensive interferometric mapping. We find no preference among published disk maser candidates to lie in high-inclination galaxies. This provides independent support for conclusions that in late-type galaxies, central engine accretion disks and galactic plane orientations are not correlated.

  4. Estimating the angular velocity of a rigid body moving in the plane from tangential and centripetal acceleration measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods are available for the estimation of the angular velocity of a rigid body from point-acceleration measurements: (i) the time-integration of the angular acceleration and (ii) the square-rooting of the centripetal acceleration. The inaccuracy of the first method is due mainly to the accumulation of the error on the angular acceleration throughout the time-integration process, which does not prevent that it be used successfully in crash tests with dummies, since these experiments never last more than one second. On the other hand, the error resulting from the second method is stable through time, but becomes inaccurate whenever the rigid body angular velocity approaches zero, which occurs in many applications. In order to take advantage of the complementarity of these two methods, a fusion of their estimates is proposed. To this end, the accelerometer measurements are modeled as exact signals contaminated with bias errors and Gaussian white noise. The relations between the variables at stake are written in the form of a nonlinear state-space system in which the angular velocity and the angular acceleration are state variables. Consequently, a minimum-variance-error estimate of the state vector is obtained by means of extended Kalman filtering. The performance of the proposed estimation method is assessed by means of simulation. Apparently, the resulting estimation method is more robust than the existing accelerometer-only methods and competitive with gyroscope measurements. Moreover, it allows the identification and the compensation of any bias error in the accelerometer measurements, which is a significant advantage over gyroscopes

  5. Cicada (Tibicen linnei) steers by force vectoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samane Zeyghami; Nidhin Babu; Haibo Dong∗

    2016-01-01

    To change flight direction, flying animals modulate aerodynamic force either relative to their bodies to generate torque about the center of mass, or relative to the flight path to produce centripetal force that curves the trajectory. In employing the latter, the direction of aerodynamic force remains fixed in the body frame and rotations of the body redirect the force. While both aforementioned techniques are essential for flight, it is critical to investigate how an animal balances the two to achieve aerial locomotion. Here, we measured wing and body kinematics of cicada (Tibicen linnei) in free flight, including flight periods of both little and substantial body reorientations. It is found that cicadas employ a common force vectoring technique to execute all these flights. We show that the direction of the half-stroke averaged aerodynamic force relative to the body is independent of the body orientation, varying in a range of merely 20 deg. Despite directional limitation of the aerodynamic force, pitch and roll torque are generated by altering wing angle of attack and its mean position relative to the center of mass. This results in body rotations which redirect the wing force in the global frame and consequently change the flight trajectory.

  6. General Laws and Centripetal Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagers Op Akkerhuis, G.A.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The large number of discoveries in the last few decades has caused a scientific crisis that is characterised by overspecialisation and compartmentalisation. To deal with this crisis, scientists look for integrating approaches, such as general laws and unifying theories. Representing what can be cons

  7. NASTRAN forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.; Gallo, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of a new capability, developed and added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7, to conduct forced vibration analysis of turned cyclic structures rotating about their axis of symmetry, are presented. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations as well as those due to the translational acceleration of the axis of rotation, are included. The equations of motion are first derived for an arbitrary grid point of the cyclic sector finite element model and then extended for the complete model. The equations are solved by four principal steps: (1) transformation of applied loads at frequency-dependent circumferential harmonic components; (2) application of circumferential harmonic-dependent intersegment compatibility constraints; (3) solution of frequency-dependent circumferential harmonic components of displacements; and (4) recovery of frequency-dependent response in various segments of the total structure. Five interrelated examples are presented to illustrate the various features of the development.

  8. Subatomic forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inside the atom, particles interact through two forces which are never felt in the everyday world. But they may hold the key to the Universe. These ideas on subatomic forces are discussed with respect to the strong force, the electromagnetic force and the electroweak force. (author)

  9. Electroweak Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The united force that encompasses the electromagnetic force and the weak nuclear force. The unification of these two forces is described by a theory that was devised during the 1960s by Sheldon Glashow, Steven Weinberg and Abdus Salam according to which, at high enough energies, the electromagnetic force and the weak nuclear interaction behave in exactly the same way....

  10. Labor Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  11. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  12. Force sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, David

    2007-01-01

    A young child can explore and learn and compensate for unknown dynamics by prodding, pushing, touching, grasping and feeling. Force sensing and software research could soon allow artificial mechanisms to do the same. Force sensing has its roots in strain gauges, piezoelectrics, Wheatstone bridges, automation, robotics, grippers and virtual reality. That force sensing research has now become commonplace and has expanded from those roots to include so much more: video games, athletic equipment,...

  13. Strong Force

    CERN Multimedia

    Without the strong force, there could be no life. The carbon in living matter is synthesised in stars via the strong force. Lighter atomic nuclei become bound together in a process called nuclear fusion. A minor change in this interaction would make life impossible. As its name suggests, the strong force is the most powerful of the 4 forces, yet its sphere of influence is limited to within the atomic nucleus. Indeed it is the strong force that holds together the quarks inside the positively charged protons. Without this glue, the quarks would fly apart repulsed by electromagnetism. In fact, it is impossible to separate 2 quarks : so much energy is needed, that a second pair of quarks is produced. Text for the interactive: Can you pull apart the quarks inside a proton?

  14. Weak Force

    CERN Multimedia

    Without the weak force, the sun wouldn't shine. The weak force causes beta decay, a form of radioactivity that triggers nuclear fusion in the heart of the sun. The weak force is unlike other forces: it is characterised by disintegration. In beta decay, a down quark transforms into an up quark and an electron is emitted. Some materials are more radioactive than others because the delicate balance between the strong force and the weak force varies depending on the number of particles in the atomic nucleus. We live in the midst of a natural radioactive background that varies from region to region. For example, in Cornwall where there is a lot of granite, levels of background radiation are much higher than in the Geneva region. Text for the interactive: Move the Geiger counter to find out which samples are radioactive - you may be surprised. It is the weak force that is responsible for the Beta radioactivity here. The electrons emitted do not cross the plastic cover. Why do you think there is some detected radioa...

  15. Role of radiation reaction forces in the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we study the influence of radiation reaction (RR) forces on the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles. It is assumed that the particles move along magnetic field lines anchored in the rotating central object. The common 'bead-on-the-wire' approximation is used. The solutions are found and analyzed for cases when the form of the prescribed trajectory (rigidly rotating field line) is approximated by: (a) straight line, and (b) Archimedes spiral. Dynamics of neutral and charged particles are compared with the emphasis on the role of RR forces in the latter case. It is shown that for charged particles there exist locations of stable equilibrium. It is demonstrated that for particular initial conditions RR forces cause centripetal motion of the particles: their 'falling' on the central rotating object. It is found that in the case of Archimedes spiral both neutral and charged particles can reach infinity where their motion has asymptotically force-free character. The possible importance of these processes for the acceleration of relativistic, charged particles by rotating magnetospheres in the context of the generation of nonthermal, high-energy emission of AGN and pulsars is discussed

  16. The swim force as a body force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  17. Malaysia and forced migration

    OpenAIRE

    Arzura Idris

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the phenomenon of “forced migration” in Malaysia. It examines the nature of forced migration, the challenges faced by Malaysia, the policy responses and their impact on the country and upon the forced migrants. It considers forced migration as an event hosting multifaceted issues related and relevant to forced migrants and suggests that Malaysia has been preoccupied with the issue of forced migration movements. This is largely seen in various responses invoked from Malaysi...

  18. Handbook of force transducers

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanescu, Dan Mihai

    2011-01-01

    Part I introduces the basic ""Principles and Methods of Force Measurement"" acording to a classification into a dozen of force transducers types: resistive, inductive, capacitive, piezoelectric, electromagnetic, electrodynamic, magnetoelastic, galvanomagnetic (Hall-effect), vibrating wires, (micro)resonators, acoustic and gyroscopic. Two special chapters refer to force balance techniques and to combined methods in force measurement. Part II discusses the ""(Strain Gauge) Force Transducers Components"", evolving from the classical force transducer to the digital / intelligent one, with the inco

  19. Surface and Interfacial Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Hans-Jurgen

    2010-01-01

    This systematic introduction to the topic includes theoretical concepts to help readers understand and predict surface forces, while also integrating experimental techniques and practical applications with up-to-date examples plus motivating exercises. Starting with intermolecular forces, the authors discuss different surfaces forces, with a major part devoted to surface forces between solid surfaces in liquid media. In addition, they cover surface forces between liquid-vapor interfaces and between liquid-liquid interfaces.

  20. Centripetal obesity and metabolics malfunctions: patogeny, measurement and prophylatic role of physical exercise Obesidade centrípeta e disfunções metabólicas: patogenia, mensuração e papel profilático do exercício físico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana E. Ribeiro Pinto Guedes

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Although fat excess in the body is considered as an independent risk factor for the establishment of degenerative malfunctions, the concentration of fat in the subcutaneous region of the trunk and abdomen and, especially the one located in the intra-abdominal or visceral region, shows closer association with metabolic disturbances. The centripetal fat concentration consists of a clear risk factor for the metabolic syndrome, also known as plurimetabolic syndrome or simply “syndrome X”. This syndrome is characterized by a range of endocrine-metabolic malfunctions leading its carrier to a high impairment in his/her life quality, due to a resulting morbid mortality. The prevalence of visceral obesity and its possible degenerative consequences seem to be mainly a result of endocrine and genetic disturbances, being the diagnosis carried out through estimates for anthropometric measures or with methods of diagnosis by means of images. Among the resources used for the prevention and treatment of high levels of centripetal adiposity, a negative energetic balance through alimentary reeducation and physical exercise shows a high effectiveness. As a consequence, the trunk, abdomen and visceral fat may be preferably mobilized as an energetic source when compared to the fat located in other regions of the body. As for the physical exercise, there is no agreement in relation to the ideal type, intensity, frequency and duration, although the aerobic exercises prove to be the most effective ones.   Apesar do excesso de gordura no corpo ser considerado como fator de risco independente para o advento de disfunções degenerativas, a concentração de gordura localizada na região do tronco e do abdome e, principalmente, aquela disposta na região intra-abdominal ou visceral é a que apresenta maior associação com distúrbios metabólicos. A concentração de gordura centrípeta constitui-se em nítido fator de risco para a chamada síndrome metab

  1. Repulsive casimir forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss repulsive Casimir forces between dielectric materials with nontrivial magnetic susceptibility. It is shown that considerations based on the naive pairwise summation of van der Waals and Casimir-Polder forces may not only give an incorrect estimate of the magnitude of the total Casimir force but even the wrong sign of the force when materials with high dielectric and magnetic responses are involved. Indeed repulsive Casimir forces may be found in a large range of parameters, and we suggest that the effect may be realized in known materials. The phenomenon of repulsive Casimir forces may be of importance both for experimental study and for nanomachinery applications

  2. Force propagation and force generation in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Oliver; Duschl, Claus

    2010-09-01

    Determining how forces are produced by and propagated through the cytoskeleton (CSK) of the cell is of great interest as dynamic processes of the CSK are intimately correlated with many molecular signaling pathways. We are presenting a novel approach for integrating measurements on cell elasticity, transcellular force propagation, and cellular force generation to obtain a comprehensive description of dynamic and mechanical properties of the CSK under force loading. This approach uses a combination of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We apply well-defined loading schemes onto the apical cell membrane of fibroblasts using the SFM and simultaneously use TIRF microscopy to image the topography of the basal cell membrane. The locally distinct changes of shape and depth of the cytoskeletal imprints onto the basal membrane are interpreted as results of force propagation through the cytoplasm. This observation provides evidence for the tensegrity model and demonstrates the usefulness of our approach that does not depend on potentially disturbing marker compounds. We confirm that the actin network greatly determines cell stiffness and represents the substrate that mediates force transduction through the cytoplasm of the cell. The latter is an essential feature of tensegrity. Most importantly, our new finding that, both intact actin and microtubule networks are required for enabling the cell to produce work, can only be understood within the framework of the tensegrity model. We also provide, for the first time, a direct measurement of the cell's mechanical power output under compression at two femtowatts. PMID:20607861

  3. Forces in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced by an observer in general coordinates. The general force is then applied to the local co-moving coordinate system of a uniformly accelerating observer, leading to an expression of the inertial force experienced by the observer. Next, applying the general force in Schwarzschild coordinates is shown to lead to familiar expressions of the gravitational force. As a more complex demonstration, the general force is applied to an observer in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates near a rotating, Kerr black hole. It is then shown that when the angular momentum of the black hole goes to zero, the force on the observer reduces to the force on an observer held stationary in Schwarzschild coordinates. As a final consideration, the force on an observer moving in rotating coordinates is derived. Expressing the force in terms of Christoffel symbols in rotating coordinates leads to familiar expressions of the centrifugal and Coriolis forces on the observer. It is envisioned that the techniques presented herein will be most useful to graduate level students, as well as those undergraduate students having experience with general relativity and tensor analysis.

  4. Malaysia and forced migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzura Idris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the phenomenon of “forced migration” in Malaysia. It examines the nature of forced migration, the challenges faced by Malaysia, the policy responses and their impact on the country and upon the forced migrants. It considers forced migration as an event hosting multifaceted issues related and relevant to forced migrants and suggests that Malaysia has been preoccupied with the issue of forced migration movements. This is largely seen in various responses invoked from Malaysia due to “south-south forced migration movements.” These responses are, however, inadequate in terms of commitment to the international refugee regime. While Malaysia did respond to economic and migration challenges, the paper asserts that such efforts are futile if she ignores issues critical to forced migrants.

  5. Three-nucleon forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the role of three-nucleon forces in ab initio calculations of nuclear systems is investigated. The difference between genuine and induced many-nucleon forces is emphasized. Induced forces arise in the process of solving the nuclear many-body problem as technical intermediaries toward calculationally converged results. Genuine forces make up the Hamiltonian. They represent the chosen underlying dynamics. The hierarchy of contributions arising from genuine two-, three- and many-nucleon forces is discussed. Signals for the need of the inclusion of genuine three-nucleon forces are studied in nuclear systems, technically best under control, especially in three-nucleon and four-nucleon systems. Genuine three-nucleon forces are important for details in the description of some observables. Their contributions to observables are small on the scale set by two-nucleon forces. (author)

  6. Hydrophobic Forces in Flotation

    OpenAIRE

    Pazhianur, Rajesh R

    1999-01-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used to conduct force measurements to better understand the role of hydrophobic forces in flotation. The force measurements were conducted between a flat mineral substrate and a hydrophobic glass sphere in aqueous solutions. It is assumed that the hydrophobic glass sphere may simulate the behavior of air bubbles during flotation. The results may provide information relevant to the bubble-particle interactions occurring during flotation. The glass ...

  7. Effective Nuclear Forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculation of effective forces in nuclei from the Hamada- Johnston potential is described. This work begins from the theories of Brueckner and Bethe and applies them to finite systems. Various renormalizations of the force are discussed. The density dependence of the effective forces is considered in detail. Arguments for the partial breakdown of the shell model in heavy nuclei are given. (author)

  8. Forces in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  9. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force. Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without…

  10. Crossflow force transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related

  11. Turbulent flow in rib-roughened channel under the effect of Coriolis and rotational buoyancy forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletti, Filippo; Jacono, David Lo; Cresci, Irene; Arts, Tony

    2014-04-01

    The turbulent flow inside a rotating channel provided with transverse ribs along one wall is studied by means of two-dimensional time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The measurement set-up is mounted on the same rotating disk with the test section, allowing to obtain the same accuracy and resolution as in a non-rotating rig. The Reynolds number is 15 000, and the rotation number is 0.38. As the ribbed wall is heated, both the Coriolis force and the centrifugal force play a role in the fluid dynamics. The mean velocity fields highlight the major impact of the rotational buoyancy (characterized by a buoyancy number of 0.31) on the flow along the leading side of the duct. In particular, since the flow is directed radially outward, the near-wall layers experience significant centripetal buoyancy. The recirculation area behind the obstacles is enlarged to the point of spanning the whole inter-rib space. Also the turbulent fluctuations are significantly altered, and overall augmented, with respect to the non-buoyant case, resulting in higher turbulence levels far from the rib. On the other hand the centrifugal force has little or no impact on the flow along the trailing wall. Vortex identification, proper orthogonal decomposition, and two-point correlations are used to highlight rotational effects, and in particular to determine the dominant scales of the turbulent unsteady flow, the time-dependent behavior of the shear layer and of the recirculation bubble behind the wall-mounted obstacles, the lifetime and advection velocity of the coherent structures.

  12. Efficacy of climate forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Lacis, A.; Schmidt, G. A.; Russell, G.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bell, N.; Cairns, B.; Canuto, V.; Chandler, M.; Cheng, Y.; Del Genio, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Fleming, E.; Friend, A.; Hall, T.; Jackman, C.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N.; Koch, D.; Lean, J.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K.; Menon, S.; Miller, R.; Minnis, P.; Novakov, T.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, Ja.; Perlwitz, Ju.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Shindell, D.; Stone, P.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.; Thresher, D.; Wielicki, B.; Wong, T.; Yao, M.; Zhang, S.

    2005-09-01

    We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the "efficacy" of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ˜110%, which increases to ˜145% when its indirect effects on stratospheric H2O and tropospheric O3 are included, yielding an effective climate forcing of ˜0.8 W/m2 for the period 1750-2000 and making CH4 the largest anthropogenic climate forcing other than CO2. Black carbon (BC) aerosols from biomass burning have a calculated efficacy ˜58%, while fossil fuel BC has an efficacy ˜78%. Accounting for forcing efficacies and for indirect effects via snow albedo and cloud changes, we find that fossil fuel soot, defined as BC + OC (organic carbon), has a net positive forcing while biomass burning BC + OC has a negative forcing. We show that replacement of the traditional instantaneous and adjusted forcings, Fi and Fa, with an easily computed alternative, Fs, yields a better predictor of climate change, i.e., its efficacies are closer to unity. Fs is inferred from flux and temperature changes in a fixed-ocean model run. There is remarkable congruence in the spatial distribution of climate change, normalized to the same forcing Fs, for most climate forcing agents, suggesting that the global forcing has more relevance to regional climate change than may have been anticipated. Increasing greenhouse gases intensify the Hadley circulation in our model, increasing rainfall in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), Eastern United States, and East Asia, while intensifying dry conditions in the subtropics including the Southwest United States, the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and an expanding Sahel. These features survive in model simulations that use all estimated forcings for the period 1880-2000. Responses to localized forcings, such

  13. Quantum fictitious forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bialynicki-Birula, I; Cirone, M.A.; Dahl, Jens Peder;

    2002-01-01

    We present Heisenberg's equation of motion for the radial variable of a free non-relativistic particle in D dimensions. The resulting radial force consists of three contributions: (i) the quantum fictitious force which is either attractive or repulsive depending on the number of dimensions, (ii......) a singular quantum force located at the origin, and (iii) the centrifugal force associated with non-vanishing angular momentum. Moreover, we use Heisenberg's uncertainty relation to introduce a lower bound for the kinetic energy of an ensemble of neutral particles. This bound is quadratic in the number...... of atoms and can be traced back to the repulsive quantum fictitious potential. All three forces arise for a free particle: "Force without force"....

  14. Forces in molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  15. Quantum fictitious forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bialynicki-Birula, I; Cirone, M.A.; Dahl, Jens Peder; Seligman, T.H.; Straub, F.; Schleich, W.P.

    We present Heisenberg's equation of motion for the radial variable of a free non-relativistic particle in D dimensions. The resulting radial force consists of three contributions: (i) the quantum fictitious force which is either attractive or repulsive depending on the number of dimensions, (ii) a...... singular quantum force located at the origin, and (iii) the centrifugal force associated with non-vanishing angular momentum. Moreover, we use Heisenberg's uncertainty relation to introduce a lower bound for the kinetic energy of an ensemble of neutral particles. This bound is quadratic in the number of...... atoms and can be traced back to the repulsive quantum fictitious potential. All three forces arise for a free particle: "Force without force"....

  16. Rate of force development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Aagaard, Per; Blazevich, Anthony J;

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of rate of force development during rapid contractions has recently become quite popular for characterising explosive strength of athletes, elderly individuals and patients. The main aims of this narrative review are to describe the neuromuscular determinants of rate of force devel....... Therefore, we provide evidence-based practical recommendations for rational quantification of rate of force development in both laboratory and clinical settings.......The evaluation of rate of force development during rapid contractions has recently become quite popular for characterising explosive strength of athletes, elderly individuals and patients. The main aims of this narrative review are to describe the neuromuscular determinants of rate of force...... development and to discuss various methodological considerations inherent to its evaluation for research and clinical purposes. Rate of force development (1) seems to be mainly determined by the capacity to produce maximal voluntary activation in the early phase of an explosive contraction (first 50-75 ms...

  17. Nonlinear Dynamic Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Björnham, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) is an experimental technique that is commonly used to assess information of the strength, energy landscape, and lifetime of noncovalent bio-molecular interactions. DFS traditionally requires an applied force that increases linearly with time so that the bio-complex under investigation is exposed to a constant loading rate. However, tethers or polymers can modulate the applied force in a nonlinear regime. For example, bacterial adhesion pili and polymers with worm-like chain properties are examples of structures that show nonlinear force responses. In these situations, the theory for traditional DFS cannot be readily applied. In this work we expand the theory for DFS to also include nonlinear external forces while still maintaining compatibility with the linear DFS theory. To validate the theory we modeled a bio-complex expressed on a stiff, an elastic and a worm-like chain polymer, using Monte Carlo methods, and assessed the corresponding rupture force spectra. It was found th...

  18. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  19. Three-body forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-body forces are defined and their properties discussed. Evidence for such forces in the trinucleon bound states and scattering reactions is reviewed. The binding energy defects of the trinucleon bound states, the 3He charge density, the Phillips line for doublet n-d scattering lengths, and three-nucleon breakup reactions are discussed, together with the possible influence of three-body forces on these observables

  20. Casimir force of expulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Fateev, Evgeny G.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility in principle is shown that the noncompensated Casimir force can exist in nanosized open metal cavities. The force shows up as time-constant expulsion of open cavities toward their least opening. The optimal parameters of the angles of the opening, of "generating lines" of cavities and their lengths are found at which the expulsive force is maximal. The theory is created for trapezoid configurations, in particular for parallel mirrors which experience both the transverse Casimi...

  1. Theory of intermolecular forces

    CERN Document Server

    Margenau, H; Ter Haar, D

    1971-01-01

    Theory of Intermolecular Forces deals with the exposition of the principles and techniques of the theory of intermolecular forces. The text focuses on the basic theory and surveys other aspects, with particular attention to relevant experiments. The initial chapters introduce the reader to the history of intermolecular forces. Succeeding chapters present topics on short, intermediate, and long range atomic interactions; properties of Coulomb interactions; shape-dependent forces between molecules; and physical adsorption. The book will be of good use to experts and students of quantum mechanics

  2. Intermolecular and surface forces

    CERN Document Server

    Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2011-01-01

    This reference describes the role of various intermolecular and interparticle forces in determining the properties of simple systems such as gases, liquids and solids, with a special focus on more complex colloidal, polymeric and biological systems. The book provides a thorough foundation in theories and concepts of intermolecular forces, allowing researchers and students to recognize which forces are important in any particular system, as well as how to control these forces. This third edition is expanded into three sections and contains five new chapters over the previous edition.· starts fr

  3. No fifth force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Hopes that geophysicists might be able to document a fifth force of nature have diminished, as new measurements and analyses of earlier geodetic experiments have yielded no solid evidence of a non-Newtonian component of gravity.Modern physics recognizes four fundamental forces with distinct spheres of influence: The strong and weak nuclear forces operate over the range of one atom, while gravity and electromagnetism have an infinite range. Gravity measurements over a few centimeters in laboratories and over millions of kilometers in space continue to buttress Issac Newton's conclusion that the gravitational force between two objects decreases as the square of the distance between them.

  4. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  5. Force Concept Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestenes, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reports the rationale, design, validation, and uses of the "Force Concept Inventory," an instrument to assess the students' beliefs on force. Includes results and implications of two studies that compared the inventory with the "Mechanics Baseline." Includes a copy of the instrument. (MDH)

  6. OOTW Force Design Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  7. Notes on forcing axioms

    CERN Document Server

    Todorcevic, Stevo; Feng, Qi

    2013-01-01

    In the mathematical practice, the Baire category method is a tool for establishing the existence of a rich array of generic structures. However, in mathematics, the Baire category method is also behind a number of fundamental results such as the Open Mapping Theorem or the Banach-Steinhaus Boundedness Principle. This volume brings the Baire category method to another level of sophistication via the internal version of the set-theoretic forcing technique. It is the first systematic account of applications of the higher forcing axioms with the stress on the technique of building forcing notions

  8. Magnetic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principles of the operation of the magnetic force microscope are considered. The main areas of application of magnetic force microscopy are characterised. The prospects are shown of using this method for solving problems of materials science, including the most topical problem, viz., the creation of magnetic recording media with ultrahigh recording density. Unique potentials for investigation of nanostructures using a combination of magnetic force microscopy with electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance are pointed out. Primary attention is focused on the description of experimental techniques. The bibliography includes 27 references.

  9. Quantized Casimir Force

    OpenAIRE

    Tse, Wang-Kong; Macdonald, A. H.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the Casimir effect between two-dimensional electron systems driven to the quantum Hall regime by a strong perpendicular magnetic field. In the large separation (d) limit where retardation effects are essential we find i) that the Casimir force is quantized in units of 3\\hbar c \\alpha^2/(8\\pi^2 d^4), and ii) that the force is repulsive for mirrors with same type of carrier, and attractive for mirrors with opposite types of carrier. The sign of the Casimir force is therefore elec...

  10. Quantized Casimir force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Wang-Kong; MacDonald, A H

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the Casimir effect between two-dimensional electron systems driven to the quantum Hall regime by a strong perpendicular magnetic field. In the large-separation (d) limit where retardation effects are essential, we find (i) that the Casimir force is quantized in units of 3ħcα(2)/8π(2)d(4) and (ii) that the force is repulsive for mirrors with the same type of carrier and attractive for mirrors with opposite types of carrier. The sign of the Casimir force is therefore electrically tunable in ambipolar materials such as graphene. The Casimir force is suppressed when one mirror is a charge-neutral graphene system in a filling factor ν=0 quantum Hall state. PMID:23368242

  11. New force in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review recent experimental and theoretical work dealing with the proposed fifth force. Further analysis of the original Eotvos experiments has uncovered no challenges to our original assertion that these data evidence a correlation characteristic of the presence of a new coupling to baryon number or hypercharge. Various models suggest that the proposed fifth force could be accommodated naturally into the existing theoretical framework. 40 refs

  12. ForcePAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemann, J.; Damkilde, Lars

    2009-01-01

    ForcePAD is a 2-dimensional finite element application that started as a concept application for finite element modeling. Over the course of 10 years the application has been evolved into an application that is used extensively in both an educational setting as well as a tool for design and engin...... engineering. In the latest version of ForcePAD an optimization module was added to enable to take advantage of topology optimization in the design process....

  13. Bow Crushing Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of these notes is to present a basis for the estimation of the internal collision forces between conventinal merchant vessels and large volume offshore structures in the form of gravity-supported offshore installations and bridges crossing international shipping routes.The main emphas...... is on the presentation of impact loads on fixed offshore structures due to bow collisions. The crushing forces are determined as functions of vessels size, vessels speed, bow profile, collision angles and eccentric impacts....

  14. Strategic forces briefing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bing, G.; Chrzanowski, P.; May, M.; Nordyke, M.

    1989-04-06

    The Strategic Forces Briefing'' is our attempt, accomplished over the past several months, to outline and highlight the more significant strategic force issues that must be addressed in the near future. Some issues are recurrent: the need for an effective modernized Triad and a constant concern for force survivability. Some issues derive from arms control: the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (SALT) are sufficiently advanced to set broad numerical limits on forces, but not so constraining as to preclude choices among weapon systems and deployment modes. Finally, a new administration faced with serious budgetary problems must strive for the most effective strategic forces limited dollars can buy and support. A review of strategic forces logically begins with consideration of the missions the forces are charged with. We begin the briefing with a short review of targeting policy and implementation within the constraints of available unclassified information. We then review each element of the Triad with sections on SLBMs, ICBMs, and Air-Breathing (bomber and cruise missile) systems. A short section at the end deals with the potential impact of strategic defense on offensive force planning. We consider ABM, ASAT, and air defense; but we do not attempt to address the technical issues of strategic defense per se. The final section gives a brief overview of the tritium supply problem. We conclude with a summary of recommendations that emerge from our review. The results of calculation on the effectiveness of various weapon systems as a function of cost that are presented in the briefing are by Paul Chrzanowski.

  15. Motional Casimir force

    OpenAIRE

    Jaekel, Marc-Thierry; Reynaud, Serge

    2001-01-01

    We study the situation where two point like mirrors are placed in the vacuum state of a scalar field in a two-dimensional spacetime. Describing the scattering upon the mirrors by transmittivity and reflectivity functions obeying unitarity, causality and high frequency transparency conditions, we compute the fluctuations of the Casimir forces exerted upon the two motionless mirrors. We use the linear response theory to derive the motional forces exerted upon one mirror when it moves or when th...

  16. Casimir force for electrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Høye, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    The Casimir force between a pair of parallell plates filled with ionic particles is considered. We use a statistical mechanical approach and consider the classical high temperature limit. In this limit the ideal metal result with no transverse electric (TE) zero frequency mode is recovered. This result has also been obtained by Jancovici and \\v{S}amaj earlier. Our derivation differs mainly from the latter in the way the Casimir force is evaluated from the correlation function. By our approach...

  17. Friction force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Roland Bennewitz

    2005-01-01

    Friction force microscopy (FFM) can detect lateral force variations on the atomic scale when sliding a sharp tip over a flat surface. The sliding often takes the form of a stick-slip movement with the same periodicity as the atomic lattice. Here, I discuss how the occurrence of stick-slip instabilities is related to the onset of dissipation. The velocity and load dependence of atomic friction on various materials are discussed in the light of simple classical laws of friction.

  18. Polynomial force approximations and multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Platz; Daniel Forchheimer; Tholén, Erik A; David B. Haviland

    2013-01-01

    We present polynomial force reconstruction from experimental intermodulation atomic force microscopy (ImAFM) data. We study the tip–surface force during a slow surface approach and compare the results with amplitude-dependence force spectroscopy (ADFS). Based on polynomial force reconstruction we generate high-resolution surface-property maps of polymer blend samples. The polynomial method is described as a special example of a more general approximative force reconstruction, where the aim is...

  19. Forced ventilation increases variability of isometric finger forces

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Sheng; Yasuda, Nobuo

    2006-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the effects of forced ventilation on variability of the index finger force at the submaximal levels. Fourteen (6 men, 8 women) healthy subjects were instructed to perform self-initiated forced inspiration and forced expiration, the Valsalva maneuver and normal breathing while sustaining 15%, 30%, and 45% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) by the index finger. Standard deviation (S.D.) of finger forces increased significantly with the level of force. At each level...

  20. Radiative forcing by contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerkoetter, R.; Schumann, U. [DLR Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Phys. der Atmosphaere; Doelling, D.R.; Minnis, P. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center; Nakajima, T.; Tsushima, Y. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Center for Climate System Research

    1999-08-01

    A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmosphere. The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, midlatitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres. Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere, a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 Wm{sup -2} daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude. The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover. (orig.) 78 refs.

  1. Radiative forcing by contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Meerkötter

    Full Text Available A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmosphere. The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres. Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere, a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 Wm-2 daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude. The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology · radiative processes

  2. Confusion around the tidal force and the centrifugal force

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, Takuya; Boffin, Henri M J

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the tidal force, whose notion is sometimes misunderstood in the public domain literature. We discuss the tidal force exerted by a secondary point mass on an extended primary body such as the Earth. The tidal force arises because the gravitational force exerted on the extended body by the secondary mass is not uniform across the primary. In the derivation of the tidal force, the non-uniformity of the gravity is essential, and inertial forces such as the centrifugal force are not needed. Nevertheless, it is often asserted that the tidal force can be explained by the centrifugal force. If we literally take into account the centrifugal force, it would mislead us. We therefore also discuss the proper treatment of the centrifugal force.

  3. Unification of fundamental forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdus Salam, a Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge, provides an accessible overview of modern particle physics and the quest for the unification of the fundamental forces, the electromagnetic, strong nuclear weak nuclear and gravitational. A major theme of the lecture is the way in which the theoretical physicists approach the task of imposing orders on a seemingly chaotic universe. A secondary theme is that the electroweak force is most likely to be the force of life. The theme of the philosophy behind the work of theorists is continued in two additional lectures by Werner Heisenberg and Paul Dirac which give fascinating insights into the modus operandi and work of two of the founders of quantum mechanics. (author)

  4. The amazing normal forces

    CERN Document Server

    Petrache, Horia I

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript is written for students in introductory physics classes to address some of the common difficulties and misconceptions of the normal force, especially the relationship between normal and friction forces. Accordingly, it is intentionally informal and conversational in tone to teach students how to build an intuition to complement mathematical formalism. This is accomplished by beginning with common and everyday experience and then guiding students toward two realizations: (i) That real objects are deformable even when deformations are not easily visible, and (ii) that the relation between friction and normal forces follows from the action-reaction principle. The traditional formulae under static and kinetic conditions are then analyzed to show that peculiarity of the normal-friction relationship follows readily from observations and knowledge of physics principles.

  5. Bi-Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Peng; Speicher, Nora K; Röttger, Richard;

    2014-01-01

    The explosion of the biological data has dramatically reformed today's biological research. The need to integrate and analyze high-dimensional biological data on a large scale is driving the development of novel bioinformatics approaches. Biclustering, also known as 'simultaneous clustering' or 'co......-clustering', has been successfully utilized to discover local patterns in gene expression data and similar biomedical data types. Here, we contribute a new heuristic: 'Bi-Force'. It is based on the weighted bicluster editing model, to perform biclustering on arbitrary sets of biological entities, given any kind of...... pairwise similarities. We first evaluated the power of Bi-Force to solve dedicated bicluster editing problems by comparing Bi-Force with two existing algorithms in the BiCluE software package. We then followed a biclustering evaluation protocol in a recent review paper from Eren et al. (2013) (A...

  6. Forcing for mathematicians

    CERN Document Server

    Weaver, Nik

    2014-01-01

    Ever since Paul Cohen's spectacular use of the forcing concept to prove the independence of the continuum hypothesis from the standard axioms of set theory, forcing has been seen by the general mathematical community as a subject of great intrinsic interest but one that is technically so forbidding that it is only accessible to specialists. In the past decade, a series of remarkable solutions to long-standing problems in C*-algebra using set-theoretic methods, many achieved by the author and his collaborators, have generated new interest in this subject. This is the first book aimed at explain

  7. Friction force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Bennewitz

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Friction force microscopy (FFM can detect lateral force variations on the atomic scale when sliding a sharp tip over a flat surface. The sliding often takes the form of a stick-slip movement with the same periodicity as the atomic lattice. Here, I discuss how the occurrence of stick-slip instabilities is related to the onset of dissipation. The velocity and load dependence of atomic friction on various materials are discussed in the light of simple classical laws of friction.

  8. Force-Free Foliations

    CERN Document Server

    Compère, Geoffrey; Lupsasca, Alexandru

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic field configurations with vanishing Lorentz force density are known as force-free and appear in terrestrial, space, and astrophysical plasmas. We explore a general method for finding such configurations based on formulating equations for the field lines rather than the field itself. The basic object becomes a foliation of spacetime or, in the stationary axisymmetric case, of the half-plane. We use this approach to find some new stationary and axisymmetric solutions, one of which could represent a rotating plasma vortex near a magnetic null point.

  9. Radiative Forcing of Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

  10. Confusion around the tidal force and the centrifugal force

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Takuya; Isaka, Hiromu; Boffin, Henri M. J.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the tidal force, whose notion is sometimes misunderstood in the public domain literature. We discuss the tidal force exerted by a secondary point mass on an extended primary body such as the Earth. The tidal force arises because the gravitational force exerted on the extended body by the secondary mass is not uniform across the primary. In the derivation of the tidal force, the non-uniformity of the gravity is essential, and inertial forces such as the centrifugal force are not nee...

  11. Fifth force, sixth force and all that

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the recent literature, a few claims appeared about possible deviations from the ordinary gravitational laws (both at the terrestrial and at the galactic level). The experimental evidence does not seem to be conclusive; nor its is clear if new forces are showing up, or if we have to accept actual deviations from Newton or Einstein gravitation (in the latter case, the validity of the very Equivalence Principle might be on the stage). In such a situation, the attempts by various authors at explaining the ''new effects'' just on the basis of the ordinary theory of General Relativity (for instance, in terms of quantum gravity) can be regarded as logically instance, in terms of quantum gravity) can be regarded as logically questionable. In this pedagogically oriented paper, the problem is approached within the classical realm, by exploring whether the possible new effects can be accounted for through minimal modifications of the standard formulatiaon of General Relativity: in particular, through exploitation and extension of the role of the cosmological constant

  12. The fifth force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a phenomenological description of the ''fifth force'' which focuses on the implications of the existing data from satellite and geophysical measurements of gravity, the Eoetvoes experiment, decays into hyperphotons, and the energy-dependence of the K0 - anti K0 parameters

  13. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  14. Separation problems and forcing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletal, Jindřich

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2013), s. 1350002. ISSN 0219-0613 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : separation * set of uniqueness * forcing Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.364, year: 2012 http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0219061313500025

  15. Forces in strategy formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensen, Elmer Fly; Sanchez, Ron

    2008-01-01

    literature. Based on an extensive review of relevant theory and empirical work in strategic decision-making, organizational change theory, cognitive and social psychology, and strategy processes, seven kinds of ''forces'' - rational, imposed, teleological, learning, political, heuristic, and social...

  16. The Dynamic Force Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  17. The Force of Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascher, Carol

    2005-01-01

    "The Force of Ideas" describes a little-known aspect of both educational history and Viennese psychoanalysis during the interwar years: the movement for psychoanalytic pedagogy. The author traces her father's own story, beginning with his application to the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society for training as a psychoanalytic pedagogue, as a way to…

  18. Reduction in Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phay, Robert

    Chapter 2 in a book on school law discusses the reasons for reduction in force (RIF) and presents a set of model regulations for school districts as the best means of minimizing legal problems resulting from RIF. The reasons for RIF include declining student enrollments; reduced turnover among teachers; changes in programs; and more constrained…

  19. Casimir forces and geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casimir interactions are interactions induced by quantum vacuum fluctuations and thermal fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Using a path integral quantization for the gauge field, an effective Gaussian action will be derived which is the starting point to compute Casimir forces between macroscopic objects analytically and numerically. No assumptions about the independence of the material and shape dependent contributions to the interaction are made. We study the limit of flat surfaces in further detail and obtain a concise derivation of Lifshitz' theory of molecular forces. For the case of ideally conducting boundaries, the Gaussian action will be calculated explicitly. Both limiting cases are also discussed within the framework of a scalar field quantization approach, which is applicable for translationally invariant geometries. We develop a non-perturbative approach to calculate the Casimir interaction from the Gaussian action for periodically deformed and ideally conducting objects numerically. The obtained results reveal two different scaling regimes for the Casimir force as a function of the distance between the objects, their deformation wavelength and -amplitude. The results confirm that the interaction is non-additive, especially in the presence of strong geometric deformations. Furthermore, the numerical approach is extended to calculate lateral Casimir forces. The results are consistent with the results of the proximity-force approximation for large deformation wavelengths. A qualitatively different behaviour between the normal and lateral force is revealed. We also establish a relation between the boundary induced change of the of the density of states for the scalar Helmholtz equation and the Casimir interaction using the path integral method. For statically deformed boundaries, this relation can be expressed as a novel trace formula, which is formally similar to the so-called Krein-Friedel-Lloyd formula. While the latter formula describes the

  20. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  1. Jet impact force studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In sludge procesing and waste removal operations, settled sludge is resuspended using turbulent jets from centrifugal slurry pumps. The effects of these turbulent jets on cooling coil structures in waste tanks have been examined to determine if the use of slurry pumps will lead to damage of the coils or their bottom supports. Force equations and direct force measurements were used to examine three slurry pumps and three tank cooling coil structures. The three pumps were: the Bingham-Willamette Company (BWC) pump; the Quad Volute pump; and the single nozzle pump. The three cooling coil structures were: The Type III tank design with angle iron bottom supports (yield stress - 36,000 psi), the Type I and II tank design with steel rod guides as bottom support (yield stress - 24,000 psi), and the cooling coil bundles found in some Type III tanks such as tanks 32 and 35 (yield stress - 36,000 psi)

  2. Force Modulator System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  3. Forced plume characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    CRAPPER, P. F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of turbulent forced plumes generated by the steady release of mass, momentum and buoyancy from a finite source in a uniform environment. The entrainment coefficient assumption has been made; however a variable coefficient has been used so that the characteristics of the transition from jet to plume behaviour can be presented more clearly. A modified Boussinesq approximation has been made which corrects for the effect of density variations in the mass and ...

  4. Optimal Sales Force Compensation

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Kräkel; Anja Schöttner

    2014-01-01

    We analyze a dynamic moral-hazard model to derive optimal sales force compensation plans without imposing any ad hoc restrictions on the class of feasible incentive contracts. We explain when the compensation plans that are most common in practice - fixed salaries, quota-based bonuses, commissions, or a combination thereof - are optimal. Fixed salaries are optimal for small revenue-cost ratios. Quota-based bonuses (commissions) should be used if the revenue-cost ratio takes intermediate (larg...

  5. Concepts of force

    CERN Document Server

    Jammer, Max

    2011-01-01

    Both historical treatment and critical analysis, this work by a noted physicist takes a fascinating look at a fundamental of physics, tracing its development from ancient to modern times. Kepler's initiation of scientific conceptualization, Newton's definition, post-Newtonian reinterpretation - contrasting concepts of Leibniz, Boscovich, Kant with those of Mach, Kirchhoff, Hertz. In-depth analysis of contemporary trend toward eliminating force from conceptual scheme of physics. ""An excellent presentation."" - Science. 1962 edition.

  6. Casimir force driven ratchets

    OpenAIRE

    Emig, Thorsten

    2007-01-01

    We explore the non-linear dynamics of two parallel periodically patterned metal surfaces that are coupled by the zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field between them. The resulting Casimir force generates for asymmetric patterns with a time-periodically driven surface-to-surface distance a ratchet effect, allowing for directed lateral motion of the surfaces in sizeable parameter ranges. It is crucial to take into account inertia effects and hence chaotic dynamics which are descri...

  7. Modified entropic force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of statistical thermodynamics tells us the equipartition law of energy does not hold in the limit of very low temperatures. It is found the Debye model is very successful in explaining the experimental results for most of the solid objects. Motivated by this fact, we modify the entropic force formula which is proposed very recently. Since the Unruh temperature is proportional to the strength of the gravitational field, so the modified entropic force formula is an extension of the Newtonian gravity to the weak field. On the contrary, general relativity extends Newtonian gravity to the strong field case. Corresponding to Debye temperature, there exists a Debye acceleration gD. It is found the Debye acceleration is gD=10-15 N kg-1. This acceleration is very much smaller than the gravitational acceleration 10-4 N kg-1 which is felt by Neptune and the gravitational acceleration 10-10 N kg-1 felt by the Sun. Therefore, the modified entropic force can be very well approximated by the Newtonian gravity in the Solar System and in the Galaxy. With this Debye acceleration, we find the current cosmic speeding up can be explained without invoking any kind of dark energy.

  8. Gap Task Force

    CERN Multimedia

    Lissuaer, D

    One of the more congested areas in the ATLAS detector is the GAP region (the area between the Barrel Calorimeter and the End Cap calorimeter) where Inner Detector services, LAr Services and some Tile services all must co-habitat in a very limited area. It has been clear for some time that the space in the GAP region is not sufficient to accommodate all that is needed. In the last few month additional problems of routing all the services to Z=0 have been encountered due to the very limited space between the Tile Calorimeter and the first layer of Muon chambers. The Technical Management Board (TMB) and the Executive Board (EB) decided in the middle of March to establish a Task Force to look at this problem and come up with a solution within well-specified guidelines. The task force consisted of experts from the ID, Muon, Liquid Argon and Tile systems in addition to experts from the Technical Coordination team and the Physics coordinator. The task force held many meetings and in general there were some very l...

  9. Urban task force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubović Ljiljana V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Urban Task Force Report has brought to our attention, that English towns and cities today require a new renaissance. The comprehensive planning has retarded urban living (Urban Renaissance, Sharing the Vision 01.99, 1999. Forty percent of inner-urban housing stock is subsidized 'social' housing. A review of the demographic and development trends have lead to the UK Government’s new urban policy that prioritizes the regeneration of towns and cities by building on recycled urban land and protecting the countryside. As result, Urban Task Force (UTF was founded the with the following aims To identify causes of urban decline in England; To recommend practical solutions how to bring people back into cities; To establish a new vision for urban regeneration based on the principles of design excellence, social well being and environmental responsibility within a viable economic and legislative framework (Urban Task Force, 1999:1. This paper represents the analysis of the economic and political effects of the program and its viability.

  10. The task force process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the unique aspects of the Fernald Citizens Task Force process that have contributed to a largely successful public participation effort at Fernald. The Fernald Citizens Task Force passed quickly by many procedural issues. Instead, the Task Force concentrated on (a) educating itself about the site, its problems, and possible solutions, and (b) choosing a directed way to approach its mandate: To make recommendations on several open-quotes big pictureclose quotes issues, including future use of the site, cleanup levels, waste disposition, and cleanup priorities. This paper presents the approach used at Fernald for establishing and running a focused site-specific advisory board, the key issues that have been faced, and how these issues were resolved. The success of Fernald in establishing a strong and functioning site-specific advisory board serves as a useful model for other DOE facilities, although the Fernald model is just one of many approaches that can be taken. However, the approach presented here has worked extremely well for Fernald

  11. Force reflection with compliance control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won S.

    1993-08-01

    Two types of systems for force-reflecting control, which enables high force-reflection gain, are presented: position-error-based force reflection and low-pass-filtered force reflection. Both of the systems are combined with shared compliance control. In the position-error-based class, the position error between the commanded and the actual position of a compliantly controlled robot is used to provide force reflection. In the low-pass-filtered force reflection class, the low-pass-filtered output of the compliance control is used to provide force reflection. The increase in force reflection gain can be more than 10-fold as compared to a conventional high-bandwidth pure force reflection system, when high compliance values are used for the compliance control.

  12. The Forces at Play in Optical Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocious, Jordan

    Optical force microscopy is a novel technique where mechanical detection with a cantilevered probe replaces the detection of photons to investigate optically induced processes and states. A theoretical and experimental analysis is performed here of the forces present in optical force microscopy operated in tapping mode, which reveals two dominant optically induced forces, the gradient force and the scattering force. Force-distance curves are reconstructed from experimental amplitude and phase information for glass, gold nanowires and molecular clusters of silicon naphtalocyanine samples. The scattering force is shown to be insensitive to both nano-scale tip-sample distances and sample polarizability and is dependent on the form of the tip. The gradient force demonstrates a z-4 tip-sample distance dependence, localized to a few nanometers, and is strongly dependent on the polarizability of the sample which enables spectroscopic imaging through force detection. The different distance-dependence and polarizability-dependence of the gradient and scattering forces give rise to a complex force-distance curve which determines imaging contrast along with the cantilever set-point, knowledge of which is essential for image interpretation.

  13. Does entropic force always imply the Newtonian force law?

    OpenAIRE

    Myung, Yun Soo

    2010-01-01

    We study the entropic force by introducing a bound $S \\le A^{3/4}$ between entropy and area which was derived by imposing the non-gravitational collapse condition. In this case, applying a modified entropic force to this system does not lead to the Newtonian force law.

  14. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  15. Activation Force Splines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Erleben, Kenny

    dimensional 2D/3D deformable model. Our activation splines are easy to set up and can be used for physics based animation of deformable models such as snake motion and locomotion of characters. Our approach generalises easily to both 2D and 3D simulations and is applicable in physics based games or animations......We present a method for simulating the active contraction of deformable models, usable for interactive animation of soft deformable objects. We present a novel physical principle as the governing equation for the coupling between the low dimensional 1D activation force model and the higher...... due to its simplicity and very low computational cost....

  16. Modernization of African Armed Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Concept paper framing the debate at the Dakar Forum Workshop on Modernization of Armed forces in Africa.......Concept paper framing the debate at the Dakar Forum Workshop on Modernization of Armed forces in Africa....

  17. Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Woźny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Force Dynamics of Verb ComplementationThe concepts of motion and force are both extensively discussed in cognitive linguistics literature. But they are discussed separately. The first usually in the context of ‘motion situations’ (Talmy, Slobin, Zlatev, the other as part of the Force Dynamics framework, which was developed by Talmy. The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to argue that the concepts of force and motion should not be isolated but considered as two inseparable parts of force-motion events. The second goal is to prove that the modified Force Dynamics (force-motion framework can be used for precise characterization of the verb complementation patterns. To this end, a random sample of 50 sentences containing the verb ‘went’ is analyzed, demonstrating the differences between the categories of intensive and intransitive complementation with respect to the linguistically coded parameters of force and motion.

  18. Lateral Casimir force beyond the proximity-force approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Robson B; Neto, Paulo A Maia; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    2006-03-17

    We argue that the appropriate variable to study a nontrivial geometry dependence of the Casimir force is the lateral component of the Casimir force, which we evaluate between two corrugated metallic plates outside the validity of the proximity-force approximation. The metallic plates are described by the plasma model, with arbitrary values for the plasma wavelength, the plate separation, and the corrugation period, the corrugation amplitude remaining the smallest length scale. Our analysis shows that in realistic experimental situations the proximity-force approximation overestimates the force by up to 30%. PMID:16605712

  19. Lateral Casimir Force beyond the Proximity-Force Approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We argue that the appropriate variable to study a nontrivial geometry dependence of the Casimir force is the lateral component of the Casimir force, which we evaluate between two corrugated metallic plates outside the validity of the proximity-force approximation. The metallic plates are described by the plasma model, with arbitrary values for the plasma wavelength, the plate separation, and the corrugation period, the corrugation amplitude remaining the smallest length scale. Our analysis shows that in realistic experimental situations the proximity-force approximation overestimates the force by up to 30%

  20. Casimir force on amplifying bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Sambale, Agnes; Welsch, Dirk-Gunnar; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Dung, Ho Trung

    2009-01-01

    Based on a unified approach to macroscopic QED that allows for the inclusion of amplification in a limited space and frequency range, we study the Casimir force as a Lorentz force on an arbitrary partially amplifying system of linearly locally responding (isotropic) magnetoelectric bodies. We demonstrate that the force on a weakly polarisable/magnetisable amplifying object in the presence of a purely absorbing environment can be expressed as a sum over the Casimir--Polder forces on the excite...

  1. Force reflecting hand controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAffee, Douglas A.; Snow, Edward R.; Townsend, William T.

    1993-03-01

    A universal input device for interfacing a human operator with a slave machine such as a robot or the like includes a plurality of serially connected mechanical links extending from a base. A handgrip is connected to the mechanical links distal from the base such that a human operator may grasp the handgrip and control the position thereof relative to the base through the mechanical links. A plurality of rotary joints is arranged to connect the mechanical links together to provide at least three translational degrees of freedom and at least three rotational degrees of freedom of motion of the handgrip relative to the base. A cable and pulley assembly for each joint is connected to a corresponding motor for transmitting forces from the slave machine to the handgrip to provide kinesthetic feedback to the operator and for producing control signals that may be transmitted from the handgrip to the slave machine. The device gives excellent kinesthetic feedback, high-fidelity force/torque feedback, a kinematically simple structure, mechanically decoupled motion in all six degrees of freedom, and zero backlash. The device also has a much larger work envelope, greater stiffness and responsiveness, smaller stowage volume, and better overlap of the human operator's range of motion than previous designs.

  2. Force and motion

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Intimidated by inertia? Frightened by forces? Mystified by Newton s law of motion? You re not alone and help is at hand. The stop Faking It! Series is perfect for science teachers, home-schoolers, parents wanting to help with homework all of you who need a jargon-free way to learn the background for teaching middle school physical science with confidence. With Bill Roberton as your friendly, able but somewhat irreverent guide, you will discover you CAN come to grips with the basics of force and motion. Combining easy-to-understand explanations with activities using commonly found equipment, this book will lead you through Newton s laws to the physics of space travel. The book is as entertaining as it is informative. Best of all, the author understands the needs of adults who want concrete examples, hands-on activities, clear language, diagrams and yes, a certain amount of empathy. Ideas For Use Newton's laws, and all of the other motion principles presented in this book, do a good job of helping us to underst...

  3. Dynamics of forced biopolymer translocation

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtola, V V; Kaski, K; 10.1209/0295-5075/85/58006

    2009-01-01

    We present results from our simulations of biopolymer translocation in a solvent which explain the main experimental findings. The forced translocation can be described by simple force balance arguments for the relevant range of pore potentials in experiments and biological systems. Scaling of translocation time with polymer length varies with pore force and friction. Hydrodynamics affects this scaling and significantly reduces translocation times.

  4. Gradient and scattering forces in photoinduced force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahng, Junghoon; Brocious, Jordan; Fishman, Dmitry A.; Huang, Fei; Li, Xiaowei; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar; Potma, Eric Olaf

    2014-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis of the dominant forces measured in photoinduced force microscopy is presented. It is shown that when operated in the noncontact and soft-contact modes, the microscope is sensitive to the optically induced gradient force (Fg) and the scattering force (Fsc). The reconstructed force-distance curve reveals a tip-dependent scattering force in the 30-60 pN range. Whereas the scattering force is virtually insensitive to the nanoscopic tip-sample distance, the gradient force shows a z-4 dependence and is manifest only for tip-sample distances of a few nm. Measurements on glass, gold nanowires, and molecular clusters of silicon naphtalocyanine confirm that the gradient force is strongly dependent on the polarizability of the sample, enabling spectroscopic imaging through force detection. The nearly constant Fsc and the spatially dependent Fg give rise to a complex force-distance curve, which varies from point to point in the specimen and dictates the image contrast observed for a given set point of the cantilevered tip.

  5. Interfacial forces between silica surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal particle stability and some other interfacial phenomena are governed by interfacial force interactions. The two well known forces are van der Waals force and electrostatic force, as documented by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Moreover, advances in modern instrumentation and colloid science suggested that some short-ranged forces or structure forces are important for relevant colloidal systems. The interfacial and/or molecular forces can be measured as a resultant force as function of separation distance by atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloid probe. This article presents a discussion on AFM colloid probe measurement of silica particle and silica wafer surfaces in solutions with some technical notifications in measurement and data convolution mechanisms. The measured forces are then analyzed and discussed based on the 'constant charge' and 'constant potential' models of DLVO theory. The difference between the prediction of DLVO theory and the measured results indicates that there is a strong short-range structure force between the two hydrophilic surfaces, even at extremely low ionic concentration, such as Milli-Q water purity solution.

  6. TRIGA forced shutdowns analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for improving the operation leads us to use new methods and strategies. Probabilistic safety assessments and statistical analysis provide insights useful for our reactor operation. This paper is dedicated to analysis of the forced shutdowns during the first reactor operation period, between 1980 to 1989. A forced shutdown data base was designed using data on forced shutdowns collected from the reactor operation logbooks. In order to sort out the forced shutdowns the records have the following fields: - current number, date, equipment failed, failure type (M for mechanical, E for electrical, D for irradiation device, U for human factor failure; - scram mode, SE for external scram, failure of reactor cooling circuits and/or irradiation devices, SR for reactor scram, exceeding of reactor nuclear parameters, SB for reactor scram by control rod drop, SM for manual scram required by the abnormal reactor status; - scram cause, giving more information on the forced shutdown. This data base was processed using DBase III. The data processing techniques are presented. To sort out the data, one of the criteria was the number of scrams per year, failure type, scram mode, etc. There are presented yearly scrams, total operation time in hours, total unavailable time, median unavailable time period, reactor availability A. There are given the formulae used to calculate the reactor operational parameters. There are shown the scrams per year in the 1980 to 1989 period, the reactor operation time per year, the reactor shutdown time per year and the operating time versus down time per year. Total number of scrams in the covered period was 643 which caused a reactor down time of 4282.25 hours. In a table the scrams as sorted on the failure type is shown. Summarising, this study emphasized some problems and difficulties which occurred during the TRIGA reactor operation at Pitesti. One main difficulty in creating this data base was the unstandardized scram record mode. Some times

  7. Parallel computation with the force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology, called the force, supports the construction of programs to be executed in parallel by a force of processes. The number of processes in the force is unspecified, but potentially very large. The force idea is embodied in a set of macros which produce multiproceossor FORTRAN code and has been studied on two shared memory multiprocessors of fairly different character. The method has simplified the writing of highly parallel programs within a limited class of parallel algorithms and is being extended to cover a broader class. The individual parallel constructs which comprise the force methodology are discussed. Of central concern are their semantics, implementation on different architectures and performance implications.

  8. Medium-assisted vacuum force

    CERN Document Server

    Tomas, M S

    2005-01-01

    We discuss some implications of a very recently obtained result for the force on a slab in a planar cavity based on the calculation of the vacuum Lorentz force [C. Raabe and D.-G. Welsch, Phys. Rev. A 71, 013814 (2005)]. We demonstrate that, according to this formula, the total force on the slab consists of a medium-screened Casimir force and, in addition to it, a medium-assisted force. The sign of of the medium-assisted force is determined solely by the properties of the cavity mirrors. In the Lifshitz configuration, this force is proportional to 1/d at small distances and is very small compared with the corresponding van der Waals force. At large distances, however, it is proportional to 1/d^4 and is comparable with the Casimir force, especially for denser media. The exponents in these power laws decrease by 1 in the case of a thin slab. The formula for the medium-assisted force also describes the force on a layer of the cavity medium, which has similar properties. For dilute media, it implies an atom-mirro...

  9. Force Limit System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  10. Students' conceptions about force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Students from a young age have developed in their own minds differing concepts of things such as all creatures having a soul. Also children see the environment and interpret what they see according to their own understanding and explanation. In particular, with regards to physics, things like light, heat, motion, structure of matter and energy are understood at the level of a child s comprehension. Most often the child s understanding varies quite differently from the actual true meaning. As a result the child is reluctant to accept any other explanation. In such situations the necessary difficulties must be tackled with care and caution pertinent to the individual. Studies at K.S.U University related to force and motion of various departments in the Faculty of Science and Letters have been investigated. After evaluations of all the findings a number of suggestions have been made to change student views and ideas

  11. The resistible force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many people of today have an oppositional attitude towards the continual loss of sense of existence which manifests itself in 'the great refusal'. They also behave in an anti-authoritarian manner towards their first father Marx. They realize that it is ourselves who have to search and find. The protest groups of the most different origin have come into being as 'the sand in the wheels' of a seemingly irresistable force. They have formed themselves beyond the 'Left' and the 'Right'. Nuclear energy is the instrument which acts as a gear for their opposition, which establishes it and which provides the basis for their self-concept. It is the symbol where the conflict between living standard and living quality breaks open. In essential, however, the protest is growing towards supporting an effective administration of all goods of our world. (orig./HP)

  12. Silicon force sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  13. Stochastic Quantization and Casimir Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Pablo; Soto, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we show how the stochastic quantization method developed by Parisi and Wu can be used to obtain Casimir forces. Both quantum and thermal fluctuations are taken into account by a Langevin equation for the field. The method allows the Casimir force to be obtained directly, derived from the stress tensor instead of the free energy. It only requires the spectral decomposition of the Laplacian operator in the given geometry. The formalism provides also an expression for the fluctuations of the force. As an application we compute the Casimir force on the plates of a finite piston of arbitrary cross section. Fluctuations of the force are also directly obtained, and it is shown that, in the piston case, the variance of the force is twice the force squared.

  14. Surface forces studied with colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Giesbers, M.

    2001-01-01

    Forces between surfaces are a determining factor for the performance of natural as well as synthetic colloidal systems, and play a crucial role in industrial production processes. Measuring these forces is a scientific and experimental challenge and over the years several techniques have been developed to measure the interaction between surfaces directly as a function of their separation distance. Colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (colloidal probe AFM) offers the possibility to study su...

  15. Lateral Casimir force beyond the Proximity Force Approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Robson B.; Neto, Paulo A. Maia; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    2006-01-01

    We argue that the appropriate variable to study a non trivial geometry dependence of the Casimir force is the lateral component of the Casimir force, which we evaluate between two corrugated metallic plates outside the validity of the Proximity Force Approximation (PFA). The metallic plates are described by the plasma model, with arbitrary values for the plasma wavelength, the plate separation and the corrugation period, the corrugation amplitude remaining the smallest length scale. Our analy...

  16. 一种基于虚拟力的无人机路径跟踪控制方法%A Virtual Force Based Path Following Approach for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勋; 张代兵; 沈林成

    2016-01-01

    提出一种基于虚拟力的无人机路径跟踪控制方法。通过设计虚拟向心力、虚拟弹簧力和虚拟阻力计算期望的转向速率。其中虚拟向心力可以补偿参考路径曲率,虚拟弹簧力使无人机收敛到参考路径上,虚拟阻力能够在收敛过程中防止震荡的产生。该方法不仅可以跟踪直线和圆形路径,还可以精确跟踪变曲率曲线。在跟踪直线时,该方法等价于比例―微分控制;跟踪圆形或变曲率曲线时,等价于反馈线性化方法。论文分析了该方法的稳定性和收敛性,考虑了输入约束对该方法跟踪性能的影响。利用虚拟力控制无人机,使控制参数具有明确的物理意义,从而使参数在实际应用中容易整定。仿真结果证明该方法是有效的,且跟踪性能优于NLGL(非线性导航逻辑)方法。%A virtual force based path following approach is presented for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Three virtual forces, including a virtual centripetal force, a virtual spring force and a virtual drag force, are designed to calculate the desired heading rate. The virtual centripetal force compensates the influence of the reference curvature. The virtual spring force ensures the vehicle converge to the reference path. Meanwhile, the virtual drag force prevents oscillation in the convergence process. The proposed approach can be used to accurately follow straight-line, circle, as well as curve with time-varying curvature. The approach is equivalent to a proportional-derivative controller when following a straight-line, equivalent to a feedback linearization method when following circular or curved paths. The stability and convergence are analyzed. The influence of the input constraint on the following performance is considered. When using virtual forces to control UAVs, the physical meanings of the parameters are definite, which makes them easy to tune in application. Simulation results demonstrate the

  17. An Integrated Higgs Force Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    An Integrated Higgs force theory (IHFT) was based on 2 key requirement amplifications: a matter particle/Higgs force was one and inseparable; a matter particle/Higgs force bidirectionally condensed/evaporated from/to super force. These were basis of 5 theories: particle creation, baryogenesis, superpartner/quark decays, spontaneous symmetry breaking, and stellar black holes. Our universe's 129 matter/force particles contained 64 supersymmetric Higgs particles; 9 transient matter particles/Higgs forces decayed to 8 permanent matter particles/Higgs forces; mass was given to a matter particle by its Higgs force and gravitons; and sum of 8 Higgs force energies of 8 permanent matter particles was dark energy. An IHFT's essence is the intimate physical relationships between 8 theories. These theories are independent because physicists in one theory worked independently of physicists in the other seven. An IHFT's premise is without sacrificing their integrities, 8 independent existing theories are replaced by 8 interrelated amplified theories. Requirement amplifications provide interfaces between the 8 theories. Intimate relationships between 8 theories including the above 5 and string, Higgs forces, and Super Universe are described. The sorting category selected was F. PARTICLES AND FIELDS (e.g., F1 Higgs Physics, F10 Alternative Beyond the Standard Model Physics, F11 Dark Sector Theories and Searches, and F12 Particle Cosmology).

  18. Theory of Casimir Forces without the Proximity-Force Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Rubí, J. Miguel

    2016-03-01

    We analyze both the attractive and repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces recently reported in experimental investigations. By using a kinetic approach, we obtain the Casimir forces from the power absorbed by the materials. We consider collective material excitations through a set of relaxation times distributed in frequency according to a log-normal function. A generalized expression for these forces for arbitrary values of temperature is obtained. We compare our results with experimental measurements and conclude that the model goes beyond the proximity-force approximation.

  19. Origin of Confining Force

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present exact calculations that substantiate a clear picture relating the confining force of QCD to the zero-modes of the Faddeev-Popov (FP) operator $\\mathcal{M}(A) = - \\partial \\cdot D(A)$. This is done in two steps. First we calculate the spectral decomposition of the FP operator and show that the ghost propagator $\\mathcal{G}(k; A) = \\langle \\vec{k}| \\mathcal{M}^{-1}(A) | \\vec{k} \\rangle$ in an external gauge potential $A$ is enhanced at low $k$ in Fourier space for configurations $A$ on the Gribov horizon. This results from the new formula in the low-$k$ regime $\\mathcal{G}^{ab}(k,A) = \\delta^{ab} \\lambda_{|\\vec{k}|}^{-1}(gA)$, where $\\lambda_{|\\vec{k}|}(gA)$ is the eigenvalue of the FP operator that emerges from $\\lambda_{|\\vec{k}|}(0) = \\vec{k}^2$ at $A$ = 0. Next we derive a strict inequality signaling the divergence of the color-Coulomb potential at low momentum $k$ namely, $\\widetilde{\\mathcal{V}}(k) \\geq k^2 G^2(k)$ for $k \\to 0$, where $\\widetilde{\\mathcal{V}}(k)$ is the Fourier...

  20. Forces of nature

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2072602

    2016-01-01

    A breathtaking and beautiful exploration of our planet. This groundbreaking book, which accompanies the new BBC1 TV series, provides the deepest answers to the simplest questions. 'Why is the sky blue?' 'Why is the Earth round?' 'Why is every snowflake unique?' To answer these and many other questions, Professor Brian Cox will reveal some of the most extraordinary phenomena and events on Earth and in the Universe and beyond. From the immensity of Earth's globe to all the world's myriad snowflakes, the forces of nature shape everything we see. Pushed to extremes, the results are astonishing. From the realm of auroras to the heart of our planet, the ingredients that make everything on Earth connect each one of us in an eternal cycle of life. Brian will reveal why Earth is the most colourful world we know, exploring the white light of the sun as it travels through the darkness of space until it hits Earth's atmosphere where it begins a new journey, splitting into a rainbow of colours. From the great plains of th...

  1. Microphotonic Forces From Superfluid Flow

    CERN Document Server

    McAuslan, D L; Baker, C; Sachkou, Y; He, X; Sheridan, E; Bowen, W P

    2015-01-01

    In cavity optomechanics, radiation pressure and photothermal forces are widely utilized to cool and control micromechanical motion, with applications ranging from precision sensing and quantum information to fundamental science. Here, we realize an alternative approach to optical forcing based on superfluid flow and evaporation in response to optical heating. We demonstrate optical forcing of the motion of a cryogenic microtoroidal resonator at a level of 1.46 nN, roughly one order of magnitude larger than the radiation pressure force. We use this force to feedback cool the motion of a microtoroid mechanical mode to 137 mK. The photoconvective forces demonstrated here provide a new tool for high bandwidth control of mechanical motion in cryogenic conditions, and have the potential to allow efficient transfer of electromagnetic energy to motional kinetic energy.

  2. Wind Forces on Container Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of the wind forces acting on a 9,000+ TEU container ship has been carried out through a series of wind tunnel tests. It was investigated how the wind forces depend on the container configuration on the deck using a 1:450 scale model and a series of appropriate container configura......An investigation of the wind forces acting on a 9,000+ TEU container ship has been carried out through a series of wind tunnel tests. It was investigated how the wind forces depend on the container configuration on the deck using a 1:450 scale model and a series of appropriate container...... presented as nondimensional coefficients. It is concluded, that the measured forces and moment depend on the container configuration on deck, and the results may provide a general idea of how the magnitude of the wind forces is affected by a given container stacking configuration on a similar container ship....

  3. Microphotonic Forces From Superfluid Flow

    OpenAIRE

    McAuslan, D. L.; Harris, G. I.; Baker, C; Sachkou, Y.; He, X; Sheridan, E.; Bowen, W. P.

    2015-01-01

    In cavity optomechanics, radiation pressure and photothermal forces are widely utilized to cool and control micromechanical motion, with applications ranging from precision sensing and quantum information to fundamental science. Here, we realize an alternative approach to optical forcing based on superfluid flow and evaporation in response to optical heating. We demonstrate optical forcing of the motion of a cryogenic microtoroidal resonator at a level of 1.46 nN, roughly one order of magnitu...

  4. Gravity as Quantum Entanglement Force

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae-Weon; Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Jungjai

    2010-01-01

    We conjecture that the total quantum entanglement of matter and vacuum in the universe tends to increase with time, like entropy, and that an effective force is associated with this tendency. We also suggest that gravity and dark energy are types of quantum entanglement forces, similar to Verlinde's entropic force, and give holographic dark energy with an equation of state comparable to current observational data. This connection between quantum entanglement and gravity could give some new in...

  5. Agglomerative Forces and Cluster Shapes

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr,William Robert; Kominers, Scott Duke

    2014-01-01

    We model spatial clusters of similar firms. Our model highlights how agglomerative forces lead to localized, individual connections among firms, while interaction costs generate a defined distance over which attraction forces operate. Overlapping firm interactions yield agglomeration clusters that are much larger than the underlying agglomerative forces themselves. Empirically, we demonstrate that our model’s assumptions are present in the structure of technology and labor flows within Silico...

  6. Is Gravity an Entropic Force?

    OpenAIRE

    Shan Gao

    2011-01-01

    The remarkable connections between gravity and thermodynamics seem to imply that gravity is not fundamental but emergent, and in particular, as Verlinde suggested, gravity is probably an entropic force. In this paper, we will argue that the idea of gravity as an entropic force is debatable. It is shown that there is no convincing analogy between gravity and entropic force in Verlinde’s example. Neither holographic screen nor test particle satisfies all requirements for the existence of entrop...

  7. Surface Forces in Foam Films

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liguang

    2006-01-01

    Fundamental studies of surface forces in foam films are carried out to explain the stability of foams and froths in froth flotation. The thin film pressure balance (TFPB) technique was used to study the surface forces between air bubbles in water from equilibrium film thickness and dynamic film thinning measurements. The results were compared with the disjoining pressure predicted from the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The contribution from the non-DLVO force was estimated b...

  8. Forced circumcision of men (abridged).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Michael

    2014-08-01

    The forced circumcision of men is a widespread human rights abuse that often accompanies other human rights violations. It occurs in clashes between circumcising and non-circumcising cultures, or when individuals in circumcising cultures reject circumcision. This article documents the forced circumcision of men against their will, shows how evidence of forced circumcision has been downplayed and discounted, and outlines and discusses some measures that could help to reduce its prevalence. PMID:24014634

  9. Is repulsive Casimir force physical?

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sung Nae

    2004-01-01

    The Casimir force for charge-neutral, perfect conductors of non-planar geometric configurations have been investigated. The configurations are: (1) the plate-hemisphere, (2) the hemisphere-hemisphere and (3) the spherical shell. The resulting Casimir forces for these physical arrangements have been found to be attractive. The repulsive Casimir force found by Boyer for a spherical shell is a special case requiring stringent material property of the sphere, as well as the specific boundary cond...

  10. Casimir force between bimetallic heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcenas, J.; Reyes, L.; Esquivel Sirvent, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364 Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico, 01000 (Mexico)

    2005-05-01

    We present a general method for calculating the Casimir force between heterostructures using an effective surface impedance approach. Within this formalism we study the effect of thin film coatings on the force. As a case study we present results for a system made of alternate layers of Mg and Ni and evaluate the effect that Pd coatings have on the Casimir force. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. MEMS Bragg grating force sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Hansen, Ole

    2011-01-01

    We present modeling, design, fabrication and characterization of a new type of all-optical frequency modulated MEMS force sensor based on a mechanically amplified double clamped waveguide beam structure with integrated Bragg grating. The sensor is ideally suited for force measurements in harsh...... environments and for remote and distributed sensing and has a measured sensitivity of -14 nm/N, which is several times higher than what is obtained in conventional fiber Bragg grating force sensors. © 2011 Optical Society of America....

  12. Rindler force at large distances

    CERN Document Server

    Grumiller, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Given some assumptions it is possible to derive the most general theory of gravity at large distances. The force law derived from this theory contains a Rindler term in addition to well-known contributions, a Schwarzschild mass and a cosmological constant. The same force law recently was confronted with solar system precision data. The Rindler force, if present in Nature, has intriguing consequences for gravity at large distances. In particular, the Rindler force is capable of explaining about 10% of the Pioneer anomaly and simultaneously ameliorates the shape of galactic rotation curves.

  13. Force As A Momentum Current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  14. Coaxial Atomic Force Microscope Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, K A; Westervelt, R M

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate coaxial atomic force microscope (AFM) tweezers that can trap and place small objects using dielectrophoresis (DEP). An attractive force is generated at the tip of a coaxial AFM probe by applying a radio frequency voltage between the center conductor and a grounded shield; the origin of the force is found to be DEP by measuring the pull-off force vs. applied voltage. We show that the coaxial AFM tweezers (CAT) can perform three dimensional assembly by picking up a specified silica microsphere, imaging with the microsphere at the end of the tip, and placing it at a target destination.

  15. Coaxial atomic force microscope tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K. A.; Aguilar, J. A.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate coaxial atomic force microscope (AFM) tweezers that can trap and place small objects using dielectrophoresis (DEP). An attractive force is generated at the tip of a coaxial AFM probe by applying a radio frequency voltage between the center conductor and a grounded shield; the origin of the force is found to be DEP by measuring the pull-off force versus applied voltage. We show that the coaxial AFM tweezers can perform three-dimensional assembly by picking up a specified silica microsphere, imaging with the microsphere at the end of the tip, and placing it at a target destination.

  16. Measuring Forces between Oxide Surfaces Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Høj, Jakob Weiland

    1996-01-01

    The interactions between colloidal particles play a major role in processing of ceramics, especially in casting processes. With the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) it is possible to measure the inter-action force between a small oxide particle (a few micron) and a surface as function of surface...

  17. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  18. Role of attractive forces in tapping tip force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    We present experimental and numerical results demonstrating the drastic influence of attractive forces on the behaviour of the atomic force microscope when operated in the resonant tapping tip mode in an ambient environment. It is often assumed that tapping is related to repulsive interaction....... In contrast, we find that in general the attractive forces are the most dominant interaction in this mode of operation. We show that attractive forces in combination with the repulsive elastic type of forces cause points of instability in the parameter space constituted by: the cantilever swing amplitude......, the frequency bias point, and the distance between the fixed end of the cantilever and the sample. These points of instability can result in disturbances during image acquisition on hard elastic surfaces. ©1997 American Institute of Physics....

  19. Radiative screening of fifth forces

    CERN Document Server

    Burrage, Clare; Millington, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We describe a symmetron model in which the screening of fifth forces arises at the one-loop level through the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. We show that such a theory can avoid current constraints on the existence of fifth forces, but still has the potential to give rise to observable deviations from general relativity.

  20. Dielectrophoresis force of colloidal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Ou-Yang, Daniel

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is the motion of a polarizable colloidal particle in a non­uniform electric field. The magnitude of the DEP force is known to be proportional to the gradient of E2. The DEP force also depends on the relative polarizability of the particle to that of the surrounding medium. Due to its ease of use, DEP has been proposed for a variety of applications to manipulate colloidal particles in a microfluidic setting. However, accurate measurements of the DEP force on colloidal nanoparticles are lacking. A new method is proposed to measure accurately the DEP potential force of colloidal nanoparticles by using confocal fluorescence imaging to determine the density distributions of dilute colloidal nanoparticle in a DEP potential force field. The DEP potential field can be calculated from the particle density distributions since the spatial distribution of the particle number density follows the Boltzmann distribution of the DEP potential energy. The validity of the measured DEP force is tested by examining the force as a function of the E field strength and particle size. The classic Maxwell­Wagner­O'Konski is found to be inadequate to fully describe the frequency dependence of the DEP force. NSF 0928299, Emulsion Polymer Institute, Department of Physics of Lehigh University.

  1. Blocking of Brute Force Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Venkata Krishna Reddy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A common threat Web developers face is a password-guessing attack known as a brute-force attack. A brute-force attack is an attempt to discover a password by systematically trying every possible combination of letters, numbers, and symbols until you discover the one correct combination that works. If your Web site requires user authentication, you are a good target for a brute-force attack. An attacker can always discover a password through a brute-force attack, but the downside is that it could take years to find it. Depending on the password's length and complexity, there could be trillions of possible combinations. To speed things up a bit, a brute-force attack could start with dictionary words or slightly modified dictionary words because most people will use those rather than a completely random password. These attacks are called dictionary attacks or hybrid brute-force attacks. Brute-force attacks put user accounts at risk and flood your site with unnecessary traffic. Hackers launch brute-force attacks using widely available tools that utilize wordlists and smart rule set to intelligently and automatically guess user passwords. Although such attacks are easy to detect, they are not so easy to prevent

  2. Force.com enterprise architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Fawcett, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This book is for advanced Force.com developers and architects who need to understand the Salesforce platform from the perspective of enterprise-level requirements. You should have an existing understanding of Apex and Visualforce. Those familiar with other enterprise software ecosystems will also find this book ideal as they adopt Force.com.

  3. Mesonic theory of effective forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of nucleon-nucleon effective interaction on base of meson theory of nuclear forces is considered. The dependence of effective force parameters from coupling constants and masses of the exchange mesons is investigated. The results of nuclear matter calculations are presented. 36 refs.; 9 figs.; 2 tabs

  4. Pseudo force acting between bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Abhinav Ray; Deva, Anish; Sarma, Arun

    It has been shown that a non-contact force acts between two macroscopic physical objects held close together, which is not associated with the gravitational and electrostatic force. An experiment was conducted with objects of different mass, material and geometry to find the magnitude and properties of this apparent or pseudo force. The order of magnitude was found to be 10-5 and it remained constant for all types of objects while only the coefficient increased as the distance between the objects reduced. It only started acting at small distances and failed to make a body move if it experienced static friction from any contact surface. The nature of the force was found to be attractive as well as repulsive. Due to gravitation being a solely attractive force, it was eliminated as a possible reason for the pseudo force. The experiment was performed twice, once by grounding the apparatus and then again without grounding. The order of the force remained the same for both cases. As the test objects were held by hand, they were grounded through the human body. Also, none of the objects used were in contact with each other for the duration of this work, preventing any contact electrification. Due to these factors, the force was not considered electrostatic in nature.

  5. Casimir force between dispersive magnetodielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomas, M.S. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)]. E-mail: tomas@thphys.irb.hr

    2005-07-25

    We extend our approach to the Casimir effect between absorbing dielectric multilayers [M.S. Tomas, Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 052103] to magnetodielectric systems. The resulting expression for the force is used to numerically explore the effect of the medium dispersion on the attractive/repulsive force in a metal-magnetodielectric system described by the Drude-Lorentz permittivities and permeabilities.

  6. Casimir force between dispersive magnetodielectrics

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas, M. S.

    2004-01-01

    We extend our approach to the Casimir effect between absorbing dielectric multilayers [M. S. Tomas, Phys. Rev. A 66, 052103 (2002)] to magnetodielectric systems. The resulting expression for the force is used to numerically explore the effect of the medium dispersion on the attractive/repulsive force in a metal-magnetodielectric system described by the Drude-Lorentz permittivities and permeabilities.

  7. Adhesive forces at bimetallic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Force concepts in condensed systems have progressed significantly in recent years. In the context of bimetallic interfaces we consider the Pauli-Hellman-Feynman theorem, use it to check the variational calculations of interfacial energies and estimate the force constants. (author). 13 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  9. Entropic forces in Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Roos, Nico

    2013-01-01

    The interest in the concept of entropic forces has risen considerably since E. Verlinde proposed to interpret the force in Newton s second law and Gravity as entropic forces. Brownian motion, the motion of a small particle (pollen) driven by random impulses from the surrounding molecules, may be the first example of a stochastic process in which such forces are expected to emerge. In this note it is shown that at least two types of entropic motion can be identified in the case of 3D Brownian motion (or random walk). This yields simple derivations of known results of Brownian motion, Hook s law and, applying an external (nonradial) force, Curie s law and the Langevin-Debye equation.

  10. Entropic forces in Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Nico

    2014-12-01

    Interest in the concept of entropic forces has risen considerably since Verlinde proposed in 2011 to interpret the force in Newton's second law and gravity as entropic forces. Brownian motion—the motion of a small particle (pollen) driven by random impulses from the surrounding molecules—may be the first example of a stochastic process in which such forces are expected to emerge. In this article, it is shown that at least two types of entropic force can be identified in three-dimensional Brownian motion. This analysis yields simple derivations of known results of Brownian motion, Hooke's law, and—applying an external (non-radial) force—Curie's law and the Langevin-Debye equation.

  11. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces.

  12. Labour force participation and the feminising of the labour force

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Brendan M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of changes in labour force particiapation rates on the size and structure of the Irish labour force over the period 1971-1991. The rise in participation rates among females aged 25-54 and the decline in participation among older and younger people of both sexes altered the structure of the labour force significantly. Time series of annual participation rates are used to explore the reasons for these changes. It is shown that participation rates among those aged ...

  13. High force 10 kN piezoresistive silicon force sensor with output independent of force distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijze, R.A.F.; Wiegerink, R.J.; Krijnen, G.J.M.; Berenschot, J.W.; Boer, de M.J.; Elwenspoek, M.C.; Peeters, Eric; Paul, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    A 10kN silicon force sensor is realized in which the force is measured by compressing a meander shaped polysilicon strain gage. A second gage which is not loaded, is used for temperature compensation, for compensation of bending and stretching stresses in the chip and for common changes in zero load

  14. Differential force balances during levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Paul

    The simplest arithmetic of inertial, buoyant, magnetic and electrokinetic levitation is explored in the context of a model living system with “acceleration-sensitive structures” in which motion, if allowed, produces a biological effect. The simple model is a finite-sized object enclosed within another finite-sized object suspended in an outer fluid (liquid or vapor) medium. The inner object has density and electrical and magnetic properties quantitatively different from those of the outer object and the medium. In inertial levitation (“weightlessness”) inertial accelerations are balanced, and the forces due to them are canceled in accordance with Newton’s third law. In the presence of inertial acceleration (gravity, centrifugal) motionlessness depends on a balance between the levitating force and the inertial force. If the inner and outer objects differ in density one or the other will be subjected to an unbalanced force when one object is levitated by any other force (buoyant, magnetic, electrokinetic). The requirements for motionlessness of the internal object in the presence of a levitating force are equality of density in the case of buoyant levitation, equality of magnetic susceptibility in the case of magnetic levitation, and equality of zeta potential and dielectric constant in the case of electrokinetic levitation. Examples of internal “acceleration-sensitive structures” are cellular organelles and the organs of advanced plants and animals. For these structures fundamental physical data are important in the interpretation of the effects of forces used for levitation.

  15. Point-Force Energy Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Tristan; Squires, Kyle

    2005-11-01

    Fully resolved simulations of particle-laden turbulent flows are computationally expensive even with a single particle. Therefore, simulations of flows with realistic numbers of particles typically treat the disperse phase as point-particles and models are used to account for the interaction between the phases. The particle trajectories are determined using a Lagrangian particle equation of motion that accounts for the fluid forces. The effect of the particulate phase on the fluid is included using point-force momentum coupling, where the opposite of the force applied to each particle by the fluid is distributed back to fluid grid points in a local region. In this work, we perform direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a particle moving at a prescribed constant or time-dependent velocity through a stationary fluid, and use the resulting force history in a corresponding point-force simulation to study point-force energy coupling. The energy input from the moving particle and the fluid dissipation in the DNS are compared to corresponding quantities in the unresolved calculation. A range of particle Reynolds numbers and ratios of the particle diameter to the unresolved grid spacing are considered to determine the conditions under which point-force momentum coupling provides accurate energy coupling.

  16. Lorentz-force approach to the Casimir force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach to the problem of the Casimir force on magnetodielectric bodies is outlined, which is based on the calculation of the ground-state Lorentz force acting on the polarization and magnetization charges and currents that constitute the bodies within the framework of linear, macroscopic electrodynamics. As an application, planar structures are considered and a correct generalization of Casimir's original formula to the case where the two highly reflecting plates are embedded in a medium is given

  17. Lorentz-force approach to the Casimir force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raabe, Christian; Welsch, Dirk-Gunnar [Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2006-04-01

    An approach to the problem of the Casimir force on magnetodielectric bodies is outlined, which is based on the calculation of the ground-state Lorentz force acting on the polarization and magnetization charges and currents that constitute the bodies within the framework of linear, macroscopic electrodynamics. As an application, planar structures are considered and a correct generalization of Casimir's original formula to the case where the two highly reflecting plates are embedded in a medium is given.

  18. Comment on Repulsive Casimir Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Iannuzzi, D

    2003-01-01

    A recent theoretical calculation shows that the Casimir force between two parallel plates can be repulsive for plates with nontrivial magnetic properties (O. Kenneth et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 033001 (2002)). According to the authors, the effect may be observed with known materials, such as ferrites and garnets, and it might be possible to engineer micro- or nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS or NEMS) that could take advantage of a short range repulsive force. Here we show that on the contrary the Casimir force between two parallel plates in vacuum at micron and submicron distance is always attractive.

  19. Air Force neutron dosimetry program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 1000 Air Force personnel are monitored for neutron radiation resulting from various sources at more than thirty worldwide locations. Neutron radiation spanning several orders of magnitude in energy is encountered. The Air Force currently uses albedo thermoluminescent neutron dosimeters for personnel monitoring. The energy dependence of the albedo neutron dosimeter is a current problem and the development of site specific correction factors is ongoing. A summary of data on the energy dependence is presented as well as efforts to develop algorithms for the dosimeter. An overview of current Air Force neutron dosimetry users and needs is also presented

  20. Force sensing in surgical sutures

    OpenAIRE

    Horeman, T.; Meijer, E. J.; Harlaar, J. J.; Lange, J.F.; Van den Dobbelsteen, J.J.; Dankelman, J.

    2013-01-01

    The tension in a suture is an important factor in the process of wound healing. If there is too much tension in the suture, the blood flow is restricted and necrosis can occur. If the tension is too low, the incision opens up and cannot heal properly. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design and evaluation of the Stitch Force (SF) sensor and the Hook-In Force (HIF) sensor. These sensors were developed to measure the force on a tensioned suture inside a closed incision and to measur...

  1. Force sensing in surgical sutures

    OpenAIRE

    Horeman, Tim; Meijer, Evert-jan; Harlaar, Jaap; Lange, Johan; Dobbelsteen, John; Dankelman, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe tension in a suture is an important factor in the process of wound healing. If there is too much tension in the suture, the blood flow is restricted and necrosis can occur. If the tension is too low, the incision opens up and cannot heal properly. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design and evaluation of the Stitch Force (SF) sensor and the Hook-In Force (HIF) sensor. These sensors were developed to measure the force on a tensioned suture inside a closed incision a...

  2. Force Sensing in Surgical Sutures

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The tension in a suture is an important factor in the process of wound healing. If there is too much tension in the suture, the blood flow is restricted and necrosis can occur. If the tension is too low, the incision opens up and cannot heal properly. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design and evaluation of the Stitch Force (SF) sensor and the Hook-In Force (HIF) sensor. These sensors were developed to measure the force on a tensioned suture inside a closed incision and to measur...

  3. Radiometric force in dusty plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatov, A M

    2000-01-01

    A radiofrequency glow discharge plasma, which is polluted with a certain number of dusty grains, is studied. In addition to various dusty plasma phenomena, several specific colloidal effects should be considered. We focus on radiometric forces, which are caused by inhomogeneous temperature distribution. Aside from thermophoresis, the role of temperature distribution in dusty plasmas is an open question. It is shown that inhomogeneous heating of the grain by ion flows results in a new photophoresis like force, which is specific for dusty discharges. This radiometric force can be observable under conditions of recent microgravity experiments.

  4. Casimir force between liquid metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Sirvent, R.; Escobar, J. V.

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical calculation of the Casimir force between liquid metals at room temperature using as case studies mercury (Hg) and eutectic indium gallium (EInGa). The surface tension of the liquids creates surfaces of zero roughness that are truly equipotential, an ideal characteristic for Casimir force experiments. As we show the dielectric properties of Au, EInGa and Hg are very similar and the difference on the Casimir force between Au and EInGa and Au and Hg is less than 4%. Based on these results, a modification of the IUPUI experiment for detecting deviations of Newtonian gravity is proposed.

  5. Electromagnetic force distribution inside matter

    CERN Document Server

    Mansuripur, Masud; Wright, Ewan M

    2013-01-01

    Using the Finite Difference Time Domain method, we solve Maxwell's equations numerically and compute the distribution of electromagnetic fields and forces inside material media. The media are generally specified by their dielectric permittivity epsilon(w) and magnetic permeability mu(w), representing small, transparent dielectric and magnetic objects such as platelets and micro-beads. Using two formulations of the electromagnetic force-density, one due to H. A. Lorentz [Collected Papers 2, 164 (1892)], the other due to A. Einstein and J. Laub [Ann, Phys. 331, 541 (1908)], we show that the force-density distribution inside a given object can differ substantially between the two formulations. This is remarkable, considering that the total force experienced by the object is always the same, irrespective of whether the Lorentz or the Einstein-Laub formula is employed. The differences between the two formulations should be accessible to measurement in deformable objects.

  6. Active media under rotational forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Villar, Vicente; Porteiro, Jose L F; Muñuzuri, Alberto P

    2006-10-01

    The bubble-free Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction has been used to study the effects of centrifugal forces on autowave propagation. The reaction parameters were chosen such that the system oscillates naturally creating target waves. In the present study, the system was forced to rotate with a constant velocity around a central axis. In studying the effects of such a forcing on the system, we focused on target dynamics. The system reacts to this forcing in different ways, the most spectacular being a dramatic increase in the period of the target, the effect growing stronger as we move away from the center of rotation. A numerical study was carried out using the two-variable Oregonator model, modified to include convective effects through the diffusion coefficient. The numerical results showed a good qualitative agreement with those of the experiments. PMID:17155149

  7. Voice Force tulekul / Tõnu Ojala

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojala, Tõnu, 1969-

    2005-01-01

    60. sünnipäeva tähistava Tallinna Tehnikaülikooli Akadeemilise Meeskoori juubelihooaja üritusest - a capella pop-gruppide festivalist Voice Force (kontserdid 12. nov. klubis Parlament ja 3. dets. Vene Kultuurikeskuses)

  8. US Air Force Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Worksheets containing pilot balloon data computed from releases at Air Force stations in the western United States. Elevation and azimuth angles are used to compute...

  9. Labour force survey: methodological problems

    OpenAIRE

    Bokun, N. C.

    2013-01-01

    The main principles, characteristics and problems of Labour Force Survey (LFS), conducted by the State Statistics of Belarus are considered. The purposes, sampling plan, sample design, data collection mode, the methods of estimation are analyzed.

  10. US Air Force Base Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly observations taken by U.S. Air Force personnel at bases in the United States and around the world. Foreign observations concentrated in the Middle East and...

  11. Knudsen force based MEMS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen forces are gas molecular forces which originate from the differential temperatures in rarefied gases. We report measurements of these forces at normal ambience on test structures made by surface micromachining of polysilicon. Using these results, a surface micromachined Knudsen vacuum sensor has been simulated, fabricated and characterized. The vacuum sensor has an area of 1 mm2. The fabricated device has a sensitivity of 40 fF Pa−1 in the pressure range of 0.1–10 Pa. The measured data is analysed and the magnitude of the Knudsen's force is extracted. The paper also suggests ways to enhance the range and improve the sensitivity of such sensors. (paper)

  12. Calibration of lateral force measurements in atomic force microscopy with a piezoresistive force sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present here a method to calibrate the lateral force in the atomic force microscope. This method makes use of an accurately calibrated force sensor composed of a tipless piezoresistive cantilever and corresponding signal amplifying and processing electronics. Two ways of force loading with different loading points were compared by scanning the top and side edges of the piezoresistive cantilever. Conversion factors between the lateral force and photodiode signal using three types of atomic force microscope cantilevers with rectangular geometries (normal spring constants from 0.092 to 1.24 N/m and lateral stiffness from 10.34 to 101.06 N/m) were measured in experiments using the proposed method. When used properly, this method calibrates the conversion factors that are accurate to ±12.4% or better. This standard has less error than the commonly used method based on the cantilever's beam mechanics. Methods such of this allow accurate and direct conversion between lateral forces and photodiode signals without any knowledge of the cantilevers and the laser measuring system

  13. The Lorentz force and superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    To change the velocity of an electron requires that a Lorentz force acts on it, through an electric or a magnetic field. We point out that within the conventional understanding of superconductivity electrons appear to change their velocity in the absence of Lorentz forces. This indicates a fundamental problem with the conventional theory of superconductivity. A hypothesis is proposed to resolve this difficulty. This hypothesis is consistent with the theory of hole superconductivity.

  14. Electromagnetic force distribution inside matter

    OpenAIRE

    Mansuripur, Masud; Zakharian, Armis R.; Wright, Ewan M.

    2013-01-01

    Using the Finite Difference Time Domain method, we solve Maxwell's equations numerically and compute the distribution of electromagnetic fields and forces inside material media. The media are generally specified by their dielectric permittivity epsilon(w) and magnetic permeability mu(w), representing small, transparent dielectric and magnetic objects such as platelets and micro-beads. Using two formulations of the electromagnetic force-density, one due to H. A. Lorentz [Collected Papers 2, 16...

  15. Wave Forces on Windturbine Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Juul; Frigaard, Peter

    A testprogramme has been performed to determine the wave forces on two types of foundations for an offshore windturbine. the tested foundation types are a monopile and cone. Furthermore the shaft of the cone has been tested.......A testprogramme has been performed to determine the wave forces on two types of foundations for an offshore windturbine. the tested foundation types are a monopile and cone. Furthermore the shaft of the cone has been tested....

  16. Advanced atomic force microscopy techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Thilo Glatzel; Hendrik Hölscher; Thomas Schimmel; Baykara, Mehmet Z; Schwarz, Udo D.; Ricardo Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Although its conceptual approach is as simple as the technique used in record players already introduced in the 19th century, the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in 1986 by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber was a milestone for nanotechnology. The scanning tunneling microscope (STM), introduced some years earlier, had already achieved atomic resolution, but is limited to conductive surfaces. Since its operational principle is based on the detection of the forces acting between tip and s...

  17. Thought Experiments on Gravitational Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Lynden-Bell, Donald; Katz, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Large contributions to the near closure of the Universe and to the acceleration of its expansion are due to the gravitation of components of the stress-energy tensor other than its mass density. To familiarise astronomers with the gravitation of these components we conduct thought experiments on gravity, analogous to the real experiments that our forebears conducted on electricity. By analogy to the forces due to electric currents we investigate the gravitational forces due to the flows of mo...

  18. Electrostatic forces for personnel restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, N.; Ciciora, J.; Gardner, R.; Porter, K.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing electrostatic forces for personnel retention devices on exterior spacecraft surfaces was analyzed. The investigation covered: (1) determination of the state of the art; (2) analysis of potential adhesion surfaces; (3) safety considerations for personnel; (4) electromagnetic force field determination and its effect on spacecraft instrumentation; and (5) proposed advances to current technology based on documentation review, analyses, and experimental test data.

  19. An End to Forced Labor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    China is working on an improved drug rehabilitation regulation that drops work as a form of treatment China is going to release a new regulation soon to give detail to the rules for forced-and-isolated rehab treatment,a new measure replac- ing forced drug treatment through labor, according to an official with the China Narcotics Control Foundation(CNCF). Chen Xingyou,Secretary General of the

  20. Forces in Liquid Metal Contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Using rather well known theory about capillary bridges between two electrodes we calculate the tensile force that can be applied to liquid metal contacts in the micrometer regime. Assuming circular symmetry, full wetting of the electrodes, and neglecting gravity, we present a brief review...... of the necessary theory and find numerically the forces to be in the 100μN range for liquid metals as mercury and liquid Gallium suspended between electrodes of 20μm radius....

  1. Casimir force in absorbing multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    The Casimir effect in a dispersive and absorbing multilayered system is considered adopting the (net) vacuum-field pressure point of view to the Casimir force. Using the properties of the macroscopic field operators appropriate for absorbing systems and a convenient compact form of the Green function for a multilayer, a straightforward and transparent derivation of the Casimir force in a lossless layer of an otherwise absorbing multilayer is presented. The resulting expression in terms of the...

  2. Casimir force between metallic mirrors

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    1999-01-01

    We study the influence of finite conductivity of metals on the Casimir effect. We put the emphasis on explicit theoretical evaluations which can help comparing experimental results with theory. The reduction of the Casimir force is evaluated for plane metallic plates. The reduction of the Casimir energy in the same configuration is also calculated. It can be used to infer the reduction of the force in the plane-sphere geometry through the `proximity theorem'. Frequency dependent dielectric re...

  3. Turbomachinery Rotor Forces: Final Report

    OpenAIRE

    Arndt, Norbert

    1988-01-01

    The overall objective of this contract was to experimentally and theoretically evaluate the fluid-induced forces, both steady and unsteady, acting upon an impeller of a centrifugal pump, and to investigate impeller blade-diffuser vane interaction in centrifugal pumps with vaned radial diffusers. Knowledge of the steady and unsteady forces, and the associated rotordynamic coefficients, is required to effectively model the rotordynamics of high speed turbopumps such as the High P...

  4. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  5. Health and Labour Force Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Heather Holt

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between health and labour force participation using data from the first three waves of the Survey of Family, Income and Employment (SoFIE) (2002/05). Using various health measures, the results show that health is significantly related to labour force participation, even after accounting for certain types of endogeneity. The results of the standard regression models including individual chronic diseases indicate that five out of the nine chronic diseases co...

  6. Democratic Control of Military Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Smail Ostrakovic

    2011-01-01

    The transition requirement for post communism countries, especially the part that is about military forces is to establish those civil-military relation that will have prepared projects for awareness evolving of society and mili­tary about necessity of democratic control over military sector of country through development of many different communication forms and shapes. Before everything, it means the entire freedom and independence of media at access to military forces as the topic and subj...

  7. The Shadow Economy Labour Force

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich Schneider

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the main focus lies on the development and size of the shadow economy labour force in OECD, developing and transition countries. Besides informal employment in the rural and non-rural sector, other measures of informal employment like the share of employees not covered by social security, own account workers or unpaid family workers are also shown. The most influential factors on the shadow labour force are tax policies and state regulation, which, if they rise, increase both. ...

  8. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related question...

  9. Is Gravity an Entropic Force?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Gao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable connections between gravity and thermodynamics seem to imply that gravity is not fundamental but emergent, and in particular, as Verlinde suggested, gravity is probably an entropic force. In this paper, we will argue that the idea of gravity as an entropic force is debatable. It is shown that there is no convincing analogy between gravity and entropic force in Verlinde’s example. Neither holographic screen nor test particle satisfies all requirements for the existence of entropic force in a thermodynamics system. Furthermore, we show that the entropy increase of the screen is not caused by its statistical tendency to increase entropy as required by the existence of entropic force, but in fact caused by gravity. Therefore, Verlinde’s argument for the entropic origin of gravity is problematic. In addition, we argue that the existence of a minimum size of spacetime, together with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle in quantum theory, may imply the fundamental existence of gravity as a geometric property of spacetime. This may provide a further support for the conclusion that gravity is not an entropic force.

  10. Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guclu, Caner; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, Hemantha Kumar; Capolino, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures, at optical frequencies, is investigated theoretically. Till now optical magnetic effects were not used in scanning probe microscopy because of the vanishing natural magnetism with increasing frequency. On the other hand, artificial magnetism in engineered nanostructures led to the development of measurable optical magnetism. Here two examples of nanoprobes that are able to generate strong magnetic dipolar fields at optical frequency are investigated: first, an ideal magnetically polarizable nanosphere and then a circular cluster of silver nanospheres that has a looplike collective plasmonic resonance equivalent to a magnetic dipole. Magnetic forces are evaluated based on nanostructure polarizabilities, i.e., induced magnetic dipoles, and magnetic-near field evaluations. As an initial assessment on the possibility of a magnetic nanoprobe to detect magnetic forces, we consider two identical magnetically polarizable nanoprobes and observe magnetic forces on the order of piconewtons, thereby bringing it within detection limits of conventional atomic force microscopes at ambient pressure and temperature. The detection of magnetic force is a promising method in studying optical magnetic transitions that can be the basis of innovative spectroscopy applications.

  11. 32 CFR 632.4 - Deadly force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Deadly force. 632.4 Section 632.4 National... INVESTIGATIONS USE OF FORCE BY PERSONNEL ENGAGED IN LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SECURITY DUTIES § 632.4 Deadly force. (a) Deadly force is destructive physical force directed against a person or persons (e.g., firing a...

  12. Restoring force method and response estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The restoring force method is briefly outlined. Signal modifications that are necessary to successfully determine restoring force functions are discussed and illustrated. Restoring force functions for a base and a force excited system were determined and their effectiveness demonstrated by comparing measured and predicted signals. Additional developments that would make the restoring force method more general are suggested. 5 refs., 12 figs

  13. Tension density as counter force to the Lorentz force density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Senami, Masato; Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-08-01

    It is confirmed numerically that the tension density defined in quantum field theory is the counter force to the Lorentz force density. We take benzenedithiol in a nonequilibrium steady state as an example for the numerical demonstration of the balance between these densities. While we use simply a nonequilibrium Green’s function method for a quantum conduction state instead of computations based on quantum field theory, the balance between the tension density and the Lorentz force density can be confirmed. The tension density is free from the relaxation time ansatz and defined as a local quantity. The tension density may give a novel viewpoint to the understanding of the physics of electrical conduction.

  14. L'ensenyament dels conceptes de força centrípeta i força centrífuga : una proposta inspirada en la història mecànica

    OpenAIRE

    Casadellà Reig, Josep; Miró, C.

    1997-01-01

    Textbook authors use many types of resources to teach centripetal acceleration, centripetal force and centrifugal force. They are resources between an intuitive and a formal perspective. We try to make a review, not exhaustive, of three points of view and also to present a new one supported on an original Newton's idea, and which could present some advantages when teaching and learning these concepts.

  15. Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, G.; Hashimoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 × 10-10 Pa-1), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability (˜10 μm), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact (˜20 μm without the plug-in support), light (˜5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range (˜μN) and high resolution (˜nN) force sensors.

  16. Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, G. [Laboratory for Photonics and Nanostructures, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marcoussis 91460 (France); Hashimoto, H. [Department of EECE, Chuo University 1-13-27 Kasuga, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Pa{sup -1}), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability ({approx}10 {mu}m), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact ({approx}20 {mu}m without the plug-in support), light ({approx}5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range ({approx}{mu}N) and high resolution ({approx}nN) force sensors.

  17. Casimir Force Between Quantum Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field fluctuations are responsible for an attractive force - the Casimir force - between two parallel (globally neutral) metallic plates separated by a distance d. At high temperature, or equivalently large d, this force is known to exhibit a classical and universal character (independent of the material constitution of the plates). In a recent work, we have displayed the microscopic mechanisms responsible for this universality within a classical model. The plates consist of slabs containing classical charged particles in fluid phase and thermal equilibrium (plasmas). The universality of the force proves to originate from screening sum rules satisfied by the charge correlations. Here we show how this result is altered when the quantum-mechanical nature of the particles is taken into account. It turns out that in addition to the classical result, the asymptotic force for large d comprises a non-universal quantum correction, which is, however, small at high temperature. The method relies on an exact representation of the charge correlations by quantum Mayer graphs, based on the Feynman-Kac path integral formalism. (author)

  18. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Zihua

    2008-01-01

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in...

  19. Electrostatic patch potentials in Casimir force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Joseph; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between interacting surfaces. The force can be minimized by applying a potential to one of the two surfaces. However, electrostatic patch potentials remain and contribute an additional force which can obscure the Casimir force signal. We will discuss recent measurements of patch potentials made with Heterodyne Amplitude-Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy that suggest patches could be responsible for >1% of the signal in some Casimir force measurements, and thus make the distinction between different theoretical models of the Casimir force (e.g. a Drude-model or a plasma-model for the dielectric response) difficult to discern.

  20. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhaokun

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design.

  1. Force Spectroscopy in Studying Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools-for example, optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy-have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here, we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case, we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design. PMID:27193551

  2. Atomic force microscopy and direct surface force measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ralston, J.; Larson, I.; Rutland, M.; Feiler, A.; Kleijn, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is designed to provide high-resolution (in the ideal case, atomic) topographical analysis, applicable to both conducting and nonconducting surfaces. The basic imaging principle is very simple: a sample attached to a piezoelectric positioner is rastered beneath a sha

  3. Capillary forces in tapping mode atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zitzler, L.; Herminghaus, S.; Mugele, F.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the relative humidity on amplitude and phase of the cantilever oscillation while operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) in the tapping mode. If the free oscillation amplitude A0 exceeds a certain critical amplitude Ac, the amplitude- and phase-distance curves sho

  4. Forcing in Strategic Belief Models

    CERN Document Server

    Tohmè, Fernando; Gangle, Rocco

    2012-01-01

    Forcing is a methodology for building models of Set Theory satisfying certain properties. Since its inception by Paul Cohen, in the early 1960s, it has been applied to several areas in Mathematical Logic, becoming a powerful tool in the analysis of axiomatic systems. In this paper we extend the applicability of forcing to game-theoretic strategic belief models. In particular, we propose a very general notion of solutions for such games by enlarging Brandenburger's $RmAR$ condition via extension through generic types.

  5. Forced removals embodied as tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Eugene T; Morrow, Carl D; Ho, Theodore; Fürst, Nicole; Cohelia, Rebekkah; Tram, Khai Hoan; Farmer, Paul E; Wood, Robin

    2016-07-01

    South Africa has one of the worst tuberculosis burdens in the world. Several ecological forces have contributed to this, including high HIV prevalence; failing TB control strategies; crowded, poorly ventilated indoor environments-including the complex web of political and economic interests which produce them; the development of racial capitalism; and mining and migration. In the following study, we measure CO2 levels in public transport to investigate the role extended commutes from peri-urban settlements to urban sites of work-a direct result of forced removals-potentially play in propagating the TB epidemic in Cape Town, South Africa. PMID:27239703

  6. Wave Forces on Crown Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jan; Burcharth, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some of the results from a large parametric laboratory study including more than 200 long-duration model tests. The study addresses both the wave forces imposed on the breakwater crown wall as well as the performance of the structure in reducing the wave overtopping. The testing...... programme includes variations of the sea state parameters and of the geometrical configuration of the breakwater and crown wall. Basic relations between forces/overtopping and the varied parameters are examined and preliminary design guidelines for structures within the tested range of variations are...

  7. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low-high; tempo: slow-fast, dynamics: soft-loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low-high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (F mean ) and peak force (F max ) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (F mean = 1.17 N, F max = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (F mean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (F mean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  8. Casimir force on a piston

    OpenAIRE

    Cavalcanti, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    We consider a massless scalar field obeying Dirichlet boundary conditions on the walls of a two-dimensional L x b rectangular box, divided by a movable partition (piston) into two compartments of dimensions a x b and (L-a) x b. We compute the Casimir force on the piston in the limit L -> infinity. Regardless of the value of a/b, the piston is attracted to the nearest end of the box. Asymptotic expressions for the Casimir force on the piston are derived for a > b.

  9. Archimedes Force on Casimir Apparatus

    CERN Document Server

    Shevchenko, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We address a problem of Casimir apparatus in dense medium and weak gravitational field. The falling of the apparatus has to be governed by the equivalence principle, with proper account for contributions to the weight of the apparatus from its material part and from distorted quantum fields. We discuss general expression for the corresponding force in metric with cylindrical symmetry. By way of example we compute explicit expression for Archimedes force, acting on the Casimir apparatus of finite size, immersed into thermal bath of free scalar field. It is shown that besides universal term, proportional to the volume of the apparatus, there are non-universal quantum corrections, depending on the boundary conditions.

  10. Force measurement of low forces in combination with high dead loads by the use of electromagnetic force compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diethold, Christian; Hilbrunner, Falko

    2012-07-01

    This paper discusses the force measurement of small forces in combination with high dead loads. The measurement force acts perpendicular to gravity, while the dead load is orientated in the direction of gravity. Furthermore, the influence of the dead load on the metrological properties is described. The application is the flow rate measurement of conducting fluids by Lorentz force (Thess et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 164501). The aim is to measure forces with a resolution of FM = 10-6 N. The dead load is mainly due to the mass of the magnet system. It is of the order of magnitude of FG = 10 N. The force measurement system works with the principle of electromagnetic force compensation. The applied force is compensated by a Lorentz force induced by a current in a voice coil and a magnetic field of a permanent magnet. The current is proportional to the applied force.

  11. Force measurement of low forces in combination with high dead loads by the use of electromagnetic force compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the force measurement of small forces in combination with high dead loads. The measurement force acts perpendicular to gravity, while the dead load is orientated in the direction of gravity. Furthermore, the influence of the dead load on the metrological properties is described. The application is the flow rate measurement of conducting fluids by Lorentz force (Thess et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 164501). The aim is to measure forces with a resolution of FM = 10−6 N. The dead load is mainly due to the mass of the magnet system. It is of the order of magnitude of FG = 10 N. The force measurement system works with the principle of electromagnetic force compensation. The applied force is compensated by a Lorentz force induced by a current in a voice coil and a magnetic field of a permanent magnet. The current is proportional to the applied force. (paper)

  12. Security force effectiveness and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No one would propose ineffective security forces. Applied technology always has, as its purpose, to increase effectiveness. Evidence exists, however, that poorly conceived or executed technological solutions can actually do more harm than good. The author argues for improved human factor considerations in physical security applied technology -- especially in the area of security console operations

  13. Inertial forces and physics teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An epistemological and didactic analysis about inertial forces and the role of validity of Newton's Laws seen from several reference systems is performed. On the basis of considerations fulfilled, a discussion about the necessity of introducing these topics in the curriculum of physics teaching at different levels is also carried out. (Author) 21 refs

  14. Forcing contact inhibition of locomotion

    OpenAIRE

    Roycroft, A.; Mayor, R.

    2015-01-01

    Contact inhibition of locomotion drives a variety of biological phenomenon, from cell dispersion to collective cell migration and cancer invasion. New imaging techniques have allowed contact inhibition of locomotion to be visualised in vivo for the first time, helping to elucidate some of the molecules and forces involved in this phenomenon.

  15. Nonlinear Electromagnetic Forces in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Labun, Lance; 10.5506/APhysPolB.43.2237

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetism becomes a nonlinear theory having (effective) photon-photon interactions due at least to electron-positron fluctuations in the vacuum. We discuss the consequences of the nonlinearity for the force felt by a charge probe particle, and compare the impact of Euler-Kockel QED effective nonlinearity to the possibility of Born-Infeld-type nonlinearity.

  16. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17). PMID:27192830

  17. Towards one force of nature

    CERN Multimedia

    BBC Open University

    1983-01-01

    ... a significant chapter in the history of science ... the discovery of the charged W boson "The best way to begin is to look at what CERN has traditionally been about..." Forces that shape the world. Explanation of how it works in the accelerator LEP

  18. Force Augmentation for Relief Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, J.

    1982-01-01

    Simple design change for poppet relief valve enables flow through valve to exert additional force to help keep valve open. Although originally intended for relief valves for liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen in Space Shuttle orbiter, concept is applicable to pressure-or flow-actuated valves for wide range of fluids and temperatures.

  19. Force of an actin spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jennifer; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosomal process of the horseshoe crab sperm is a novel mechanochemical molecular spring that converts its elastic stain energy to mechanical work upon the chemical activation by Ca2+. Twisted and bent, the initial state of the acrosomal bundle features a high degree of complexity in its structure and the energy is believed to be stored in the highly strained actin filaments as an elastic potential energy. When activated, the bundle relaxes from the coil of the highly twisted and bent filaments to its straight conformation at a mean velocity of 15um/s. The mean extension velocity increases dramatically from 3um/s to 27um/s when temperature of the medium is changed from 9.6C to 32C (respective viscosities of 1.25-0.75cp), yet it exhibits a very weak dependence on changes in the medium viscosity (1cp-33cp). These experiments suggest that the uncoiling of the actin spring should be limited not by the viscosity of the medium but by the unlatching events of involved proteins at a molecular level. Unlike the viscosity-limited processes, where force is directly related to the rate of the reaction, a direct measurement is required to obtain the spring force of the acrosomal process. The extending acrosomal bundle is forced to push against a barrier and its elastic buckling response is analyzed to measure the force generated during the uncoiling.

  20. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  1. Constructing the self-force

    CERN Document Server

    Poisson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    I present an overview of the methods involved in the computation of the scalar, electromagnetic, and gravitational self-forces acting on a point particle moving in a curved spacetime. For simplicity, the focus here will be on the scalar self-force. The lecture follows closely my review article on this subject published in Living Reviews in Relativity. I begin with a review of geometrical elements (Synge's world function, the parallel propagator). Next I introduce useful coordinate systems (Fermi normal coordinates and retarded light-cone coordinates) in a neighborhood of the particle's world line. I then present the wave equation for a scalar field in curved spacetime and the equations of motion for a particle endowed with a scalar charge. The wave equation is solved by means of a Green's function, and the self-force is constructed from the field gradient. Because the retarded field is singular on the world line, the self-force must involve a regularized version of the field gradient, and I describe how the r...

  2. Force10 P10 Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, J; Goldstone, R; Instenes, S; Lawver, B

    2007-06-08

    The lack of an acceptable intrusion monitoring solution limits the deployment of 10GE (10 Gigabit-per-second Ethernet) technology across the LLNL's unclassified network infrastructure. The desire to operate at 10GE motivates us to evaluate the functionality and performance of a 10GE intrusion monitoring solution, the Force10 P10.

  3. Dielectrophoretic Forces on the Nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaldach, C M; Bourcier, W L; Wilson, W D; Paul, P H

    2004-03-30

    We have developed a method of calculation of the dielectrophoretic force on a nanoparticle in a fluid environment where variations in the electric field and electric field gradients are on the same nanoscale as the particle. The Boundary Element Dielectrophoretic Force (BEDF) method involves constructing a solvent-accessible or molecular surface surrounding the particle, calculating the normal component of the electric field at the surface boundary elements and then solving a system of linear equations for the induced surface polarization charge on each element. Different surface elements of the molecule may experience quite different polarizing electric fields, unlike the situation in the point dipole approximation. A single 100 Angstrom radius ring test configuration is employed to facilitate comparison with the well-known point dipole approximation (PDA). We find remarkable agreement between the forces calculated by the BEDF and PDA methods for a 1 Angstrom polarizable sphere. However, for larger particles, the differences between the methods become qualitative as well as quantitative; the character of the force changes from attractive at the origin of the ring for a 50 Angstrom sphere, to repulsive for a 75 Angstrom sphere. Equally dramatic differences are found in a more complex electrical environment involving two sets of 10 rings.

  4. Fuel oil quality task force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laisy, J.; Turk, V. [R.W. Beckett Corp., Elyria, OH (United States)

    1997-09-01

    In April, 1996, the R.W. Beckett Corporation became aware of a series of apparently unrelated symptoms that made the leadership of the company concerned that there could be a fuel oil quality problem. A task force of company employees and industry consultants was convened to address the topic of current No. 2 heating oil quality and its effect on burner performance. The task force studied changes in fuel oil specifications and trends in properties that have occurred over the past few years. Experiments were performed at Beckett and Brookhaven National Laboratory to understand the effect of changes in some fuel oil properties. Studies by other groups were reviewed, and field installations were inspected to gain information about the performance of fuel oil that is currently being used in the U.S. and Canada. There was a special concern about the use of red dye in heating oils and the impact of sulfur levels due to the October, 1993 requirement of low sulfur (<0.05%) for on-highway diesel fuel. The results of the task force`s efforts were published in July, 1996. The primary conclusion of the task force was that there is not a crisis or widespread general problem with fuel oil quality. Localized problems that were seen may have been related to refinery practices and/or non-traditional fuel sources. System cleanliness is very important and the cause of many oil burner system problems. Finally, heating oil quality should get ongoing careful attention by Beckett engineering personnel and heating oil industry groups.

  5. May the Force Be with You!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Timothy; Guy, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Students have a difficult time understanding force, especially when dealing with a moving object. Many forces can be acting on an object at the same time, causing it to stay in one place or move. By directly observing these forces, students can better understand the effect these forces have on an object. With a simple, student-built device called…

  6. Deriving force field parameters for coordination complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrby, Per-Ola; Brandt, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The process of deriving molecular mechanics force fields for coordination complexes is outlined. Force field basics are introduced with an emphasis on special requirements for metal complexes. The review is then focused on how to set up the initial model, define the target, refine the parameters......, and validate the final force field, Alternatives to force field derivation are discussed briefly....

  7. Wave Forces on Offshore Windturbine Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Juul; Frigaard, Peter

    The present report on the wave forces is the first report on the Borkum Riff project. A testprogramme has been performed to dertermine the wave forces on windturbine foundations.......The present report on the wave forces is the first report on the Borkum Riff project. A testprogramme has been performed to dertermine the wave forces on windturbine foundations....

  8. The Casimir force for passive mirrors

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrecht, A.; Jaekel, M. -T.; Reynaud, S.

    1998-01-01

    We show that the Casimir force between mirrors with arbitrary frequency dependent reflectivities obeys bounds due to causality and passivity properties. The force is always smaller than the Casimir force between two perfectly reflecting mirrors. For narrow-band mirrors in particular, the force is found to decrease with the mirrors bandwidth.

  9. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liam Collins; Stephen Jesse; Kilpatrick, Jason I.; Alexander Tselev; M. Baris Okatan; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid–gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe–sample...

  10. Lorentz force actuation of a heated atomic force microscope cantilever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report Lorentz force-induced actuation of a silicon microcantilever having an integrated resistive heater. Oscillating current through the cantilever interacts with the magnetic field around a NdFeB permanent magnet and induces a Lorentz force that deflects the cantilever. The same current induces cantilever heating. With AC currents as low as 0.2 mA, the cantilever can be oscillated as much as 80 nm at resonance with a DC temperature rise of less than 5 °C. By comparison, the AC temperature variation leads to a thermomechanical oscillation that is about 1000 times smaller than the Lorentz deflection at the cantilever resonance. The cantilever position in the nonuniform magnetic field affects the Lorentz force-induced deflection, with the magnetic field parallel to the cantilever having the largest effect on cantilever actuation. We demonstrate how the cantilever actuation can be used for imaging, and for measuring the local material softening temperature by sensing the contact resonance shift. (paper)

  11. Measurement adhesion force between fine particle and effect of humidity: An study with Atomic Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhesion force is interaction between particle- particle and particle surface. First Hertz in 1882 calculated adhesion force between spherical particle and planar surface. Adhesion force in interested for scientist and different industries such as paint, foot, pharmaceutical, etc. In this study we measured adhesion force between fine particle such as silica and silicon and mica surface, with Atomic Force Microscopy. The adhesion force measured between particle-planar surfaces with Atomic Force Microscopy on different humidity and simulated results.

  12. Detecting Chameleons through Casimir Force Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Brax, Philippe; van de Bruck, Carsten; Davis, Anne-Christine; Mota, David F.; Shaw, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    The best laboratory constraints on strongly coupled chameleon fields come not from tests of gravity per se but from precision measurements of the Casimir force. The chameleonic force between two nearby bodies is more akin to a Casimir-like force than a gravitational one: The chameleon force behaves as an inverse power of the distance of separation between the surfaces of two bodies, just as the Casimir force does. Additionally, experimental tests of gravity often employ a thin metallic sheet ...

  13. Physical microscopic model of proteins under force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2012-06-14

    Nature has evolved proteins to counteract forces applied on living cells, and has designed proteins that can sense forces. One can appreciate Nature's ingenuity in evolving these proteins to be highly sensitive to force and to have a high dynamic force range at which they operate. To achieve this level of sensitivity, many of these proteins are composed of multiple domains and linking peptides connecting these domains, each of them having their own force response regimes. Here, using a simple model of a protein, we address the question of how each individual domain responds to force. We also ask how multidomain proteins respond to forces. We find that the end-to-end distance of individual domains under force scales linearly with force. In multidomain proteins, we find that the force response has a rich range: at low force, extension is predominantly governed by "weaker" linking peptides or domain intermediates, while at higher force, the extension is governed by unfolding of individual domains. Overall, the force extension curve comprises multiple sigmoidal transitions governed by unfolding of linking peptides and domains. Our study provides a basic framework for the understanding of protein response to force, and allows for interpretation experiments in which force is used to study the mechanical properties of multidomain proteins. PMID:22375559

  14. Thought Experiments on Gravitational Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Lynden-Bell, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Large contributions to the near closure of the Universe and to the acceleration of its expansion are due to the gravitation of components of the stress-energy tensor other than its mass density. To familiarise astronomers with the gravitation of these components we conduct thought experiments on gravity, analogous to the real experiments that our forebears conducted on electricity. By analogy to the forces due to electric currents we investigate the gravitational forces due to the flows of momentum, angular momentum, and energy along a cylinder. Under tension the gravity of the cylinder decreases but the 'closure' of the 3-space around it increases. When the cylinder carries a torque the flow of angular momentum along it leads to a novel helical interpretation of Levi-Civita's external metric and a novel relativistic effect. Energy currents give gravomagnetic effects in which parallel currents repel and antiparallel currents attract, though such effects must be added to those of static gravity. The gravity of...

  15. Physicists' Forced Migrations under Hitler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerchen, Alan

    2011-03-01

    When the Nazis came to power in early 1933 they initiated formal and informal measures that forced Jews and political opponents from public institutions such as universities. Some physicists retired and others went into industry, but most emigrated. International communication and contact made emigration a viable option despite the desperate economic times in the Great Depression. Another wave of emigrations followed the annexation of Austria in 1938. Individual cases as well as general patterns of migration and adaptation to new environments will be examined in this presentation. One important result of the forced migrations was that many of the physicists expelled under Hitler played important roles in strengthening physics elsewhere, often on the Allied side in World War II.

  16. Consistent force fields for saccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kjeld

    -ray and neutron diffraction, vibrational frequencies, dipolemoments, unit cell dimensions and lattice energies. The range of model compounds covered so far includes alkanes, ethers, alcohols, ketones and mono- and disaccharides. Electrostatic interactions are handled by fractional charges assigned to...... individual atoms. Charges are modeled such that Mulliken population analyses are reproduced. Morse functions are used for all bonded interactions; experimentally deriveddissociation energies are used as parameters. Van der Waals interactions are modeled with Lennard-Jones 12-6 functions.The anomeric and exo......-anomeric effects are accounted for without addition of specific terms. The work is done in the framework of the Consistent Force Field which originatedin Israel and was further developed in Denmark. The actual methods and strategies employed havebeen described previously. Extensive testing of the force field is...

  17. Consistent force fields for saccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kjeld

    1999-01-01

    -ray and neutron diffraction, vibrational frequencies, dipolemoments, unit cell dimensions and lattice energies. The range of model compounds covered so far includes alkanes, ethers, alcohols, ketones and mono- and disaccharides. Electrostatic interactions are handled by fractional charges assigned to...... individual atoms. Charges are modeled such that Mulliken population analyses are reproduced. Morse functions are used for all bonded interactions; experimentally deriveddissociation energies are used as parameters. Van der Waals interactions are modeled with Lennard-Jones 12-6 functions.The anomeric and exo......-anomeric effects are accounted for without addition of specific terms. The work is done in the framework of the Consistent Force Field which originatedin Israel and was further developed in Denmark. The actual methods and strategies employed havebeen described previously. Extensive testing of the force field is...

  18. Chiral forces and molecular dissymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiral molecules leading to helical macromolecules seem to preserve information and extend it better. In the biological world RNA is the very paradigm for self-replication, elongation and autocatalytic editing. The nucleic acid itself is not chiral. It acquires its chirality by association with D-sugars. Although the chiral information or selectivity put in by the unit monomer is no longer of much interest to the biologists - they tend to leave it to the Darwinian selection principle to take care of it as illustrated by Frank's model - it is vital to understand the origin of chirality. There are three different approaches for the chiral origin of life: (1) Phenomenological, (2) Electromagnetic molecular and Coriolis forces and (3) Atomic or nuclear force, the neutral weak current. The phenomenological approach involves spontaneous symmetry breaking fluctuations in far for equilibrium systems or nucleation and crystallization. Chance plays a major role in the chiral molecule selected

  19. Electronic transitions and intermolecular forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes two different subjects - electronic transitions and intermolecular forces - that are related mainly by the following observation: The wavenumber at which an electronic transition in an atom or molecule occurs, depends on the environment of that atom or molecule. This implies, for instance, that when a molecule becomes solvated its absorption spectrum may be shifted either to the blue or to the red side of the original gasphase spectrum. In part I attention is paid to the experimental aspects of VUV spectroscopy, both in the gasphase and in the condensed phase. In part II a series of papers are presented, dealing with the calculation of intermolecular forces (and some related topics) both for the ground state and for the excited state interactions, using different non-empirical methods. The calculations provide, among other results, a semiquantitative interpretation of the spectral blue shifts encountered in our experiments. (Auth.)

  20. Lorentz Force Electrical Impedance Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lafon, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a method called Lorentz Force Electrical Impedance Tomography. The electrical conductivity of biological tissues can be measured through their sonication in a magnetic field: the vibration of the tissues inside the field induces an electrical current by Lorentz force. This current, detected by electrodes placed around the sample, is proportional to the ultrasonic pressure, to the strength of the magnetic field and to the electrical conductivity gradient along the acoustic axis. By focusing at different places inside the sample, a map of the electrical conductivity gradient can be established. In this study experiments were conducted on a gelatin phantom and on a beef sample, successively placed in a 300 mT magnetic field and sonicated with an ultrasonic transducer focused at 21 cm emitting 500 kHz bursts. Although all interfaces are not visible, in this exploratory study a good correlation is observed between the electrical conductivity image and the ultrasonic image. This method offers...

  1. Z0: The extra force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Researchers at CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research) have reason to believe that they have finally observed the elusive superheavy Z0 nuclear particle. The observation is important because it represents the unifying link between the physics of weak-field phenomena and electromagnetic forces. The Z0 particle was predicted by the Salam-Weinberg model, which is an attempt to pull together all physical forces into a single field theory. The as yet uncalibrated experiments at CERN project the new particle's mass at 95±5 GeV, or about the equivalent to the combined masses of 95 protons. What remains in the search for such nuclear particles are “heavier Z0” particles (200 GeV), “top quarks,” and “Higgs particles,” all of which are parts of the Salam-Weinberg model.

  2. The nature of motive force

    CERN Document Server

    Pramanick, Achintya Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In this monograph Prof. Pramanick explicates the law of motive force, a fundamental law of nature that can be observed and appreciated as an addition to the existing laws of thermodynamics. This unmistakable and remarkable tendency of nature is equally applicable to all other branches of studies. He first conceptualized the law of motive force in 1989, when he was an undergraduate student. Here he reports various applications of the law in the area of  thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics and solid mechanics, and shows how it is possible to solve analytically century-old unsolved problems through its application. This book offers a comprehensive account of the law and its relation to other laws and principles, such as the generalized conservation principle, variational formulation, Fermat’s principle, Bejan’s constructal law, entropy generation minimization, Bejan’s method of intersecting asymptotes and equipartition principle. Furthermore, the author addresses some interrelated fundamental p...

  3. Performance contracts for police forces

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Vollaard

    2003-01-01

    In 2003, the government will enter into performance contracts with each of the 25 regional police forces. The performance contracts establish a direct link between meeting a number of quantitative performance targets and financial incentives. A major improvement in police performance is necessary to meet the objective of 20 to 25 percent less criminal and disorderly behavior by 2006. A closer look at the performance contracts learns that they may not be the most appropriate policy instrument ...

  4. Sensorless torque/force control

    OpenAIRE

    KHALIL, Islam Shoukry Mohammed; Şabanoviç, Asif; SABANOVIC, Asif

    2011-01-01

    Motion control systems represent a main subsystem for majority of processing systems that can be found in the industrial sector. These systems are concerned with the actuation of all devices in the manufacturing process such as machines, robots, conveyor systems and pick and place mechanisms such that they satisfy certain motion requirements, e.g., the pre specified reference trajectories are followed along with delivering the proper force or torque to the point of interest at which the proce...

  5. A beginner's guide to forcing

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, Timothy Y

    2007-01-01

    This expository paper, aimed at the reader without much background in set theory or logic, gives an overview of Cohen's proof (via forcing) of the independence of the continuum hypothesis. It emphasizes the broad outlines and the intuitive motivation while omitting most of the proofs. The reader must of course consult standard textbooks for the missing details, but this article provides a map of the forest so that the beginner will not get lost while forging through the trees.

  6. Nuclear Forces and Nuclear Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Machleidt, R.

    1998-01-01

    After a historical review, I present the progress in the field of realistic NN potentials that we have seen in recent years. A new generation of very quantitative (high-quality/high-precision) NN potentials has emerged. These potentials will serve as reliable input for microscopic nuclear structure calculations and will allow for a systematic investigation of off-shell effects. The issue of three-nucleon forces is also discussed.

  7. Considerations upon sales force management

    OpenAIRE

    Codruţ Dura

    2004-01-01

    Sales management involves sales planning (the process of establishing a broad set of goals, policies and procedures for achieving objectives), organizing the sales function (by establishing sales organizations structured geographically, by product types, by market or customer classes, or by function), staffing the sales function (including recruiting salespeople and interviewing, testing and hiring them), directing the sales force (via training and motivating) and evaluating and controlling s...

  8. Force sensitivity of plant gravisensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurinavičius, R.; Švegždien≐, D.; Gaina, V.

    Rotation at 4, 10, 50 and 100 rpm on a horizontal clinostat and in microgravity exerts limited effects on the morphogenesis of lettuce and cress root statocytes and statoliths if compared with the vertical control or 1 g spaceflight reference centrifuge. However, the average distance of statoliths from the distal wall increases. The pattern of plastid location of microgravity-grown and that of clino-rotated samples has been determined at 10, 50, and 100 rpm. Experiments on the centrifuge-clinostat and spaceflight centrifuge (acceleration forces of 0.005 to 1 g) revealed that the average statolith location depends on the amplitude of acropetally or basipetally directed mass acceleration. Decreasing the acropetally directed force from 1 g to 0.4 g dislocates statoliths towards the cell center possibly mediated by the elastic forces of the cytoskeleton. In statocytes formed on the clinostat or in microgravity, the majority of statoliths are located at the center of the cell. To force the statoliths from the center of the statocyte towards one of its poles, a threshold mass acceleration of 0.01 g is required. Statocytes with centrally-located statoliths are considerably more effective in transducing a gravistimulus than those with distally-located plastids. The latent time of the graviresponse is shorter and the response itself is enhanced in roots grown on the clinostat compared to vertically grown samples. The early phases of graviperception are independent of root growth conditions since presentation time and g-threshold are similar for roots grown stationary and those on a clinostat. We propose a sequence of events in gravitropic stimulation that considers not only the lateral displacement of statoliths, as predicted by the starch-statolith hypothesis, but also its longitudinal motion, together with differential gravisensitivity of mechanotransducing structures along the lower-most longitudinal cell wall.

  9. Mechanical Forces and Lymphatic Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    This review examines current understanding of how the lymphatic vessel network can optimize lymph flow in response to various mechanical forces. Lymphatics are organized as a vascular tree, with blind-ended initial lymphatics, precollectors, prenodal collecting lymphatics, lymph nodes, postnodal collecting lymphatics and the larger trunks (thoracic duct and right lymph duct) that connect to the subclavian veins. The formation of lymph from interstitial fluid depends heavily on oscillating pre...

  10. Hydrodynamic forces on composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Millhouse, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Using a tow tank environment an experiment was set up to measure for response of composite samples of varying stiffness to a geometrically comparable more rigid aluminum sample which was tested at increasing speeds. Also, a square composite shape was tested in a frame providing clamped boundary conditions. Testing of this sample over varying speeds was also performed at varying position angles and was analyzed for force, strain and flo...

  11. Market Forces and Sex Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Hellerstein, Judith K.; David Neumark; Troske, Kenneth R.

    1998-01-01

    We report new evidence on the existence of sex discrimination in wages and whether competitive market forces act to reduce or eliminate discrimination. Specifically, we use plant- and firm-level data to examine the relationships between profitability, growth and ownership changes, product market power, and the sex composition of a plant's or firm's workforce. Our strongest finding is that among plants with high levels of product market power, those that employ relatively more women are more p...

  12. The Falsification of Nuclear Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, R Navarro; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    We review our work on the statistical uncertainty analysis of the NN force. This is based on the Granada-2013 database where a statistically meaningful partial wave analysis comprising a total of 6713 np and pp published scattering data from 1950 till 2013 below pion production threshold has been made. We stress the necessary conditions required for a correct and self-consistent statistical interpretation of the discrepancies between theory and experiment which enable a subsequent statistical error propagation and correlation analysis

  13. The Falsification of Nuclear Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Perez, R.; Amaro, J. E.; Ruiz Arriola, E.

    2016-03-01

    We review our work on the statistical uncertainty analysis of the NN force. This is based on the Granada-2013 database where a statistically meaningful partial wave analysis comprising a total of 6713 np and pp published scattering data from 1950 till 2013 below pion production threshold has been made. We stress the necessary conditions required for a correct and self-consistent statistical interpretation of the discrepancies between theory and experiment which enable a subsequent statistical error propagation and correlation analysis

  14. Casimir force: an alternative treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    The Casimir force between two parallel uncharged closely spaced metallic plates is evaluated in ways alternatives to those usually considered in the literature. In a first approximation we take in account the suppressed quantum numbers of a cubic box, representing a cavity which was cut in a metallic block. We combine these ideas with those of the MIT bag model of hadrons, but adapted to non-relativistic particles. In a second approximation we consider the particles occupying the energy level...

  15. No-nonsense Casimir force

    OpenAIRE

    Herdegen, Andrzej

    2000-01-01

    Two thin conducting, electrically neutral, parallel plates forming an isolated system in vacuum exert attracting force on each other, whose origin is the quantum electrodynamical interaction. This theoretical hypothesis, known as Casimir effect, has been also confirmed experimentally. Despite long history of the subject, no completely convincing theoretical analysis of this effect appears in the literature. Here we discuss the effect (for the scalar field) anew, on a revised physical and math...

  16. Casimir force between eccentric cylinders

    OpenAIRE

    Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Lombardo, Fernando C.; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.; Onofrio, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    We consider the Casimir interaction between a cylinder and a hollow cylinder, both conducting, with parallel axis and slightly different radii. The Casimir force, which vanishes in the coaxial situation, is evaluated for both small and large eccentricities using the proximity approximation. The cylindrical configuration offers various experimental advantages with respect to the parallel planes or the plane-sphere geometries, leading to favourable conditions for the search of extra-gravitation...

  17. Repulsive Casimir Force: Sufficient Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Luigi; Lambrecht, Astrid

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the Casimir energy of two parallel plates made by materials of different penetration depth and no medium in between is derived. We study the Casimir force density and derive analytical constraints on the two penetration depths which are sufficient conditions to ensure repulsion. Compared to other methods our approach needs no specific model for dielectric or magnetic material properties and constitutes a complementary analysis.

  18. Numerical calculation of Casimir forces

    OpenAIRE

    Kilen, Isak Ragnvald

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis a set of regularized boundary integral equation are introduced that can be used to calculate the Casimir force induced by a two dimensional scalar field. The boundary integral method is compared to the functional integral method and mode summation where possible. Comparisons are done for the case of two parallel plates, two concentric circles and two adjacent circles. The results indicate that the boundary integral method correctly predicts the geometry dependence of the C...

  19. Labor force activity after 60

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder J.; Larsen, Mona

    2015-01-01

    participation from individual education and from self-assessed health is analyzed based on available micro data. Policy reforms and changes in the retirement area have been enacted since the mid-1990s in the included countries and more sweeping reforms are enacted or under review for the years ahead. We include...... a brief survey of policy changes in the Scandinavian countries and Germany as other determinants of labor force participation in the 60 and older group....

  20. Friction forces in cosmological models

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato; Gregoris, Daniele; Succi, Sauro

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of test particles undergoing friction forces in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spacetime. The interaction with the background fluid is modeled by introducing a Poynting-Robertson-like friction force in the equations of motion, leading to measurable (at least in principle) deviations of the particle trajectories from geodesic motion. The effect on the peculiar velocities of the particles is investigated for various equations of state of the background fluid and different standard cosmological models. The friction force is found to have major effects on particle motion in closed FRW universes, where it turns the time-asymptotic value (approaching the recollapse) of the peculiar particle velocity from ultra-relativistic (close to light speed) to a co-moving one, i.e., zero peculiar speed. On the other hand, for open or flat universes the effect of the friction is not so significant, because the time-asymptotic peculiar particle speed is largely non-relativistic also in the geodesi...

  1. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. PMID:25554301

  2. 78 FR 63208 - UPDATE-Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... Epidemiology, Analysis, and Library Services; Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services... Services Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of... Force (Task Force). The in-person Task Force meeting is being replaced by an abbreviated conference...

  3. The Engineering of Optical Conservative Force

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Junjie; Ding, Kun; Du, Guiqiang; Lin, Zhifang; Chan, C T; Ng, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Optical forces have been fruitfully applied in a broad variety of areas that not only span the traditional scientific fields such as physics, chemistry, and biology, but also in more applied fields. It is customary and useful to split the optical force into the (conservative) gradient force and the (non-conservative) scattering and absorption force. These forces are different in attributes. The ability to tailor them will open great potential in fundamental optics and practical applications. Here, we present an analytical and a numerical approach to calculate these forces, and, with these tools, we create a fairly general class of 2D conservative optical force field. In general, particles immersed in an optical force do not obey equilibrium statistical mechanics, making the analysis complicated. With conservative forces, these issues are resolved.

  4. Interaction force microscopy based on quartz tuning fork force sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yexian

    The ability to sense small changes in the interaction force between a scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip and a substrate requires cantilevers with a sharp mechanical resonance. A typical commercially available cantilever in air is characterized by a resonance with a Q factor of 100 ˜ 300. The low Q factor can be attributed to imperfections in the cantilever itself as well as damping effects of the surrounding air. To substantially increase the Q factor, novel concepts are required. For this reason, we have performed a systematic study of quartz tuning fork resonators for possible use with SPMs. We find that tuning fork resonators operating in air are characterized by Q factors in the order of 104, thereby greatly improving the SPM's ability to measure small shifts in the interaction force. By carefully attaching commercially available SPM tips to the tuning fork, it is possible to obtain SPM images using non-contact imaging techniques and analyze the tip-sample interactions. The assembly of uniform molecular monolayers on atomically flat substrates for molecular electronics applications has received widespread attention during the past ten years. Scanning probe techniques are often used to assess substrate topography, molecular ordering and electronic properties, yet little is known about the fundamental tip-molecule interaction. To address this issue we have built an Interaction Force Microscope using a quartz tuning fork to probe tip-molecular monolayer interactions using scanning probe microscopy. The high quality factor and stable resonant frequency of a quartz tuning fork allows accurate measurement of small shifts in the resonant frequency as the tip interacts with the substrate. To permit an accurate measure of surface interaction forces, the electrical and piezomechanical properties of a tuning fork have been calibrated using a fiber optical interferometer. In prior work [1], we have studied molecular layers formed from either 4-Trifluoro

  5. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Collins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid–gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe–sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present. Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM, a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids, KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions. EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  6. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, M Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid-liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid-liquid interface. PMID:25671164

  7. Force override rate controller for remote actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvertsen, James M.

    1992-09-01

    Many remotely operated robotic manipulator systems are operated in rate control mode to achieve a commanded position and orientation of the end-effector. Performance of certain tasks, such as applying a torque to a screw, would be more efficient if performed in unilateral force control mode. A six axis force-torque model was developed to determine the require number and positioning of sensors and using force sensing resistors, a prototype force-torque transducer was built for testing. Using a force error signal, individual joint angles may be computed in and algorithm to achieve force replication in the end-effector.

  8. Origin of Knudsen forces on heated microbeams

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Taishan

    2010-09-09

    The presented work probes the fundamentals of Knudsen forces. Using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, the flows induced by temperature inhomogeneity within a representative configuration and the Knudsen force acting on a heated microbeam are captured as functions of Knudsen number in the entire flow regime. Both flow strength and Knudsen force peak in the transition regime and negative Knudsen force absent in experimental data is observed. The mechanisms of the thermally induced flows and Knudsen forces are studied. It has been found that thermal edge flow is the main driven source for the formation of the Knudsen force on microbeams and domain configuration plays an important role in the process.

  9. Forced oscillations with linear and nonlinear damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aijun; Ma, Li; Keene, David; Klingel, Joshua; Payne, Marvin; Wang, Xiao-jun

    2016-01-01

    A general solution is derived for the differential equations of forced oscillatory motion with both linear damping ( ˜v ) and nonlinear damping ( ˜v2 ). Experiments with forced oscillators are performed using a flat metal plate with a drag force due to eddy currents and a flat piece of stiffened cardboard with a drag force due to air resistance serving as the linear and nonlinear damping, respectively. Resonance of forced oscillations for different damping forces and quality factors is demonstrated. The experimental measurements and theoretical calculations are in good agreement, and damping constants are determined.

  10. Rotordynamic Forces on Centrifugal Pump Impellers

    OpenAIRE

    Franz, R.; Arndt, N.; Caughey, T. K.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A.J

    1987-01-01

    The asymmetric flow around an impeller in a volute exerts a force upon the impeller. To study the rotordynamic force on an impeller which is vibrating around its machine axis of rotation, the impeller, mounted on a dynamometer, is made to whirl in a circular orbit within the volute. The measured force is expressed as the sum of a steady radial force and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the impeller. These forces were measured in separate tests on a centrifugal pump with rad...

  11. Electrostatic interaction in atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Butt, Hans-Jüurgen

    1991-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy, the stylus experiences an electrostatic force when imaging in aqueous medium above a charged surface. This force has been calculated numerically with continuum theory for a silicon nitrite or silicon oxide stylus. For comparison, the Van der Waals force was also calculated. In contrast to the Van der Waals attraction, the electrostatic force is repulsive. At a distance of 0.5 nm the electrostatic force is typically 10-12-10-10 N and thus comparable in strength to t...

  12. Increased Force Variability in Chronic Stroke: Contributions of Force Modulation below 1 Hz

    OpenAIRE

    Lodha, Neha; Misra, Gaurav; Coombes, Stephen A.; Evangelos A Christou; James H Cauraugh

    2013-01-01

    Increased force variability constitutes a hallmark of arm disabilities following stroke. Force variability is related to the modulation of force below 1 Hz in healthy young and older adults. However, whether the increased force variability observed post stroke is related to the modulation of force below 1 Hz remains unknown. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare force modulation below 1 Hz in chronic stroke and age-matched healthy individuals. Both stroke and control individuals (N =...

  13. Set Your Creative Forces Free!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier Sørensen, Bent; Villadsen, Kaspar

    -hierarchical’ and aestheticized managerial practice reconfigures power relations within a creative industry. The key problematic is ‘governmental’ in the sense suggested by Michel Foucault in as far as the manager’s ethical self-practice—which involves expressive and ‘liberated’ bodily comportment—is used as a means for culture...... eccentric Managing Director. At first glance the essential message to the employees may be read as ‘set Your creative forces and potentials free!; a statement which activates a semantics of liberation of artistic creativeness and rebellious transgression of conventions. It is suggested, however...

  14. Interfacial forces in aqueous media

    CERN Document Server

    van Oss, Carel J

    2006-01-01

    Thoroughly revised and reorganized, the second edition of Interfacial Forces in Aqueous Media examines the role of polar interfacial and noncovalent interactions among biological and nonbiological macromolecules as well as biopolymers, particles, surfaces, cells, and both polar and apolar polymers. The book encompasses Lifshitz-van der Waals and electrical double layer interactions, as well as Lewis acid-base interactions between colloidal entities in polar liquids such as water. New in this Edition: Four previously unpublished chapters comprising a new section on interfacial propertie

  15. Phonon forces and cold denaturatio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    Protein unfolds upon temperature reduction as Well as upon In increase in temperature, These phenomena are called cold denaturation and hot denaturation, respectively. The contribution from quantum mode forces to denaturation is estimated using a simple phenomenological model describing the...... molecule Is a continuum. The frequencies of the vibrational modes depend on the molecular dimensionality; hence, the zero-point energies for the folded and the denatured protein are estimated to differ by several electron volts. For a biomolecule such an energy is significant and may contribute to cold...... denaturing. This is consistent with the empirical observation that cold denaturation is exothermic anti hot denaturation endothermic....

  16. Exotic nuclei and Yukawa's forces

    OpenAIRE

    Otsuka, Taka; Suzuki, Toshio; Utsuno, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    In this plenary talk, we will overview the evolution of the shell structure in stable and exotic nuclei as a new paradigm of nuclear structure physics. This shell evolution is primarily due to the tensor force. The robust mechanism and some examples will be presented. Such examples include the disappearance of existing magic numbers and the appearance of new ones. The nuclear magic numbers have been believed, since Mayer and Jensen, to be constants as 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, …This turned out to be ...

  17. Casimir-force-driven ratchets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emig, T

    2007-04-20

    We explore the nonlinear dynamics of two parallel periodically patterned metal surfaces that are coupled by the zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field between them. The resulting Casimir force generates for asymmetric patterns with a time periodically driven surface-to-surface distance a ratchet effect, allowing for directed lateral motion of the surfaces in sizable parameter ranges. It is crucial to take into account inertia effects and hence chaotic dynamics which are described by Langevin dynamics. Multiple velocity reversals occur as a function of driving, mean surface distance, and effective damping. These transport properties are shown to be stable against weak ambient noise. PMID:17501407

  18. Forces between asymmetric polymer brushes

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, D.F.K.; Cates, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    We study the equilibrium compression of asymmetric polymer brushes grafted on flat plates, under athermal and theta solvent conditions, using a lattice self-consistent field (SCF) approach. We find that the separation d between two plates coated asymmetrically with brushes of type 1 and 2, as a function of the force F, obeys the "bisection rule", d(F) = (d1(F) + d 2(F)) /2 where d1(F)and d 2(F) are the corresponding separations for the symmetric brushes of type 1 and 2 respectively.The bisect...

  19. Quarkonium Binding and Entropic Force

    CERN Document Server

    Satz, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    A Q-Qbar bound state represents a balance between repulsive kinetic and attractive potential energy. In a hot quark-gluon plasma, the interaction potential experiences medium effects. Color screening modifies the attractive binding force between the quarks, while the increase of entropy with Q-Qbar separation gives rise to a growing repulsion. We study the role of these phenomena for in-medium Q-Qbar binding and dissociation. It is found that the relevant potential for Q-Qbar binding is the free energy F; with increasing Q-Qbar separation, further binding through the internal energy U is compensated by repulsive entropic effects.

  20. Friction Forces in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, D.; Gregoris, D.; Rosquist, K.

    2015-01-01

    Friction forces play an important role in a wide class of phenomena both in the contexts of classical mechanics and general relativity. This paper discusses the Poynting-Robertson approach to the description of the motion of a massive test particle inside a perfect fluid undergoing dissipative effects in curved space. Specific cases of motions 1) inside a photon gas near a Schwarzschild black hole; 2) inside a photon gas in the Tolman metric are then discussed with applications to models of accretion disks of a black hole and to motion inside a static radiation dominated Universe.

  1. Factors Affecting Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingxu; Lin, Jintai; Ni, Ruijing

    2016-04-01

    Rapid industrial and economic growth has meant a large amount of aerosols in the atmosphere with strong radiative forcing (RF) upon the climate system. Over parts of the globe, the negative forcing of aerosols has overcompensated for the positive forcing of greenhouse gases. Aerosol RF is determined by emissions and various chemical-transport-radiative processes in the atmosphere, a multi-factor problem whose individual contributors have not been well quantified. In this study, we analyze the major factors affecting RF of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIOAs, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), primary organic aerosol (POA), and black carbon (BC). We analyze the RF of aerosols produced by 11 major regions across the globe, including but not limited to East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, North America, and Western Europe. Factors analyzed include population size, per capita gross domestic production (GDP), emission intensity (i.e., emissions per unit GDP), chemical efficiency (i.e., mass per unit emissions) and radiative efficiency (i.e., RF per unit mass). We find that among the 11 regions, East Asia produces the largest emissions and aerosol RF, due to relatively high emission intensity and a tremendous population size. South Asia produce the second largest RF of SIOA and BC and the highest RF of POA, in part due to its highest chemical efficiency among all regions. Although Southeast Asia also has large emissions, its aerosol RF is alleviated by its lowest chemical efficiency. The chemical efficiency and radiative efficiency of BC produced by the Middle East-North Africa are the highest across the regions, whereas its RF is lowered by a small per capita GDP. Both North America and Western Europe have low emission intensity, compensating for the effects on RF of large population sizes and per capita GDP. There has been a momentum to transfer industries to Southeast Asia and South Asia, and such transition is expected to continue in the coming years. The

  2. Gravity as an Emergent Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from first principles and general assumptions Newton's law of gravitation is shown to arise naturally and unavoidably in a theory in which space is emergent through a holographic scenario. Gravity is explained as an entropic force caused by changes in the information associated with the positions of material bodies. A relativistic generalization of the presented arguments directly leads to the Einstein equations. When space is emergent even Newton's law of inertia needs to be explained. The equivalence principle leads us to conclude that it is actually this law of inertia whose origin is entropic. (author)

  3. Computer-Controlled Force Generator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TDA Research, Inc proposes to develop a compact, low power, high life-cycle computer controlled Programmable Force Generator (PFG) that can generate any force...

  4. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Comment In an effort to make the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations clearer and ... Current as of: May 2016 Internet Citation: Home . U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. June 2016. http://www. ...

  5. University of Amsterdam selects Force10 Networks

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Force10 Networks Inc. today announced the University of Amsterdam has selected Force10 E-Series switch/routers to provide a high performance network infra- structure for next-generation grid computing applications" (1/2 page).

  6. Imaging spectroscopy with the atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Baselt, David R.; Baldeschwieler, John D.

    1994-01-01

    Force curve imaging spectroscopy involves acquiring a force-distance curve at each pixel of an atomic force microscope image. Processing of the resulting data yields images of sample hardness and tip-sample adhesion. These images resemble Z modulation images and the sum of forward and reverse friction images, respectively, and like them exhibit a number of potentially misleading contrast mechanisms. In particular, XY tip motion has a pronounced effect on hardness images and the meniscus force...

  7. Electromechanical Coupled Forced Responses for Microplate

    OpenAIRE

    Xu LiZhong; Fu XiaoRui

    2014-01-01

    The electromechanical coupled forced response of the microplate subjected to electrostatic force is investigated. Using electromechanical coupled dynamic equations and the mode superposition method, the forced responses of the microplate to voltage excitation and load excitation are analyzed, respectively. Based on this, the coupled forced responses of the micrplate to voltage and load excitations are obtained. Beat vibration caused by the coupled response is investigated and the condition th...

  8. The economic costs of reserve forces utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, Craig L.; Ryan, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    This project offers a model useful for estimating the social cost of U.S. Reserve Forces and National Guard employment alternatives in support of the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). We consider two specific alternatives in this report: (1) the operational force (status quo) and (2) increasing Active Duty Force end strength and keeping Reserve Forces as a strategic reserve. We assume both alternatives are equal in effectiveness. Each alternative provides certain benefits and costs to Ame...

  9. Down force calibration stand test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Down Force Calibration Stand was developed to provide an improved means of calibrating equipment used to apply, display and record Core Sample Truck (CST) down force. Originally, four springs were used in parallel to provide a system of resistance that allowed increasing force over increasing displacement. This spring system, though originally deemed adequate, was eventually found to be unstable laterally. For this reason, it was determined that a new method for resisting down force was needed

  10. Improved Precision Measurement of the Casimir Force

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Anushree; Lin, Chiung-Yuan; Mohideen, U.

    1999-01-01

    We report an improved precision measurement of the Casimir force. The force is measured between a large Al coated sphere and flat plate using an Atomic Force Microscope. The primary experimental improvements include the use of smoother metal coatings, reduced noise, lower systematic errors and independent measurement of surface separations. Also the complete dielectric spectrum of the metal is used in the theory. The average statistical precision remains at the same 1% of the forces measured ...

  11. Casimir force between integrable and chaotic pistons

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Ezequiel; Mazzitelli, Francisco Diego; Monastra, Alejandro G.; Wisniacki, Diego A.

    2010-01-01

    We have computed numerically the Casimir force between two identical pistons inside a very long cylinder, considering different shapes for the pistons. The pistons can be considered as quantum billiards, whose spectrum determines the vacuum force. The smooth part of the spectrum fixes the force at short distances, and depends only on geometric quantities like the area or perimeter of the piston. However, correcting terms to the force, coming from the oscillating part of the spectrum which is ...

  12. Force, motion & simple machines big book

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Our Combined resource includes all the required fundamentals for teaching Force, Motion & Simple Machines. Give your students a kick start on learning with our resource that has simplified language and vocabulary. We begin with a look at force, motion and work, with examples of simple machines in daily life. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance.

  13. Design and experimental characterization of a NiTi-based, high-frequency, centripetal peristaltic actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development and experimental testing of a peristaltic device actuated by a single shape-memory NiTi wire are described. The actuator is designed to radially shrink a compliant silicone pipe, and must work on a sustained basis at an actuation frequency that is higher than those typical of NiTi actuators. Four rigid, aluminum-made circular sectors are sitting along the pipe circumference and provide the required NiTi wire housing. The aluminum assembly acts as geometrical amplifier of the wire contraction and as heat sink required to dissipate the thermal energy of the wire during the cooling phase. We present and discuss the full experimental investigation of the actuator performance, measured in terms of its ability to reduce the pipe diameter, at a sustained frequency of 1.5 Hz. Moreover, we investigate how the diameter contraction is affected by various design parameters as well as actuation frequencies up to 4 Hz. We manage to make the NiTi wire work at 3% in strain, cyclically providing the designed pipe wall displacement. The actuator performance is found to decay approximately linearly with actuation frequencies up to 4 Hz. Also, the interface between the wire and the aluminum parts is found to be essential in defining the functional performance of the actuator. (paper)

  14. Baking-powder driven centripetal pumping controlled by event-triggering of functional liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinahan, David J.; Burger, Robert; Vembadi, Abhishek;

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports radially inbound pumping by the event-triggered addition of water to on-board stored baking powder in combination with valving by an immiscible, high-specific weight liquid on a centrifugal microfluidic platform. This technology allows making efficient use of precious real esta......-on-a-Disc” (LoaD) cartridge can be significantly enhanced while maintaining minimum requirements on the intrinsically simple, spindle-motor based instrumentation....

  15. Lorentz-Force Hydrophone Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Gilles, Bruno; Poizat, Adrien; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lafon, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    A Lorentz-force hydrophone consists of a thin wire placed inside a magnetic field. When under the influence of an ultrasound pulse, the wire vibrates and an electrical signal is induced by the Lorentz force that is proportional to the pulse amplitude. In this study a compact prototype of such a hydrophone is introduced and characterized, and the hydrodynamic model previously developed is refined. It is shown that the wire tension has a negligible effect on the measurement of pressure. The frequency response of the hydrophone reaches 1 MHz for wires with a diameter ranging between 70 and 400 \\micro m. The hydrophone exhibits a directional response such that the signal amplitude differs by less than 3dB as the angle of the incident ultrasound pulse varies from -20$^o$ and +20$^o$. The linearity of the measured signal is confirmed across the 50 kPa to 10 MPa pressure range, and an excellent resistance to cavitation is observed. This hydrophone is of interest for high pressure ultrasound measurements including Hi...

  16. Shell evolutions and nuclear forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combining all experimental discoveries, some remarkable and general shell evolutions can be observed in the chart of nuclides. In the present contribution, the striking analogy between the behavior of the harmonic oscillator gaps N=8, 20 and 40 from the valley of stability to more neutron-rich regions is presented in section 2. The onset of deformation through intruder configurations at N=20 is depicted in section 3 using two recent experimental studies on the 34Si and 32Mg isotones. Section 4 proposes to study the evolution of the neutron single particle energies of the neutron d3/2, f7/2 and p3/2 orbitals between which the N=20 and N=28 gaps are formed. The underlying nuclear forces leading to the disappearance of the N=20 shell gap and the swapping between the f7/2 and p3/2 orbit is described. Section 5 shows that a hierarchy in the nuclear forces is responsible for these drastic shell evolutions. A generalization of this mechanism to other regions of the chart of nuclides (around 60Ca, below 78Ni and below 132Sn where the r-process nucleosynthesis occurs) is also proposed

  17. Casimir force: an alternative treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, P R

    2009-01-01

    The Casimir force between two parallel uncharged closely spaced metallic plates is evaluated in ways alternatives to those usually considered in the literature. In a first approximation we take in account the suppressed quantum numbers of a cubic box, representing a cavity which was cut in a metallic block. We combine these ideas with those of the MIT bag model of hadrons, but adapted to non-relativistic particles. In a second approximation we consider the particles occupying the energy levels of the Bohr atom, so that the Casimir force depends explicitly on the fine structure constant alpha. In both treatments, the mean energies which have explicit dependence on the particle mass and on the maximum occupied quantum number (related to the Fermi level of the system) at the beginning of the calculations, have these dependences mutually canceled at the end of them. Finally by comparing the averaged energies computed in both approximations, we are able to make an estimate of the value of the fine structure consta...

  18. THE CHARACTERIZATION OF GRINDING FORCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.F. Fielding

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally the grinding process has been a finishing process and the operating parameters and the resuns obtained in this mode are well known. However, wHh the advent of more modern techniques in grinding, there is a need for a greater understanding of the process and in particular a need to be able to predict the forces in grinding. The work reported here is part of an overall programme to study the effects of different dress leads, wheel formulations and metal removal rates on grinding ratios, surlace finish and grinding forces. The work so far has led to the development of empirical relationships based on the various factors in the dressing and grinding operations, these empirical relationships are more easily applied than the relationships developed by other researchers that rely on measurements obtained during testing. The work is now being extended to develop a theoretical derivation on the same principles, the implications of which will be discussed in the paper.

  19. Drag force in asymptotically Lifshitz spacetimes

    OpenAIRE

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir

    2009-01-01

    We calculated drag force for asymptotically Lifshitz space times in (d + 2)-dimensions with arbitrary dynamical exponent $z$. We find that at zero and finite temperature the drag force has a non-zero value. Using the drag force calculations, we investigate the DC conductivity of strange metals.

  20. Quantum anticentrifugal force for wormhole geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Dandoloff, Rossen

    2009-01-01

    We show the existence of an anticentrifugal force in a wormhole geometry in $R^3$. This counterintuitive force was shown to exist in a flat $R^2$ space. The role the geometry plays in the appearance of this force is discussed.

  1. Precipitation Response to Regional Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindell, D. T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Milly, G.

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation shifts can have large impacts on human society and ecosystems. Many aspects of how inhomogeneous radiative forcings influence precipitation remain unclear, however. Here we investigate regional precipitation responses to various forcings imposed in different latitude bands in a climate model. We find that several regions show strong, significant responses to most forcings, but that the magnitude and even the sign depends upon the forcing location and type. Aerosol and ozone forcings typically induce larger responses than equivalent carbon dioxide (CO2) forcing, and the influence of remote forcings often outweighs that of local forcings. Consistent with this, ozone and especially aerosols contribute greatly to precipitation changes over the Sahel and South and East Asia in historical simulations, and inclusion of aerosols greatly increases the agreement with observed trends in these areas, which cannot be attributed to either greenhouse gases or natural forcings. Estimates of precipitation responses derived from multiplying our Regional Precipitation Potentials (RPP; the response per unit forcing relationships) by historical forcings typically capture the actual response in full transient climate simulations fairly well, suggesting that these relationships may provide useful metrics. The strong sensitivity to aerosol and ozone forcing suggests that although some air quality improvements may unmask greenhouse gas-induced warming, they have large benefits for reducing regional disruption of the hydrologic cycle.

  2. 24 CFR 968.120 - Force account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PUBLIC HOUSING MODERNIZATION General § 968.120 Force account. (a) For both CIAP and CGP, a PHA may undertake the activities using force account labor, only where specifically approved by HUD in the CIAP... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Force account. 968.120 Section...

  3. Amplitude death in steadily forced chaotic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Guo-Lin; He Wen-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Steady forcing can induce the amplitude death in chaotic systems, which generally exists in coupled dynamic systems. Using the Lorenz system as a typical example, this paper investigates the dynamic behaviours of the chaotic system with steady forcing numerically, and finds that amplitude death can occur as the strength of the steady forcing goes beyond a critical constant.

  4. Three-body forces and the trinucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-body forces are discussed in the context of classical, atomic, solid-state and nuclear physics. The basic theoretical ingredients used in the construction of such forces are reviewed. Experimental evidence for three-nucleon forces and an overview of the three-nucleon bound states are presented. 53 refs., 9 figs

  5. Forces on Architecture Decisions – A Viewpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesch, Uwe van; Avgeriou, Paris; Hilliard, Rich

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the notion of forces as influences upon architecture decisions is introduced. To facilitate the documentation of forces as a part of architecture descriptions, we specify a decision forces viewpoint, which extends our existing framework for architecture decisions, following the conven

  6. Precipitation response to regional radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Shindell

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation shifts can have large impacts on human society and ecosystems. Many aspects of how inhomogeneous radiative forcings influence precipitation remain unclear, however. Here we investigate regional precipitation responses to various forcings imposed in different latitude bands in a climate model. We find that several regions show strong, significant responses to most forcings, but the magnitude and even the sign depends upon the forcing location and type. Aerosol and ozone forcings typically induce larger responses than equivalent carbon dioxide (CO2 forcing, and the influence of remote forcings often outweighs that of local forcings. Consistent with this, ozone and especially aerosols contribute greatly to precipitation changes over the Sahel and South and East Asia in historical simulations, and inclusion of aerosols greatly increases the agreement with observed trends in these areas, which cannot be attributed to either greenhouse gases or natural forcings. Estimates of precipitation responses derived from multiplying our Regional Precipitation Potential (RPP; the response per unit forcing relationships by historical forcings typically capture the actual response in full transient climate simulations fairly well, suggesting that these relationships may provide useful metrics. The strong sensitivity to aerosol and ozone forcing suggests that although some air quality improvements may unmask greenhouse gas-induced changes in temperature, they have large benefits for reducing regional disruption of the hydrologic cycle.

  7. Precipitation response to regional radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Shindell

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation shifts can have large impacts on human society and ecosystems. Many aspects of how inhomogeneous radiative forcings influence precipitation remain unclear, however. Here we investigate regional precipitation responses to various forcings imposed in different latitude bands in a climate model. We find that several regions show strong, significant responses to most forcings, but that the magnitude and even the sign depends upon the forcing location and type. Aerosol and ozone forcings typically induce larger responses than equivalent carbon dioxide (CO2 forcing, and the influence of remote forcings often outweighs that of local forcings. Consistent with this, ozone and especially aerosols contribute greatly to precipitation changes over the Sahel and South and East Asia in historical simulations, and inclusion of aerosols greatly increases the agreement with observed trends in these areas, which cannot be attributed to either greenhouse gases or natural forcings. Estimates of precipitation responses derived from multiplying our Regional Precipitation Potentials (RPP; the response per unit forcing relationships by historical forcings typically capture the actual response in full transient climate simulations fairly well, suggesting that these relationships may provide useful metrics. The strong sensitivity to aerosol and ozone forcing suggests that although some air quality improvements may unmask greenhouse gas-induced warming, they have large benefits for reducing regional disruption of the hydrologic cycle.

  8. Master-slave robot force telepresence technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to make the manipulators useful, some force-feedback is required to enable the operator to sense the robot's feelings. Without force-feedback, many tasks will not be able to be carried out. For these rea sons, a master-slave system with different kinematics has been developed. The system permits us to vary the ra tio of the position/attitude, to design a master manipulator without considering the kinematics of the slave ma nipulator, and so on. To overcome the difficulties, a master-slave manipulator system with different kinematics is proposed. The master manipulator is force-controlled via a force torque sensor in the handle. As to master slave manipulator system with two way force feedback is concerned, the force goes to the actuator from the oper ator, and come back to the operator from the actuator. The working situation is viewed by the stereo TV supervi sory system. The force and vision telepresence are thus achieved. In order to ensure the maneuverability, direct drive DC motors and PWM servo units are adopted to improve the response speed. It can provide force response in a wide range. A lot of experiments were performed with the master-slave manipulator system force telepres ence to study the force response under restricted environment. By two force sensors, the force-position bilateral force response system effectively decreases the affection of friction and inertia force, and increases the authen ticity of bilateral force response. When the slave manipulator ann is encountered with soft-object(sponge), in the experiments, the operator can clearly have the fine feeling as if he himself is contacted with the object.

  9. Physical Microscopic Model of Proteins Under Force

    OpenAIRE

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2012-01-01

    Nature has evolved proteins to counter-act forces applied on living cells, and designed proteins that can sense forces. One can appreciate Nature’s ingenuity in evolving these proteins to be highly sensitive to force and to have a high dynamic force range at which they operate. To achieve this level of sensitivity, many of these proteins are comprised of multiple domains and linking peptides connecting these domain, each of them have their own force response regimes. Here, using a simple mode...

  10. Noncontact atomic force microscopy v.3

    CERN Document Server

    Morita, Seizo; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest developments in noncontact atomic force microscopy. It deals with the following outstanding functions and applications that have been obtained with atomic resolution after the publication of volume 2: (1) Pauli repulsive force imaging of molecular structure, (2) Applications of force spectroscopy and force mapping with atomic resolution, (3) Applications of tuning forks, (4) Applications of atomic/molecular manipulation, (5) Applications of magnetic exchange force microscopy, (6) Applications of atomic and molecular imaging in liquids, (7) Applications of combine

  11. Forced expiratory indices in normal Libyan men.

    OpenAIRE

    Shamssain, M H

    1988-01-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced expiratory ratio in the first second (FEV1% VC), forced expiratory flow between 200 and 1200 ml (FEF200-1200), and forced mid expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC (FMF) were measured in 275 Libyan men ranging from 20 to 60 years. All values were lower with increasing age and, apart from FEV1% VC, were positively correlated with standing height. This study can be used as a source of reference for Libyan men.

  12. Modeling forces in high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a simple model that uses computed shielding currents to determine the forces acting on a high-temperature superconductor (HTS). The model has been applied to measurements of the force between HTS and permanent magnets (PM). Results show the expected hysteretic variation of force as the HTS moves first toward and then away from a permanent magnet, including the reversal of the sign of the force. Optimization of the shielding currents is carried out through a simulated annealing algorithm in a C++ program that repeatedly calls a commercial electromagnetic software code. Agreement with measured forces is encouraging

  13. Force measurement in a nanomachining instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Hocken, Robert J.; Patten, John A.; Lovingood, John

    2000-11-01

    Two miniature, high sensitivity force transducers were employed to measure the thrust force along the in-feed direction and the cutting force along the cross-feed direction in a nanomachining instrument. The instrument was developed for conducting fundamental experiments of nanocutting especially on brittle materials. The force transducers of piezoelectric quartz type can measure machining forces ranging from 0.2 mN to 10 N. The submillinewton resolution makes it possible to measure the machining forces in the cutting experiments with depths of cut as small as the nanometer level. The stiffness and resonant frequency of the force transducers are 400 mN/nm and 300 kHz, respectively, which meet the specification of the instrument. A force transducer assembly is designed to provide a mechanism to adjust the preload on the force transducer and to decouple the measurement of forces. The assembly consists of three dual-axis circular flexures and a subframe. The axial stiffness of the flexures is designed to be greater than 6×107 N/m and the lateral stiffness of the flexures is designed to be 1×106 N/m to provide proper decoupling of forces.

  14. Effect of dielectrophoretic force on swimming bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Phu; Marcos

    2015-07-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been applied widely in bacterial manipulation such as separating, concentrating, and focusing. Previous studies primarily focused on the collective effects of DEP force on the bacterial population. However, the influence of DEP force on the swimming of a single bacterium had not been investigated. In this study, we present a model to analyze the effect of DEP force on a swimming helically flagellated bacterium, particularly on its swimming direction and velocity. We consider a simple DEP force that acts along the X-direction, and its strength as well as direction varies with the X- and Y-positions. Resistive force theory is employed to compute the hydrodynamic force on the bacterium's flagellar bundle, and the effects of both DEP force and rotational diffusion on the swimming of the bacterium are simultaneously taken into consideration using the Fokker-Planck equation. We show the mechanism of how DEP force alters the orientation and velocity of the bacterium. In most cases, the DEP force dominantly influences the orientation of the swimming bacterium; however, when the DEP force strongly varies along the Y-direction, the rotational diffusion is also responsible for determining the bacterium's reorientation. More interestingly, the variance of DEP force along the Y-direction causes the bacterium to experience a translational velocity perpendicular to its primary axis, and this phenomenon could be utilized to focus the bacteria. Finally, we show the feasibility of applying our findings to achieve bacterial focusing. PMID:25785901

  15. Dynamic atomic force microscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Ricardo; Pérez, Rubén

    2002-09-01

    In this report we review the fundamentals, applications and future tendencies of dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. Our focus is on understanding why the changes observed in the dynamic properties of a vibrating tip that interacts with a surface make possible to obtain molecular resolution images of membrane proteins in aqueous solutions or to resolve atomic-scale surface defects in ultra high vacuum (UHV). Our description of the two major dynamic AFM modes, amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) emphasises their common points without ignoring the differences in experimental set-ups and operating conditions. Those differences are introduced by the different feedback parameters, oscillation amplitude in AM-AFM and frequency shift and excitation amplitude in FM-AFM, used to track the topography and composition of a surface. The theoretical analysis of AM-AFM (also known as tapping-mode) emphasises the coexistence, in many situations of interests, of two stable oscillation states, a low and high amplitude solution. The coexistence of those oscillation states is a consequence of the presence of attractive and repulsive components in the interaction force and their non-linear dependence on the tip-surface separation. We show that key relevant experimental properties such as the lateral resolution, image contrast and sample deformation are highly dependent on the oscillation state chosen to operate the instrument. AM-AFM allows to obtain simultaneous topographic and compositional contrast in heterogeneous samples by recording the phase angle difference between the external excitation and the tip motion (phase imaging). Significant applications of AM-AFM such as high-resolution imaging of biomolecules and polymers, large-scale patterning of silicon surfaces, manipulation of single nanoparticles or the fabrication of single electron devices are also reviewed. FM-AFM (also called non

  16. Many-body monopolar forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that realistic interactions derived from Brueckner calculations based on the N-N potentials, give excellent spectroscopy provided their monopole behaviour is corrected. The latter is related to saturation properties of nuclei and demands the introduction of a non analytic dependence of the effective interaction on the particle number. This mechanism is certainly related to a density dependence and no need is felt empirically of forces of rank higher than two-some new results concern the theory of spectral distributions: the parametrization of the monopole feld and calculations of traces of H and H2 at fixed n,t,v (number, isospin, seniority). This results are useful in the context of quasiconfiguration theory to establish the foundations of Shell Model calculations in the ZBM spaces

  17. Searches for new macroscopic forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The search for new interactions and their associated bosons is a central theme in modern physics. Such searches are particularly topical today, when there is a consensus that the Standard Model cannot be complete, and that new interactions and their mediating particles are required. However, because of the wide variety of theoretical ideas for overcoming the perceived difficulties of the Standard Model, there is no consensus on the expected properties of mediating particles. One normally supposes that the bosons mediating these new interactions have not been observed because they are too massive to have been produced by existing accelerators. Therefore particle searches are usually conducted at the highest energy accelerators. However, it has recently been recognized that there is another quite different and largely unexplored window on possible new physics, namely the search for new bosons with masses so low that they would generate a macroscopic force. This paper covers recent theoretical and experimental work that addresses this possibility

  18. Technology as a driving force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The competitiveness of the Norwegian Continental shelf has been put firmly on the agenda in Norway since the report from a working group set up by the Ministry of Industry and Energy was released in February this year. If there is to be secured a long future for oil and gas activities, a reduction in the time and costs used in the projects of the order of 40-50%, without jeopardizing the high safety and environmental standards achieved in Norway. The paper addresses how technology can be a driving force in achieving these aims. But technology alone cannot do the job. Progress and changes in several other areas are also necessary, and the new scenario also calls for improved relations between all actors in the North Sea, authorities, oil companies, contractors and labour unions. 15 figs

  19. Shell Evolutions and Nuclear Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Sorlin, O

    2014-01-01

    During the last 30 years, and more specifically during the last 10 years, many experiments have been carried out worldwide using different techniques to study the shell evolution of nuclei far from stability. What seemed not conceivable some decades ago became rather common: all known magic numbers that are present in the valley of stability disappear far from stability and are replaced by new ones at the drip line. By gathering selected experimental results, beautifully consistent pictures emerge, that very likely take root in the properties of the nuclear forces.The present manuscript describes some of these discoveries and proposes an intuitive understanding of these shell evolutions derived from observations. Extrapolations to yet unstudied regions, as where the explosive r-process nucleosynthesis occurs, are proposed. Some remaining challenges and puzzling questions are also addressed.

  20. Shell Evolutions and Nuclear Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorlin O.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last 30 years, and more specifically during the last 10 years, many experiments have been carried out worldwide using different techniques to study the shell evolution of nuclei far from stability. What seemed not conceivable some decades ago became rather common: all known magic numbers that are present in the valley of stability disappear far from stability and are replaced by new ones at the drip line. By gathering selected experimental results, beautifully consistent pictures emerge, that very likely take root in the properties of the nuclear forces.The present manuscript describes some of these discoveries and proposes an intuitive understanding of these shell evolutions derived from observations. Extrapolations to yet unstudied regions, as where the explosive r-process nucleosynthesis occurs, are proposed. Some remaining challenges and puzzling questions are also addressed.

  1. Automatic force balance calibration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Alice T.

    1995-05-01

    A system for automatically calibrating force balances is provided. The invention uses a reference balance aligned with the balance being calibrated to provide superior accuracy while minimizing the time required to complete the calibration. The reference balance and the test balance are rigidly attached together with closely aligned moment centers. Loads placed on the system equally effect each balance, and the differences in the readings of the two balances can be used to generate the calibration matrix for the test balance. Since the accuracy of the test calibration is determined by the accuracy of the reference balance and current technology allows for reference balances to be calibrated to within +/-0.05% the entire system has an accuracy of +/-0.2%. The entire apparatus is relatively small and can be mounted on a movable base for easy transport between test locations. The system can also accept a wide variety of reference balances, thus allowing calibration under diverse load and size requirements.

  2. Probing The Atomic Higgs Force

    CERN Document Server

    Delaunay, Cédric; Perez, Gilad; Soreq, Yotam

    2016-01-01

    We propose an approach to probe Higgs boson couplings to the building blocks of matter: the electron and the up and down quarks, with precision measurement of isotope shifts in atomic clock transitions. We show that the attractive Higgs force between nuclei and their bound electrons induces measurable non-linearities in a King plot of two isotope shifts. We present an experimental method which, given state-of-the-art accuracy in frequency comparison, competes with and potentially surpasses the Large Hadron Collider in bounding the Higgs-to-light-fermion couplings. Better knowledge of the latter is an important test of the Standard Model which could lead, besides the establishment of new physics above the weak scale, to an alternative understanding of the flavor puzzle.

  3. An analysis of nuclear-electronic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derow, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    It is known that electrons can act in waves and so can protons and neutrons, and that they have a negative, positive and neutral charge, respectively. It seems the motion of the positive charge and motion of the negative charge of the atom keep them from merging and yet the attractive forces stop them from parting, apart from when radiation activity is observed. The neutral charge may add a motion which loosens the attraction of the positive protonic attractive force for the negative electronic force. It seems thus the atom is relatively immobilized negative, positive and neutral waves held in confined motion. These waves can be loosed into travelling as waves by forces which break the balance of intra-atomic attractive forces and thus cause the emission of sub-atomic ``particles'' as waves. Thus the attractive forces in normal circumstances balance the ``wave motion'' forces, keeping stable atomic structure intact.

  4. Control of parallel manipulators using force feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanua, Prabjot

    1994-01-01

    Two control schemes are compared for parallel robotic mechanisms actuated by hydraulic cylinders. One scheme, the 'rate based scheme', uses the position and rate information only for feedback. The second scheme, the 'force based scheme' feeds back the force information also. The force control scheme is shown to improve the response over the rate control one. It is a simple constant gain control scheme better suited to parallel mechanisms. The force control scheme can be easily modified for the dynamic forces on the end effector. This paper presents the results of a computer simulation of both the rate and force control schemes. The gains in the force based scheme can be individually adjusted in all three directions, whereas the adjustment in just one direction of the rate based scheme directly affects the other two directions.

  5. Size Dependent Orientation of Knudsen Force

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Taishan

    2012-03-03

    Knudsen force acting on a heated microbeam adjacent to a cold substrate in a rarefied gas is a mechanical force created by unbalanced thermal gradients. The measured force has its direction pointing towards the side with a lower thermal gradient and its magnitude vanishes in both continuum and free-molecule limits. In our previous study, negative Knudsen forces were discovered at the high Knudsen regime before diminishing in the free-molecule limit. Such a phenomenon was however not observed in the experiment. In this paper, the existence of such a negative Knudsen force is further confirmed using both numerical simulation and theoretical analysis. The asymptotic order of the Knudsen force near the collisionless limit is analyzed and the analytical expression of its leading term is provided, from which approaches for the enhancement of negative Knudsen forces are proposed. Copyright © 2012 by ASME.

  6. Rotordynamic forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, R.; Arndt, N.; Caughey, T. K.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The asymmetric flow around an impeller in a volute exerts a force upon the impeller. To study the rotordynamic force on an impeller which is vibrating around its machine axis of rotation, the impeller, mounted on a dynamometer, is made to whirl in a circular orbit within the volute. The measured force is expressed as the sum of a steady radial force and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the impeller. These forces were measured in separate tests on a centrifugal pump with radically increased shroud clearance, a two-dimensional impeller, and an impeller with an inducer, the impeller of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine). In each case, a destabilizing force was observed over a region of positive whirl.

  7. Towards measuring the Archimedes force of vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Calloni, Enrico; De Rosa, Rosario; Di Fiore, Luciano; Esposito, Giampiero; Garufi, Fabio; Rosa, Luigi; Rovelli, Carlo; Ruggi, Paolo; Tafuri, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the force exerted by the gravitational field on a Casimir cavity in terms of Archimedes' force of vacuum, we identify the force that can be tested against observation and we show that the present technology makes it possible to perform the first experimental tests. We motivate the use of suitable high-Tc superconductors as modulators of Archimedes' force. We analyze the possibility of using gravitational wave interferometers as detectors of the force, transported through an optical spring from the Archimedes vacuum force apparatus to the gravitational interferometers test masses to maintain the two systems well separated. We also analyze the use of balances to actuate and detect the force, we compare different solutions and discuss the most important experimental issues.

  8. DNA under Force: Mechanics, Electrostatics, and Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqiang Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the basic intra- and inter-molecular forces of DNA has helped us to better understand and further predict the behavior of DNA. Single molecule technique elucidates the mechanics of DNA under applied external forces, sometimes under extreme forces. On the other hand, ensemble studies of DNA molecular force allow us to extend our understanding of DNA molecules under other forces such as electrostatic and hydration forces. Using a variety of techniques, we can have a comprehensive understanding of DNA molecular forces, which is crucial in unraveling the complex DNA functions in living cells as well as in designing a system that utilizes the unique properties of DNA in nanotechnology.

  9. Concepts of Force and Frictional Force: The Influence of Preconceptions on Learning across Different Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S. V.; Sharma, K. C.

    2007-01-01

    Students' understanding regarding force and frictional force was probed by administering a force concept inventory (FCI) and a frictional force concept inventory (FFCI) which was followed by practical activities to investigate the application aspect of the concepts in real situations. Analysis of the two audio-video recorded interviews and…

  10. 78 FR 27969 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Program Office, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control... Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health... Prevention (CDC) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)....

  11. 77 FR 56845 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... and Analysis Program Office, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers... Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health... Prevention (CDC) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)....

  12. 78 FR 2996 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... and Analysis Program Office, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers... Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health... Prevention (CDC) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)....

  13. Forced marriage, forced sex: the perils of childhood for girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, M; Sen, P; Thomson, M

    1998-11-01

    A recently formed interagency Forum on the Rights of Girls and Women in Marriage is investigating the widespread problem of nonconsensual marriage and forced sex and advocating for legislative and policy initiatives. This article reviews three research projects in this area: research by Anti-Slavery International on child marriage in parts of West Africa, an investigation by Save the Children of children's views of early marriage, and research conducted by CHANGE on women's resistance to domestic violence in Calcutta, India. Girls who marry before 15 years of age are more likely to be illiterate than their older counterparts, more likely to be dowry payment brides, less likely to come into contact with development projects, have higher rates of infant mortality, and are most vulnerable to sexual violence. In many cases, intercourse is initiated before the girl begins to menstruate. Although adult women also face sexual violence within marriage, this problem is all the more traumatic for girls who lack any information about sexuality. Sex with girls below a certain age is usually covered by rape legislation, but, in countries such as India, this is mitigated by the religiously defined personal laws. The absence of adequate legal and policy action frameworks to deal with the rights of girls, coupled with the lack of sanctions against these abuses, comprise state complicity and neglect of duty under international law to this vulnerable group. PMID:12294409

  14. Catch Force Links and the Low to High Force Transition of Myosin

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas M. Butler; Mooers, Susan U.; Siegman, Marion J.

    2006-01-01

    Catch is characterized by maintenance of force with very low energy utilization in some invertebrate muscles. Catch is regulated by phosphorylation of the mini-titin, twitchin, and a catch component of force exists at all [Ca2+] except those resulting in maximum force. The mechanism responsible for catch force was characterized by determining how the effects of agents that inhibit the low to high force transition of the myosin cross-bridge (inorganic phosphate, butanedione monoxime, trifluope...

  15. SA FORCES IN THE SECOND WORLD WAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SADF Archives SADF Archives

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available UNION DEFENCE FORCE: LAND FORCES Organisation of Union Defence Force (a Pre-War. At the outbreak of war in September, 1939, the armed forces of the Union consisted of a Permanent Force of 352 Officers and 5033 men, and an Active Citizen Force of 918 Officers and 12 572 men. Of the Permanent Force, 173 Officers and 1664 men formed the South African Air Force, 47 Officers and 562 men were members of the South African Artillery and 17 Officers and 1 705 men formed the Special Service Battalion, a unit consisting of men who served on a short-service basis for a minimum of one year. The rest were concerned principally in the supply services and in administering the Active Citizen Force. The latter was roughly parallel to the Territorial Army in Britain, since membership, although nominally compulsory, was in effect restricted to volunteers from among the various age groups called up annually for compulsory registration. Members of the Active Citizen Force were enrolled in units, some of which could show a history dating back to the middle of the last century, and were required to perform 1½ to 4 hours of non-continuous training per week, and 15 days of continuous training, in camp, each year. 

  16. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-14

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  17. Heterogeneous Force Chains in Cellularized Biopolymer Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher Allen Rucksack; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    Biopolymer Networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the mechanical response of a model biopolymer network due to the active contraction of embedded cells. Specifically, a graph (bond-node) model derived from confocal microscopy data is used to represent the network microstructure, and cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes, representing the focal adhesion sites. A force-based stochastic relaxation method is employed to obtain force-balanced network under cell contraction. We find that the majority of the forces are carried by a small number of heterogeneous force chains emerged from the contracting cells. The force chains consist of fiber segments that either possess a high degree of alignment before cell contraction or are aligned due to the reorientation induced by cell contraction. Large fluctuations of the forces along different force chains are observed. Importantly, the decay of the forces along the force chains is significantly slower than the decay of radially averaged forces in the system, suggesting that the fibreous nature of biopolymer network structure could support long-range mechanical signaling between cells.

  18. Radiation force and balance of electromagnetic momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, I.; Jiménez, J. L.; Roa-Neri, J. A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Some force densities can be expressed as a divergence of a stress tensor, as is the case with the electromagnetic force density. We have shown elsewhere that from the Maxwell equations several balance equations of electromagnetic momentum can be derived, depending on the form these equations are expressed in terms of fields E, D, B, H, and polarisations P and M. These balance equations imply different force densities and different stress tensors, providing a great flexibility to solve particular problems. Among these force densities we have found some proposed in the past with plausibility arguments, like the Einstein–Laub force density, while other proposed force densities appear as particular or limit cases of these general force densities, like the Helmholtz force density. We calculate the radiation force of an electromagnetic wave incident on a semi-infinite negligibly absorbing material using these balance equations, corroborating in this way that the surface integration of the stress tensor gives the same result that the calculation made through a volume integration of the force density, as done by Bohren. As is usual in applications of Gauss’s theorem, the surface on which the surface integral is to be performed must be chosen judiciously, and due care of discontinuities on the boundary conditions must be taken. Advanced undergraduates and graduate students will find a different approach to new aspects of the interaction of radiation with matter.

  19. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flemming H Gravesen; Peter Funch-Jensen; Hans Gregersen; Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method.

  20. Unify the electromagnetic force and gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng Ming, Zheng

    2013-04-01

    In the process of mankind investigate natural rule: people know four kinds of force: electromagnetic force, gravitation, weak force, and strong force. Meanwhile people use these four kinds force to explain all phenomena in the Nature. Obviously people do not know their mechanism of origin until now. On the other hand, these four kinds force is the difference showing form of one force, is not it? For solve these questions and find their mechanism of origin, I do some experiments and discover that the moving photons produce gravitation. This discovery shows the origin of gravitation. Meanwhile I also do experiments show that light is a particle, but is not a wave-particle duality. My experiments show that the elementary particles moving produce gravitation and electromagnetic force, this effect also produce wave effect. That is to say my experiment and calculate not only reveal the origin of gravitation, but also reveal the origin of electric charge and magnetic force. Base on this I first unify the electromagnetic force and gravitation. The more detail see below website: https://www.lap-publishing.com/catalog/details/store/gb/book/978-3-8473-2658-8/mechanism-of-interaction-in-moving-matter.

  1. Uncertainties in forces extracted from non-contact atomic force microscopy measurements by fitting of long-range background forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Sweetman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In principle, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM now readily allows for the measurement of forces with sub-nanonewton precision on the atomic scale. In practice, however, the extraction of the often desired ‘short-range’ force from the experimental observable (frequency shift is often far from trivial. In most cases there is a significant contribution to the total tip–sample force due to non-site-specific van der Waals and electrostatic forces. Typically, the contribution from these forces must be removed before the results of the experiment can be successfully interpreted, often by comparison to density functional theory calculations. In this paper we compare the ‘on-minus-off’ method for extracting site-specific forces to a commonly used extrapolation method modelling the long-range forces using a simple power law. By examining the behaviour of the fitting method in the case of two radically different interaction potentials we show that significant uncertainties in the final extracted forces may result from use of the extrapolation method.

  2. Mechanically-forced dynamos (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bars, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is a commonly accepted hypothesis that convection is responsible for planetary dynamos. However, the validity of the convective dynamo model can be questioned in various planets and moons as well as in asteroids, where the constraints from thermal evolution and compositional core models are sometimes difficult to reconcile with available data from paleomagnetism and in situ measurements. Over the last few years, researches have thus been pursued to find alternative mechanisms for sustaining intense three-dimensional motions in liquid cores, a necessary ingredient for planetary dynamo. In particular, mechanical forcings driven by libration, precession, nutation and tides, have received a renewed interest, following the first studies by Malkus in the 60's. A huge reservoir of energy is available in the rotational and orbital motions of all planetary systems. If planetary bodies were completely rigid and rotating at a constant spin rate, their fluid layers in the absence of convection would also behave rigidly and follow the spin of their boundaries. But small periodic perturbations of the shape of the core/mantle boundary (i.e. dynamic tides) and/or small periodic perturbations of the direction of the spin vector (i.e. precession and nutation) and/or small periodic perturbations of the spin rate (i.e. libration) systematically perturb this rigid state. Then, each of these small perturbations is capable of triggering instabilities in fluid layers, conveying energy from the spin and orbital motions to drive intense three-dimensional flows in the liquid cores. With the view to establish a general framework for planetary applications, I will present here the basic physical ingredients of these instabilities, which involve a resonance between the considered mechanical forcing and two inertial waves of the core. I will then review the numerical and experimental validations of this generic principle, and the few magnetohydrodynamic validations of their dynamo capacity

  3. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  4. Mechanical forces and lymphatic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Jerome W

    2014-11-01

    This review examines the current understanding of how the lymphatic vessel network can optimize lymph flow in response to various mechanical forces. Lymphatics are organized as a vascular tree, with blind-ended initial lymphatics, precollectors, prenodal collecting lymphatics, lymph nodes, postnodal collecting lymphatics and the larger trunks (thoracic duct and right lymph duct) that connect to the subclavian veins. The formation of lymph from interstitial fluid depends heavily on oscillating pressure gradients to drive fluid into initial lymphatics. Collecting lymphatics are segmented vessels with unidirectional valves, with each segment, called a lymphangion, possessing an intrinsic pumping mechanism. The lymphangions propel lymph forward against a hydrostatic pressure gradient. Fluid is returned to the central circulation both at lymph nodes and via the larger lymphatic trunks. Several recent developments are discussed, including evidence for the active role of endothelial cells in lymph formation; recent developments on how inflow pressure, outflow pressure, and shear stress affect the pump function of the lymphangion; lymphatic valve gating mechanisms; collecting lymphatic permeability; and current interpretations of the molecular mechanisms within lymphatic endothelial cells and smooth muscle. An improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms by which lymphatic vessels sense mechanical stimuli, integrate the information, and generate the appropriate response is key for determining the pathogenesis of lymphatic insufficiency and developing treatments for lymphedema. PMID:25107458

  5. Mechanical Forces and Lymphatic Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    This review examines current understanding of how the lymphatic vessel network can optimize lymph flow in response to various mechanical forces. Lymphatics are organized as a vascular tree, with blind-ended initial lymphatics, precollectors, prenodal collecting lymphatics, lymph nodes, postnodal collecting lymphatics and the larger trunks (thoracic duct and right lymph duct) that connect to the subclavian veins. The formation of lymph from interstitial fluid depends heavily on oscillating pressure gradients to drive fluid into initial lymphatics. Collecting lymphatics are segmented vessels with unidirectional valves, with each segment, called a lymphangion, possessing an intrinsic pumping mechanism. The lymphangions propel lymph forward against a hydrostatic pressure gradient. Fluid is returned to the central circulation both at lymph nodes and via the larger lymphatic trunks. Several recent developments are discussed, including: evidence for the active role of endothelial cells in lymph formation; recent developments on how inflow pressure, outflow pressure, and shear stress affect pump function of the lymphangion; lymphatic valve gating mechanisms; collecting lymphatic permeability; and current interpretations of the molecular mechanisms within lymphatic endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms by lymphatic vessels sense mechanical stimuli, integrate the information, and generate the appropriate response is key for determining the pathogenesis of lymphatic insufficiency and developing treatments for lymphedema. PMID:25107458

  6. Hidden force opposing ice compression

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Chang Q; Zheng, Weitao

    2012-01-01

    Coulomb repulsion between the unevenly-bound bonding and nonbonding electron pairs in the O:H-O hydrogen-bond is shown to originate the anomalies of ice under compression. Consistency between experimental observations, density functional theory and molecular dynamics calculations confirmed that the resultant force of the compression, the repulsion, and the recovery of electron-pair dislocations differentiates ice from other materials in response to pressure. The compression shortens and strengthens the longer-and-softer intermolecular O:H lone-pair virtual-bond; the repulsion pushes the bonding electron pair away from the H+/p and hence lengthens and weakens the intramolecular H-O real-bond. The virtual-bond compression and the real-bond elongation symmetrize the O:H-O as observed at ~60 GPa and result in the abnormally low compressibility of ice. The virtual-bond stretching phonons ( 3000 cm-1) softened upon compression. The cohesive energy of the real-bond dominates and its loss lowers the critical temperat...

  7. Force distribution in a semiflexible loop

    CERN Document Server

    Waters, James T

    2016-01-01

    Loops undergoing thermal fluctuations are prevalent in nature. Ring-like or cross-linked polymers, cyclic macromolecules, and protein-mediated DNA loops all belong to this category. Stability of these molecules are generally described in terms of free energy, an average quantity, but it may also be impacted by local fluctuating forces acting within these systems. The full distribution of these forces can thus give us insights into mechanochemistry beyond the predictive capability of thermodynamics. In this paper, we study the force exerted by an inextensible semiflexible polymer constrained in a looped state. By using a novel simulation method termed "phase-space sampling", we generate the equilibrium distribution of chain conformations in both position and momentum space. We compute the constraint forces between the two ends of the loop in this chain ensemble using Lagrangian mechanics, and show that the mean of these forces is equal to the thermodynamic force. By analyzing kinetic and potential contribution...

  8. Measuring the force ejecting DNA from phage

    CERN Document Server

    Evilevitch, A; Knobler, C M; Gelbart, W M

    2004-01-01

    We discuss how a balance can be established between the force acting to eject DNA from viral capsids and the force resisting its entry into a colloidal suspension which mimics the host cell cytoplasm. The ejection force arises from the energy stored in the capsid as a consequence of the viral genome (double-stranded DNA) being strongly bent and crowded on itself. The resisting force is associated with the osmotic pressure exerted by the colloidal particles in the host solution. Indeed, recent experimental work has demonstrated that the extent of ejection can be progressively limited by increasing the external osmotic pressure; at a sufficiently high pressure the ejection is completely suppressed. We outline here a theoritical analysis that allows a determination of the internal (capsid) pressure by examining the different relations between force and pressure inside and outside the capsid, using the experimentally measured position of the force balance.

  9. Attentional Focusing Instructions and Force Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Marchant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research progress assessing the role of attentional focusing instructions on skill acquisition and performance has lead researchers to apply this approach to force production tasks. Initial converging evidence indicates that force production tasks are sensitive to verbal instruction; externally focused instructions (onto movement outcomes, or onto the object force is being exerted against are shown to be more beneficial than internally focused instructions (focusing attention onto the movements being executed. These benefits are observed for maximal and accurate force production, as well as the maintenance of force production in prolonged tasks. A range of mechanisms are identified supporting the proposal that an external focus promotes movement efficiency in line with energy and effort conservation. Future research is required to assess how this developing body of work interacts with the broader understanding of psychological and physiological factors implicated in the effective production, maintenance and limitation of maximal or sub-maximal forces.

  10. Force reflecting hand controller for manipulator teleoperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryfogle, Mark D.

    1991-12-01

    A force reflecting hand controller based upon a six degree of freedom fully parallel mechanism, often termed a Stewart Platform, has been designed, constructed, and tested as an integrated system with a slave robot manipulator test bed. A force reflecting hand controller comprises a kinesthetic device capable of transmitting position and orientation commands to a slave robot manipulator while simultaneously representing the environmental interaction forces of the slave manipulator back to the operator through actuators driving the hand controller mechanism. The Stewart Platform was chosen as a novel approach to improve force reflecting teleoperation because of its inherently high ratio of load generation capability to system mass content and the correspondingly high dynamic bandwidth. An additional novelty of the program was to implement closed loop force and torque control about the hand controller mechanism by equipping the handgrip with a six degree of freedom force and torque measuring cell. The mechanical, electrical, computer, and control systems are discussed and system tests are presented.

  11. Retinal Changes Induced by Epiretinal Tangential Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario R. Romano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of forces are active in vitreoretinal traction diseases: tangential and anterior-posterior forces. However, tangential forces are less characterized and classified in literature compared to the anterior-posterior ones. Tangential epiretinal forces are mainly due to anomalous posterior vitreous detachment (PVD, vitreoschisis, vitreopapillary adhesion (VPA, and epiretinal membranes (ERMs. Anomalous PVD plays a key role in the formation of the tangential vectorial forces on the retinal surface as consequence of gel liquefaction (synchysis without sufficient and fast vitreous dehiscence at the vitreoretinal interface. The anomalous and persistent adherence of the posterior hyaloid to the retina can lead to vitreomacular/vitreopapillary adhesion or to a formation of avascular fibrocellular tissue (ERM resulting from the proliferation and transdifferentiation of hyalocytes resident in the cortical vitreous remnants after vitreoschisis. The right interpretation of the forces involved in the epiretinal tangential tractions helps in a better definition of diagnosis, progression, prognosis, and surgical outcomes of vitreomacular interfaces.

  12. Wave Forces Acting on Vertical Walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ben-xia; YU Yu-xiu; YU Xi-ping

    2008-01-01

    Regular and irregular wave forces acting on vertical walls are studied by a previously developed numerical model. The computed wave forces are compared with the available experimental data to verify the numerical model, and satisfactory agreements are obtained. The variation of wave forces with incident angles and the shape of simultaneous pressure distribution are investigated, and the comparisons between numerical results and Goda's predictions are also carried out. It is concluded that the maximum wave forces acting on the unit length of vertical wall is often induced by the obliquely incident waves instead of normally incident waves, while Goda's formula may be inapplicable for oblique wave incidence. The shape of simultaneous pressure distribution is not significantly influenced by incident angles, and it can be favorably predicted by Goda's formula. When regular wave heights are taken as the same as irregular wave height H1%, the irregular wave forces Ph,1% are slightly larger than regular wave forces in most cases.

  13. Royal Danish Air Force. Air Operations Doctrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Søren

    This brief examines the development of the first Danish Air Force Air Operations Doctrine, which was officially commissioned in October 1997 and remained in effect until 2010. The development of a Danish air power doctrine was heavily influenced by the work of Colonel John Warden (USAF), both...... through his book ”The Air Campaign” and his subsequent planning of the air campaign against Iraq in 1990-1991. Warden’s ideas came to Denmark and the Danish Air Force by way of Danish Air Force students attending the United States Air Force Air University in Alabama, USA. Back in Denmark, graduates from...... the Air University inspired a small number of passionate airmen, who then wrote the Danish Air Operations Doctrine. The process was supported by the Air Force Tactical Command, which found that the work dovetailed perfectly with the transformation process that the Danish Air Force was in the midst of...

  14. Casimir force between integrable and chaotic pistons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have computed numerically the Casimir force between two identical pistons inside a very long cylinder, considering different shapes for the pistons. The pistons can be considered quantum billiards, whose spectrum determines the vacuum force. The smooth part of the spectrum fixes the force at short distances and depends only on geometric quantities like the area or perimeter of the piston. However, correcting terms to the force, coming from the oscillating part of the spectrum which is related to the classical dynamics of the billiard, could be qualitatively different for classically integrable or chaotic systems. We have performed a detailed numerical analysis of the corresponding Casimir force for pistons with regular and chaotic classical dynamics. For a family of stadium billiards, we have found that the correcting part of the Casimir force presents a sudden change in the transition from regular to chaotic geometries. This suggests that there could be signatures of quantum chaos in the Casimir effect.

  15. Casimir-Polder forces on moving atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polarizable atoms and molecules experience the Casimir-Polder force near magnetoelectric bodies, a force that is induced by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field and the matter. Atoms and molecules in relative motion to a magnetoelectric surface experience an additional velocity-dependent force. We present a full quantum-mechanical treatment of this force and identify a generalized Doppler effect, the time delay between photon emission and reabsorption, and the Roentgen interaction as its three sources. For ground-state atoms, the force is very small and always decelerating, hence commonly known as quantum friction. For atoms and molecules in electronically excited states, on the contrary, both decelerating and accelerating forces can occur depending on the magnitude of the atomic transition frequency relative to the surface-plasmon frequency.

  16. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, Piotr [Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92120 (United States); Dupradeau, Francois-Yves [UMR CNRS 6219-Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 1 rue des Louvels, F-80037 Amiens (France); Duan, Yong [Genome Center and Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang Junmei, E-mail: pcieplak@burnham.or [Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 6001 Forest Park Boulevard, ND9.136, Dallas, TX 75390-9050 (United States)

    2009-08-19

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component-polarization energy-and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. (topical review)

  17. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Duan, Yong; Wang, Junmei

    2009-08-19

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component-polarization energy-and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. PMID:21828594

  18. Study of adhesive forces on a silicon nanotip by atomic force microscope in contact mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agache, Vincent; Legrand, Bernard; Collard, Dominique; Buchaillot, Lionel

    2002-04-01

    Atomic Force Microscope operating in contact mode is used in this paper for probing the spatial distribution of adhesive forces versus the topography of a silicon nanotip. This nanotip consists in an ultra sha4rp silicon tip with radius less than 15 nm fabricated using a combination of high- resolution electron beam lithography and plasma dry etching. The amplitude of the forces is determined from force versus distance curve measurements. Hence, by determining the contact point and the pull-off force from the force curves, the surface topography and the adhesive forces are simultaneously obtained at various locations on the surface. This paper reports both measurements and the modeling of adhesive forces versus the contact point on the nanotip. As the nanotip is sharper and has got a smaller aperture angle than the employed Atomic Force Microscope tip, the measurements are focused on the nanotip apex.

  19. Adhesive forces investigation on a silicon tip by contact-mode atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agache, Vincent; Legrand, Bernard; Collard, Dominique; Buchaillot, Lionel

    2002-09-01

    An atomic force microscope operating in contact mode is used in this letter for probing the adhesive forces at the apex of a silicon nanotip with typical radius smaller than 15 nm, fabricated using a combination of high-resolution electron beam lithography and plasma dry etching. The amplitude of the forces is deduced from force versus distance curve measurements. By determining the contact point and the pull-off force from the force curves, the surface topography and the adhesive forces are simultaneously obtained at various locations on the surface. This letter reports both measurements and modeling of adhesive forces versus the contact point on the nanotip. As the nanotip is sharper and has a smaller aperture angle than the employed atomic force microscope tip, the measurements are focused on the nanotip apex.

  20. Minimizing tip–sample forces in jumping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control and minimization of tip–sample interaction forces are imperative tasks to maximize the performance of atomic force microscopy. In particular, when imaging soft biological matter in liquids, the cantilever dragging force prevents identification of the tip–sample mechanical contact, resulting in deleterious interaction with the specimen. In this work we present an improved jumping mode procedure that allows detecting the tip–sample contact with high accuracy, thus minimizing the scanning forces (∼100 pN) during the approach cycles. To illustrate this method we report images of human adenovirus and T7 bacteriophage particles which are prone to uncontrolled modifications when using conventional jumping mode. -- Highlights: ► Improvement in atomic force microscopy in buffer solution. ► Peak force detection. ► Subtracting the cantilever dragging force. ► Forces in the 100 pN range. ► Imaging of delicate viruses with atomic force microscopy.

  1. Protein high-force pulling simulations yield low-force results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Lichter

    Full Text Available All-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations are used to pull with extremely large constant force (750-3000 pN on three small proteins. The introduction of a nondimensional timescale permits direct comparison of unfolding across all forces. A crossover force of approximately 1100 pN divides unfolding dynamics into two regimes. At higher forces, residues sequentially unfold from the pulling end while maintaining the remainder of the protein force-free. Measurements of hydrodynamic viscous stresses are made easy by the high speeds of unfolding. Using an exact low-Reynolds-number scaling, these measurements can be extrapolated to provide, for the first time, an estimate of the hydrodynamic force on low-force unfolding. Below 1100 pN, but surprisingly still at extremely large applied force, intermediate states and cooperative unfoldings as seen at much lower forces are observed. The force-insensitive persistence of these structures indicates that decomposition into unfolded fragments requires a large fluctuation. This finding suggests how proteins are constructed to resist transient high force. The progression of [Formula: see text] helix and [Formula: see text] sheet unfolding is also found to be insensitive to force. The force-insensitivity of key aspects of unfolding opens the possibility that numerical simulations can be accelerated by high applied force while still maintaining critical features of unfolding.

  2. Nonequilibrium Forces between Dragged Ultrasoft Colloids

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, S.P.; Winkler, R. G.; Gompper, G.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamical deformation of ultrasoft colloids as well as their dynamic frictional forces are numerically investigated, when one colloid is dragged past another at constant velocity. Hydrodynamic interactions are captured by a particle-based mesoscopic simulation method. At vanishing relative velocity, the equilibrium repulsive force-distance curve is obtained. At large drag velocities, in contrast, we find an apparent attractive force for departing colloids along the dragging direction. The...

  3. Cantilever based optical interfacial force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonander, Jeremy R.; Kim, Byung I.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a cantilever based optical interfacial force microscopy (COIFM) that employs a microactuated silicon cantilever and optical detection method to establish the measurement of the single molecular interactions using the force feedback technique. Through the direct measurement of the COIFM force-distance curves, we have demonstrated that the COIFM is capable of unveiling structural and mechanical information on interfacial water at the single molecular level over all distances between two hydrophilic surfaces.

  4. Static magnetic forces and torques in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic forces acting on the various metallic objects around the ATLAS detector, are the subject of the given paper. A system designer could use the information on global forces and torque acting on various components, obtained in this report, to optimize them. The results of force calculations could also serve as additional criteria for the replacement of the magnetic baseline material of various structures by nonmagnetic ones

  5. Forced displacement in Colombia: Magnitude and causes

    OpenAIRE

    Ana María Ibáñez

    2009-01-01

    The article describes the magnitude, geographical extent, and causes of forced populationdisplacements in Colombia. Forced migration in Colombia is a war strategy adopted by armed groups to strengthen territorial strongholds, weaken civilian support to the enemy, seize valuable lands, and produce and transport illegal drugs with ease. Forced displacement in Colombia today affects 3.5 million people. Equivalent to 7.8 percent of Colombia’s population, and second worldwide only to Sudan, this s...

  6. Force Feedback for Assembly of Aircraft Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Marie; Murray, Tom; Robertsson, Anders; Stolt, Andreas; Ossbahr, Gilbert; Nilsson, Klas

    2010-01-01

    Variability in composite manufacture and the limitations in positional accuracy of common industrial robots have hampered automation of assembly tasks within aircraft manufacturing. One way to handle geometry variations and robot compliancy is to use force control. Force control technology utilizes a sensor mounted on the robot to feedback force data to the controller system so instead of being position driven, i.e. programmed to achieve a certain position with the tool, the robot can be prog...

  7. The five competitive forces that shape strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    In 1979, a young associate professor at Harvard Business School published his first article for HBR, "How Competitive Forces Shape Strategy." In the years that followed, Michael Porter's explication of the five forces that determine the long-run profitability of any industry has shaped a generation of academic research and business practice. In this article, Porter undertakes a thorough reaffirmation and extension of his classic work of strategy formulation, which includes substantial new sections showing how to put the five forces analysis into practice. The five forces govern the profit structure of an industry by determining how the economic value it creates is apportioned. That value may be drained away through the rivalry among existing competitors, of course, but it can also be bargained away through the power of suppliers or the power of customers or be constrained by the threat of new entrants or the threat of substitutes. Strategy can be viewed as building defenses against the competitive forces or as finding a position in an industry where the forces are weaker. Changes in the strength of the forces signal changes in the competitive landscape critical to ongoing strategy formulation. In exploring the implications of the five forces framework, Porter explains why a fast-growing industry is not always a profitable one, how eliminating today's competitors through mergers and acquisitions can reduce an industry's profit potential, how government policies play a role by changing the relative strength of the forces, and how to use the forces to understand complements. He then shows how a company can influence the key forces in its industry to create a more favorable structure for itself or to expand the pie altogether. The five forces reveal why industry profitability is what it is. Only by understanding them can a company incorporate industry conditions into strategy. PMID:18271320

  8. Dynamic balancing with rotating radial electromagnetic force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勇; 陆永平

    2004-01-01

    A method of producing rotating radial electromagnetic force with a separable structure is proposed,and an experimental model was designed on which open loop vibration control experiments were carried out. Experimental results prove that the electromagnetic force designed has a constant magnitude and an uniform speed,and the idea of using an electromagnetic force as an active control in automatic balancing is correct in principle,and practicable in engineering.

  9. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    OpenAIRE

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure o...

  10. Sales-Force Incentives and Inventory Management

    OpenAIRE

    Fangruo Chen

    2000-01-01

    This article studies the problem of sales-force compensation by considering the impact of sales-force behavior on a firm's production and inventory system. The sales force's compensation package affects how the salespeople are going to exert their effort, which in turn determines the sales pattern for the firm's product and ultimately drives the performance of the firm's production and inventory system. In general, a smooth demand process facilitates production/inventory planning. Therefore, ...

  11. Thin film sensors for measuring small forces

    OpenAIRE

    F. Schmaljohann; Hagedorn, D.; LÖffler, F.

    2015-01-01

    Especially in the case of measuring small forces, the use of conventional foil strain gauges is limited. The measurement uncertainty rises by force shunts and is due to the polymer foils used, as they are susceptible to moisture. Strain gauges in thin film technology present a potential solution to overcome these effects because of their direct and atomic contact with the measuring body, omitting an adhesive layer and the polymer foil. For force measurements up to 1 N, a...

  12. Kolmogorov scaling from random force fields

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Mogens H.; Sneppen, Kim; Angheluta, Luiza

    2008-01-01

    We show that the classical Kolmogorov and Richardson scaling laws in fully developed turbulence are consistent with a random Gaussian force field. Numerical simulations of a shell model approximation to the Navier-Stokes equations suggest that the fluctuations in the force (acceleration) field are scale independent throughout the inertial regime. We conjecture that Lagrangian statistics of the relative velocity in a turbulent flow is determined by the typical force field, whereas the multisca...

  13. Oscillating behavior within the social force model

    CERN Document Server

    Chraibi, Mohcine

    2014-01-01

    The social force model belongs to a class of microscopic force-based pedestrian model for which the interaction with the neighbors solely depends on the distance spacings. Yet, distance based models can lead to unrealistic oscillating behaviors with collision and negative peed (especially in 1D scenarios. With appropriate approximations we analyze the behavior of a simplified force-based model and show that with "realistic" parameter values the system oscillates.

  14. Quantitative modeling of forces in electromagnetic tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Bijamov, Alex; Shubitidze, Fridon; Oliver, Piercen M.; Vezenov, Dmitri V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses numerical simulations of the magnetic field produced by an electromagnet for generation of forces on superparamagnetic microspheres used in manipulation of single molecules or cells. Single molecule force spectroscopy based on magnetic tweezers can be used in applications that require parallel readout of biopolymer stretching or biomolecular binding. The magnetic tweezers exert forces on the surface-immobilized macromolecule by pulling a magnetic bead attached to the free...

  15. Forced Marriage: Prevalence and Service Response

    OpenAIRE

    Kazmirski, Anne; Keogh, Peter; Kumari, Vijay; Maisie, Ruth; Gowland, Sally; Purdon, Susan; Khanum, Nazia

    2009-01-01

    Aim The study aimed to inform policy for new guidelines to support statutory responsibility for dealing with cases of forced marriage, to improve understanding of its prevalence and examine responses to cases. What is a forced marriage? A forced marriage is one conducted without the consent of both parties, and under duress. Findings How cases are reported Cases were usually reported direct by young people or by friends to schools, colleges, youth agencies and volunt...

  16. Surface Screening in the Casimir Force

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras-Reyes, Ana M.; Mochán, W. Luis

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the corrections to the Casimir force between two metals due to the spatial dispersion of their response functions. We employ model-independent expressions for the force in terms of the optical coefficients. We express the non-local corrections to the Fresnel coefficients employing the surface $d_\\perp$ parameter, which accounts for the distribution of the surface screening charge. Within a self-consistent jellium calculation, spatial dispersion increases the Casimir force signifi...

  17. Surface impedance and the Casimir force

    OpenAIRE

    Bezerra, V.B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Romero, C.

    2001-01-01

    The impedance boundary condition is used to calculate the Casimir force in configurations of two parallel plates and a shpere (spherical lens) above a plate at both zero and nonzero temperature. The impedance approach allows one to find the Casimir force between the realistic test bodies regardless of the electromagnetic fluctuations inside the media. Although this approach is an approximate one, it has wider areas of application than the Lifshitz theory of the Casimir force. The general form...

  18. Demonstration of the Lateral Casimir Force

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, F; Mohideen, U.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2002-01-01

    The lateral Casimir force between a sinusoidally corrugated gold coated plate and large sphere was measured for surface separations between 0.2 $\\mu$m to 0.3 $\\mu$m using an atomic force microscope. The measured force shows the required periodicity corresponding to the corrugations. It also exhibits the necessary inverse fourth power distance dependence. The obtained results are shown to be in good agreement with a complete theory taking into account the imperfectness of the boundary metal. T...

  19. Sample dependence of the Casimir force

    OpenAIRE

    Pirozhenko, I.; Lambrecht, A.; Svetovoy, V.B.

    2006-01-01

    We have analysed available optical data for Au in the mid-infrared range which is important for a precise prediction of the Casimir force. Significant variation of the data demonstrates genuine sample dependence of the dielectric function. We demonstrate that the Casimir force is largely determined by the material properties in the low frequency domain and argue that therefore the precise values of the Drude parameters are crucial for an accurate evaluation of the force. These parameters can ...

  20. The Casimir force between rough metallic plates

    OpenAIRE

    Genet, Cyriaque; Lambrecht, Astrid; Neto, Paulo Maia; Reynaud, Serge

    2003-01-01

    The Casimir force between two metallic plates is affected by their roughness state. This effect is usually calculated through the so-called `proximity force approximation' which is only valid for small enough wavevectors in the spectrum of the roughness profile. We introduce here a more general description with a wavevector-dependent roughness sensitivity of the Casimir effect. Since the proximity force approximation underestimates the effect, a measurement of the roughness spectrum is needed...

  1. The Scattering Approach to the Casimir Force

    OpenAIRE

    Reynaud, S.; Canaguier-Durand, A.; Messina, R; Lambrecht, A.; Neto, P A Maia

    2010-01-01

    We present the scattering approach which is nowadays the best tool for describing the Casimir force in realistic experimental configurations. After reminders on the simple geometries of 1d space and specular scatterers in 3d space, we discuss the case of stationary arbitrarily shaped mirrors in electromagnetic vacuum. We then review specific calculations based on the scattering approach, dealing for example with the forces or torques between nanostructured surfaces and with the force between ...

  2. Sample dependence of the Casimir force

    OpenAIRE

    Svetovoy, V.B.

    2004-01-01

    Difference between bulk material and deposited film is shown to have an appreciable influence on the Casimir force. Analysis of the optical data on gold films unambiguously demonstrates the sample dependence: the dielectric functions of the films deposited in different conditions are different on the level that cannot be ignored in high precision prediction of the force. It is argued that the precise values of the Drude parameters are crucial for accurate evaluation of the force. The dielectr...

  3. Quantitative non contact dynamic Casimir force measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Jourdan, Guillaume; Lambrecht, Astrid; Comin, Fabio; Chevrier, Joël

    2009-01-01

    We show that the Casimir force gradient can be quantitatively measured with no contact involved. Results of the Casimir force measurement with systematic uncertainty of 3% are presented for the distance range of 100-600 nm. The statistical uncertainty is shown to be due to the thermal fluctuations of the force probe. The corresponding signal to noise ratio equals unity at the distance of 600 nm. Direct contact between surfaces used in most previous studies to determine absolute distance separ...

  4. Reduction of the Casimir force using aerogels

    OpenAIRE

    Esquivel-Sirvent, R.

    2007-01-01

    By using silicon oxide based aerogels we show numerically that the Casimir force can be reduced several orders of magnitude, making its effect negligible in nanodevices. This decrease in the Casimir force is also present even when the aerogels are deposited on metallic substrates. To calculate the Casimir force we model the dielectric function of silicon oxide aerogels using an effective medium dielectric function such as the Clausius-Mossotti approximation. The results show that both the por...

  5. The Casimir force at high temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Buenzli, P. R.; Martin, Ph. A.

    2005-01-01

    The standard expression of the high-temperature Casimir force between perfect conductors is obtained by imposing macroscopic boundary conditions on the electromagnetic field at metallic interfaces. This force is twice larger than that computed in microscopic classical models allowing for charge fluctuations inside the conductors. We present a direct computation of the force between two quantum plasma slabs in the framework of non relativistic quantum electrodynamics including quantum and ther...

  6. From Territorial Defence to Expeditionary Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyemann, Dorthe; Staun, Jørgen Meedom

    2016-01-01

    After the Cold War the Danish Armed Forces moved away from its traditional role of territorial defense of Danish soil and towards a role as a globally deployable expeditionary force, imbedded with UK and/or US forces. This shift in national strategy amplified the requirements of the young officers......’ ability to think and act strategically in international missions. This article discusses to what extent this has been reflected in the education of the young officers....

  7. Nuclear forces from EFT: Recent developments

    OpenAIRE

    Meißner U.-G.; Epelbaum E.; Krebs H.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear forces are considered based on chiral perturbation theory with and without explicit ∆-isobar degrees of freedom. We discuss the subleading corrections to chiral three-nucleon forces in the ∆-less formalism which contain no additional free parameters. In the formalism with explicit ∆-isobar we present the complete next-to-next-to-leading order analysis of isospin-conserving and next-to-leading order analysis of isospinviolating nuclear forces. The perturbative expansion of nucle...

  8. Force distribution in a semiflexible loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, James T.; Kim, Harold D.

    2016-04-01

    Loops undergoing thermal fluctuations are prevalent in nature. Ringlike or cross-linked polymers, cyclic macromolecules, and protein-mediated DNA loops all belong to this category. Stability of these molecules are generally described in terms of free energy, an average quantity, but it may also be impacted by local fluctuating forces acting within these systems. The full distribution of these forces can thus give us insights into mechanochemistry beyond the predictive capability of thermodynamics. In this paper, we study the force exerted by an inextensible semiflexible polymer constrained in a looped state. By using a simulation method termed "phase-space sampling," we generate the equilibrium distribution of chain conformations in both position and momentum space. We compute the constraint forces between the two ends of the loop in this chain ensemble using Lagrangian mechanics, and show that the mean of these forces is equal to the thermodynamic force. By analyzing kinetic and potential contributions to the forces, we find that the mean force acts in the direction of increasing extension not because of bending stress, but in spite of it. Furthermore, we obtain a distribution of constraint forces as a function of chain length, extension, and stiffness. Notably, increasing contour length decreases the average force, but the additional freedom allows fluctuations in the constraint force to increase. The force distribution is asymmetric and falls off less sharply than a Gaussian distribution. Our work exemplifies a system where large-amplitude fluctuations occur in a way unforeseen by a purely thermodynamic framework, and offers computational tools useful for efficient, unbiased simulation of a constrained system.

  9. Casimir forces beyond the proximity approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Bimonte, G; Jaffe, R L; Kardar, M

    2011-01-01

    The proximity force approximation (PFA) relates the interaction between closely spaced, smoothly curved objects to the force between parallel plates. Precision experiments on Casimir forces necessitate, and spur research on, corrections to the PFA. We use a derivative expansion for gently curved surfaces to derive the leading curvature modifications to the PFA. Our methods apply to any homogeneous and isotropic materials; here we present results for Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions and for perfect conductors. A Pad\\'e extrapolation constrained by a multipole expansion at large distance and our improved expansion at short distances, provides an accurate expression for the sphere-plate Casimir force at all separations.

  10. Dynamic force patterns of an undulatory microswimmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Rafael D.; Backholm, Matilda; Ryu, William S.; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2014-05-01

    We probe the viscous forces involved in the undulatory swimming of the model organism C. elegans. Using micropipette deflection, we attain direct measurements of lateral and propulsive forces produced in response to the motion of the worm. We observe excellent agreement of the results with resistive force theory, through which we determine the drag coefficients of this organism. The drag coefficients are in accordance with theoretical predictions. Using a simple scaling argument, we obtain a relationship between the size of the worm and the forces that we measure, which well describes our data.

  11. Transition States from Empirical Force Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2003-01-01

    This is an overview of the use of empirical force fields in the study of reaction mechanisms. EVB-type methods (including RFF and MCMM) produce full reaction surfaces by mixing, in the simplest case, known force fields describing reactants and products. The SEAM method instead locates approximate...... transition structures by energy minimization along the intersection of the component force fields. The TSFF approach (including Q2MM) designs a new force field mimicking the transition structure as an energy minimum. The scope and applicability of the various methods are compared....

  12. Current-induced forces: a simple derivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Todorov, Tchavdar N.; Dundas, Daniel; Lü, Jing-Tao;

    2014-01-01

    aims at combining methodology with an emphasis on the underlying physics through examples. We discuss and compare two forces present only under current-the non-conservative electron wind force and a Lorentz-like velocity-dependent force. It is shown that in metallic nanowires both display significant...... features at the wire surface, making it a candidate for the nucleation of current-driven structural transformations and failure. Finally we discuss the problem of force noise and the limitations of Ehrenfest dynamics....

  13. Forces predicted at the ankle during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, R G

    1982-01-01

    A biomechanical model of the ankle joint was developed and was used to predict the forces at the ankle during the stance phase of running. Measurements from five cadavers were averaged to obtain insertion points and directions of pull of equivalent tendons with respect to the assumed center of the ankle joint. A minimum joint force solution was obtained by assuming that only two equivalent muscle groups could exert force at one time. Three subjects ran at 4.47 m/s across a force platform that recorded the external forces and moments acting on the foot. Cinematography was used to measure the foot and leg positions during stance. Peak resultant joint forces ranging from 9.0 to 13.3 times body weight and peak Achilles tendon forces ranging from 5.3 to 10.0 times body weight were predicted. Small variations in some cases resulted in large differences in predicted forces. The highest tendon forces predicted exceeded those reported to cause damage to cadaver tendons in other studies. PMID:7132650

  14. Kolmogorov scaling from random force fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Mogens H; Angheluta, Luiza; 10.1209/0295-5075/84/10011

    2009-01-01

    We show that the classical Kolmogorov and Richardson scaling laws in fully developed turbulence are consistent with a random Gaussian force field. Numerical simulations of a shell model approximation to the Navier-Stokes equations suggest that the fluctuations in the force (acceleration) field are scale independent throughout the inertial regime. We conjecture that Lagrangian statistics of the relative velocity in a turbulent flow is determined by the typical force field, whereas the multiscaling is associated to extreme events in the force field fluctuations.

  15. Critical Casimir force between inhomogeneous boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubail, Jerome; Santachiara, Raoul; Emig, Thorsten

    2015-12-01

    To study the critical Casimir force between chemically structured boundaries immersed in a binary mixture at its demixing transition, we consider a strip of Ising spins subject to alternating fixed spin boundary conditions. The system exhibits a boundary phase transition as function of the relative amount of up and down boundary spins. This transition is associated with a sign change of the asymptotic force and a diverging length that sets the scale for the crossover between different universal force amplitudes. Using conformal field theory and a mapping to Majorana fermions, we obtain the universal scaling function of this crossover, and the force at short distances.

  16. Three-body critical Casimir forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, T. G.; Harnau, L.; Dietrich, S.

    2015-04-01

    Within mean-field theory we calculate universal scaling functions associated with critical Casimir forces for a system consisting of three parallel cylindrical colloids immersed in a near-critical binary liquid mixture. For several geometrical arrangements and boundary conditions at the surfaces of the colloids we study the force between two colloidal particles in the direction normal to their axes, analyzing the influence of the presence of a third particle on that force. Upon changing temperature or the relative positions of the particles we observe interesting features such as a change of sign of this force caused by the presence of the third particle. We determine the three-body component of the forces acting on one of the colloids by subtracting the pairwise forces from the total force. The three-body contribution to the total critical Casimir force turns out to be more pronounced for small surface-to-surface distances between the colloids as well as for temperatures close to criticality. Moreover, we compare our results with similar ones for other physical systems such as three atoms interacting via van der Waals forces.

  17. Tailoring the thermal Casimir force with graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Svetovoy, V.; Moktadir, Z.; Elwenspoek, M; Mizuta, H.

    2011-01-01

    – The Casimir interaction is omnipresent source of forces at small separations between bodies, which is difficult to change by varying external conditions. Here we show that graphene interacting with a metal can have the best known force contrast to the temperature and the Fermi level variations. In the distance range 50–300nm the force is measurable and can vary a few times for graphene with a bandgap much larger than the temperature. In this distance range the main part of the force is due ...

  18. System analysis of force feedback microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Mario S. [CFMC/Dep. de Física, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Costa, Luca [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Université Joseph Fourier BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Chevrier, Joël [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Université Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Comin, Fabio [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-02-07

    It was shown recently that the Force Feedback Microscope (FFM) can avoid the jump-to-contact in Atomic force Microscopy even when the cantilevers used are very soft, thus increasing force resolution. In this letter, we explore theoretical aspects of the associated real time control of the tip position. We take into account lever parameters such as the lever characteristics in its environment, spring constant, mass, dissipation coefficient, and the operating conditions such as controller gains and interaction force. We show how the controller parameters are determined so that the FFM functions at its best and estimate the bandwidth of the system under these conditions.

  19. System analysis of force feedback microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Mario S.; Costa, Luca; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2014-02-01

    It was shown recently that the Force Feedback Microscope (FFM) can avoid the jump-to-contact in Atomic force Microscopy even when the cantilevers used are very soft, thus increasing force resolution. In this letter, we explore theoretical aspects of the associated real time control of the tip position. We take into account lever parameters such as the lever characteristics in its environment, spring constant, mass, dissipation coefficient, and the operating conditions such as controller gains and interaction force. We show how the controller parameters are determined so that the FFM functions at its best and estimate the bandwidth of the system under these conditions.

  20. Super-Resolved Traction Force Microscopy (STFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin-York, Huw; Shrestha, Dilip; Felce, James H; Waithe, Dominic; Moeendarbary, Emad; Davis, Simon J; Eggeling, Christian; Fritzsche, Marco

    2016-04-13

    Measuring small forces is a major challenge in cell biology. Here we improve the spatial resolution and accuracy of force reconstruction of the well-established technique of traction force microscopy (TFM) using STED microscopy. The increased spatial resolution of STED-TFM (STFM) allows a greater than 5-fold higher sampling of the forces generated by the cell than conventional TFM, accessing the nano instead of the micron scale. This improvement is highlighted by computer simulations and an activating RBL cell model system. PMID:26923775

  1. Inhomogeneous radiative forcing of homogeneous greenhouse gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Tan, Xiaoxiao; Xia, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Radiative forcing of a homogeneous greenhouse gas (HGG) can be very inhomogeneous because the forcing is dependent on other atmospheric and surface variables. In the case of doubling CO2, the monthly mean instantaneous forcing at the top of the atmosphere is found to vary geographically and temporally from positive to negative values, with the range (-2.5-5.1 W m-2) being more than 3 times the magnitude of the global mean value (2.3 W m-2). The vertical temperature change across the atmospheric column (temperature lapse rate) is found to be the best single predictor for explaining forcing variation. In addition, the masking effects of clouds and water vapor also contribute to forcing inhomogeneity. A regression model that predicts forcing from geophysical variables is constructed. This model can explain more than 90% of the variance of the forcing. Applying this model to analyzing the forcing variation in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models, we find that intermodel discrepancy in CO2 forcing caused by model climatology leads to considerable discrepancy in their projected change in poleward energy transport.

  2. Casimir Forces between Nanoparticles and Substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Román-Velázquez, C E; Villarreal, C; Esquivel-Sirvent, R; Noguez, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    We study the Casimir force between a nanoparticle and a substrate. We consider the interaction of metal nanoparticles with different substrates within the dipolar approximation. We study the force as a function of the distance for gold and potassium spheres, which are over a substrate of titanium dioxide, sapphire and a perfect conductor. We show that Casimir force is important in systems at the nanometer scale. We study the force as a function of the material properties, radii of the spheres, and the distance between the sphere and the substrate.

  3. Undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluskin, Efim; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Xu, Joseph Z.

    2016-05-31

    A method and apparatus for implementing dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for undulators are provided. An undulator includes a respective set of magnet arrays, each attached to a strongback, and placed on horizontal slides and positioned parallel relative to each other with a predetermined gap. Magnetic forces are compensated by a set of compensation springs placed along the strongback. The compensation springs are conical springs having exponential-force characteristics that substantially match undulator magnetic forces independently of the predetermined gap. The conical springs are positioned along the length of the magnets.

  4. Transfer of Rural Surplus Labor Force in Liaocheng City, China

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yong-Jin; Zhang, Er-xun; Liu, Jia-zhen; Pan, Rui-zheng; Zhou, Chang-hui; Kou, Wen-juan

    2009-01-01

    Based on the introduction of research theories about rural labor force transfer at home and abroad, taking Liaocheng City as the representative of medium and small cities, transfer situation of rural labor force in Liaocheng City is discussed from several aspects, including the transfer of total labor force, structure of labor force, flow of regional labor force, industry selection of labor force, and income of labor force. Combining with the situation of labor force transfer in Liaocheng Cit...

  5. 14 CFR 1203b.106 - Use of deadly force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of deadly force. 1203b.106 Section... AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.106 Use of deadly force. Deadly force shall be used only in those circumstances where the security force officer reasonably believes...

  6. Magnus Force and Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Superfluids

    OpenAIRE

    Sonin, E. B.

    2001-01-01

    The paper addresses the problem of the transverse force (Magnus force) on a vortex in a Galilean invariant quantum Bose liquid. Interaction of quasiparticles (phonons) with a vortex produces an additional transverse force (Iordanskii force). The Iordanskii force is related to the acoustic Aharonov--Bohm effect.Connection of the effective Magnus force with the Berry phase is also discussed.

  7. Hyper-resistive forced magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vekstein, G., E-mail: g.vekstein@manchester.ac.uk [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    We study Taylor's model of forced magnetic reconnection mediated by plasma hyper-resistivity. This includes both linear and nonlinear regimes of the process. It is shown how the onset of plasmoid instability occurs in the strongly nonlinear regime of forced reconnection.

  8. Complex Light and Optical Forces X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This year marked the 10th Anniversary Edition of the conference on Complex Light and Optical Forces that is part of Photonics West. We again had a record number of submissions, indicative of the rising visibility and stature of this conference. Indeed, Complex Light and Optical Forces is still the...

  9. 78 FR 30731 - Armed Forces Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-12402 Filed 5-21-13; 11:15 am] Billing code..., liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And on Armed Forces Day, we honor those who serve bravely and... the United States at their homes on Armed Forces Day, and I urge citizens to learn more about...

  10. ANALYSIS OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BRUHWILER, D.L.; SIDORIN, A.O.

    2006-05-29

    A comprehensive examination of theoretical models for the friction force, in use by the electron cooling community, was performed. Here, they present their insights about the models gained as a result of comparison between the friction force formulas and direct numerical simulations, as well as studies of the cooling process as a whole.

  11. Atomic force microscopy in cell biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Zhexue; ZHANG Zhiling; PANG Daiwen

    2005-01-01

    The history, characteristic, operation modes and coupling techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM) are introduced. Then the application in cell biology is reviewed in four aspects: cell immobilization methods, cell imaging, force spectrum study and cell manipulation. And the prospect of AFM application in cell biology is discussed.

  12. Comparative investigations of tablet crushing force testers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnergaard, Jørn; Jensen, C.G.; Poulsen, L.;

    2005-01-01

    The performance of 16 tablet breaking force testers was evaluated in terms of accuracy, reproducibility and repeatability. Three tablet formulations with different plastic or brittle deformation mechanisms and with target breaking forces of 50, 100 and 150 N were tested. Statistically significant...

  13. Relativistic generalization of the Newtonian force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whereas there is no denying the essential contribution of geometrodynamics, it must be admitted that our physical intuition is still firmly based in the Newtonian concept of force. Here we extend some earlier work re-introducing the Newtonian force concept into relativity theory. Some fundamentally new insights into the relativistic effects due to charge and rotation are presented. (author)

  14. Adhesion force studies of nanofibers and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Malcolm; Zhong, Wen; Xu, Xiuling; Thomson, Douglas

    2010-07-20

    Surface adhesion between nanofibers and nanoparticles has attracted attention for potential biomedical applications, but the measurement has not been reported. Adhesion forces were measured using a polystyrene (PS) nanoparticle attached to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip/probe. Electrospun PS nanofibers of different diameters were tapped with the probe to study the effect of fiber diameters on adhesion force. Both AFM experiments and numerical models suggest that the adhesion force increases with increased fiber diameters. Numerical models further demonstrated that local deformation of the fiber surface, including the flattening of surface asperities and the nanofiber wrapping around the particle during contact, may have a significant impact on the adhesion force. The adhesion forces are in the order of 100 nN, much smaller than the adhesion forces of the gecko foot hair, but much larger than that of the receptor-ligand pair, antibody-antigen pair, and single-stranded DNA from a substrate. Adhesion forces of nanofibers with roughness were predicted by numerical analysis. This study is expected to provide approaches and information useful in the design of nanomedicine and scaffold based on nanofibers for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20552953

  15. MR compatible strain gauge based force transducer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duinen, Hiske; Post, Marijn; Vaartjes, Koen; Hoogduin, Hans; Zijdewind, Inge

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate brain activation during motor tasks accurately one must also measure output parameters such as muscle force or muscle activity. Especially in clinical situations where the force output can be compromised by changes at different levels of the motor system, it is essential to stan

  16. Homosexuality in the Dutch Armed Forces 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anna Adolfsen; Saskia Keuzenkamp; m.m.v. Linda Mans

    2006-01-01

    Original title: Uniform uit de kast. This study looks at the attitudes of defence personnel to homosexuality. How do members of the military view homosexual colleagues? Can gays and lesbians working in the armed forces be open about their sexual preferences? Do they regard the armed forces as a gay

  17. Magnetic resonance force microscopy: recent results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Force detection of magnetic resonance has been demonstrated experimentally and used for imaging in EPR. This paper will review the basic principles of Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) and will report some recent results in NMR imaging and the operation of a low-temperature MRFM. (author). 31 refs., 14 figs

  18. Wave Forces on Offshore Windturbine Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    The present paper is a supplement to the report by Juul Larsen and Frigaard. It contains some additional quality control to the force measurements performed by Juul Larsen and Frigaard.......The present paper is a supplement to the report by Juul Larsen and Frigaard. It contains some additional quality control to the force measurements performed by Juul Larsen and Frigaard....

  19. Ambulatory Measurement of Ground Reaction Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Peter H.; Liedtke, Christian; Droog, Ed

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of ground reaction forces is important in the biomechanical analysis of gait and other motor activities. It is the purpose of this study to show the feasibility of ambulatory measurement of ground reaction forces using two six degrees of freedom sensors mounted under the shoe. One se

  20. About Radiation Reaction with Force Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Velazquez, Gustavo Lopez

    2015-01-01

    The difficulty of usual approach to radiation reaction is pointed out , and a possible approach based on the force acting to the charged particle which produces the acceleration itself, is presented. This approach brings about an expression such that acceleration is zero whenever the external force is zero.

  1. Mathematical Model of Gravitational and Electrostatic Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Krouglov, A

    2006-01-01

    Author presents mathematical model for acting-on-a-distance attractive and repulsive forces based on propagation of energy waves that produces Newton expression for gravitational and Coulomb expression for electrostatic forces. Model uses mathematical observation that difference between two inverse exponential functions of the distance asymptotically converges to function proportional to reciprocal of distance squared.

  2. Repulsive Casimir Force in Chiral Metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, R.; Zhou, J.; Koschny, Th.; Economou, E.N.; Soukoulis, C.M.

    2009-09-04

    We demonstrate theoretically that one can obtain repulsive Casimir forces and stable nanolevitations by using chiral metamaterials. By extending the Lifshitz theory to treat chiral metamaterials, we find that a repulsive force and a minimum of the interaction energy possibly exist for strong chirality, under realistic frequency dependencies and correct limiting values (for zero and infinite frequencies) of the permittivity, permeability, and chiral coefficients.

  3. Repulsive Casimir Force in Chiral Metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, R.; Zhou, J.; Koschny, Th.; Economou, E. N.; Soukoulis, C. M.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that one can obtain repulsive Casimir forces and stable nanolevitations by using chiral metamaterials. By extending the Lifshitz theory to treat chiral metamaterials, we find that a repulsive force and a minimum of the interaction energy exist for strong chirality, under realistic frequency dependencies and correct limiting values (for zero and infinite frequencies) of the permittivity, permeability, and chiral coefficients.

  4. Casimir forces in systems near jamming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Justin; Liétor-Santos, Juan-José

    Casimir forces arise when long-ranged fluctuations are geometrically confined between two surfaces. In most cases these fluctuations are quantum or thermal in nature, such as those near a classical critical point, yet this is not a requirement. The T = 0 jamming transition in frictionless, granular systems shares many properties with classical critical points, such as a diverging correlation length, although it has recently been identified as a unique example of a random first-order transition (RFOT). Here we show the existence of Casimir forces between two pinned particles immersed in systems near the frictionless jamming transition. We observe two components to the total force: a short-ranged, depletion force and a long-ranged, repulsive Casimir force. The Casimir force dominates when the pinned particles are much larger than the ambient jammed particles. In this case, we find that particles with the largest forces have the least number of contacts, and that these particles are clustered between the pinned particles, giving rise to a repulsive force which is independent of system preparation and inter-particle potential. We acknowledge support from NSF DMR-1455086.

  5. Nonequilibrium thermal Casimir-Polder forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the nonequilibrium Casimir-Polder force on an atom prepared in an incoherent superposition of internal energy eigenstates, which is placed in a magnetoelectric environment of nonuniform temperature. After solving the coupled atom-field dynamics within the framework of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics, we derive a general expression for the thermal Casimir-Polder force.

  6. Entropic force and its cosmological implications

    OpenAIRE

    Myung, Yun Soo

    2010-01-01

    We investigate a possibility of realizing the entropic force into the cosmology. A main issue is how the holographic screen is implemented in the Newtonian cosmology. Contrary to the relativistic realization of Friedmann equations, we do not clarify the connection between Newtonian cosmology and entropic force because there is no way of implementing the holographic screen in the Newtonian cosmology.

  7. Cantilevers orthodontics forces measured by fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Neblyssa; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Valmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    Fibers Bragg Gratings were used to evaluate the transmission of the forces generates by orthodontic mechanic based one and two cantilevers used to move molars to the upright position. The results showed levels forces of approximately 0,14N near to the root of the molar with one and two cantilevers.

  8. Protein folding in a force clamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek; Szymczak, P.

    2006-05-01

    Kinetics of folding of a protein held in a force clamp are compared to an unconstrained folding. The comparison is made within a simple topology-based dynamical model of ubiquitin. We demonstrate that the experimentally observed variations in the end-to-end distance reflect microscopic events during folding. However, the folding scenarios in and out of the force clamp are distinct.

  9. Static and dynamical Meissner force fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coupling between copper-based high temperature superconductors (HTS) and magnets is represented by a force field. Zero-field cooled experiments were performed with several forms of superconductors: (1) cold-pressed sintered cylindrical disks; (2) small particles fixed in epoxy polymers; and (3) small particles suspended in hydrocarbon waxes. Using magnets with axial field symmetries, direct spatial force measurements in the range of 0.1 to 10(exp 4) dynes were performed with an analytical balance and force constants were obtained from mechanical vibrational resonances. Force constants increase dramatically with decreasing spatial displacement. The force field displays a strong temperature dependence between 20 and 90 K and decreases exponentially with increasing distance of separation. Distinct slope changes suggest the presence of B-field and temperature-activated processes that define the forces. Hysteresis measurements indicated that the magnitude of force scales roughly with the volume fraction of HTS in composite structures. Thus, the net force resulting from the field interaction appears to arise from regions as small or smaller than the grain size and does not depend on contiguous electron transport over large areas. Results of these experiments are discussed

  10. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  11. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Mechanical Forces during Protein Folding by using Molecular Force Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauch, Tim; Hoffmann, Marvin T; Dreuw, Andreas

    2016-05-18

    Detailed folding pathways of proteins are still largely unknown. Real-time monitoring of mechanical forces acting in proteins during structural transitions would provide deep insights into these highly complex processes. Here, we propose two molecular force probes that can be incorporated into the protein backbone to gain insight into the magnitude and direction of mechanical forces acting in proteins during natural folding and unfolding through their optical spectroscopic response. In fact, changes in the infrared and Raman spectra are proportional to the mechanical force deforming the force probes, and the relevant bands can be intensified and shifted to a transparent window in the protein spectrum by isotopic substitution. As a result, the proposed molecular force probes can act as "force rulers", allowing the spectroscopic observation and measurement of mechanical forces acting within the proteins under natural conditions without external perturbation. PMID:26928925

  12. Manipulating bubbles with secondary Bjerknes forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas bubbles in a sound field are submitted to a radiative force, known as the secondary Bjerknes force. We propose an original experimental setup that allows us to investigate in detail this force between two bubbles, as a function of the sonication frequency, as well as the bubbles radii and distance. We report the observation of both attractive and, more interestingly, repulsive Bjerknes force, when the two bubbles are driven in antiphase. Our experiments show the importance of taking multiple scatterings into account, which leads to a strong acoustic coupling of the bubbles when their radii are similar. Our setup demonstrates the accuracy of secondary Bjerknes forces for attracting or repealing a bubble, and could lead to new acoustic tools for noncontact manipulation in microfluidic devices

  13. Controlling police (excessive force: The American case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakir Gül

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the issue of police abuse of power, particularly police use of excessive force. Since the misuse of force by police is considered a problem, some entity must discover a way to control and prevent the illegal use of coercive power. Unlike most of the previous studies on the use of excessive force, this study uses a path analysis. However, not all the findings are consistent with the prior studies and hypotheses. In general, findings indicate that training may be a useful tool in terms of decreasing the use of excessive force, thereby reducing civilians’ injuries and citizens’ complaints. The results show that ethics training in the academy is significantly related to the use of excessive force. Further, it was found that community-oriented policing training in the academy was associated with the citizens’ complaints. A national (secondary data, collected from the law enforcement agencies in the United States are used to explore the research questions.

  14. Surface plasmon polariton assisted optical pulling force

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, M I; Bogdanov, A A; Shalin, A S; Dogariu, A

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate both analytically and numerically the existence of optical pulling forces acting on particles located near plasmonic interfaces. Two main factors contribute to the appearance of this negative reaction force. The interference between the incident and reflected waves induces a rotating dipole with an asymmetric scattering pattern while the directional excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) enhances the linear momentum of scattered light. The strongly asymmetric SPP excitation is determined by spin-orbit coupling of the rotating dipole and surface plasmon polariton. As a result of the total momentum conservation, the force acting on the particle points in a direction opposite to the incident wave propagation. We derive analytical expressions for the force acting on a dipolar particles placed in the proximity of plasmonic surfaces. Analytical expressions for this pulling force are derived within the dipole approximation and are in excellent agreement with results of electromagnetic numerica...

  15. Intrinsic Charges and the Strong Forc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert B.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available According to a revised quantum electrodynamic theory, there are models of leptons such as the electron which possess both a net integrated electric charge and a much larger intrinsic charge of both polarities. From estimates based on such models, the corresponding Coulomb force due to the intrinsic charges then becomes two orders of magnitude larger than that due to the conventional net charge. This intrinsic charge force can also have the features of a short-range interaction. If these results would generally hold true, the intrinsic charge force could either interact with a strong force of different origin and character, or could possibly become identical with the strong force.

  16. Manipulating bubbles with secondary Bjerknes forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanoy, Maxime [Institut Langevin, ESPCI ParisTech, CNRS (UMR 7587), PSL Research University, 1 rue Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes, Université Paris-Diderot, CNRS (UMR 7057), 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75013 Paris (France); Derec, Caroline; Leroy, Valentin [Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes, Université Paris-Diderot, CNRS (UMR 7057), 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75013 Paris (France); Tourin, Arnaud [Institut Langevin, ESPCI ParisTech, CNRS (UMR 7587), PSL Research University, 1 rue Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

    2015-11-23

    Gas bubbles in a sound field are submitted to a radiative force, known as the secondary Bjerknes force. We propose an original experimental setup that allows us to investigate in detail this force between two bubbles, as a function of the sonication frequency, as well as the bubbles radii and distance. We report the observation of both attractive and, more interestingly, repulsive Bjerknes force, when the two bubbles are driven in antiphase. Our experiments show the importance of taking multiple scatterings into account, which leads to a strong acoustic coupling of the bubbles when their radii are similar. Our setup demonstrates the accuracy of secondary Bjerknes forces for attracting or repealing a bubble, and could lead to new acoustic tools for noncontact manipulation in microfluidic devices.

  17. Tendon Force Transmission at the Nanoscale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, René

    2013-01-01

    difficult to tackle. The tendon hierarchy ranges from molecules (2 nm) over fibrils (200 nm), fibers (2 μm) and fascicles (200 μm) to tendons (10 mm), and to derive the mechanisms of force transmission it is necessary to know the mechanical behavior at each hierarchical level. The aim of the present work...... was to elucidate the mechanisms of force transmission in tendons primarily by investigating the mechanical behavior at the hierarchical level of collagen fibrils. To do so we have developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM) method for tensile testing of native collagen fibrils. The thesis contains five...... connective tissue function that are poorly understood. One such aspect is the microscopic mechanisms of force transmission through tendons over macroscopic distances. Force transmission is at the heart of tendon function, but the large range of scales in the hierarchical structure of tendons has made it...

  18. Overview of the Force Scientific Parallel Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Alaghband

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The Force parallel programming language designed for large-scale shared-memory multiprocessors is presented. The language provides a number of parallel constructs as extensions to the ordinary Fortran language and is implemented as a two-level macro preprocessor to support portability across shared memory multiprocessors. The global parallelism model on which the Force is based provides a powerful parallel language. The parallel constructs, generic synchronization, and freedom from process management supported by the Force has resulted in structured parallel programs that are ported to the many multiprocessors on which the Force is implemented. Two new parallel constructs for looping and functional decomposition are discussed. Several programming examples to illustrate some parallel programming approaches using the Force are also presented.

  19. Study of surface forces dependence on pH by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavoille, J; Takadoum, J

    2002-06-01

    We used an atomic force microscope to investigate silicon nitride tip interactions with various materials (copper, nickel, silicon carbide) as a function of pH. The electrolyte used was 10(-3) M NaCl and the interactions observed through force versus distance curves (attraction or repulsion) depended on the pH value. Interaction forces calculation was derived from force versus distance curve data and the results are discussed in terms of electrostatic interactions using Zeta potential theory. PMID:16290640

  20. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of electrostatic interactions between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential (SP) of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtere...

  1. Force control is related to low-frequency oscillations in force and surface EMG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwasil Moon

    Full Text Available Force variability during constant force tasks is directly related to oscillations below 0.5 Hz in force. However, it is unknown whether such oscillations exist in muscle activity. The purpose of this paper, therefore, was to determine whether oscillations below 0.5 Hz in force are evident in the activation of muscle. Fourteen young adults (21.07 ± 2.76 years, 7 women performed constant isometric force tasks at 5% and 30% MVC by abducting the left index finger. We recorded the force output from the index finger and surface EMG from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI muscle and quantified the following outcomes: 1 variability of force using the SD of force; 2 power spectrum of force below 2 Hz; 3 EMG bursts; 4 power spectrum of EMG bursts below 2 Hz; and 5 power spectrum of the interference EMG from 10-300 Hz. The SD of force increased significantly from 5 to 30% MVC and this increase was significantly related to the increase in force oscillations below 0.5 Hz (R(2 = 0.82. For both force levels, the power spectrum for force and EMG burst was similar and contained most of the power from 0-0.5 Hz. Force and EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz were highly coherent (coherence = 0.68. The increase in force oscillations below 0.5 Hz from 5 to 30% MVC was related to an increase in EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz (R(2 = 0.51. Finally, there was a strong association between the increase in EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz and the interference EMG from 35-60 Hz (R(2 = 0.95. In conclusion, this finding demonstrates that bursting of the EMG signal contains low-frequency oscillations below 0.5 Hz, which are associated with oscillations in force below 0.5 Hz.

  2. Precision measurements of the Casimir force using an atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Casimir force results from the alteration by boundaries of the zero point electromagnetic energy. We have used the atomic force microscope to make precision measurements of the Casimir force between a large gold coated sphere and a flat plate. The complete dielectric spectrum of the metal is used in the comparison of theory to the experiment. The average statistical precision is around 1% of the forces measured at the closest separation

  3. Sparse regularization for force identification using dictionaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Baijie; Zhang, Xingwu; Wang, Chenxi; Zhang, Hang; Chen, Xuefeng

    2016-04-01

    The classical function expansion method based on minimizing l2-norm of the response residual employs various basis functions to represent the unknown force. Its difficulty lies in determining the optimum number of basis functions. Considering the sparsity of force in the time domain or in other basis space, we develop a general sparse regularization method based on minimizing l1-norm of the coefficient vector of basis functions. The number of basis functions is adaptively determined by minimizing the number of nonzero components in the coefficient vector during the sparse regularization process. First, according to the profile of the unknown force, the dictionary composed of basis functions is determined. Second, a sparsity convex optimization model for force identification is constructed. Third, given the transfer function and the operational response, Sparse reconstruction by separable approximation (SpaRSA) is developed to solve the sparse regularization problem of force identification. Finally, experiments including identification of impact and harmonic forces are conducted on a cantilever thin plate structure to illustrate the effectiveness and applicability of SpaRSA. Besides the Dirac dictionary, other three sparse dictionaries including Db6 wavelets, Sym4 wavelets and cubic B-spline functions can also accurately identify both the single and double impact forces from highly noisy responses in a sparse representation frame. The discrete cosine functions can also successfully reconstruct the harmonic forces including the sinusoidal, square and triangular forces. Conversely, the traditional Tikhonov regularization method with the L-curve criterion fails to identify both the impact and harmonic forces in these cases.

  4. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Goodman, Miriam B. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  5. Negative Knudsen force on heated microbeams

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Taishan

    2011-11-18

    Knudsen force acting on a heated microbeam adjacent to a cold substrate in a rarefied gas is a mechanical force created by unbalanced thermal gradients. The measured force has its direction pointing towards the side with a lower thermal gradient and its magnitude vanishes in both continuum and free-molecule limits. In our previous study, negative Knudsen forces were discovered at the high Knudsen regime before diminishing in the free-molecule limit. Such a phenomenon was, however, neither observed in experiment [A. Passian et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 124503 (2003)], nor captured in the latest numerical study [J. Nabeth et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 066306 (2011)]. In this paper, the existence of such a negative Knudsen force is further confirmed using both numerical simulation and theoretical analysis. The asymptotic order of the Knudsen force near the collisionless limit is analyzed and the analytical expression of its leading term is provided, from which approaches for the enhancement of negative Knudsen forces are proposed. The discovered phenomenon could find its applications in novel mechanisms for pressure sensing and actuation.

  6. Radiative Forcing Over Ocean by Ship Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; Wilcox, E.; Poudyal, R.; Wang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in surface albedo represent one of the main forcing agents that can counteract, to some extent, the positive forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Here, we report on enhanced ocean reflectance from ship wakes over the Pacific Ocean near the California coast, where we determined, based on airborne radiation measurements that ship wakes can increase reflected sunlight by more than 100%. We assessed the importance of this increase to climate forcing, where we estimated the global radiative forcing of ship wakes to be -0.00014 plus or minus 53% Watts per square meter assuming a global distribution of 32331 ships of size of greater than or equal to 100000 gross tonnage. The forcing is smaller than the forcing of aircraft contrails (-0.007 to +0.02 Watts per square meter), but considering that the global shipping fleet has rapidly grown in the last five decades and this trend is likely to continue because of the need of more inter-continental transportation as a result of economic globalization, we argue that the radiative forcing of wakes is expected to be increasingly important especially in harbors and coastal regions.

  7. Observation of the thermal Casimir force

    CERN Document Server

    Sushkov, A O; Dalvit, D A R; Lamoreaux, S K

    2010-01-01

    Quantum theory predicts the existence of the Casimir force between macroscopic bodies, due to the zero-point energy of electromagnetic field modes around them. This quantum fluctuation-induced force has been experimentally observed for metallic and semiconducting bodies, although the measurements to date have been unable to clearly settle the question of the correct low-frequency form of the dielectric constant dispersion (the Drude model or the plasma model) to be used for calculating the Casimir forces. At finite temperature a thermal Casimir force, due to thermal, rather than quantum, fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, has been theoretically predicted long ago. Here we report the experimental observation of the thermal Casimir force between two gold plates. We measured the attractive force between a flat and a spherical plate for separations between 0.7 $\\mu$m and 7 $\\mu$m. An electrostatic force caused by potential patches on the plates' surfaces is included in the analysis. The experimental resul...

  8. Detecting chameleons through Casimir force measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The best laboratory constraints on strongly coupled chameleon fields come not from tests of gravity per se but from precision measurements of the Casimir force. The chameleonic force between two nearby bodies is more akin to a Casimir-like force than a gravitational one: The chameleon force behaves as an inverse power of the distance of separation between the surfaces of two bodies, just as the Casimir force does. Additionally, experimental tests of gravity often employ a thin metallic sheet to shield electrostatic forces; however, this sheet masks any detectable signal due to the presence of a strongly coupled chameleon field. As a result of this shielding, experiments that are designed to specifically test the behavior of gravity are often unable to place any constraint on chameleon fields with a strong coupling to matter. Casimir force measurements do not employ a physical electrostatic shield and as such are able to put tighter constraints on the properties of chameleons fields with a strong matter coupling than tests of gravity. Motivated by this, we perform a full investigation on the possibility of testing chameleon models with both present and future Casimir experiments. We find that present-day measurements are not able to detect the chameleon. However, future experiments have a strong possibility of detecting or rule out a whole class of chameleon models

  9. How weather impacts the forced climate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirtman, Ben P. [University of Miami, Division of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography, Rosenstiel School for Atmospheric and Marine Science, Miami, FL (United States); Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States); Schneider, Edwin K.; Straus, David M. [George Mason University, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Earth Sciences, Fairfax, VA (United States); Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States); Min, Dughong; Burgman, Robert [University of Miami, Division of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography, Rosenstiel School for Atmospheric and Marine Science, Miami, FL (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The new interactive ensemble modeling strategy is used to diagnose how noise due to internal atmospheric dynamics impacts the forced climate response during the twentieth century (i.e., 1870-1999). The interactive ensemble uses multiple realizations of the atmospheric component model coupled to a single realization of the land, ocean and ice component models in order to reduce the noise due to internal atmospheric dynamics in the flux exchange at the interface of the component models. A control ensemble of so-called climate of the twentieth century simulations of the Community Climate Simulation Model version 3 (CCSM3) are compared with a similar simulation with the interactive ensemble version of CCSM3. Despite substantial differences in the overall mean climate, the global mean trends in surface temperature, 500 mb geopotential and precipitation are largely indistinguishable between the control ensemble and the interactive ensemble. Large differences in the forced response; however, are detected particularly in the surface temperature of the North Atlantic. Associated with the forced North Atlantic surface temperature differences are local differences in the forced precipitation and a substantial remote rainfall response in the deep tropical Pacific. We also introduce a simple variance analysis to separately compare the variance due to noise and the forced response. We find that the noise variance is decreased when external forcing is included. In terms of the forced variance, we find that the interactive ensemble increases this variance relative to the control. (orig.)

  10. Force transmission in cohesive granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radjai, Farhang; Topin, Vincent; Richefeu, Vincent; Voivret, Charles; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Azéma, Emilien; El Youssoufi, Said

    2010-05-01

    We use numerical simulations to investigate force and stress transmission in cohesive granular media covering a wide class of materials encountered in nature and industrial processing. The cohesion results either from capillary bridges between particles or from the presence of a solid binding matrix filling fully or partially the interstitial space. The liquid bonding is treated by implementing a capillary force law within a debonding distance between particles and simulated by the discrete element method. The solid binding matrix is treated by means of the Lattice Element Method (LEM) based on a lattice-type discretization of the particles and matrix. Our data indicate that the exponential fall-off of strong compressive forces is a generic feature of both cohesive and noncohesive granular media both for liquid and solid bonding. The tensile forces exhibit a similar decreasing exponential distribution, suggesting that this form basically reflects granular disorder. This is consistent with the finding that not only the contact forces but also the stress components in the bulk of the particles and matrix, accessible from LEM simulations in the case of solid bonding, show an exponential fall-off. We also find that the distribution of weak compressive forces is sensitive to packing anisotropy, particle shape and particle size distribution. In the case of wet packings, we analyze the self-equilibrated forces induced by liquid bonds and show that the positive and negative particle pressures form a bi-percolating structure.

  11. Quantitative measurement of tip sample forces by dynamic force spectroscopy in ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, H.; Anczykowski, B.

    2005-03-01

    We introduce a dynamic force spectroscopy technique enabling the quantitative measurement of conservative and dissipative tip-sample forces in ambient conditions. In difference to the commonly detected force-vs-distance curves dynamic force microscopy allows to measure the full range of tip-sample forces without hysteresis effects caused by a jump-to-contact. The approach is based on the specific behavior of a self-driven cantilever (frequency-modulation technique). Experimental applications on different samples (Fischer-sample, silicon wafer) are presented.

  12. Simultaneous measurement of normal and friction forces using a cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung I.; Bonander, Jeremy R.; Rasmussen, Jared A.

    2011-05-01

    We measured normal and friction forces simultaneously using a recently developed cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope technique for studies of interfacial structures and mechanical properties of nanoscale materials. We derived how the forces can be incorporated into the detection signal using the classical Euler equation for beams. A lateral modulation with the amplitude of nanometers was applied to create the friction forces between tip and sample. We demonstrated its capability by measuring normal and friction forces of interfacial water at the molecular scale over all distance ranges.

  13. Experimental Investigation of the Velocity Effect on Adhesion Forces with an Atomic Force Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏征; 赵亚溥

    2004-01-01

    Capillary forces are significantly dominant in adhesive forces measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM)in ambient air, which are always thought to be dependent on water film thickness, relative humidity, and the free energy of water film. We study the nature of the pull-off force on a variety of surfaces as a function of tip velocity.It is found that the capillary forces are of relatively strong dependence on tip velocity. The present experiment is expected to provide a better understanding of the work mechanism of AFM in ambient air.

  14. Matter-screened Casimir force and Casimir-Polder force in planar structures

    OpenAIRE

    Raabe, Christian; Welsch, Dirk-Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    Using a recently developed theory of the Casimir force (Raabe C and Welsch D-G 2005 Phys. Rev. A 71 013814), we calculate the force that acts on a plate in front of a planar wall and the force that acts on the plate in the case where the plate is part of matter that fills the space in front of the wall. We show that in the limit of a dielectric plate whose permittivity is close to unity, the force obtained in the former case reduces to the ordinary, i.e., unscreened Casimir-Polder force actin...

  15. Collective force generated by multiple biofilaments can exceed the sum of forces due to individual ones

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Dipjyoti; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2013-01-01

    Collective dynamics and force generation by cytoskeletal filaments are crucial in many cellular processes. Investigating growth dynamics of a bundle of N independent cytoskeletal filaments pushing against a wall, we show that ATP/GTP hydrolysis leads to a collective phenomena that is currently unknown. Obtaining force-velocity relations for different models that capture chemical switching, we show, analytically and numerically, that the collective stall force of N filaments is greater than N times the stall force of a single filament. Simulating growing actin and microtubule bundles, considering both sequential and random hydrolysis, we make quantitative predictions of the excess forces.

  16. Impaired Inhibitory Force Feedback in Fixed Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugge, Winfred; Schouten, Alfred C; van Hilten, Jacobus J; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2016-04-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial disorder associated with an aberrant host response to tissue injury. About 25% of CRPS patients suffer poorly understood involuntary sustained muscle contractions associated with dysfunctional reflexes that result in abnormal postures (fixed dystonia). A recent modeling study simulated fixed dystonia (FD) caused by aberrant force feedback. The current study aims to validate this hypothesis by experimentally recording the modulation of reflexive force feedback in patients with FD. CRPS patients with and without FD, patients with FD but without CRPS, as well as healthy controls participated in the experiment. Three task instructions and three perturbation characteristics were used to evoke a wide range of responses to force perturbations. During position tasks ("maintain posture"), healthy subjects as well as patients resisted the perturbations, becoming more stiff than when being relaxed (i.e., the relax task). Healthy subjects and CRPS patients without FD were both more compliant during force tasks ("maintain force") than during relax tasks, meaning they actively gave way to the imposed forces. Remarkably, the patients with FD failed to do so. A neuromuscular model was fitted to the experimental data to separate the distinct contributions of position, velocity and force feedback, as well as co-contraction to the motor behavior. The neuromuscular modeling indicated that inhibitory force feedback is deregulated in patients with FD, for both CRPS and non-CRPS patients. From previously published simulation results and the present experimental study, it is concluded that aberrant force feedback plays a role in fixed dystonia. PMID:25955788

  17. Variable Acceleration Force Calibration System (VACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Parker, Peter A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Landman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, force balances have been calibrated manually, using a complex system of free hanging precision weights, bell cranks, and/or other mechanical components. Conventional methods may provide sufficient accuracy in some instances, but are often quite complex and labor-intensive, requiring three to four man-weeks to complete each full calibration. To ensure accuracy, gravity-based loading is typically utilized. However, this often causes difficulty when applying loads in three simultaneous, orthogonal axes. A complex system of levers, cranks, and cables must be used, introducing increased sources of systematic error, and significantly increasing the time and labor intensity required to complete the calibration. One aspect of the VACS is a method wherein the mass utilized for calibration is held constant, and the acceleration is changed to thereby generate relatively large forces with relatively small test masses. Multiple forces can be applied to a force balance without changing the test mass, and dynamic forces can be applied by rotation or oscillating acceleration. If rotational motion is utilized, a mass is rigidly attached to a force balance, and the mass is exposed to a rotational field. A large force can be applied by utilizing a large rotational velocity. A centrifuge or rotating table can be used to create the rotational field, and fixtures can be utilized to position the force balance. The acceleration may also be linear. For example, a table that moves linearly and accelerates in a sinusoidal manner may also be utilized. The test mass does not have to move in a path that is parallel to the ground, and no re-leveling is therefore required. Balance deflection corrections may be applied passively by monitoring the orientation of the force balance with a three-axis accelerometer package. Deflections are measured during each test run, and adjustments with respect to the true applied load can be made during the post-processing stage. This paper will

  18. Imaging stability in force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung I., E-mail: ByungKim@boisestate.edu [Department of Physics, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive Boise, ID 83725-1570, United States of America (United States); Boehm, Ryan D. [Department of Physics, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive Boise, ID 83725-1570, United States of America (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We studied the stability of force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy (HSAFM) by imaging soft, hard, and biological sample surfaces at various applied forces. The HSAFM images showed sudden topographic variations of streaky fringes with a negative applied force when collected on a soft hydrocarbon film grown on a grating sample, whereas they showed stable topographic features with positive applied forces. The instability of HSAFM images with the negative applied force was explained by the transition between contact and noncontact regimes in the force–distance curve. When the grating surface was cleaned, and thus hydrophilic by removing the hydrocarbon film, enhanced imaging stability was observed at both positive and negative applied forces. The higher adhesive interaction between the tip and the surface explains the improved imaging stability. The effects of imaging rate on the imaging stability were tested on an even softer adhesive Escherichia coli biofilm deposited onto the grating structure. The biofilm and planktonic cell structures in HSAFM images were reproducible within the force deviation less than ∼0.5 nN at the imaging rate up to 0.2 s per frame, suggesting that the force-feedback HSAFM was stable for various imaging speeds in imaging softer adhesive biological samples. - Highlights: ► We investigated the imaging stability of force-feedback HSAFM. ► Stable–unstable imaging transitions rely on applied force and sample hydrophilicity. ► The stable–unstable transitions are found to be independent of imaging rate.

  19. Influence of atomic force microscope (AFM) probe shape on adhesion force measured in humidity environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳丽; 涂育松; 谭惠丽

    2014-01-01

    In micro-manipulation, the adhesion force has very important influence on behaviors of micro-objects. Here, a theoretical study on the effects of humidity on the adhesion force is presented between atomic force microscope (AFM) tips and substrate. The analysis shows that the precise tip geometry plays a critical role on humidity depen-dence of the adhesion force, which is the dominant factor in manipulating micro-objects in AFM experiments. For a blunt (paraboloid) tip, the adhesion force versus humidity curves tends to the apparent contrast (peak-to-valley corrugation) with a broad range. This paper demonstrates that the abrupt change of the adhesion force has high correla-tion with probe curvatures, which is mediated by coordinates of solid-liquid-vapor contact lines (triple point) on the probe profiles. The study provides insights for further under-standing nanoscale adhesion forces and the way to choose probe shapes in manipulating micro-objects in AFM experiments.

  20. Measurement of inter-particle forces by an interfacial force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Huang; Asghar Mesbah-Nejad; Seyed M. Tadayyon; Peter Norton; Hui Zhang; Jesse Zhu

    2010-01-01

    An inteffacial force microscope (IFM) was employed to measure the inter-particle forces between two individual glass beads with diameters varying from 8 to 20 μm. With the feedback function of IFM turned off, attractive forces were obtained. The forces varied in the range of 0.1-0.34 μN, and their validity was confirmed by a theoretical analysis of the van der Waals force between the same glass beads. With the feedback function switched on, no attractive forces between particles were detected by the IFM when the probe approached the sample substrate. This may be attributed to the dramatic change of the attractive forces within a very short separation distance and/or the relatively poor signal-to-noise ratio of the IFM.

  1. The influences of wall Lorentz force and field Lorentz force on the cylinder drag reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhang; Bao-Chun Fan; Zhi-Hna Chen; Yan-Ling Li

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the effects of Lorentz force on drag reduction for a circular cylinder have been studied experimentally and numerically.Based on its effects on drag reduction,the Lorentz force is found to be classified into two parts:one acts directly on the cylinder,named as the wall Lorentz force,and the other called the field Lorentz force acts on the fluid inside the boundary layer.The wall Lorentz force leads to the generation of a thrust,whereas the field Lorentz force results in drag increase.Since the former dominates the drag variation,the drag would reduce accordingly and even turn into negative (thrust) with the application of Lorentz force.

  2. Friction measurements using force versus distance friction loops in force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, G. S.; Dinte, B. P.; Blach-Watson, J. A.; Myhra, S.

    2004-07-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) allows investigation of the properties of surfaces and interfaces at atomic scale resolution. However, several different operational modes (imaging, force versus distance and lateral force), need to be deployed in order to gain insight into the structure, tribiological and mechanical properties. A new method, based on a variation of the force versus distance mode, has been developed. In essence, a coupling of the deformational modes of the probe is exploited whereby the tip is induced to undergo lateral travel in response to application of an out-of-plane force (and thus normal bending of the force-sensing lever). The lateral travel induces in-plane forces that are then measurable as a consequence of stimulation of the 'buckling' deformational mode of the lever. Outcomes will be demonstrated for atomically flat surfaces of WTe 2 and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  3. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform

    CERN Document Server

    Lentink, David; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2014-01-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on tethered experiments with robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for nonintrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is ...

  4. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10−100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed

  5. Nonequilibrium forces between dragged ultrasoft colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sunil P; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard

    2011-10-01

    The dynamical deformation of ultrasoft colloids as well as their dynamic frictional forces are numerically investigated, when one colloid is dragged past another at constant velocity. Hydrodynamic interactions are captured by a particle-based mesoscopic simulation method. At vanishing relative velocity, the equilibrium repulsive force-distance curve is obtained. At large drag velocities, in contrast, we find an apparent attractive force for departing colloids along the dragging direction. The deformation, in the close encounter of colloids, and the energy dissipation are examined as a function of the drag velocity and their separation. PMID:22107322

  6. Three-Dimensional Force Field Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Alexander; Hölscher, Hendrik; Langkat, S. M.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2003-12-01

    A method is presented that utilizes the frequency modulation technique in ultra-high vacuum to measure the tip-sample force field in all three dimensions with atomic resolution. It is based on a systematic procedure to record frequency shift versus distance curves. After their conversion into the tip-surface potential landscape the complete force field in all three dimensions can be calculated. Experimental results obtained in the non-contact regime on NiO(001) with an iron-coated silicon tip are presented to demonstrate that interatomic vertical and lateral forces can be determined and assigned to specific sites within the surface unit cell.

  7. Coupled surface polaritons and the Casimir force

    CERN Document Server

    Henkel, C; Mulet, J P; Greffet, J J; Henkel, Carsten; Joulain, Karl; Mulet, Jean-Philippe; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2004-01-01

    The Casimir force between metallic plates made of realistic materials is evaluated for distances in the nanometer range. A spectrum over real frequencies is introduced and shows narrow peaks due to surface resonances (plasmon polaritons or phonon polaritons) that are coupled across the vacuum gap. We demonstrate that the Casimir force originates from the attraction (repulsion) due to the corresponding symmetric (antisymmetric) eigenmodes, respectively. This picture is used to derive a simple analytical estimate of the Casimir force at short distances. We recover the result known for Drude metals without absorption and compute the correction for weakly absorbing materials.

  8. Dental fitness classification in the Canadian forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Richard R

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian Forces Dental Services utilizes a dental classification system to identify those military members dentally fit for an overseas deployment where dental resources may be limited. Although the Canadian Forces Dental Services dental classification system is based on NATO standards, it differs slightly from the dental classification systems of other NATO country dental services. Data collected by dental teams on overseas deployments indicate a low rate of emergency dental visits by Canadian Forces members who were screened as dentally fit to deploy. PMID:18277717

  9. Lipid14: The Amber Lipid Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, Callum J.; Madej, Benjamin D.; Skjevik, Åge A.; Betz, Robin M.; Teigen, Knut; Gould, Ian R.; Walker, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    The AMBER lipid force field has been updated to create Lipid14, allowing tensionless simulation of a number of lipid types with the AMBER MD package. The modular nature of this force field allows numerous combinations of head and tail groups to create different lipid types, enabling the easy insertion of new lipid species. The Lennard-Jones and torsion parameters of both the head and tail groups have been revised and updated partial charges calculated. The force field has been validated by si...

  10. Context sensitivity in the force concept inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay Stewart

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The force concept inventory and a 10-question context-modified test were given to 647 students enrolled in introductory physics classes at the University of Arkansas. Context changes had an effect ranging from −3% to 10% on the individual questions. The average student score on the ten transformed questions was 3% higher than the average student score on the corresponding 10 force concept inventory questions. Therefore, the effect of contextual changes on the total of the 10 questions is not sufficient to affect normal use of the force concept inventory as a diagnostic instrument.

  11. Magnetic Force Transmission of a Reciprocating Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-chang Tan; Fu-sheng Zheng; Jian-gang Li

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic force transmission of a reciprocating motion is studied by theoretical analysis and experiment. A mathematical model for calculating the magnetic force is derived using the theory of equivalent magnetic charges. An experimental rig is constructed to test the transmission and the model is verified by experiment. Effect of the transmission parameters on the magnetic force is analyzed theoretically from the model, and characteristic of the transmission is studied experimentally. Since the transmission is without direct contact between two elements, it is suitable for application in an organism.

  12. Correlation Force Spectroscopy for Single Molecule Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Radiom, Milad

    2014-01-01

    This thesis addresses development of a new force spectroscopy tool, correlation force spectroscopy (CFS), for the measurement of the mechanical properties of very small volumes of material (molecular to �[BULLET]m3) at kHz-MHz time-scales. CFS is based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the principles of CFS resemble those of dual-trap optical tweezers. CFS consists of two closely-spaced micro-cantilevers that undergo thermal fluctuations. Measurement of the correlation in thermal fluctu...

  13. Sensing Current and Forces with SPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Y.; Maier, Sabine; Hendriksen, Bas; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-07-02

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are well established techniques to image surfaces and to probe material properties at the atomic and molecular scale. In this review, we show hybrid combinations of AFM and STM that bring together the best of two worlds: the simultaneous detection of atomic scale forces and conduction properties. We illustrate with several examples how the detection of forces during STM and the detection of currents during AFM can give valuable additional information of the nanoscale material properties.

  14. Demonstration of the lateral casimir force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F; Mohideen, U; Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M

    2002-03-11

    The lateral Casimir force between a sinusoidally corrugated gold coated plate and large sphere was measured for surface separations between 0.2 to 0.3 microm using an atomic force microscope. The measured force shows the required periodicity corresponding to the corrugations. It also exhibits the necessary inverse fourth power distance dependence. The obtained results are shown to be in good agreement with a complete theory taking into account the imperfectness of the boundary metal. This demonstration opens new opportunities for the use of the Casimir effect for lateral translation in microelectromechanical systems. PMID:11909341

  15. Lateral-deflection-controlled friction force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, Kenji; Hamaoka, Satoshi; Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Itoh, Shintaro; Zhang, Hedong

    2014-08-01

    Lateral-deflection-controlled dual-axis friction force microscopy (FFM) is presented. In this method, an electrostatic force generated with a probe-incorporated micro-actuator compensates for friction force in real time during probe scanning using feedback control. This equivalently large rigidity can eliminate apparent boundary width and lateral snap-in, which are caused by lateral probe deflection. The method can evolve FFM as a method for quantifying local frictional properties on the micro/nanometer-scale by overcoming essential problems to dual-axis FFM.

  16. Low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wago, Koichi

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a technique whose goal is to combine the three-dimensional, chemically specific imaging capability of magnetic resonance imaging with the atomic-scale spatial resolution of scanning force microscopy. MRFM relies on the detection of small oscillatory magnetic forces between spins in the sample and a magnetic tip, using a micromechanical cantilever. The force resolution is a key issue for successfully operating MRFM experiments. Operating at low temperature improves the force resolution because of the reduced thermal energy and increased mechanical Q of the cantilever. The spin polarization is also enhanced at low temperature, leading to the improved magnetic resonance sensitivity for ensemble spin samples. A low-temperature magnetic resonance force detection apparatus was built and used to demonstrate a force resolution of 8×10sp{-17}\\ N/sqrt{Hz} at 6 K with a commercial single-crystal silicon cantilever. Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were detected in micron-size samples. Force-detection technique was also applied to a wide range of magnetic resonance measurements, including inversion recovery, nutation, and spin echoes. Force-detected EPR spectra of phosphorus-doped silicon revealed hyperfine splitting, illustrating the possibility of using the MRFM technique for spectroscopic purposes. An improved low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscope was also built, incorporating a magnetic tip mounted directly on the cantilever. This allows a much wider variety of samples to be investigated and greatly improves the convenience of the technique. Using the improved microscope, three-dimensional EPR imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed a broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real

  17. Lateral chirality-sorting optical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Amaury; Mueller, J. P. Balthasar; Capasso, Federico

    2015-01-01

    The transverse component of the spin angular momentum of evanescent waves gives rise to lateral optical forces on chiral particles, which have the unusual property of acting in a direction in which there is neither a field gradient nor wave propagation. Because their direction and strength depends on the chiral polarizability of the particle, they act as chirality-sorting and may offer a mechanism for passive chirality spectroscopy. The absolute strength of the forces also substantially exceeds that of other recently predicted sideways optical forces. PMID:26453555

  18. Freedom Denied: Forced Labor in California

    OpenAIRE

    Tuller, David; Fletcher, Laurel; Stover, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Forced labor is a serious and pervasive problem in the United States. At any given time ten thousand or more people work as forced laborers in scores of cities and towns across the country. And it is likely that the actual number is much higher, possibly reaching into the tens of thousands. Because forced labor is hidden, inhumane, widespread, and criminal, sustained and coordinated efforts by U.S. law enforcement, social service providers, and the general public are needed to expose and erad...

  19. Sensing And Force-Reflecting Exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberman, Brian; Fontana, Richard; Marcus, Beth

    1993-01-01

    Sensing and force-reflecting exoskeleton (SAFiRE) provides control signals to robot hand and force feedback from robot hand to human operator. Operator makes robot hand touch objects gently and manipulates them finely without exerting excessive forces. Device attaches to operator's hand; comfortable and lightweight. Includes finger exoskeleton, cable mechanical transmission, two dc servomotors, partial thumb exoskeleton, harness, amplifier box, two computer circuit boards, and software. Transduces motion of index finger and thumb. Video monitor of associated computer displays image corresponding to motion.

  20. Simulating central forces in the classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirregabiria, Juan M

    2015-01-01

    We describe the easy to customize and extend open source Java program Central force workbench that can be used in the classroom to simulate the motion of a particle (or a two-body system) under central forces. It may be useful to illustrate problems in which the analytical solution is not available as well as to help students to grasp a more intuitive understanding of the main features of this kind of problem and to realize the exceptional nature of the particular case of Newtonian (and harmonic) forces. We also include some suggestions on how to use the program as a pedagogical tool.