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Sample records for centrioles

  1. Atypical centrioles during sexual reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Khire, Atul; Fishman, Emily L.; Jo, Kyoung H.

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are conserved, self-replicating, microtubule-based, 9-fold symmetric subcellular organelles that are essential for proper cell division and function. Most cells have two centrioles and maintaining this number of centrioles is important for animal development and physiology. However, how animals gain their first two centrioles during reproduction is only partially understood. It is well established that in most animals, the centrioles are contributed to the zygote by the sperm. Howe...

  2. Control of daughter centriole formation by the pericentriolar material: Control of centriole duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Loncarek, Jadranka; Hergert, Polla; Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2008-01-01

    Controlling the number of its centrioles is vital for the cell as supernumerary centrioles result in multipolar mitosis and genomic instability1,2. Normally, just one daughter centriole forms on each mature (mother) centriole3,4; however, a mother centriole can produce multiple daughters within a single cell cycle5,6. The mechanisms that prevent centriole ‘overduplication’ are poorly understood. Here we use laser microsurgery to test the hypothesis that attachment of the daughter centriole to...

  3. The Caenorhabditis elegans protein SAS-5 forms large oligomeric assemblies critical for centriole formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogala, KB; Dynes, NJ; Hatzopoulos, GN; Yan, J.; Pong, SK; Robinson, CV; Deane, CM; Gönczy, P; Vakonakis, I

    2015-01-01

    eLife digest Most animal cells contain structures known as centrioles. Typically, a cell that is not dividing contains a pair of centrioles. But when a cell prepares to divide, the centrioles are duplicated. The two pairs of centrioles then organize the scaffolding that shares the genetic material equally between the newly formed cells at cell division. Centriole assembly is tightly regulated and abnormalities in this process can lead to developmental defects and cancer. Centrioles likely con...

  4. Centrioles in the cell cycle. I. Epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    A study was made of the structure of the centrosome in the cell cycle in a nonsynchronous culture of pig kidney embryo (PE) cells. In the spindle pole of the metaphase cell there are two mutually perpendicular centrioles (mother and daughter) which differ in their ultrastructure. An electron-dense halo, which surrounds only the mother centriole and is the site where spindle microtubules converge, disappears at the end of telophase. In metaphase and anaphase, the mother centriole is situated p...

  5. Conserved molecular interactions in centriole-to-centrosome conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jingyan; Lipinszki, Zoltan; Rangone, Hélène; Min, Mingwei; Mykura, Charlotte; Chao-Chu, Jennifer; Schneider, Sandra; Dzhindzhev, Nikola S; Gottardo, Marco; Riparbelli, Maria Giovanna; Callaini, Giuliano; Glover, David M

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles are required to assemble centrosomes for cell division and cilia for motility and signalling. New centrioles assemble perpendicularly to pre-existing ones in G1-S and elongate throughout S and G2. Fully elongated daughter centrioles are converted into centrosomes during mitosis to be able to duplicate and organize pericentriolar material in the next cell cycle. Here we show that centriole-to-centrosome conversion requires sequential loading of Cep135, Ana1 (Cep295) and Asterless (Cep152) onto daughter centrioles during mitotic progression in both Drosophila melanogaster and human. This generates a molecular network spanning from the inner- to outermost parts of the centriole. Ana1 forms a molecular strut within the network, and its essential role can be substituted by an engineered fragment providing an alternative linkage between Asterless and Cep135. This conserved architectural framework is essential for loading Asterless or Cep152, the partner of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Plk4. Our study thus uncovers the molecular basis for centriole-to-centrosome conversion that renders daughter centrioles competent for motherhood. PMID:26595382

  6. Centriole Age Underlies Asynchronous Primary Cilium Growth in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Charles T; Stearns, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that are present in most mammalian tissues and play important roles in development and disease [1]. They are required for the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) [2-4] and PDGF [5] signalling pathways. Primary cilia grow from the older of the two centrioles of the centrosome, referred to as the mother centriole. In cycling cells the cilium typically grows in G1 and is lost before mitosis, but the regulation of its growth is poorly understood. Centriole ...

  7. The presence of centrioles and centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells suggests human parthenotes developed in vitro can differentiate into mature cells without a sperm centriole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo Yon, E-mail: boyonlee@gmail.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Sang Woo; Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Seung Bo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sperm centriole is the progenitor of centrosomes in all somatic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Centrioles and centrosomes exist in parthenogenetic ovarian teratoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without a sperm centriole, parthenogenetic oocytes produce centrioles and centrosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parthenogenetic human oocytes can develop and differentiate into mature cells. -- Abstract: In most animals, somatic cell centrosomes are inherited from the centriole of the fertilizing spermatozoa. The oocyte centriole degenerates during oogenesis, and completely disappears in metaphase II. Therefore, the embryos generated by in vitro parthenogenesis are supposed to develop without any centrioles. Exceptional acentriolar and/or acentrosomal developments are possible in mice and in some experimental cells; however, in most animals, the full developmental potential of parthenogenetic cells in vitro and the fate of their centrioles/centrosomes are not clearly understood. To predict the future of in vitro human parthenogenesis, we explored the centrioles/centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells by immunofluorescent staining and transmission electron microscopy. We confirmed the presence of centrioles and centrosomes in these well-known parthenogenetic ovarian tumor cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate that, even without a sperm centriole, parthenotes that develop from activated oocytes can produce their own centrioles/centrosomes, and can even develop into the well-differentiated mature tissue.

  8. The centriole adjunct of insects: Need to update the definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallai, Romano; Paoli, Francesco; Mercati, David; Lupetti, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    The ancestral eukaryotes presumably had an MTOC (microtubule organizing center) which late gave origin to the centriole and the flagellar axoneme. The centrosome of insect early spermatids is in general composed of two components: a single centriole and a cloud of electron-dense pericentriolar material (PCM). During spermiogenesis, the centriole changes its structure and gives rise to a flagellar axoneme, while the proteins of PCM, gamma tubulin in particular, are involved in the production of microtubules for the elongation and shaping of spermatid components. At the end of spermiogenesis, in many insects, additional material is deposited beneath the nucleus to form the centriole adjunct (ca). This material can also extend along the flagellum in two accessory bodies (ab) flanking the axoneme. Among Homoptera Sternorrhyncha, a progressive modification of their sperm flagella until complete disappearance has been verified. In the Archaeococcidae Matsucoccus feytaudi, however, a motile sperm flagellum-like structure is formed by an MTOC activity. This finding gives support to the hypothesis that an evolutionary reversal has occurred in the group and that the cell, when a non-functional centriole is present, activates an ancestral structure, an MTOC, to form a polarized motile bundle of microtubules restoring sperm motility. The presence and extension of the centriole adjunct in the different insect orders is also enlisted. PMID:26899558

  9. CDK5RAP2 Regulates Centriole Engagement and Cohesion in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Barrera, Jose A.; Kao, Ling-Rong; Robert E Hammer; Seemann, Joachim; Fuchs, Jannon L.; Megraw, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    Centriole duplication occurs once per cell cycle, ensuring that each cell contains two centrosomes, each containing a mother-daughter pair of tightly engaged centrioles at mitotic entry. Loss of the tight engagement between mother and daughter centrioles appears to license the next round of centriole duplication. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating this process remain largely unknown. Mutations in CDK5RAP2, which encodes a centrosomal protein, cause autosomal recessive primary microc...

  10. C-NAP1 and rootletin restrain DNA damage-induced centriole splitting and facilitate ciliogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Conroy, Pauline C.; Saladino, Chiara; Dantas, Tiago J.; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Morrison, Ciaran G.

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are found on most human cells and exist as motile cilia or non-motile primary cilia. Primary cilia play sensory roles in transducing various extracellular signals, and defective ciliary functions are involved in a wide range of human diseases. Centrosomes are the principal microtubule-organizing centers of animal cells and contain two centrioles. We observed that DNA damage causes centriole splitting in non-transformed human cells, with isolated centrioles carrying the mother centriole ...

  11. Integrity of the Pericentriolar Material Is Essential for Maintaining Centriole Association during M Phase.

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    Mi Young Seo

    Full Text Available A procentriole is assembled next to the mother centriole during S phase and remains associated until M phase. After functioning as a spindle pole during mitosis, the mother centriole and procentriole are separated at the end of mitosis. A close association of the centriole pair is regarded as an intrinsic block to the centriole reduplication. Therefore, deregulation of this process may cause a problem in the centriole number control, resulting in increased genomic instability. Despite its importance for faithful centriole duplication, the mechanism of centriole separation is not fully understood yet. Here, we report that centriole pairs are prematurely separated in cells whose cell cycle is arrested at M phase by STLC. Dispersal of the pericentriolar material (PCM was accompanied. This phenomenon was independent of the separase activity but needed the PLK1 activity. Nocodazole effectively inhibited centriole scattering in STLC-treated cells, possibly by reducing the microtubule pulling force around centrosomes. Inhibition of PLK1 also reduced the premature separation of centrioles and the PCM dispersal as well. These results revealed the importance of PCM integrity in centriole association. Therefore, we propose that PCM disassembly is one of the driving forces for centriole separation during mitotic exit.

  12. Cdk1 Phosphorylates Drosophila Sas-4 to Recruit Polo to Daughter Centrioles and Convert Them to Centrosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Zsofia A; Wainman, Alan; Gartenmann, Lisa; Raff, Jordan W

    2016-06-20

    Centrosomes and cilia are organized by a centriole pair comprising an older mother and a younger daughter. Centriole numbers are tightly regulated, and daughter centrioles (which assemble in S phase) cannot themselves duplicate or organize centrosomes until they have passed through mitosis. It is unclear how this mitotic "centriole conversion" is regulated, but it requires Plk1/Polo kinase. Here we show that in flies, Cdk1 phosphorylates the conserved centriole protein Sas-4 during mitosis. This creates a Polo-docking site that helps recruit Polo to daughter centrioles and is required for the subsequent recruitment of Asterless (Asl), a protein essential for centriole duplication and mitotic centrosome assembly. Point mutations in Sas-4 that prevent Cdk1 phosphorylation or Polo docking do not block centriole disengagement during mitosis, but block efficient centriole conversion and lead to embryonic lethality. These observations can explain why daughter centrioles have to pass through mitosis before they can duplicate and organize a centrosome. PMID:27326932

  13. The E2F-DP1 Transcription Factor Complex Regulates Centriole Duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline G; Liu, Yan; Williams, Christopher W; Smith, Harold E; O'Connell, Kevin F

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles play critical roles in the organization of microtubule-based structures, from the mitotic spindle to cilia and flagella. In order to properly execute their various functions, centrioles are subjected to stringent copy number control. Central to this control mechanism is a precise duplication event that takes place during S phase of the cell cycle and involves the assembly of a single daughter centriole in association with each mother centriole . Recent studies have revealed that posttranslational control of the master regulator Plk4/ZYG-1 kinase and its downstream effector SAS-6 is key to ensuring production of a single daughter centriole. In contrast, relatively little is known about how centriole duplication is regulated at a transcriptional level. Here we show that the transcription factor complex EFL-1-DPL-1 both positively and negatively controls centriole duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Specifically, we find that down regulation of EFL-1-DPL-1 can restore centriole duplication in a zyg-1 hypomorphic mutant and that suppression of the zyg-1 mutant phenotype is accompanied by an increase in SAS-6 protein levels. Further, we find evidence that EFL-1-DPL-1 promotes the transcription of zyg-1 and other centriole duplication genes. Our results provide evidence that in a single tissue type, EFL-1-DPL-1 sets the balance between positive and negative regulators of centriole assembly and thus may be part of a homeostatic mechanism that governs centriole assembly. PMID:26772748

  14. The E2F-DP1 Transcription Factor Complex Regulates Centriole Duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline G. Miller

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Centrioles play critical roles in the organization of microtubule-based structures, from the mitotic spindle to cilia and flagella. In order to properly execute their various functions, centrioles are subjected to stringent copy number control. Central to this control mechanism is a precise duplication event that takes place during S phase of the cell cycle and involves the assembly of a single daughter centriole in association with each mother centriole . Recent studies have revealed that posttranslational control of the master regulator Plk4/ZYG-1 kinase and its downstream effector SAS-6 is key to ensuring production of a single daughter centriole. In contrast, relatively little is known about how centriole duplication is regulated at a transcriptional level. Here we show that the transcription factor complex EFL-1-DPL-1 both positively and negatively controls centriole duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Specifically, we find that down regulation of EFL-1-DPL-1 can restore centriole duplication in a zyg-1 hypomorphic mutant and that suppression of the zyg-1 mutant phenotype is accompanied by an increase in SAS-6 protein levels. Further, we find evidence that EFL-1-DPL-1 promotes the transcription of zyg-1 and other centriole duplication genes. Our results provide evidence that in a single tissue type, EFL-1-DPL-1 sets the balance between positive and negative regulators of centriole assembly and thus may be part of a homeostatic mechanism that governs centriole assembly.

  15. PP2A targets SAS-5 in centriole assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Megraw, Tim

    2011-01-01

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, a pair of papers from the Gönczy and O’Connell labs show that the protein phosphatase PP2A regulates SAS-5 to control centriole duplication. Two paradigms are presented to explain how PP2A regulates SAS-5.

  16. Anomalous centriole configurations are detected in Drosophila wing disc cells upon Cdk1 inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Vidwans, Smruti J.; Wong, Mei Lie; O'Farrell, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    The centriole, organizer of the centrosome, duplicates by assembling a unique daughter identical to itself in overall organization and length. The centriole is a cylindrical structure composed of nine sets of microtubules and is thus predicted to have nine-fold symmetry. During duplication, a daughter lacking discrete microtubular organization first appears off the wall of the mother centriole. It increases in length perpendicularly away from the mother and terminates growth when it matches t...

  17. The mother centriole plays an instructive role in defining cell geometry.

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    Jessica L Feldman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Centriole positioning is a key step in establishment and propagation of cell geometry, but the mechanism of this positioning is unknown. The ability of pre-existing centrioles to induce formation of new centrioles at a defined angle relative to themselves suggests they may have the capacity to transmit spatial information to their daughters. Using three-dimensional computer-aided analysis of cell morphology in Chlamydomonas, we identify six genes required for centriole positioning relative to overall cell polarity, four of which have known sequences. We show that the distal portion of the centriole is critical for positioning, and that the centriole positions the nucleus rather than vice versa. We obtain evidence that the daughter centriole is unable to respond to normal positioning cues and relies on the mother for positional information. Our results represent a clear example of "cytotaxis" as defined by Sonneborn, and suggest that centrioles can play a key function in propagation of cellular geometry from one generation to the next. The genes documented here that are required for proper centriole positioning may represent a new class of ciliary disease genes, defects in which would be expected to cause disorganized ciliary position and impaired function.

  18. Cep152 interacts with Plk4 and is required for centriole duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Emily M; Kulukian, Anita; Holland, Andrew J; Cleveland, Don W; Stearns, Tim

    2010-11-15

    Centrioles are microtubule-based structures that organize the centrosome and nucleate cilia. Centrioles duplicate once per cell cycle, and duplication requires Plk4, a member of the Polo-like kinase family; however, the mechanism linking Plk4 activity and centriole formation is unknown. In this study, we show in human and frog cells that Plk4 interacts with the centrosome protein Cep152, the orthologue of Drosophila melanogaster Asterless. The interaction requires the N-terminal 217 residues of Cep152 and the crypto Polo-box of Plk4. Cep152 and Plk4 colocalize at the centriole throughout the cell cycle. Overexpression of Cep152 (1-217) mislocalizes Plk4, but both Cep152 and Plk4 are able to localize to the centriole independently of the other. Depletion of Cep152 prevents both normal centriole duplication and Plk4-induced centriole amplification and results in a failure to localize Sas6 to the centriole, an early step in duplication. Cep152 can be phosphorylated by Plk4 in vitro, suggesting that Cep152 acts with Plk4 to initiate centriole formation. PMID:21059850

  19. Distinct mechanisms eliminate mother and daughter centrioles in meiosis of starfish oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego-Pinto, Joana; Somogyi, Kálmán; Karreman, Matthia A; König, Julia; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Bettencourt-Dias, Mónica; Gönczy, Pierre; Schwab, Yannick; Lénárt, Péter

    2016-03-28

    Centriole elimination is an essential process that occurs in female meiosis of metazoa to reset centriole number in the zygote at fertilization. How centrioles are eliminated remains poorly understood. Here we visualize the entire elimination process live in starfish oocytes. Using specific fluorescent markers, we demonstrate that the two older, mother centrioles are selectively removed from the oocyte by extrusion into polar bodies. We show that this requires specific positioning of the second meiotic spindle, achieved by dynein-driven transport, and anchorage of the mother centriole to the plasma membrane via mother-specific appendages. In contrast, the single daughter centriole remaining in the egg is eliminated before the first embryonic cleavage. We demonstrate that these distinct elimination mechanisms are necessary because if mother centrioles are artificially retained, they cannot be inactivated, resulting in multipolar zygotic spindles. Thus, our findings reveal a dual mechanism to eliminate centrioles: mothers are physically removed, whereas daughters are eliminated in the cytoplasm, preparing the egg for fertilization. PMID:27002173

  20. Plk4-dependent phosphorylation of STIL is required for centriole duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Anne-Sophie; Bärenz, Felix; Richter, Kai T; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Duplication of centrioles, namely the formation of a procentriole next to the parental centriole, is regulated by the polo-like kinase Plk4. Only a few other proteins, including STIL (SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus, SIL) and Sas-6, are required for the early step of centriole biogenesis. Following Plk4 activation, STIL and Sas-6 accumulate at the cartwheel structure at the initial stage of the centriole assembly process. Here, we show that STIL interacts with Plk4 in vivo. A STIL fragment harboring both the coiled-coil domain and the STAN motif shows the strongest binding affinity to Plk4. Furthermore, we find that STIL is phosphorylated by Plk4. We identified Plk4-specific phosphorylation sites within the C-terminal domain of STIL and show that phosphorylation of STIL by Plk4 is required to trigger centriole duplication. PMID:25701666

  1. Plk4-dependent phosphorylation of STIL is required for centriole duplication

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    Anne-Sophie Kratz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of centrioles, namely the formation of a procentriole next to the parental centriole, is regulated by the polo-like kinase Plk4. Only a few other proteins, including STIL (SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus, SIL and Sas-6, are required for the early step of centriole biogenesis. Following Plk4 activation, STIL and Sas-6 accumulate at the cartwheel structure at the initial stage of the centriole assembly process. Here, we show that STIL interacts with Plk4 in vivo. A STIL fragment harboring both the coiled-coil domain and the STAN motif shows the strongest binding affinity to Plk4. Furthermore, we find that STIL is phosphorylated by Plk4. We identified Plk4-specific phosphorylation sites within the C-terminal domain of STIL and show that phosphorylation of STIL by Plk4 is required to trigger centriole duplication.

  2. SAS-1 is a C2 domain protein critical for centriole integrity in C. elegans.

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    Lukas von Tobel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles important for the formation of cilia, flagella and centrosomes. Despite progress in understanding the underlying assembly mechanisms, how centriole integrity is ensured is incompletely understood, including in sperm cells, where such integrity is particularly critical. We identified C. elegans sas-1 in a genetic screen as a locus required for bipolar spindle assembly in the early embryo. Our analysis reveals that sperm-derived sas-1 mutant centrioles lose their integrity shortly after fertilization, and that a related defect occurs when maternal sas-1 function is lacking. We establish that sas-1 encodes a C2 domain containing protein that localizes to centrioles in C. elegans, and which can bind and stabilize microtubules when expressed in human cells. Moreover, we uncover that SAS-1 is related to C2CD3, a protein required for complete centriole formation in human cells and affected in a type of oral-facial-digital (OFD syndrome.

  3. The ASQ2 gene required for mother-daughter centriole linkage and mitotic spindle orientation encodes a conserved TBCC-like protein

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Jessica L.; Marshall, Wallace F

    2009-01-01

    An intriguing feature of centrioles is that these highly complicated microtubule-based structures duplicate once per cell cycle and the cell has precise control over their number. Each cell contains exactly two centrioles, linked together as a pair, one of which is a mother centriole formed in a previous cell cycle and the other a daughter centriole whose assembly is templated by the mother. Neither the molecular basis nor the functional role of mother-daughter centriole linkage is understood...

  4. Determination of Mother Centriole Maturation in CPAP-Depleted Cells Using the Ninein Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Miseon; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in centrosomal protein genes have been identified in a number of genetic diseases in brain development, including microcephaly. Centrosomal P4.1-associated protein (CPAP) is one of the causal genes implicated in primary microcephaly. We previously proposed that CPAP is essential for mother centriole maturation during mitosis. Methods We immunostained CPAP-depleted cells using the ninein antibody, which selectively detects subdistal appendages in mature mother centrioles. ...

  5. Apparent diffusive motion of centrin foci in living cells: implications for diffusion-based motion in centriole duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Rafelski, Susanne M.; Keller, Lani C.; Alberts, Jonathan B.; Marshall, Wallace F

    2011-01-01

    The degree to which diffusion contributes to positioning cellular structures is an open question. Here we investigate the question of whether diffusive motion of centrin granules would allow them to interact with the mother centriole. The role of centrin granules in centriole duplication remains unclear, but some proposed functions of these granules, for example in providing pre-assembled centriole subunits, or by acting as unstable “pre-centrioles” that need to be captured by the mother cent...

  6. Apparent diffusive motion of centrin foci in living cells: implications for diffusion-based motion in centriole duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafelski, Susanne M.; Keller, Lani C.; Alberts, Jonathan B.; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2011-04-01

    The degree to which diffusion contributes to positioning cellular structures is an open question. Here we investigate the question of whether diffusive motion of centrin granules would allow them to interact with the mother centriole. The role of centrin granules in centriole duplication remains unclear, but some proposed functions of these granules, for example, in providing pre-assembled centriole subunits, or by acting as unstable 'pre-centrioles' that need to be captured by the mother centriole (La Terra et al 2005 J. Cell Biol. 168 713-22), require the centrin foci to reach the mother. To test whether diffusive motion could permit such interactions in the necessary time scale, we measured the motion of centrin-containing foci in living human U2OS cells. We found that these centrin foci display apparently diffusive undirected motion. Using the apparent diffusion constant obtained from these measurements, we calculated the time scale required for diffusion to capture by the mother centrioles and found that it would greatly exceed the time available in the cell cycle. We conclude that mechanisms invoking centrin foci capture by the mother, whether as a pre-centriole or as a source of components to support later assembly, would require a form of directed motility of centrin foci that has not yet been observed.

  7. Apparent diffusive motion of centrin foci in living cells: implications for diffusion-based motion in centriole duplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degree to which diffusion contributes to positioning cellular structures is an open question. Here we investigate the question of whether diffusive motion of centrin granules would allow them to interact with the mother centriole. The role of centrin granules in centriole duplication remains unclear, but some proposed functions of these granules, for example, in providing pre-assembled centriole subunits, or by acting as unstable 'pre-centrioles' that need to be captured by the mother centriole (La Terra et al 2005 J. Cell Biol. 168 713–22), require the centrin foci to reach the mother. To test whether diffusive motion could permit such interactions in the necessary time scale, we measured the motion of centrin-containing foci in living human U2OS cells. We found that these centrin foci display apparently diffusive undirected motion. Using the apparent diffusion constant obtained from these measurements, we calculated the time scale required for diffusion to capture by the mother centrioles and found that it would greatly exceed the time available in the cell cycle. We conclude that mechanisms invoking centrin foci capture by the mother, whether as a pre-centriole or as a source of components to support later assembly, would require a form of directed motility of centrin foci that has not yet been observed

  8. A mutation in the centriole-associated protein centrin causes genomic instability via increased chromosome loss in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

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    Marshall Wallace F

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of centrioles in mitotic spindle function remains unclear. One approach to investigate mitotic centriole function is to ask whether mutation of centriole-associated proteins can cause genomic instability. Results We addressed the role of the centriole-associated EF-hand protein centrin in genomic stability using a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin mutant that forms acentriolar bipolar spindles and lacks the centrin-based rhizoplast structures that join centrioles to the nucleus. Using a genetic assay for loss of heterozygosity, we found that this centrin mutant showed increased genomic instability compared to wild-type cells, and we determined that the increase in genomic instability was due to a 100-fold increase in chromosome loss rates compared to wild type. Live cell imaging reveals an increased rate in cell death during G1 in haploid cells that is consistent with an elevated rate of chromosome loss, and analysis of cell death versus centriole copy number argues against a role for multipolar spindles in this process. Conclusion The increased chromosome loss rates observed in a centrin mutant that forms acentriolar spindles suggests a role for centrin protein, and possibly centrioles, in mitotic fidelity.

  9. The HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein induces centriole multiplication through deregulation of Polo-like kinase 4 expression

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    Duensing Stefan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs such as HPV-16 is intimately associated with squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs of the anogenital tract and a subset of oropharyngeal carcinomas. Such lesions, including pre-invasive precursors, frequently show multipolar mitoses and aneuploidy. The high-risk HPV-16-encoded E7 oncoprotein has been shown to rapidly induce centrosome abnormalities thereby causing the formation of supernumerary mitotic spindle poles and increasing the risk for chromosome missegregation. HPV-16 E7 has been found to rapidly induce centriole overduplication, in part, through the simultaneous formation of more than one daughter centriole at single maternal centrioles (centriole multiplication. The precise molecular mechanism that underlies HPV-16 E7-induced centriole multiplication, however, remains poorly understood. Findings Here, we show that human keratinocytes engineered to stably express the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein exhibit aberrant Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4 protein expression at maternal centrioles. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase (qRT-PCR analysis of these cells revealed an increase of PLK4 mRNA levels compared to control cells. Importantly, the ability of the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein to induce centriole multiplication was found to correlate with its ability to activate the PLK4 promoter and to up-regulate PLK4 mRNA. Conclusions These results highlight the critical role of PLK4 transcriptional deregulation in centriole multiplication in HPV-16 E7-expressing cells. Our findings encourage further experiments to test transcriptional inhibitors or small molecules targeting PLK4 to prevent centriole abnormalities, mitotic infidelity and malignant progression in HPV-associated neoplasms and other tumors in which PLK4 regulation is disrupted.

  10. SAS-6 engineering reveals interdependence between cartwheel and microtubules in determining centriole architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Manuel; Noga, Akira; Frey, Daniel; Hamel, Virginie; Guichard, Paul; Kraatz, Sebastian H W; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Hosner, Sarah; Flückiger, Isabelle; Jaussi, Rolf; Wieser, Mara M; Thieltges, Katherine M; Deupi, Xavier; Müller, Daniel J; Kammerer, Richard A; Gönczy, Pierre; Hirono, Masafumi; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-04-01

    Centrioles are critical for the formation of centrosomes, cilia and flagella in eukaryotes. They are thought to assemble around a nine-fold symmetric cartwheel structure established by SAS-6 proteins. Here, we have engineered Chlamydomonas reinhardtii SAS-6-based oligomers with symmetries ranging from five- to ten-fold. Expression of a SAS-6 mutant that forms six-fold symmetric cartwheel structures in vitro resulted in cartwheels and centrioles with eight- or nine-fold symmetries in vivo. In combination with Bld10 mutants that weaken cartwheel-microtubule interactions, this SAS-6 mutant produced six- to eight-fold symmetric cartwheels. Concurrently, the microtubule wall maintained eight- and nine-fold symmetries. Expressing SAS-6 with analogous mutations in human cells resulted in nine-fold symmetric centrioles that exhibited impaired length and organization. Together, our data suggest that the self-assembly properties of SAS-6 instruct cartwheel symmetry, and lead us to propose a model in which the cartwheel and the microtubule wall assemble in an interdependent manner to establish the native architecture of centrioles. PMID:26999736

  11. CAND1 Promotes PLK4-Mediated Centriole Overduplication and Is Frequently Disrupted in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Korzeniewski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes play a crucial role in the maintenance of genome stability by orchestrating bipolar mitotic spindle formation. The centrosome normally duplicates precisely once before mitosis in a process that is extensively regulated by protein degradation including SKP1-Cullin 1 (CUL1-F-box (SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. The core SCF component CUL1 has recently been found to be required to suppress the formation of supernumerary centrosomes and centrioles, the core-forming units of centrosomes. Here, we identify the CUL1-interacting protein cullin-associated and neddylation-dissociated 1 (CAND1 as a novel centrosomal protein with a role in centriole duplication control. CAND1 was found to synergize with Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4, a master regulator of centriole biogenesis, in the induction of centriole overduplication. We provide evidence that CAND1 functions in this process by increasing PLK4 protein stability. Furthermore, mutants of CUL1 that lack the ability to interact with CAND1 and are unable to assemble functional E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes were impaired in their ability to restrain aberrant daughter centriole synthesis. To corroborate a role of CAND1 in human carcinogenesis, we analyzed a series of prostate adenocarcinomas and found altered expression of CAND1 on the mRNA or protein level in 52.9% and 40.8%, respectively, of the tumor samples analyzed. These results highlight the role of altered SCF components in cancer in general and encourage further studies to explore the SCF-CAND1 axis for the development of novel predictive biomarkers and therapeutic approaches in prostate cancer.

  12. SAS-6 coiled-coil structure and interaction with SAS-5 suggest a regulatory mechanism in C. elegans centriole assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Renping; Cabral, Gabriela; Lettman, Molly M; Dammermann, Alexander; Dong, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Oligomerization of the core centriole component SAS-6, thought to underlie establishment of a correct nine-fold symmetric ‘cartwheel' structure, is guided by specific interactions with its conserved partner SAS-5.

  13. Par6γ is at the mother centriole and controls centrosomal protein composition through a Par6α-dependent pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Dormoy, Valérian; Tormanen, Kati; Sütterlin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The centrosome contains two centrioles that differ in age, protein composition and function. This non-membrane bound organelle is known to regulate microtubule organization in dividing cells and ciliogenesis in quiescent cells. These specific roles depend on protein appendages at the older, or mother, centriole. In this study, we identified the polarity protein partitioning defective 6 homolog gamma (Par6γ) as a novel component of the mother centriole. This specific localization required the ...

  14. Nudel Contributes to Microtubule Anchoring at the Mother Centriole and Is Involved in Both Dynein-dependent and -independent Centrosomal Protein Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Jing; Yang, Zhenye; Song, Wei; Chen, Qi; Wang, Fubin; Zhang, Qiangge; Zhu, Xueliang

    2006-01-01

    The centrosome is the major microtubule-organizing center in animal cells. Although the cytoplasmic dynein regulator Nudel interacts with centrosomes, its role herein remains unclear. Here, we show that in Cos7 cells Nudel is a mother centriole protein with rapid turnover independent of dynein activity. During centriole duplication, Nudel targets to the new mother centriole later than ninein but earlier than dynactin. Its centrosome localization requires a C-terminal region that is essential ...

  15. A genome-wide RNAi screen to dissect centriole duplication and centrosome maturation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Dobbelaere

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by an amorphous pericentriolar material (PCM. Here, we have performed a microscopy-based genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screen in Drosophila cells to identify proteins required for centriole duplication and mitotic PCM recruitment. We analysed 92% of the Drosophila genome (13,059 genes and identified 32 genes involved in centrosome function. An extensive series of secondary screens classified these genes into four categories: (1 nine are required for centriole duplication, (2 11 are required for centrosome maturation, (3 nine are required for both functions, and (4 three genes regulate centrosome separation. These 32 hits include several new centrosomal components, some of which have human homologs. In addition, we find that the individual depletion of only two proteins, Polo and Centrosomin (Cnn can completely block centrosome maturation. Cnn is phosphorylated during mitosis in a Polo-dependent manner, suggesting that the Polo-dependent phosphorylation of Cnn initiates centrosome maturation in flies.

  16. The SAS-5 N-terminal domain is a tetramer, with implications for centriole assembly in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Shimanovskaya, Ekaterina; Qiao, Renping; Lesigang, Johannes; Dong, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The centriole is a conserved microtubule-based organelle essential for both centrosome formation and cilium biogenesis. It has a unique 9-fold symmetry and its assembly is governed by at least five component proteins (SPD-2, ZYG-1, SAS-5, SAS-6 and SAS-4), which are recruited in a hierarchical order. Recently published structural studies of the SAS-6 N-terminal domain have greatly advanced our understanding of the mechanisms of centriole assembly. However, it remains unclear how the weak inte...

  17. The Mother Centriole Appendage Protein Cenexin Modulates Lumen Formation through Spindle Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hui-Fang; Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2016-03-21

    Establishing apical-basal polarity is instrumental in the functional shaping of a solitary lumen within an acinus. By exploiting micropatterned slides, wound healing assays, and three-dimensional culture systems, we identified a mother centriole subdistal appendage protein, cenexin, as a critical player in symmetric lumen expansion through the control of microtubule organization. In this regard, cenexin was required for both centrosome positioning in interphase cells and proper spindle orientation during mitosis. In contrast, the essential mother centriole distal appendage protein CEP164 did not play a role in either process, demonstrating the specificity of subdistal appendages for these events. Importantly, upon closer examination we found that cenexin depletion decreased astral microtubule length, disrupted astral microtubule minus-end organization, and increased levels of the polarity protein NuMA at the cell cortex. Interestingly, spindle misorientation and NuMA mislocalization were reversed by treatment with a low dose of the microtubule-stabilizing agent paclitaxel. Taken together, these results suggest that cenexin modulates microtubule organization and stability to mediate spindle orientation. PMID:26948879

  18. STIL binding to Polo-box 3 of PLK4 regulates centriole duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arquint, Christian; Gabryjonczyk, Anna-Maria; Imseng, Stefan; Böhm, Raphael; Sauer, Evelyn; Hiller, Sebastian; Nigg, Erich A; Maier, Timm

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinases (PLK) are eukaryotic regulators of cell cycle progression, mitosis and cytokinesis; PLK4 is a master regulator of centriole duplication. Here, we demonstrate that the SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (STIL) protein interacts via its coiled-coil region (STIL-CC) with PLK4 in vivo. STIL-CC is the first identified interaction partner of Polo-box 3 (PB3) of PLK4 and also uses a secondary interaction site in the PLK4 L1 region. Structure determination of free PLK4-PB3 and its STIL-CC complex via NMR and crystallography reveals a novel mode of Polo-box-peptide interaction mimicking coiled-coil formation. In vivo analysis of structure-guided STIL mutants reveals distinct binding modes to PLK4-PB3 and L1, as well as interplay of STIL oligomerization with PLK4 binding. We suggest that the STIL-CC/PLK4 interaction mediates PLK4 activation as well as stabilization of centriolar PLK4 and plays a key role in centriole duplication. PMID:26188084

  19. The Mechanism of Dynein Light Chain LC8-mediated Oligomerization of the Ana2 Centriole Duplication Factor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slevin, Lauren K.; Romes, Erin M.; Dandulakis, Mary G.; Slep, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Centrioles play a key role in nucleating polarized microtubule networks. In actively dividing cells, centrioles establish the bipolar mitotic spindle and are essential for genomic stability. Drosophila anastral spindle-2 (Ana2) is a conserved centriole duplication factor. Although recent work has demonstrated that an Ana2-dynein light chain (LC8) centriolar complex is critical for proper spindle positioning in neuroblasts, how Ana2 and LC8 interact is yet to be established. Here we examine the Ana2-LC8 interaction and map two LC8-binding sites within the central region of Ana2, Ana2M (residues 156–251). Ana2 LC8-binding site 1 contains a signature TQT motif and robustly binds LC8 (KD of 1.1 μm), whereas site 2 contains a TQC motif and binds LC8 with lower affinity (KD of 13 μm). Both LC8-binding sites flank a predicted ∼34-residue α-helix. We present two independent atomic structures of LC8 dimers in complex with Ana2 LC8-binding site 1 and site 2 peptides. The Ana2 peptides form β-strands that extend a central composite LC8 β-sandwich. LC8 recognizes the signature TQT motif in the first LC8 binding site of Ana2, forming extensive van der Waals contacts and hydrogen bonding with the peptide, whereas the Ana2 site 2 TQC motif forms a uniquely extended β-strand, not observed in other dynein light chain-target complexes. Size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle static light scattering demonstrates that LC8 dimers bind Ana2M sites and induce Ana2 tetramerization, yielding an Ana2M4-LC88 complex. LC8-mediated Ana2 oligomerization probably enhances Ana2 avidity for centriole-binding factors and may bridge multiple factors as required during spindle positioning and centriole biogenesis. PMID:24920673

  20. The mechanism of dynein light chain LC8-mediated oligomerization of the Ana2 centriole duplication factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slevin, Lauren K; Romes, Erin M; Dandulakis, Mary G; Slep, Kevin C

    2014-07-25

    Centrioles play a key role in nucleating polarized microtubule networks. In actively dividing cells, centrioles establish the bipolar mitotic spindle and are essential for genomic stability. Drosophila anastral spindle-2 (Ana2) is a conserved centriole duplication factor. Although recent work has demonstrated that an Ana2-dynein light chain (LC8) centriolar complex is critical for proper spindle positioning in neuroblasts, how Ana2 and LC8 interact is yet to be established. Here we examine the Ana2-LC8 interaction and map two LC8-binding sites within the central region of Ana2, Ana2M (residues 156-251). Ana2 LC8-binding site 1 contains a signature TQT motif and robustly binds LC8 (KD of 1.1 μm), whereas site 2 contains a TQC motif and binds LC8 with lower affinity (KD of 13 μm). Both LC8-binding sites flank a predicted ~34-residue α-helix. We present two independent atomic structures of LC8 dimers in complex with Ana2 LC8-binding site 1 and site 2 peptides. The Ana2 peptides form β-strands that extend a central composite LC8 β-sandwich. LC8 recognizes the signature TQT motif in the first LC8 binding site of Ana2, forming extensive van der Waals contacts and hydrogen bonding with the peptide, whereas the Ana2 site 2 TQC motif forms a uniquely extended β-strand, not observed in other dynein light chain-target complexes. Size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle static light scattering demonstrates that LC8 dimers bind Ana2M sites and induce Ana2 tetramerization, yielding an Ana2M4-LC88 complex. LC8-mediated Ana2 oligomerization probably enhances Ana2 avidity for centriole-binding factors and may bridge multiple factors as required during spindle positioning and centriole biogenesis. PMID:24920673

  1. Spindle positioning in human cells relies on proper centriole formation and on the microcephaly proteins CPAP and STIL

    OpenAIRE

    Kitagawa, D.; Kohlmaier, G.; Keller, D.; Strnad, P.; Balestra, F. R.; Fluckiger, I.; Gonczy, P.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with MCPH (autosomal recessive primary microcephaly) exhibit impaired brain development, presumably due to the compromised function of neuronal progenitors. Seven MCPH loci have been identified, including one that encodes centrosome protein 4.1 associated protein (CPAP; also known as centromere protein J, CENPJ). CPAP is a large coiled-coil protein enriched at the centrosome, a structure that comprises two centrioles and surrounding pericentriolar material (PCM). CPAP depletion impai...

  2. Disruption of mouse Cenpj, a regulator of centriole biogenesis, phenocopies Seckel syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E McIntyre

    Full Text Available Disruption of the centromere protein J gene, CENPJ (CPAP, MCPH6, SCKL4, which is a highly conserved and ubiquitiously expressed centrosomal protein, has been associated with primary microcephaly and the microcephalic primordial dwarfism disorder Seckel syndrome. The mechanism by which disruption of CENPJ causes the proportionate, primordial growth failure that is characteristic of Seckel syndrome is unknown. By generating a hypomorphic allele of Cenpj, we have developed a mouse (Cenpj(tm/tm that recapitulates many of the clinical features of Seckel syndrome, including intrauterine dwarfism, microcephaly with memory impairment, ossification defects, and ocular and skeletal abnormalities, thus providing clear confirmation that specific mutations of CENPJ can cause Seckel syndrome. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased levels of DNA damage and apoptosis throughout Cenpj(tm/tm embryos and adult mice showed an elevated frequency of micronucleus induction, suggesting that Cenpj-deficiency results in genomic instability. Notably, however, genomic instability was not the result of defective ATR-dependent DNA damage signaling, as is the case for the majority of genes associated with Seckel syndrome. Instead, Cenpj(tm/tm embryonic fibroblasts exhibited irregular centriole and centrosome numbers and mono- and multipolar spindles, and many were near-tetraploid with numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities when compared to passage-matched wild-type cells. Increased cell death due to mitotic failure during embryonic development is likely to contribute to the proportionate dwarfism that is associated with CENPJ-Seckel syndrome.

  3. Direct Binding of SAS-6 to ZYG-1 Recruits SAS-6 to the Mother Centriole for Cartwheel Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Lettman, Molly M; Wong, Yao Liang; Viscardi, Valeria; Niessen, Sherry; Chen, Sheng-hong; Shiau, Andrew K.; Zhou, Huilin; Desai, Arshad; Oegema, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of SAS-6 dimers to form the centriolar cartwheel requires the ZYG-1/Plk4 kinase. Here we show that ZYG-1 recruits SAS-6 to the mother centriole independently of its kinase activity; kinase activity is subsequently required for cartwheel assembly. We identify a direct interaction between ZYG-1 and the SAS-6 coiled-coil that explains its kinase activity-independent function in SAS-6 recruitment. Perturbing this interaction, or the interaction between an adjacent segment of the SAS-6 co...

  4. A centrosome-autonomous signal that involves centriole disengagement permits centrosome duplication in G2 phase after DNA damage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-11-15

    DNA damage can induce centrosome overduplication in a manner that requires G2-to-M checkpoint function, suggesting that genotoxic stress can decouple the centrosome and chromosome cycles. How this happens is unclear. Using live-cell imaging of cells that express fluorescently tagged NEDD1\\/GCP-WD and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, we found that ionizing radiation (IR)-induced centrosome amplification can occur outside S phase. Analysis of synchronized populations showed that significantly more centrosome amplification occurred after irradiation of G2-enriched populations compared with G1-enriched or asynchronous cells, consistent with G2 phase centrosome amplification. Irradiated and control populations of G2 cells were then fused to test whether centrosome overduplication is allowed through a diffusible stimulatory signal, or the loss of a duplication-inhibiting signal. Irradiated G2\\/irradiated G2 cell fusions showed significantly higher centrosome amplification levels than irradiated G2\\/unirradiated G2 fusions. Chicken-human cell fusions demonstrated that centrosome amplification was limited to the irradiated partner. Our finding that only the irradiated centrosome can duplicate supports a model where a centrosome-autonomous inhibitory signal is lost upon irradiation of G2 cells. We observed centriole disengagement after irradiation. Although overexpression of dominant-negative securin did not affect IR-induced centrosome amplification, Plk1 inhibition reduced radiation-induced amplification. Together, our data support centriole disengagement as a licensing signal for DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification.

  5. Epitope of titin A-band-specific monoclonal antibody Tit1 5 H1.1 is highly conserved in several Fn3 domains of the titin molecule. Centriole staining in human, mouse and zebrafish cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikelsaar Aavo-Valdur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have reported on the development of a new mouse anti-titin monoclonal antibody, named MAb Titl 5 H1.1, using the synthetic peptide N-AVNKYGIGEPLESDSVVAK-C which corresponds to an amino acid sequence in the A-region of the titin molecule as immunogen. In the human skeletal muscles, MAb Titl 5 H1.1 reacts specifically with titin in the A-band of the sarcomere and in different non-muscle cell types with nucleus and cytoplasm, including centrioles. In this report we have studied the evolutionary aspects of the binding of MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 with its target antigen (titin. Results We have specified the epitope area of MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 by subpeptide mapping to the hexapeptide N-AVNKYG-C. According to protein databases this amino acid sequence is located in the COOH-terminus of several different Fn3 domains of the A-region of titin molecule in many organisms, such as human being, mouse, rabbit, zebrafish (Danio rerio, and even in sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis. Our immunohisto- and cytochemical studies with MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 in human, mouse and zebrafish tissues and cell cultures showed a striated staining pattern in muscle cells and also staining of centrioles, cytoplasm and nuclei in non-muscle cells. Conclusions The data confirm that titin can play, in addition to the known roles in striated muscle cells also an important role in non-muscle cells as a centriole associated protein. This phenomenon is highly conserved in the evolution and is related to Fn3 domains of the titin molecule. Using titin A-band-specific monoclonal antibody MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 it was possible to locate titin in the sarcomeres of skeletal muscle cells and in the centrioles, cytoplasm and nuclei of non-muscle cells in phylogenetically so distant organisms as Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and zebrafish (Danio rerio.

  6. Identification of antigenically related polypeptides at centrioles and basal bodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, W.; Fung, B.; Shyamala, M; Kasamatsu, H

    1981-01-01

    An antigen localized at the centriolar region has been identified by indirect immunofluorescence studies in African green monkey kidney, human, hamster, rat, and mouse cells. The antigen consists of two polypeptides of 14,000 and 17,000 daltons. A related antigen is also present at the basal body region in ciliated cells from chicken, cat, mouse, pig, steer, and rabbit trachea and from rabbit fimbria. Immunoelectron microscopy shows that the immunoreactive antigen is indeed located in the reg...

  7. Auditory hair cell centrioles undergo confined Brownian motion throughout the developmental migration of the kinocilium.

    OpenAIRE

    Lepelletier, Léa; de Monvel, Jacques Boutet; Buisson, Johanna; Desdouets, Chantal; Petit, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Planar polarization of the forming hair bundle, the mechanosensory antenna of auditory hair cells, depends on the poorly characterized center-to-edge displacement of a primary cilium, the kinocilium, at their apical surface. Taking advantage of the gradient of hair cell differentiation along the cochlea, we reconstituted a map of the kinocilia displacements in the mouse embryonic cochlea. We then developed a cochlear organotypic culture and video-microscopy approach to monitor the movements o...

  8. Production of Basal Bodies in bulk for dense multicilia formation [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiumin Yan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Centriole number is normally under tight control and is directly linked to ciliogenesis. In cells that use centrosomes as mitotic spindle poles, one pre-existing mother centriole is allowed to duplicate only one daughter centriole per cell cycle. In multiciliated cells, however, many centrioles are generated to serve as basal bodies of the cilia. Although deuterosomes were observed more than 40 years ago using electron microscopy and are believed to produce most of the basal bodies in a mother centriole-independent manner, the underlying molecular mechanisms have remained unknown until recently. From these findings arise more questions and a call for clarifications that will require multidisciplinary efforts.

  9. Formation of the tetraploid intermediate is associated with the development of cells with more than four centrioles in the elastase-simian virus 40 tumor antigen transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The development of pancreatic cancer in transgenic mice expressing the simian virus 40 tumor antigen placed under controlling regions of the elastase I gene is characterized by the sequential appearance of tetraploid and then multiple aneuploid cell populations. Pancreatic tissues from such transgenic mice were studied between 8 and 32 days of age. Virtually 100% of acinar cell nuclei had immunohistochemically detectable tumor antigen by 18 days. Tetraploid cells were demonstrated by DNA cont...

  10. Drosophila melanogaster as a model for basal body research

    OpenAIRE

    Jana, Swadhin Chandra; Bettencourt-Dias, Mónica; Durand, Bénédicte; Timothy L. Megraw

    2016-01-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is one of the most extensively studied organisms in biological research and has centrioles/basal bodies and cilia that can be modelled to investigate their functions in animals generally. Centrioles are nine-fold symmetrical microtubule-based cylindrical structures required to form centrosomes and also to nucleate the formation of cilia and flagella. When they function to template cilia, centrioles transition into basal bodies. The fruit fly has various...

  11. [Ultrastructure of spermatogenesis and spermatozoa of Emallagma cheliferum Selys, 1875 (Coenagrionidae: Odonata)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, V; Zaha, A; Landim, C D; Ferreira, A

    1976-06-01

    The spermiogenesis in Enallagma cheliferum follows the usual patterns of differentiation in insects. Thus, the Golgi originates the acrosome; the "nebenkern", the mitochondrial structures that form a long tail with the axonema. The axonema has the configuration 9 + 9 + 2 and around the centriole a centriole adjunt is visible in the immature spermatide. The centriole adjunt differentiates into dense bodies as a "demi-lune" shape in the mature sperm. PMID:1036302

  12. Centrosome isolation and analysis by mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lis; Schrøder, Jacob Morville; Larsen, Katja M;

    2013-01-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based scaffolds that are essential for the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella with important functions throughout the cell cycle, in physiology and during development. The ability to purify centriole-containing organelles on a large scale, combined with advan...... isolate centrosomes from human cells and strategies to selectively identify and study the properties of the associated proteins using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics.......Centrioles are microtubule-based scaffolds that are essential for the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella with important functions throughout the cell cycle, in physiology and during development. The ability to purify centriole-containing organelles on a large scale, combined with...... advances in protein identification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics, have revealed multiple centriole-associated proteins that are conserved during evolution in eukaryotes. Despite these advances, the molecular basis for the plethora of processes coordinated by cilia and centrosomes is not fully...

  13. 3D-structured illumination microscopy provides novel insight into architecture of human centrosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina F. Sonnen

    2012-08-01

    Centrioles are essential for the formation of cilia and flagella. They also form the core of the centrosome, which organizes microtubule arrays important for cell shape, polarity, motility and division. Here, we have used super-resolution 3D-structured illumination microscopy to analyse the spatial relationship of 18 centriole and pericentriolar matrix (PCM components of human centrosomes at different cell cycle stages. During mitosis, PCM proteins formed extended networks with interspersed γ-Tubulin. During interphase, most proteins were arranged at specific distances from the walls of centrioles, resulting in ring staining, often with discernible density masses. Through use of site-specific antibodies, we found the C-terminus of Cep152 to be closer to centrioles than the N-terminus, illustrating the power of 3D-SIM to study protein disposition. Appendage proteins showed rings with multiple density masses, and the number of these masses was strongly reduced during mitosis. At the proximal end of centrioles, Sas-6 formed a dot at the site of daughter centriole assembly, consistent with its role in cartwheel formation. Plk4 and STIL co-localized with Sas-6, but Cep135 was associated mostly with mother centrioles. Remarkably, Plk4 formed a dot on the surface of the mother centriole before Sas-6 staining became detectable, indicating that Plk4 constitutes an early marker for the site of nascent centriole formation. Our study provides novel insights into the architecture of human centrosomes and illustrates the power of super-resolution microscopy in revealing the relative localization of centriole and PCM proteins in unprecedented detail.

  14. Re-examining the role of Drosophila Sas-4 in centrosome assembly using two-colour-3D-SIM FRAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conduit, Paul T; Wainman, Alan; Novak, Zsofia A; Weil, Timothy T; Raff, Jordan W

    2015-01-01

    Centrosomes have many important functions and comprise a 'mother' and 'daughter' centriole surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM). The mother centriole recruits and organises the PCM and templates the formation of the daughter centriole. It has been reported that several important Drosophila PCM-organising proteins are recruited to centrioles from the cytosol as part of large cytoplasmic 'S-CAP' complexes that contain the centriole protein Sas-4. In a previous paper (Conduit et al., 2014b) we showed that one of these proteins, Cnn, and another key PCM-organising protein, Spd-2, are recruited around the mother centriole before spreading outwards to form a scaffold that supports mitotic PCM assembly; the recruitment of Cnn and Spd-2 is dependent on another S-CAP protein, Asl. We show here, however, that Cnn, Spd-2 and Asl are not recruited to the mother centriole as part of a complex with Sas-4. Thus, PCM recruitment in fly embryos does not appear to require cytosolic S-CAP complexes. PMID:26530814

  15. Sex and flagellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, L; Grafen, A

    1990-12-01

    The centriole is one of the cell's more enigmatic structures. It lives a Jekyll and Hyde existence, changing from the basal body, which seeds the production of cilia and flagellae, into the centriole, in which guise it is of uncertain function. Recent work has indicated the possibility of DNA tightly packed into the structure's core. This finding sheds light on theories of the evolutionary origins of the centriole and of its possible involvement in the evolution of sex. Recent experimental work has been testing this latter possibility. PMID:21232406

  16. Locus: 4599 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Hs.270847 H. sapiens - S: gi|29824588|ref|NC_000017.5|NC_000017 NC_000017 Homo sapiens tubulin, ... inding | GTPase activity | centriole | microtubule polymerization ... | microtubule-based movement | nucleus | spermatog ...

  17. Locus: 8569 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Mm.158073 M. musculus + S: gi|38091687|ref|NT_039515.2|Mm11_39555_32 NT_039515 Mus musculus adul ... centriole | cytoplasm | microtubule | microtubule polymerization ... | microtubule-based movement | nucleus | spermatog ...

  18. Drosophila neuroblasts retain the daughter centrosome

    OpenAIRE

    Januschke, Jens; Llamazares, Salud; Reina, Jose; Gonzalez, Cayetano

    2011-01-01

    During asymmetric mitosis, both in male Drosophila germline stem cells and in mouse embryo neural progenitors, the mother centrosome is retained by the self-renewed cell; hence suggesting that mother centrosome inheritance might contribute to stemness. We test this hypothesis in Drosophila neuroblasts (NBs) tracing photo converted centrioles and a daughter-centriole-specific marker generated by cloning the Drosophila homologue of human Centrobin. Here we show that upon asymmetric mitosis, the...

  19. CPAP is required for cilia formation in neuronal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kuo-Sheng; Tang, Tang K

    2012-01-01

    Summary The primary cilium is a microtubule-based structure protruded from the basal body analogous to the centriole. CPAP (centrosomal P4.1-associated protein) has previously been reported to be a cell cycle-regulated protein that controls centriole length. Mutations in CPAP cause primary microcephaly (MCPH) in humans. Here, using a cell-based system that we established to monitor cilia formation in neuronal CAD (Cath.a-differentiated) cells and hippocampal neurons, we found that CPAP is req...

  20. The Centrosome-Specific Phosphorylation of Cnn by Polo/Plk1 Drives Cnn Scaffold Assembly and Centrosome Maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Conduit, PT; Feng, Z; Richens, JH; Baumbach, J.; Wainman, A; Bakshi, SD; Dobbelaere, J; Johnson, S; Lea, SM; Raff, JW

    2014-01-01

    Summary Centrosomes are important cell organizers. They consist of a pair of centrioles surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM) that expands dramatically during mitosis—a process termed centrosome maturation. How centrosomes mature remains mysterious. Here, we identify a domain in Drosophila Cnn that appears to be phosphorylated by Polo/Plk1 specifically at centrosomes during mitosis. The phosphorylation promotes the assembly of a Cnn scaffold around the centrioles that is in constant flu...

  1. Abnormal centrosomal structure and duplication in Cep135-deficient vertebrate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanç, Burcu; Pütz, Monika; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Gergely, Fanni; Morrison, Ciaran G.

    2013-01-01

    Centrosomes are key microtubule-organizing centers that contain a pair of centrioles, conserved cylindrical, microtubule-based structures. Centrosome duplication occurs once per cell cycle and relies on templated centriole assembly. In many animal cells this process starts with the formation of a radially symmetrical cartwheel structure. The centrosomal protein Cep135 localizes to this cartwheel, but its role in vertebrates is not well understood. Here we examine the involvement of Cep135 in centriole function by disrupting the Cep135 gene in the DT40 chicken B-cell line. DT40 cells that lack Cep135 are viable and show no major defects in centrosome composition or function, although we note a small decrease in centriole numbers and a concomitant increase in the frequency of monopolar spindles. Furthermore, electron microscopy reveals an atypical structure in the lumen of Cep135-deficient centrioles. Centrosome amplification after hydroxyurea treatment increases significantly in Cep135-deficient cells, suggesting an inhibitory role for the protein in centrosome reduplication during S-phase delay. We propose that Cep135 is required for the structural integrity of centrioles in proliferating vertebrate cells, a role that also limits centrosome amplification in S-phase–arrested cells. PMID:23864714

  2. Estrutura fina do espermatozóide de Mellita quinquiesperforata Leske (Echinodermata do litoral norte do Brasil Fine structure of the spermatozoon of the Mellita quinquiesperforata (Echinodermata of the Northern littoral of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilson Matos

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The fine structure of the spermatozoon in the Mellita quinquiesperforata Leske, 1778 was studied. Collected from the Amazon region, were described by light and transmission electron microscopy. The spermatozoon consisted of a acrosome complex, nucleus, four to six mitochondria, two centrioles and flagellum. The acrosome was composed of a acrosome complex, the acrosomal vesicle and the subacrosomal space. The nucleus are composed by dense material. The middle piece contains 4-6 mitochondria which are arranged around the centrioles, the 9p+0, whose axoneme has the classic 9p+2 microtubular construction.

  3. A SAS-6-like protein suggests that the Toxoplasma conoid complex evolved from flagellar components

    OpenAIRE

    De Leon, Jessica; Scheumann, Nicole; Beatty, Wandy; Beck, Josh R; Tran, Johnson Q.; Yau, Candace; Bradley, Peter J.; Gull, Keith; Wickstead, Bill; Morrissette, Naomi S.

    2013-01-01

    SAS-6 is required for centriole biogenesis in diverse eukaryotes. Here, we describe a novel family of SAS-6-like (SAS6L) proteins that share an N-terminal domain with SAS-6 but lack coiled-coil tails. SAS6L proteins are found in a subset of eukaryotes that contain SAS-6, including diverse protozoa and green algae. In the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, SAS-6 localizes to the centriole but SAS6L is found above the conoid, an enigmatic tubulin-containing structure found at the apex of ...

  4. A novel family of katanin-like 2 protein isoforms (KATNAL2), interacting with nucleotide-binding proteins Nubp1 and Nubp2, are key regulators of different MT-based processes in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ververis, Antonis; Christodoulou, Andri; Christoforou, Maria; Kamilari, Christina; Lederer, Carsten W; Santama, Niovi

    2016-01-01

    Katanins are microtubule (MT)-severing AAA proteins with high phylogenetic conservation throughout the eukaryotes. They have been functionally implicated in processes requiring MT remodeling, such as spindle assembly in mitosis and meiosis, assembly/disassembly of flagella and cilia and neuronal morphogenesis. Here, we uncover a novel family of katanin-like 2 proteins (KATNAL2) in mouse, consisting of five alternatively spliced isoforms encoded by the Katnal2 genomic locus. We further demonstrate that in vivo these isoforms are able to interact with themselves, with each other and moreover directly and independently with MRP/MinD-type P-loop NTPases Nubp1 and Nubp2, which are integral components of centrioles, negative regulators of ciliogenesis and implicated in centriole duplication in mammalian cells. We find KATNAL2 localized on interphase MTs, centrioles, mitotic spindle, midbody and the axoneme and basal body of sensory cilia in cultured murine cells. shRNAi of Katnal2 results in inefficient cytokinesis and severe phenotypes of enlarged cells and nuclei, increased numbers of centrioles and the manifestation of aberrant multipolar mitotic spindles, mitotic defects, chromosome bridges, multinuclearity, increased MT acetylation and an altered cell cycle pattern. Silencing or stable overexpression of KATNAL2 isoforms drastically reduces ciliogenesis. In conclusion, KATNAL2s are multitasking enzymes involved in the same cell type in critically important processes affecting cytokinesis, MT dynamics, and ciliogenesis and are also implicated in cell cycle progression. PMID:26153462

  5. Regulated assembly of a supramolecular centrosome scaffold in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodruff, J. B.; Wueseke, O.; Viscardi, V.;

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome organizes microtubule arrays within animal cells and comprises two centrioles surrounded by an amorphous protein mass called the pericentriolar material (PCM). Despite the importance of centrosomes as microtubule-organizing centers, the mechanism and regulation of PCM assembly are ...

  6. Tankyrase 1 regulates centrosome function by controlling CPAP stability

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Mi Kyung; Dudognon, Charles; Smith, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Centrosomal P4.1-associated protein (CPAP) degradation and function is shown to be controlled by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase tankyrase 1. CPAP PARsylation precisely precedes its degradation in G1, limiting centriole elongation and ensuring proper centrosome function.

  7. Cytoplasmic inheritance of organelles in brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomura, Taizo; Nagasato, Chikako; Kimura, Kei

    2010-03-01

    Brown algae, together with diatoms and chrysophytes, are a member of the heterokonts. They have either a characteristic life cycle of diplohaplontic alternation of gametophytic and sporophytic generations that are isomorphic or heteromorphic, or a diplontic life cycle. Isogamy, anisogamy and oogamy have been recognized as the mode of sexual reproduction. Brown algae are the characteristic group having elaborated multicellular organization within the heterokonts. In this study, cytoplasmic inheritance of chloroplasts, mitochondria and centrioles was examined, with special focus on sexual reproduction and subsequent zygote development. In oogamy, chloroplasts and mitochondria are inherited maternally. In isogamy, chloroplasts in sporophyte cells are inherited biparentally (maternal or paternal); however, mitochondria (or mitochondrial DNA) derived from the female gamete only remained during zygote development after fertilization. Centrioles in zygotes are definitely derived from the male gamete, irrespective of the sexual reproduction pattern. Female centrioles in zygotes are selectively broken down within 1-2 h after fertilization. The remaining male centrioles play a crucial role as a part of the centrosome for microtubule organization, mitosis, determination of the cytokinetic plane and cytokinesis, as well as for maintaining multicellularity and regular morphogenesis in brown algae. PMID:20145971

  8. Organelle-cytoskeleton relationships in fibroblasts: mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and endoplasmic reticulum in phases of movement and growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Rees, D A

    1982-01-01

    actions of both colchicine and dihydrocytochalasin B showing that orientation and translocation depend on a co-ordinate interaction of microtubules and microfilamentous meshwork around the centrioles as origin. The Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum do not rearrange dramatically during the...

  9. The equatorial position of the metaphase plate ensures symmetric cell divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chia Huei; Gasic, Ivana; Huber-Reggi, Sabina P; Dudka, Damian; Barisic, Marin; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome alignment in the middle of the bipolar spindle is a hallmark of metazoan cell divisions. When we offset the metaphase plate position by creating an asymmetric centriole distribution on each pole, we find that metaphase plates relocate to the middle of the spindle before anaphase. The spindle assembly checkpoint enables this centering mechanism by providing cells enough time to correct metaphase plate position. The checkpoint responds to unstable kinetochore-microtubule attachments resulting from an imbalance in microtubule stability between the two half-spindles in cells with an asymmetric centriole distribution. Inactivation of the checkpoint prior to metaphase plate centering leads to asymmetric cell divisions and daughter cells of unequal size; in contrast, if the checkpoint is inactivated after the metaphase plate has centered its position, symmetric cell divisions ensue. This indicates that the equatorial position of the metaphase plate is essential for symmetric cell divisions. PMID:26188083

  10. The kinetochore protein, CENPF, is mutated in human ciliopathy and microcephaly phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waters, Aoife M; Asfahani, Rowan; Carroll, Paula; Bicknell, Louise; Lescai, Francesco; Bright, Alison; Chanudet, Estelle; Brooks, Anthony; Christou-Savina, Sonja; Osman, Guled; Walsh, Patrick; Bacchelli, Chiara; Chapgier, Ariane; Vernay, Bertrand; Bader, David M; Deshpande, Charu; O' Sullivan, Mary; Ocaka, Louise; Stanescu, Horia; Stewart, Helen S; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Otto, Edgar; Johnson, Colin A; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Katsanis, Nicholas; Davis, Erica; Kleta, Robert; Hubank, Mike; Doxsey, Stephen; Jackson, Andrew; Stupka, Elia; Winey, Mark; Beales, Philip L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in microtubule-regulating genes are associated with disorders of neuronal migration and microcephaly. Regulation of centriole length has been shown to underlie the pathogenesis of certain ciliopathy phenotypes. Using a next-generation sequencing approach, we identified...... mutations in a novel centriolar disease gene in a kindred with an embryonic lethal ciliopathy phenotype and in a patient with primary microcephaly. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole exome sequencing data from a non-consanguineous Caucasian kindred exhibiting mid-gestation lethality and ciliopathic malformations...... microcephaly, we identified two CENPF mutations [c.1744G>T, p.E582X; c.8692 C>T, p.R2898X] by whole exome sequencing. We found that CENP-F colocalised with Ninein at the subdistal appendages of the mother centriole in mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells. Intraflagellar transport protein-88 (IFT-88...

  11. Conductin/axin2 and Wnt signalling regulates centrosome cohesion

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjihannas, Michel V; Brückner, Martina; Behrens, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Wnt signalling regulates centrosome cohesion. Work by the Behrens group shows that conductin/axin2, a negative regulator of β-catenin, localizes to centrosomes by binding to the centriole-associated component C-Nap1. Conductin/axin2 promotes centrosome cohesion by phosphorylating β-catenin at centrosomes and the authors propose a model for the regulation of centrosome separation by conductin and Wnt signalling.

  12. The disassembly and reassembly of functional centrosomes in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Schnackenberg, Bradley J.; Khodjakov, Alexey; Rieder, Conly L.; Palazzo, Robert E.

    1998-01-01

    Animal cells contain a single centrosome that nucleates and organizes a polarized array of microtubules which functions in many cellular processes. In most cells the centrosome is composed of two centrioles surrounded by an ill-defined “cloud” of pericentriolar material. Recently, γ-tubulin-containing 25-nm diameter ring structures have been identified as likely microtubule nucleation sites within the pericentriolar material of isolated centrosomes. Here we demonstrate that when Spisula centr...

  13. Dimerization of CPAP Orchestrates Centrosome Cohesion Plasticity*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Lingli; Jin, Changjiang; Chu, Youjun; Varghese, Chris; Hua, Shasha; Yan, Feng; Miao, Yong; Liu, Jing; Mann, David; Ding, Xia; Zhang, Jiancun; Wang, Zhiyong; Dou, Zhen; Yao, XueBiao

    2009-01-01

    Centrosome cohesion and segregation are accurately regulated to prevent an aberrant separation of duplicated centrosomes and to ensure the correct formation of bipolar spindles by a tight coupling with cell cycle machinery. CPAP is a centrosome protein with five coiled-coil domains and plays an important role in the control of brain size in autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. Previous studies showed that CPAP interacts with tubulin and controls centriole length. Here, we reported that C...

  14. Phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A Maintains Spindle Pole Integrity during Mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    En-Ju Chou; Liang-Yi Hung; Chieh-Ju C. Tang; Wen-Bin Hsu; Hsin-Yi Wu; Pao-Chi Liao; Tang K. Tang

    2016-01-01

    CPAP is required for centriole elongation during S/G2 phase, but the role of CPAP in mitosis is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CPAP maintains spindle pole integrity through its phosphorylation by Aurora-A during mitosis. Depletion of CPAP induced a prolonged delay in mitosis, pericentriolar material (PCM) dispersion, and multiple mitotic abnormalities. Further studies demonstrated that CPAP directly interacts with and is phosphorylated by Aurora-A at serine 467 during mitosis. In...

  15. The primary cilium as a multiple cellular signaling scaffold in development and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hyuk Wan Ko*

    2012-01-01

    Primary cilia, single hair-like appendage on the surface of themost mammalian cells, were once considered to be vestigialcellular organelles for a past century because of their tinystructure and unknown function. Although they lack ancestralmotility function of cilia or flagella, they share common groundwith multiciliated motile cilia and flagella on internal structuresuch as microtubule based nine outer doublets nucleated from thebase of mother centrioles called basal body. Making cilia,cili...

  16. A highly conserved Poc1 protein characterized in embryos of the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica: localization and functional studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Fourrage

    Full Text Available Poc1 (Protein of Centriole 1 proteins are highly conserved WD40 domain-containing centriole components, well characterized in the alga Chlamydomonas, the ciliated protazoan Tetrahymena, the insect Drosophila and in vertebrate cells including Xenopus and zebrafish embryos. Functions and localizations related to the centriole and ciliary axoneme have been demonstrated for Poc1 in a range of species. The vertebrate Poc1 protein has also been reported to show an additional association with mitochondria, including enrichment in the specialized "germ plasm" region of Xenopus oocytes. We have identified and characterized a highly conserved Poc1 protein in the cnidarian Clytia hemisphaerica. Clytia Poc1 mRNA was found to be strongly expressed in eggs and early embryos, showing a punctate perinuclear localization in young oocytes. Fluorescence-tagged Poc1 proteins expressed in developing embryos showed strong localization to centrioles, including basal bodies. Anti-human Poc1 antibodies decorated mitochondria in Clytia, as reported in human cells, but failed to recognise endogenous or fluorescent-tagged Clytia Poc1. Injection of specific morpholino oligonucleotides into Clytia eggs prior to fertilization to repress Poc1 mRNA translation interfered with cell division from the blastula stage, likely corresponding to when neosynthesis normally takes over from maternally supplied protein. Cell cycle lengthening and arrest were observed, phenotypes consistent with an impaired centriolar biogenesis or function. The specificity of the defects could be demonstrated by injection of synthetic Poc1 mRNA, which restored normal development. We conclude that in Clytia embryos, Poc1 has an essentially centriolar localization and function.

  17. Allophagy: A macroautophagic process degrading spermatozoid-inherited organelles

    OpenAIRE

    Al Rawi, Sara; Louvet-Vallée, Sophie; Djeddi, Abderazak; Sachse, Martin; Culetto, Emmanuel; Hajjar, Connie; Boyd, Lynn; Legouis, Renaud; Galy, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    In most animals, during oocyte fertilization the spermatozoon provides DNA and centrioles together with some cytoplasm and organelles, but paternal mitochondria are generally eliminated in the embryo. Using the model animal C. elegans we have shown that paternal organelle degradation is dependent on the formation of autophagosomes a few minutes after fertilization. This macroautophagic process is preceded by an active ubiquitination of some spermatozoon-inherited organelles. Analysis of ferti...

  18. Allophagy: a macroautophagic process degrading spermatozoid-inherited organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rawi, Sara; Louvet-Vallée, Sophie; Djeddi, Abderazak; Sachse, Martin; Culetto, Emmanuel; Hajjar, Connie; Boyd, Lynn; Legouis, Renaud; Galy, Vincent

    2012-03-01

    In most animals, during oocyte fertilization the spermatozoon provides DNA and centrioles together with some cytoplasm and organelles, but paternal mitochondria are generally eliminated in the embryo. Using the model animal C. elegans we have shown that paternal organelle degradation is dependent on the formation of autophagosomes a few minutes after fertilization. This macroautophagic process is preceded by an active ubiquitination of some spermatozoon-inherited organelles. Analysis of fertilized mouse embryos suggests that this autophagy event is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:22361582

  19. Constructing and deconstructing roles for the primary cilium in tissue architecture and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Seeley, E. Scott; Nachury, Maxence V.

    2009-01-01

    Primary cilia are exquisitely designed sensory machines that have evolved at least three distinct sensory modalities to monitor the extracellular environment. The presence and activation of growth factor, morphogen, and hormone receptors within the confines of the ciliary membrane, the intrinsic physical relationship between the ciliary axoneme and the centriole, and the preferential assembly of primary cilia on the apical surfaces of tissue epithelia highlight the importance of this organell...

  20. RNG1 is a Late Marker of the Apical Polar Ring in Toxoplasma gondii

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Johnson Q.; de Leon, Jessica C.; Li, Catherine; Huynh, My-Hang; Beatty, Wandy; Morrissette, Naomi S.

    2010-01-01

    The asexually proliferating stages of apicomplexan parasites cause acute symptoms of diseases such as malaria, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis. These stages are characterized by the presence of two independent microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). Centrioles are found at the poles of the intranuclear spindle. The apical polar ring (APR), a MTOC unique to apicomplexans, organizes subpellicular microtubules which impose cell shape and apical polarity on these protozoa. Here we describe th...

  1. The Two SAS-6 Homologs in Tetrahymena thermophila Have Distinct Functions in Basal Body Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Culver, Brady P.; Meehl, Janet B.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Winey, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are structurally and functionally conserved organelles present in basal as well as higher eukaryotes. The assembly of cilia requires a microtubule based scaffold called a basal body. The ninefold symmetry characteristic of basal bodies and the structurally similar centriole is organized around a hub and spoke structure termed the cartwheel. To date, SAS-6 is one of the two clearly conserved components of the cartwheel. In some organisms, overexpression of SAS-6 causes the f...

  2. Centrocortin Cooperates with Centrosomin to Organize Drosophila Embryonic Cleavage Furrows

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Ling-Rong; Timothy L Megraw

    2009-01-01

    In the Drosophila early embryo the centrosome coordinates assembly of cleavage furrows [1–3]. Currently, the molecular pathway that links the centrosome and the cortical microfilaments is unknown. In centrosomin (cnn) mutants, where the centriole forms but the centrosome pericentriolar material (PCM) fails to assemble [4, 5], actin microfilaments are not organized into furrows at the syncytial cortex [6]. While CNN is required for centrosome assembly and function [4, 6, 7], little is known of...

  3. Cellular Mechanisms of Ciliary Length Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Keeling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cilia and flagella are evolutionarily conserved, membrane-bound, microtubule-based organelles on the surface of most eukaryotic cells. They play important roles in coordinating a variety of signaling pathways during growth, development, cell mobility, and tissue homeostasis. Defects in ciliary structure or function are associated with multiple human disorders called ciliopathies. These diseases affect diverse tissues, including, but not limited to the eyes, kidneys, brain, and lungs. Many processes must be coordinated simultaneously in order to initiate ciliogenesis. These include cell cycle, vesicular trafficking, and axonemal extension. Centrioles play a central role in both cell cycle progression and ciliogenesis, making the transition between basal bodies and mitotic spindle organizers integral to both processes. The maturation of centrioles involves a functional shift from cell division toward cilium nucleation which takes place concurrently with its migration and fusion to the plasma membrane. Several proteinaceous structures of the distal appendages in mother centrioles are required for this docking process. Ciliary assembly and maintenance requires a precise balance between two indispensable processes; so called assembly and disassembly. The interplay between them determines the length of the resulting cilia. These processes require a highly conserved transport system to provide the necessary substances at the tips of the cilia and to recycle ciliary turnover products to the base using a based microtubule intraflagellar transport (IFT system. In this review; we discuss the stages of ciliogenesis as well as mechanisms controlling the lengths of assembled cilia.

  4. Ultrastructural study of spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon of Acanthocephaloides incrassatus (Molin, 1858) (Acanthocephala, Paleacanthocephala, Arhythmacanthidae) from Anguilla anguilla (Pisces, Teleostei) in Urbino ponds (Corsica Island).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foata, J; Quilichini, Y; Dal Pos, N; Greani, S; Marchand, B

    2012-07-01

    This study deals with first ultrastructure features of Acanthocephaloides incrassatus (Paleacanthocephala, Arhythmacanthidae), a parasite of the fish Anguilla anguilla, reported for the first time in a Mediterranean pond. The spermiogenesis of A. incrassatus shows original specificities which have never been pointed out to this day in ultrastructural studies on spermiogenesis: the centriolar derivative is divided into two parts of different densities: an electron-dense, and the other, electron-lucent; a ring form has been observed on each side of the axoneme; a centriole with one central element. After the elaboration of a flagellum of 9+2 pattern, the centriole migrates in a nuclear groove. Rapidly, the centriole disappears. Then, the flagellum migration occurs by a series of processes and gives rise to a spermatozoon. The spermatozoon of A. incrassatus presents its own specificities: it exhibits an evolution of the centriolar derivative characterized by only nine peripheral elements deprived of a central element in the anterior part, then nine peripheral and one central element, and finally, nine peripheral elements with two central elements. An assumption is emitted on a probable correspondence of the evolution of the derivative centriolar during the spermiogenesis and the evolution that occurs in the spermatozoon. Protein granules also show different sizes and forms, full or emptied of their contents compared with data on other Acanthocephala. PMID:22307764

  5. Primary ciliogenesis requires the distal appendage component Cep123

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Sillibourne

    2013-04-01

    Primary cilium formation is initiated at the distal end of the mother centriole in a highly co-ordinated manner. This requires the capping of the distal end of the mother centriole with a ciliary vesicle and the anchoring of the basal body (mother centriole to the cell cortex, both of which are mediated by the distal appendages. Here, we show that the distal appendage protein Cep123 (Cep89/CCDC123 is required for the assembly, but not the maintenance, of a primary cilium. In the absence of Cep123 ciliary vesicle formation fails, suggesting that it functions in the early stages of primary ciliogenesis. Consistent with such a role, Cep123 interacts with the centriolar satellite proteins PCM-1, Cep290 and OFD1, all of which play a role in primary ciliogenesis. These interactions are mediated by a domain in the C-terminus of Cep123 (400–783 that overlaps the distal appendage-targeting domain (500–600. Together, the data implicate Cep123 as a new player in the primary ciliogenesis pathway and expand upon the role of the distal appendages in this process.

  6. Sperm-cell ultrastructure of North American sturgeons. IV. The pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus Forbes and Richardson, 1905)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLauro, M.N.; Walsh, R.A.; Peiffer, M.; Bennett, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    Sperm-cell morphology and ultrastructure in the pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) were examined using transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Metrics and structure were compared with similar metrics obtained from other published descriptions of sturgeon sperm cells. General morphology was found to be similar to that of sperm cells of the white (Acipenser transmontanus), lake (A. fulvescens), stellate (A. stellatus), Chinese (A. sinensis), Russian (A. gueldenstaedti colchicus), and shortnose (A. brevirostrum) sturgeons, which all shared a gradual tapering of the nuclear diameter from posterior to anterior, unlike that of the Atlantic sturgeon (A. oxyrhynchus). The sperm cell of the pallid sturgeon was similar in size to that of the Atlantic sturgeon, being only slightly larger. The sperm cell of the pallid sturgeon differed from those of other sturgeons chiefly in the acrosomal region, where the posterolateral projections (PLP) have the shape of an acute triangle and are arranged in a spiral about the longitudinal axis of the cell. The PLP were longer than those of other sturgeons, being twice the length of those of the Atlantic sturgeon and 58% longer than those of the lake sturgeon. Also, in cross section the acrosome had the shape of a hollow cone rather than the cap of an oak tree acorn, as was found in ultrastructural studies of other sturgeons. In addition, we were able to confirm that the structural arrangement of the distal centriole of the midpiece is identical with that of the proximal centriole: nine sets of microtubular triplets around the periphery of the centriole. This information is of potential use to fishery biologists, forensic biologists, zoologists, reproductive physiologists, taxonomists, evolutionary biologists, and aquaculturists.

  7. A comparative overview of the sperm centriolar complex in mammals and birds: Variations on a theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soley, John T

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the structure, function and anomalies of the sperm centriolar complex (CC) on a comparative basis between mammals and birds. The information is based on selected references from the literature supplemented by original observations on spermiogenesis and sperm structure in disparate mammalian (cheetah and cane rat) and avian (ostrich, rhea and emu) species. Whereas the basic structure of the CC (a diplosome surrounded by pericentriolar material) is similar in Aves and Mammalia, certain differences are apparent. Centriole reduction does not generally occur in birds, but when present as in oscines, involves the loss of the proximal centriole. In ratites, the distal centriole forms the core of the entire midpiece and incorporates the outer dense fibres in addition to initiating axoneme formation. The elements of the connecting piece are not segmented in birds and less complex in basic design than in mammals. The functions of the various components of the CC appear to be similar in birds and mammals. Despite obvious differences in sperm head shape, the centrosomal anomalies afflicting both vertebrate groups demonstrate structural uniformity across species and display a similar range of defects. Most abnormalities result from defective migration and alignment of the CC relative to the nucleus. The most severe manifestation is that of acephalic sperm, while angled tail attachment, abaxial and multiflagellate sperm reflect additional defective forms. The stump-tail defect is not observed in birds. A comparison of defective sperm formation and centrosomal dysfunction at the molecular level is currently difficult owing to the paucity of relevant information on avian sperm. PMID:26907939

  8. CENP-W plays a role in maintaining bipolar spindle structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kaczmarczyk

    Full Text Available The CENP-W/T complex was previously reported to be required for mitosis. HeLa cells depleted of CENP-W displayed profound mitotic defects, with mitotic timing delay, disorganized prometaphases and multipolar spindles as major phenotypic consequences. In this study, we examined the process of multipolar spindle formation induced by CENP-W depletion. Depletion of CENP-W in HeLa cells labeled with histone H2B and tubulin fluorescent proteins induced rapid fragmentation of originally bipolar spindles in a high proportion of cells. CENP-W depletion was associated with depletion of Hec1 at kinetochores. The possibility of promiscuous centrosomal duplication was ruled out by immunofluorescent examination of centrioles. However, centrioles were frequently observed to be abnormally split. In addition, a large proportion of the supernumerary poles lacked centrioles, but were positively stained with different centrosomal markers. These observations suggested that perturbation in spindle force distribution caused by defective kinetochores could contribute to a mechanical mechanism for spindle pole disruption. 'Spindle free' nocodazole arrested cells did not exhibit pole fragmentation after CENP-W depletion, showing that pole fragmentation is microtubule dependent. Inhibition of centrosome separation by monastrol reduced the incidence of spindle pole fragmentation, indicating that Eg5 plays a role in spindle pole disruption. Surprisingly, CENP-W depletion rescued the monopolar spindle phenotype of monastrol treatment, with an increased frequency of bipolar spindles observed after CENP-W RNAi. We overexpressed the microtubule cross-linking protein TPX2 to create spindle poles stabilized by the microtubule cross-linking activity of TPX2. Spindle pole fragmentation was suppressed in a TPX2-dependent fashion. We propose that CENP-W, by influencing proper kinetochore assembly, particularly microtubule docking sites, can confer spindle pole resistance to traction

  9. Ultrastructure of ostrich (Struthio camelus) spermatozoa: I. Transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soley, J T

    1993-06-01

    The origin and relationships of the tinamous (Order Tinamiformes), ratites (Order Struthioniformes, Rheiformes, Casuariiformes, Apterygiformes) and birds of the order Galliformes and Anseriformes is the subject of much debate and it has been suggested that the ultrastructural analysis of a wide variety of avian sperm may provide information relevant to this problem. This paper describes the fine structure of ostrich sperm and compares the results with published information for other non-passerine birds. Ostrich sperm display a short, conical acrosome which covers the tapered tip of the long, cylindrical nucleus. A nuclear invagination housing an acrosomal rod extends deep within the karyoplasm. A centriolar complex is situated beneath the head and consists of a short proximal centriole and a long (3.0 microns) distal centriole which extends the complete length of the midpiece. The central cavity of the distal centriole contains a pair of microtubules embedded in a rod of electron-dense material. The midpiece is surrounded by a mitochondrial sheath. Concentrations of fine granular material are present between the mitochondria. The principal-piece of the tail is demarcated from the midpiece by a distinct annulus and characterized by a ribbed fibrous sheath enclosing a typical axoneme. Rudimentary coarse fibres are observed between the fibrous sheath and the doublet microtubules of the axoneme in the proximal region of the principal-piece. The end-piece contains a disorganized collection of axonemal microtubules. Ostrich sperm differ in a number of respects from that of other non-passerine birds (the absence of a typical perforatorium; the presence of a ribbed fibrous sheath; a deep nuclear invagination; the structure and length of the distal centriole) but show a close similarity to sperm of the rhea and crested tinamou, both representatives of primitive avian families. These observations add further support to the theory that the ratites and tinamous constitute a

  10. Novel asymmetrically localizing components of human centrosomes identified by complementary proteomics methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lis; Vanselow, Katja; Skogs, Marie;

    2011-01-01

    constituents of human centrosomes. From a background of non-specific proteins, we distinguished 126 known and 40 candidate centrosomal proteins, of which 22 were confirmed as novel components. An antibody screen covering 4000 genes revealed an additional 113 candidates. We illustrate the power of our methods...... by identifying a novel set of five proteins preferentially associated with mother or daughter centrioles, comprising genes implicated in cell polarity. Pulsed labelling demonstrates a remarkable variation in the stability of centrosomal protein complexes. These spatiotemporal proteomics data provide...

  11. Structure of the SAS-6 cartwheel hub from Leishmania major

    OpenAIRE

    van Breugel, Mark; Wilcken, Rainer; McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Rutherford, Trevor J; Johnson, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    eLife digest Many cells have tiny hair-like structures called cilia on their surface that are important for communicating with other cells and for detecting changes in the cell’s surroundings. Some cilia also beat to move fluids across the cell surface—for example, to move mucus out of the lungs—or act as flagella that undergo rapid whip-like movements to propel cells along. Cilia are formed when a small cylindrical structure in the cell called a centriole docks against the cell membrane and ...

  12. Basal body structure in Trichonympha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Paul; Gönczy, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Trichonympha is a symbiotic flagellate of many species of termites and of the wood-feeding cockroach. Remarkably, this unicellular organism harbors up to over ten thousand flagella on its surface, which serve to propel it through the viscous environment of the host hindgut. In the 1960s, analysis of resin-embedded Trichonympha samples by electron microscopy revealed that the basal bodies that give rise to these flagella are exceptionally long, with a proximal, cartwheel-bearing, region some 50 times longer than that of regular centrioles. In recent years, this salient feature has prompted the analysis of the 3D architecture of Trichonympha basal bodies in the native state using cryo-electron tomography. The resulting ~40 Å resolution map of the basal body proximal region revealed a number of novel features that may be conserved in centrioles of other systems. These include proximal-distal polarity of the pinhead structure that links the cartwheel to centriolar microtubules, as well as of the linker between the A and the C microtubules. Moreover, this work demonstrated that the cartwheel is made of stacked ring-like structures that likely each comprise 18 molecules of SAS-6 proteins. PMID:26937279

  13. The primary cilium as a multiple cellular signaling scaffold in development and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk Wan Ko*

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary cilia, single hair-like appendage on the surface of themost mammalian cells, were once considered to be vestigialcellular organelles for a past century because of their tinystructure and unknown function. Although they lack ancestralmotility function of cilia or flagella, they share common groundwith multiciliated motile cilia and flagella on internal structuresuch as microtubule based nine outer doublets nucleated from thebase of mother centrioles called basal body. Making cilia,ciliogenesis, in cells depends on the cell cycle stage due to reuseof centrioles for cell division forming mitotic spindle pole (Mphase and assembling cilia from basal body (starting G1 phaseand maintaining most of interphase. Ciliary assembly requiredtwo conflicting processes such as assembly and disassembly andbalance between these two processes determines the length ofcilia. Both process required highly conserved transport system tosupply needed substance to grow tip of cilia and bring ciliaryturnover product back to the base of cilia using motor protein,kinesin and dynein, and transport protein complex, IFT particles.Disruption of ciliary structure or function causes multiple humandisorder called ciliopathies affecting disease of diverse ciliatedtissues ranging from eye, kidney, respiratory tract and brain.Recent explosion of research on the primary cilia and theirinvolvement on animal development and disease attracts scientificinterest on how extensively the function of cilia related to specificcell physiology and signaling pathway. In this review, I introducegeneral features of primary cilia and recent progress inunderstanding of the ciliary length control and signaling pathwaystransduced through primary cilia in vertebrates.

  14. Molecular basis of the STIL coiled coil oligomerization explains its requirement for de-novo formation of centrosomes in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Ahuvit; Amartely, Hadar; Rabinowicz, Noa; Shamir, Mai; Friedler, Assaf; Izraeli, Shai

    2016-01-01

    The STIL protein is essential for centriole replication and for the non-templated, de novo centriole biogenesis that is required for mammalian embryogenesis. Here we performed quantitative biophysical and structural analysis of the central short coiled coil domain (CCD) of STIL that is critical for its function. Using biophysical, biochemical and cell biology approaches, we identified the specific residues in the CCD that mediate the oligomerization, centrosomal localization and protein interactions of STIL. We characterized the structural properties of the coiled coil peptide using circular dichroism spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. We identified two regions in this domain, containing eight hydrophobic residues, which mediate the coiled coil oligomerization. Mutations in these residues destabilized the coiled coil thermodynamically but in most cases did not affect its secondary structure. Reconstituting mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking endogenous Stil, we show that STIL oligomerization mediated by these residues is not only important for the centrosomal functions of STIL during the canonical duplication process but also for de-novo formation of centrosomes. PMID:27075531

  15. CEP164-null cells generated by genome editing show a ciliation defect with intact DNA repair capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Owen M; Gaboriau, David; Karakaya, Kadin; King, Sinéad; Dantas, Tiago J; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Krämer, Alwin; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2016-05-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule structures that extend from the distal end of the mature, mother centriole. CEP164 is a component of the distal appendages carried by the mother centriole that is required for primary cilium formation. Recent data have implicated CEP164 as a ciliopathy gene and suggest that CEP164 plays some roles in the DNA damage response (DDR). We used reverse genetics to test the role of CEP164 in the DDR. We found that conditional depletion of CEP164 in chicken DT40 cells using an auxin-inducible degron led to no increase in sensitivity to DNA damage induced by ionising or ultraviolet irradiation. Disruption of CEP164 in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells blocked primary cilium formation but did not affect cellular proliferation or cellular responses to ionising or ultraviolet irradiation. Furthermore, we observed no localisation of CEP164 to the nucleus using immunofluorescence microscopy and analysis of multiple tagged forms of CEP164. Our data suggest that CEP164 is not required in the DDR. PMID:26966185

  16. RNG1 is a late marker of the apical polar ring in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Johnson Q; de Leon, Jessica C; Li, Catherine; Huynh, My-Hang; Beatty, Wandy; Morrissette, Naomi S

    2010-09-01

    The asexually proliferating stages of apicomplexan parasites cause acute symptoms of diseases such as malaria, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis. These stages are characterized by the presence of two independent microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). Centrioles are found at the poles of the intranuclear spindle. The apical polar ring (APR), a MTOC unique to apicomplexans, organizes subpellicular microtubules which impose cell shape and apical polarity on these protozoa. Here we describe the characteristics of a novel protein that localizes to the APR of Toxoplasma gondii which we have named ring-1 (RNG1). There are related RNG1 proteins in Neospora caninum and Sarcocystis neurona but no obvious homologs in Plasmodium spp., Cryptosporidium spp. or Babesia spp. RNG1 is a small, low-complexity, detergent-insoluble protein that assembles at the APR very late in the process of daughter parasite replication. We were unable to knock-out the RNG1 gene, suggesting that its gene product is essential. Tagged RNG1 lines have also allowed us to visualize the APR during growth of Toxoplasma in the microtubule-disrupting drug oryzalin. Oryzalin inhibits nuclear division and cytokinesis although Toxoplasma growth continues, and similar to earlier observations of unchecked centriole duplication in oryzalin-treated parasites, the APR continues to duplicate during aberrant parasite growth. PMID:20658557

  17. Morphology of the male reproductive system and sperm ultrastructure of the egg parasitoid Gryon pennsylvanicum (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Francesco; Gottardo, Marco; Dallai, Romano; Roversi, Pio Federico

    2013-07-01

    Gryon pennsylvanicum is a platygastrid hymenopteran that has lately received increasing attention in Europe due to its possible use in biological control of the conifer seed bug pest Leptoglossus occidentalis. Here the male reproductive system and the spermatogenesis of this species, along with those of Gryon muscaeformis, are examined ultrastructurally for the first time. The male genital system is formed by a pair of testes, each containing only one follicle, a pair of accessory glands and deferent ducts connected to a single ejaculatory duct. All the stages of spermatogenesis are described in detail. Characteristic features of the Gryon spp. sperm, which are 100 μm long, are the presence of a polygonal nucleus, only one mitochondrial derivative, the occurrence of the centriole adjunct and a typical insect 9 + 9 + 2 flagellar axoneme. The single derivative, however, results from a process in which one of the two mitochondria is lost during spermiogenesis. Unlike in other insects, two centrioles occur in spermatids as a consequence of the ameiotic parthenogenesis. These characteristics stand as a valuable tool for phylogenetic inferences. Furthermore this study suggests a useful strategy for laboratory mass rearing. PMID:23567492

  18. Dissecting the function and assembly of acentriolar microtubule organizing centers in Drosophila cells in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Baumbach

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acentriolar microtubule organizing centers (aMTOCs are formed during meiosis and mitosis in several cell types, but their function and assembly mechanism is unclear. Importantly, aMTOCs can be overactive in cancer cells, enhancing multipolar spindle formation, merotelic kinetochore attachment and aneuploidy. Here we show that aMTOCs can form in acentriolar Drosophila somatic cells in vivo via an assembly pathway that depends on Asl, Cnn and, to a lesser extent, Spd-2--the same proteins that appear to drive mitotic centrosome assembly in flies. This finding enabled us to ablate aMTOC formation in acentriolar cells, and so perform a detailed genetic analysis of the contribution of aMTOCs to acentriolar mitotic spindle formation. Here we show that although aMTOCs can nucleate microtubules, they do not detectably increase the efficiency of acentriolar spindle assembly in somatic fly cells. We find that they are required, however, for robust microtubule array assembly in cells without centrioles that also lack microtubule nucleation from around the chromatin. Importantly, aMTOCs are also essential for dynein-dependent acentriolar spindle pole focusing and for robust cell proliferation in the absence of centrioles and HSET/Ncd (a kinesin essential for acentriolar spindle pole focusing in many systems. We propose an updated model for acentriolar spindle pole coalescence by the molecular motors Ncd/HSET and dynein in conjunction with aMTOCs.

  19. Dissecting the function and assembly of acentriolar microtubule organizing centers in Drosophila cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Janina; Novak, Zsofia Anna; Raff, Jordan W; Wainman, Alan

    2015-05-01

    Acentriolar microtubule organizing centers (aMTOCs) are formed during meiosis and mitosis in several cell types, but their function and assembly mechanism is unclear. Importantly, aMTOCs can be overactive in cancer cells, enhancing multipolar spindle formation, merotelic kinetochore attachment and aneuploidy. Here we show that aMTOCs can form in acentriolar Drosophila somatic cells in vivo via an assembly pathway that depends on Asl, Cnn and, to a lesser extent, Spd-2--the same proteins that appear to drive mitotic centrosome assembly in flies. This finding enabled us to ablate aMTOC formation in acentriolar cells, and so perform a detailed genetic analysis of the contribution of aMTOCs to acentriolar mitotic spindle formation. Here we show that although aMTOCs can nucleate microtubules, they do not detectably increase the efficiency of acentriolar spindle assembly in somatic fly cells. We find that they are required, however, for robust microtubule array assembly in cells without centrioles that also lack microtubule nucleation from around the chromatin. Importantly, aMTOCs are also essential for dynein-dependent acentriolar spindle pole focusing and for robust cell proliferation in the absence of centrioles and HSET/Ncd (a kinesin essential for acentriolar spindle pole focusing in many systems). We propose an updated model for acentriolar spindle pole coalescence by the molecular motors Ncd/HSET and dynein in conjunction with aMTOCs. PMID:26020779

  20. Spermiogenesis and spermatozoon ultrastructure of the cranial digenean Troglotrema acutum (Leuckart, 1842).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, Jordi; Fournier-Chambrillon, Christine; Fournier, Pascal; Torres, Jordi

    2006-06-01

    Ultrastructure of spermiogenesis and the main characters of the mature spermatozoon of Troglotrema acutum are described by means of transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were obtained from the nasolacrimal sinuses of an American mink (Mustela vison). Spermiogenesis in T. acutum follows the general pattern of digeneans. The zone of differentiation is a conical-shaped area bordered by cortical microtubules and delimited at its base by a ring of arched membranes. This area contains 2 centrioles associated with striated rootlets and an intercentriolar body between them. The centrioles develop 2 free flagella that grow ortogonally to the median cytoplasmic process. The posterior flagellar rotation and proximodistal fusion of the free flagella with the median cytoplasmic process originate the spermatozoon. The mature spermatozoon of T. acutum is characterized by the presence of 2 axonemes of different lengths presenting the 9+'1' trepaxonematan pattern, 2 bundles of parallel cortical microtubules, 2 mitochondria, a nucleus, and granules of glycogen. These ultrastructural characters are compared with other digenean species previously studied and the importance of different spermatological features is discussed. PMID:16883984

  1. A novel role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR in centrosome amplification - implications for chemoprevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Payel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Centrosome aberrations can cause genomic instability and correlate with malignant progression in common human malignancies such as breast and prostate cancer. Deregulation of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2 activity has previously been shown to be critically involved in centrosome overduplication. We therefore test here whether small molecule CDK inhibitors derived from the bis-indole indirubin can be used to suppress centrosome aberrations as a novel approach to chemoprevention of malignant progression. Results As expected, we found that the CDK inhibitor indirubin-3'-oxime (IO suppresses centrosome amplification in breast cancer cells. However, we made the unexpected discovery that indirubin-derived compounds that have been chemically modified to be inactive as kinase inhibitors such as 1-methyl-indirubin-3'-oxime (MeIO still significantly reduced centrosome amplification. All indirubins used in the present study are potent agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR, which is known for its important role in the cellular metabolism of xenobiotics. To corroborate our results, we first show that the coincidence of nuclear AhR overexpression, reflecting a constitutive activation, and numerical centrosome aberrations correlates significantly with malignancy in mammary tissue specimens. Remarkably, a considerable proportion (72.7% of benign mammary tissue samples scored also positive for nuclear AhR overexpression. We furthermore provide evidence that continued expression of endogenous AhR is critical to promote centriole overduplication induced by cyclin E and that AhR and cyclin E may function in the same pathway. Overexpression of the AhR in the absence of exogenous ligands was found to rapidly disrupt centriole duplication control. Nonetheless, the AhR agonists IO and MeIO were still found to significantly reduce centriole overduplication stimulated by ectopic AhR expression. Conclusions Our results indicate that

  2. Cyclin G2 is a centrosome-associated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that influences microtubule stability and induces a p53-dependent cell cycle arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyclin G2 is an atypical cyclin that associates with active protein phosphatase 2A. Cyclin G2 gene expression correlates with cell cycle inhibition; it is significantly upregulated in response to DNA damage and diverse growth inhibitory stimuli, but repressed by mitogenic signals. Ectopic expression of cyclin G2 promotes cell cycle arrest, cyclin dependent kinase 2 inhibition and the formation of aberrant nuclei [Bennin, D. A., Don, A. S., Brake, T., McKenzie, J. L., Rosenbaum, H., Ortiz, L., DePaoli-Roach, A. A., and Horne, M. C. (2002). Cyclin G2 associates with protein phosphatase 2A catalytic and regulatory B' subunits in active complexes and induces nuclear aberrations and a G1/S-phase cell cycle arrest. J Biol Chem 277, 27449-67]. Here we report that endogenous cyclin G2 copurifies with centrosomes and microtubules (MT) and that ectopic G2 expression alters microtubule stability. We find exogenous and endogenous cyclin G2 present at microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs) where it colocalizes with centrosomal markers in a variety of cell lines. We previously reported that cyclin G2 forms complexes with active protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and colocalizes with PP2A in a detergent-resistant compartment. We now show that cyclin G2 and PP2A colocalize at MTOCs in transfected cells and that the endogenous proteins copurify with isolated centrosomes. Displacement of the endogenous centrosomal scaffolding protein AKAP450 that anchors PP2A at the centrosome resulted in the depletion of centrosomal cyclin G2. We find that ectopic expression of cyclin G2 induces microtubule bundling and resistance to depolymerization, inhibition of polymer regrowth from MTOCs and a p53-dependent cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we determined that a 100 amino acid carboxy-terminal region of cyclin G2 is sufficient to both direct GFP localization to centrosomes and induce cell cycle inhibition. Colocalization of endogenous cyclin G2 with only one of two GFP-centrin-tagged centrioles, the

  3. Establishment of a human malignant fibrous histiocytoma cell line, COMA. Characterization By conventional cytogenetics, comparative genomic hybridization, and multiplex fluorescence In situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairal, A; Chibon, F; Rousselet, A; Couturier, J; Terrier, P; Aurias, A

    2000-09-01

    The human COMA cell line has been established from a storiform pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). As expected for this tumor type, a very complex karyotype was observed after R-banding analysis. An extensive analysis by 24-color painting, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed. Twelve complex marker chromosomes recurrently observed were clearly identified; among them, three were systematically present in all analyzed metaphases. Amplifications detected by CGH were refined by FISH with probes specific for various candidate loci. A significant aneuploidy and numerous micronuclei were observed, which could be related to the anomalies of centriole numbers detected in a proportion of cells. Such an analysis, performed on a series of MFH cell lines, would allow the delineation of the genomic alterations specific for the oncogenesis or progression of this complex tumor type or both. PMID:11063793

  4. Symbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.

    1991-01-01

    Ongoing work to test the hypothesis of the origin of eukaryotic cell organelles by microbial symbioses is discussed. Because of the widespread acceptance of the serial endosymbiotic theory (SET) of the origin of plastids and mitochondria, the idea of the symbiotic origin of the centrioles and axonemes for spirochete bacteria motility symbiosis was tested. Intracellular microtubular systems are purported to derive from symbiotic associations between ancestral eukaryotic cells and motile bacteria. Four lines of approach to this problem are being pursued: (1) cloning the gene of a tubulin-like protein discovered in Spirocheata bajacaliforniesis; (2) seeking axoneme proteins in spirochets by antibody cross-reaction; (3) attempting to cultivate larger, free-living spirochetes; and (4) studying in detail spirochetes (e.g., Cristispira) symbiotic with marine animals. Other aspects of the investigation are presented.

  5. The Centrosome Undergoes Plk1-Independent Interphase Maturation during Inflammation and Mediates Cytokine Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertii, Anastassiia; Ivshina, Maria; Zimmerman, Wendy; Hehnly, Heidi; Kant, Shashi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2016-05-23

    Cytokine production is a necessary event in the immune response during inflammation and is associated with mortality during sepsis, autoimmune disorders, cancer, and diabetes. Stress-activated MAP kinase signaling cascades that mediate cytokine synthesis are well established. However, the downstream fate of cytokines before they are secreted remains elusive. We report that pro-inflammatory stimuli lead to recruitment of pericentriolar material, specifically pericentrin and γ-tubulin, to the centrosome. This is accompanied by enhanced microtubule nucleation and enrichment of the recycling endosome component FIP3, all of which are hallmarks of centrosome maturation during mitosis. Intriguingly, centrosome maturation occurs during interphase in an MLK-dependent manner, independent of the classic mitotic kinase, Plk1. Centrosome disruption by chemical prevention of centriole assembly or genetic ablation of pericentrin attenuated interleukin-6, interleukin-10, and MCP1 secretion, suggesting that the centrosome is critical for cytokine production. Our results reveal a function of the centrosome in innate immunity. PMID:27219065

  6. Postfertilization autophagy of sperm organelles prevents paternal mitochondrial DNA transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rawi, Sara; Louvet-Vallée, Sophie; Djeddi, Abderazak; Sachse, Martin; Culetto, Emmanuel; Hajjar, Connie; Boyd, Lynn; Legouis, Renaud; Galy, Vincent

    2011-11-25

    In sexual reproduction of most animals, the spermatozoon provides DNA and centrioles, together with some cytoplasm and organelles, to the oocyte that is being fertilized. Paternal mitochondria and their genomes are generally eliminated in the embryo by an unknown degradation mechanism. We show that, upon fertilization, a Caenorhabditis elegans spermatozoon triggers the recruitment of autophagosomes within minutes and subsequent paternal mitochondria degradation. Whereas the nematode-specific sperm membranous organelles are ubiquitinated before autophagosome formation, the mitochondria are not. The degradation of both paternal structures and mitochondrial DNA requires an LC3-dependent autophagy. Analysis of fertilized mouse embryos shows the localization of autophagy markers, which suggests that this autophagy event is evolutionarily conserved to prevent both the transmission of paternal mitochondrial DNA to the offspring and the establishment of heteroplasmy. PMID:22033522

  7. Holographic View of the Brain Memory Mechanism Based on Evanescent Superluminal Photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Musha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available D. Pollen and M. Trachtenberg proposed the holographic brain theory to help explain the existence of photographic memories in some people. They suggested that such individuals had more vivid memories because they somehow could access a very large region of their memory holograms. Hameroff suggested in his paper that cylindrical neuronal microtubule cavities, or centrioles, function as waveguides for the evanescent photons for quantum signal processing. The supposition is that microtubular structures of the brain function as a coherent fiber bundle set used to store holographic images, as would a fiber-optic holographic system. In this paper, the author proposes that superluminal photons propagating inside the microtubules via evanescent waves could provide the access needed to record or retrieve a quantum coherent entangled holographic memory.

  8. Mesocestoides lineatus (Goeze, 1782) (Mesocestoididae): new data on sperm ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, Jordi; Eira, Catarina; Swiderski, Zdzisław; Conn, David Bruce

    2007-06-01

    Spermiogenesis and the ultrastructural characters of the spermatozoon of Mesocestoides lineatus are described by means of transmission electron microscopy, including cytochemical analysis for glycogen. Materials were obtained from a golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) after experimental infection with tetrathyridia metacestodes obtained from naturally infected lizards (Anolis carolinensis) from Louisiana. Spermiogenesis in M. lineatus is characterized by the orthogonal growth of a free flagellum, a flagellar rotation, and a proximodistal fusion. The zone of differentiation contains 2 centrioles associated with striated rootlets and a reduced intercentriolar body. The mature spermatozoon of M. lineatus lacks a mitochondrion, and it is characterized by the presence of (1) a single, spiraled, crested body 150 nm thick; (2) a single axoneme of the 9+'1' pattern of trepaxonematan Platyhelminthes; (3) a parallel and reduced row of submembranous cortical microtubules; (4) a spiraled cordon of glycogen granules; and (5) a spiraled nucleus encircling the axoneme. PMID:17626346

  9. Sperm tail differentiation in the nudibranch mollusc Hypselodoris tricolor (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, A; Moreno, F J; García-Herdugo, G

    1988-06-01

    The sperm axoneme of Hypselodoris tricolor forms from a single centriole that is located initially beneath the plasma membrane and then migrates to the nuclear surface. A conspicuous centriolar adjunct-like formation is present in the neck of midspermatids, but it becomes very reduced at the end of spermiogenesis. In spermatocyte and spermatid mitochondria, intracristal bodies originate from the accumulation of a dense material in some cristae. From our observations and foregoing reports, it may be concluded that the process of sperm tail differentiation in opisthobranchs resembles that in pulmonates, whereas it differs in many respects from that occurring in prosobranchs. The appearance of intracristal bodies in modified mitochondria seems to be a special feature of spermatogenesis in the opisthobranchs that does not occur in the two other groups of gastropod molluscs. PMID:3235038

  10. Centriolar CPAP/SAS-4 Imparts Slow Processive Microtubule Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashwani; Aher, Amol; Dynes, Nicola J; Frey, Daniel; Katrukha, Eugene A; Jaussi, Rolf; Grigoriev, Ilya; Croisier, Marie; Kammerer, Richard A; Akhmanova, Anna; Gönczy, Pierre; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-05-23

    Centrioles are fundamental and evolutionarily conserved microtubule-based organelles whose assembly is characterized by microtubule growth rates that are orders of magnitude slower than those of cytoplasmic microtubules. Several centriolar proteins can interact with tubulin or microtubules, but how they ensure the exceptionally slow growth of centriolar microtubules has remained mysterious. Here, we bring together crystallographic, biophysical, and reconstitution assays to demonstrate that the human centriolar protein CPAP (SAS-4 in worms and flies) binds and "caps" microtubule plus ends by associating with a site of β-tubulin engaged in longitudinal tubulin-tubulin interactions. Strikingly, we uncover that CPAP activity dampens microtubule growth and stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting catastrophes and promoting rescues. We further establish that the capping function of CPAP is important to limit growth of centriolar microtubules in cells. Our results suggest that CPAP acts as a molecular lid that ensures slow assembly of centriolar microtubules and, thereby, contributes to organelle length control. PMID:27219064

  11. Ultrastructure of spermatozoa of Onthophagus taurus (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae) exhibits heritable variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Michael; Simmons, Leigh W.

    2011-03-01

    Sperm competition is thought to be an important selective pressure shaping sperm form and function. However, few studies have moved beyond gross examinations of sperm morphology. Sperm length is subject to sexual selection via sperm competition in the scarab beetle Onthophagus taurus. Here, the structure and ultrastructure of spermatozoa in this species were investigated using light and electron microscopy. Spermatozoa were found to be filiform, measuring about 1,200 mm in length. The sperm head consists of a three-layered acrosome and a nuclear region bearing the anterior extension of the centriole adjunct. Acrosome and nuclear regions are bilaterally symmetric, with their axes of symmetry being orthogonal to each other. Head and flagellar structures are connected by a well-developed centriole adjunct. The sperm heads are asymmetrically surrounded by accessory material and embedded into the cytoplasm of the spermatocyst cell. The accessory material is produced inside the spermatids and then transferred to the outside due to a new membrane formed around the sperm's organelles. The old spermatid membrane separates the accessory material from the cyst cell. The flagellum contains a 9+9+2 axoneme, two accessory bodies, and two mitochondrial derivatives of unequal size. The major mitochondrial derivative is significantly larger than the minor one. The axoneme is arranged in a sinusoidal manner parallel along the major mitochondrial derivative. The spermatozoa show no progressive motility when released in buffer solution which is likely to be the result of the flagellar arrangement and the structure of the major mitochondrial derivative. The cross-sectional area of the minor and the major mitochondrial derivatives show different patterns of genetic variation. The data provide the first estimates of genetic variation in sperm ultrastructure for any species, and give evidence for the persistence of genetic variation in ultrastructure required for the rapid and divergent

  12. Opposing effects of pericentrin and microcephalin on the pericentriolar material regulate CHK1 activation in the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonczak, A K; Mullee, L I; Wang, Y; Comartin, D; Inoue, T; Pelletier, L; Morrison, C G

    2016-04-14

    Genotoxic stresses lead to centrosome amplification, a frequently-observed feature in cancer that may contribute to genome instability and to tumour cell invasion. Here we have explored how the centrosome controls DNA damage responses. For most of the cell cycle, centrosomes consist of two centrioles embedded in the proteinaceous pericentriolar material (PCM). Recent data indicate that the PCM is not an amorphous assembly of proteins, but actually a highly organised scaffold around the centrioles. The large coiled-coil protein, pericentrin, participates in PCM assembly and has been implicated in the control of DNA damage responses (DDRs) through its interactions with checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) and microcephalin (MCPH1). CHK1 is required for DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification, whereas MCPH1 deficiency greatly increases the amplification seen after DNA damage. We found that the PCM showed a marked expansion in volume and a noticeable change in higher-order organisation after ionising radiation treatment. PCM expansion was dependent on CHK1 kinase activity and was potentiated by MCPH1 deficiency. Furthermore, pericentrin deficiency or mutation of a separase cleavage site blocked DNA damage-induced PCM expansion. The extent of nuclear CHK1 activation after DNA damage reflected the level of PCM expansion, with a reduction in pericentrin-deficient or separase cleavage site mutant-expressing cells, and an increase in MCPH1-deficient cells that was suppressed by the loss of pericentrin. Deletion of the nuclear export signal of CHK1 led to its hyperphosphorylation after irradiation and reduced centrosome amplification. Deletion of the nuclear localisation signal led to low CHK1 activation and low centrosome amplification. From these data, we propose a feedback loop from the PCM to the nuclear DDR in which CHK1 regulates pericentrin-dependent PCM expansion to control its own activation. PMID:26165835

  13. Pericentriolar Targeting of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus GAG Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhi Zhang

    Full Text Available The Gag protein of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV is the chief determinant of subcellular targeting. Electron microscopy studies show that MMTV Gag forms capsids within the cytoplasm and assembles as immature particles with MMTV RNA and the Y box binding protein-1, required for centrosome maturation. Other betaretroviruses, such as Mason-Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV, assemble adjacent to the pericentriolar region because of a cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal in the Matrix protein. Previous studies suggest that the MMTV Matrix protein may also harbor a similar cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal. Herein, we show that a substantial fraction of MMTV Gag localizes to the pericentriolar region. This was observed in HEK293T, HeLa human cell lines and the mouse derived NMuMG mammary gland cells. Moreover, MMTV capsids were observed adjacent to centrioles when expressed from plasmids encoding either MMTV Gag alone, Gag-Pro-Pol or full-length virus. We found that the cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal in the MMTV Matrix protein was sufficient for pericentriolar targeting, whereas mutation of the glutamine to alanine at position 56 (D56/A resulted in plasma membrane localization, similar to previous observations from mutational studies of M-PMV Gag. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy studies showed that MMTV capsids accumulate around centrioles suggesting that, similar to M-PMV, the pericentriolar region may be a site for MMTV assembly. Together, the data imply that MMTV Gag targets the pericentriolar region as a result of the MMTV cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal, possibly aided by the Y box protein-1 required for the assembly of centrosomal microtubules.

  14. Actin and Arp2/3 localize at the centrosome of interphase cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan, E-mail: jan.gettemans@vib-ugent.be

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Actin was detected at the centrosome with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. {yields} Centrosomal actin was found in interphase but not mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. {yields} Neither the anti-actin antibody C4 that binds to globular, monomer actin, nor the anti-actin antibody 2G2 that recognizes the nuclear conformation of actin detect actin at the centrosome. {yields} The Arp2/3 complex transiently localizes at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. -- Abstract: Although many actin binding proteins such as cortactin and the Arp2/3 activator WASH localize at the centrosome, the presence and conformation of actin at the centrosome has remained elusive. Here, we report the localization of actin at the centrosome in interphase but not in mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. Centrosomal actin was detected with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. In addition, we report the transient presence of the Arp2/3 complex at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. Overexpression of an Arp2/3 component resulted in expansion of the pericentriolar matrix and selective accumulation of the Arp2/3 component in the pericentriolar matrix. Altogether, we hypothesize that the centrosome transiently recruits Arp2/3 to perform processes such as centrosome separation prior to mitotic entry, whereas the observed constitutive centrosomal actin staining in interphase cells reinforces the current model of actin-based centrosome reorientation toward the leading edge in migrating cells.

  15. Site-specific basal body duplication in Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Eileen T; Dutcher, Susan K

    2014-02-01

    Correct centriole/basal body positioning is required for numerous biological processes, yet how the cell establishes this positioning is poorly understood. Analysis of centriolar/basal body duplication provides a key to understanding basal body positioning and function. Chlamydomonas basal bodies contain structural features that enable specific triplet microtubules to be specified. Electron tomography of cultures enriched in mitotic cells allowed us to follow basal body duplication and identify a specific triplet at which duplication occurs. Probasal bodies elongate in prophase, assemble transitional fibers (TF) and are segregated with a mature basal body near the poles of the mitotic spindle. A ring of nine-singlet microtubules is initiated at metaphase, orthogonal to triplet eight. At telophase/cytokinesis, triplet microtubule blades assemble first at the distal end, rather than at the proximal cartwheel. The cartwheel undergoes significant changes in length during duplication, which provides further support for its scaffolding role. The uni1-1 mutant contains short basal bodies with reduced or absent TF and defective transition zones, suggesting that the UNI1 gene product is important for coordinated probasal body elongation and maturation. We suggest that this site-specific basal body duplication ensures the correct positioning of the basal body to generate landmarks for intracellular patterning in the next generation. PMID:24166861

  16. Mutation in CEP63 co-segregating with developmental dyslexia in a Swedish family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Svensson, Idor; Darki, Fahimeh; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Lindvall, Jessica M; Ameur, Adam; Jacobsson, Christer; Klingberg, Torkel; Kere, Juha; Matsson, Hans

    2015-11-01

    Developmental dyslexia is the most common learning disorder in children. Problems in reading and writing are likely due to a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors, resulting in reduced power of studies of the genetic factors underlying developmental dyslexia. Our approach in the current study was to perform exome sequencing of affected and unaffected individuals within an extended pedigree with a familial form of developmental dyslexia. We identified a two-base mutation, causing a p.R229L amino acid substitution in the centrosomal protein 63 kDa (CEP63), co-segregating with developmental dyslexia in this pedigree. This mutation is novel, and predicted to be highly damaging for the function of the protein. 3D modelling suggested a distinct conformational change caused by the mutation. CEP63 is localised to the centrosome in eukaryotic cells and is required for maintaining normal centriole duplication and control of cell cycle progression. We found that a common polymorphism in the CEP63 gene had a significant association with brain white matter volume. The brain regions were partly overlapping with the previously reported region influenced by polymorphisms in the dyslexia susceptibility genes DYX1C1 and KIAA0319. We hypothesise that CEP63 is particularly important for brain development and might control the proliferation and migration of cells when those two events need to be highly coordinated. PMID:26400686

  17. Physical association between a novel plasma-membrane structure and centrosome orients cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Takefumi; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    In the last mitotic division of the epidermal lineage in the ascidian embryo, the cells divide stereotypically along the anterior-posterior axis. During interphase, we found that a unique membrane structure invaginates from the posterior to the centre of the cell, in a microtubule-dependent manner. The invagination projects toward centrioles on the apical side of the nucleus and associates with one of them. Further, a cilium forms on the posterior side of the cell and its basal body remains associated with the invagination. A laser ablation experiment suggests that the invagination is under tensile force and promotes the posterior positioning of the centrosome. Finally, we showed that the orientation of the invaginations is coupled with the polarized dynamics of centrosome movements and the orientation of cell division. Based on these findings, we propose a model whereby this novel membrane structure orchestrates centrosome positioning and thus the orientation of cell division axis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16550.001 PMID:27502556

  18. Primary cilium - antenna-like structure on the surface of most mammalian cell types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary cilium is a sensory solitary non-motile microtubule-based organelle protruding in the quiescent phase of the cell cycle from the surface of the majority of human cells, including embryonic cells, stem cells and stromal cells of malignant tumors. The presence of a primary cilium on the surface of a cell is transient, limited to the quiescent G1(G0) phase and the beginning of the S phase of the cell cycle. The primary cilium is formed from the mother centriole. Primary cilia are key coordinators of signaling pathways during development and tissue homeostasis and, when deffective, they are a major cause of human diseases and developmental disorders, now commonly referred to as ciliopathies. Most cancer cells do not possess a primary cilium. The loss of the primary cilium is a regular feature of neoplastic transformation in the majority of solid tumors. The primary cilium could serve as a tumor suppressor organelle. The aim of this paper was to provide a review of the current knowledge of the primary cilium.

  19. Polyglutamylated Tubulin Binding Protein C1orf96/CSAP Is Involved in Microtubule Stabilization in Mitotic Spindles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Hamada, Mayako; Sato, Nobuko; Toramoto, Iyo

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome-associated C1orf96/Centriole, Cilia and Spindle-Associated Protein (CSAP) targets polyglutamylated tubulin in mitotic microtubules (MTs). Loss of CSAP causes critical defects in brain development; however, it is unclear how CSAP association with MTs affects mitosis progression. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of CSAP with mitotic spindles. Loss of CSAP caused MT instability in mitotic spindles and resulted in mislocalization of Nuclear protein that associates with the Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA), with defective MT dynamics. Thus, CSAP overload in the spindles caused extensive MT stabilization and recruitment of NuMA. Moreover, MT stabilization by CSAP led to high levels of polyglutamylation on MTs. MT depolymerization by cold or nocodazole treatment was inhibited by CSAP binding. Live-cell imaging analysis suggested that CSAP-dependent MT-stabilization led to centrosome-free MT aster formation immediately upon nuclear envelope breakdown without γ-tubulin. We therefore propose that CSAP associates with MTs around centrosomes to stabilize MTs during mitosis, ensuring proper bipolar spindle formation and maintenance. PMID:26562023

  20. Kinetid structure in Choanocytes of Sponges (Heteroscleromorpha): Toward the ancestral Kinetid of Demospongiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakov, Igor R; Karpov, Sergey A

    2016-07-01

    Every large clade of Eukarya has its own pattern of kinetid (flagellar apparatus) structure, which is stable and specific within the group, thereby being a good phylogenetic marker. The kinetid structure of sponge choanocytes might be a candidate for such marker for the phylogeny of Porifera. Kinetids of two heteroscleromorphs, Halichondria sp. (Suberitida) and Crellomima imparidens (Poecilosclerida), have been investigated here for the first time, and a reconstruction of the kinetid for each species is provided. The kinetids of both species comprise a flagellar kinetosome with a nuclear fibrillar root, a basal foot and satellite producing microtubules; a centriole is absent. Good resolution images reveal a new thin structure, the axial granule, in the flagellar transition zone which might be present in other sponges. The comparison of kinetids in investigated sponges revealed three types of kinetid in Demospongiae, and their distribution in the taxon has been shown on a molecular phylogenetic tree. Kinetid characters of the common ancestor of Demospongiae are discussed. J. Morphol. 277:925-934, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27091517

  1. Primary cilium - antenna-like structure on the surface of most mammalian cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, J.; Sitorova, V.; Hadzi Nikolov, D.; Mokry, J.; Richter, I.; Kasaova, L.; Filip, S.; Ryska, A.; Petera, J.

    2011-12-01

    The primary cilium is a sensory solitary non-motile microtubule-based organelle protruding in the quiescent phase of the cell cycle from the surface of the majority of human cells, including embryonic cells, stem cells and stromal cells of malignant tumors. The presence of a primary cilium on the surface of a cell is transient, limited to the quiescent G1(G0) phase and the beginning of the S phase of the cell cycle. The primary cilium is formed from the mother centriole. Primary cilia are key coordinators of signaling pathways during development and tissue homeostasis and, when deffective, they are a major cause of human diseases and developmental disorders, now commonly referred to as ciliopathies. Most cancer cells do not possess a primary cilium. The loss of the primary cilium is a regular feature of neoplastic transformation in the majority of solid tumors. The primary cilium could serve as a tumor suppressor organelle. The aim of this paper was to provide a review of the current knowledge of the primary cilium.

  2. Asterless Reduction during Spermiogenesis Is Regulated by Plk4 and Is Essential for Zygote Development in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khire, Atul; Vizuet, Alberto A; Davila, Enrique; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer

    2015-11-16

    Centrosome reduction is the decrease in centrosomal components during spermatid differentiation (spermiogenesis). It is one of several dramatic subcellular reorganizations that lead to spermatozoa formation common to a wide range of animals. However, the mechanism underlying centrosome reduction is unknown and its functions are unclear. Here, we show that in Drosophila melanogaster spermiogenesis, the quantity of centrosomal proteins is dramatically reduced; for example, Asterless (Asl) is reduced ∼500-fold and is barely detected in spermatozoa. Asl reduction is regulated through a subset of its domains by the master regulator of centriole duplication Plk4 and by the ubiquitin ligase that targets Plk4 for degradation: Slimb. When Asl reduction is attenuated by Asl overexpression, plk4 mutations, Plk4 RNAi, or Slimb overexpression, Asl levels are higher in spermatozoa, resulting in embryos with reduced viability. Significantly, overexpressing Plk4 and Asl simultaneously, or combining plk4 and slimb mutations, balances their opposing effects on Asl reduction, restoring seemingly normal fertility. This suggests that increased Asl levels cause the observed reduced fertility and not other pleotropic effects. Attenuation of Asl reduction also causes delayed development and a failure to form astral microtubules in the zygote. Together, we provide the first insight into a molecular mechanism that regulates centrosome reduction and the first direct evidence that centrosome reduction is essential for post-fertilization development. PMID:26480844

  3. “Stop Ne(c)king around”: How interactomics contributes to functionally characterize Nek family kinases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriela; Vaz; Meirelles; Arina; Marina; Perez; Edmárcia; Elisa; de; Souza; Ferna; Luisa; Basei; Priscila; Ferreira; Papa; Talita; Diniz; Melo; Hanchuk; Vanessa; Bomfim; Cardoso; Jrg; Kobarg

    2014-01-01

    Aside from Polo and Aurora, a third but less studied kinase family involved in mitosis regulation is the never in mitosis-gene A(NIMA)-related kinases(Neks). The founding member of this family is the sole member NIMA of Aspergillus nidulans, which is crucial for the initiation of mitosis in that organism. All 11 human Neks have been functionally assigned to one of the three core functions established for this family in mammals:(1) centrioles/mitosis;(2) primary ciliary function/ciliopathies; and(3) DNA damage response(DDR). Recent findings, especially on Nek 1 and 8, showed however, that several Neks participate in parallel in at least two of these contexts: primary ciliary function and DDR. In the core section of this in-depth review, we report the current detailed functional knowledge on each of the 11 Neks. In the discussion, we return to the cross-connections among Neks and point out how our and other groups’ functional and interactomics studies revealed that most Neks interact with protein partners associated with two if not all three of the functional contexts. We then raise the hypothesis that Neks may be the connecting regulatory elements that allow the cell to fine tune and synchronize the cellular events associated with these three core functions. The new and exciting findings on the Nek family open new perspectives and should allow the Neks to finally claim the attention they deserve in the field of kinases and cell cycle biology.

  4. Studying protein assembly with reversible Brownian dynamics of patchy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assembly of protein complexes like virus shells, the centriole, the nuclear pore complex, or the actin cytoskeleton is strongly determined by their spatial structure. Moreover, it is becoming increasingly clear that the reversible nature of protein assembly is also an essential element for their biological function. Here we introduce a computational approach for the Brownian dynamics of patchy particles with anisotropic assemblies and fully reversible reactions. Different particles stochastically associate and dissociate with microscopic reaction rates depending on their relative spatial positions. The translational and rotational diffusive properties of all protein complexes are evaluated on-the-fly. Because we focus on reversible assembly, we introduce a scheme which ensures detailed balance for patchy particles. We then show how the macroscopic rates follow from the microscopic ones. As an instructive example, we study the assembly of a pentameric ring structure, for which we find excellent agreement between simulation results and a macroscopic kinetic description without any adjustable parameters. This demonstrates that our approach correctly accounts for both the diffusive and reactive processes involved in protein assembly

  5. Phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A Maintains Spindle Pole Integrity during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, En-Ju; Hung, Liang-Yi; Tang, Chieh-Ju C; Hsu, Wen-Bin; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Pao-Chi; Tang, Tang K

    2016-03-29

    CPAP is required for centriole elongation during S/G2 phase, but the role of CPAP in mitosis is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CPAP maintains spindle pole integrity through its phosphorylation by Aurora-A during mitosis. Depletion of CPAP induced a prolonged delay in mitosis, pericentriolar material (PCM) dispersion, and multiple mitotic abnormalities. Further studies demonstrated that CPAP directly interacts with and is phosphorylated by Aurora-A at serine 467 during mitosis. Interestingly, the dispersal of the PCM was effectively rescued by ectopic expression of wild-type CPAP or a phospho-mimic CPAP-S467D mutant, but not a non-phosphorylated CPAP-S467A mutant. Finally, we found that CPAP-S467D has a low affinity for microtubule binding but a high affinity for PCM proteins. Together, our results support a model wherein CPAP is required for proper mitotic progression, and phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A is essential for maintaining spindle pole integrity. PMID:26997271

  6. Phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A Maintains Spindle Pole Integrity during Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Ju Chou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CPAP is required for centriole elongation during S/G2 phase, but the role of CPAP in mitosis is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CPAP maintains spindle pole integrity through its phosphorylation by Aurora-A during mitosis. Depletion of CPAP induced a prolonged delay in mitosis, pericentriolar material (PCM dispersion, and multiple mitotic abnormalities. Further studies demonstrated that CPAP directly interacts with and is phosphorylated by Aurora-A at serine 467 during mitosis. Interestingly, the dispersal of the PCM was effectively rescued by ectopic expression of wild-type CPAP or a phospho-mimic CPAP-S467D mutant, but not a non-phosphorylated CPAP-S467A mutant. Finally, we found that CPAP-S467D has a low affinity for microtubule binding but a high affinity for PCM proteins. Together, our results support a model wherein CPAP is required for proper mitotic progression, and phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A is essential for maintaining spindle pole integrity.

  7. The Primary Cilium in Cell Signaling and Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaud III, Edward J [ORNL; Yoder, Bradley [University of Alabama, Birmingham

    2006-01-01

    The primary cilium is a microtubule-based antenna-like structure that emanates from the surface of virtually all cells in the mammalian body. It is anchored to the cell by the basal body, which develops from the mother centriole of the centrosome in a manner that is coordinately regulated with the cell cycle. The primary cilium is a sensory organelle that receives both mechanical and chemical signals from other cells and the environment, and transmits these signals to the nucleus to elicit a cellular response. Recent studies revealed that multiple components of the Sonic hedgehog and plateletderived growth factor receptor-A signal transduction pathways localize to the primary cilium, and that loss of the cilium blocks ligand-induced signaling by both pathways. In light of the major role that these pathways play in numerous types of cancer, we anticipate that the emerging discoveries being made about the function of the primary cilium in signaling pathways that are critical for embryonic development and tissue homeostasis in adults will also provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis. (Cancer Res 2006; 66 13): 6463-7)

  8. RTTN Mutations Link Primary Cilia Function to Organization of the Human Cerebral Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand Kia, Sima; Verbeek, Elly; Engelen, Erik; Schot, Rachel; Poot, Raymond A.; de Coo, Irenaeus F.M.; Lequin, Maarten H.; Poulton, Cathryn J.; Pourfarzad, Farzin; Grosveld, Frank G.; Brehm, António; de Wit, Marie Claire Y.; Oegema, Renske; Dobyns, William B.; Verheijen, Frans W.; Mancini, Grazia M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Polymicrogyria is a malformation of the developing cerebral cortex caused by abnormal organization and characterized by many small gyri and fusion of the outer molecular layer. We have identified autosomal-recessive mutations in RTTN, encoding Rotatin, in individuals with bilateral diffuse polymicrogyria from two separate families. Rotatin determines early embryonic axial rotation, as well as anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning in the mouse. Human Rotatin has recently been identified as a centrosome-associated protein. The Drosophila melanogaster homolog of Rotatin, Ana3, is needed for structural integrity of centrioles and basal bodies and maintenance of sensory neurons. We show that Rotatin colocalizes with the basal bodies at the primary cilium. Cultured fibroblasts from affected individuals have structural abnormalities of the cilia and exhibit downregulation of BMP4, WNT5A, and WNT2B, which are key regulators of cortical patterning and are expressed at the cortical hem, the cortex-organizing center that gives rise to Cajal-Retzius (CR) neurons. Interestingly, we have shown that in mouse embryos, Rotatin colocalizes with CR neurons at the subpial marginal zone. Knockdown experiments in human fibroblasts and neural stem cells confirm a role for RTTN in cilia structure and function. RTTN mutations therefore link aberrant ciliary function to abnormal development and organization of the cortex in human individuals. PMID:22939636

  9. The Rac1 regulator ELMO controls basal body migration and docking in multiciliated cells through interaction with Ezrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epting, Daniel; Slanchev, Krasimir; Boehlke, Christopher; Hoff, Sylvia; Loges, Niki T; Yasunaga, Takayuki; Indorf, Lara; Nestel, Sigrun; Lienkamp, Soeren S; Omran, Heymut; Kuehn, E Wolfgang; Ronneberger, Olaf; Walz, Gerd; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that are present on most cells and are required for normal tissue development and function. Defective cilia cause complex syndromes with multiple organ manifestations termed ciliopathies. A crucial step during ciliogenesis in multiciliated cells (MCCs) is the association of future basal bodies with the apical plasma membrane, followed by their correct spacing and planar orientation. Here, we report a novel role for ELMO-DOCK1, which is a bipartite guanine nucleotide exchange factor complex for the small GTPase Rac1, and for the membrane-cytoskeletal linker Ezrin, in regulating centriole/basal body migration, docking and spacing. Downregulation of each component results in ciliopathy-related phenotypes in zebrafish and disrupted ciliogenesis in Xenopus epidermal MCCs. Subcellular analysis revealed a striking impairment of basal body docking and spacing, which is likely to account for the observed phenotypes. These results are substantiated by showing a genetic interaction between elmo1 and ezrin b. Finally, we provide biochemical evidence that the ELMO-DOCK1-Rac1 complex influences Ezrin phosphorylation and thereby probably serves as an important molecular switch. Collectively, we demonstrate that the ELMO-Ezrin complex orchestrates ciliary basal body migration, docking and positioning in vivo. PMID:25516973

  10. Three-dimensional organization of micronuclei induced by colchicine in PtK sub 1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraud, G.; Laquerriere, F.; Masson, C.; Arnoult, J.; Labidi, B.; Hernandez-Verdun, D. (Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France))

    1989-03-01

    In PtK{sub 1} cells micronucleated by colchicine, the authors previously demonstrated that some micronuclei contain a single chromosome. Here, they investigated interphase chromosome organization in micronucleated PtK{sub 1} cells using conventional electron microscopy and three-dimensional computer reconstruction. The distribution of micronuclei was not always polarized, but in some cells they formed a ring. When this occurred, centrioles and Golgi apparatus were located inside the ring. On freeze-fracture replicas, they observed that nuclear pore distinction among the micronuclei was heterogeneous, and on thin sections some micronuclei displayed an incomplete nuclear envelope, with gaps in the double membrane and areas without lamina or condensed chromatin. By autoradiography, they showed that the fibrillar dots were not sites of active transcription. They applied three dimensional reconstruction to one micronucleated cell containing 22 micronuclei whose size indicated that each micronucleus probably contained one chromosome. In this cell they demonstrated that only the smallest micronuclei had an incomplete nuclear envelope. The presence in micronuclei of either nucleoli or fibrillar dots was found to be mutually exclusive. Taken together, these findings indicate that in the diploid nuclei of PtK{sub 1} cells, the three-dimensional organization of the nucleolar domain seems to be directly controlled by the X-chromosome.

  11. Downregulation of Protein 4.1R impairs centrosome function,bipolar spindle organization and anaphase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Jeffrey R.; Go, Minjoung M.; Bahmanyar, S.; Barth,A.I.M.; Krauss, Sharon Wald

    2006-03-17

    Centrosomes nucleate and organize interphase MTs and areinstrumental in the assembly of the mitotic bipolar spindle. Here wereport that two members of the multifunctional protein 4.1 family havedistinct distributions at centrosomes. Protein 4.1R localizes to maturecentrioles whereas 4.1G is a component of the pericentriolar matrixsurrounding centrioles. To selectively probe 4.1R function, we used RNAinterference-mediated depletion of 4.1R without decreasing 4.1Gexpression. 4.1R downregulation reduces MT anchoring and organization atinterphase and impairs centrosome separation during prometaphase.Metaphase chromosomes fail to properly condense/align and spindleorganization is aberrant. Notably 4.1R depletion causes mislocalizationof its binding partner NuMA (Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus Protein),essential for spindle pole focusing, and disrupts ninein. Duringanaphase/telophase, 4.1R-depleted cells have lagging chromosomes andaberrant MT bridges. Our data provide functional evidence that 4.1R makescrucial contributions to centrosome integrity and to mitotic spindlestructure enabling mitosis and anaphase to proceed with the coordinatedprecision required to avoid pathological events.

  12. Sperm ultrastructure of the spider crab Maja brachydactyla (Decapoda: Brachyura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeó, Carles G; Kurtz, Kathryn; Rotllant, Guiomar; Chiva, Manel; Ribes, Enric

    2010-04-01

    This study describes the morphology of the sperm cell of Maja brachydactyla, with emphasis on localizing actin and tubulin. The spermatozoon of M. brachydactyla is similar in appearance and organization to other brachyuran spermatozoa. The spermatozoon is a globular cell composed of a central acrosome, which is surrounded by a thin layer of cytoplasm and a cup-shaped nucleus with four radiating lateral arms. The acrosome is a subspheroidal vesicle composed of three concentric zones surrounded by a capsule. The acrosome is apically covered by an operculum. The perforatorium penetrates the center of the acrosome and has granular material partially composed of actin. The cytoplasm contains one centriole in the subacrosomal region. A cytoplasmic ring encircles the acrosome in the subapical region of the cell and contains the structures-organelles complex (SO-complex), which is composed of a membrane system, mitochondria with few cristae, and microtubules. In the nucleus, slightly condensed chromatin extends along the lateral arms, in which no microtubules have been observed. Chromatin fibers aggregate in certain areas and are often associated with the SO-complex. During the acrosomal reaction, the acrosome could provide support for the penetration of the sperm nucleus, the SO-complex could serve as an anchor point for chromatin, and the lateral arms could play an important role triggering the acrosomal reaction, while slightly decondensed chromatin may be necessary for the deformation of the nucleus. PMID:19885919

  13. Expression of Nucleolin Affects Microtubule Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, Xavier; Place, Christophe; Delage, Helene; Mongelard, Fabien; Monier, Karine; Bouvet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolin is present in diverse cellular compartments and is involved in a variety of cellular processes from nucleolar structure and function to intracellular trafficking, cell adhesion and migration. Recently, nucleolin has been localized at the mature centriole where it is involved in microtubule nucleation and anchoring. Although this new function of nucleolin linked to microtubule regulation has been identified, the global effects of nucleolin on microtubule dynamics have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we analyzed the roles of nucleolin protein levels on global microtubule dynamics by tracking the EB3 microtubule plus end binding protein in live cells. We have found that during microtubule growth phases, nucleolin affects both the speed and life time of polymerization and by analyzing catastrophe events, we showed that nucleolin reduces catastrophe frequency. This new property of nucleolin was then confirmed in a cold induced microtubule depolymerization experiment in which we have found that cold resistant microtubules were totally destabilized in nucleolin depleted cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate a new function of nucleolin on microtubule stabilization, thus bringing novel insights into understanding the multifunctional properties of nucleolin in healthy and cancer cells. PMID:27309529

  14. CHARACTER OF TUMOR ASSOCIATED PROTEIN RECOGNIZED BY MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY AGAINST YUNNAN GEJIU LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To identify and characterize lung cancer associated protein N35 and attempt to learn the prospective possibility of the clinical application of the protein N35. Methods: Immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, differential centrifigation and subcellular assay, immunohistochemistry, N-glycanase digestion, mitotic cell immunoflourescence and multiple methods of affinity chromatography have been used with the monoclonal antibody N-35 to detect the distribution of the protein N35 among the various cancer cell lines and normal human tissue, the relationship between the protein N35 and glycoprotein, the location of the subcellular structure and chromosomal domain of the protein N35,the most effective way of purification of tumor associated protein N35. Results: The protein N35 is a glycoprotein, distributes to the human lung cancer cell line GLC-82, human cervical cancer cell line Hela, human hepatic cancer cell line HepG-2 and human breast cancer cell line PMC with different relative molecular mass(Mr), but no expression of the protein ingredient in normal human fresh tissue; concentrates at the nuclei significantly ,much more than at the mitochondrail and membrane, locates at the centriole of the chromosomal domain. Conclusions: The lung cancer associated protein N35 might be expressed only by the cancer cells and related with the proliferation of cancer cells as a role of tumor cell growth regulator.

  15. Establishment and mitotic characterization of new Drosophila acentriolar cell lines from DSas-4 mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lecland

    2013-01-01

    In animal cells the centrosome is commonly viewed as the main cellular structure driving microtubule (MT assembly into the mitotic spindle apparatus. However, additional pathways, such as those mediated by chromatin and augmin, are involved in the establishment of functional spindles. The molecular mechanisms involved in these pathways remain poorly understood, mostly due to limitations inherent to current experimental systems available. To overcome these limitations we have developed six new Drosophila cell lines derived from Drosophila homozygous mutants for DSas-4, a protein essential for centriole biogenesis. These cells lack detectable centrosomal structures, astral MT, with dispersed pericentriolar proteins D-PLP, Centrosomin and γ-tubulin. They show poorly focused spindle poles that reach the plasma membrane. Despite being compromised for functional centrosome, these cells could successfully undergo mitosis. Live-cell imaging analysis of acentriolar spindle assembly revealed that nascent MTs are nucleated from multiple points in the vicinity of chromosomes. These nascent MTs then grow away from kinetochores allowing the expansion of fibers that will be part of the future acentriolar spindle. MT repolymerization assays illustrate that acentriolar spindle assembly occurs “inside-out” from the chromosomes. Colchicine-mediated depolymerization of MTs further revealed the presence of a functional Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC in the acentriolar cells. Finally, pilot RNAi experiments open the potential use of these cell lines for the molecular dissection of anastral pathways in spindle and centrosome assembly.

  16. Expression of Nucleolin Affects Microtubule Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Gaume

    Full Text Available Nucleolin is present in diverse cellular compartments and is involved in a variety of cellular processes from nucleolar structure and function to intracellular trafficking, cell adhesion and migration. Recently, nucleolin has been localized at the mature centriole where it is involved in microtubule nucleation and anchoring. Although this new function of nucleolin linked to microtubule regulation has been identified, the global effects of nucleolin on microtubule dynamics have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we analyzed the roles of nucleolin protein levels on global microtubule dynamics by tracking the EB3 microtubule plus end binding protein in live cells. We have found that during microtubule growth phases, nucleolin affects both the speed and life time of polymerization and by analyzing catastrophe events, we showed that nucleolin reduces catastrophe frequency. This new property of nucleolin was then confirmed in a cold induced microtubule depolymerization experiment in which we have found that cold resistant microtubules were totally destabilized in nucleolin depleted cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate a new function of nucleolin on microtubule stabilization, thus bringing novel insights into understanding the multifunctional properties of nucleolin in healthy and cancer cells.

  17. The Drosophila Pericentrin-like-protein (PLP cooperates with Cnn to maintain the integrity of the outer PCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H. Richens

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by a matrix of pericentriolar material (PCM. In vertebrate cells, Pericentrin plays an important part in mitotic PCM assembly, but the Drosophila Pericentrin-like protein (PLP appears to have a more minor role in mitotic fly cells. Here we investigate the function of PLP during the rapid mitotic cycles of the early Drosophila embryo. Unexpectedly, we find that PLP is specifically enriched in the outer-most regions of the PCM, where it largely co-localizes with the PCM scaffold protein Cnn. In the absence of PLP the outer PCM appears to be structurally weakened, and it rapidly disperses along the centrosomal microtubules (MTs. As a result, centrosomal MTs are subtly disorganized in embryos lacking PLP, although mitosis is largely unperturbed and these embryos develop and hatch at near-normal rates. Y2H analysis reveals that PLP can potentially form multiple interactions with itself and with the PCM recruiting proteins Asl, Spd-2 and Cnn. A deletion analysis suggests that PLP participates in a complex network of interactions that ultimately help to strengthen the PCM.

  18. A nano-reference-system based on two orthogonal (molecular micro-goniometers: the centrosome of animal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regolini Marco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The centrosome, because of 9-fold-symmetry of its orthogonalcentrioles and their circumferential polarity (nonequivalence of the nine centriolarblades,each one molecularly distinguishable, constitutes a biological discrete interface, composed of two orthogonal macromolecular protractors, capable of recognizing and decoding morphogenetic instructions, translating them and delivering targeted molecular complexes into their expected 3D real location in the cell: like an interface or a wiring device, the centrosome recognizes each targeting sequence, matches it with the corresponding receptor, soconnectingit with the correctly-oriented microtubule, directed and targeted towards the desired definite cortical compartment.Morphogenetic geometric instructions (DNA coded are translated by the centrosome into actual locations in cells, and, as a consequence, macromolecules, labeled by DNA geometric signals, can be correctly delivered into their programmed cell locations. In addition, the centrosome (the most chiral and enantiomorphous cell structure plays a geometric key role in left-right patterning: axial centriole circumferential polarity, if reversely oriented, constitutes a likely molecular base for bilateral symmetry.

  19. The Drosophila Pericentrin-like-protein (PLP) cooperates with Cnn to maintain the integrity of the outer PCM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richens, Jennifer H; Barros, Teresa P; Lucas, Eliana P; Peel, Nina; Pinto, David Miguel Susano; Wainman, Alan; Raff, Jordan W

    2015-01-01

    Centrosomes comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by a matrix of pericentriolar material (PCM). In vertebrate cells, Pericentrin plays an important part in mitotic PCM assembly, but the Drosophila Pericentrin-like protein (PLP) appears to have a more minor role in mitotic fly cells. Here we investigate the function of PLP during the rapid mitotic cycles of the early Drosophila embryo. Unexpectedly, we find that PLP is specifically enriched in the outer-most regions of the PCM, where it largely co-localizes with the PCM scaffold protein Cnn. In the absence of PLP the outer PCM appears to be structurally weakened, and it rapidly disperses along the centrosomal microtubules (MTs). As a result, centrosomal MTs are subtly disorganized in embryos lacking PLP, although mitosis is largely unperturbed and these embryos develop and hatch at near-normal rates. Y2H analysis reveals that PLP can potentially form multiple interactions with itself and with the PCM recruiting proteins Asl, Spd-2 and Cnn. A deletion analysis suggests that PLP participates in a complex network of interactions that ultimately help to strengthen the PCM. PMID:26157019

  20. Effects of cadmium and copper on the ultrastructure ofAnkistrodesmus braunii andAnabaena 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massalski, A; Laube, V M; Kushner, D J

    1981-06-01

    The effects of brief exposure to, or growth in the presence of, lethal and sublethal concentrations of Cu(NO)2 and Cd(NO3) on the ultrastructure of the blue-green algaAnabaena 7120 and the green algaAnkistrodesmus braunii were studied. Exposure to increasing amount of both metal ions led to the appearance of larger proportions of electron-dense cells whose organelles were less well defined than those of untreated cells. Metal-treated cells ofAnabaena 7120 became distorted. Some had a corrugated appearance. Others lysed, leaving a much larger proportion of heterocysts. Such heterocysts were often empty or had a curious collapsed appearance. Growth ofA. braunii in the presence of 10(-4) M Cu(NO2)2 produced substantial numbers of multinucleate giant cells with thick walls; such cells result from repeated mitotic division without subsequent cytokinesis. The giant cells contained centrioles, structures not as yet found in normal cells of the genusAnkistrodesmus. Some nuclei of giant, but not of normal, cells contained deep indentations that appeared as "holes" in cross section. Some giant cells also contained triple parallel strands of endoplasmic reticulum which extended across much of the cell, connecting to the nuclear envelope. Some ultrastructural changes were also noted in algal cells grown over sediment containing Cu or Cd, but these were generally less severe than those occurring when metal ions were added directly to the algal cultures. PMID:24227427

  1. Development of Polyspermic Rice Zygotes1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Fertilization is a general feature of eukaryotic uni- and multicellular organisms to restore a diploid genome from female and male gamete haploid genomes. In most animals and fucoid algae, polyspermy block occurs at the plasmogamy step. Because the polyspermy barrier in animals and in fucoid algae is incomplete, polyspermic zygotes are generated by multiple fertilization events. However, these polyspermic zygotes with extra centrioles from multiple sperms show aberrant nuclear and cell division. In angiosperms, polyspermy block functions in the egg cell and the central cell to promote faithful double fertilization, although the mechanism of polyspermy block remains unclear. In contrast to the case in animals and fucoid algae, polyspermic zygotes formed in angiosperms are not expected to die because angiosperms lack centrosomes. However, there have been no reports on the developmental profiles of polyspermic zygotes at cellular level in angiosperms. In this study, we produced polyspermic rice zygotes by electric fusion of an egg cell with two sperm cells, and monitored their developmental profiles. Two sperm nuclei and an egg nucleus fused into a zygotic nucleus, and the triploid zygote divided into a two-celled embryo via mitotic division with a typical bipolar microtubule spindle, as observed during mitosis of a diploid zygote. The two-celled proembryos further developed and regenerated into triploid plants. These findings suggest that polyspermic plant zygotes have the potential to form triploid embryos. Polyspermy in angiosperms might be a pathway for the formation of triploid plants, which can contribute significantly to the formation of autopolyploids. PMID:26945052

  2. Ultrastructure of the seminiferous tubules in human testes before and after varicocelectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgür, H; Kaya, M; Doran, S; Solmaz, S

    2003-12-01

    Ultrastructure of the membrana propria and the seminiferous epithelium was studied in infertile human testis both before and 3-6 months after varicocelectomy. The frequent alterations, observed before and after the operation, were extremely thickened membrana propria, deep invaginations, multilamination and knob-like formation of basal laminae and formation of multinucleated spermatids, which were all considered as the common response of the testis to different noxious agents. Although the cells of the seminiferous epithelium were clearly affected by varicocele before varicocelectomy, many areas exhibited normal features after the operation. Furthermore, multinucleated cells, sharing common features of Sertoli cell and spermatogonium, were observed, as well as presence of well-developed annulate lamellae in the Sertoli cells, exhibiting centrioles in the vicinity of their nuclei after varicocelectomy. These multiple ultrastructural observations indicate that Sertoli cell division takes place. This study suggests that if the observation period of the tissue samples after varicocelectomy is long enough, the reversible changes of the tubular cells would be seen much more frequently. PMID:14618398

  3. AcEST: DK961032 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |O15119|TBX3_HUMAN T-box transcription factor TBX3 OS=Homo sap... 30 8.9 sp|Q6GPV5|RN181_XENLA RING finger pr... 37 1.5 tr|Q4CX06|Q4CX06_TRYCR Dispersed gene family protein 1 (DGF-1), ... 37 1.5 tr|A8I9U4|A8I9U4_CHLRE Centriole proteome pr...), ... 35 4.3 tr|Q4CQB2|Q4CQB2_TRYCR Dispersed gene family protein 1 (DGF-1), ... 35 4.3 tr|A8Q2T0|A8Q2T0_MA..._RHILT Putative uncharacterized protein OS=Rhizo... 35 5.6 tr|Q4D824|Q4D824_TRYCR Dispersed gene family prot...sb2, puta... 35 5.6 tr|A9GDZ6|A9GDZ6_SORC5 Putative uncharacterized protein OS=Soran... 34 7.4 tr|Q4DUI9|Q4DUI9_TRYCR Disp

  4. Sperm ultrastructure of the European hornet Vespa crabro (Linnaeus, 1758) (Hymenoptera: Vespidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Karina; Lino-Neto, José; Dolder, Heidi; Dallai, Romano

    2009-01-01

    This study represents the first sperm description of a Vespinae species (Vespa crabro). The acrosome consists of an acrosomal vesicle and a perforatorium. The nucleus has compact chromatin and shows lenticular structures on the nuclear envelope. These structures, which have never been observed in a hymenopteran sperm, could be clusters of nuclear pores. The centriolar adjunct has an asymmetric pattern and shows a structured periphery. The centriole consists of 9 accessory microtubules and 9 doublet microtubules devoid of arms and spokes. The axoneme has a 9+9+2 microtubule pattern and the accessory microtubules have 16 protofilaments. The mitochondrial derivatives differ in length and diameter. The larger one is adjacent to the nuclear base, while the smaller one begins below the centriolar adjunct. They possess three distinct areas and a large paracrystalline region, which occurs only in the large one. The large mitochondrial derivative ends first, followed by the small one. The axoneme gradually disorganizes: first the central microtubules disappear, then the doublets, which show opened B-tubules, and finally the accessory microtubules. The sperm morphology of V. crabro is very similar to that of the polistine wasp, Agelaia vicina. This can indicate that, in Vespidae, sperm morphology is maintained without important variations among subfamilies and/or that this similarity indicates close phylogenetic relationship between these two subfamilies. Although Vespidae phylogenetically related to Formicidae, these data suggest that the former more closely related to Apoidea than to Formicidae. PMID:18675936

  5. A closed conformation of the Caenorhabditis elegans separase-securin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Gudrun; Richards, Mark W; Winter, Anja; Beuron, Fabienne; Morris, Edward; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The protease separase plays a key role in sister chromatid disjunction and centriole disengagement. To maintain genomic stability, separase activity is strictly regulated by binding of an inhibitory protein, securin. Despite its central role in cell division, the separase and securin complex is poorly understood at the structural level. This is partly owing to the difficulty of generating a sufficient quantity of homogeneous, stable protein. Here, we report the production of Caenorhabditis elegans separase-securin complex, and its characterization using biochemical methods and by negative staining electron microscopy. Single particle analysis generated a density map at a resolution of 21-24 Å that reveals a close, globular structure of complex connectivity harbouring two lobes. One lobe matches closely a homology model of the N-terminal HEAT repeat domain of separase, whereas the second lobe readily accommodates homology models of the separase C-terminal death and caspase-like domains. The globular structure of the C. elegans separase-securin complex contrasts with the more elongated structure previously described for the Homo sapiens complex, which could represent a different functional state of the complex, suggesting a mechanism for the regulation of separase activity through conformational change. PMID:27249343

  6. Pharmacological inhibition of Polo Like Kinase 2 (PLK2) does not cause chromosomal damage or result in the formation of micronuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, Kent, E-mail: Kent.fitzgerald@elan.com [Pharmacological Sciences, Elan Pharmaceuticals Inc., 180 Oyster Point Boulevard, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States); Bergeron, Marcelle, E-mail: Marcelle.bergeron@elan.com [Pharmacological Sciences, Elan Pharmaceuticals Inc., 180 Oyster Point Boulevard, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States); Willits, Christopher, E-mail: Chris.willits@elan.com [Pharmacological Sciences, Elan Pharmaceuticals Inc., 180 Oyster Point Boulevard, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States); Bowers, Simeon, E-mail: Simeon.bowers@elan.com [Chemistry, Elan Pharmaceuticals Inc., 180 Oyster Point Boulevard, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States); Aubele, Danielle L., E-mail: Danielle.aubele@elan.com [Chemistry, Elan Pharmaceuticals Inc., 180 Oyster Point Boulevard, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States); Goldbach, Erich, E-mail: Erich.goldbach@elan.com [Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Elan Pharmaceuticals Inc., 180 Oyster Point Boulevard, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States); Tonn, George, E-mail: George.tonn@elan.com [Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Elan Pharmaceuticals Inc., 180 Oyster Point Boulevard, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States); Ness, Daniel, E-mail: Dan.ness@elan.com [Nonclinical Safety Evaluation, Elan Pharmaceuticals Inc., 180 Oyster Point Boulevard, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States); Olaharski, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.olaharski@agios.com [Nonclinical Safety Evaluation, Elan Pharmaceuticals Inc., 180 Oyster Point Boulevard, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Polo Like Kinase 2 (PLK2) phosphorylates α-synuclein and is considered a putative therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease. Several lines of evidence indicate that PLK2 is involved with proper centriole duplication and cell cycle regulation, inhibition of which could impact chromosomal integrity during mitosis. The objectives of the series of experiments presented herein were to assess whether specific inhibition of PLK2 is genotoxic and determine if PLK2 could be considered a tractable pharmacological target for Parkinson's disease. Several selective PLK2 inhibitors, ELN 582175 and ELN 582646, and their inactive enantiomers, ELN 582176 and ELN 582647, did not significantly increase the number of micronuclei in the in vitro micronucleus assay. ELN 582646 was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats in an exploratory 14-day study where flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood identified a dose-dependent increase in the number of micronucleated reticulocytes. A follow-up investigative study demonstrated that ELN 582646 administered to PLK2 deficient and wildtype mice significantly increased the number of peripheral micronucleated reticulocytes in both genotypes, suggesting that ELN 582646-induced genotoxicity is not through the inhibition of PLK2. Furthermore, significant reduction of retinal phosphorylated α-synuclein levels was observed at three non-genotoxic doses, additional data to suggest that pharmacological inhibition of PLK2 is not the cause of the observed genotoxicity. These data, in aggregate, indicate that PLK2 inhibition is a tractable CNS pharmacological target that does not cause genotoxicity at doses and exposures that engage the target in the sensory retina. - Highlights: • Active and inactive enantiomers test negative in the in vitro micronucleus test. • ELN 582646 significantly increased micronuclei at 100 and 300 mg/kg/day doses. • ELN 582646 significantly increased micronuclei in PLK2 knockout mice. • ELN 582646

  7. Ultrastructural features of spermatogenesis in Melanorivulus punctatus (Cyprinodontiformes: Rivulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Mônica; Ferreira, Adelina; Mehanna, Mahmoud

    2014-07-01

    Fish belonging to the family Rivulidae possess one of the most complex reproductive systems. Rivulus, a genus of freshwater fish in the Rivulidae family, was recently reclassified into five genera, including Melanorivulus. Its type species, M. punctatus, is widely distributed and probably represents a species complex. The ultrastructure of sperm has been broadly used in systematics, and we hereby describe the ultrastructural features of spermatogenesis in M. punctatus. Ten M. punctatus males were collected from the reservoir of Parque Estadual da Quineira, municipality of Chapada dos Guimarães, Mato Grosso, Brazil, and prepared for analysis by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. M. punctatus undergoes cystic spermatogenesis. Its cysts consist of groups of germ cells that are in synchronous development and are surrounded by cytoplasmic projections of Sertoli cells. With the breakdown of the cysts, the spermatozoa are released and their maturation is completed in the duct, where part of the cytoplasmic material is discarded through the vesicles. The mature spermatozoon is characterized by a spherical head with homogeneously condensed chromatin, a symmetric midpiece consisting of a pair of perpendicular centrioles, a ring of mitochondria, several vesicles, and one flagellum medial to the nucleus. Early stages of spermatogenesis show no peculiarities; however, in spermiogenesis, we observed that the spermatids remain interconnected by cytoplasmic bridges and have pockets of residual cytoplasm. The sperm is of the aquasperm type and is similar to that observed in the members of the family Rivulidae. The spermatozoa have a single flagellum that consists of a classic axoneme (9+2), as found in most groups of fish, despite the lateral extensions. PMID:24811986

  8. iLoc-Euk: a multi-label classifier for predicting the subcellular localization of singleplex and multiplex eukaryotic proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chen Chou

    Full Text Available Predicting protein subcellular localization is an important and difficult problem, particularly when query proteins may have the multiplex character, i.e., simultaneously exist at, or move between, two or more different subcellular location sites. Most of the existing protein subcellular location predictor can only be used to deal with the single-location or "singleplex" proteins. Actually, multiple-location or "multiplex" proteins should not be ignored because they usually posses some unique biological functions worthy of our special notice. By introducing the "multi-labeled learning" and "accumulation-layer scale", a new predictor, called iLoc-Euk, has been developed that can be used to deal with the systems containing both singleplex and multiplex proteins. As a demonstration, the jackknife cross-validation was performed with iLoc-Euk on a benchmark dataset of eukaryotic proteins classified into the following 22 location sites: (1 acrosome, (2 cell membrane, (3 cell wall, (4 centriole, (5 chloroplast, (6 cyanelle, (7 cytoplasm, (8 cytoskeleton, (9 endoplasmic reticulum, (10 endosome, (11 extracellular, (12 Golgi apparatus, (13 hydrogenosome, (14 lysosome, (15 melanosome, (16 microsome (17 mitochondrion, (18 nucleus, (19 peroxisome, (20 spindle pole body, (21 synapse, and (22 vacuole, where none of proteins included has ≥25% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset. The overall success rate thus obtained by iLoc-Euk was 79%, which is significantly higher than that by any of the existing predictors that also have the capacity to deal with such a complicated and stringent system. As a user-friendly web-server, iLoc-Euk is freely accessible to the public at the web-site http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/iLoc-Euk. It is anticipated that iLoc-Euk may become a useful bioinformatics tool for Molecular Cell Biology, Proteomics, System Biology, and Drug Development Also, its novel approach will further stimulate the development of

  9. Cep70 and Cep131 contribute to ciliogenesis in zebrafish embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Matthias

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centrosome is the cell's microtubule organising centre, an organelle with important roles in cell division, migration and polarity. However, cells can divide and flies can, for a large part of development, develop without them. Many centrosome proteins have been identified but the roles of most are still poorly understood. The centrioles of the centrosome are similar to the basal bodies of cilia, hair-like extensions of many cells that have important roles in cell signalling and development. In a number of human diseases, such Bardet-Biedl syndrome, centrosome/cilium proteins are mutated, leading to polycystic kidney disease, situs inversus, and neurological problems, amongst other symptoms. Results We describe zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos depleted for two uncharacterised, centrosome proteins, Cep70 and Cep131. The phenotype of these embryos resembles that of zebrafish mutants for intraflagellar transport proteins (IFTs, with kidney and ear development affected and left-right asymmetry randomised. These organs and processes are those affected in Bardet-Biedl syndrome and other similar diseases. Like these diseases, the root cause of the phenotype lies, in fact, in dysfunctional cilia, which are shortened but not eliminated in several tissues in the morphants. Centrosomes and basal bodies, on the other hand, are present. Both Cep70 and Cep131 possess a putative HDAC (histone deacetylase interacting domain. However, we could not detect in yeast two-hybrid assays any interaction with the deacetylase that controls cilium length, HDAC6, or any of the IFTs that we tested. Conclusion Cep70 and Cep131 contribute to ciliogenesis in many tissues in the zebrafish embryo: cilia are made in cep70 and cep131 morphant zebrafish embryos but are shortened. We propose that the role of these centrosomal/basal body proteins is in making the cilium and that they are involved in determination of the length of the axoneme.

  10. Pharmacological inhibition of Polo Like Kinase 2 (PLK2) does not cause chromosomal damage or result in the formation of micronuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polo Like Kinase 2 (PLK2) phosphorylates α-synuclein and is considered a putative therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease. Several lines of evidence indicate that PLK2 is involved with proper centriole duplication and cell cycle regulation, inhibition of which could impact chromosomal integrity during mitosis. The objectives of the series of experiments presented herein were to assess whether specific inhibition of PLK2 is genotoxic and determine if PLK2 could be considered a tractable pharmacological target for Parkinson's disease. Several selective PLK2 inhibitors, ELN 582175 and ELN 582646, and their inactive enantiomers, ELN 582176 and ELN 582647, did not significantly increase the number of micronuclei in the in vitro micronucleus assay. ELN 582646 was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats in an exploratory 14-day study where flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood identified a dose-dependent increase in the number of micronucleated reticulocytes. A follow-up investigative study demonstrated that ELN 582646 administered to PLK2 deficient and wildtype mice significantly increased the number of peripheral micronucleated reticulocytes in both genotypes, suggesting that ELN 582646-induced genotoxicity is not through the inhibition of PLK2. Furthermore, significant reduction of retinal phosphorylated α-synuclein levels was observed at three non-genotoxic doses, additional data to suggest that pharmacological inhibition of PLK2 is not the cause of the observed genotoxicity. These data, in aggregate, indicate that PLK2 inhibition is a tractable CNS pharmacological target that does not cause genotoxicity at doses and exposures that engage the target in the sensory retina. - Highlights: • Active and inactive enantiomers test negative in the in vitro micronucleus test. • ELN 582646 significantly increased micronuclei at 100 and 300 mg/kg/day doses. • ELN 582646 significantly increased micronuclei in PLK2 knockout mice. • ELN 582646 decreased

  11. Disruption of microtubules uncouples budding and nuclear division in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, Naomi S; Sibley, L David

    2002-03-01

    The tachyzoite stage of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii has two populations of microtubules: spindle microtubules and subpellicular microtubules. To determine how these two microtubule populations are regulated, we investigated microtubule behavior during the cell cycle following treatment with microtubule-disrupting drugs. Previous work had established that the microtubule populations are individually nucleated by two distinct microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs): the apical polar ring for the subpellicular microtubules and spindle pole plaques/centrioles for the spindle microtubules. When replicating tachyzoites were treated with 0.5 microM oryzalin or 1.0 mM colchicine they retained the capacity to form a spindle and undergo nuclear division. Although these parasites could complete budding, they lost the bulk of their subpellicular microtubules and the ability to reinvade host cells. Both nascent spindle and subpellicular microtubules were disrupted in 2.5 microM oryzalin or 5.0 mM colchicine. Under these conditions, parasites grew in size and replicated their genome but were incapable of nuclear division. After removal from 0.5 microM oryzalin, Toxoplasma tachyzoites were able to restore normal subpellicular microtubules and a fully invasive phenotype. When oryzalin was removed from Toxoplasma tachyzoites treated with 2.5 microM drug, the parasites attempted to bud as crescent-shaped tachyzoites. Because the polyploid nuclear mass could not be correctly segregated, many daughter parasites lacked nuclei altogether although budding and scission from the maternal mass was able to be completed. Multiple MTOCs permit Toxoplasma tachyzoites to control nuclear division independently from cell polarity and cytokinesis. This unusual situation grants greater cell cycle flexibility to these parasites but abolishes the checks for coregulation of nuclear division and cytokinesis found in other eukaryotes. PMID:11870220

  12. Morphology and ultrastructure of Brachymystax lenok tsinlingensis spermatozoa by scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Shao, Jian; Li, Ping; Wu, Jinming; Wei, Qiwei

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate Brachymystax lenok tsinlingensis spermatozoa cell morphology and ultrastructure through scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Findings revealed that the spermatozoa can be differentiated into three major parts: a spherical head without an acrosome, a short mid-piece, and a long, cylindrical flagellum. The mean length of the spermatozoa was 36.11±2.84μm, with a spherical head length of 2.78±0.31μm. The mean anterior and posterior head widths were 2.20±0.42μm and 2.55±0.53μm, respectively. The nuclear fossa was positioned at the base of the nucleus that contained the anterior portion of flagellum and a centriolar complex (proximal and distal centrioles). The short mid-piece was located laterally to the nucleus and possessed just one spherical mitochondrion with a mean diameter of 0.65±0.14μm. The spermatozoa flagellum was long and cylindrical, and could be separated into two parts: a long main-piece and a short end-piece. The main piece of the flagellum had short irregular side-fins. The axoneme composed the typical '9+2' microtubular doublet structure and was enclosed by the cell membran e. This study confirmed that B. lenok tsinlingensis spermatozoa can be categorized as teleostean "Type I" spermatozoa; 'primitive' or 'ect-aquasperm type' spermatozoa. To the best of the authers knowledge, this was the first study conducted on the morphology and ultrastructure of B. lenok tsinlingensis spermatozoa. PMID:27375213

  13. 紧密角管藻雄配子的超微结构%Ultrastructure of male gametes in Cerataulina compacta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王团老; 林均民; 胡韧; 杨听林; 谢宏

    2001-01-01

    紧密角管藻精子发生是由精母细胞减数分裂先产生双鞭毛体,然后双鞭毛体分裂形成单鞭毛的精子.精子鞭毛器的结构包括鞭毛轴丝和基体,鞭毛轴丝含有9对二联体组成的周位微管,但无中央微管,属于“9+0”微管构型,基体靠近细胞核,由9对二联体周位微管和中央结构组成“车轮”状结构,在过渡区存在基板.精原细胞、双鞭毛体和精子的细胞器组成及结构与营养细胞相似,在生殖细胞中未发现高尔基体,却存在电子致密体.%The spermatogenesis of Cerataulina compacta was that the spermatocytes first produced biflagellate cells through miosis and then the biflagellate cells divided into uniflagellate sperms.The flagellar apparatus included flagellar axoneme and basal body.The axoneme consisted of 9 doublet microtubules, lacking central tubules,which was “9+0” frib pattern, paraxial swellings were found in axoneme,their structures were not clear.The basal body attached to nucleus contained 9 doublet microtubules,which were extended from axoneme, and a central structure to construct a “wheel”pattern, it was a focus of microtubules,possibly functioning as a centriole.Within axoneme and basal body there was a basal plate.The composition and structure of organella in spermatocytes、biflagellate cells and sperms was similar to those in vegetative cells,no Golgi body was found in the sexual cells, but containing high electon-dense bodies.

  14. A new method for predicting the subcellular localization of eukaryotic proteins with both single and multiple sites: Euk-mPLoc 2.0.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chen Chou

    Full Text Available Information of subcellular locations of proteins is important for in-depth studies of cell biology. It is very useful for proteomics, system biology and drug development as well. However, most existing methods for predicting protein subcellular location can only cover 5 to 12 location sites. Also, they are limited to deal with single-location proteins and hence failed to work for multiplex proteins, which can simultaneously exist at, or move between, two or more location sites. Actually, multiplex proteins of this kind usually posses some important biological functions worthy of our special notice. A new predictor called "Euk-mPLoc 2.0" is developed by hybridizing the gene ontology information, functional domain information, and sequential evolutionary information through three different modes of pseudo amino acid composition. It can be used to identify eukaryotic proteins among the following 22 locations: (1 acrosome, (2 cell wall, (3 centriole, (4 chloroplast, (5 cyanelle, (6 cytoplasm, (7 cytoskeleton, (8 endoplasmic reticulum, (9 endosome, (10 extracell, (11 Golgi apparatus, (12 hydrogenosome, (13 lysosome, (14 melanosome, (15 microsome (16 mitochondria, (17 nucleus, (18 peroxisome, (19 plasma membrane, (20 plastid, (21 spindle pole body, and (22 vacuole. Compared with the existing methods for predicting eukaryotic protein subcellular localization, the new predictor is much more powerful and flexible, particularly in dealing with proteins with multiple locations and proteins without available accession numbers. For a newly-constructed stringent benchmark dataset which contains both single- and multiple-location proteins and in which none of proteins has pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same location, the overall jackknife success rate achieved by Euk-mPLoc 2.0 is more than 24% higher than those by any of the existing predictors. As a user-friendly web-server, Euk-mPLoc 2.0 is freely accessible at http

  15. Tubulinlike protein from Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudes, D.; Fracek, S. P. Jr; Laursen, R. A.; Margulis, L.; Obar, R.; Tzertzinis, G.

    1987-01-01

    Tubulin proteins are the fundamental subunits of all polymeric microtubule-based eukaryotic structures. Long, hollow structures each composed of 13 protofilaments as revealed by electron microscopy, microtubules (240 angstroms in diameter) are nearly ubiquitous in eukaryotes. These proteins have been the subject of intense biochemical and biophysical interest since the early 1970s and are of evolutionary interest as well. If tubulin-based structures (i.e., neurotubules, mitotic spindle tubules, centrioles, kinetosomes, axonemes, etc.) evolved from spirochetes by way of motility symbioses, tubulin homologies with spirochete proteins should be detectable. Tubulin proteins are widely thought to be limited to eukaryotes. Yet both azotobacters and spirochetes have shown immunological cross-reactivity with anitubulin antibodies. In neither of these studies was tubulin isolated nor any specific antigen identified as responsible for the immunoreactivity. Furthermore, although far less uniform in structure than eukaryotic microtubules, various cytoplasmic fibers and tubules (as seen by electron microscopy) have been reported in several types of prokaryotes (e.g., Spirochaeta; large termite spirochetes; treponemes; cyanobacteria; and Azotobacter. This work forms a part of our long-range study of the possible prokaryotic origin of tubulin and microtubules. Spirochetes are helically shaped gram-negative motile prokaryotes. They differ from all other bacteria in that the position of their flagella is periplasmic: their flagella lie between the inner and outer membranes of the gram-negative cell wall. Some of the largest spirochetes have longitudinally aligned 240 angstroms microtubules. Unfortunately, in spite of many attempts, all of the larger spirochetes (family Pillotaceae) with well-defined cytoplasmic tubules and antitubulin immunoreactivity are not cultivable. However, a newly described spirochete species (Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis) possessing cytoplasmic fibers

  16. 条纹锯精子超微结构及其入卵过程的电镜观察%Observations on the Spermatozoon, Egg and Fertilization Process of Centropristis striata Using the Electronic Microscopic Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈超; 贾瑞锦; 李炎璐; 吴雷明; 宋振鑫; 赵从明; 吴坚

    2014-01-01

    To explore the fertilization mechanism of Centropristis striata and improve the fertilization rate, the ultrastructure of spermatozoon and egg and the fertilization process were observed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results showed that the sperm of C. striata was mainly composed of the following three parts:1) head;mainly consisted with nucleus and without the acrosomal structure;2) midpiece;consisted with mitochondrion, centriolar complex (including proximal centriole and matrix) and sleeve structure; and 3) tail; consisted with axoneme that is surrounded by plasma membrane. The axoneme of C. striata was consistent with the typical“9+2”structure in most fish. The eggs were spherical, colorless, and transparent with the diameter at (0.950±0.039) mm, which belonged to pelagic eggs. A big grain of oil ball (0.182 ± 0.011mm in diameter) was observed in the egg. Overlapping curves were observed on the surface of the eggs, on which the tiny holes with different sizes (0.246±0.103 µm) were evenly distributed. A completely-opened fertilization hole was in the central part of the funneled area at the animal pole. The shell of the egg included plasma membrane, vitelline membrane and shell membrane. The shell was filled with cytoplasm. The fertilization process of C. striata was short. The sperm penetrated into the egg through the micropyle in 10 seconds after insemination. The morphological feature of the fertilized egg changed after that, and the fertilization cone and fertilization plug were observed. Finally, about 60 s after insemination, the fertilization hole closed to prevent the penetration of other sperms. This study may provide theoretical foundation to improve the fertilization rate of C. striata artificial breeding.%采用扫描和透射电镜技术对自然成熟的条纹锯精子、卵子及精子入卵过程进行观察。观察结果显示,其精子由头部、中段和尾部三部分