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Sample records for centre based cardiac

  1. Complications of cardiac catheterization: one centre's experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, B C; Beanlands, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    Data on complication rates in a cardiac catheterization laboratory were prospectively gathered over a 6-year period. During this time 7960 catheterizations were performed. Death occurred in seven (0.1%) of the cases. The difference between the mortality rates for procedures performed with and without systemically administered heparin (0.04% and 0.2% respectively) was barely statistically significant (p less than 0.05). A significant complication occurred in 1.5% of the cases; however, most di...

  2. Cardiac phantom measurement validating the methodology for a cardiac multi-centre trial with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyts, Johan; Mortelmans, Luc; Van de Werf, Frans; Djian, Jacques; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Schwaiger, Marcus; Touboul, Paul; Maes, Alex

    2002-12-01

    In an ongoing international multi-centre trial, positron emission tomography (PET) is being used to evaluate the effect of a new P-selectin antagonist on the infarct size in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated with thrombolysis. Although it is possible to correct for site-dependent factors, it is desirable to reduce these factors to a minimum. Therefore, acquisition and reconstruction protocols have been defined that can be closely followed by all participating centres. The resulting reconstructed images are transferred to the core centre for central processing with semi-automatic software. This paper reports on the multi-centre phantom experiment that was carried out to assess the inter-centre reproducibility of defect size determination with this protocol. Also, the spatial resolution of the short axis slices was examined. In addition, the analysis procedure was applied to normal PET studies to evaluate the specificity of perfusion defect detection. The transmural cold defect in the phantom occupied 14.8% of the left ventricular area. The automated analysis was applied to the phantom measurements from the 14 participating PET cameras. It yielded an accurate estimate of 15.1% with a standard deviation of 0.6%, indicating excellent reproducibility. The spatial resolution in the short axis slices was similar for all PET systems: 9.6+/-0.8 mm. The same procedure produced a defect size of zero in the studies of normal volunteers. This study indicates that cardiac studies from multiple PET systems can be pooled for statistical analysis.

  3. Cardiac phantom measurement validating the methodology for a cardiac multi-centre trial with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuyts, Johan; Mortelmans, Luc; Maes, Alex [Nuclear Medicine, UZ Gasthuisberg, K.U. Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van de Werf, Frans [Cardiology, UZ Gasthuisberg, K.U. Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Djian, Jacques [Wyeth Research, Paris la Defense Cedex (France); Sambuceti, Gianmario [Instituto di Fisiologia Clinica CNR, Pisa (Italy); Schwaiger, Marcus [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, TU Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Touboul, Paul [Hopital Cardio-Vasculaire et Pneumologique, Lyon (France)

    2002-12-01

    In an ongoing international multi-centre trial, positron emission tomography (PET) is being used to evaluate the effect of a new P-selectin antagonist on the infarct size in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated with thrombolysis. Although it is possible to correct for site-dependent factors, it is desirable to reduce these factors to a minimum. Therefore, acquisition and reconstruction protocols have been defined that can be closely followed by all participating centres. The resulting reconstructed images are transferred to the core centre for central processing with semi-automatic software. This paper reports on the multi-centre phantom experiment that was carried out to assess the inter-centre reproducibility of defect size determination with this protocol. Also, the spatial resolution of the short axis slices was examined. In addition, the analysis procedure was applied to normal PET studies to evaluate the specificity of perfusion defect detection. The transmural cold defect in the phantom occupied 14.8% of the left ventricular area. The automated analysis was applied to the phantom measurements from the 14 participating PET cameras. It yielded an accurate estimate of 15.1% with a standard deviation of 0.6%, indicating excellent reproducibility. The spatial resolution in the short axis slices was similar for all PET systems: 9.6{+-}0.8 mm. The same procedure produced a defect size of zero in the studies of normal volunteers. This study indicates that cardiac studies from multiple PET systems can be pooled for statistical analysis. (orig.)

  4. Frequency of cardiac defects among children at echocardiography centre in a teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess frequency of cardiac defects among children from birth to 12 years of age on each Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted at echocardiography centre in coronary care unit at Bahawal Victoria Hby Paediatric Transthoracic echo probe; 2-D colour Doppler, Acuson CV-70 and Niemo-30 echocardiography machines. Mothers of children with cardiac defects were interviewed at the echocardiography centre. Variables included were A- Muscular plus Vascular defects; B- Valvular defects; C-Pericardial effusion; D- Dextrocardia and E- Congestive cardiac failure. History of children for sore throat followed by joint pains; history of mothers for drug intake (antihypertensive, antipyretic, anti-emetic, hypoglycaemic) as well as chronic diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, anaemia) during pregnancy were surveyed. Parity of mothers, their cousin marriages, and family socio-economic status was also inquired. The results were tabulated, analyzed and finally subjected to suitable test of significant (SR of proportion) to find out statistical significant if any. Results: It was found that out of 150 patients, 76 (50.66%) were suffering from Cardiac muscular and Vascular defects, 61 (40.66%) Valvular defects, 7 (4.66%) Pericardial effusion, 2 (1.33%) Dextrocardia and 4 (2.66%) from Congestive Cardiac Failure. According to age, 54 (36%) were from birth to 3 years of age and 51 (34%) from 10 to 12 years. There was history of Rheumatic fever among 45 (30%) children. There were 106 (70.6%) children from lower socio-economic class and 79 (52.6%) parents had history of cousin marriages. Conclusion: Frequency of cardiac defects was more in children of male sex, lower socio-economic group, from birth to three years age and children from primipara mothers in our specified locality. Rheumatic fever, cousin's marriage, and prescribed drugs intake during pregnancy (for metabolic and hormonal disorders) were other contributors to cardiac defects. (author)

  5. POST INFARCT LEFT VENTRICULAR ANEURYSMS : 5YEAR SURGICAL EXPERIENCE IN A RURAL CARDIAC CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikrishnan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES : This is a long term follow up of 54 patients with post infarct left ventricular aneurysm, operated over a period of 5 years, from 2005 to 2010, in a rural cardiac centre. This study aims at assessing efficacy of simple linear closure technique and its long term results. Follow up was done over a period of 2 to 5 years by clinical examination and 2D echocardiography. MATERIALS AND METHODS : 54 patients underwent surgery for left ventricular aneurysm. Age ranged from 50 – 70 years. 50 patients were operated electively and 4 patients within 15 days of acute myocardial infarction. All were approached by median sternotomy incision. Aortic canulat ion was done after heparinisation (3mg/kg. Aorto - bicaval canulation was employed and membrane oxygenators were used in all patients. After cross clamping the aorta, blood cardioplegia was used in all patients. Aortic cross clamp time varied from 40 - 90 min and bypass time varied from 90 - 120 min. Aneurysm was resected and sutured with 2/0 prolene and Teflon felt reinforcement with CABG as concomitant procedure in some. Inotropic support with adrenaline, dopamine or dobutamine was used in all patients. IABP w as employed in 48 patients. All patients were electively ventilated for 24 - 48 hours. 6 required re exploration due to bleeding. 10 patients had mild MR which was left alone. RESULTS : 54 patients were operated for left ventricular aneurysm over a period of 5 years. 4 patients died postoperatively due to low cardiac output and arrhythmias. Follow up was done clinically and with 2D Echocardiography. At the end of 2 years, 22 patients showed no further improvement in LVEF, 32 patients LVEF improved by 10 - 15%. A ll patients required decongestive management. 6 patients died at the end of 2 years. CONCLUSION : Timely and planned surgery with simple techniques, for left ventricular aneurysms can give acceptable mortality and morbidity, in a rural cardiac Centre

  6. Cardiac Work-Up Protocol for Liver Transplant Candidates: Experience from a Single Liver Transplant Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Carrie; Saincher, Meghana; Tandon, Puneeta; Meeberg, Glenda; Williams, Randy; Burak, Kelly W; Bain, Vincent G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemic cardiac events can cause significant morbidity and mortality postliver transplantation; however, no validated protocols to screen patients before transplantation exist.OBJECTIVES: To report the introduction of a noninvasive cardiac screening protocol used at the Liver Unit, University of Calgary (Calgary, Alberta); to determine whether the protocol decreases use of coronary angiograms; and to compare cardiac outcomes using the new protocol with an appropriately matched hi...

  7. Cardiac magnetic source imaging based on current multipole model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Fa-Kuan; Wang Qian; Hua Ning; Lu Hong; Tang Xue-Zheng; Ma Ping

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the heart current source can be reduced into a current multipole. By adopting three linear inverse methods, the cardiac magnetic imaging is achieved in this article based on the current multipole model expanded to the first order terms. This magnetic imaging is realized in a reconstruction plane in the centre of human heart, where the current dipole array is employed to represent realistic cardiac current distribution. The current multipole as testing source generates magnetic fields in the measuring plane, serving as inputs of cardiac magnetic inverse problem. In the heart-torso model constructed by boundary element method, the current multipole magnetic field distribution is compared with that in the homogeneous infinite space, and also with the single current dipole magnetic field distribution.Then the minimum-norm least-squares (MNLS) method, the optimal weighted pseuDOInverse method (OWPIM), and the optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM) are selected as the algorithms for inverse computation based on current multipole model innovatively, and the imaging effects of these three inverse methods are compared. Besides,two reconstructing parameters, residual and mean residual, are also discussed, and their trends under MNLS, OWPIM and OCLIM each as a function of SNR are obtained and compared.

  8. Grand rounds from international lupus centres cardiac abnormalities in SLE : pancarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, M; Brouwer, J; Kallenberg, GGM

    2000-01-01

    Many patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) develop cardiac manifestations during the course of their disease. Pericarditis is most commonly seen, with a reported prevalence of 60%. Myocardial involvement is present in only a minority of patients. In recent years, due to better noninvasive

  9. UICEE Centre for Problem Based Learning (UCPBL) at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Flemming Kobberøe; Enemark, Stig; Moesby, Egon

    2002-01-01

    University is considered to have a strong position in Problem-Based Learning (PBL) with many years of experience. Within engineering education co-operation with industry has also always been a field of high importance for Aalborg University and part of the PBL concept. An increasing number of universities......UICEE Centre for Problem-Based Learning (UCPBL) is a global centre for Problem-Based Learning located at Aalborg University, Denmark UCPBL is established as a partner to the UNESCO International Centre for Engineering Education (UICEE) located at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Aalborg...... and engineering schools worldwide are consequently seeking consultancy and cooperation with Aalborg University. The establishment of UCPBL is therefore welcomed as a possibility to merge these activities into one organisational structure and to strengthen the effort of improving engineering education...

  10. Tertiary centres have improved survival compared to other hospitals in the Copenhagen area after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Wachtell, Kristian; Nielsen, Søren Loumann;

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has been reported to carry very varying morbidity and mortality. However, it remains unclear whether this is caused by intrinsic factors of the OHCA or due to the level of in-hospital care. The aim of this study is to compare 30-day and long......-term mortality after OHCA at tertiary heart centres and non-tertiary university hospitals. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data from the Copenhagen OHCA registry from June 2002 through December 2010 included a total of 1218 consecutive patients treated by the same mobile emergency care unit (MECU) with either return...... angiography. Therefore, patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (n=198) were excluded from the analysis. 30-day mortality was 56% vs. 76% and long term (up to 8years) mortality was 78% vs. 94% for tertiary and non-tertiary hospitals, respectively, both p...

  11. The China Patient-Centred Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (China PEACE)-Prospective Study of 3-Vessel Disease: rationale and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chenfei; Bongiovanni, Tasce; Li, Xi; Gao, Huawei; Zhang, Heng; Li, Jing; Zhao, Yan; Yuan, Xin; Hua, Kun; Hu, Shengshou; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin; Zheng, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Complex coronary artery disease (left main and three-vessel disease) carries high risks of adverse events and cost burden. However, in China, little is known about which patients are directed toward which treatment strategies and what outcomes are being achieved. Methods and analysis Using the China PEACE (Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events) research network, this prospective study of three-Vessel Disease, the China PEACE-3VD study, has a plan to consecutively register over 4000 patients with a diagnosis of 3VD and/or left-main disease by elective coronary angiography at 24 large cardiovascular centres in China. We centrally conducted medical record abstraction and SYNTAX Score calculation for all registered patients. The sites invited patients to the prospective cohort, and conducted 1-year follow-up on major events, including cardiac events, symptoms, secondary prevention and quality of life. The estimated entire sample size of eligible patients of 4000 was determined based on both feasibility and consideration of adequate statistical precision for describing the treatment decisions, guidelines adherence and appropriateness of treatment for patients with complex coronary artery diseases. The study is designed to investigate patient, clinician and hospital factors associated with each treatment strategy (percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting or medical therapy) as well as appropriateness of treatment choice, current guideline compliance and patient-reported outcomes for patients with complex coronary artery disease in large cardiovascular centres in China, as a foundation for enhanced knowledge in the field and to assist quality improvement initiatives. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol was approved by the ethics committee at the China National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases. Findings will be shared with participating hospitals, policymakers and the academic community, to promote

  12. Location-based solutions in the Experience centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Alapetite, Alexandre; Holdgaard, Nanna;

    In this paper we present a prototype system for location-based guiding. A user survey has been conducted and the observations are used to support design choices. The prototype allows for both indoor and outdoor navigation at and in the vicinity of the experience centre NaturBornholm1 in Denmark u...... using a combination of Bluetooth, GPS and QR-codes. Bluetooth and GPS are used for location-based information and QR-codes are used to convey user preferences....

  13. Location-based solutions in the Experience centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witzner Hansen, Dan; Alapetite, Alexandre Philippe Bernard; Holdgaard, Nanna;

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a prototype system for location-based guiding. A user survey has been conducted and the observations are used to support design choices. The prototype allows for both indoor and outdoor navigation at and in the vicinity of the experience centre NaturBornholm1 in Denmark u...... using a combination of Bluetooth, GPS and QRcodes. Bluetooth and GPS are used for location-based information and QR-codes are used to convey user preferences....

  14. Reconciling evidence-based medicine and patient-centred care: defining evidence-based inputs to patient-centred decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based and patient-centred health care movements have each enhanced the discussion of how health care might best be delivered, yet the two have evolved separately and, in some views, remain at odds with each other. No clear model has emerged to enable practitioners to capitalize on the advantages of each so actual practice often becomes, to varying degrees, an undefined mishmash of each. When faced with clinical uncertainty, it becomes easy for practitioners to rely on formulas for care developed explicitly by expert panels, or on the tacit ones developed from experience or habit. Either way, these tendencies towards 'cookbook' medicine undermine the view of patients as unique particulars, and diminish what might be considered patient-centred care. The sequence in which evidence is applied in the care process, however, is critical for developing a model of care that is both evidence based and patient centred. This notion derives from a paradigm for knowledge delivery and patient care developed over decades by Dr. Lawrence Weed. Weed's vision enables us to view evidence-based and person-centred medicine as wholly complementary, using computer tools to more fully and reliably exploit the vast body of collective knowledge available to define patients' uniqueness and identify the options to guide patients. The transparency of the approach to knowledge delivery facilitates meaningful practitioner-patient dialogue in determining the appropriate course of action. Such a model for knowledge delivery and care is essential for integrating evidence-based and patient-centred approaches. PMID:26456314

  15. Cardiac tissue ablation with catheter-based microwave heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, C

    2004-11-01

    The common condition of atrial fibrillation is often treated by cutting diseased cardiac tissue to disrupt abnormal electrical conduction pathways. Heating abnormal tissue with electromagnetic power provides a minimally invasive surgical alternative to treat these cardiac arrhythmias. Radio frequency ablation has become the method of choice of many physicians. Recently, microwave power has also been shown to have great therapeutic benefit in medical treatment requiring precise heating of biological tissue. Since microwave power tends to be deposited throughout the volume of biological media, microwave heating offers advantages over other heating modalities that tend to heat primarily the contacting surface. It is also possible to heat a deeper volume of tissue with more precise control using microwaves than with purely thermal conduction or RF electrode heating. Microwave Cardiac Ablation (MCA) is used to treat heart tissue that allows abnormal electrical conduction by heating it to the point of inactivation. Microwave antennas that fit within catheter systems can be positioned close to diseased tissue. Specialized antenna designs that unfurl from the catheter within the heart can then radiate specifically shaped fields, which overcome problems such as excessive surface heating at the contact point. The state of the art in MCA is reviewed in this paper and a novel catheter-based unfurling wide aperture antenna is described. This antenna consists of the centre conductor of a coaxial line, shaped into a spiral and insulated from blood and tissue by a non-conductive fluid filled balloon. Initially stretched straight inside a catheter for transluminal guiding, once in place at the cardiac target, the coiled spiral antenna is advanced into the inflated balloon. Power is applied in the range of 50-150 W at the reserved industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) frequency of 915 MHz for 30-90 s to create an irreversible lesion. The antenna is then retracted back into the

  16. User centred evaluation of a recommendation based image browsing system

    OpenAIRE

    Leelanupab, T.; Hopfgartner, F.; Jose, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel approach to recommend images by mining user interactions based on implicit feedback of user browsing. The underlying hypothesis is that the interaction implicitly indicates the interests of the users for meeting practical image retrieval tasks. The algorithm mines interaction data and also low-level content of the clicked images to choose diverse images by clustering heterogeneous features. A user-centred, task-oriented, comparative evaluation was undertake...

  17. Information and communication technology-based cardiac rehabilitation homecare programs

    OpenAIRE

    Karunanithi, Mohanraj

    2015-01-01

    Marlien Varnfield, Mohanraj KarunanithiAustralian eHealth Research Centre, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has, for many years, been a highly recommended approach to secondary prevention for patients recovering after a heart attack or heart surgery. These programs are traditionally delivered from a hospital outpatient center. Despite demonstrated benefits and gui...

  18. Information and communication technology-based cardiac rehabilitation homecare programs

    OpenAIRE

    Varnfield M; Karunanithi M

    2015-01-01

    Marlien Varnfield, Mohanraj KarunanithiAustralian eHealth Research Centre, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has, for many years, been a highly recommended approach to secondary prevention for patients recovering after a heart attack or heart surgery. These programs are traditionally delivered from a hospital outpatient center. Despite demonstrated benefits and guideli...

  19. Location-based solutions in the Experience centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Alapetite, Alexandre; Holdgaard, Nanna;

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a prototype system for location-based guiding. A user survey has been conducted and the observations are used to support design choices. The prototype allows for both indoor and outdoor navigation at and in the vicinity of the NaturBornholm' experience centre in Denmark u...... using a combination of Bluetooth, Near Field Communication (NFC), GPS and QR codes. Bluetooth, NFC and GPS are used for location-based information and QR codes are used to convey user preferences....

  20. Human Centred Design: a bibliometric overview based on Science Direct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas José Garcia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to realize a bibliometric review on Science Direct to create a outlook about Human Centred Design in order to identify the most significant authors, journals and key-words as well as the most recurrent denomination about the subject. The method employed consist of application of three classical bibliometric laws: the Inverse Square Law of Lotka; the Bradford’s Law of Scattering and; The frequency law of words in a text of Zipf. The results indicate that the subject is not a main subject of Design and related areas and does not have a main author based on Science Direct. The journals covered with more articles about the subject are the International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics and the Applied Ergonomics.

  1. Mechanistically based mapping of human cardiac fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sanjiv M; Zaman, Junaid A B

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms underpinning human cardiac fibrillation remain elusive. In his 1913 paper 'On dynamic equilibrium in the heart', Mines proposed that an activation wave front could propagate repeatedly in a circle, initiated by a stimulus in the vulnerable period. While the dynamics of activation and recovery are central to cardiac fibrillation, these physiological data are rarely used in clinical mapping. Fibrillation is a rapid irregular rhythm with spatiotemporal disorder resulting from two fundamental mechanisms - sources in preferred cardiac regions or spatially diffuse self-sustaining activity, i.e. with no preferred source. On close inspection, however, this debate may also reflect mapping technique. Fibrillation is initiated from triggers by regional dispersion in repolarization, slow conduction and wavebreak, then sustained by non-uniform interactions of these mechanisms. Notably, optical mapping of action potentials in atrial fibrillation (AF) show spiral wave sources (rotors) in nearly all studies including humans, while most traditional electrogram analyses of AF do not. Techniques may diverge in fibrillation because electrograms summate non-coherent waves within an undefined field whereas optical maps define waves with a visually defined field. Also fibrillation operates at the limits of activation and recovery, which are well represented by action potentials while fibrillatory electrograms poorly represent repolarization. We conclude by suggesting areas for study that may be used, until such time as optical mapping is clinically feasible, to improve mechanistic understanding and therapy of human cardiac fibrillation. PMID:26607671

  2. Acoustic cardiac signals analysis: a Kalman filter–based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salleh SH

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sheik Hussain Salleh,1 Hadrina Sheik Hussain,2 Tan Tian Swee,2 Chee-Ming Ting,2 Alias Mohd Noor,2 Surasak Pipatsart,3 Jalil Ali,4 Preecha P Yupapin31Department of Biomedical Instrumentation and Signal Processing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Malaysia; 2Centre for Biomedical Engineering Transportation Research Alliance, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, Malaysia; 3Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research Alliance, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Institute of Advanced Photonics Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, MalaysiaAbstract: Auscultation of the heart is accompanied by both electrical activity and sound. Heart auscultation provides clues to diagnose many cardiac abnormalities. Unfortunately, detection of relevant symptoms and diagnosis based on heart sound through a stethoscope is difficult. The reason GPs find this difficult is that the heart sounds are of short duration and separated from one another by less than 30 ms. In addition, the cost of false positives constitutes wasted time and emotional anxiety for both patient and GP. Many heart diseases cause changes in heart sound, waveform, and additional murmurs before other signs and symptoms appear. Heart-sound auscultation is the primary test conducted by GPs. These sounds are generated primarily by turbulent flow of blood in the heart. Analysis of heart sounds requires a quiet environment with minimum ambient noise. In order to address such issues, the technique of denoising and estimating the biomedical heart signal is proposed in this investigation. Normally, the performance of the filter naturally depends on prior information related to the statistical properties of the signal and the background noise. This paper proposes Kalman filtering for denoising statistical heart sound. The cycles of heart sounds are certain to follow first-order Gauss–Markov process. These cycles are observed with additional noise

  3. Centre-based versus home-based childcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauchmüller, R.

    2013-01-01

    Centre‐based childcare is seen as a public investment to facilitate maternal employment. Recent theoretical research proposes that such investments potentially lead to substantial gains in child development and thus to high returns for society as a whole. However, the empirical evidence is still sca

  4. A Design-based introduction to learning centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Kristine; Hestbech, Astrid Margrethe; Gundersen, Peter Bukovica

    2016-01-01

    private and public businesses is pivotal for achieving a sustainable model for online education in rural areas. Furthermore, the paper presents a series of thinking technologies in the form of models and categories, which can be used as tools for establishing learning centres and designing learning......In the last decades, outskirt areas in Denmark have suffered from depopulation and economic decline, a development that has led to a centralised education system where higher education institutions are vested in a central body in urban areas rather than in rural communities. University College...... Zealand has initiated a research project in collaboration with three municipalities in the region of Zealand and partners from the Nordic countries, which investigates the potential of municipal learning centres as a means to solve educational challenges in outskirt areas. A municipal learning centre is a...

  5. A mobile phone-based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: the care assessment platform (CAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation programs offer effective means to prevent recurrence of a cardiac event, but poor uptake of current programs have been reported globally. Home based models are considered as a feasible alternative to avoid various barriers related to care centre based programs. This paper sets out the study design for a clinical trial seeking to test the hypothesis that these programs can be better and more efficiently supported with novel Information and Communication Technologies (ICT. Methods/Design We have integrated mobile phones and web services into a comprehensive home- based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Mobile phones with a built-in accelerometer sensor are used to measure physical exercise and WellnessDiary software is used to collect information on patients' physiological risk factors and other health information. Video and teleconferencing are used for mentoring sessions aiming at behavioural modifications through goal setting. The mentors use web-portal to facilitate personal goal setting and to assess the progress of each patient in the program. Educational multimedia content are stored or transferred via messaging systems to the patients phone to be viewed on demand. We have designed a randomised controlled trial to compare the health outcomes and cost efficiency of the proposed model with a traditional community based rehabilitation program. The main outcome measure is adherence to physical exercise guidelines. Discussion The study will provide evidence on using mobile phones and web services for mentoring and self management in a home-based care model targeting sustainable behavioural modifications in cardiac rehabilitation patients. Trial registration The trial has been registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR with number ACTRN12609000251224.

  6. Characterization of Cardiac Patients Based on the Synergy Model

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    Tavangar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardiac patients need comprehensive support due to the adverse effects of this disease on different aspects of their lives. Synergy intervention is a model that focuses on patients' requirements. Objectives This study aimed to determine the eightfold characteristic of cardiac patients based on the synergy model that represent their clinical requirements. Materials and Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 40 cardiac patients hospitalized at the cardiac care unit (CCU of Yazd Afshar Hospital were randomly selected. The data were collected by using a two-part check-list including demographic characteristics and also by studying eight characteristics of patients through interviewing and reviewing their records. The results were analyzed using descriptive statistics such as frequency (percentage and analytical statistics such as Spearman and Mann-Whitney test with the SPSS software, version 18. Results The results showed that among patients' internal characteristics, reversibility (70.6%, vulnerability (68.6%, and predictability (80.4% at level 1 (the minimum score had the highest frequency and stability (49% and complexity (54.9% were at level 3 (average score. Among external characteristics participation in decision-making (80.4% at level 1 had the highest frequency while care (62.7% and recourses (98% were at level 3. Conclusions Ignoring any of the eightfold characteristics based on the synergy model interferes with comprehensive support of cardiac patients. Therefore, it is necessary for professional health practitioners, especially nurses, to consider patients' eightfold characteristics in order to provide quality care.

  7. International centres of excellence based on research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of high flux research reactors were, or will be constructed. Each of these high flux facilities has the potential to be an important regional or International Centre of Excellence based on Research Reactors (ICERR) and scientific hub for research and materials investigations. Some are so organized currently, but for many there is a strongly national focus and scope for a significant expansion of their international role. There are manifold benefits of an expanded international role both for the ICERR's themselves and for the institutes that affiliate with them. These benefits include increased utilization and financial stability, increased international prestige, and enhanced scientific resources and capabilities. There are significant hurdles to obtaining the benefits from an expanded international role. For example, to achieve its full potential an ICERR must accommodate scientists from other nations, and include the plans and aspirations of the international community in the ICERR governance. The ICERR must also fully meet the national responsibilities for safety and security. Balancing these potentially conflicting requirements and finding a path through the organisational and legal issues is a significant challenge for any institute. The existing ICERR's therefore provide important case studies and examples of best practice that could inform the actions of other potential ICERR's. This paper describes an IAEA initiative to encourage and support the formation of new ICERR's, strengthen existing ones, and increase training resources available to Member States. The initiative will seek to share best practice and facilitate meetings and technical exchanges between the existing and potential ICERRs, and between the potential ICERR's and potential subscribing or affiliating institutes. (orig.)

  8. Assessing Cardiac Dynamics based on X-Ray Coronary Angiograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Sun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of quantitatively assessing cardiac motion including global and local dynamic performances during cardiac cycles is addressed. In vivo X-ray coronary angiographic image sequences covering several cardiac cycles are used as source image data. The three-dimensional (3-D surface of the heart based on extended superquadrics (ESQ surface model in each phase is constructed from 3-D coronary vessel skeletons, which are reconstructed from a pair of nearly orthogonal angiographic sequences. Complex dynamic performances of the heart are decomposed into global and local components according to a priori anatomical and dynamic knowledge that have been confirmed by medical observations and non-rigid motion theory. Parameters of all components are quantitatively estimated through motion decomposition and compensation. Consequently, cardiac dynamics during cardiac cycles are comprehensively depicted with quantitative parameters. Validation of the proposed method with clinically acquired in vivo image data has been carried out, the results of which have verified the feasibility and accuracy of the proposed method.

  9. Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation for Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Oldridge, Neil; Thompson, David R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although recommended in guidelines for the management of coronary heart disease (CHD), concerns have been raised about the applicability of evidence from existing meta-analyses of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study is to update the Cochrane...

  10. Information and communication technology-based cardiac rehabilitation homecare programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varnfield M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marlien Varnfield, Mohanraj KarunanithiAustralian eHealth Research Centre, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR has, for many years, been a highly recommended approach to secondary prevention for patients recovering after a heart attack or heart surgery. These programs are traditionally delivered from a hospital outpatient center. Despite demonstrated benefits and guideline recommendations, CR utilization has been poor, particularly in women, older patients, and ethnic minority groups. To overcome some of the barriers to the traditional delivery of CR, different delivery platforms and approaches have been developed in recent years. In general, Telehealth solutions which have been used to address the delivery of CR services remotely include: 1 patient–provider contact delivered by telephone systems; 2 the Internet, with the majority of patient–provider contact for risk factor management taking place online; and 3 interventions using Smartphones as tools to deliver CR through (independently or in combination with short message service messaging, journaling applications, connected measurement devices, and remote coaching. These solutions have been shown to overcome some of the barriers in CR participation and show potential as alternative or complementary options for individuals that find traditional center-based CR programs difficult to commit to. The major benefits of remote platforms for CR delivery are the ability to deliver these interventions without ongoing face-to-face contact, which provides an opportunity to reach large numbers of people, and the convenience of selecting the timing of cardiovascular disease management sessions. Furthermore, technologies have the potential to deliver long-term follow-up, which programs delivered by health professionals cannot afford to do due to staff shortages and budget restrictions

  11. Speckle Tracking Based Strain Analysis Is Sensitive for Early Detection of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Xiangbo An; Jingjing Wang; Hao Li; Zhizhen Lu; Yan Bai; Han Xiao; Youyi Zhang; Yao Song

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a key pathological process of many cardiac diseases. However, early detection of cardiac hypertrophy is difficult by the currently used non-invasive method and new approaches are in urgent need for efficient diagnosis of cardiac malfunction. Here we report that speckle tracking-based strain analysis is more sensitive than conventional echocardiography for early detection of pathological cardiac hypertrophy in the isoproterenol (ISO) mouse model. Pathological hypertrophy...

  12. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by medical dispatchers in emergency medical dispatch centres in two countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Andréll, Cecilia; Viereck, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains low. Early recognition by emergency medical dispatchers is essential for an effective chain of actions, leading to early cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of an automated external defibrillator and rapid dispatching....... This raises a discussion of definitions and transparency in general in scientific reporting of OHCA recognition, which is essential if used as quality indicator in emergency medical services....

  13. Material-based engineering strategies for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Mieke H van; Bax, Noortje A M; Spreeuwel, Ariane C C van; van der Schaft, Daisy W J; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue is composed of muscle and non-muscle cells, surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM) and spatially organized into a complex three-dimensional (3D) architecture to allow for coordinated contraction and electrical pulse propagation. Despite emerging evidence for cardiomyocyte turnover in mammalian hearts, the regenerative capacity of human cardiac tissue is insufficient to recover from damage, e.g. resulting from myocardial infarction (MI). Instead, the heart 'repairs' lost or injured tissue by ongoing synthesis and remodeling of scar tissue. Conventional therapies and timely (stem) cell delivery to the injured tissue markedly improve short-term function and remodeling, but do not attenuate later stage adverse remodeling, leading to functional deterioration and eventually failure of the heart. Material-based therapies have been successfully used to mechanically support and constrain the post-MI failing heart, preventing it from further remodeling and dilation. When designed to deliver the right microenvironment for endogenous or exogenous cells, as well as the mechanical and topological cues to guide neo-tissue formation, material-based therapies may even reverse remodeling and boost cardiac regeneration. This paper reviews the up-to-date status of material-based cardiac regeneration with special emphasis on 1) the use of bare biomaterials to deliver passive constraints that unload the heart, 2) the use of materials and cells to create engineered cardiac constructs for replacement, support, or regeneration of damaged myocardium, and 3) the development of bio-inspired and bioactive materials that aim to enhance the endogenous regenerative capacity of the heart. As the therapies should function in the infarcted heart, the damaged host environment and engineered in vitro test systems that mimic this environment, are reviewed as well.

  14. Strategic development of the Greek centre for work based learning partnerships (GCWBLP)

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Panagiotis

    2003-01-01

    Work based learning (WBL) is the term being used to describe a class of university programmes that bring together universities and work organisations to create new learning opportunities in workplaces. Middlesex University was a pioneer in the institutional development of work based learning through its National Centre of Work Based Learning Partnerships (NCWBLP) established in 1993. The Greek Centre (GCWBLP) was established in Athens and began operations in 1997 to promote WBL programm...

  15. Abaqus/Standard-based quantification of human cardiac mechanical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Genet, Martin; Kuhl, Ellen; Guccione, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling can provide critical insight into existing and potential new surgical procedures, medical or minimally-invasive treatments for heart failure, one of the leading causes of deaths in the world that has reached epidemic proportions. In this paper, we present our Abaqus/Standard-based pipeline to create subject-specific left ventricular models. We first review our generic left ventricular model, and then the personalization process based on magnetic resonance images. Identification of subject-specific cardiac material properties is done by coupling Abaqus/Standard to the python optimization library NL-Opt. Compared to previous studies from our group, the emphasis is here on the fully implicit solving of the model, and the two-parameter optimization of the passive cardiac material properties.

  16. Dealing with existential anxiety in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte; Pedersen, Birthe D; Dreyer, Pia;

    2015-01-01

    physically and psychologically challenged, the patients were encouraged to maintain an active lifestyle. Three themes were identified: anxiety regarding exercise, whereby the patients are initially insecure about how to behave with their diseased hearts; encouragement from training together, whereby...... the patients support each other in exercising; and growing confidence in the heart, whereby the patients enjoy being physically active. Conclusions In exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation, patients' insecurity with respect to their heart disease is revealed as an existential anxiety. Through peer support...... and a positive physical perception, the patients gain renewed self-efficacy, helping them to continue their lives in an active and satisfying way. Relevance to clinical practice Knowing that patients are confronted with an existential anxiety during exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is important because...

  17. A proposed referral centre based on HL7/XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T S; Liao, B S; Lee, C H; Gough, T G

    2002-01-01

    With the growth of the Inteernet, hospitals have also applied HL7 (Health Level Seven) to exchange data between them. The referral system is identified as an appropriate application system. The effect of referral is to transfer the patient to a suitable hospital in a timely fashion, and to arrange appropriate treatment for the patient. Taking advantage of the Internet to exchange referral data can, not only accelerate the process of patient referral, but also avoid the unnecessary repeat examinations to decrease the waste of medical resources. This article builds up a referral-related message according to the HL7 standard, and develops a referral centre using the Internet environment, making use of XML (eXtensible Markup Language) standard to transform the referral-related data to XML format and exchange referral data between platforms. This electronic referral mechanism is expected to offer other hospitals experience of improved referral practice. PMID:15460680

  18. A survey of membrane oxygenator heat-exchanger integrity testing at cardiac surgery centres in Great Britain and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Matthew; Campbell, John

    2013-11-01

    Membrane oxygenator heat exchanger (HE) device failure is reported to be very low for both short- and long-term extracorporeal devices. All oxygenator manufacturers provide instructions for leak testing of their HE devices prior to patient use. In addition to these recommendations, since 2006 at Nottingham University Hospitals (NUH) we have also additionally pressure tested HE devices prior to use. We conducted a national survey of cardiac centers in Great Britain and Ireland to determine the methods undertaken in individual centers for validation of the integrity of HE devices. Furthermore, we also collected information on the routine maintenance techniques utilized within these centers to inhibit microbial growth in the water used in the heater-cooler units (HCUs). In total, 34 responses were collected from the 57 centers performing cardiac surgery, producing a response rate of 60%. Of the responding centers, 71% are adhering to manufacturer's recommended guidelines of circulating the water through the device for 5 minutes. Of these centers, 17% reported detecting a leak between the HE and membrane compartment of the oxygenator. In responding centers, 29% reported using the pressure test technique. In the centers utilizing pressure testing, 60% reported detecting a leak. This survey reports an association of a greater HE leak detection rate using the pressure test technique compared to using water testing in isolation (p = 0.034). We believe the pressure testing method provides the perfusionist with confidence in the integrity of the HE for short- and long-term circulatory support devices prior to use in both elective and emergency situations.

  19. Ketamine in adult cardiac surgery and the cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit: An evidence-based clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mazzeffi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a unique anesthetic drug that provides analgesia, hypnosis, and amnesia with minimal respiratory and cardiovascular depression. Because of its sympathomimetic properties it would seem to be an excellent choice for patients with depressed ventricular function in cardiac surgery. However, its use has not gained widespread acceptance in adult cardiac surgery patients, perhaps due to its perceived negative psychotropic effects. Despite this limitation, it is receiving renewed interest in the United States as a sedative and analgesic drug for critically ill-patients. In this manuscript, the authors provide an evidence-based clinical review of ketamine use in cardiac surgery patients for intensive care physicians, cardio-thoracic anesthesiologists, and cardio-thoracic surgeons. All MEDLINE indexed clinical trials performed during the last 20 years in adult cardiac surgery patients were included in the review.

  20. Creative elements: network-based predictions of active centres in proteins, cellular and social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Csermely, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Active centres and hot spots of proteins have a paramount importance in enzyme action, protein complex formation and drug design. Recently a number of publications successfully applied the analysis of residue networks to predict active centres in proteins. Most real-world networks show a number of properties, such as small-worldness or scale-free degree distribution, which are rather general features of networks from molecules to the society. Based on extensive analogies I propose that the existing findings and methodology enable us to detect active centres in cells, social networks and ecosystems. Members of these active centres are creative elements of the respective networks, which may help them to survive unprecedented, novel challenges, and play a key role in the development, survival and evolvability of complex systems.

  1. Cardiac CT for planning redo cardiac surgery: effect of knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction on image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Seitaro [MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Department of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Weissman, Gaby; Weigold, W. Guy [MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Department of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); Vembar, Mani [Philips Healthcare, CT Clinical Science, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR) on image quality in cardiac CT performed for the planning of redo cardiac surgery by comparing IMR images with images reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR). We studied 31 patients (23 men, 8 women; mean age 65.1 ± 16.5 years) referred for redo cardiac surgery who underwent cardiac CT. Paired image sets were created using three types of reconstruction: FBP, HIR, and IMR. Quantitative parameters including CT attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each cardiovascular structure were calculated. The visual image quality - graininess, streak artefact, margin sharpness of each cardiovascular structure, and overall image quality - was scored on a five-point scale. The mean image noise of FBP, HIR, and IMR images was 58.3 ± 26.7, 36.0 ± 12.5, and 14.2 ± 5.5 HU, respectively; there were significant differences in all comparison combinations among the three methods. The CNR of IMR images was better than that of FBP and HIR images in all evaluated structures. The visual scores were significantly higher for IMR than for the other images in all evaluated parameters. IMR can provide significantly improved qualitative and quantitative image quality at in cardiac CT for planning of reoperative cardiac surgery. (orig.)

  2. Speckle Tracking Based Strain Analysis Is Sensitive for Early Detection of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangbo An

    Full Text Available Cardiac hypertrophy is a key pathological process of many cardiac diseases. However, early detection of cardiac hypertrophy is difficult by the currently used non-invasive method and new approaches are in urgent need for efficient diagnosis of cardiac malfunction. Here we report that speckle tracking-based strain analysis is more sensitive than conventional echocardiography for early detection of pathological cardiac hypertrophy in the isoproterenol (ISO mouse model. Pathological hypertrophy was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of ISO. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy was established by daily treadmill exercise for six weeks. Strain analysis, including radial strain (RS, radial strain rate (RSR and longitudinal strain (LS, showed marked decrease as early as 3 days after ISO injection. Moreover, unlike the regional changes in cardiac infarction, strain analysis revealed global cardiac dysfunction that affects the entire heart in ISO-induced hypertrophy. In contrast, conventional echocardiography, only detected altered E/E', an index reflecting cardiac diastolic function, at 7 days after ISO injection. No change was detected on fractional shortening (FS, E/A and E'/A' at 3 days or 7 days after ISO injection. Interestingly, strain analysis revealed cardiac dysfunction only in ISO-induced pathological hypertrophy but not the physiological hypertrophy induced by exercise. Taken together, our study indicates that strain analysis offers a more sensitive approach for early detection of cardiac dysfunction than conventional echocardiography. Moreover, multiple strain readouts distinguish pathological cardiac hypertrophy from physiological hypertrophy.

  3. Speckle Tracking Based Strain Analysis Is Sensitive for Early Detection of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xiangbo; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Hao; Lu, Zhizhen; Bai, Yan; Xiao, Han; Zhang, Youyi; Song, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a key pathological process of many cardiac diseases. However, early detection of cardiac hypertrophy is difficult by the currently used non-invasive method and new approaches are in urgent need for efficient diagnosis of cardiac malfunction. Here we report that speckle tracking-based strain analysis is more sensitive than conventional echocardiography for early detection of pathological cardiac hypertrophy in the isoproterenol (ISO) mouse model. Pathological hypertrophy was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of ISO. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy was established by daily treadmill exercise for six weeks. Strain analysis, including radial strain (RS), radial strain rate (RSR) and longitudinal strain (LS), showed marked decrease as early as 3 days after ISO injection. Moreover, unlike the regional changes in cardiac infarction, strain analysis revealed global cardiac dysfunction that affects the entire heart in ISO-induced hypertrophy. In contrast, conventional echocardiography, only detected altered E/E', an index reflecting cardiac diastolic function, at 7 days after ISO injection. No change was detected on fractional shortening (FS), E/A and E'/A' at 3 days or 7 days after ISO injection. Interestingly, strain analysis revealed cardiac dysfunction only in ISO-induced pathological hypertrophy but not the physiological hypertrophy induced by exercise. Taken together, our study indicates that strain analysis offers a more sensitive approach for early detection of cardiac dysfunction than conventional echocardiography. Moreover, multiple strain readouts distinguish pathological cardiac hypertrophy from physiological hypertrophy.

  4. Toward cardiac electrophysiological mapping based on micro-Tesla NMR: a novel modality for localizing the cardiac reentry

    OpenAIRE

    Kiwoong Kim

    2012-01-01

    Matching the proton magnetic resonance frequency to the frequency of a periodic electrophysiological excitation of myocardium enables direct localization of the cardiac reentry by magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The feasibility of this new idea has been demonstrated by conducting a numerical simulation based on a realistic heart model and experimental parameters in SQUID-based micro-Tesla NMR.

  5. Toward cardiac electrophysiological mapping based on micro-Tesla NMR: a novel modality for localizing the cardiac reentry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiwoong

    2012-06-01

    Matching the proton magnetic resonance frequency to the frequency of a periodic electrophysiological excitation of myocardium enables direct localization of the cardiac reentry by magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The feasibility of this new idea has been demonstrated by conducting a numerical simulation based on a realistic heart model and experimental parameters in SQUID-based micro-Tesla NMR.

  6. South Street Centre: A Model For Community-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Betsy

    1998-01-01

    For 11 years, a private school operated out of a rented house has offered homeschoolers, charter- and public-school students, families, preschoolers, community activists, college students, apprentices, and educators programs that reflect the homeschooling lifestyle and incorporate feminine-based education. Describes the school's structure,…

  7. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewinter, Christian; Doherty, Patrick; Gale, Christopher P;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (EBCR) for patients with heart failure (HF). However, established research has not investigated the longer-term outcomes including mortality and hospitalisation in light of the contemporary management of HF. METHODS: This was ......BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (EBCR) for patients with heart failure (HF). However, established research has not investigated the longer-term outcomes including mortality and hospitalisation in light of the contemporary management of HF. METHODS......: This was a systematic review including a meta-analysis of EBCR on all-cause mortality, hospital admission, and standardised exercise capacity using four separate exercise tests in patients with heart failure over a minimum follow-up of six months from January 1999-January 2013. Electronic searches were performed...... in their funnel plots. CONCLUSIONS: EBCR in patients with HF is associated with significant improvements in exercise capacity and hospital admission over a minimum of six months follow-up, but not in all-cause mortality....

  8. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T B; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Berg, S K;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Owing to a lack of evidence, patients undergoing heart valve surgery have been offered exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) since 2009 based on recommendations for patients with ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of CR...... on the costs of healthcare use and sick leave among heart valve surgery patients over 12 months post surgery. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide survey on the CR participation of all patients having undergone valve surgery between 1 January 2011 and 30 June 2011 (n=667). Among the responders (n=500, 75...... expensive outpatient visits. Further studies should investigate the benefits of CR to heart valve surgery patients as part of a formal cost-utility analysis....

  9. The Val142Ile transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis: not only an Afro-American pathogenic variant? A single-centre Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Francesco; Frusconi, Sabrina; Bergesio, Franco; Grifoni, Elisa; Fabbri, Alessia; Giuliani, Costanza; Falconi, Serena; Bonifacio, Stefania; Perfetto, Federico

    2016-02-01

    Transthyterin amyloidosis is a life-threatening disorder caused by the deposition of hepatocyte-derived transthyretin (TTR) amyloid in various tissues and organs. The most common worldwide pathogenic variant with almost exclusive cardiac involvement is Val142Ile with an allele frequency of 3.5% in U.S. African-American population, but supposed extremely rare, with only sporadic cases in Caucasian patients. Unexpectedly, in our amyloidosis referral centre, we identified five patients (15.1% of all TTRm diagnosed patients, three families, two singleton) with Val142Ile variant belonging to unrelated families of Caucasian origin. Molecular study was performed in a total of 10 individuals of which three were Italian families (three affected individuals and five unaffected individuals) and two were singleton (one Italian patient and one patient from Argentine with Spanish ancestry). Sequence analysis of TTR gene revealed the presence of the heterozygous Val142Ile in the five affected patients and in five asymptomatic individuals. All probands underwent, at diagnosis, a complete clinical, echocardiographic and biohumoral evaluation. To the best of our knowledge, we describe the larger report of Caucasian patients with Val142Ile cardiomyopathy. All patients at diagnosis showed symptoms of heart failure with increased thickness of left ventricular walls and systo-diastolic left ventricular dysfunction. They also showed increased plasma values of NT-proBNP and troponin I. Our data confirm that Caucasian patients with the Val142Ile pathogenic variant have phenotypic manifestations similar to that of African-American one. Moreover, our data clearly show that Val142Ile pathogenic variant is not only an African-American mutation but could be also an underestimated Caucasian variant. PMID:26428663

  10. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heewon; Ko, Hoon; Thap, Tharoeun; Jeong, Changwon; Noh, Se-Eung; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR) with the target heart rate zone (THZ). The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone's built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone's built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient's HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis. PMID:27551969

  11. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heewon; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR) with the target heart rate zone (THZ). The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone’s built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone’s built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient’s HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis. PMID:27551969

  12. Development of a QFD-based expert system for CNC turning centre selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kanika; Chakraborty, Shankar

    2015-10-01

    Computer numerical control (CNC) machine tools are automated devices capable of generating complicated and intricate product shapes in shorter time. Selection of the best CNC machine tool is a critical, complex and time-consuming task due to availability of a wide range of alternatives and conflicting nature of several evaluation criteria. Although, the past researchers had attempted to select the appropriate machining centres using different knowledge-based systems, mathematical models and multi-criteria decision-making methods, none of those approaches has given due importance to the voice of customers. The aforesaid limitation can be overcome using quality function deployment (QFD) technique, which is a systematic approach for integrating customers' needs and designing the product to meet those needs first time and every time. In this paper, the adopted QFD-based methodology helps in selecting CNC turning centres for a manufacturing organization, providing due importance to the voice of customers to meet their requirements. An expert system based on QFD technique is developed in Visual BASIC 6.0 to automate the CNC turning centre selection procedure for different production plans. Three illustrative examples are demonstrated to explain the real-time applicability of the developed expert system.

  13. Evaluating Three School-Based Integrated Health Centres Established by a Partnership in Cornwall to Inform Future Provision and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Reynold

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to report the process, findings and implications of a three-year evaluation of integrated health centres (IHCs) established in three secondary schools in Cornwall by the School-Based Integrated Health Centres (SBIHC) partnership. Design/methodology/approach: When the partners had completed the capital works, an…

  14. Student Experience and Academic Success: Comparing a Student-Centred and a Lecture-Based Course Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severiens, Sabine; Meeuwisse, Marieke; Born, Marise

    2015-01-01

    Past research has shown that, under certain conditions, student-centred and small-scale course programmes result in more academic success. The present study investigates these conditions in further detail. It is examined whether, in comparison to a course programme that is relatively more lecture-based, a student-centred course programme promotes…

  15. Characterization of cardiac quiescence from retrospective cardiac computed tomography using a correlation-based phase-to-phase deviation measure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, Carson A.; McClellan, James H. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Drive Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Arepalli, Chesnal D. [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, 3350-950 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E3 (Canada); Auffermann, William F.; Henry, Travis S. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, 1364 Clifton Road Northeast, Suite 309, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Khosa, Faisal [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Division of Emergency Radiology, 550 Peachtree Street Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia 30308 (United States); Coy, Adam M. [School of Medicine, Emory University, 100 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Tridandapani, Srini, E-mail: stridan@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Winship Cancer Institute, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Drive Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate knowledge of cardiac quiescence is crucial to the performance of many cardiac imaging modalities, including computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). To accurately quantify quiescence, a method for detecting the quiescent periods of the heart from retrospective cardiac computed tomography (CT) using a correlation-based, phase-to-phase deviation measure was developed. Methods: Retrospective cardiac CT data were obtained from 20 patients (11 male, 9 female, 33–74 yr) and the left main, left anterior descending, left circumflex, right coronary artery (RCA), and interventricular septum (IVS) were segmented for each phase using a semiautomated technique. Cardiac motion of individual coronary vessels as well as the IVS was calculated using phase-to-phase deviation. As an easily identifiable feature, the IVS was analyzed to assess how well it predicts vessel quiescence. Finally, the diagnostic quality of the reconstructed volumes from the quiescent phases determined using the deviation measure from the vessels in aggregate and the IVS was compared to that from quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner. Three board-certified radiologists, fellowship-trained in cardiothoracic imaging, graded the diagnostic quality of the reconstructions using a Likert response format: 1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = adequate, 4 = nondiagnostic. Results: Systolic and diastolic quiescent periods were identified for each subject from the vessel motion calculated using the phase-to-phase deviation measure. The motion of the IVS was found to be similar to the aggregate vessel (AGG) motion. The diagnostic quality of the coronary vessels for the quiescent phases calculated from the aggregate vessel (P{sub AGG}) and IVS (P{sub IV} {sub S}) deviation signal using the proposed methods was comparable to the quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner (P{sub CT}). The one exception was the RCA, which improved for P{sub AGG} for 18 of the 20 subjects when compared to P

  16. Algorithm of far-field centre estimation based on phase-only matched filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Yan-Qi; Zhu Bao-Qiang; Liu Dai-Zhong; Liu Xiao-Feng; Lin Zun-Qi

    2009-01-01

    Estimation of the far-field centre is carried out in beam auto-alignment. In this paper, the features of the far-field of a square beam are presented. Based on these features, a phase-only matched filter is designed, and the algorithm of centre estimation is developed. Using the simulated images with different kinds of noise and the 40 test images that are taken in sequence, the accuracy of this algorithm is estimated. Results show that the error is no more than one pixel for simulated noise images with a 99% probability, and the stability is restricted within one pixel for test images. Using the improved algorithm, the consumed time is reduced to 0.049 s.

  17. Acoustic cardiac signals analysis: a Kalman filter-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Sheik Hussain; Hussain, Hadrina Sheik; Swee, Tan Tian; Ting, Chee-Ming; Noor, Alias Mohd; Pipatsart, Surasak; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2012-01-01

    Auscultation of the heart is accompanied by both electrical activity and sound. Heart auscultation provides clues to diagnose many cardiac abnormalities. Unfortunately, detection of relevant symptoms and diagnosis based on heart sound through a stethoscope is difficult. The reason GPs find this difficult is that the heart sounds are of short duration and separated from one another by less than 30 ms. In addition, the cost of false positives constitutes wasted time and emotional anxiety for both patient and GP. Many heart diseases cause changes in heart sound, waveform, and additional murmurs before other signs and symptoms appear. Heart-sound auscultation is the primary test conducted by GPs. These sounds are generated primarily by turbulent flow of blood in the heart. Analysis of heart sounds requires a quiet environment with minimum ambient noise. In order to address such issues, the technique of denoising and estimating the biomedical heart signal is proposed in this investigation. Normally, the performance of the filter naturally depends on prior information related to the statistical properties of the signal and the background noise. This paper proposes Kalman filtering for denoising statistical heart sound. The cycles of heart sounds are certain to follow first-order Gauss-Markov process. These cycles are observed with additional noise for the given measurement. The model is formulated into state-space form to enable use of a Kalman filter to estimate the clean cycles of heart sounds. The estimates obtained by Kalman filtering are optimal in mean squared sense. PMID:22745550

  18. Acoustic cardiac signals analysis: a Kalman filter-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Sheik Hussain; Hussain, Hadrina Sheik; Swee, Tan Tian; Ting, Chee-Ming; Noor, Alias Mohd; Pipatsart, Surasak; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2012-01-01

    Auscultation of the heart is accompanied by both electrical activity and sound. Heart auscultation provides clues to diagnose many cardiac abnormalities. Unfortunately, detection of relevant symptoms and diagnosis based on heart sound through a stethoscope is difficult. The reason GPs find this difficult is that the heart sounds are of short duration and separated from one another by less than 30 ms. In addition, the cost of false positives constitutes wasted time and emotional anxiety for both patient and GP. Many heart diseases cause changes in heart sound, waveform, and additional murmurs before other signs and symptoms appear. Heart-sound auscultation is the primary test conducted by GPs. These sounds are generated primarily by turbulent flow of blood in the heart. Analysis of heart sounds requires a quiet environment with minimum ambient noise. In order to address such issues, the technique of denoising and estimating the biomedical heart signal is proposed in this investigation. Normally, the performance of the filter naturally depends on prior information related to the statistical properties of the signal and the background noise. This paper proposes Kalman filtering for denoising statistical heart sound. The cycles of heart sounds are certain to follow first-order Gauss-Markov process. These cycles are observed with additional noise for the given measurement. The model is formulated into state-space form to enable use of a Kalman filter to estimate the clean cycles of heart sounds. The estimates obtained by Kalman filtering are optimal in mean squared sense.

  19. The IAEA Collaborating Centre for Neutron Activation Based Methodologies of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Institute Delft was inaugurated in May 2009 as a new IAEA Collaborating Centre for Neutron Activation Based Methodologies of Research Reactors. The collaboration involves education, research and development in (i) Production of reactor-produced, no-carrier added radioisotopes of high specific activity via neutron activation; (ii) Neutron activation analysis with emphasis on automation as well as analysis of large samples, and radiotracer techniques; and, as a cross-cutting activity, (iii) Quality assurance and management in research and application of research reactor based techniques and in research reactor operations. (author)

  20. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrefai MT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad T Alrefai,1–3 Divya Murali,4 Arghya Paul,4 Khalid M Ridwan,1,2 John M Connell,1,2 Dominique Shum-Tim1,2 1Division of Cardiac Surgery, 2Division of Surgical Research, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Abstract: Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. Keywords: stem cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac surgery, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, heart, scaffolds, organoids, cell sheet and tissue engineering

  1. Availability of, referral to and participation in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina B; Berg, Selina K; Sibilitz, Kirstine L;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As with ischaemic heart disease, cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is recommended for patients undergoing heart valve surgery; recommendations are based on limited evidence. The organization of CR programmes and factors associated with uptake among patients undergoing heart valve surgery have...

  2. Satellite-based climate information within the WMO RA VI Regional Climate Centre on Climate Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obregón, A.; Nitsche, H.; Körber, M.; Kreis, A.; Bissolli, P.; Friedrich, K.; Rösner, S.

    2014-05-01

    The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) established Regional Climate Centres (RCCs) around the world to create science-based climate information on a regional scale within the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS). The paper introduces the satellite component of the WMO Regional Climate Centre on Climate Monitoring (RCC-CM) for Europe and the Middle East. The RCC-CM product portfolio is based on essential climate variables (ECVs) as defined by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS), spanning the atmospheric (radiation, clouds, water vapour) and terrestrial domains (snow cover, soil moisture). In the first part, the input data sets are briefly described, which are provided by the EUMETSAT (European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites) Satellite Application Facilities (SAF), in particular CM SAF, and by the ESA (European Space Agency) Climate Change Initiative (CCI). In the second part, the derived RCC-CM products are presented, which are divided into two groups: (i) operational monitoring products (e.g. monthly means and anomalies) based on near-real-time environmental data records (EDRs) and (ii) climate information records (e.g. climatologies, time series, trend maps) based on long-term thematic climate data records (TCDRs) with adequate stability, accuracy and homogeneity. The products are provided as maps, statistical plots and gridded data, which are made available through the RCC-CM website (www.dwd.de/rcc-cm).

  3. An active contour framework based on the Hermite transform for shape segmentation of cardiac MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba-J, Leiner; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Early detection of cardiac affections is fundamental to address a correct treatment that allows preserving the patient's life. Since heart disease is one of the main causes of death in most countries, analysis of cardiac images is of great value for cardiac assessment. Cardiac MR has become essential for heart evaluation. In this work we present a segmentation framework for shape analysis in cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images. The method consists of an active contour model which is guided by the spectral coefficients obtained from the Hermite transform (HT) of the data. The HT is used as model to code image features of the analyzed images. Region and boundary based energies are coded using the zero and first order coefficients. An additional shape constraint based on an elliptical function is used for controlling the active contour deformations. The proposed framework is applied to the segmentation of the endocardial and epicardial boundaries of the left ventricle using MR images with short axis view. The segmentation is sequential for both regions: the endocardium is segmented followed by the epicardium. The algorithm is evaluated with several MR images at different phases of the cardiac cycle demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method. Several metrics are used for performance evaluation.

  4. Indirect three-dimensional printing: A method for fabricating polyurethane-urea based cardiac scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Córdova, R; Mathew, D A; Balint, R; Carrillo-Escalante, H J; Cervantes-Uc, J M; Hidalgo-Bastida, L A; Hernández-Sánchez, F

    2016-08-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds are a key part of cardiac tissue engineering therapies. The group has recently synthesized a novel polycaprolactone based polyurethane-urea copolymer that showed improved mechanical properties compared with its previously published counterparts. The aim of this study was to explore whether indirect three-dimensional (3D) printing could provide a means to fabricate this novel, biodegradable polymer into a scaffold suitable for cardiac tissue engineering. Indirect 3D printing was carried out through printing water dissolvable poly(vinyl alcohol) porogens in three different sizes based on a wood-stack model, into which a polyurethane-urea solution was pressure injected. The porogens were removed, leading to soft polyurethane-urea scaffolds with regular tubular pores. The scaffolds were characterized for their compressive and tensile mechanical behavior; and their degradation was monitored for 12 months under simulated physiological conditions. Their compatibility with cardiac myocytes and performance in novel cardiac engineering-related techniques, such as aggregate seeding and bi-directional perfusion, was also assessed. The scaffolds were found to have mechanical properties similar to cardiac tissue, and good biocompatibility with cardiac myocytes. Furthermore, the incorporated cells preserved their phenotype with no signs of de-differentiation. The constructs worked well in perfusion experiments, showing enhanced seeding efficiency. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1912-1921, 2016. PMID:26991636

  5. Communication training for centre-based carers of children with severe or profound disabilities in the Western Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Geiger

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a preliminary, qualitative review of an approach to training centre-based carers in supporting basic communication development and providing communication opportunities for the children with severe and profound disabilities in their care. In South Africa, these children are often the most neglected in terms of planning and providing appropriate interventions. For those with severe communication disabilities, an additional lack is in the area of the basic human right to meaningful interactions and communication. Sustainable strategies to provide opportunities for basic communication development of these children are urgently sought. Several effective international and local parent training programmes have been developed, but the urgent need remains to train centre-based carers who are taking care of groups of diversely disabled children in severely under-resourced settings. Non-profit organisations (NPOs have been exploring practical centre-based approaches to skills sharing in physical rehabilitation, activities for daily living, feeding and support for basic communication development. As a freelance speech therapist contracted by four NPOs to implement hands-on training in basic communication for centre-based carers of non-verbal children, the author describes a training approach that evolved over three years, in collaboration with the carers and centre managements. Implications for training (for speech therapists and for community-based rehabilitation workers and for further research are identified.

  6. Estimation of the vehicle's centre of gravity based on a braking model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hongwei; Zhang, Libin; Shan, Hongying; Liu, Huanfeng; Liu, Yicai

    2015-10-01

    A vehicle's centre of gravity (CG) is an important property that affects the vehicle's handing stability, ride comfort and safety. For example, a high CG may lead to a serious traffic accident due to the adverse effects it may have on roll and handling stability. In this paper, we develop a dynamic detection method to obtain vehicle's height that uses a simulation model based on a dynamic analysis during braking. Simulations show that the dynamic detection method is feasible. Experiments with three different vehicles are performed to verify the proposed method. The previously established prediction detection and lifting detection (LD) methods are used for comparison. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method has higher accuracy and efficiency than the LD method. Thus, the proposed method is useful for the vehicle detection.

  7. Quality descriptors of optical beams based on centred reduced moments I spot analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Castaneda, R; García-Sucerquia, J

    2003-01-01

    A method for analyzing beam spots is discussed. It is based on the central reduced moments of the spot and its associated density functions. These functions allow us to separately analyze specific spot fractions, in such a way that specific combinations of higher order moments can be interpreted as coordinates of their centre of mass and the length and orientations of their principal axis. So, the descriptors of the associated density functions deal with the quantitative estimation of spot features, such as coma-like and astigmatism-like distortions. To assure high accuracy, background noise suppression and an optimal match of the spot support onto the region [-1,1]x[- 1,1] are performed prior to the calculation of the moments. Simulations were performed for illustrating the method.

  8. Nonlinear consensus protocols for multi-agent systems based on centre manifold reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yu-Mei; Guan Xin-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear consensus protocols for dynamic directed networks of multi-agent systems with fixed and switching topologies are investigated separately in this paper. Based on the centre manifold reduction technique,nonlinear consensus protocols are presented.We prove that a group of agents can reach a β-consensus,the value of which is the group decision value varying from the minimum and the maximum values of the initial states of the agents.Moreover,we derive the conditions to guarantee that all the agents reach a β-consensus on a desired group decision value.Finally,a simulation study concerning the vertical alignment manoeuvere of a team of unmanned air vehicles is performed.Simulation results show that the nonlinear consensus protocols proposed are more effective than the linear protocols for the formation control of the agents and they are an improvement over existing protocols.

  9. Psychiatric rehabilitation in community-based day centres: Motivation and satisfaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Eklund, Mona; Tjörnstrand, Carina

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study investigated attendees' motivation and motives for participation in day centres and their satisfaction with the rehabilitation, while also addressing the influence of day centre orientation (work- or meeting-place orientation), gender and age. Methods: Ninety-three Swedish day centre attendees participated in a cross-sectional study and completed questionnaires about motivation, motives, and satisfaction with the rehabilitation. Data were analysed with non-p...

  10. Centre of pressure patterns in the golf swing: individual-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Kevin; Best, Russell

    2012-06-01

    Weight transfer has been identified as important in group-based analyses. The aim of this study was to extend this work by examining the importance of weight transfer in the golf swing on an individual basis. Five professional and amateur golfers performed 50 swings with the driver, hitting a ball into a net. The golfer's centre of pressure position and velocity, parallel with the line of shot, were measured by two force plates at eight swing events that were identified from high-speed video. The relationships between these parameters and club head velocity at ball contact were examined using regression statistics. The results did support the use of group-based analysis, with all golfers returning significant relationships. However, results were also individual-specific, with golfers returning different combinations of significant factors. Furthermore, factors not identified in group-based analysis were significant on an individual basis. The most consistent relationship was a larger weight transfer range associated with a larger club head velocity (p < 0.05). All golfers also returned at least one significant relationship with rate of weight transfer at swing events (p < 0.01). Individual-based analysis should form part of performance-based biomechanical analysis of sporting skills. PMID:22900399

  11. Implementation of EPICS based vacuum control system for variable energy cyclotron centre, Kolkata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Anindya, E-mail: r-ani@vecc.gov.in; Bhole, R. B.; Nandy, Partha P.; Yadav, R. C.; Pal, Sarbajit; Roy, Amitava [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2015-03-15

    The vacuum system of the Room Temperature (K = 130) Cyclotron of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre is comprised of vacuum systems of main machine and Beam Transport System. The vacuum control system is upgraded to a PLC based Automated system from the initial relay based Manual system. The supervisory control of the vacuum system is implemented in Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). An EPICS embedded ARM based vacuum gauge controller is developed to mitigate the requirement of vendor specific gauge controller for gauges and also for seamless integration of the gauge controllers with the control system. A set of MS-Windows ActiveX components with embedded EPICS Channel Access interface are developed to build operator interfaces with less complex programming and to incorporate typical Windows feature, e.g., user authentication, file handling, better fonts, colors, mouse actions etc. into the operator interfaces. The control parameters, monitoring parameters, and system interlocks of the system are archived in MySQL based EPICS MySQL Archiver developed indigenously. In this paper, we describe the architecture, the implementation details, and the performance of the system.

  12. Neutron Based Imaging and Element-mapping at the Budapest Neutron Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Z.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Belgya, T.; Balaskó, M.; Horváth, L. Z.; Maróti, B.

    The Budapest Neutron Centre (BNC) is a consortium of institutes to co-ordinate research activities carried out at the Budapest Research Reactor. It hosts two neutron imaging facilities (RAD and NORMA) operated by the Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences and offers access to this scientific infrastructure for the domestic and international users. The radiography station (RAD) at the thermal neutron beamline of the reactor gives a possibility to study relatively large objects by thermal neutron-, gamma- and X-ray radiography, and to benefit from the complementary features of the different radiations. RAD is being extended in 2014 with digital imaging and tomographic capabilities. The image detection is based on suitable converter screens. The static radiography and tomography images are acquired by a new, large area sCMOS camera, whereas the dynamic radiography is accomplished by a low-light-level TV camera and a frame grabber card. The NORMA facility is designed to perform neutron radiography and tomography on small samples using guided cold neutrons. Here two non-destructive techniques are coupled to determine the chemical composition and to visualize the internal structure of heterogeneous objects. The position-sensitive element analysis with prompt-gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and the imaging with neutron radiography/tomography (NR/NT) are integrated into a unique facility called NIPS-NORMA. The goal of such a combination of these methods is to save substantial beam time in the so-called NR/NT-driven PGAI (Prompt Gamma Activation Imaging) mode, in which the interesting regions are first visualized and located, and subsequently the time-consuming prompt-gamma measurements are made only where it is really needed. The paper will give an overview about the technical details of the facilities, and the latest results of selected applications from the fields of archaeometry, engineering and material science.

  13. Air Pollution and the Risk of Cardiac Defects: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Bing-Fang; Lee, Yungling Leo; Jaakkola, Jouni J K

    2015-11-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies have assessed the role of the exposure to ambient air pollution in the development of cardiac birth defects, but they have provided somewhat inconsistent results. To assess the associations between exposure to ambient air pollutants and the risk of cardiac defects, a population-based case-control study was conducted using 1087 cases of cardiac defects and a random sample of 10,870 controls from 1,533,748 Taiwanese newborns in 2001 to 2007.Logistic regression was performed to calculate odds ratios for 10 ppb increases in O3 and 10 μg/m increases in PM10. In addition, we compared the risk of cardiac defects in 4 categories-high exposure (>75th percentile); medium exposure (75th to 50th percentile); low exposure (patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) were associated with 10 ppb increases in O3 exposure during the first 3 gestational months among term and preterm babies. In comparison between high PM10 exposure and reference category, there were statistically significant elevations in the effect estimates of ASD for all and terms births. In addition, there was a negative or weak association between SO2, NO2, CO, and cardiac defects.The study proved that exposure to outdoor air O3 and PM10 during the first trimester of gestation may increase the risk of VSD, ASD, and PDA. PMID:26554783

  14. MR-Based Cardiac and Respiratory Motion-Compensation Techniques for PET-MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Camila; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Reader, Andrew J; Marsden, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion cause image quality degradation in PET imaging, affecting diagnostic accuracy of the images. Whole-body simultaneous PET-MR scanners allow for using motion information estimated from MR images to correct PET data and produce motion-compensated PET images. This article reviews methods that have been proposed to estimate motion from MR images and different techniques to include this information in PET reconstruction, in order to overcome the problem of cardiac and respiratory motion in PET-MR imaging. MR-based motion correction techniques significantly increase lesion detectability and contrast, and also improve accuracy of uptake values in PET images.

  15. MOEMS-based cardiac enzymes detector for acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amritsar, Jeetender; Stiharu, Ion G.; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Balagopal, Ganesharam; Li, Xing

    2004-10-01

    Biomedical applications of MOEMS are limited only by the mankind imagination. Precision measurements on minute amounts of biological material could be performed by optical means with a remarkable accuracy. Although available in medical laboratories for general purposes, such analyzers are making their way directly to the users in the form of dedicated equipment. Such an example is a test kit to detect the existence of cardiac enzymes in the blood stream. Apart from the direct users, the medical personnel will make use of such tools given the practicality of the kit. In a large proportion of patients admitted to the hospital suspected of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI), the symptoms and electrocardiographic changes are inconclusive. This necessitates the use of biochemical markers of myocardial damage for correct exclusion or conformation of AMI. In this study the concept of MOEMS is applied for the detection of enzyme reaction, in which glass spectrums are scanned optically when enzyme molecules adsorb on their surface. This paper presents the optical behavior of glass spectrums under Horseradish Peroxide (HRP) enzyme reaction. The reported experimental results provide valuable information that will be useful in the development of biosensors for enzymatic detection. This paper also reports the dynamic behavior of different glass spectrums.

  16. Crystalloid-based cardioplegia for minimally invasive cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misfeld, Martin; Davierwala, Piroze

    2012-01-01

    With the ever-increasing popularity of minimally invasive (MI) cardiac surgery, procedures like aortic valve replacement, with or without concomitant aortic surgery, and mitral and tricuspid valve procedures are now routinely performed through a minimal-access partial upper sternotomy and right anterolateral small thoracotomy, respectively, in our institution. To have optimal visualization through a small incision, it is extremely important to reduce the number of instruments, retractors, and cannulae passing through the incision to a bare minimum and to avoid repeated manipulation of the operative field. Repeated use of blood cardioplegia to maintain myocardial protection can sometimes prevent the surgeon from executing the aforementioned measures. However, if adequate myocardial protection can be achieved and maintained by administering a single dose of crystalloid cardioplegia, it would help expedite the operation with greater ease. At our institution, myocardial protection during aortic valve surgery is achieved using either blood or crystalloid cardioplegia according to surgeon preference. However, crystalloid cardioplegia has become the standard myocardial protection strategy for performing MI mitral valve surgery. Our experience with crystalloid cardioplegia for MI mitral valve surgery is the focus of this article.

  17. Estimation of the optimal VV delay by an IEGM-based method in cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Min, Xiaoyi; Meine, Mathias; Baker, James H.; Pires, Luis A.; Turk, Kyong T.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Kowal, Robert C.; Paris, Michael; Park, Euljoon; Fain, Eric S.

    2007-01-01

    Determination of the optimal interventricular (VV) delay in cardiac resynchronization therapy currently relies on costly, time-consuming echocardiographic (ECHO) methods. This study evaluated the performance of a new intracardiac electrogram (IEGM)-based VV method compared to the aortic velocity tim

  18. Meta-Analyses of Human Cell-Based Cardiac Regeneration Therapies: Controversies in Meta-Analyses Results on Cardiac Cell-Based Regenerative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Navarese, Eliano P; Moye, Lemuel À

    2016-04-15

    In contrast to multiple publication-based meta-analyses involving clinical cardiac regeneration therapy in patients with recent myocardial infarction, a recently published meta-analysis based on individual patient data reported no effect of cell therapy on left ventricular function or clinical outcome. A comprehensive review of the data collection, statistics, and the overall principles of meta-analyses provides further clarification and explanation for this controversy. The advantages and pitfalls of different types of meta-analyses are reviewed here. Each meta-analysis approach has a place when pivotal clinical trials are lacking and sheds light on the magnitude of the treatment in a complex healthcare field.

  19. Three-dimensional quantum photonic elements based on single nitrogen vacancy-centres in laser-written microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Schell, Andreas W; Fischer, Joachim; Henze, Rico; Wolters, Janik; Wegener, Martin; Benson, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    A fully integrated quantum optical technology requires active quantum systems incorporated into resonant optical microstructures and inter-connected in three dimensions via photonic wires. Nitrogen vacancy-centres (NV-centres) in diamond which are excellent photostable room temperature single-photon emitters are ideal candidates for that purpose. Extensive research efforts to couple NV-centres to photonic structures such as optical microresonators, microcavities, and waveguides have been pursued. Strategies for integration range from top-down fabrication via etching of diamond membranes to sophisticated bottom-up assembly of hybrid structures using diamond nanocrystals where the latter approach allows for deterministic coupling. Recently, another approach based on the incorporation of nanodiamonds in soft glass optical fibres via a melting process has been introduced. Here, we utilize two-photon direct laser writing (DLW) to fabricate fully three-dimensional (3D) structures from a photoresist mixed with a sol...

  20. Parental Concerns Regarding a Centre-Based Early Intervention Programme for Down Syndrome in Malaysia: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunagaratnam, Nagasangari; Loh, Sau Cheong

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study provides information on the concerns faced by parents having children with Down syndrome in a centre-based Early Intervention Programme in Malaysia and how they coped with these concerns. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of five parents and two special educators. The interview and observation findings…

  1. Dynamic Data Management Based on Archival Process Integration at the Centre for Environmental Data Archival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Esther; Waterfall, Alison; Pepler, Sam; Newey, Charles

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we decribe a business process modelling approach to the integration of exisiting archival activities. We provide a high level overview of existing practice and discuss how procedures can be extended and supported through the description of preservation state. The aim of which is to faciliate the dynamic controlled management of scientific data through its lifecycle. The main types of archival processes considered are: • Management processes that govern the operation of an archive. These management processes include archival governance (preservation state management, selection of archival candidates and strategic management) . • Operational processes that constitute the core activities of the archive which maintain the value of research assets. These operational processes are the acquisition, ingestion, deletion, generation of metadata and preservation actvities, • Supporting processes, which include planning, risk analysis and monitoring of the community/preservation environment. We then proceed by describing the feasability testing of extended risk management and planning procedures which integrate current practices. This was done through the CEDA Archival Format Audit which inspected British Atmospherics Data Centre and National Earth Observation Data Centre Archival holdings. These holdings are extensive, comprising of around 2PB of data and 137 million individual files which were analysed and characterised in terms of format based risk. We are then able to present an overview of the risk burden faced by a large scale archive attempting to maintain the usability of heterogeneous environmental data sets. We conclude by presenting a dynamic data management information model that is capable of describing the preservation state of archival holdings throughout the data lifecycle. We provide discussion of the following core model entities and their relationships: • Aspirational entities, which include Data Entity definitions and their associated

  2. Neonatal Hearing Screening Programme (NHSP): At A Rural Based Tertiary Care Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yojana; Mishra, Girish; Bhatt, Sushen H; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar

    2015-12-01

    Deafness is the most common curable childhood handicap. It is a well recognised fact that unidentified hearing impairment can adversely affect optimal speech and language development and therefore academic, social and emotional development. Universal neonatal hearing screening programmes are implemented in many developed countries. However it is still in its early stage in India. The incidence of hearing impairment in India is 1-6 per thousand newborns screened (Paediatrics 19:155-165, 1998; Indian J Paediatr 74(6):545-549, 2007; Status of Disability in India, pp 172-185 2000). To determine the incidence of permanent hearing loss of moderate to evere variety in neonates taking care in a tertiary care rural based hospital in Gujarat. It was a non randomised observational study done for duration of 3 years. All neonates born in Shri Krishna Hospital underwent screening using two stage protocols with DPOAE test and final confirmation done with BERA. Total 2534 neonates were screened out of them 52 failed and 2482 (97.94 %) neonates passed in the 1st DPOAE test with 2.05 % refer rate. Total 7 (2 per 1000) neonates were detected with hearing impairment. 10 % neonates had one or other high risk factor. Out of high risk neonates, 1.8 % were diagnosed with hearing impairment in high risk group. Overall the follow-up rate was 72.7 %. Hospital based universal hearing screening of new born before discharge is feasible at a rural based tertiary care centre. Non specialist staff is invaluable in achieving a satisfactory referral rate with two stage hearing screening protocol. However, more efficacious tracking and follow up system is needed to improve the follow up rate for diagnosis.

  3. Neonatal Hearing Screening Programme (NHSP): At A Rural Based Tertiary Care Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yojana; Mishra, Girish; Bhatt, Sushen H; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar

    2015-12-01

    Deafness is the most common curable childhood handicap. It is a well recognised fact that unidentified hearing impairment can adversely affect optimal speech and language development and therefore academic, social and emotional development. Universal neonatal hearing screening programmes are implemented in many developed countries. However it is still in its early stage in India. The incidence of hearing impairment in India is 1-6 per thousand newborns screened (Paediatrics 19:155-165, 1998; Indian J Paediatr 74(6):545-549, 2007; Status of Disability in India, pp 172-185 2000). To determine the incidence of permanent hearing loss of moderate to evere variety in neonates taking care in a tertiary care rural based hospital in Gujarat. It was a non randomised observational study done for duration of 3 years. All neonates born in Shri Krishna Hospital underwent screening using two stage protocols with DPOAE test and final confirmation done with BERA. Total 2534 neonates were screened out of them 52 failed and 2482 (97.94 %) neonates passed in the 1st DPOAE test with 2.05 % refer rate. Total 7 (2 per 1000) neonates were detected with hearing impairment. 10 % neonates had one or other high risk factor. Out of high risk neonates, 1.8 % were diagnosed with hearing impairment in high risk group. Overall the follow-up rate was 72.7 %. Hospital based universal hearing screening of new born before discharge is feasible at a rural based tertiary care centre. Non specialist staff is invaluable in achieving a satisfactory referral rate with two stage hearing screening protocol. However, more efficacious tracking and follow up system is needed to improve the follow up rate for diagnosis. PMID:26693457

  4. L’implication des organisations non gouvernementales dans les systèmes de santé des pays du Sud: l’exemple du Shisong Cardiac Centre The involvement of NGOs in the health systems in developing countries: the example of Shisong Cardiac Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butera Gianfranco

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Dans le tiers monde, près de 800 000 enfants naissent chaque année avec des cardiopathies congénitales (CC. Plusieurs millions d’enfants y vivent avec des CC corrigeables et une grande majorité décède à cause de l’absence de structure médicale spécialisée dans la correction chirurgicale totale ou palliative. C’est dans cette optique que l’association Associazione bambini cardiopatici nel mondo (Association mondiale des enfants cardiopathes a été créée. Grâce aux efforts de cette association, plus de 500 enfants souffrant de CC ont pu être évacués et soignés à l’hôpital de San Donato et plus 800 dans leur pays. Près de 200 praticiens en provenance des pays du Sud ont dans cette même perspective bénéficiée d’une formation en Italie. Cent quinze missions chirurgicales ont été réalisées dans différents pays: Egypte, Tunisie, Libye, Palestine, Cameroun, Roumanie, Azerbaïdjan, Pérou, Syrie, Yémen, Kurdistan et au Mali. Plusieurs hôpitaux ont été équipés gratuitement. Actuellement, l’association œuvre ardemment pour la réalisation de trois projets essentiels dont l’un est la construction d’un centre cardiaque dans la région de Shisong au Cameroun (Shisong Cardiac Centre. Ce centre cardiaque sera équipé d’appareils de dernière génération permettant de réaliser des investigations et la chirurgie cardiaques. L’inauguration de ce centre est prévue pour Novembre 2009.

  5. Ultrabright and efficient single-photon generation based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in nanodiamonds on a solid immersion lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single photons are fundamental elements for quantum information technologies such as quantum cryptography, quantum information storage and optical quantum computing. Colour centres in diamond have proven to be stable single-photon sources and thus essential components for reliable and integrated quantum information technology. A key requirement for such applications is a large photon flux and a high efficiency. Paying tribute to various attempts to maximize the single-photon flux, we show that collection efficiencies of photons from colour centres can be increased with a rather simple experimental setup. To do so, we spin-coated nanodiamonds containing single nitrogen-vacancy (N-V) colour centres on the flat surface of a ZrO2 solid immersion lens. We found stable single-photon count rates of up to 853 kcts s-1 at saturation under continuous wave excitation while having access to more than 100 defect centres with count rates from 400 to 500 kcts s-1. For a blinking defect centre, we found count rates up to 2.4 Mcts s-1 for time intervals of several tens of seconds. It seems to be a general feature that very high rates are accompanied by blinking behaviour. The overall collection efficiency of our setup of up to 4.2% is the highest yet reported for N-V defect centres in diamond. Under pulsed excitation of a stable emitter of 10 MHz, 2.2% of all pulses caused a click on the detector adding to 221 kcts s-1 thus, opening the way towards diamond-based on-demand single-photon sources for quantum applications.

  6. KLIMA 2050: a research-based innovation centre for risk reduction through climate adaptation of infrastructure and buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, Anders; Time, Berit; Kvande, Tore; Sivertsen, Edvard; Cepeda, Jose; Lappegard Hauge, Åshild; Bygballe, Lena; Almås, Anders-Johan

    2016-04-01

    Klima 2050 - Risk reduction through climate adaptation of buildings and infrastructure is a Centre for Research based Innovation (SFI), funded jointly by the Research Council of Norway (RCN) and the partners of the centre. The aim of Klima 2050 is to reduce the societal risks associated with climate changes, including enhanced precipitation and flood water exposure within the built environment. The Centre will strengthen companies' innovation capacity through a focus on long-term research. It is also a clear objective to facilitate close cooperation between Research & Development, performing companies, public entities, and prominent research groups. Emphasis will be placed on development of moisture-resilient buildings, storm-water management, blue-green solutions, mitigation measures for water-triggered landslides, socio-economic incentives and decision-making processes. Both extreme weather and gradual climatic changes will be addressed. The Centre consists of a consortium of 18 partners from three sectors: industry, public entities and research/education organizations. The partners from the industry/private sector include a variety of companies from the building industry. The public entities comprise the most important infrastructure owners in Norway (public roads, railroads, buildings, airports), as well as the directorate for water and energy. The research and education partners are SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, the Norwegian Business School, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, the Norwegian Meteorological Institute, and the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute. This contribution presents the main research plans and activities of this Centre, which was started in 2015 and will run for 8 years, until 2023. The presentation also includes options for international cooperation in the Centre via PhD and postdoctoral positions, MSc projects and guest-researcher stays with Klima 2050 partners.

  7. Genetic Diversity of Bali Cattle Based on Microsatellite Marker in Indonesian Breeding Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Septian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetics characterization in livestock based on microsatellite has been widely implemented including for Bali cattle in three different breeding centres in Indonesia. This study aimed to determine diversity of Bali cattle microsatellites in three breeding centers namely BPTU Bali cattle in Bali, BPT-HMT Serading Sumbawa in West Nusa Tenggara, and Village Breeding Center in South Sulawesi. The number of animals used in this study was 95 head of cattle consisted of 32 heads from BPTU Bali Province, 32 heads from BPT-HMT Serading Sumbawa, and 31 heads from Village Barru Breeding Center Barru distric. Microsatellite loci used to determine the diversity was the locus SPS115, INRA037, MM12, and ETH185 based on flourescently labeled fragment method. Data analysis of microsatellite in Bali cattle at three different locations was performed by using POPGEN 1.2, Cervus, and POPTREE2 programs. The results showed that microsatellite diversity in Bali cattle detected 32 alleles from three different locations, and there were specific alleles at each location. Average values of observed heterozygosity (Ho and expected heterozygosity (He were 0.418 and 0.604 respectively, while the average value of polymorphism informative content (PIC was 0.579. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in general suggested that the loci used in the Bali cattle in three populations were in equilibrium, except INRA037 and ETH185. The genetic diversity between populations of Bali cattle was 0.033 (3%, while the inbreeding coefficient index in all populations was 0.296 (29.6 %. Bali cattle phylogeny tree with three populations showed that the populations of Bali cattle in BPTU Bali and VBC Barru had close genetic distance compared to the population of Bali cattle in BPT-HMT Serading Sumbawa. The results of this study provide information that the characteristics of Bali cattle breeding centers in three locations are different, so we need a directed breeding program in each population.

  8. Motion adaptive patch-based low-rank approach for compressed sensing cardiac cine MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Huisu; Kim, Kyung Sang; Kim, Daniel; Bresler, Yoram; Ye, Jong Chul

    2014-11-01

    One of the technical challenges in cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to reduce the acquisition time to enable the high spatio-temporal resolution imaging of a cardiac volume within a short scan time. Recently, compressed sensing approaches have been investigated extensively for highly accelerated cine MRI by exploiting transform domain sparsity using linear transforms such as wavelets, and Fourier. However, in cardiac cine imaging, the cardiac volume changes significantly between frames, and there often exist abrupt pixel value changes along time. In order to effectively sparsify such temporal variations, it is necessary to exploit temporal redundancy along motion trajectories. This paper introduces a novel patch-based reconstruction method to exploit geometric similarities in the spatio-temporal domain. In particular, we use a low rank constraint for similar patches along motion, based on the observation that rank structures are relatively less sensitive to global intensity changes, but make it easier to capture moving edges. A Nash equilibrium formulation with relaxation is employed to guarantee convergence. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm clearly reconstructs important anatomical structures in cardiac cine image and provides improved image quality compared to existing state-of-the-art methods such as k-t FOCUSS, k-t SLR, and MASTeR.

  9. Cell-based therapies for cardiac repair : a meeting report on scientific observations and European regulatory viewpoints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schüssler-Lenz, Martina; Beuneu, Claire; Menezes-Ferreira, Margarida; Jekerle, Veronika; Bartunek, Jozef; Chamuleau, Steven; Celis, Patrick; Doevendans, Pieter; O'Donovan, Maura; Hill, Jonathan; Hystad, Marit; Jovinge, Stefan; Kyselovič, Ján; Lipnik-Stangelj, Metoda; Maciulaitis, Romaldas; Prasad, Krishna; Samuel, Anthony; Tenhunen, Olli; Tonn, Torsten; Rosano, Giuseppe; Zeiher, Andreas; Salmikangas, Paula

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, novel cell-based products have been studied in patients with acute and chronic cardiac disease to assess whether these therapies are efficacious in improving heart function and preventing the development of end-stage heart failure. Cardiac indications studied include acute myocar

  10. Behaviour change techniques in home-based cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Heron, Neil; Kee, Frank; Donnelly, Michael; Cardwell, Christopher; Tully, Mark A; Cupples, Margaret E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes offering secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease (CVD) advise healthy lifestyle behaviours, with the behaviour change techniques (BCTs) of goals and planning, feedback and monitoring, and social support recommended. More information is needed about BCT use in home-based CR to support these programmes in practice.AIM: To identify and describe the use of BCTs in home-based CR programmes.DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomised controlled trials o...

  11. Reduction of motion artifacts in cardiac CT based on partial angle reconstructions from short scan data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Juliane; Bruder, Herbert; Allmendinger, Thomas; Stierstorfer, Karl; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelriess, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Until today, several software-based approaches to increase the temporal resolution in cardiac computed tomography by estimating motion vector fields (MVFs) have been developed. Thereunder, the majority are motion compensation algorithms, which estimate the MVFs employing a three-dimensional registration routine working on reconstructions of multiple cardiac phases.2, 6, 7, 12 We present an algorithm that requires nothing more than the data needed for a short scan reconstruction for motion estimation and motion-compensated reconstruction, which both are based on the reconstruction of volumes from a limited angular range.2, 3, 7, 8 Those partial angle reconstructions are centered at different time points during the short scan and have a temporal resolution of about 10ms each. The MVFs are estimated by a constrained cost function optimization routine employing a motion artifact measuring cost function. During optimization, the MVFs are applied directly by warping the partial angle reconstructions, and the motion compensation is established by simply adding the shifted images. In order to enforce smooth vector fields and keep the number of parameters low, the motion is modeled by a low degree polynomial. Furthermore, to find a good estimation of the MVFs even in phases with rapid cardiac motion, the constrained optimization is re-initialized multiple times. The algorithm is validated with the help of a simulation study and applied to patient data, where motion- compensated reconstructions are performed in various cardiac phases. We show that the image quality can be improved, also in more rapid cardiac phases due to re-initialization of the optimization routine.

  12. ICA based automatic segmentation of dynamic H(2)(15)O cardiac PET images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margadán-Méndez, Margarita; Juslin, Anu; Nesterov, Sergey V; Kalliokoski, Kari; Knuuti, Juhani; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we applied an iterative independent component analysis (ICA) method for the separation of cardiac tissue components (myocardium, right, and left ventricle) from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images. Previous phantom and animal studies have shown that ICA separation extracts the cardiac structures accurately. Our goal in this study was to investigate the methodology with human studies. The ICA separated cardiac structures were used to calculate the myocardial perfusion in two different cases: 1) the regions of interest were drawn manually on the ICA separated component images and 2) the volumes of interest (VOI) were automatically segmented from the component images. For the whole myocardium, the perfusion values of 25 rest and six drug-induced stress studies obtained with these methods were compared to the values from the manually drawn regions of interest on differential images. The separation of the rest and stress studies using ICA-based methods was successful in all cases. The visualization of the cardiac structures from H (2) (15) O PET studies was improved with the ICA separation. Also, the automatic segmentation of the VOI seemed to be feasible. PMID:19273031

  13. False Alarm Reduction in BSN-Based Cardiac Monitoring Using Signal Quality and Activity Type Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanatorn Tanantong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available False alarms in cardiac monitoring affect the quality of medical care, impacting on both patients and healthcare providers. In continuous cardiac monitoring using wireless Body Sensor Networks (BSNs, the quality of ECG signals can be deteriorated owing to several factors, e.g., noises, low battery power, and network transmission problems, often resulting in high false alarm rates. In addition, body movements occurring from activities of daily living (ADLs can also create false alarms. This paper presents a two-phase framework for false arrhythmia alarm reduction in continuous cardiac monitoring, using signals from an ECG sensor and a 3D accelerometer. In the first phase, classification models constructed using machine learning algorithms are used for labeling input signals. ECG signals are labeled with heartbeat types and signal quality levels, while 3D acceleration signals are labeled with ADL types. In the second phase, a rule-based expert system is used for combining classification results in order to determine whether arrhythmia alarms should be accepted or suppressed. The proposed framework was validated on datasets acquired using BSNs and the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. For the BSN dataset, acceleration and ECG signals were collected from 10 young and 10 elderly subjects while they were performing ADLs. The framework reduced the false alarm rate from 9.58% to 1.43% in our experimental study, showing that it can potentially assist physicians in diagnosing a vast amount of data acquired from wireless sensors and enhance the performance of continuous cardiac monitoring.

  14. PATIENTS OVERCOME ANXIETY AND ARE ENCOURAGED TO BE PHYSICAL ACTIVE THROUGH EXERCISE-BASED CARDIAC REHABILITATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D.;

    other to begin exercising; and growing confidence in the heart, whereby the patients overcome anxiety and dare to be physically active. Conclusions. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation provides a comfort-giving setting that offers peer support and a positive physical perception leading to confidence...... interviews were performed 1-2 months later. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was conducted, comprising three methodological steps: naïve reading, structural analysis and comprehensive interpretation. Results. The preliminary findings are that although physically and especially mentally...... into that the heart endures physical activity. In addition to serving as physical guidance, exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation offers valuable mental support. The patients find help to overcome an initial anxiety and move forward towards a physically active life featuring a feeling of improved health and new...

  15. Family-based associations in measures of psychological distress and quality of life in a cardiac screening clinic for inheritable cardiac diseases: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGorrian Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family-based cardiac screening programmes for persons at risk for genetic cardiac diseases are now recommended. However, the psychological wellbeing and health related quality of life (QoL of such screened patients is poorly understood, especially in younger patients. We sought to examine wellbeing and QoL in a representative group of adults aged 16 and over in a dedicated family cardiac screening clinic. Methods Prospective survey of consecutive consenting patients attending a cardiac screening clinic, over a 12 month period. Data were collected using two health measurement tools: the Short Form 12 (version 2 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, along with baseline demographic and screening visit-related data. The HADS and SF-12v.2 outcomes were compared by age group. Associations with a higher HADS score were examined using logistic regression, with multi-level modelling used to account for the family-based structure of the data. Results There was a study response rate of 86.6%, with n=334 patients providing valid HADS data (valid response rate 79.5%, and data on n=316 retained for analysis. One-fifth of patients were aged under 25 (n=61. Younger patients were less likely than older to describe significant depression on their HADS scale (p Conclusions High levels of anxiety were seen amongst patients attending a family-based cardiac screening clinic.Younger patients also had high rates of clinically significant anxiety. Higher levels of anxiety and depression tends to run in families, and this has implications for family screening and intervention programmes.

  16. All-Optical Programmable Disaggregated Data Centre Network realized by FPGA-based Switch and Interface Card

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Yan; Saridis, George; Shu, Yi; R. Rofoee, Bijan; Yan, Shuang Yi; Arslan, Murat; Richardson, David; Poole, Simon; Zervas, Georgios; Simeonidou, Dimitra; Bradley, Tom; Wheeler, Natalie V.; Wong, Nicholas H.L.; Poletti, Francesco; Petrovich, Marco N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a FPGA-based Switch and Interface Card (SIC) and its application scenario in an all-optical, programmable disaggregated Data Centre Network (DCN). Our novel SIC is designed and implemented to replace traditional optical Network Interface Cards (NICs), plugged into the server directly, supporting Optical Packet Switching (OPS)/ Optical Circuit Switching (OCS) or Time Division Multiplexing (TDM)/ Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) traffic on demand. Placing the SIC in eac...

  17. Hybrid Pixel-Based Method for Cardiac Ultrasound Fusion Based on Integration of PCA and DWT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Mazaheri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical image fusion is the procedure of combining several images from one or multiple imaging modalities. In spite of numerous attempts in direction of automation ventricle segmentation and tracking in echocardiography, due to low quality images with missing anatomical details or speckle noises and restricted field of view, this problem is a challenging task. This paper presents a fusion method which particularly intends to increase the segment-ability of echocardiography features such as endocardial and improving the image contrast. In addition, it tries to expand the field of view, decreasing impact of noise and artifacts and enhancing the signal to noise ratio of the echo images. The proposed algorithm weights the image information regarding an integration feature between all the overlapping images, by using a combination of principal component analysis and discrete wavelet transform. For evaluation, a comparison has been done between results of some well-known techniques and the proposed method. Also, different metrics are implemented to evaluate the performance of proposed algorithm. It has been concluded that the presented pixel-based method based on the integration of PCA and DWT has the best result for the segment-ability of cardiac ultrasound images and better performance in all metrics.

  18. Practice what you preach: developing person-centred culture in inpatient mental health settings through strengths-based, transformational leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Paul; Field, John; Molloy, Luke; Yu, Nickolas; Holmes, Douglas; Pile, Emily

    2013-08-01

    The experience of nursing staff and consumers in inpatient mental health wards is often reported as being negative. Efforts to improve culture and practice have had limited success, with ineffective leadership, staff resistance, and unresponsive organisational culture identified as common barriers to change. Practice development has been promoted as an approach to developing person-centred culture that enables professional development through participation, learning and empowerment. For person-centred practice to flourish, organisational leadership at all levels must reflect the same principles. In preparation for the opening of a new integrated mental health service, an inpatient mental health team participated in a practice development project. An action research approach was used to facilitate a series of "away days," initially with the nursing team and then other members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT). Transformational leadership principles were adopted in the facilitation of team activities underpinned by strengths and solution-focused practices. Evaluation of the project by staff members was very positive and there was a high level of participation in practice development activities. The project resulted in the creation of a development plan for the ward, which prioritised five key themes: person-centred care, personal recovery, strengths-based principles, and evidence-based and values-based care. The project outcomes highlight the importance of leadership, which parallels the ideals promoted for clinical practice.

  19. Practice what you preach: developing person-centred culture in inpatient mental health settings through strengths-based, transformational leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Paul; Field, John; Molloy, Luke; Yu, Nickolas; Holmes, Douglas; Pile, Emily

    2013-08-01

    The experience of nursing staff and consumers in inpatient mental health wards is often reported as being negative. Efforts to improve culture and practice have had limited success, with ineffective leadership, staff resistance, and unresponsive organisational culture identified as common barriers to change. Practice development has been promoted as an approach to developing person-centred culture that enables professional development through participation, learning and empowerment. For person-centred practice to flourish, organisational leadership at all levels must reflect the same principles. In preparation for the opening of a new integrated mental health service, an inpatient mental health team participated in a practice development project. An action research approach was used to facilitate a series of "away days," initially with the nursing team and then other members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT). Transformational leadership principles were adopted in the facilitation of team activities underpinned by strengths and solution-focused practices. Evaluation of the project by staff members was very positive and there was a high level of participation in practice development activities. The project resulted in the creation of a development plan for the ward, which prioritised five key themes: person-centred care, personal recovery, strengths-based principles, and evidence-based and values-based care. The project outcomes highlight the importance of leadership, which parallels the ideals promoted for clinical practice. PMID:23909671

  20. Non-contact detection of cardiac rate based on visible light imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huishi; Zhao, Yuejin; Dong, Liquan

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a non-contact method to detect human cardiac rate at a distance. This detection is based on the general lighting condition. Using the video signal of human face region captured by webcam, we acquire the cardiac rate based on the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy theory. In this paper, the cardiac rate detecting method is mainly in view of the blood's different absorptivities of the lights various wavelengths. Firstly, we discompose the video signal into RGB three color signal channels and choose the face region as region of interest to take average gray value. Then, we draw three gray-mean curves on each color channel with time as variable. When the imaging device has good fidelity of color, the green channel signal shows the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy information most clearly. But the red and blue channel signals can provide more other physiological information on the account of their light absorptive characteristics of blood. We divide red channel signal by green channel signal to acquire the pulse wave. With the passband from 0.67Hz to 3Hz as a filter of the pulse wave signal and the frequency spectrum superimposed algorithm, we design frequency extracted algorithm to achieve the cardiac rate. Finally, we experiment with 30 volunteers, containing different genders and different ages. The results of the experiments are all relatively agreeable. The difference is about 2bmp. Through the experiment, we deduce that the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy theory based on visible light can also be used to detect other physiological information.

  1. The development of a hassle-based diagnostic scale for predicting burnout in call centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willie A. Visser

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a brief daily hassle diagnostic questionnaire that could be used to identify daily hassles for customer service representatives within a call centre environment, and to investigate the relationship between daily hassles and burnout. A crosssectional survey was used with an accidental sample (N = 394 taken from a service and sales call centre. An exploratory factor analysis of the data resulted in a six-factor model of daily hassles consisting of daily demands, continuous change, co-worker hassles, demotivating work environment, transportation hassles and personal concerns. The internal consistency of one factor, namely personal concerns, was low. Exhaustion was best predicted by four categories of daily hassles, namely daily demands, continuous change, a demotivating work environment, and transportation hassles.

  2. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Two Early Intervention Programs for Young Children with Autism: Centre-Based with Parent Program and Home-Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jacqueline; Williams, Katrina; Carter, Mark; Evans, David; Parmenter, Trevor; Silove, Natalie; Clark, Trevor; Warren, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This study compares outcomes of early intervention programs for young children with autism; an individualised home-based program (HB), a small group centre-based program for children combined with a parent training and support group (CB) and a non-treatment comparison group (WL). Outcome measures of interest include social and communication skill…

  3. Volunteer based media activities as a tool of empowerment at Youth Activity Centre Happi

    OpenAIRE

    Swanljung, Heidi; Burkhardt, Amelie; Kosunen, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to research how the active participation in voluntary media activities enables youth empowerment. For the Bachelor’s thesis at Laurea University of Applied Sciences, the authors conducted this research in co-operation with Youth Activity Centre Happi, located in Helsinki. The target group involved ten youngsters aged 14-18 years, who partcipate in the media activities of the youth center on voluntary basis. The thesis topic was decided due to common interests...

  4. Image-Based Structural Modeling of the Cardiac Purkinje Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R. Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Purkinje network is a specialized conduction system within the heart that ensures the proper activation of the ventricles to produce effective contraction. Its role during ventricular arrhythmias is less clear, but some experimental studies have suggested that the Purkinje network may significantly affect the genesis and maintenance of ventricular arrhythmias. Despite its importance, few structural models of the Purkinje network have been developed, primarily because current physical limitations prevent examination of the intact Purkinje network. In previous modeling efforts Purkinje-like structures have been developed through either automated or hand-drawn procedures, but these networks have been created according to general principles rather than based on real networks. To allow for greater realism in Purkinje structural models, we present a method for creating three-dimensional Purkinje networks based directly on imaging data. Our approach uses Purkinje network structures extracted from photographs of dissected ventricles and projects these flat networks onto realistic endocardial surfaces. Using this method, we create models for the combined ventricle-Purkinje system that can fully activate the ventricles through a stimulus delivered to the Purkinje network and can produce simulated activation sequences that match experimental observations. The combined models have the potential to help elucidate Purkinje network contributions during ventricular arrhythmias.

  5. Web-based multimedia courseware for emergency cardiac patient management simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosiadou, V; Compton, T; Panchal, T; Polovina, S

    2000-01-01

    This is a multidisciplinary inter-departmental/faculty project between the departments of computer science, electronic, communications and electrical engineering and nursing and paramedic sciences. The objective is to develop a web based multimedia front end to existing simulations of cardiac emergency scenaria. It will be used firstly in the teaching of nurses. The University of Hertfordshire is the only University in Britain using simulations of cardiac emergency scenaria for nurse and paramedic science education and therefore this project will add the multimedia dimension in distributed courses over the web and will assess the improvement in the educational process. The use of network and multimedia technologies, provide interactive learning, immediate feedback to students' responses, individually tailored instructions, objective testing and entertaining delivery. The end product of this project will serve as interactive material to enhance experiential learning for nursing students using the simulations of cardiac emergency scenaria. The emergency treatment simulations have been developed using VisSim and may be compiled as C code. The objective of the project is to provide a web based user friendly multimedia interface in order to demonstrate the way in which patients may be managed in critical situations by applying advanced technological equipment and drug administration. Then the user will be able to better appreciate the concepts involved by running the VisSim simulations. The evaluation group for the proposed software will be the Department of Nursing and Paramedic Sciences About 200 nurses use simulations every year for training purposes as part of their course requirements.

  6. Development and evaluation of a treadmill-based exercise tolerance test in cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, Julie; Adams, Jenny; Cheng, Dunlei; Barton, Stephanie; Bigej-Cerqua, Janet; Mims, Lisa; Molden, Jennifer; Anderson, Valerie

    2013-07-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation exercise prescriptions should be based on exercise stress tests; however, limitations in performing stress tests in this setting typically force reliance on subjective measures like the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI). We developed and evaluated a treadmill-based exercise tolerance test (ETT) to provide objective physiologic measures without requiring additional equipment or insurance charges. The ETT is stopped when the patient's Borg scale rating of perceived exertion (RPE) reaches 15 or when any sign/symptom indicates risk of an adverse event. Outcomes of the study included reasons for stopping; maximum heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and rate pressure product; and adverse events. We tested equivalence to the DASI as requiring the 95% confidence interval for the mean difference between DASI and ETT metabolic equivalents (METs) to fall within the range (-1, 1). Among 502 consecutive cardiac rehabilitation patients, one suffered a panic attack; no other adverse events occurred. Most (80%) stopped because they reached an RPE of 15; the remaining 20% were stopped on indications that continuing risked an adverse event. Mean maximum systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and rate pressure product were significantly (P pressure products remained below 36,000. The mean difference between DASI and ETT METs was -0.8 (-0.98, -0.65), indicating equivalence at our threshold. In conclusion, the ETT can be performed within cardiac rehabilitation, providing a functional capacity assessment equivalent to the DASI and objective physiologic measures for developing exercise prescriptions and measuring progress. PMID:23814381

  7. Uso de bomba centrífuga no pós-operatório de cirurgia cardíaca Assisted circulation in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M Pêgo-Fernandes

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Nos casos de choque cardiogênico após cirurgia cardíaca com auxílio da circulação extracorpórea retratarlos às drogas e ao balão intra-aórtico, as bombas centrífugas têm sido a primeira opção em vários Serviços. Esse fato deve-se à facilidade de manuseio, de instalação, custo razoável, grande disponibilidade, e alto grau de eficiência. O objetivo deste trabalho é o relato da experiência do Instituto do Coração com 8 pacientes submetidos a essa terapêutica, no período de maio de 1990 a dezembro de 1991. Nesses 8 doentes foi utilizado previamente balão intra-aórtico e feito uso maciço de drogas vasoativas. A idade variou de 54 a 66 anos. Três foram submetidos a revascularização do miocárdio, 2 a correção de aneurisma de ventrículo esquerdo, 2 a troca de valva mitral e 1 a transplante cardíaco. Em 7 a assistência foi de ventrículo esquerdo e em 1 de direito. A duração da assistência variou de 18 a 126 horas. Ocorreram três óbitos em assistência, sendo que dois eram pacientes em "ponte" para transplante que não obtiveram doador, e um morreu por complicações de sangramento e insuficiência renal aguda. Dos 5 (62,5% pacientes retirados da assistência, 2 faleceram tardiamente sendo 1 com pulmão de choque e 1 com complicação neurológica e insuficiência renal. Quando comparamos a evolução clínica com o pico de CKMB, verificamos que os 3 pacientes com pico maior que 80 faleceram, 2 em assistência e 1 tardiamente. Dos 5 doentes com pico de CKMB menor que 80, 4 foram retirados de assistência, com 3 sobreviventes tardios, e o único que morreu em assistência foi por problemas de sangramento. Os 3 (35% pacientes sobreviventes estão no 5º, 9º e 19º meses de seguimento, 2 em classe funcional II e 1 em classe I. A utilização precoce, antes de complicações irreversíveis, da assistência circulatória, deverá permitir resultados progressivamente melhores, nesse grupo de pacientes de alto risco

  8. SLA-based optimisation of virtualised resource for multi-tier web applications in cloud data centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jing; Yuan, Haitao; Tie, Ming; Tan, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic virtualised resource allocation is the key to quality of service assurance for multi-tier web application services in cloud data centre. In this paper, we develop a self-management architecture of cloud data centres with virtualisation mechanism for multi-tier web application services. Based on this architecture, we establish a flexible hybrid queueing model to determine the amount of virtual machines for each tier of virtualised application service environments. Besides, we propose a non-linear constrained optimisation problem with restrictions defined in service level agreement. Furthermore, we develop a heuristic mixed optimisation algorithm to maximise the profit of cloud infrastructure providers, and to meet performance requirements from different clients as well. Finally, we compare the effectiveness of our dynamic allocation strategy with two other allocation strategies. The simulation results show that the proposed resource allocation method is efficient in improving the overall performance and reducing the resource energy cost.

  9. Nanodiamond-based nanostructures for coupling nitrogen-vacancy centres to metal nanoparticles and semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianxiao; Steinsultz, Nat; Ouyang, Min

    2016-01-01

    The ability to control the interaction between nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond and photonic and/or broadband plasmonic nanostructures is crucial for the development of solid-state quantum devices with optimum performance. However, existing methods typically employ top-down fabrication, which restrict scalable and feasible manipulation of nitrogen-vacancy centres. Here, we develop a general bottom-up approach to fabricate an emerging class of freestanding nanodiamond-based hybrid nanostructures with external functional units of either plasmonic nanoparticles or excitonic quantum dots. Precise control of the structural parameters (including size, composition, coverage and spacing of the external functional units) is achieved, representing a pre-requisite for exploring the underlying physics. Fine tuning of the emission characteristics through structural regulation is demonstrated by performing single-particle optical studies. This study opens a rich toolbox to tailor properties of quantum emitters, which can facilitate design guidelines for devices based on nitrogen-vacancy centres that use these freestanding hybrid nanostructures as building blocks. PMID:27273426

  10. Nanodiamond-based nanostructures for coupling nitrogen-vacancy centres to metal nanoparticles and semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianxiao; Steinsultz, Nat; Ouyang, Min

    2016-06-01

    The ability to control the interaction between nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond and photonic and/or broadband plasmonic nanostructures is crucial for the development of solid-state quantum devices with optimum performance. However, existing methods typically employ top-down fabrication, which restrict scalable and feasible manipulation of nitrogen-vacancy centres. Here, we develop a general bottom-up approach to fabricate an emerging class of freestanding nanodiamond-based hybrid nanostructures with external functional units of either plasmonic nanoparticles or excitonic quantum dots. Precise control of the structural parameters (including size, composition, coverage and spacing of the external functional units) is achieved, representing a pre-requisite for exploring the underlying physics. Fine tuning of the emission characteristics through structural regulation is demonstrated by performing single-particle optical studies. This study opens a rich toolbox to tailor properties of quantum emitters, which can facilitate design guidelines for devices based on nitrogen-vacancy centres that use these freestanding hybrid nanostructures as building blocks.

  11. When Students Take the Lead: Enhancing Quality and Relevance of Higher Education through Innovation in Student-Centred Problem-Based Active Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreher, Ralph; Simpson, Colin; Sørensen, Olav Jull;

    2016-01-01

    Student-centred problem-based active learning contributes substantially to the enhancement of students’ competitiveness and employability. It also contributes to research, allowing academic staff to engage in research-based teaching, bringing the latest business and scientific developments directly...... to the students. Student-centred problem-based active learning encourages students to work independently and constructively using academic staff as mentors and supervisors. It is a learning philosophy according to which the learning process is organized in such a way that the students actively engage in finding...... problems and answers to these problems; student-centred active learning also encourages students to pursue their own learning objectives and paths....

  12. Evaluation of bluetooth low power for physiological monitoring in a home based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Timothy; Ding, Hang; D'Souza, Matthew; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in Australia, and places large burdens on the healthcare system. To assist patients with CVDs in recovering from cardiac events and mediating cardiac risk factors, a home based cardiac rehabilitation program, known as the Care Assessment Platform (CAP), was developed. In the CAP program, patients are required to manually enter health information into their mobile phones on a daily basis. The manual operation is often subject to human errors and is inconvenient for some elderly patients. To improve this, an automated wireless solution has been desired. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the feasibility of implementing the newly released Bluetooth 4.0 (BT4.0) for the CAP program, and practically evaluate BT4.0 communications between a developed mobile application and some emulated healthcare devices. The study demonstrated that BT4.0 addresses usability, interoperability and security for healthcare applications, reduces the power consumption in wireless communication, and improves the flexibility of interface for software development. This evaluation study provides an essential mobile BT4.0 framework to incorporate a large range of healthcare devices for clinical assessment and intervention in the CAP program, and hence it is useful for similar development and research work of other mobile healthcare solutions. PMID:22797030

  13. R&D networks and regional knowledge production: an agent-based simulation of the Austrian competence centres programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Korber

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Publicly funded competence centres have gained high recognition for improving science-industry collaboration. With the requirement for long-term and geographically concentrated R&D, competence centres provide an environment for joint learning and transfer of “sticky” knowledge. The objective of this paper is to investigate how a competence centres programme affects knowledge production in the regional innovation system. In order to address this issue, we draw on a simulation approach and develop an agent-based model of the Vienna Life Sciences innovation system. Companies, research organisations and universities are heterogeneous agents that create scientific publications, patents, as well as high-tech jobs. Simulation runs refer to long-term scenarios regarding the level and duration of public funding. By addressing the complexities of knowledge interaction in the context of the “local buzz” versus “global pipelines” discussion, the results show the potential of empirically calibrated simulation models for ex-ante impact assessment in R&D policy.

  14. A Resource-Based View (RBV) of Singapore as A Pre-Eminent Wealth Management Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Pena Mora, Yadir Adriana

    2007-01-01

    Singapore is a world recognised financial and wealth management centre, and one of the best in the Asia-Pacific region. The fast growth of the world’s private wealth is boosting the wealth management sector, making this segment of the financial industry very attractive. Both big and small players are concentrating their efforts in this direction. Singapore has benefited from this growth. The question asked is “how and why is Singapore attracting the private wealth and institutions?” Especiall...

  15. Catheter-Based Educational Experiences: A Canadian Survey of Current Residents and Recent Graduates in Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanda, Nadzir; Chan, Vincent; Chan, Ryan; Rubens, Fraser D

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has witnessed significant developments in the use of catheter-based therapies in cardiovascular medicine. We sought to assess the educational opportunities for cardiac surgery trainees to determine their readiness for participation in these strategies. A web-based survey was distributed to current residents, recent graduates, and program directors in Canadian cardiac surgery residency programs from 2008-2013. The survey was distributed to 110 residents and graduates. Forty-five percent completed the survey. Thirty-five percent expressed that they experienced resistance organizing their rotations because they had to compete with non-cardiac surgery colleagues, and 6 were denied local cardiac catheterization rotations. By the end of the rotation, 56% were comfortable performing a diagnostic cardiac catheterization independently. Exposure to being the operator performing diagnostic catheterization was significantly associated with the positive perception of being able to perform a diagnostic catheterization independently (odds ratio [OR], 5.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-19.81; P = 0.017). Eighty-eight percent of respondents expressed the need for more exposure in catheter-based rotations. Seven of 11 program directors completed the survey. All believed such rotations should be mandatory and foresaw a bigger role for hybrid catheter-based/cardiac surgery procedures in the future. Trainees and program directors perceive that increased exposure to catheter-based therapies is important to career development as a cardiac surgeon. This survey will contribute to the development of a cardiac surgery training curriculum as we foresee more hybrid and team procedures.

  16. Calibration of robot tool centre point using camera-based system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordić Zaviša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot Tool Centre Point (TCP calibration problem is of great importance for a number of industrial applications, and it is well known both in theory and in practice. Although various techniques have been proposed for solving this problem, they mostly require tool jogging or long processing time, both of which affect process performance by extending cycle time. This paper presents an innovative way of TCP calibration using a set of two cameras. The robot tool is placed in an area where images in two orthogonal planes are acquired using cameras. Using robust pattern recognition, even deformed tool can be identified on images, and information about its current position and orientation forwarded to control unit for calibration. Compared to other techniques, test results show significant reduction in procedure complexity and calibration time. These improvements enable more frequent TCP checking and recalibration during production, thus improving the product quality.

  17. Prenatal diagnosis of cardiac defects : accuracy and benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clur, S. A.; Van Brussel, P. M.; Ottenkamp, J.; Bilardo, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The prenatal diagnosis of cardiac defects can potentially reduce postnatal morbidity and mortality. We wanted to evaluate prenatal cardiac diagnosis accuracy in a population referred for echocardiography. Methods Single centre retrospective study of echocardiography referrals between April

  18. Creation and Global Deployment of a Mobile, Application-Based Cognitive Simulator for Cardiac Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Zachary E; Ogden, William David; Fann, James I; Burdon, Thomas A; Sheikh, Ahmad Y

    2016-01-01

    Several modern learning frameworks (eg, cognitive apprenticeship, anchored instruction, and situated cognition) posit the utility of nontraditional methods for effective experiential learning. Thus, development of novel educational tools emphasizing the cognitive framework of operative sequences may be of benefit to surgical trainees. We propose the development and global deployment of an effective, mobile cognitive cardiac surgical simulator. In methods, 16 preclinical medical students were assessed. Overall, 4 separate surgical modules (sternotomy, cannulation, decannulation, and sternal closure) were created utilizing the Touch Surgery (London, UK) platform. Modules were made available to download free of charge for use on mobile devices. Usage data were collected over a 6-month period. Educational efficacy of the modules was evaluated by randomizing a cohort of medical students to either module usage or traditional, reading-based self-study, followed by a multiple-choice learning assessment tool. In results, downloads of the simulator achieved global penetrance, with highest usage in the USA, Brazil, Italy, UK, and India. Overall, 5368 unique users conducted a total of 1971 hours of simulation. Evaluation of the medical student cohort revealed significantly higher assessment scores in those randomized to module use versus traditional reading (75% ± 9% vs 61% ± 7%, respectively; P mobile, interactive cognitive simulator for cardiac surgery. Simulators of this type may be effective for the training and assessment of surgical students. We investigated whether an interactive, mobile-computing-based cognitive task simulator for cardiac surgery could be developed, deployed, and validated. Our findings suggest that such simulators may be a useful learning tool. PMID:27568126

  19. Creation and Global Deployment of a Mobile, Application-Based Cognitive Simulator for Cardiac Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Zachary E; Ogden, William David; Fann, James I; Burdon, Thomas A; Sheikh, Ahmad Y

    2016-01-01

    Several modern learning frameworks (eg, cognitive apprenticeship, anchored instruction, and situated cognition) posit the utility of nontraditional methods for effective experiential learning. Thus, development of novel educational tools emphasizing the cognitive framework of operative sequences may be of benefit to surgical trainees. We propose the development and global deployment of an effective, mobile cognitive cardiac surgical simulator. In methods, 16 preclinical medical students were assessed. Overall, 4 separate surgical modules (sternotomy, cannulation, decannulation, and sternal closure) were created utilizing the Touch Surgery (London, UK) platform. Modules were made available to download free of charge for use on mobile devices. Usage data were collected over a 6-month period. Educational efficacy of the modules was evaluated by randomizing a cohort of medical students to either module usage or traditional, reading-based self-study, followed by a multiple-choice learning assessment tool. In results, downloads of the simulator achieved global penetrance, with highest usage in the USA, Brazil, Italy, UK, and India. Overall, 5368 unique users conducted a total of 1971 hours of simulation. Evaluation of the medical student cohort revealed significantly higher assessment scores in those randomized to module use versus traditional reading (75% ± 9% vs 61% ± 7%, respectively; P mobile, interactive cognitive simulator for cardiac surgery. Simulators of this type may be effective for the training and assessment of surgical students. We investigated whether an interactive, mobile-computing-based cognitive task simulator for cardiac surgery could be developed, deployed, and validated. Our findings suggest that such simulators may be a useful learning tool.

  20. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  1. Regression-Based Cardiac Motion Prediction From Single-Phase CTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metz, C.T.; Baka, N.; Kirisli, H.;

    2012-01-01

    State of the art cardiac CT enables the acquisition of imaging data of the heart over the entire cardiac cycle at concurrent high spatial and temporal resolution. However, in clinical practice, acquisition is increasingly limited to 3D images. Estimating the shape of the cardiac structures...

  2. Diversification des exploitations agricoles à base de cacaoyer au Centre Cameroun : mythe ou réalité ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagoret P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversification of cocoa farms in the Central Cameroon: myth or reality? A survey was conducted among 1,171 farmers to assess the degree of diversification on cocoa-based farms in the Centre Province of Cameroon, which is the main cocoa producing zone in the country. Fifteen years after the onset of liberalization of the cocoa supply chain, the results showed that area under cocoa predominates in the cropping plan on a farming system scale. The same applied for the contribution made by cocoa income to overall farm functioning. However, a further study carried out on 74 cocoa plantations in that region showed that diversification was more perceptible on the cocoa based production systems. In fact, fruit tree species, which are very often found in cocoa plantations, partly explained the occurrence of substantial agrobiodiversity. A north – south gradient was found in which diversification of the cocoa growing system was significantly greater in the forest – savannah transition zone than in the forest zone. However, it turned out that the process of diversification by planting fruit tree species in cocoa plantations was not a new phenomenon, since it involved all cocoa plantings whatever their age. This research thus relativizes the extent of the diversification strategy adopted by cocoa producers in the Centre Province of Cameroon in response to changes in their socioeconomic environment and the instability of international markets.

  3. Cardiac C-arm CT: 4D non-model based heart motion estimation and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prümmer, M.; Fahrig, R.; Wigström, L.; Boese, J.; Lauritsch, G.; Strobel, N.; Hornegger, J.

    2007-03-01

    The combination of real-time fluoroscopy and 3D cardiac imaging on the same C-arm system is a promising technique that might improve therapy planning, guiding, and monitoring in the interventional suite. In principal, to reconstruct a 3D image of the beating heart at a particular cardiac phase, a complete set of X-ray projection data representing that phase is required. One approximate approach is the retrospectively ECG-gated FDK reconstruction (RG-FDK). From the acquired data set of N s multiple C-arm sweeps, those projection images which are acquired closest in time to the desired cardiac phase are retrospectively selected. However, this approach uses only 1/ N s of the obtained data. Our goal is to utilize data from other cardiac phases as well. In order to minimize blurring and motion artifacts, cardiac motion has to be compensated for, which can be achieved using a temporally dependent spatial 3D warping of the filtered-backprojections. In this work we investigate the computation of the 4D heart motion based on prior reconstructions of several cardiac phases using RG-FDK. A 4D motion estimation framework is presented using standard fast non-rigid registration. A smooth 4D motion vector field (MVF) represents the relative deformation compared to a reference cardiac phase. A 4D deformation regridding by adaptive supersampling allows selecting any reference phase independently of the set of phases used in the RG-FDK for a motion corrected reconstruction. Initial promising results from in vivo experiments are shown. The subjects individual 4D cardiac MVF could be computed from only three RG-FDK image volumes. In addition, all acquired projection data were motion corrected and subsequently used for image reconstruction to improve the signal-to-noise ratio compared to RG-FDK.

  4. Evaluating an undergraduate interprofessional simulation-based educational module: communication, teamwork, and confidence performing cardiac resuscitation skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Luctkar-Flude

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Marian Luctkar-Flude1, Cynthia Baker1, Cheryl Pulling1, Robert McGraw2, Damon Dagnone2, Jennifer Medves1, Carly Turner-Kelly11School of Nursing, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada; 2School of Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, CanadaPurpose: Interprofessional (IP collaboration during cardiac resuscitation is essential and contributes to patient wellbeing. The purpose of this study is to evaluate an innovative simulation-based IP educational module for undergraduate nursing and medical students on cardiac resuscitation skills.Methods: Nursing and medical trainees participated in a new cardiac resuscitation curriculum involving a 2-hour IP foundational cardiac resuscitation skills lab, followed by three 2-hour IP simulation sessions. Control group participants attended the existing two 2-hour IP simulation sessions. Study respondents (N = 71 completed a survey regarding their confidence performing cardiac resuscitation skills and their perceptions of IP collaboration.Results: Despite a consistent positive trend, only one out of 17 quantitative survey items were significantly improved for learners in the new curriculum. They were more likely to report feeling confident managing the airway during cardiac resuscitation (P = 0.001. Overall, quantitative results suggest that senior nursing and medical students were comfortable with IP communication and teamwork and confident with cardiac resuscitation skills. There were no significant differences between nursing students’ and medical students’ results. Through qualitative feedback, participants reported feeling comfortable learning with students from other professions and found value in the IP simulation sessions.Conclusion: Results from this study will inform ongoing restructuring of the IP cardiac resuscitation skills simulation module as defined by the action research process. Specific improvements that are suggested by these findings include strengthening the team

  5. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images.

  6. A Study of Mechanical Optimization Strategy for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Based on an Electromechanical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Dou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimal electrode position and interventricular (VV delay in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT improves its success. However, the precise quantification of cardiac dyssynchrony and magnitude of resynchronization achieved by biventricular (BiV pacing therapy with mechanical optimization strategies based on computational models remain scant. The maximum circumferential uniformity ratio estimate (CURE was used here as mechanical optimization index, which was automatically computed for 6 different electrode positions based on a three-dimensional electromechanical canine model of heart failure (HF caused by complete left bundle branch block (CLBBB. VV delay timing was adjusted accordingly. The heart excitation propagation was simulated with a monodomain model. The quantification of mechanical intra- and interventricular asynchrony was then investigated with eight-node isoparametric element method. The results showed that (i the optimal pacing location from maximal CURE of 0.8516 was found at the left ventricle (LV lateral wall near the equator site with a VV delay of 60 ms, in accordance with current clinical studies, (ii compared with electrical optimization strategy of ERMS, the LV synchronous contraction and the hemodynamics improved more with mechanical optimization strategy. Therefore, measures of mechanical dyssynchrony improve the sensitivity and specificity of predicting responders more. The model was subject to validation in future clinical studies.

  7. A hospital based study on causes peculiar of congestive car-diac failure (CCF)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamzullah Khan; Hikmatullah Jan; Mohammad Hafizullah; Mahmoodul Hassan; Adnan Gul

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To determine the frequency of risk factors of congestive cardiac failure in a tertiary care hospital of Peshawar.Methods:This retrospective observational study was conducted in department of Cardiology,Post-graduate Medical Institute,Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar,from March 2005 to September 2007.Relevant information regarding the risk factors of congestive cardiac failure were recorded on questionnaire prepared in accordance with the objectives of the study.Results:1 019 patients with established diagnosis of cardiac fail-ure (based on clinical findings and relevant investigations) were included.Out of total sampling 583 (57.12%)were males and 436(42.78%)were females.The age range of the patients was from 6 years to 82 years with mean age of 48.5 years and mode of age was 45 years.The distribution of causative factors of CCF was:ischemic heart disease (IHD)36.31%,hypertension 26.30%,dilated cardiomyopathy 10.10%,obstr-uctve and restrictive cardiomyopathies 5.39%,valvular heart diseases (VHD)9.32%,congenital heart dis-ease like ventricular septal defects (VSD)4.41%,atrial septal defects (ASD)0.58%,atrial fibrillation (AF)2.25%,constrictive pericardidtis 1.07%,Pericardial effusion 0.68%,chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary hypertension 1.47%,thyrotoxicosis 0.68%,complete heart block 0.29% and paget disease in 0.09% cases.Conclusion:Ischemic heart disease,hypertension,cardiomypathies,valvular heart disease and congenital heart disease are major contributor to CCF in our patients.

  8. SVM-based classification of LV wall motion in cardiac MRI with the assessment of STE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify normal/abnormal wall motion in Left Ventricle (LV) function in cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), taking as reference, strain information obtained from 2D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography (STE). Without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images acquired during a cardiac cycle, spatio-temporal profiles are extracted from a subset of radial lines from the ventricle centroid to points outside the epicardial border. Classical Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used to classify features extracted from gray levels of the spatio-temporal profile as well as their representations in the Wavelet domain under the assumption that the data may be sparse in that domain. Based on information obtained from radial strain curves in 2D-STE studies, we label all the spatio-temporal profiles that belong to a particular segment as normal if the peak systolic radial strain curve of this segment presents normal kinesis, or abnormal if the peak systolic radial strain curve presents hypokinesis or akinesis. For this study, short-axis cine- MR images are collected from 9 patients with cardiac dyssynchrony for which we have the radial strain tracings at the mid-papilary muscle obtained by 2D STE; and from one control group formed by 9 healthy subjects. The best classification performance is obtained with the gray level information of the spatio-temporal profiles using a RBF kernel with 91.88% of accuracy, 92.75% of sensitivity and 91.52% of specificity.

  9. Surface based cardiac and respiratory motion extraction for pulmonary structures from multi-phase CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Berg, Jens; Barschdorf, Hans; Blaffert, Thomas; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian

    2007-03-01

    During medical imaging and therapeutic interventions, pulmonary structures are in general subject to cardiac and respiratory motion. This motion leads potentially to artefacts and blurring in the resulting image material and to uncertainties during interventions. This paper presents a new automatic approach for surface based motion tracking of pulmonary structures and reports on the results for cardiac and respiratory induced motion. The method applies an active shape approach to ad-hoc generated surface representations of the pulmonary structures for phase to phase surface tracking. Input of the method are multi-phase CT data, either cardiac or respiratory gated. The iso-surface representing the transition between air or lung parenchyma to soft tissue, is triangulated for a selected phase p 0. An active shape procedure is initialised in the image of phase p I using the generated surface in p 0. The used internal energy term penalizes shape deformation as compared to p 0. The process is iterated for all phases p i to p i+1 of the complete cycle. Since the mesh topology is the same for all phases, the vertices of the triangular mesh can be treated as pseudo-landmarks defining tissue trajectories. A dense motion field is interpolated. The motion field was especially designed to estimate the error margins for radiotherapy. In the case of respiratory motion extraction, a validation on ten biphasic thorax CT images (2.5mm slice distance) was performed with expert landmarks placed at vessel bifurcations. The mean error on landmark position was below 2.6mm. We further applied the method to ECG gated images and estimated the influence of the heart beat on lung tissue displacement.

  10. Experiences of Telebased Information Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten

    1999-01-01

    Tele-based information community centres or just tele-centres have been seen as the killer application to empower local communities in developed and developing countries to meet the challenges of the information society. This paper will present a number of models for introducing such centres and ...... and discuss the different models and national strategies used for setting up tele-based information in relation to the Ghana experience.......Tele-based information community centres or just tele-centres have been seen as the killer application to empower local communities in developed and developing countries to meet the challenges of the information society. This paper will present a number of models for introducing such centres...

  11. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Caroline; Angermann, Christiane E; Knop, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    Amyloidoses are a heterogeneous group of multisystem disorders, which are characterized by an extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Typically affected are the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. More than half of the patients die due to cardiac involvement. Clinical signs of cardiac amyloidosis are edema of the lower limbs, hepatomegaly, ascites and elevated jugular vein pressure, frequently in combination with dyspnea. There can also be chest pain, probably due to microvessel disease. Dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system or arrhythmias may cause low blood pressure, dizziness, or recurrent syncope. The AL amyloidosis caused by the deposition of immunoglobulin light chains is the most common form. It can be performed by monoclonal gammopathy. The desirable treatment therapy consists of high-dose melphalan therapy twice followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. Due to the high peritransplantation mortality, selection of appropriate patients is mandatory. The ATTR amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by the amyloidogenic form of transthyretin, a plasmaprotein that is synthesized in the liver. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative therapy. The symptomatic treatment of cardiac amyloidosis is based on the current guidelines for chronic heart failure according to the patient's New York Heart Association (NYHA) state. Further types of amyloidosis with possible cardiac involvement comprise the senile systemic amyloidosis caused by the wild-type transthyretin, secondary amyloidosis after chronic systemic inflammation, and the beta(2)-microglobulin amyloidosis after long-term dialysis treatment. PMID:18344065

  12. Profile of stroke patients treated at a community - based rehabilitation centre in a Cape Town health district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Rhoda

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in both developed and developing countries. Limited information is available, in South Africa, on the epidemiological profile of stroke survivors requiring rehabilitation. A descriptive study was therefore undertaken to compile, amongst others the demographic and medical profile of stroke patients attending  rehabilitation at a primary health care facility (Bishop Lavis Rehabilitation Centre.  Both medical- and rehabilitation records were reviewed to ensure completeness of information and to minimize missing clinical data bias. Relevant data was  captured on a data capture sheet.  The latter was based on key findings from the literature and developed by the researcher. The mean age of the population of stroke patients studied was 59 years, which is markedly younger than what has been reported globally in the literature. As was expected, hypertension was found to be the most prevalent risk factor. The presence of a combination of risk factors in the  majority of the group (on average, 2.4 risk factors per person warrants the introduction of aggressive health  education and stroke prevention programmes at this primary health care centre.

  13. Assessment of phase based dose modulation for improved dose efficiency in cardiac CT on an anthropomorphic motion phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Adam; Nilsen, Roy; Nett, Brian

    2014-03-01

    State of the art automatic exposure control modulates the tube current across view angle and Z based on patient anatomy for use in axial full scan reconstructions. Cardiac CT, however, uses a fundamentally different image reconstruction that applies a temporal weighting to reduce motion artifacts. This paper describes a phase based mA modulation that goes beyond axial and ECG modulation; it uses knowledge of the temporal view weighting applied within the reconstruction algorithm to improve dose efficiency in cardiac CT scanning. Using physical phantoms and synthetic noise emulation, we measure how knowledge of sinogram temporal weighting and the prescribed cardiac phase can be used to improve dose efficiency. First, we validated that a synthetic CT noise emulation method produced realistic image noise. Next, we used the CT noise emulation method to simulate mA modulation on scans of a physical anthropomorphic phantom where a motion profile corresponding to a heart rate of 60 beats per minute was used. The CT noise emulation method matched noise to lower dose scans across the image within 1.5% relative error. Using this noise emulation method to simulate modulating the mA while keeping the total dose constant, the image variance was reduced by an average of 11.9% on a scan with 50 msec padding, demonstrating improved dose efficiency. Radiation dose reduction in cardiac CT can be achieved while maintaining the same level of image noise through phase based dose modulation that incorporates knowledge of the cardiac reconstruction algorithm.

  14. Novel phase-based noise reduction strategy for quantification of left ventricular function and mass assessment by cardiac CT: Comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wai, Bryan, E-mail: bwai@partners.org [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thai, Wai-ee [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brown, Heather [Qi Imaging, Redwood City, California (United States); Truong, Quynh A. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Background: Tube current modulation in retrospective ECG gated cardiac computed tomography (CT) results in increased image noise and may reduce the accuracy of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and mass assessment. Objective: To examine the effects of a novel CT phase-based noise reduction (NR) algorithm on LV EF and mass quantification as compared to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods: In 40 subjects, we compared the LV EF and mass between CT and CMR. In a subset of 24 subjects with tube current modulated CT, the effect of phase-based noise reduction strategies on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the assessment of LV EF and mass was compared to CMR. Results: There was excellent correlation between CT and CMR for EF (r = 0.94) and mass (r = 0.97). As compared to CMR, the limits of agreement improved with increasing strength of NR strategy. There was a systematic underestimation of LV mass by CT compared to CMR with no NR (−10.3 ± 10.1 g) and low NR (−10.3 ± 12.5 g), but was attenuated with high NR (−0.5 ± 8.3 g). Studies without NR had lower CNR compared to low and high NR at both the ES phase and ED phase (all p < 0.01). Conclusions: A high NR strategy on tube current modulated functional cardiac CT improves correlation of EF compared to CMR and reduces variability of EF and mass evaluation by increasing the CNR. In an effort to reduce radiation dose with tube current modulation, this strategy provides better image quality when LV function and mass quantification is needed.

  15. Novel phase-based noise reduction strategy for quantification of left ventricular function and mass assessment by cardiac CT: Comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Tube current modulation in retrospective ECG gated cardiac computed tomography (CT) results in increased image noise and may reduce the accuracy of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and mass assessment. Objective: To examine the effects of a novel CT phase-based noise reduction (NR) algorithm on LV EF and mass quantification as compared to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods: In 40 subjects, we compared the LV EF and mass between CT and CMR. In a subset of 24 subjects with tube current modulated CT, the effect of phase-based noise reduction strategies on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the assessment of LV EF and mass was compared to CMR. Results: There was excellent correlation between CT and CMR for EF (r = 0.94) and mass (r = 0.97). As compared to CMR, the limits of agreement improved with increasing strength of NR strategy. There was a systematic underestimation of LV mass by CT compared to CMR with no NR (−10.3 ± 10.1 g) and low NR (−10.3 ± 12.5 g), but was attenuated with high NR (−0.5 ± 8.3 g). Studies without NR had lower CNR compared to low and high NR at both the ES phase and ED phase (all p < 0.01). Conclusions: A high NR strategy on tube current modulated functional cardiac CT improves correlation of EF compared to CMR and reduces variability of EF and mass evaluation by increasing the CNR. In an effort to reduce radiation dose with tube current modulation, this strategy provides better image quality when LV function and mass quantification is needed

  16. Model-based imaging of cardiac electrical function in human atria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modre, Robert; Tilg, Bernhard; Fischer, Gerald; Hanser, Friedrich; Messnarz, Bernd; Schocke, Michael F. H.; Kremser, Christian; Hintringer, Florian; Roithinger, Franz

    2003-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging of electrical function in the human atria is attained by the combination of data from electrocardiographic (ECG) mapping and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An anatomical computer model of the individual patient is the basis for our computer-aided diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias. Three patients suffering from Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, from paroxymal atrial fibrillation, and from atrial flutter underwent an electrophysiological study. After successful treatment of the cardiac arrhythmia with invasive catheter technique, pacing protocols with stimuli at several anatomical sites (coronary sinus, left and right pulmonary vein, posterior site of the right atrium, right atrial appendage) were performed. Reconstructed activation time (AT) maps were validated with catheter-based electroanatomical data, with invasively determined pacing sites, and with pacing at anatomical markers. The individual complex anatomical model of the atria of each patient in combination with a high-quality mesh optimization enables accurate AT imaging, resulting in a localization error for the estimated pacing sites within 1 cm. Our findings may have implications for imaging of atrial activity in patients with focal arrhythmias.

  17. Three-dimensional Content-Based Cardiac Image Retrieval using global and local descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamasco, Leila C C; Nunes, Fátima L S

    2015-01-01

    The increase in volume of medical images generated and stored has created difficulties in accurate image retrieval. An alternative is to generate three-dimensional (3D) models from such medical images and use them in the search. Some of the main cardiac illnesses, such as Congestive Heart Failure (CHF), have deformation in the heart's shape as one of the main symptoms, which can be identified faster in a 3D object than in slices. This article presents techniques developed to retrieve 3D cardiac models using global and local descriptors within a content-based image retrieval system. These techniques were applied in pre-classified 3D models with and without the CHF disease and they were evaluated by using Precision vs. Recall metric. We observed that local descriptors achieved better results than a global descriptor, reaching 85% of accuracy. The results confirmed the potential of using 3D models retrieval in the medical context to aid in the diagnosis. PMID:26958280

  18. Image-Based Personalization of Cardiac Anatomy for Coupled Electromechanical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, A; Augustin, C M; Neic, A; Prassl, A J; Holler, M; Fastl, T E; Hennemuth, A; Bredies, K; Kuehne, T; Bishop, M J; Niederer, S A; Plank, G

    2016-01-01

    Computational models of cardiac electromechanics (EM) are increasingly being applied to clinical problems, with patient-specific models being generated from high fidelity imaging and used to simulate patient physiology, pathophysiology and response to treatment. Current structured meshes are limited in their ability to fully represent the detailed anatomical data available from clinical images and capture complex and varied anatomy with limited geometric accuracy. In this paper, we review the state of the art in image-based personalization of cardiac anatomy for biophysically detailed, strongly coupled EM modeling, and present our own tools for the automatic building of anatomically and structurally accurate patient-specific models. Our method relies on using high resolution unstructured meshes for discretizing both physics, electrophysiology and mechanics, in combination with efficient, strongly scalable solvers necessary to deal with the computational load imposed by the large number of degrees of freedom of these meshes. These tools permit automated anatomical model generation and strongly coupled EM simulations at an unprecedented level of anatomical and biophysical detail. PMID:26424476

  19. Label-Free Detection of Cardiac Troponin-I Using Carbon Nanofiber Based Nanoelectrode Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Koehne, Jessica Erin; Gandhiraman, Ram P.; Meyyappan, M.

    2013-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. A carbon nanofiber (CNF) multiplexed array has been fabricated with 9 sensing pads, each containing 40,000 carbon nanofibers as nanoelectrodes. Here, we report the use of vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for the detection of cardiac Troponin-I for the early diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Antibody, antitroponin, probe immobilization and subsequent binding to human cardiac troponin-I were characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry techniques. Each step of the modification process resulted in changes in electrical capacitance or resistance to charge transfer due to the changes at the electrode surface upon antibody immobilization and binding to the specific antigen. This sensor demonstrates high sensitivity, down to 0.2 ng/mL, and good selectivity making this platform a good candidate for early stage diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

  20. Development and clinical study of mobile 12-lead electrocardiography based on cloud computing for cardiac emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hideo; Uchimura, Yuji; Waki, Kayo; Omae, Koji; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    To improve emergency services for accurate diagnosis of cardiac emergency, we developed a low-cost new mobile electrocardiography system "Cloud Cardiology®" based upon cloud computing for prehospital diagnosis. This comprises a compact 12-lead ECG unit equipped with Bluetooth and Android Smartphone with an application for transmission. Cloud server enables us to share ECG simultaneously inside and outside the hospital. We evaluated the clinical effectiveness by conducting a clinical trial with historical comparison to evaluate this system in a rapid response car in the real emergency service settings. We found that this system has an ability to shorten the onset to balloon time of patients with acute myocardial infarction, resulting in better clinical outcome. Here we propose that cloud-computing based simultaneous data sharing could be powerful solution for emergency service for cardiology, along with its significant clinical outcome.

  1. Development and clinical study of mobile 12-lead electrocardiography based on cloud computing for cardiac emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hideo; Uchimura, Yuji; Waki, Kayo; Omae, Koji; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    To improve emergency services for accurate diagnosis of cardiac emergency, we developed a low-cost new mobile electrocardiography system "Cloud Cardiology®" based upon cloud computing for prehospital diagnosis. This comprises a compact 12-lead ECG unit equipped with Bluetooth and Android Smartphone with an application for transmission. Cloud server enables us to share ECG simultaneously inside and outside the hospital. We evaluated the clinical effectiveness by conducting a clinical trial with historical comparison to evaluate this system in a rapid response car in the real emergency service settings. We found that this system has an ability to shorten the onset to balloon time of patients with acute myocardial infarction, resulting in better clinical outcome. Here we propose that cloud-computing based simultaneous data sharing could be powerful solution for emergency service for cardiology, along with its significant clinical outcome. PMID:23920851

  2. Three-dimensional cardiac tissue fabrication based on cell sheet technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Shinako; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2016-01-15

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising therapeutic strategy for severe heart failure. However, conventional tissue engineering methods by seeding cells into biodegradable scaffolds have intrinsic limitations such as inflammatory responses and fibrosis arising from the degradation of scaffolds. On the other hand, we have developed cell sheet engineering as a scaffold-free approach for cardiac tissue engineering. Confluent cultured cells are harvested as an intact cell sheet using a temperature-responsive culture surface. By layering cardiac cell sheets, it is possible to form electrically communicative three-dimensional cardiac constructs. Cell sheet transplantation onto damaged hearts in several animal models has revealed improvements in heart functions. Because of the lack of vasculature, the thickness of viable cardiac cell sheet-layered tissues is limited to three layers. Pre-vascularized structure formation within cardiac tissue and multi-step transplantation methods has enabled the formation of thick vascularized tissues in vivo. Furthermore, development of original bioreactor systems with vascular beds has allowed reconstruction of three-dimensional cardiac tissues with a functional vascular structure in vitro. Large-scale culture systems to generate pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac cells can create large numbers of cardiac cell sheets. Three-dimensional cardiac tissues fabricated by cell sheet engineering may be applied to treat heart disease and tissue model construction.

  3. Identifying regional cardiac abnormalities from myocardial strains using nontracking-based strain estimation and spatio-temporal tensor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhen; Liu, Qingshan; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Axel, Leon

    2011-12-01

    Myocardial strain is a critical indicator of many cardiac diseases and dysfunctions. The goal of this paper is to extract and use the myocardial strain pattern from tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify and localize regional abnormal cardiac function in human subjects. In order to extract the myocardial strains from the tagged images, we developed a novel nontracking-based strain estimation method for tagged MRI. This method is based on the direct extraction of tag deformation, and therefore avoids some limitations of conventional displacement or tracking-based strain estimators. Based on the extracted spatio-temporal strain patterns, we have also developed a novel tensor-based classification framework that better conserves the spatio-temporal structure of the myocardial strain pattern than conventional vector-based classification algorithms. In addition, the tensor-based projection function keeps more of the information of the original feature space, so that abnormal tensors in the subspace can be back-projected to reveal the regional cardiac abnormality in a more physically meaningful way. We have tested our novel methods on 41 human image sequences, and achieved a classification rate of 87.80%. The regional abnormalities recovered from our algorithm agree well with the patient's pathology and clinical image interpretation, and provide a promising avenue for regional cardiac function analysis. PMID:21606022

  4. Adoption of community-based cardiac rehabilitation programs and physical activity following phase III cardiac rehabilitation in Scotland: a prospective and predictive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniehotta, Falko F; Gorski, Charlotta; Araujo-Soares, Vera

    2010-09-01

    Little is known about levels of physical activity and attendance at phase IV community-based Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) programs following completion of exercise-focussed, hospital-based phase III CR. This study aims to test, compare and combine the predictive utility of the Common-Sense Self-Regulation Model (CS-SRM) and the extended Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) with action planning for two rehabilitation behaviours: physical activity and phase IV CR attendance. Individuals diagnosed with coronary heart disease (n = 103) completed baseline measures of illness perceptions, intentions, perceived behavioural control (PBC), action planning and past physical activity in the last week of a phase III CR program, and 95 participants completed follow-up measures of physical activity and attended phase IV CR (objectively confirmed) 2 months later. Only one predictor (PBC/cyclical timeline) significantly predicted levels and change of physical activity. While illness perceptions were not predictive of phase IV CR attendance, the extended TPB model showed good predictive power with action planning and intention as the most powerful predictors. Amongst participants who planned when and where to attend phase IV CR at the end of phase III rehabilitation, 65.9% subsequently attended a phase IV CR program compared to only 18.5% of those who had not made a plan. This study adds to our understanding of cardiac rehabilitation behaviour after completion of health service delivered programs. Comparing theoretical models and rehabilitation behaviours contributes to the development of behaviour theory.

  5. Pilates based core stability training in ambulant individuals with multiple sclerosis: protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with Multiple Sclerosis (MS frequently experience balance and mobility impairments, including reduced trunk stability. Pilates-based core stability training, which is aimed at improving control of the body's stabilising muscles, is popular as a form of exercise with people with MS and therapists. A replicated single case series study facilitated by the Therapists in MS Group in the United Kingdom (UK provides preliminary evidence that this approach can improve balance and mobility in ambulant people with MS; further evidence is needed to substantiate these findings to ensure that limited time, energy, finances and resources are used to best effect. This study builds upon the pilot work undertaken in the case series study by implementing a powered randomised controlled study, with the aims of: 1 Establishing the effectiveness of core stability training 2 Comparing core stability training with standardised physiotherapy exercise 3 Exploring underlying mechanisms of change associated with this intervention Methods This is a multi-centre, double blind, block randomised, controlled trial. Eligible participants will be recruited from 4 UK centres. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of three groups: Pilates based core stability training, standardised physiotherapy exercise or contract-relax relaxation sessions (placebo control. All will receive face to face training sessions over a 12 week period; together with a 15 minute daily home programme. All will be assessed by a blinded assessor before training, at the end of the 12 week programme and at 4 week follow-up. The primary outcome measure is the 10 metre timed walk. Secondary outcome measures are the MS walking Scale (MSWS-12, the Functional Reach (forwards and lateral, a 10 point Numerical Rating Scale to determine "Difficulty in carrying a drink when walking", and the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC Scale. In addition, ultrasound imaging of the

  6. Chest Pain of Suspected Cardiac Origin: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brian Savino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of chest pain of suspected cardiac origin and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods: We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of chest pain and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the chest pain protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were use of supplemental oxygen, aspirin, nitrates, opiates, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG, ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI regionalization systems, prehospital fibrinolysis and β-blockers. Results: The protocols varied widely in terms of medication and dosing choices, as well as listed contraindications to treatments. Every agency uses oxygen with 54% recommending titrated dosing. All agencies use aspirin (64% recommending 325mg, 24% recommending 162mg and 15% recommending either, as well as nitroglycerin and opiates (58% choosing morphine. Prehospital 12- Lead ECGs are used in 97% of agencies, and all but one agency has some form of regionalized care for their STEMI patients. No agency is currently employing prehospital fibrinolysis or β-blocker use. Conclusion: Protocols for chest pain of suspected cardiac origin vary widely across California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols.

  7. Cardiac motion correction based on partial angle reconstructed images in x-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seungeon; Chang, Yongjin; Ra, Jong Beom, E-mail: jbra@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    two conjugate PAR images. To evaluate the proposed algorithm, digital XCAT and physical dynamic cardiac phantom datasets are used. The XCAT phantom datasets were generated with heart rates of 70 and 100 bpm, respectively, by assuming a system rotation time of 300 ms. A physical dynamic cardiac phantom was scanned using a slowly rotating XCT system so that the effective heart rate will be 70 bpm for a system rotation speed of 300 ms. Results: In the XCAT phantom experiment, motion-compensated 3D images obtained from the proposed algorithm show coronary arteries with fewer motion artifacts for all phases. Moreover, object boundaries contaminated by motion are well restored. Even though object positions and boundary shapes are still somewhat different from the ground truth in some cases, the authors see that visibilities of coronary arteries are improved noticeably and motion artifacts are reduced considerably. The physical phantom study also shows that the visual quality of motion-compensated images is greatly improved. Conclusions: The authors propose a novel PAR image-based cardiac motion estimation and compensation algorithm. The algorithm requires an angular scan range of less than 360°. The excellent performance of the proposed algorithm is illustrated by using digital XCAT and physical dynamic cardiac phantom datasets.

  8. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation improves hemodynamic responses after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ghashghaei, Fatemeh Esteki; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Marandi, Seyed Mohammad; Ghashghaei, Samira Esteki

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disorders are an important public health problem worldwide. They are also the leading cause of mortality and morbidity. Therefore, American Heart Association proposed cardiac rehabilitation program as an essential part of care for cardiac patients to improve functional capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation program on functional status and some hemodynamic responses in patients after coronary artery bypass graft (...

  9. Cardiac injuries caused by blunt trauma: an autopsy based assessment of the injury pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Arzu Akcay; Karayel, Ferah Anik; Akyildiz, Elif; Pakis, Isil; Uzun, Ibrahim; Gurpinar, Kagan; Atilmis, Umit; Kir, Ziya

    2010-01-01

    Nonpenetrating chest trauma with injury to the heart and aorta has become increasingly common, particularly as a result of rapid deceleration in high-speed vehicular accidents, over the past 2-3 decades. The high mortality rate of cardiac injuries and possible late onset complications make blunt cardiac injuries an important challenging point for legal medicine. One hundred and ninety cases with blunt cardiac injuries in a period of 3 years were analyzed retrospectively in terms of patterns of cardiac injury, survival times, and demographic profiles of the cases in this study.

  10. Echocardiographic effects of changing atrioventricular delay in cardiac resynchronization therapy based on displacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valeur, Nana; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Risum, Niels;

    2010-01-01

    In studies showing benefits of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), individual atrioventricular (AV) delays have been optimized using echocardiography. However, the method for AV delay optimization remains controversial....

  11. Engineered Biomaterials to Enhance Stem Cell-Based Cardiac Tissue Engineering and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Waters, Renae; Roula, Boustany; Dana, Rahbani; Yara, Seif; Alexandre, Toubia; Paul, Arghya

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Since adult cardiac cells are limited in their proliferation, cardiac tissue with dead or damaged cardiac cells downstream of the occluded vessel does not regenerate after myocardial infarction. The cardiac tissue is then replaced with nonfunctional fibrotic scar tissue rather than new cardiac cells, which leaves the heart weak. The limited proliferation ability of host cardiac cells has motivated investigators to research the potential cardiac regenerative ability of stem cells. Considerable progress has been made in this endeavor. However, the optimum type of stem cells along with the most suitable matrix-material and cellular microenvironmental cues are yet to be identified or agreed upon. This review presents an overview of various types of biofunctional materials and biomaterial matrices, which in combination with stem cells, have shown promises for cardiac tissue replacement and reinforcement. Engineered biomaterials also have applications in cardiac tissue engineering, in which tissue constructs are developed in vitro by combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for drug screening or eventual implantation. This review highlights the benefits of using biomaterials in conjunction with stem cells to repair damaged myocardium and give a brief description of the properties of these biomaterials that make them such valuable tools to the field. PMID:26953627

  12. A wavelet transform based feature extraction and classification of cardiac disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathi, S; Beaulah, H Lilly; Vanithamani, R

    2014-09-01

    This paper approaches an intellectual diagnosis system using hybrid approach of Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model for classification of Electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. This method is based on using Symlet Wavelet Transform for analyzing the ECG signals and extracting the parameters related to dangerous cardiac arrhythmias. In these particular parameters were used as input of ANFIS classifier, five most important types of ECG signals they are Normal Sinus Rhythm (NSR), Atrial Fibrillation (AF), Pre-Ventricular Contraction (PVC), Ventricular Fibrillation (VF), and Ventricular Flutter (VFLU) Myocardial Ischemia. The inclusion of ANFIS in the complex investigating algorithms yields very interesting recognition and classification capabilities across a broad spectrum of biomedical engineering. The performance of the ANFIS model was evaluated in terms of training performance and classification accuracies. The results give importance to that the proposed ANFIS model illustrates potential advantage in classifying the ECG signals. The classification accuracy of 98.24 % is achieved. PMID:25023652

  13. The client-centred approach as experienced by male neurological rehabilitation clients in occupational therapy. A qualitative study based on a grounded theory tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Dominique; Devisch, Ignaas; De Vriendt, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To explore the perspectives of male clients in a neurological rehabilitation setting with regard to the occupational therapy they have received and the client-centred approach. Method This study involved a qualitative research design based on the grounded theory tradition. Individual in-depth interviews were used to collect data. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method. Seven male participants from an inpatient neurological setting were included using a theoretical sampling technique. Results Three themes emerged to describe the approach of the therapists to client-centred practice: (a) a shared biomedical focus as the start of the rehabilitation process, (b) the un-simultaneous shift from a biomedical towards a psycho-social focus and (c) formal versus informal nature of gathering client information. Conclusion A client-centred approach entails a shift from the therapist focussing on recovery from the short-term neurological issues towards the long-term consequences of the disease. According to the client, this shift in reasoning must occur at a specific and highly subjective moment during the rehabilitation process. Identifying this moment could strengthen the client-centred approach. Implications for Rehabilitation Client-centred practice entails a shift from recovering the short-term neurological issues towards the long-term psycho-social consequences of the disease. To be effective in client-centred practice, the clients expect from the professional to be an authority with regard to biomedical issues and to be partner with regard to psycho-social issues. Client-centred practice is most likely to be successful when client is susceptible to discuss his psycho-social issues and finding this moment is a challenge for the professional. Using formal methods for goal setting do not necessarily cover all the information needed for a client-centred therapy programme. Rather, using informal methods could lead to a more valid image of the client

  14. The client-centred approach as experienced by male neurological rehabilitation clients in occupational therapy. A qualitative study based on a grounded theory tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Dominique; Devisch, Ignaas; De Vriendt, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To explore the perspectives of male clients in a neurological rehabilitation setting with regard to the occupational therapy they have received and the client-centred approach. Method This study involved a qualitative research design based on the grounded theory tradition. Individual in-depth interviews were used to collect data. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method. Seven male participants from an inpatient neurological setting were included using a theoretical sampling technique. Results Three themes emerged to describe the approach of the therapists to client-centred practice: (a) a shared biomedical focus as the start of the rehabilitation process, (b) the un-simultaneous shift from a biomedical towards a psycho-social focus and (c) formal versus informal nature of gathering client information. Conclusion A client-centred approach entails a shift from the therapist focussing on recovery from the short-term neurological issues towards the long-term consequences of the disease. According to the client, this shift in reasoning must occur at a specific and highly subjective moment during the rehabilitation process. Identifying this moment could strengthen the client-centred approach. Implications for Rehabilitation Client-centred practice entails a shift from recovering the short-term neurological issues towards the long-term psycho-social consequences of the disease. To be effective in client-centred practice, the clients expect from the professional to be an authority with regard to biomedical issues and to be partner with regard to psycho-social issues. Client-centred practice is most likely to be successful when client is susceptible to discuss his psycho-social issues and finding this moment is a challenge for the professional. Using formal methods for goal setting do not necessarily cover all the information needed for a client-centred therapy programme. Rather, using informal methods could lead to a more valid image of the client.

  15. A registration based approach for 4D cardiac micro-CT using combined prospective and retrospective gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Cristian T.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Fox, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in murine cardiac studies with three-dimensional cone beam micro-computed tomography (CT) have used either prospective or retrospective gating technique. While prospective gating ensures the best image quality and the highest resolution, it involves longer sampling times and higher radiation dose. Sampling is faster and the radiation dose can be reduced with retrospective gating but the image quality is affected by the limited number of projections with an irregular angular distribution which complicate the reconstruction process, causing significant streaking artifacts. This work involves both prospective and retrospective gating in sampling. Deformable registration is used between a high quality image set acquired with prospective gating with the multiple data sets during the cardiac cycle obtained using retrospective gating. Tests were conducted on a four-dimensional (4D) cardiac mouse phantom and after optimization, the method was applied to in vivo cardiac micro-CT data. Results indicate that, by using our method, the sampling time can be reduced by a factor of 2.5 and the radiation dose can be reduced 35% compared to the prospective sampling while the image quality can be maintained. In conclusion, we proposed a novel solution to 4D cine cardiac micro-CT based on a combined prospective with retrospective gating in sampling and deformable registration post reconstruction that mixed the advantages of both strategies. PMID:18491508

  16. A comparison study of atlas-based 3D cardiac MRI segmentation: global versus global and local transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryanani, Aditya; Dangi, Shusil; Ben-Zikri, Yehuda Kfir; Linte, Cristian A.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a standard-of-care imaging modality for cardiac function assessment and guidance of cardiac interventions thanks to its high image quality and lack of exposure to ionizing radiation. Cardiac health parameters such as left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass, thickness, and strain can be assessed by segmenting the heart from cardiac MRI images. Furthermore, the segmented pre-operative anatomical heart models can be used to precisely identify regions of interest to be treated during minimally invasive therapy. Hence, the use of accurate and computationally efficient segmentation techniques is critical, especially for intra-procedural guidance applications that rely on the peri-operative segmentation of subject-specific datasets without delaying the procedure workflow. Atlas-based segmentation incorporates prior knowledge of the anatomy of interest from expertly annotated image datasets. Typically, the ground truth atlas label is propagated to a test image using a combination of global and local registration. The high computational cost of non-rigid registration motivated us to obtain an initial segmentation using global transformations based on an atlas of the left ventricle from a population of patient MRI images and refine it using well developed technique based on graph cuts. Here we quantitatively compare the segmentations obtained from the global and global plus local atlases and refined using graph cut-based techniques with the expert segmentations according to several similarity metrics, including Dice correlation coefficient, Jaccard coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and Mean absolute distance error.

  17. [Anesthesia management of geriatric patients with arterial pressure-based cardiac output monitoring FloTrac sensor for emergency surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Goto, Koji; Yasuda, Norihisa; Kusaka, Junya; Hidaka, Seigo; Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2009-06-01

    In cases of emergency surgery for geriatric patients, immediate anesthesia induction and careful intraoperative management is necessary without sufficient preoperative information. We report anesthesia management of a 96-year and a 90-year old patients with FloTrac sensor which is an arterial pressure-based cardiac output monitoring device and is able to manage critical patients effectively and safely during anesthesia.

  18. Anatomical-based partial volume correction for low-dose dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation geometry transfer matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with 99mTc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of 99mTc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both 99mTc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and 99mTc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly for low

  19. Understanding exercise behaviour during home-based cardiac rehabilitation: a theory of planned behaviour perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Although home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs have been shown to produce significant increases in exercise capacity, obtaining patient adherence to these programs has been challenging. It is therefore critical to identify key theoretical determinants of exercise during home-based CR in order to inform the development of behavioural interventions that improve adherence. The present study examined the utility of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in explaining exercise behaviour during home-based CR. Seventy-six patients who were receiving 6 months of home-based CR completed a TPB questionnaire at the beginning and mid-point of the program and a physical activity scale at the mid-point and end of the program. Path analyses showed that attitude and perceived behavioural control significantly predicted intention for both time intervals (baseline to 3 months, and 3 months to 6 months), whereas subjective norm only predicted intention within the 1st 3 months. Intention significantly predicted implementation intention, which, in turn, significantly predicted exercise for both time intervals. Finally, several underlying accessible beliefs were significantly related to exercise for both time intervals. Therefore, results suggest that the TPB is a potentially useful framework for understanding exercise behaviour during home-based CR.

  20. Collaborative effects of bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation and prehospital advanced cardiac life support by physicians on survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a nationwide population-based observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Yasunaga, Hideo; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Tanabe, Seizan; Akahane, Manabu; OGAWA, Toshio; Koike, Soichi; Imamura, Tomoaki

    2010-01-01

    Introduction There are inconsistent data about the effectiveness of prehospital physician-staffed advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) on the outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Furthermore, the relative importance of bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCPR) and ACLS and the effectiveness of their combination have not been clearly demonstrated. Methods Using a prospective, nationwide, population-based registry of all OHCA patients in Japan, we enrolled 95,072 pa...

  1. Patient-reported outcomes at hospital discharge from Heart Centres, a national cross-sectional survey with a register-based follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Svanholm, Jette; Lauberg, Astrid;

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Patient reported health status, which includes symptom burden, functional status and quality of life, is an important measure of health. Differences in health status between diagnostic groups within cardiology have only been sparsely investigated. These outcomes may predict morbidity......, mortality, labour market affiliation and healthcare utilisation in various diagnostic groups. A national survey aiming to include all cardiac diagnostic groups from a total Heart Centre population has been designed as the DenHeart survey. Methods and analysis: DenHeart is designed as a cross...... in national registers. The following instruments are used: SF-12, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, EQ-5D, Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ), HeartQoL and Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale. The following variables are collected from national registers: action diagnosis, procedures...

  2. Virtual slices allocation in multi-tenant data centre architectures based on optical technologies and SDN

    OpenAIRE

    Spadaro, Salvatore; Pagès Cruz, Albert; Perelló Muntan, Jordi; Agraz Bujan, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    A Software Defined Networking (SDN)-based architecture, employing optical technologies for multi-tenant data centers (DCs), is firstly discussed. Then, an efficient orchestration algorithm for Virtual Data Centers (VDCs) allocation is presented, highlighting the benefits that come from the usage of hybrid optical technologies.

  3. ASSUMED OXYGEN-CONSUMPTION BASED ON CALCULATION FROM DYE DILUTION CARDIAC-OUTPUT - AN IMPROVED FORMULA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BERGSTRA, A; VANDIJK, RB; HILLEGE, HL; LIE, KI; MOOK, GA

    1995-01-01

    This study was performed because of observed differences between dye dilution cardiac output and the Fick cardiac output, calculated from estimated oxygen consumption according to LaFarge and Miettinen, and to find a better formula for assumed oxygen consumption. In 250 patients who underwent left a

  4. Heat pipe based thermal management systems for energy-efficient data centres

    OpenAIRE

    Jouhara, H; Meskimmon, R

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential applications for heat-pipe based heat exchangers in enhancing the efficiency of data centres’ cooling. The paper starts by assessing current industry practise and highlighting the challenges facing the data-storage industry; illustrating the legislative, technical and commercial constraints that are now, or will be prevalent in the industry as the sector continues to grow to cater for the ever increasing appetite for public sector, commercial and consumer...

  5. A system for seismocardiography-based identification of quiescent heart phases: implications for cardiac imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Carson A; Su, Jin-Jyh; McClellan, James H; Brand, Oliver; Bhatti, Pamela T; Buice, Ashley L; Stillman, Arthur E; Tang, Xiangyang; Tridandapani, Srini

    2012-09-01

    Seismocardiography (SCG), a representation of mechanical heart motion, may more accurately determine periods of cardiac quiescence within a cardiac cycle than the electrically derived electrocardiogram (EKG) and, thus, may have implications for gating in cardiac computed tomography. We designed and implemented a system to synchronously acquire echocardiography, EKG, and SCG data. The device was used to study the variability between EKG and SCG and characterize the relationship between the mechanical and electrical activity of the heart. For each cardiac cycle, the feature of the SCG indicating Aortic Valve Closure was identified and its time position with respect to the EKG was observed. This position was found to vary for different heart rates and between two human subjects. A color map showing the magnitude of the SCG acceleration and computed velocity was derived, allowing for direct visualization of quiescent phases of the cardiac cycle with respect to heart rate. PMID:22581141

  6. Evidence-based medicine meets person-centred care: a collaborative perspective on the relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Amy I; Djulbegovic, Ben; Biswas, Rakesh; Chatterjee, Pranab

    2015-12-01

    In a recent list-serve, the way forward for evidence-based medicine was discussed. The purpose of this paper was to share the reflections and multiple perspectives discussed in this peer-to-peer encounter and to invite the reader to think with a mind for positive change in the practice of health care. Let us begin with a simple question. What if we dared to look at evidence-based medicine (EBM) and informed shared decision making like two wheels on a bike? They both need to be full of substance, well connected, lubricated and working in balance, propelled and guided by a competent driver, with good vision to get the bike where we want it to go. We need all the tools in the toolkit for the bike to stay operational and to meet the needs of the driver. By the same rationale, evidence alone is necessary but not sufficient for decision making; values are necessary and if neglected, may default to feelings based on social pressures and peer influence. Medical decisions, even shared ones, lack focus without evidence and application. Just as a bike may need a tune up from time to time to maintain optimal performance, EBM may benefit from a tune up where we challenge ourselves to move away from general assumptions and traditions and instead think clearly about the issues we face and how to ask well-formed, specific questions to get the answers to meet the needs we face in health care. PMID:26358758

  7. Early detection of cardiac dysfunction in the type 1 diabetic heart using speckle-tracking based strain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Danielle L; Nichols, Cody E; Croston, Tara L; McLaughlin, Sarah L; Petrone, Ashley B; Lewis, Sara E; Thapa, Dharendra; Long, Dustin M; Dick, Gregory M; Hollander, John M

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced sensitivity in echocardiographic analyses may allow for early detection of changes in cardiac function beyond the detection limits of conventional echocardiographic analyses, particularly in a small animal model. The goal of this study was to compare conventional echocardiographic measurements and speckle-tracking based strain imaging analyses in a small animal model of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Conventional analyses revealed differences in ejection fraction, fractional shortening, cardiac output, and stroke volume in diabetic animals relative to controls at 6-weeks post-diabetic onset. In contrast, when assessing short- and long-axis speckle-tracking based strain analyses, diabetic mice showed changes in average systolic radial strain, radial strain rate, radial displacement, and radial velocity, as well as decreased circumferential and longitudinal strain rate, as early as 1-week post-diabetic onset and persisting throughout the diabetic study. Further, we performed regional analyses for the LV and found that the free wall region was affected in both the short- and long-axis when assessing radial dimension parameters. These changes began 1-week post-diabetic onset and remained throughout the progression of the disease. These findings demonstrate the use of speckle-tracking based strain as an approach to elucidate cardiac dysfunction from a global perspective, identifying left ventricular cardiac regions affected during the progression of type 1 diabetes mellitus earlier than contractile changes detected by conventional echocardiographic measurements.

  8. Micro-Doppler Effect of Extended Streamlined Targets Based on Sliding Scattering Centre Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Tang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The scattering center of extended streamlined targets can slide when the direction of radiation is changed. The sliding scattering center has influence on the micro-Doppler effect of micro-motion of the extended streamlined target. This paper focused on the micro-Doppler of the extended streamlined target for the bistatic radar. Based on the analysis, the analytical expressions of the micro-Doppler of coning motion with sliding scattering center model were given for bistatic radar. And the results were validated by the simulated results of the scattering field based on the full-wave method of the electromagnetic computation. The results showed that the sliding of the scattering center can make the micro-Doppler be less and distorted, and the influence of the sliding is different for two different types of the sliding scattering centers: sliding on the surface and sliding on the bottom circle. The analytical expressions of the micro-Doppler are helpful to analyze the time-frequency presentations (TFR of the coning motion of the extended streamlined target and to estimate the parameters of the target.

  9. Theoretical Strength of Face-Centred-Cubic Single Crystal Copper Based on a Continuum Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Ming; LIU Zhan-Li; YOU Xiao-Chuan; NIE Jun-Feng; ZHUANG Zhuo

    2009-01-01

    The constitutive relation of single crystal copper based on atomistic potential is implemented to capture the nonlinear inter-atomic interactions. Uniaxial loading tests of single crystal copper with inter-atomic potential finite-element model are carried out to determine the corresponding ideal strength using the modified Born stability criteria. Dependence of the ideal strength on the crystallographic orientation is studied, and tension-compression asymmetry in ideal strength is also investigated. The results suggest that asymmetry for yielding strength of nano-materials may result from anisotropic character of crystal instability. Moreover, the results also reveal that the critical resolved shear stress in the direction of slip is not an accurate criterion for the ideal strength since it could not capture the dependence on the loading conditions and hydrostatic stress components for the ideal strength.

  10. Towards a highly efficient quantum spin-photon interface for an NV centre based quantum network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovic, Stefan; Bonato, Cristian; van Dam, Suzanne; Reiserer, Andreas; Zwerver, Anne-Marije; Hanson, Ronald; Quantum Transport Team

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond recently emerged as promising candidates for realizing quantum information algorithms due to their remarkable versatility. The spin of these optically active defects can be entangled with their emitted photons, making them an excellent optical interface from the perspective of quantum communication.Recently, we have demonstrated the first building blocks of such networks, performing kilometer scale entanglement of two NV centers and teleportation of quantum information.(1) However, our current protocols are inefficient due to the low emission of NV center's resonant photons into the zero phonon line (ZPL).Here we present our efforts of coupling a single NV center emitter in a diamond membrane to a fiber-based Fabry-Perot microcavity with high finesse (F >104) at cryogenic temperatures. This approach allows spectral tuning of the cavity resonance to the ZPL emission of the NV center, thereby significantly enhancing the resonant photon emission via Purcell effect. Furthermore, the bulk environment of the NV centers protects their spin properties against surface proximity effects, which is of crucial importance for quantum information processing applications. (1) B.Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682 (2015)

  11. Collaboration-Centred Cities through Urban Apps Based on Open and User-Generated Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Unai; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Pérez, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the IES Cities platform conceived to streamline the development of urban apps that combine heterogeneous datasets provided by diverse entities, namely, government, citizens, sensor infrastructure and other information data sources. This work pursues the challenge of achieving effective citizen collaboration by empowering them to prosume urban data across time. Particularly, this paper focuses on the query mapper; a key component of the IES Cities platform devised to democratize the development of open data-based mobile urban apps. This component allows developers not only to use available data, but also to contribute to existing datasets with the execution of SQL sentences. In addition, the component allows developers to create ad hoc storages for their applications, publishable as new datasets accessible by other consumers. As multiple users could be contributing and using a dataset, our solution also provides a data level permission mechanism to control how the platform manages the access to its datasets. We have evaluated the advantages brought forward by IES Cities from the developers' perspective by describing an exemplary urban app created on top of it. In addition, we include an evaluation of the main functionalities of the query mapper. PMID:27376300

  12. Nonrigid registration-based coronary artery motion correction for cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagalia, Roshni; Pack, Jed D.; Miller, James V.; Iatrou, Maria [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States); GE Healthcare, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: X-ray computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the modality of choice to noninvasively monitor and diagnose heart disease with coronary artery health and stenosis detection being of particular interest. Reliable, clinically relevant coronary artery imaging mandates high spatiotemporal resolution. However, advances in intrinsic scanner spatial resolution (CT scanners are available which combine nearly 900 detector columns with focal spot oversampling) can be tempered by motion blurring, particularly in patients with unstable heartbeats. As a result, recently numerous methods have been devised to improve coronary CTA imaging. Solutions involving hardware, multisector algorithms, or {beta}-blockers are limited by cost, oversimplifying assumptions about cardiac motion, and populations showing contraindications to drugs, respectively. This work introduces an inexpensive algorithmic solution that retrospectively improves the temporal resolution of coronary CTA without significantly affecting spatial resolution. Methods: Given the goal of ruling out coronary stenosis, the method focuses on 'deblurring' the coronary arteries. The approach makes no assumptions about cardiac motion, can be used on exams acquired at high heart rates (even over 75 beats/min), and draws on a fast and accurate three-dimensional (3D) nonrigid bidirectional labeled point matching approach to estimate the trajectories of the coronary arteries during image acquisition. Motion compensation is achieved by employing a 3D warping of a series of partial reconstructions based on the estimated motion fields. Each of these partial reconstructions is created from data acquired over a short time interval. For brevity, the algorithm 'Subphasic Warp and Add' (SWA) reconstruction. Results: The performance of the new motion estimation-compensation approach was evaluated by a systematic observer study conducted using nine human cardiac CTA exams acquired over a range of average heart

  13. Trigemino-cardiac reflex during skull-base neurosurgeries: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Khajavi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR has been studied as a phenomenon including; bradycardia, arterial hypotension, apnea and gastric hypermotility during manipulation of the peripheral or central parts of the trigeminal nerve.Case presentation: We report a case of a 26-year-old man undergoing surgery for a skull base extra axial tumor in right petrous bone suspected to metastasis of a previous renal cell carcinoma which had been treated four years ago. The patient presented with continuous and unilateral headache and difficulty in swallowing, sensory neural hearing loss, nasal speech and tongue deviation to left side. He underwent general anesthesia with standard monitoring and total intravenous anesthetic technique. The first episode of sudden onset bradycardia and hypotension related to surgical manipulation was detected intraoperatively in which the heart rate spontaneously returned to normal level once the surgical manipulation stopped. However, it repeated several times by beginning of tumor resection and manipulation in the region of trigeminal nerve. The intensity of bradycardia in subsequent episodes of TCR was relatively crescendo and had no fatigability. Finally, it was treated by administration of a single dose of atropine (0.5mg/IV and did not happen again.Conclusion: The risk of TCR should be considered in any neurosurgical intervention involving trigeminal nerve and its branches, especially at the skull base surgeries. The vigilance of the medical team and continuous intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring alerts the surgeons to interrupt surgical maneuvers upon the TCR occurrence, immediately.

  14. Evaluation of polyelectrolyte complex-based scaffolds for mesenchymal stem cell therapy in cardiac ischemia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccaldi, Caroline; Bushkalova, Raya; Alfarano, Chiara; Lairez, Olivier; Calise, Denis; Bourin, Philippe; Frugier, Celine; Rouzaud-Laborde, Charlotte; Cussac, Daniel; Parini, Angelo; Sallerin, Brigitte; Fullana, Sophie Girod

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds hold great potential for stem cell-based therapies. Indeed, recent results have shown that biomimetic scaffolds may enhance cell survival and promote an increase in the concentration of therapeutic cells at the injury site. The aim of this work was to engineer an original polymeric scaffold based on the respective beneficial effects of alginate and chitosan. Formulations were made from various alginate/chitosan ratios to form opposite-charge polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs). After freeze-drying, the resultant matrices presented a highly interconnected porous microstructure and mechanical properties suitable for cell culture. In vitro evaluation demonstrated their compatibility with mesenchymal stell cell (MSC) proliferation and their ability to maintain paracrine activity. Finally, the in vivo performance of seeded 3D PEC scaffolds with a polymeric ratio of 40/60 was evaluated after an acute myocardial infarction provoked in a rat model. Evaluation of cardiac function showed a significant increase in the ejection fraction, improved neovascularization, attenuated fibrosis as well as less left ventricular dilatation as compared to an animal control group. These results provide evidence that 3D PEC scaffolds prepared from alginate and chitosan offer an efficient environment for 3D culturing of MSCs and represent an innovative solution for tissue engineering.

  15. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  16. Constructing Taipei City Sports Centre Performance Evaluation Model with Fuzzy MCDM Approach Based on Views of Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to utilize the fuzzy analytical/network process (FAHP/FANP and decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL approach to recognize the influential indicators of sport centre business management in Taipei city’s sports centre. Twenty-three of sports centres with six-dimensions were identified from the literature review and interview with twelve experts (academic and practical experience. By considering the interrelationships among the indices, DEMATEL was used to deal with the importance and causal relationships among the evaluation indices of sports centre. Then, we employ the FAHP/FANP to determine the weight of each management criterion. Our empirical results provide two main insights: first, sports centre business management strategies comprise six-dimensions and 23 indexes; second, the FANP analysis shows that the six key factors are (in order of priority service price, site conditions, operations management, traffic conditions, sports products, and staff quality. This study uses the FANP and DEMATEL along with mathematical computing in order to provide sports centre managers with a reliable decision-making reference and to assist them in formulating the most effective business strategy possible.

  17. Interventional guidance for cardiac resynchronization therapies: merging anatomic X-ray imaging with functional ultrasound imaging based on mutually-shared landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzke, R.; Shechter, G.; Gutierrez, L.; Chan, R.C. [Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, NY (United States); Tournoux, F.; Singh, J.; Picard, M. [Dept. of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States); Brink, B. v.d.; Boomen, R. v.d. [Philips Medical System, Best (Netherlands); Gerard, O. [Philips Medical Systems, Paris (France)

    2007-06-15

    Detailed knowledge of cardiac anatomy and function is required for complex cardiac electrophysiology interventions. Cardiac resynchronization therapies (CRT), for example, requires information about coronary venous anatomy for left ventricular lead placement. In CRT, heart failure patients are equipped with dual-chamber pacemakers in order to improve cardiac output and heart failure symptoms. Cardiac function is mainly assessed with Ultrasound imaging. Fusion of complementary information from X-ray and ultrasound is an essential step towards fully utilizing all available information for CRT guidance. We present an approach for fusion of anatomical information (coronary vein structure) from X-ray with functional information (left ventricular deformation and dynamics) from ultrasound. We propose an image-based fusion approach based on mutually-shared landmarks which enable registration of both imaging spaces without the need for external tracking. (orig.)

  18. Prototype Development of an Electrical Impedance Based Simultaneous Respiratory and Cardiac Monitoring System for Gated Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kohli, Kirpal; Liu, Jeff; Schellenberg, Devin; Karvat, Anand; Parameswaran, Ash; Grewal, Parvind; Thomas, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Background In radiotherapy, temporary translocations of the internal organs and tumor induced by respiratory and cardiac activities can undesirably lead to significantly lower radiation dose on the targeted tumor but more harmful radiation on surrounding healthy tissues. Respiratory and cardiac gated radiotherapy offers a potential solution for the treatment of tumors located in the upper thorax. The present study focuses on the design and development of simultaneous acquisition of respira...

  19. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  20. A novel continuous cardiac output monitor based on pulse wave transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugo, Yoshihiro; Ukawa, Teiji; Takeda, Sunao; Ishihara, Hironori; Kazama, Tomiei; Takeda, Junzo

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring cardiac output (CO) is important for the management of patient circulation in an operation room (OR) or intensive care unit (ICU). We assumed that the change in pulse wave transit time (PWTT) obtained from an electrocardiogram (ECG) and a pulse oximeter wave is correlated with the change in stroke volume (SV), from which CO is derived. The present study reports the verification of this hypothesis using a hemodynamic analysis theory and animal study. PWTT consists of a pre-ejection period (PEP), the pulse transit time through an elasticity artery (T(1)), and the pulse transit time through peripheral resistance arteries (T(2)). We assumed a consistent negative correlation between PWTT and SV under all conditions of varying circulatory dynamics. The equation for calculating SV from PWTT was derived based on the following procedures. 1. Approximating SV using a linear equation of PWTT. 2. The slope and y-intercept of the above equation were determined under consideration of vessel compliance (SV was divided by Pulse Pressure (PP)), animal type, and the inherent relationship between PP and PWTT. Animal study was performed to verify the above-mentioned assumption. The correlation coefficient of PWTT and SV became r = -0.710 (p 〈 0.001), and a good correlation was admitted. It has been confirmed that accurate continuous CO and SV measurement is only possible by monitoring regular clinical parameters (ECG, SpO2, and NIBP). PMID:21095971

  1. A Soft Processor MicroBlaze-Based Embedded System for Cardiac Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Hassan El Mimouni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available this paper aims to contribute to the efforts of design community to demonstrate the effectiveness of the state of the art Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA, in the embedded systems development, taking a case study in the biomedical field. With this design approach, we have developed a System on Chip (SoC for cardiac monitoring based on the soft processor MicroBlaze and the Xilkernel Real Time Operating System (RTOS, both from Xilinx. The system permits the acquisition and the digitizing of the Electrocardiogram (ECG analog signal, displaying heart rate on seven segments module and ECG on Video Graphics Adapter (VGA screen, tracing the heart rate variability (HRV tachogram, and communication with a Personal Computer (PC via the serial port. We have used the MIT_BIH Database records to test and evaluate our implementation performance. In terms of the resources utilization, the implementation occupies around 70% of the used FPGA, namely the Xilinx Spartan 6 XC6SLX16. The accuracy of the QRS detection exceeds 96%.

  2. A polyaniline based ultrasensitive potentiometric immunosensor for cardiac troponin complex detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Prabhu, Alok; San, Avdar; Al-Sharab, Jafar F; Levon, Kalle

    2015-10-15

    An ultrasensitive immunosensor based on potentiometric ELISA for the detection of a cardiac biomarker, troponin I-T-C (Tn I-T-C) complex, was developed. The sensor fabrication involves typical sandwich ELISA procedures, while the final signal readout was achieved using open circuit potentiometry (OCP). Glassy carbon (GC) working electrodes were first coated with emulsion-polymerized polyaniline/dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (PANI/DNNSA) and the coated surface was utilized as a transducer layer on which sandwich ELISA incubation steps were performed. An enzymatic reaction between o-phenylenediamine (OPD) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled on the secondary antibodies. The polymer transducer charged state was mediated through electron (e(-)) and charge transfers between the transducer and charged species generated by the same enzymatic reaction. Such a change in the polymer transducer led to potential variations against an Ag/AgCl reference electrode as a function of Tn I-T-C complex concentration during incubations. The sequence of OPD and H2O2 additions, electrochemical properties of the PANI/DNNSA layer and non-specific binding prevention were all crucial factors for the assay performance. Under optimized conditions, the assay has a low limit of detection (LOD) ( 6 orders of magnitude), high repeatability (coefficient of variance < 8% for all concentrations higher than 5 pg/mL) and a short detection time (< 10 min).

  3. Single-Nucleotide Variations in Cardiac Arrhythmias: Prospects for Genomics and Proteomics Based Biomarker Discovery and Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Abunimer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are a large contributor to causes of early death in developed countries. Some of these conditions, such as sudden cardiac death and atrial fibrillation, stem from arrhythmias—a spectrum of conditions with abnormal electrical activity in the heart. Genome-wide association studies can identify single nucleotide variations (SNVs that may predispose individuals to developing acquired forms of arrhythmias. Through manual curation of published genome-wide association studies, we have collected a comprehensive list of 75 SNVs associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Ten of the SNVs result in amino acid changes and can be used in proteomic-based detection methods. In an effort to identify additional non-synonymous mutations that affect the proteome, we analyzed the post-translational modification S-nitrosylation, which is known to affect cardiac arrhythmias. We identified loss of seven known S-nitrosylation sites due to non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs. For predicted nitrosylation sites we found 1429 proteins where the sites are modified due to nsSNV. Analysis of the predicted S-nitrosylation dataset for over- or under-representation (compared to the complete human proteome of pathways and functional elements shows significant statistical over-representation of the blood coagulation pathway. Gene Ontology (GO analysis displays statistically over-represented terms related to muscle contraction, receptor activity, motor activity, cystoskeleton components, and microtubule activity. Through the genomic and proteomic context of SNVs and S-nitrosylation sites presented in this study, researchers can look for variation that can predispose individuals to cardiac arrhythmias. Such attempts to elucidate mechanisms of arrhythmia thereby add yet another useful parameter in predicting susceptibility for cardiac diseases.

  4. Rule Based Identification of Cardiac Arrhythmias from Enhanced ECG Signals Using Multi-Scale PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sharmila

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The detection of abnormal cardiac rhythms, automatic discrimination from rhythmic heart activity, became a thrust area in clinical research. Arrhythmia detection is possible by analyzing the electrocardiogram (ECG signal features. The presence of interference signals, like power line interference (PLI, Electromyogram (EMG and baseline drift interferences, could cause serious problems during the recording of ECG signals. Many a time, they pose problem in modern control and signal processing applications by being narrow in-band interference near the frequencies carrying crucial information. This paper presents an approach for ECG signal enhancement by combining the attractive properties of principal component analysis (PCA and wavelets, resulting in multi-scale PCA. In Multi-Scale Principal Component Analysis (MSPCA, the PCA’s ability to decorrelate the variables by extracting a linear relationship and wavelet analysis are utilized. MSPCA method effectively processed the noisy ECG signal and enhanced signal features are used for clear identification of arrhythmias. In MSPCA, the principal components of the wavelet coefficients of the ECG data at each scale are computed first and are then combined at relevant scales. Statistical measures computed in terms of root mean square deviation (RMSD, root mean square error (RMSE, root mean square variation (RMSV and improvement in signal to noise ratio (SNRI revealed that the Daubechies based MSPCA outperformed the basic wavelet based processing for ECG signal enhancement. With enhanced signal features obtained after MSPCA processing, the detectable measures, QRS duration and R-R interval are evaluated. By using the rule base technique, projecting the detectable measures on a two dimensional area, various arrhythmias are detected depending upon the beat falling into particular place of the two dimensional area.

  5. Cardiac status assessment with a multi-signal device for improved home-based congestive heart failure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlsteff, Jens; Carvalho, Paulo; Henriques, Jorge; Paiva, Rui P; Reiter, Harald

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-Art disease management for Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) patients is still based on easy-to-acquire measures such as heart rate (HR), weight and blood pressure (BP). However, these measures respond late to changes of the patient health status and provide limited information to personalize and adapt medication therapy. This paper describes our concept called "Cardiac Status Assessment" we have been investigating within the European project "HeartCycle" towards next-generation home-based disease management of CHF. In our concept we analyze non-invasive surrogate measures of the cardio-vascular function in particular systolic time intervals and pulse wave characteristics to estimate Cardiac Output (CO) and Systemic Vascular Resistance (SVR) both are established clinical measures. We discuss the underlying concept, a developed measurement system and first results. PMID:22254450

  6. Benefits and costs of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - a multi-centre randomised controlled equivalence trial

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Anne E; Mahal, Ajay; Hill, Catherine J; Lee, Annemarie L; Burge, Angela T; Moore, Rosemary; Nicolson, Caroline; O’Halloran, Paul; Cox, Narelle S.; Lahham, Aroub; Ndongo, Rebecca; Bell, Emily; McDonald, Christine F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary rehabilitation is widely advocated for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to improve exercise capacity, symptoms and quality of life, however only a minority of individuals with COPD are able to participate. Travel and transport are frequently cited as barriers to uptake of centre-based programs. Other models of pulmonary rehabilitation, including home-based programs, have been proposed in order to improve access to this important treatment. Previous...

  7. Scientific centres in Europe: An analysis of research strength and patterns of specialisation based on bibliometric indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, C. W.; Schwarz, Annette Winkel

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the first analysis of scientific strength by output (papers in the Science Citation Index 1994-96) produced by authors from the 'greater' urban regions of Europe, Top lists of European centres are indicated, Four agglomerations constitute the European super-league of science...... strongholds are categorised in the paper where patterns of specialisations by absolute and relative distribution of research disciplines for each city are identified and families of cities by research pattern are analysed and compared within the perspective of urban economic growth and change.......: London, Paris, Moscow and the Dutch urban agglomeration of Amsterdam, the Hague, Rotterdam and Utrecht, The next layer could be named the primary league and comprises 19 large research centres, A third group of 16 cities forms a secondary league of 16 smaller research centres, These upper-level research...

  8. The Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) - in situ observation based precipitation climatology on regional and global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, T.; Schneider, U.; Rudolf, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC, http://gpcc.dwd.de) provides global monthly precipitation analyses for monitoring and research of the earth's climate. The centre is a German contribution to the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), to the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS), and to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). It contributes to water resources assessments, flood and drought monitoring, climate variability and trend analyses. GPCC published in year 2008 a new global precipitation climatology as well as a reanalysis of its full data base for all months of the period 1901-2007. The GPCC data base comprises monthly precipitation totals from more than 70 000 different stations in the world. It produces gridded data sets of monthly precipitation on the earth's land surface derived from raingauge based observation data. Intensive quality control of observation data and station metadata ensures a high analysis quality. The different GPCC products are adjusted to different user needs. It routinely produces 2 near real-time precipitation monitoring products. Its 2 non real-time products are updated at irregular time intervals after significant updates of its observation station database. All GPCC products can be visualised and accessed free of charge via Internet from http://gpcc.dwd.de. The GPCC First Guess Product of the monthly precipitation anomaly is based on synoptic weather reports (SYNOP) from about 6,300 stations worldwide received near real-time via the WMO Global Telecommunication System (GTS). The product is available within 5 days after end of an observation month. Main application purpose is near real-time drought monitoring. The product uses since mid 2008 the new GPCC monthly precipitation climatology as analysis background. Spatial product resolution: 1.0° and 2.5°. The GPCC Monitoring Product of monthly precipitation is based on SYNOP and monthly CLIMAT reports received near real-time via GTS from about

  9. Bioimpedance-based measurement method for simultaneous acquisition of respiratory and cardiac gating signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory and cardiac motion artefacts impair the quality and reliability of medical imaging, particularly in nuclear medicine. At worst, the interpretation of distorted images may lead to inadequate or unnecessary treatment. Image artefacts can be minimized by gating the image acquisition according to respiratory phase and cardiac contractions. However, currently there are no clinically established dual-gating methods in nuclear medicine imaging. The aim of this study is to validate a previously determined optimized bioimpedance measurement configuration against traditional respiratory and cardiac measurement systems in 12 volunteers. High agreement and excellent correlations (r = 0.944–0.999) were found between respiratory peak-to-peak amplitudes as well as temporal respiratory and cardiac intervals. Above all, good quality respiratory and cardiac gating signals were obtained from all test subjects with a fairly regular sinus rhythm. Importantly, both signals were acquired simultaneously with a single device. Due to the simplicity of this inexpensive method, the technique has high potential to be adopted for dual-gating in clinical practice in the future. (paper)

  10. Meta-Analysis of Cell-based CaRdiac stUdiEs (ACCRUE) in patients with acute myocardial infarction based on individual patient data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Lemarchand, Patricia;

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: The meta-Analysis of Cell-based CaRdiac study is the first prospectively declared collaborative multinational database, including individual data of patients with ischemic heart disease treated with cell therapy. OBJECTIVE: We analyzed the safety and efficacy of intracoronary cell...

  11. Adverse Effects of Plant Food Supplements and Plants Consumed as Food: Results from the Poisons Centres-Based PlantLIBRA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüde, Saskia; Vecchio, Sarah; Sinno-Tellier, Sandra; Dopter, Aymeric; Mustonen, Harriet; Vucinic, Slavica; Jonsson, Birgitta; Müller, Dieter; Veras Gimenez Fruchtengarten, Ligia; Hruby, Karl; De Souza Nascimento, Elizabeth; Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Restani, Patrizia; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Ceschi, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Plant food supplements (PFS) are products of increasing popularity and wide-spread distribution. Nevertheless, information about their risks is limited. To fill this gap, a poisons centres-based study was performed as part of the EU project PlantLIBRA. Multicentre retrospective review of data from selected European and Brazilian poisons centres, involving human cases of adverse effects due to plants consumed as food or as ingredients of food supplements recorded between 2006 and 2010. Ten poisons centres provided a total of 75 cases. In 57 cases (76%) a PFS was involved; in 18 (24%) a plant was ingested as food. The 10 most frequently reported plants were Valeriana officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Paullinia cupana, Melissa officinalis, Passiflora incarnata, Mentha piperita, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Ilex paraguariensis, Panax ginseng, and Citrus aurantium. The most frequently observed clinical effects were neurotoxicity and gastro-intestinal symptoms. Most cases showed a benign clinical course; however, five cases were severe. PFS-related adverse effects seem to be relatively infrequent issues for poisons centres. Most cases showed mild symptoms. Nevertheless, the occurrence of some severe adverse effects and the increasing popularity of PFS require continuous active surveillance, and further research is warranted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26948409

  12. Conducting polymer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube based chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puri, Nidhi [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Niazi, Asad [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Biradar, Ashok M.; Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh-csir@yahoo.com, E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Mulchandani, Ashok, E-mail: rajesh-csir@yahoo.com, E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2014-10-13

    We report the fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based ultrasensitive label-free chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac biomarker, myoglobin (Ag-cMb). Poly(pyrrole-co-pyrrolepropylic acid) with pendant carboxyl groups was electrochemically deposited on electrophoretically aligned SWNT channel, as a conducting linker, for biomolecular immobilization of highly specific cardiac myoglobin antibody. The device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, source-drain current-voltage (I-V), and charge-transfer characteristic studies. The device exhibited a linear response with a change in conductance in SWNT channel towards the target, Ag-cMb, over the concentration range of 1.0 to 1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a sensitivity of ∼118% per decade with high specificity.

  13. Conducting polymer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube based chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based ultrasensitive label-free chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac biomarker, myoglobin (Ag-cMb). Poly(pyrrole-co-pyrrolepropylic acid) with pendant carboxyl groups was electrochemically deposited on electrophoretically aligned SWNT channel, as a conducting linker, for biomolecular immobilization of highly specific cardiac myoglobin antibody. The device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, source-drain current-voltage (I-V), and charge-transfer characteristic studies. The device exhibited a linear response with a change in conductance in SWNT channel towards the target, Ag-cMb, over the concentration range of 1.0 to 1000 ng ml−1 with a sensitivity of ∼118% per decade with high specificity.

  14. The centre of the action

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Control Centre (CCC) has all the ingredients of an action movie control room: hundreds of screens, technicians buzzing in and out, huge floor-to-ceiling windows revealing the looming vista of a mountain range, flashing lights, microphones… This is the place where not just the LHC, but the whole of CERN’s accelerator complex and technical support is based - truly the centre of the action at CERN.

  15. Student experience and academic success: comparing a student-centred and a lecture-based course programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Severiens; M. Meeuwisse; M. Born

    2014-01-01

    Past research has shown that, under certain conditions, student-centred and small-scale course programmes result in more academic success. The present study investigates these conditions in further detail. It is examined whether, in comparison to a course programme that is relatively more lecture-ba

  16. Model-based segmentation of short-axis MR cardiac images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwers, L.J.; Breeuwer, M.

    2005-01-01

    Reliable automatic segmentation of MR cardiac images is still an important problem in medical image processing. Although image data quality has improved considerably during the last years, this segmentation is still considered a difficult problem. Manual segmentation is hardly an option as this is e

  17. Host-based Th2 cell therapy for prolongation of cardiac allograft viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Amarnath

    Full Text Available Donor T cell transfusion, which is a long-standing approach to prevent allograft rejection, operates indirectly by alteration of host T cell immunity. We therefore hypothesized that adoptive transfer of immune regulatory host Th2 cells would represent a novel intervention to enhance cardiac allograft survival. Using a well-described rat cardiac transplant model, we first developed a method for ex vivo manufacture of rat host-type Th2 cells in rapamycin, with subsequent injection of such Th2.R cells prior to class I and class II disparate cardiac allografting. Second, we determined whether Th2.R cell transfer polarized host immunity towards a Th2 phenotype. And third, we evaluated whether Th2.R cell therapy prolonged allograft viability when used alone or in combination with a short-course of cyclosporine (CSA therapy. We found that host-type Th2.R cell therapy prior to cardiac allografting: (1 reduced the frequency of activated T cells in secondary lymphoid organs; (2 shifted post-transplant cytokines towards a Th2 phenotype; and (3 prolonged allograft viability when used in combination with short-course CSA therapy. These results provide further support for the rationale to use "direct" host T cell therapy for prolongation of allograft viability as an alternative to "indirect" therapy mediated by donor T cell infusion.

  18. Cardiac signal estimation based on the arterial and venous pressure signals of a hemodialysis machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmer, M; Sandberg, F; Solem, K; Olde, B; Sörnmo, L

    2016-09-01

    Continuous cardiac monitoring is usually not performed during hemodialysis treatment, although a majority of patients with kidney failure suffer from cardiovascular disease. In the present paper, a method is proposed for estimating a cardiac pressure signal by combining the arterial and the venous pressure sensor signals of the hemodialysis machine. The estimation is complicated by the periodic pressure disturbance caused by the peristaltic blood pump, with an amplitude much larger than that of the cardiac pressure signal. Using different techniques for combining the arterial and venous pressure signals, the performance is evaluated and compared to that of an earlier method which made use of the venous pressure only. The heart rate and the heartbeat occurrence times, determined from the estimated cardiac pressure signal, are compared to the corresponding quantities determined from a photoplethysmographic reference signal. Signals from 9 complete hemodialysis treatments were analyzed. For a heartbeat amplitude of 0.5 mmHg, the median absolute deviation between estimated and reference heart rate was 1.3 bpm when using the venous pressure signal only, but dropped to 0.6 bpm when combining the pressure signals. The results show that the proposed method offers superior estimation at low heartbeat amplitudes. Consequently, more patients can be successfully monitored during treatment without the need of extra sensors. The results are preliminary, and need to be verified on a separate dataset. PMID:27511299

  19. Multimodal analgesia versus traditional opiate based analgesia after cardiac surgery, a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafiq, Sulman; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Wanscher, Michael Jaeger;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate if an opiate sparing multimodal regimen of dexamethasone, gabapentin, ibuprofen and paracetamol had better analgesic effect, less side effects and was safe compared to a traditional morphine and paracetamol regimen after cardiac surgery. METHODS: Open-label, prospective...

  20. Bidirectional Assessment of Stress, job satisfaction and work ability of Educators in day care centres: a real-time observation study - the study protocol (BASE)

    OpenAIRE

    Kusma Bianca; Nienhaus Albert; Spallek Michael; Quarcoo David; Groneberg David A; Mache Stefanie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Occupational demands of educators are not very well researched. Nevertheless their work is subject to several requirements. Whether these demands have an effect on the work ability and the health status of employees has also not been examined. Furthermore it is unclear if the ownership type of day care centres have an influence on job satisfaction and work ability of the pedagogical staff and what kind of resources do exist. Previous studies were mainly based on questionna...

  1. Electrical wave propagation in an anisotropic model of the left ventricle based on analytical description of cardiac architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey F Pravdin

    Full Text Available We develop a numerical approach based on our recent analytical model of fiber structure in the left ventricle of the human heart. A special curvilinear coordinate system is proposed to analytically include realistic ventricular shape and myofiber directions. With this anatomical model, electrophysiological simulations can be performed on a rectangular coordinate grid. We apply our method to study the effect of fiber rotation and electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue (i.e., the ratio of the conductivity coefficients along and across the myocardial fibers on wave propagation using the ten Tusscher-Panfilov (2006 ionic model for human ventricular cells. We show that fiber rotation increases the speed of cardiac activation and attenuates the effects of anisotropy. Our results show that the fiber rotation in the heart is an important factor underlying cardiac excitation. We also study scroll wave dynamics in our model and show the drift of a scroll wave filament whose velocity depends non-monotonically on the fiber rotation angle; the period of scroll wave rotation decreases with an increase of the fiber rotation angle; an increase in anisotropy may cause the breakup of a scroll wave, similar to the mother rotor mechanism of ventricular fibrillation.

  2. Sensitive and real-time fiber-optic-based surface plasmon resonance sensors for myoglobin and cardiac troponin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, J-F; Obando, L; Beaudoin, S; Booksh, K

    2004-04-19

    A sensor to detect markers of cardiac muscle cell death at less than 3ngml(-1) and in less than 10min has been achieved. This fiber-optic-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is being applied to detect myoglobin (MG) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in HEPES buffered saline solution. An in vivo sensor for the early detection of the onset of myocardial infarction (MI) will greatly enhance the patient care. MG and cTnI are two biological markers released from dying cardiac muscle cells during an MI, and their detection at biologically-relevant levels can be diagnostic of MI. Antibodies specific to an antigen of interest are attached to a carboxymethylated dextran layer on a gold SPR surface. With the method developed, the lower limit of detection (LOD) for MG is 2.9ngml(-1) at 25 degrees C. The biological level for MG reaches 15-30ngml(-1) in patient blood after myocardial damage. A Langmuir adsorption isotherm describes the binding well. For cTnI, a lower detection limit of 1.4ngml(-1) was achieved in preliminary tests. cTnI levels are in the range of 1-3ngml(-1) in patient blood after myocardial damage. The antibody reaction with the carboxymethylated dextran surface was optimized by modifying the reaction pH, the temperature, and the dextran chain length. PMID:18969373

  3. Multi-layer Attribute Selection and Classification Algorithm for the Diagnosis of Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Based on HRV Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert F. Jelinek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN poses an important clinical problem, which often remains undetected due difficulty of conducting the current tests and their lack of sensitivity. CAN has been associated with growth in the risk of unexpected death in cardiac patients with diabetes mellitus. Heart rate variability (HRV attributes have been actively investigated, since they are important for diagnostics in diabetes, Parkinson's disease, cardiac and renal disease. Due to the adverse effects of CAN it is important to obtain a robust and highly accurate diagnostic tool for identification of early CAN, when treatment has the best outcome. Use of HRV attributes to enhance the effectiveness of diagnosis of CAN progression may provide such a tool. In the present paper we propose a new machine learning algorithm, the Multi-Layer Attribute Selection and Classification (MLASC, for the diagnosis of CAN progression based on HRV attributes. It incorporates our new automated attribute selection procedure, Double Wrapper Subset Evaluator with Particle Swarm Optimization (DWSE-PSO. We present the results of experiments, which compare MLASC with other simpler versions and counterpart methods. The experiments used our large and well-known diabetes complications database. The results of experiments demonstrate that MLASC has significantly outperformed other simpler techniques.

  4. Architecture design of the multi-functional wavelet-based ECG microprocessor for realtime detection of abnormal cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Li-Fang; Chen, Tung-Chien; Chen, Liang-Gee

    2012-01-01

    Most of the abnormal cardiac events such as myocardial ischemia, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and fatal arrhythmia can be diagnosed through continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis. According to recent clinical research, early detection and alarming of such cardiac events can reduce the time delay to the hospital, and the clinical outcomes of these individuals can be greatly improved. Therefore, it would be helpful if there is a long-term ECG monitoring system with the ability to identify abnormal cardiac events and provide realtime warning for the users. The combination of the wireless body area sensor network (BASN) and the on-sensor ECG processor is a possible solution for this application. In this paper, we aim to design and implement a digital signal processor that is suitable for continuous ECG monitoring and alarming based on the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) through the proposed architectures--using both programmable RISC processor and application specific integrated circuits (ASIC) for performance optimization. According to the implementation results, the power consumption of the proposed processor integrated with an ASIC for CWT computation is only 79.4 mW. Compared with the single-RISC processor, about 91.6% of the power reduction is achieved.

  5. Management of Maternal Cardiac Arrest in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jacquelyn; Cepeda Brito, Jose R; Baker, Lauren; Hughes, Patrick G; Gothard, M David; McCarroll, Michele L; Davis, Jocelyn; Silber, Angela; Ahmed, Rami A

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate confidence, knowledge, and competence after a simulation-based curriculum on maternal cardiac arrest in an Obstetrics & Gynecologic (OBGYN) residency program. Methods. Four simulations with structured debriefing focusing on high yield causes and management of maternal cardiac arrest were executed. Pre- and post-individual knowledge tests (KT) and confidence surveys (CS) were collected along with group scores of critical performance steps evaluated by content experts for the first and final simulations. Results. Significant differences were noted in individual KT scores (pre: 58.9 ± 8.9 versus post: 72.8 ± 6.1, p = 0.01) and CS total scores (pre: 22.2 ± 6.4 versus post: 29.9 ± 3.4, p = 0.007). Significant differences were noted in airway management, p = 0.008; appropriate cycles of drug/shock-CPR, p = 0.008; left uterine displacement, p = 0.008; and identifying causes of cardiac arrest, p = 0.008. Nonsignificant differences were noted for administration of appropriate drugs/doses, p = 0.074; chest compressions, p = 0.074; bag-mask ventilation before intubation, p = 0.074; and return of spontaneous circulation identification, p = 0.074. Groups remained noncompetent in team leader tasks and considering therapeutic hypothermia. Conclusion. This study demonstrated improved OBGYN resident knowledge, confidence, and competence in the management of third trimester maternal cardiac arrest. Several skills, however, will likely require more longitudinal curricular exposure and training to develop and maintain proficiency. PMID:27555967

  6. Management of Maternal Cardiac Arrest in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jacquelyn; Cepeda Brito, Jose R.; Baker, Lauren; Hughes, Patrick G.; Gothard, M. David; Davis, Jocelyn; Silber, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate confidence, knowledge, and competence after a simulation-based curriculum on maternal cardiac arrest in an Obstetrics & Gynecologic (OBGYN) residency program. Methods. Four simulations with structured debriefing focusing on high yield causes and management of maternal cardiac arrest were executed. Pre- and post-individual knowledge tests (KT) and confidence surveys (CS) were collected along with group scores of critical performance steps evaluated by content experts for the first and final simulations. Results. Significant differences were noted in individual KT scores (pre: 58.9 ± 8.9 versus post: 72.8 ± 6.1, p = 0.01) and CS total scores (pre: 22.2 ± 6.4 versus post: 29.9 ± 3.4, p = 0.007). Significant differences were noted in airway management, p = 0.008; appropriate cycles of drug/shock-CPR, p = 0.008; left uterine displacement, p = 0.008; and identifying causes of cardiac arrest, p = 0.008. Nonsignificant differences were noted for administration of appropriate drugs/doses, p = 0.074; chest compressions, p = 0.074; bag-mask ventilation before intubation, p = 0.074; and return of spontaneous circulation identification, p = 0.074. Groups remained noncompetent in team leader tasks and considering therapeutic hypothermia. Conclusion. This study demonstrated improved OBGYN resident knowledge, confidence, and competence in the management of third trimester maternal cardiac arrest. Several skills, however, will likely require more longitudinal curricular exposure and training to develop and maintain proficiency. PMID:27555967

  7. Management of Maternal Cardiac Arrest in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn Adams

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate confidence, knowledge, and competence after a simulation-based curriculum on maternal cardiac arrest in an Obstetrics & Gynecologic (OBGYN residency program. Methods. Four simulations with structured debriefing focusing on high yield causes and management of maternal cardiac arrest were executed. Pre- and post-individual knowledge tests (KT and confidence surveys (CS were collected along with group scores of critical performance steps evaluated by content experts for the first and final simulations. Results. Significant differences were noted in individual KT scores (pre: 58.9±8.9 versus post: 72.8±6.1, p=0.01 and CS total scores (pre: 22.2±6.4 versus post: 29.9±3.4, p=0.007. Significant differences were noted in airway management, p=0.008; appropriate cycles of drug/shock-CPR, p=0.008; left uterine displacement, p=0.008; and identifying causes of cardiac arrest, p=0.008. Nonsignificant differences were noted for administration of appropriate drugs/doses, p=0.074; chest compressions, p=0.074; bag-mask ventilation before intubation, p=0.074; and return of spontaneous circulation identification, p=0.074. Groups remained noncompetent in team leader tasks and considering therapeutic hypothermia. Conclusion. This study demonstrated improved OBGYN resident knowledge, confidence, and competence in the management of third trimester maternal cardiac arrest. Several skills, however, will likely require more longitudinal curricular exposure and training to develop and maintain proficiency.

  8. Effectiveness of a hospital-based work support intervention for female cancer patients - a multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sietske J Tamminga

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: One key aspect of cancer survivorship is return-to-work. Unfortunately, many cancer survivors face problems upon their return-to-work. For that reason, we developed a hospital-based work support intervention aimed at enhancing return-to-work. We studied effectiveness of the intervention compared to usual care for female cancer patients in a multi-centre randomised controlled trial. METHODS: Breast and gynaecological cancer patients who were treated with curative intent and had paid work were randomised to the intervention group (n = 65 or control group (n = 68. The intervention involved patient education and support at the hospital and improvement of communication between treating and occupational physicians. In addition, we asked patient's occupational physician to organise a meeting with the patient and the supervisor to make a concrete gradual return-to-work plan. Outcomes at 12 months of follow-up included rate and time until return-to-work (full or partial, quality of life, work ability, work functioning, and lost productivity costs. Time until return-to-work was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. RESULTS: Return-to-work rates were 86% and 83% (p = 0.6 for the intervention group and control group when excluding 8 patients who died or with a life expectancy of months at follow-up. Median time from initial sick leave to partial return-to-work was 194 days (range 14-435 versus 192 days (range 82-465 (p = 0.90 with a hazard ratio of 1.03 (95% CI 0.64-1.6. Quality of life and work ability improved statistically over time but did not differ statistically between groups. Work functioning and costs did not differ statistically between groups. CONCLUSION: The intervention was easily implemented into usual psycho-oncological care and showed high return-to-work rates. We failed to show any differences between groups on return-to-work outcomes and quality of life scores. Further research is needed to study which

  9. How a structured vibrational environment controls the performance of a photosystem II reaction centre-based photocell

    CERN Document Server

    Stones, Richard; van Grondelle, Rienk; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centres are pigment-protein complexes that can transform photo-induced electronic excitations into stable charge separated states with near-unit quantum efficiency. Here we consider a theoretical photovoltaic device that places a single photosystem II reaction centre between electrodes to investigate how the mean photo-current and its fluctuations depend on the vibrational environment that assists energy and electron transfer. Our results indicate that selective coupling to well resolved vibrational modes does not necessarily offer an advantage in terms of power output but does lead to photo-currents with suppressed noise levels. The exciton manifold and the structured vibrations assisting electron transfer can also support the emergence of a phenomenon akin to dynamical channel blockade, whereby excitonic traps can impose competing routes for population transfer under steady state operation. Our results help characterizing the device-like functionality of these complexes for their pot...

  10. A systematic review of economic evaluations of cardiac rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Wai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation (CR, a multidisciplinary program consisting of exercise, risk factor modification and psychosocial intervention, forms an integral part of managing patients after myocardial infarction (MI, revascularization surgery and percutaneous coronary interventions, as well as patients with heart failure (HF. This systematic review seeks to examine the cost-effectiveness of CR for patients with MI or HF and inform policy makers in Singapore on published cost-effectiveness studies on CR. Methods Electronic databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, NHS EED, PEDro, CINAHL were searched from inception to May 2010 for published economic studies. Additional references were identified through searching bibliographies of included studies. Two independent reviewers selected eligible publications based on the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Quality assessment of economic evaluations was undertaken using Drummond’s checklist. Results A total of 22 articles were selected for review. However five articles were further excluded because they were cost-minimization analyses, whilst one included patients with stroke. Of the final 16 articles, one article addressed both centre-based cardiac rehabilitation versus no rehabilitation, as well as home-based cardiac rehabilitation versus no rehabilitation. Therefore, nine studies compared cost-effectiveness between centre-based supervised CR and no CR; three studies examined that between centre- and home based CR; one between inpatient and outpatient CR; and four between home-based CR and no CR. These studies were characterized by differences in the study perspectives, economic study designs and time frames, as well as variability in clinical data and assumptions made on costs. Overall, the studies suggested that: (1 supervised centre-based CR was highly cost-effective and the dominant strategy when compared to no CR; (2 home-based CR was no different from centre-based CR; (3 no difference existed

  11. Dose reduction for cardiac CT using a registration-based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two reasons for the recent rise in radiation exposure from CT are increases in its clinical applicability and the desire to maintain high SNR while acquiring smaller voxels. To address this emerging dose problem, several strategies for reducing patient exposure have already been proposed. One method employed in cardiac imaging is ECG-driven modulation of the tube current between 100% at one time point in the cardiac cycle and a reduced fraction at the remaining phases. In this paper, we describe how images obtained during such acquisition can be used to reconstruct 4D data of consistent high quality throughout the cardiac cycle. In our approach, we assume that the mid-diastole (MD) phase is imaged with full dose. The MD image is then independently registered to lower dose images (lower SNR) at other frames, resulting in a set of transformations. Finally, the transformations are used to warp the MD frame through the cardiac cycle to generate the full 4D image. In addition, the transformations may be interpolated to increase the temporal sampling or to generate images at arbitrary time points. Our approach was validated using various data obtained with simulated and scanner-implemented dose modulation. We determined that as little as 10% of the total dose was required to reproduce full quality images with a 1 mm spatial error and an error in intensity values on the order of the image noise. Thus, our technique offers considerable dose reductions compared to standard imaging protocols, with minimal effects on the quality of the final data

  12. Are non-cardiac surgeries safe for dialysis patients? - A population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yih-Giun Cherng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: End-stage renal disease represents a risk complex that complicates surgical results. The surgical outcomes of dialysis patients have been studied in specific fields, but the global features of postoperative adverse outcomes in dialysis patients receiving non-cardiac surgeries have not been examined. METHODS: Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database was used to study 8,937 patients under regular dialysis with 8,937 propensity-score matched-pair controls receiving non-cardiac surgery between 2004 and 2007. We investigated the influence of hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, effects of hypertension and diabetes, and impact of additional comorbidities on postoperative adverse outcomes. RESULTS: Postoperative mortality in dialysis patients was higher than in controls (odds ratio [OR] 3.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.56 to 4.33 when receiving non-cardiac surgeries. Complications such as acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, bleeding, and septicemia were significantly increased. Postoperative mortality was significantly increased among peritoneal dialysis patients (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.70 to 4.31 and hemodialysis patients (OR 3.42, 95% CI 2.62 to 4.47 than in controls. Dialysis patients with both hypertension and diabetes had the highest risk of postoperative complications; these risks increased with number of preoperative medical conditions. Patients under dialysis also showed significantly increased length of hospitalization, more ICU stays and higher medical expenditures. CONCLUSION: Surgical patients under dialysis encountered significantly higher postoperative complications and mortality than controls when receiving non-cardiac surgeries. Different dialysis techniques, pre-existing hypertension/diabetes, and various comorbidities had complication-specific impacts on surgical adverse outcomes. These findings can help surgical teams provide better risk assessment and postoperative care for dialysis patients.

  13. Rule Based Identification of Cardiac Arrhythmias from Enhanced ECG Signals Using Multi-Scale PCA

    OpenAIRE

    K. Sharmila; E. Hari Krishna; K. Ashoka Reddy

    2013-01-01

    The detection of abnormal cardiac rhythms, automatic discrimination from rhythmic heart activity, became a thrust area in clinical research. Arrhythmia detection is possible by analyzing the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal features. The presence of interference signals, like power line interference (PLI), Electromyogram (EMG) and baseline drift interferences, could cause serious problems during the recording of ECG signals. Many a time, they pose problem in modern control and signal processing...

  14. Cardiac Malpositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Shi Joon; Im, Chung Gie; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Hasn, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    Cardiac Malposition refers to any position of the heart other than a left-sided heart in a situs solitus individual. Associated cardiac malformations are so complex that even angiocardiographic and autopsy studies may not afford an accurate information. Although the terms and classifications used to describe the internal cardiac anatomy and their arterial connections in cardiac malpositions differ and tend to be confusing, common agreement exists on the need for a segmental approach to diagnosis. Authors present 18 cases of cardiac malpositions in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between 1971 and 1979. Authors analyzed the clinical, radiographic, operative and autopsy findings with the emphasis on the angiocardiographic findings. The results are as follows: 1. Among 18 cases with cardiac malpositions, 6 cases had dextrocardia with situs inversus, 9 cases had dextrocardia with situs solitus and 3 cases had levocardia with situs inversus. 2. There was no genuine exception to visceroatrial concordance rule. 3. Associated cardiac malpositions were variable and complex with a tendency of high association of transposition and double outlet varieties with dextrocardia in situs solitus and levocardia in situs inversus. Only one in 6 cases of dextrocardia with situs inversus had pure transposition. 4. In two cases associated pulmonary atresia was found at surgery which was not predicted by angiocardiography. 5. Because many of the associated complex lesions can be corrected surgically provided the diagnosis is accurate, the selective biplane angiocardiography with or without cineradiography is essential.

  15. Myocardial scaffold-based cardiac tissue engineering: application of coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Guangjun; To, Filip; Butler, J Ryan; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ronald M; Williams, Lakiesha N; de Jongh Curry, Amy L; Liao, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Recently, we developed an optimal decellularization protocol to generate 3D porcine myocardial scaffolds, which preserve the natural extracellular matrix structure, mechanical anisotropy, and vasculature templates and also show good cell recellularization and differentiation potential. In this study, a multistimulation bioreactor was built to provide coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulation for facilitating stem cell differentiation and cardiac construct development. The acellular myocardial scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (10(6) cells/mL) by needle injection and subjected to 5-azacytidine treatment (3 μmol/L, 24 h) and various bioreactor conditioning protocols. We found that after 2 days of culturing with mechanical (20% strain) and electrical stimulation (5 V, 1 Hz), high cell density and good cell viability were observed in the reseeded scaffold. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the differentiated cells showed a cardiomyocyte-like phenotype by expressing sarcomeric α-actinin, myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin T, connexin-43, and N-cadherin. Biaxial mechanical testing demonstrated that positive tissue remodeling took place after 2 days of bioreactor conditioning (20% strain + 5 V, 1 Hz); passive mechanical properties of the 2 day and 4 day tissue constructs were comparable to those of the tissue constructs produced by stirring reseeding followed by 2 weeks of static culturing, implying the effectiveness and efficiency of the coordinated simulations in promoting tissue remodeling. In short, the synergistic stimulations might be beneficial not only for the quality of cardiac construct development but also for patients by reducing the waiting time in future clinical scenarios.

  16. Evaluation of exercise tolerance patients in cardiac rehabilitation D model based on 6 Minute Walk Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielawa Lukasz.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the results of 6-minute walk test depending on gender, age, left ventricular ejection fraction, the primary disease and BMI. Patients underwent assessment of Cardiac Rehabilitation Department in Szymbark in 2012 (80 people. Duration of rehabilitation for all patients was 21 days. The test was performed at the beginning and end of the cycle. Following the 3-week cardiac rehabilitation in the model D in a group of 80 patients with a mean age of 72 years achieved a statistically significant improvement in exercise capacity, expressed in the increase in test 6MWT distance by an average of 52 meters. In the study, men received final results statistically superior to women. The largest increase in the distance gained to patients after aortic valve prosthesis. People who are obese with a body mass index BMI over 30 have an average trip distance underperform both at baseline, final, and in the resulting increase of the distance than those with a BMI under 30. Prevention of obesity, one of the modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease should be the goal of training during cardiac rehabilitation patient education.

  17. Application of Hyperelastic-based Active Mesh Model in Cardiac Motion Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi-Banaem, Hossein; Kermani, Saeed; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Saneie, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nonlinear hyperelastic or viscoelastic nature of soft tissues has an important effect on modeling results. In medical applications, accounting nonlinearity begets an ill posed problem, due to absence of external force. Myocardium can be considered as a hyperelastic material, and variational approaches are proposed to estimate stiffness matrix, which take into account the linear and nonlinear properties of myocardium. By displacement estimation of some points in the four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging series, using a similarity criterion, the elementary deformations are estimated, then using the Moore-Penrose inverse matrix approach, all point deformations are obtained. Using this process, the cardiac wall motion is quantized to mechanically determine local parameters to investigate the cardiac wall functionality. This process was implemented and tested over 10 healthy and 20 patients with myocardial infarction. In all patients, the process was able to precisely determine the affected region. The proposed approach was also compared with linear one and the results demonstrated its superiority respect to the linear model. PMID:27563570

  18. Modeling Calcium Wave Based on Anomalous Subdiffusion of Calcium Sparks in Cardiac Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Kang, Jianhong; Fu, Ceji; Tan, Wenchang

    2013-01-01

    sparks and waves play important roles in calcium release and calcium propagation during the excitation-contraction (EC) coupling process in cardiac myocytes. Although the classical Fick’s law is widely used to model sparks and waves in cardiac myocytes, it fails to reasonably explain the full-width at half maximum(FWHM) paradox. However, the anomalous subdiffusion model successfully reproduces sparks of experimental results. In this paper, in the light of anomalous subdiffusion of sparks, we develop a mathematical model of calcium wave in cardiac myocytes by using stochastic release of release units (CRUs). Our model successfully reproduces calcium waves with physiological parameters. The results reveal how concentration waves propagate from an initial firing of one CRU at a corner or in the middle of considered region, answer how large in magnitude of an anomalous spark can induce a wave. With physiological currents (2pA) through CRUs, it is shown that an initial firing of four adjacent CRUs can form a wave. Furthermore, the phenomenon of calcium waves collision is also investigated. PMID:23483894

  19. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  20. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  1. CKD classification based on estimated GFR over three years and subsequent cardiac and mortality outcomes: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Deeb N

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is unknown whether defining chronic kidney disease (CKD based on one versus two estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR assessments changes the prognostic importance of reduced eGFR in a community-based population. Methods Participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study and the Cardiovascular Health Study were classified into 4 groups based on two eGFR assessments separated by 35.3 ± 2.5 months: sustained eGFR 2 (1 mL/sec per 1.73 m2; eGFR increase (change from below to above 60; eGFR decline (change from above to below 60; and eGFR persistently ≥60. Outcomes assessed in stratified multivariable Cox models included cardiac events and a composite of cardiac events, stroke, and mortality. Results There were 891 (4.9% participants with sustained eGFR 60. Participants with eGFR sustained Conclusion Individuals with persistently reduced eGFR are at highest risk of cardiovascular outcomes and mortality, while individuals with an eGFR 2 at any time are at intermediate risk. Use of even a single measurement of eGFR to classify CKD in a community population appears to have prognostic value.

  2. CMS Centre at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A new "CMS Centre" is being established on the CERN Meyrin site by the CMS collaboration. It will be a focal point for communications, where physicists will work together on data quality monitoring, detector calibration, offline analysis of physics events, and CMS computing operations. Construction of the CMS Centre begins in the historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room. The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room, Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. TThe LHC@FNAL Centre, in operation at Fermilab in the US, will work very closely with the CMS Centre, as well as the CERN Control Centre. (Photo Fermilab)The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room is about to start a new life. Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, the room will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. When finished, it will resemble the CERN Contro...

  3. Family-based cardiac screening in relatives of victims of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGorrian, Catherine

    2013-02-03

    AIMS: Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) occurs when a person suffers a sudden, unexpected death, with no cause found at postmortem examination. We aimed to describe the cardiac screening outcomes in a population of relatives of SADS victimsMETHODS AND RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective cohort study of consecutive families attending the Family Heart Screening clinic at the Mater Misericordiae Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, from January 2007 to September 2011. Family members of SADS victims underwent a standard screening protocol. Adjunct clinical and postmortem information was sought on the proband. Families who had an existing diagnosis, or where the proband had epilepsy, were excluded. Of 115 families identified, 73 were found to fit inclusion criteria and were retained for analysis, with data available on 262 relatives. Over half of the screened family members were female, and the mean age was 38.6 years (standard deviation 15.6). In 22 of 73 families (30%), and 36 of 262 family members (13.7%), a potentially inheritable cause of SADS was detected. Of the population screened, 32 patients (12.2%) were treated with medication, and 5 (1.9%) have received implantable cardiac defibrillators. Of the five families with long QT syndrome (LQTS) who had a pathogenic gene mutation identified, three carried two such mutations.CONCLUSION: In keeping with international estimates, 30% of families of SADS victims were found to have a potentially inherited cardiac disease. The most common positive finding was LQTS. Advances in postmortem standards and genetic studies may assist in achieving more diagnoses in these families.

  4. A population-based lifestyle intervention to promote healthy weight and physical activity in people with cardiac disease: The PANACHE (Physical Activity, Nutrition And Cardiac HEalth study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allman-Farinelli Margaret

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintaining a healthy weight and undertaking regular physical activity are important for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD. However, many people with CVD are overweight and insufficiently active. In addition, in Australia only 20-30% of people requiring cardiac rehabilitation (CR for CVD actually attend. To improve outcomes of and access to CR the efficacy, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of alternative approaches to CR need to be established. This research will determine the efficacy of a telephone-delivered lifestyle intervention, promoting healthy weight and physical activity, in people with CVD in urban and rural settings. The control group will also act as a replication study of a previously proven physical activity intervention, to establish whether those findings can be repeated in different urban and rural locations. The cost-effectiveness and acceptability of the intervention to CR staff and participants will also be determined. Methods/Design This study is a randomised controlled trial. People referred for CR at two urban and two rural Australian hospitals will be invited to participate. The intervention (healthy weight group will participate in four telephone delivered behavioural coaching and goal setting sessions over eight weeks. The coaching sessions will be on weight, nutrition and physical activity and will be supported by written materials, a pedometer and two follow-up booster telephone calls. The control (physical activity group will participate in a six week intervention previously shown to increase physical activity, consisting of two telephone delivered behavioural coaching and goal setting sessions on physical activity, supported by written materials, a pedometer and two booster phone calls. Data will be collected at baseline, eight weeks and eight months for the intervention group (baseline, six weeks and six months for the control group. The primary outcome is weight change

  5. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  6. 脑心死亡供体肝移植单中心经验——附33例报告%Liver transplantation with brain and cardiac death donors: a single centre experience with 33 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈焕伟; 邓斐文; 吴志鹏; 刘洪珍; 欧伟明; 誉铁鸥; 方滨; 李庆生; 梁丽姬

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the safety and feasibility of liver transplantation using brain and cardiac death donors.Methods The organs from 39 brain and cardiac death donors were harvested at the First People's Hospital of Foshan between September 2011 and April 2014.Five livers were allocated to other liver transplant centers through the China Organ Transplant Response System (COTRS).Two livers were discarded because of major injury and severe hepatic steatosis, respectively.The data of the 39 remaining donors and 33 liver transplant recipients with liver transplantation carried out in our department (including one liver accepted through the COTRS from another transplant center) were retrospectively analyzed.Results Among the 33 donors, 11 were in the China category Ⅰ and 22 category Ⅲ using the classification of China donor after cardiac death.The median age was 38 years.The primary causes of death were brain injury after road accident (n =22), cerebral hemorrhage (n =10), and brain tumor (n =1).The average warm ischemic time of the China category Ⅲ donors was 9.5 min (range 3 ~21 min).The average cold ischemic time of all the donors was 5.2 hours (ranged 3.8 ~ 12.5 h).The median age of the liver transplant recipients was 47.5 years (range 38 to 64 years).The primary disease of the liver transplant recipients was liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (n =8), liver failure due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (n =1), liver cirrhosis due to combined HBV and HCV infection (n =1), autoimmune hepatitis (n =1), alcoholic liver cirrhosis (n =1), acute liver function failure due to HBV infection (n =6), acute on chronic liver failure due to HBV infection (n =3), polycystic liver and kidney (n =1), and hepatocellular carcinoma (n =11).The median wait for liver transplantation was 30 days.The median hospitalization after liver transplantation was 28.0 days.At a median follow up of 54 weeks (or 13.5 months), 32 liver recipients were alive and well

  7. Cardiac involvement in tuberous sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mühler, E G; Turniski-Harder, V; Engelhardt, W.; von Bernuth, G

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the incidence, importance, and history of cardiac involvement in infants and children with tuberous sclerosis. DESIGN--Prospective study; clinical examination, sector and Doppler echocardiography, standard and ambulatory electrocardiography. SETTING--A tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--21 patients with tuberous sclerosis aged 1 day to 16 years (mean 6.3 years); follow up investigations were available in 14 cases (10 retrospective, 4 prospective; mean follow up 4.3 years...

  8. Automatic recognition of cardiac arrhythmias based on the geometric patterns of Poincaré plots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Poincaré plot emerges as an effective tool for assessing cardiovascular autonomic regulation. It displays nonlinear characteristics of heart rate variability (HRV) from electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings and gives a global view of the long range of ECG signals. In the telemedicine or computer-aided diagnosis system, it would offer significant auxiliary information for diagnosis if the patterns of the Poincaré plots can be automatically classified. Therefore, we developed an automatic classification system to distinguish five geometric patterns of the Poincaré plots from four types of cardiac arrhythmias. The statistics features are designed on measurements and an ensemble classifier of three types of neural networks is proposed. Aiming at the difficulty to set a proper threshold for classifying the multiple categories, the threshold selection strategy is analyzed. 24 h ECG monitoring recordings from 674 patients, which have four types of cardiac arrhythmias, are adopted for recognition. For comparison, Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers with linear and Gaussian kernels are also applied. The experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the extracted features and the better performance of the designed classifier. Our study can be applied to diagnose the corresponding sinus rhythm and arrhythmia substrates disease automatically in the telemedicine and computer-aided diagnosis system. (paper)

  9. Cardiac diffusion tensor imaging based on compressed sensing using joint sparsity and low-rank approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianping; Wang, Lihui; Chu, Chunyu; Zhang, Yanli; Liu, Wanyu; Zhu, Yuemin

    2016-04-29

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance (DTMR) imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been widely used to probe noninvasively biological tissue structures. However, DTI suffers from long acquisition times, which limit its practical and clinical applications. This paper proposes a new Compressed Sensing (CS) reconstruction method that employs joint sparsity and rank deficiency to reconstruct cardiac DTMR images from undersampled k-space data. Diffusion-weighted images acquired in different diffusion directions were firstly stacked as columns to form the matrix. The matrix was row sparse in the transform domain and had a low rank. These two properties were then incorporated into the CS reconstruction framework. The underlying constrained optimization problem was finally solved by the first-order fast method. Experiments were carried out on both simulation and real human cardiac DTMR images. The results demonstrated that the proposed approach had lower reconstruction errors for DTI indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivities (MD), compared to the existing CS-DTMR image reconstruction techniques. PMID:27163322

  10. Automatic recognition of cardiac arrhythmias based on the geometric patterns of Poincaré plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Guo, Tianci; Xi, Bin; Fan, Yang; Wang, Kun; Bi, Jiacheng; Wang, Ying

    2015-02-01

    The Poincaré plot emerges as an effective tool for assessing cardiovascular autonomic regulation. It displays nonlinear characteristics of heart rate variability (HRV) from electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings and gives a global view of the long range of ECG signals. In the telemedicine or computer-aided diagnosis system, it would offer significant auxiliary information for diagnosis if the patterns of the Poincaré plots can be automatically classified. Therefore, we developed an automatic classification system to distinguish five geometric patterns of the Poincaré plots from four types of cardiac arrhythmias. The statistics features are designed on measurements and an ensemble classifier of three types of neural networks is proposed. Aiming at the difficulty to set a proper threshold for classifying the multiple categories, the threshold selection strategy is analyzed. 24 h ECG monitoring recordings from 674 patients, which have four types of cardiac arrhythmias, are adopted for recognition. For comparison, Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers with linear and Gaussian kernels are also applied. The experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the extracted features and the better performance of the designed classifier. Our study can be applied to diagnose the corresponding sinus rhythm and arrhythmia substrates disease automatically in the telemedicine and computer-aided diagnosis system. PMID:25582837

  11. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack or other heart problem. You might consider cardiac rehab if you have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery Heart transplant Procedures such as angioplasty and stenting In some ...

  12. Radial thresholding to mitigate Laser-Guide-Star aberrations on Centre-of-Gravity-based Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Lardiere, Olivier; Bradley, Colin; Jackson, Kate; Hampton, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Sodium Laser Guide Stars (LGSs) are elongated sources due to the thickness and the finite distance of the sodium layer. The fluctuations of the sodium layer altitude and atom density profile induce errors on centroid measurements of elongated spots, and generate spurious optical aberrations in closed--loop adaptive optics (AO) systems. According to an analytical model and experimental results obtained with the University of Victoria LGS bench demonstrator, one of the main origins of these aberrations, referred to as LGS aberrations, is not the Centre-of-Gravity (CoG) algorithm itself, but the thresholding applied on the pixels of the image prior to computing the spot centroids. A new thresholding method, termed ``radial thresholding'', is presented here, cancelling out most of the LGS aberrations without altering the centroid measurement accuracy.

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, Marthin; Held, Klaus; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the rehabilitation measures provided for cardiac patients in Germany and to outline its legal basis and outcomes. In Germany the cardiac rehabilitation system is different from rehabilitation measures in other European countries. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany since 1885 is based on specific laws and the regulations of insurance providers. Cardiac rehabilitation has predominantly been offered as an inpatient service, but has recently been complemented by outpatient services. A general agreement on the different indications for offering these two services has yet to be reached. Cardiac rehabilitation is mainly offered after an acute cardiac event and bypass surgery. It is also indicated in severe heart failure and special cases of percutaneous coronary intervention. Most patients are men (>65%) and the age at which events occur is increasing. The benefits obtained during the 3-4 weeks after an acute event, and confirmed in numerous studies, are often later lost under 'usual care' conditions. Many attempts have been made by rehabilitation institutions to improve this deficit by providing intensive aftercare. One instrument set up to achieve this is the nationwide institution currently comprising more than 6000 heart groups with approximately 120000 outpatients. After coronary artery bypass grafting or acute coronary syndrome cardiac rehabilitation can usually be started within 10 days. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team consists of cardiologists, psychologists, exercise therapists, social workers, nutritionists and nurses. The positive effects of cardiac rehabilitation are also important economically, for example, for the improvement of secondary prevention and vocational integration. PMID:17301623

  14. Cardiac Multi-detector CT Segmentation Based on Multiscale Directional Edge Detector and 3D Level Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Sofia; Esposito, Antonio; Palmisano, Anna; Colantoni, Caterina; Cerutti, Sergio; Rizzo, Giovanna

    2016-05-01

    Extraction of the cardiac surfaces of interest from multi-detector computed tomographic (MDCT) data is a pre-requisite step for cardiac analysis, as well as for image guidance procedures. Most of the existing methods need manual corrections, which is time-consuming. We present a fully automatic segmentation technique for the extraction of the right ventricle, left ventricular endocardium and epicardium from MDCT images. The method consists in a 3D level set surface evolution approach coupled to a new stopping function based on a multiscale directional second derivative Gaussian filter, which is able to stop propagation precisely on the real boundary of the structures of interest. We validated the segmentation method on 18 MDCT volumes from healthy and pathologic subjects using manual segmentation performed by a team of expert radiologists as gold standard. Segmentation errors were assessed for each structure resulting in a surface-to-surface mean error below 0.5 mm and a percentage of surface distance with errors less than 1 mm above 80%. Moreover, in comparison to other segmentation approaches, already proposed in previous work, our method presented an improved accuracy (with surface distance errors less than 1 mm increased of 8-20% for all structures). The obtained results suggest that our approach is accurate and effective for the segmentation of ventricular cavities and myocardium from MDCT images. PMID:26319010

  15. New York Heart Association class assessment by cardiologists and outpatients with congenital cardiac disease: a head-to-head comparison of three patient-based versions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Schoormans; Y.L. Mager; F.J. Oort; M.A.G. Sprangers; B.J.M. Mulder

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to compare three patient-based New York Heart Association assessments with cardiologist assessments in outpatients with congenital cardiac disease. Methods: Consecutive adult outpatients completed three questionnaires in a random order: a patient-based tra

  16. Client Centred Desing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Nielsen, Janni; Levinsen, Karin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we argue for the use of Client Centred preparation phases when designing complex systems. Through Client Centred Design human computer interaction can extend the focus on end-users to alse encompass the client's needs, context and resources.......In this paper we argue for the use of Client Centred preparation phases when designing complex systems. Through Client Centred Design human computer interaction can extend the focus on end-users to alse encompass the client's needs, context and resources....

  17. Canadian Irradiation Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Irradiation Centre is a non-profit cooperative project between Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Radiochemical Company and Universite du Quebec, Institut Armand-Frappier, Centre for Applied Research in Food Science. The Centre's objectives are to develop, demonstrate and promote Canada's radiation processing technology and its applications by conducting applied research; training technical, professional and scientific personnel; educating industry and government; demonstrating operational and scientific procedures; developing processing procedures and standards, and performing product and market acceptance trials. This pamphlet outlines the history of radoation technology and the services offered by the Canadian Irradiation Centre

  18. The ideal Atomic Centre; Le Centre Atomique ideal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The author presents considerations which should prove to be of interest to all those who have to design, to construct and to operate a nuclear research centre. A large number of the ideas presented can also be applied to non-nuclear scientific research centres. In his report the author reviews: various problems with which the constructor is faced: ground-plan, infrastructure, buildings and the large units of scientific equipment in the centre, and those problems facing the director: maintenance, production, supplies, security. The author stresses the relationship which ought to exist between the research workers and the management. With this aim in view he proposes the creation of National School for Administration in Research which would train administrative executives for public or private organisations; they would be specialised in the fields of fundamental or applied research. (author) [French] L'auteur propose une base de reflexions a tous ceux qui doivent concevoir, realiser et faire vivre un Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires. Un grand nombre des idees exprimees peut d'ailleurs s'appliquer a un Centre d'Etudes Scientifiques non nucleaires. Dans son ouvrage, l'auteur passe en revue les differents problemes qui se posent au constructeur: plan, masse, infrastructure, batiments et grands appareils du Centre, et ceux qu'a a resoudre le directeur: entretien, fabrication, approvisionnements, securite. L'auteur insiste sur l'aspect des rapports qui doivent exister entre les chercheurs et ceux qui les administrent. Il propose a cette fin la creation d'une Ecole Nationale d'Administration de la Recherche qui formerait des cadres administratifs pour les organismes publics ou prives, specialises dans la Recherche fondamentale ou appliquee. (auteur)

  19. Assessment of data quality in an international multi-centre randomised trial of coronary artery surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bochenek Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ART is a multi-centre randomised trial of cardiac surgery which provided a unique opportunity to evaluate the data from a large number of centres from a variety of countries. We attempted to assess data quality, including recruitment rates, timeliness and completeness of the data obtained from the centres in different socio-economic strata. Methods The analysis was based on the 2-page CRF completed at the 6 week follow-up. CRF pages were categorised into "clean" (no edit query and "dirty" (any incomplete, inconsistent or illegible data. The timelines were assessed on the basis of the time interval from the visit and receipt of complete CRF. Data quality was defined as the number of data queries (in percent and time delay (in days between visit and receipt of correct data. Analyses were stratified according to the World Bank definitions into: "Developing" countries (Poland, Brazil and India and "Developed" (Italy, UK, Austria and Australia. Results There were 18 centres in the "Developed" and 10 centres in the "Developing" countries. The rate of enrolment did not differ significantly by economic level ("Developing":4.1 persons/month, "Developed":3.7 persons/month. The time interval for the receipt of data was longer for "Developing" countries (median:37 days compared to "Developed" ones (median:11 days (p Conclusions In this study we showed that data quality was comparable between centres from "Developed" and "Developing" countries. Data was received in a less timely fashion from Developing countries and appropriate systems should be instigated to minimize any delays. Close attention should be paid to the training of centres and to the central management of data quality. Trial registration ISRCTN46552265

  20. Sudden Cardiac Death in Brazil: A Community-Based Autopsy Series (2006-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Braggion-Santos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sudden cardiac death (SCD is a sudden unexpected event, from a cardiac cause, that occurs in less than one hour after the symptoms onset, in a person without any previous condition that would seem fatal or who was seen without any symptoms 24 hours before found dead. Although it is a relatively frequent event, there are only few reliable data in underdeveloped countries. Objective: We aimed to describe the features of SCD in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil (600,000 residents according to Coroners’ Office autopsy reports. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 4501 autopsy reports between 2006 and 2010, to identify cases of SCD. Specific cause of death as well as demographic information, date, location and time of the event, comorbidities and whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR was attempted were collected. Results: We identified 899 cases of SCD (20%; the rate was 30/100000 residents per year. The vast majority of cases of SCD involved a coronary artery disease (CAD (64% and occurred in men (67%, between the 6th and the 7th decades of life. Most events occurred during the morning in the home setting (53.3% and CPR was attempted in almost half of victims (49.7%. The most prevalent comorbidity was systemic hypertension (57.3%. Chagas’ disease was present in 49 cases (5.5%. Conclusion: The majority of victims of SCD were men, in their sixties and seventies and the main cause of death was CAD. Chagas’ disease, an important public health problem in Latin America, was found in about 5.5% of the cases.

  1. Bidirectional Assessment of Stress, job satisfaction and work ability of Educators in day care centres: a real-time observation study - the study protocol (BASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusma Bianca

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational demands of educators are not very well researched. Nevertheless their work is subject to several requirements. Whether these demands have an effect on the work ability and the health status of employees has also not been examined. Furthermore it is unclear if the ownership type of day care centres have an influence on job satisfaction and work ability of the pedagogical staff and what kind of resources do exist. Previous studies were mainly based on questionnaire data. Objective data does not exist. Therefore the aim of this investigation is to collect precise data relating to work of educators. Methods Effects of different types of ownership of day care centres on job satisfaction and work ability of educators will be assessed with the help of objective real time studies in combination with multi-level psycho diagnostic measurements. Discussion The present study is the first of its kind. Up to now there are no computer-based real time studies on workflow of pedagogical staff with regard to assess their work-related stress. Following an exhaustive documentation of educators work processes the day-to-day task can be estimated and approaches for prevention can be developed. This can substantially contribute to an overall improvement of child care in Germany.

  2. Developing a visualized patient-centered, flow-based and objective-oriented care path of cardiac catheterization examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ming Chuan; Chang, Polun

    2009-01-01

    It has been known that visualization is a user-preferred and more meaningful interface of information systems. To reduce the anxiety and uncertainty of patients, we transformed the sophisticated process of cardiac catheterization into visualized information. The Microsoft Visio 2003 and Excel 2003 with the VBA automation tool were used to design a process flow of Cardiac Catheterization. The results show the technical feasibility and potentials helpful for patient to realize the nursing process of cardiac catheterization. PMID:19593031

  3. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  4. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  5. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  6. A three-dimensional model-based partial volume correction strategy for gated cardiac mouse PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumouchel, Tyler; Thorn, Stephanie; Kordos, Myra; DaSilva, Jean; Beanlands, Rob S. B.; deKemp, Robert A.

    2012-07-01

    Quantification in cardiac mouse positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is limited by the imaging spatial resolution. Spillover of left ventricle (LV) myocardial activity into adjacent organs results in partial volume (PV) losses leading to underestimation of myocardial activity. A PV correction method was developed to restore accuracy of the activity distribution for FDG mouse imaging. The PV correction model was based on convolving an LV image estimate with a 3D point spread function. The LV model was described regionally by a five-parameter profile including myocardial, background and blood activities which were separated into three compartments by the endocardial radius and myocardium wall thickness. The PV correction was tested with digital simulations and a physical 3D mouse LV phantom. In vivo cardiac FDG mouse PET imaging was also performed. Following imaging, the mice were sacrificed and the tracer biodistribution in the LV and liver tissue was measured using a gamma-counter. The PV correction algorithm improved recovery from 50% to within 5% of the truth for the simulated and measured phantom data and image uniformity by 5-13%. The PV correction algorithm improved the mean myocardial LV recovery from 0.56 (0.54) to 1.13 (1.10) without (with) scatter and attenuation corrections. The mean image uniformity was improved from 26% (26%) to 17% (16%) without (with) scatter and attenuation corrections applied. Scatter and attenuation corrections were not observed to significantly impact PV-corrected myocardial recovery or image uniformity. Image-based PV correction algorithm can increase the accuracy of PET image activity and improve the uniformity of the activity distribution in normal mice. The algorithm may be applied using different tracers, in transgenic models that affect myocardial uptake, or in different species provided there is sufficient image quality and similar contrast between the myocardium and surrounding structures.

  7. Generation of human secondary cardiospheres as a potent cell processing strategy for cell-based cardiac repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Jai; Lee, Ho-Jae; Chung, Yeon-Ju; Kim, Ju-Young; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Yang, Han-Mo; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Lee, Hae-Young; Oh, Byung-Hee; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising approach for repairing damaged heart. However, there are large rooms to be improved in therapeutic efficacy. We cultured a small quantity (5-10 mg) of heart biopsy tissues from 16 patients who received heart transplantation. We produced primary and secondary cardiospheres (CSs) using repeated three-dimensional culture strategy and characterized the cells. Approximately 5000 secondary CSs were acquired after 45 days. Genetic analysis confirmed that the progenitor cells in the secondary CSs originated from the innate heart, but not from extra-cardiac organs. The expressions of Oct4 and Nanog were significantly induced in secondary CSs compared with adherent cells derived from primary CSs. Those expressions in secondary CSs were higher in a cytokine-deprived medium than in a cytokine-supplemented one, suggesting that formation of the three-dimensional structure was important to enhance stemness whereas supplementation with various cytokines was not essential. Signal blocking experiments showed that the ERK and VEGF pathways are indispensable for sphere formation. To optimize cell processing, we compared four different methods of generating spheres. Method based on the hanging-drop or AggreWell™ was superior to that based on the poly-d-lysine-coated dish or Petri dish with respect to homogeneity of the product, cellular potency and overall simplicity of the process. When transplanted into the ischemic myocardium of immunocompromised mice, human secondary CSs differentiated into cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. These results demonstrate that generation of secondary CSs from a small quantity of adult human cardiac tissue is a feasible and effective cell processing strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapy.

  8. Centre of Gravity (C.O.G)-Based Analysis on the Dynamics of the Extendable Double-Link Two-Wheeled Mobile Robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses about the analysis on the centre of gravity (C.O.G) in affecting the input reference of the motion control of the extendable double-link of two-wheeled mobile robot. The proposed system mimics double inverted pendulum, where the angular position of the first link (Link1) is to be varied depends on the value of the angular position of the second link (Link2) and the elongation of the extendable-link (Link3) that is attached to Link2 with different payload. The two-wheeled mobile robot together with the extendable link on Link2 makes that system become more flexible but yet, the system has become more unstable. The inclination of extendable link at any interest angle will affect the C.O.G of the system especially when the payload is having a significant weight. This two-wheeled mobile robot can be balanced on the condition that the system's center of gravity must be located on the centre of the wheels. Therefore the input reference of Link1 will be determined from the C.O.G analysis of the system with the payload. Preliminary results show that the angular position of Link1 can be set at suitable degree based on C.O.G analysis that is used for motion control

  9. Clinical feasibility of a myocardial signal intensity threshold-based semi-automated cardiac magnetic resonance segmentation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the accuracy and efficiency of a threshold-based, semi-automated cardiac MRI segmentation algorithm in comparison with conventional contour-based segmentation and aortic flow measurements. Short-axis cine images of 148 patients (55 ± 18 years, 81 men) were used to evaluate left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass (LVM) using conventional and threshold-based segmentations. Phase-contrast images were used to independently measure stroke volume (SV). LV parameters were evaluated by two independent readers. Evaluation times using the conventional and threshold-based methods were 8.4 ± 1.9 and 4.2 ± 1.3 min, respectively (P < 0.0001). LV parameters measured by the conventional and threshold-based methods, respectively, were end-diastolic volume (EDV) 146 ± 59 and 134 ± 53 ml; end-systolic volume (ESV) 64 ± 47 and 59 ± 46 ml; SV 82 ± 29 and 74 ± 28 ml (flow-based 74 ± 30 ml); ejection fraction (EF) 59 ± 16 and 58 ± 17 %; and LVM 141 ± 55 and 159 ± 58 g. Significant differences between the conventional and threshold-based methods were observed in EDV, ESV, and LVM measurements; SV from threshold-based and flow-based measurements were in agreement (P > 0.05) but were significantly different from conventional analysis (P < 0.05). Excellent inter-observer agreement was observed. Threshold-based LV segmentation provides improved accuracy and faster assessment compared to conventional contour-based methods. (orig.)

  10. Clinical feasibility of a myocardial signal intensity threshold-based semi-automated cardiac magnetic resonance segmentation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U.J.; Suranyi, Pal; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Fox, Mary A. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Muscogiuri, Giuseppe [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Rome (Italy); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Cannao, Paola M. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Milan, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milan (Italy); Renker, Matthias [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Kerckhoff Heart and Thorax Center, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Ruzsics, Balazs [Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals, Department of Cardiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    To assess the accuracy and efficiency of a threshold-based, semi-automated cardiac MRI segmentation algorithm in comparison with conventional contour-based segmentation and aortic flow measurements. Short-axis cine images of 148 patients (55 ± 18 years, 81 men) were used to evaluate left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass (LVM) using conventional and threshold-based segmentations. Phase-contrast images were used to independently measure stroke volume (SV). LV parameters were evaluated by two independent readers. Evaluation times using the conventional and threshold-based methods were 8.4 ± 1.9 and 4.2 ± 1.3 min, respectively (P < 0.0001). LV parameters measured by the conventional and threshold-based methods, respectively, were end-diastolic volume (EDV) 146 ± 59 and 134 ± 53 ml; end-systolic volume (ESV) 64 ± 47 and 59 ± 46 ml; SV 82 ± 29 and 74 ± 28 ml (flow-based 74 ± 30 ml); ejection fraction (EF) 59 ± 16 and 58 ± 17 %; and LVM 141 ± 55 and 159 ± 58 g. Significant differences between the conventional and threshold-based methods were observed in EDV, ESV, and LVM measurements; SV from threshold-based and flow-based measurements were in agreement (P > 0.05) but were significantly different from conventional analysis (P < 0.05). Excellent inter-observer agreement was observed. Threshold-based LV segmentation provides improved accuracy and faster assessment compared to conventional contour-based methods. (orig.)

  11. Gender-Based Differences in Cardiac Remodeling and ILK Expression after Myocardial Infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gender can influence post-infarction cardiac remodeling. To evaluate whether gender influences left ventricular (LV) remodeling and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) after myocardial infarction (MI). Female and male Wistar rats were assigned to one of three groups: sham, moderate MI (size: 20-39% of LV area), and large MI (size: ≥40% of LV area). MI was induced by coronary occlusion, and echocardiographic analysis was performed after six weeks to evaluate MI size as well as LV morphology and function. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot were used to quantify ILK in the myocardium. MI size was similar between genders. MI resulted in systolic dysfunction and enlargement of end-diastolic as well as end-systolic dimension of LV as a function of necrotic area size in both genders. Female rats with large MI showed a lower diastolic and systolic dilatation than the respective male rats; however, LV dysfunction was similar between genders. Gene and protein levels of ILK were increased in female rats with moderate and large infarctions, but only male rats with large infarctions showed an altered ILK mRNA level. A negative linear correlation was evident between LV dimensions and ILK expression in female rats with large MI. Post-MI ILK expression is altered in a gender-specific manner, and higher ILK levels found in females may be sufficient to improve LV geometry but not LV function

  12. Gender-Based Differences in Cardiac Remodeling and ILK Expression after Myocardial Infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofia, Renato Rodrigues [Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação - Universidade Nove de Julho (Uninove), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Cardiologia - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Serra, Andrey Jorge, E-mail: andreyserra@gmail.com; Silva, Jose Antonio Jr [Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação - Universidade Nove de Julho (Uninove), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Antonio, Ednei Luiz [Departamento de Cardiologia - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Manchini, Martha Trindade [Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação - Universidade Nove de Julho (Uninove), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Fernanda Aparecida Alves de [Departamento de Cardiologia - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Teixeira, Vicente Paulo Castro [Departamento de Patologia - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira [Departamento de Cardiologia - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Gender can influence post-infarction cardiac remodeling. To evaluate whether gender influences left ventricular (LV) remodeling and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) after myocardial infarction (MI). Female and male Wistar rats were assigned to one of three groups: sham, moderate MI (size: 20-39% of LV area), and large MI (size: ≥40% of LV area). MI was induced by coronary occlusion, and echocardiographic analysis was performed after six weeks to evaluate MI size as well as LV morphology and function. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot were used to quantify ILK in the myocardium. MI size was similar between genders. MI resulted in systolic dysfunction and enlargement of end-diastolic as well as end-systolic dimension of LV as a function of necrotic area size in both genders. Female rats with large MI showed a lower diastolic and systolic dilatation than the respective male rats; however, LV dysfunction was similar between genders. Gene and protein levels of ILK were increased in female rats with moderate and large infarctions, but only male rats with large infarctions showed an altered ILK mRNA level. A negative linear correlation was evident between LV dimensions and ILK expression in female rats with large MI. Post-MI ILK expression is altered in a gender-specific manner, and higher ILK levels found in females may be sufficient to improve LV geometry but not LV function.

  13. Sudden cardiac arrest risk stratification based on 24-hour Holter ECG statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Keisuke; Shiobara, Masahito; Nakamura, Saya; Yamashiro, Koichiro; Yana, Kazuo; Ono, Takuya

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using indices obtained from a long term Holter ECG record for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) risk stratification. The ndices tested were the QT-RR interval co-variability and the alternans ratio percentile (ARP(θ)) which is defined as the θ(th) percentile of alternans ratios over a 24 hour period. The QT-RR interval co-variabilities are evaluated by the serial correlation coefficient between QT and RR trend sequences (QTRC). Previously reported Kalman filter technique and a simple smoothing spline method for the trend estimation are compared. Parameter θ in the alternans ratio percentile index was optimized to achieve the best classification accuracy. These indices were estimated from 26 cardiovascular outpatients for Holter ECG record. Patients were classified into high and low risk groups according to their clinical diagnosis, and the obtained indices were compared with those of 25 control subjects. A risk stratification using the two indices QTRC and ARP(θ) yielded an average sensitivity of 0.812 and a specificity of 0.925. The sensitivities and specificities of all three categories exceeded 0.8 except for the sensitivity to detect the high-risk patient group. Other short-term ECG parameters may need to be incorporated in order to improve the sensitivity.

  14. Surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for human cardiac troponin T based on self-assembled monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Rosa Fireman; Mendes, Renata Kelly; Lins da Silva, Valdinete; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo

    2007-04-11

    The cardiac troponin T (cTnT) is specific biomarker important for trials of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI). In this paper, a SPR sensor in real time to detect the biomarker was developed on a commercially available surface plasmon resonance AUTOLAB SPIRIT. The cTnT receptor molecule was covalently immobilized on a gold substrate via a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thiols by using cysteamine-coupling chemistry. This biosensor presented a linear response range for cTnT between 0.05 and 4.5 ng/mL (r=0.997, p<0.01) with a good reproducibility (CV=4.4%). The effect of the cysteamine (CYS) concentrations on the SAM coated gold sensor was studied as a function of the amount of the immobilized cTnT monoclonal antibodies. Analysis using serum samples undiluted was carried out at room temperature showing a well agreement with the ECLIA methods and the sensor surface could be regenerated by using a solution of 1% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) without losing the sensor immunoreactivity. These studies open new perspectives of using SAM to develop regenerable immunosensor with a good reproducibility allowing its use in the clinical applications. PMID:17254730

  15. Alginate-polyester comacromer based hydrogels as physiochemically and biologically favorable entities for cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thankam, Finosh G; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2015-11-01

    The physiochemical and biological responses of tissue engineering hydrogels are crucial in determining their desired performance. A hybrid comacromer was synthesized by copolymerizing alginate and poly(mannitol fumarate-co-sebacate) (pFMSA). Three bimodal hydrogels pFMSA-AA, pFMSA-MA and pFMSA-NMBA were synthesized by crosslinking with Ca(2+) and vinyl monomers acrylic acid (AA), methacrylic acid (MA) and N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (NMBA), respectively. Though all the hydrogels were cytocompatible and exhibited a normal cell cycle profile, pFMSA-AA exhibited superior physiochemical properties viz non-freezable water content (58.34%) and water absorption per unit mass (0.97 g water/g gel) and pore length (19.92±3.91 μm) in comparing with other two hydrogels. The increased non-freezable water content and water absorption of pFMSA-AA hydrogels greatly influenced its biological performance, which was evident from long-term viability assay and cell cycle proliferation. The physiochemical and biological favorability of pFMSA-AA hydrogels signifies its suitability for cardiac tissue engineering.

  16. Temporal Trends in Coverage of Historical Cardiac Arrests Using a Volunteer-Based Network of Automated External Defibrillators Accessible to Laypersons and Emergency Dispatch Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Knudsen Lippert, Freddy; Wissenberg, Mads;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Although increased dissemination of Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) has been associated with more frequent AED use, the trade-off between the number of deployed AEDs and coverage of cardiac arrests remains unclear. We investigated how volunteer-based AED dissemination affect...

  17. Predicting physical fitness outcomes of exercise rehabilitation: An retrospective examination of program admission data from patient records in a hospital-based early outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiato, Francois Stephane

    1998-01-01

    PREDICTING PHYSICAL FITNESS OUTCOMES IN CARDIAC REHABILITATION PATIENTS by Francois S. Fabiato (ABSTRACT) Economic justification for rehabilitative services has resulted in the need for outcome based research which could quantify success or failure in individual patients and formulate baseline variables which could predict outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the utilization of baseline clinical, exercise test, and psychosocial variables to pre...

  18. A cardiac electrical activity model based on a cellular automata system in comparison with neural network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Sadiq Ali; Yousuf, Sidrah

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac Electrical Activity is commonly distributed into three dimensions of Cardiac Tissue (Myocardium) and evolves with duration of time. The indicator of heart diseases can occur randomly at any time of a day. Heart rate, conduction and each electrical activity during cardiac cycle should be monitor non-invasively for the assessment of "Action Potential" (regular) and "Arrhythmia" (irregular) rhythms. Many heart diseases can easily be examined through Automata model like Cellular Automata concepts. This paper deals with the different states of cardiac rhythms using cellular automata with the comparison of neural network also provides fast and highly effective stimulation for the contraction of cardiac muscles on the Atria in the result of genesis of electrical spark or wave. The specific formulated model named as "States of automaton Proposed Model for CEA (Cardiac Electrical Activity)" by using Cellular Automata Methodology is commonly shows the three states of cardiac tissues conduction phenomena (i) Resting (Relax and Excitable state), (ii) ARP (Excited but Absolutely refractory Phase i.e. Excited but not able to excite neighboring cells) (iii) RRP (Excited but Relatively Refractory Phase i.e. Excited and able to excite neighboring cells). The result indicates most efficient modeling with few burden of computation and it is Action Potential during the pumping of blood in cardiac cycle. PMID:27087101

  19. Validation of a raw data-based synchronization signal (kymogram) for phase-correlated cardiac image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertel, Dirk; Kachelriess, Marc; Kalender, Willi A. [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Medical Physics (IMP), Erlangen (Germany); Pflederer, Tobias; Achenbach, Stephan [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Internal Medicine II, Erlangen (Germany); Steffen, Peter [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Multimedia Communications and Signal Processing, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    Phase-correlated reconstruction is commonly used in computed tomography (CT)-based cardiac imaging. Alternatively to the commonly used ECG, the raw data-based kymogram function can be used as a synchronization signal. We used raw data of 100 consecutive patient exams to compare the performance of kymogram function to the ECG signal. For objective validation the correlation of the ECG and the kymogram was assessed. Additionally, we performed a double-blinded comparison of ECG-based and kymogram-based phase-correlated images. The two synchronization signals showed good correlation indicated by a mean difference in the detected heart rate of negligible 0.2 bpm. The mean image quality score was 2.0 points for kymogram-correlated images and 2.3 points for ECG-correlated images, respectively (3: best; 0: worst). The kymogram and the ECG provided images adequate for diagnosis for 93 and 97 patients, respectively. For 50% of the datasets the kymogram provided an equivalent or even higher image quality compared with the ECG signal. We conclude that an acceptable image quality can be assured in most cases by the kymogram. Improvements of image quality by the kymogram function were observed in a noticeable number of cases. The kymogram can serve as a backup solution when an ECG is not available or lacking in quality. (orig.)

  20. Epidemiological and clinical use of GMHAT-PC (Global Mental Health assessment tool – primary care in cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Murali

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A computer assisted interview, the GMHAT/PC has been developed to assist General Practitioners and other Health Professionals to make a quick, convenient and comprehensive standardised mental health assessment. It has proved to be a reliable and valid tool in our previous studies involving General Practitioners and Nurses. Little is known about its use in cardiac rehabilitation settings. Aim The study aims to assess the feasibility of using a computer assisted diagnostic interview by nurses for patients attending Cardiac Rehabilitation Clinics and to examine the level of agreement between the GMHAT/PC diagnosis and a Psychiatrist clinical diagnosis. Prevalence of mental illness was also measured. Design Cross sectional validation and feasibility study. Methods Nurses using GMHAT/PC examined consecutive patients presenting to a cardiac rehabilitation centre. A total of 118 patients were assessed by nurses and consultant psychiatrist in cardiac rehabilitation centres. The kappa coefficient (κ, sensitivity, and specificity of the GMHAT/PC diagnosis were analysed as measures of validity. The time taken for the interview as well as feedback from patients and interviewers were indicators of feasibility. Data on prevalence of mental disorders in an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation setting was collected. Results The mean duration of the interview was 14 minutes. Feedback from patients and interviewers indicated good practical feasibility. The agreement between GMHAT/PC interview-based diagnoses and consultant psychiatrists' ICD-10 criteria-based clinical diagnosis was good or excellent (κ = 0.76, sensitivity = 0.73, specificity = 0.90. The prevalence of mental disorders in this group was 22%, predominantly depression. Very few cases were on treatment. Conclusion GMHAT/PC can assist nurses in making accurate mental health assessments and diagnoses in a cardiac rehabilitation setting and is acceptable to cardiac patients. It can

  1. The IGU Knowledge Centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, Bernardus

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an innovative service for members of the International Gas Union - IGU. The IGU Knowledge Centre provides members with relevant information and data. In this article is described why, how and where.

  2. CENTRE FOR GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    The objective of this Annual Report is to give a general introduction to CGM as well as to give an account of the tasks carried out using the facilities of CGM's Instrument Centre during 1998 and 1999....

  3. Virtual particle therapy centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Particle therapy is an advanced technique of cancer radiation therapy, using protons or other ions to target the cancerous mass. This advanced technique requires a multi-disciplinary team working in a specialised centre. 3D animation: Nymus3D

  4. Low-level radio-frequency interference detection algorithm based on European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hailiang; Li, Qingxia; Li, Yan; Li, Yinan; Li, Hao

    2015-01-01

    At present, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is severely affected by radio frequency interferences (RFIs), and the detection of low-level RFI-contamination brightness temperatures (BTs) is still a challenge in SMOS. A low-level RFI detection algorithm is proposed, which is based on the soil surface temperature products provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting. The algorithm is analyzed in terms of RFI-flagged snapshot, RFI-flagged probability, and localization accuracy. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by SMOS data. The results show this algorithm can detect and flag more low-level RFI-contamination BTs and show a better performance.

  5. The Bruce Energy Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bruce Energy Centre Development Corporation is a joint venture of the Ontario Energy Corporation and 6 private companies formed to market surplus steam from the Bruce Nuclear Power Development. The corporation will also sell or lease land near Bruce NPD. The Bruce Energy Centre has an energy output of 900 BTU per day per dollar invested. Potential customers include greenhouse operators, aquaculturalists, food and beverage manufacturers, and traditional manufacturers

  6. Prospective evaluation of stress myocardial perfusion imaging for pre-operative cardiac risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A prospective evaluation of patients who underwent stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to assess preoperative cardiac risk was undertaken. At the time of the scan patients were classified into 4 Clinical Risk groups (CR) based on known clinical data. On completion of the scan, the patient was then categorised into 4 Scan based Risk groups (SR), incorporating size of perfusion deficit, single versus multi-vessel disease and ejection fraction. Surgery at Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre within 6 months of scan and complications were identified using the hospital medical database. Major early cardiac events coded were death (cardiac related), myocardial infarction, unstable angina, acute pulmonary oedema, cardiac arrest, and urgent revascularisation. 208 patients have reached 6 months post-MPI scan. Of these 119 (57%) were identified as having surgery. Of the Scan Risk groups, 63% of normal, 57% of increased, and 47% of high and very high groups have had surgery. An abnormal scan is associated with a three-fold risk of cardiac complication (3.5% vs 11.3%). This is lower than most previous reports and may be due to higher representation of low risk surgical procedures (14% in this series), improved peri-operative care and/or the test result influence on management (suggested by decreasing surgical rate as SR estimate rose). Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  7. The role of the sexual assault centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Eogan, Maeve

    2013-02-01

    Sexual Assault Centres provide multidisciplinary care for men and women who have experienced sexual crime. These centres enable provision of medical, forensic, psychological support and follow-up care, even if patients chose not to report the incident to the police service. Sexual Support Centres need to provide a ring-fenced, forensically clean environment. They need to be appropriately staffed and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to allow prompt provision of medical and supportive care and collection of forensic evidence. Sexual Assault Centres work best within the context of a core agreed model of care, which includes defined multi-agency guidelines and care pathways, close links with forensic science and police services, and designated and sustainable funding arrangements. Additionally, Sexual Assault Centres also participate in patient, staff and community education and risk reduction. Furthermore, they contribute to the development, evaluation and implementation of national strategies on domestic, sexual and gender-based violence.

  8. Inhaled nitric oxide in cardiac surgery: Evidence or tradition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Maria; Romano, Rosalba; Baca, Georgiana; Sarridou, Despoina; Fischer, Andreas; Simon, Andre; Marczin, Nandor

    2015-09-15

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy as a selective pulmonary vasodilator in cardiac surgery has been one of the most significant pharmacological advances in managing pulmonary hemodynamics and life threatening right ventricular dysfunction and failure. However, this remarkable story has experienced a roller-coaster ride with high hopes and nearly universal demonstration of physiological benefits but disappointing translation of these benefits to harder clinical outcomes. Most of our understanding on the iNO field in cardiac surgery stems from small observational or single centre randomised trials and even the very few multicentre trials fail to ascertain strong evidence base. As a consequence, there are only weak clinical practice guidelines on the field and only European expert opinion for the use of iNO in routine and more specialised cardiac surgery such as heart and lung transplantation and left ventricular assist device (LVAD) insertion. In this review the authors from a specialised cardiac centre in the UK with a very high volume of iNO usage provide detailed information on the early observations leading to the European expert recommendations and reflect on the nature and background of these recommendations. We also provide a summary of the progress in each of the cardiac subspecialties for the last decade and initial survey data on the views of senior anaesthetic and intensive care colleagues on these recommendations. We conclude that the combination of high price tag associated with iNO therapy and lack of substantial clinical evidence is not sustainable on the current field and we are risking loosing this promising therapy from our daily practice. Overcoming the status quo will not be easy as there is not much room for controlled trials in heart transplantation or in the current atmosphere of LVAD implantation. However, we call for international cooperation to conduct definite studies to determine the place of iNO therapy in lung transplantation and high

  9. Inhaled nitric oxide in cardiac surgery: Evidence or tradition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Maria; Romano, Rosalba; Baca, Georgiana; Sarridou, Despoina; Fischer, Andreas; Simon, Andre; Marczin, Nandor

    2015-09-15

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy as a selective pulmonary vasodilator in cardiac surgery has been one of the most significant pharmacological advances in managing pulmonary hemodynamics and life threatening right ventricular dysfunction and failure. However, this remarkable story has experienced a roller-coaster ride with high hopes and nearly universal demonstration of physiological benefits but disappointing translation of these benefits to harder clinical outcomes. Most of our understanding on the iNO field in cardiac surgery stems from small observational or single centre randomised trials and even the very few multicentre trials fail to ascertain strong evidence base. As a consequence, there are only weak clinical practice guidelines on the field and only European expert opinion for the use of iNO in routine and more specialised cardiac surgery such as heart and lung transplantation and left ventricular assist device (LVAD) insertion. In this review the authors from a specialised cardiac centre in the UK with a very high volume of iNO usage provide detailed information on the early observations leading to the European expert recommendations and reflect on the nature and background of these recommendations. We also provide a summary of the progress in each of the cardiac subspecialties for the last decade and initial survey data on the views of senior anaesthetic and intensive care colleagues on these recommendations. We conclude that the combination of high price tag associated with iNO therapy and lack of substantial clinical evidence is not sustainable on the current field and we are risking loosing this promising therapy from our daily practice. Overcoming the status quo will not be easy as there is not much room for controlled trials in heart transplantation or in the current atmosphere of LVAD implantation. However, we call for international cooperation to conduct definite studies to determine the place of iNO therapy in lung transplantation and high

  10. Hospital-based comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care among patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease: 12-month results of a randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Rasmussen, Søren;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR), although evidence for this is still limited. We investigated the 12-month effect of hospital-based CCR versus usual care (UC) for a broadly defined group of cardiac patients within the modern therapeutic ...

  11. Real-time x-ray fluoroscopy-based catheter detection and tracking for cardiac electrophysiology interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Yingliang; Housden, R. James; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Gogin, Nicolas; Cathier, Pascal [Medisys Research Group, Philips Healthcare, Paris 92156 (France); Gijsbers, Geert [Interventional X-ray, Philips Healthcare, Best 5680 DA (Netherlands); Cooklin, Michael; O' Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo [Department of Cardiology, Guys and St. Thomas' Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: X-ray fluoroscopically guided cardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures are commonly carried out to treat patients with arrhythmias. X-ray images have poor soft tissue contrast and, for this reason, overlay of a three-dimensional (3D) roadmap derived from preprocedural volumetric images can be used to add anatomical information. It is useful to know the position of the catheter electrodes relative to the cardiac anatomy, for example, to record ablation therapy locations during atrial fibrillation therapy. Also, the electrode positions of the coronary sinus (CS) catheter or lasso catheter can be used for road map motion correction.Methods: In this paper, the authors present a novel unified computational framework for image-based catheter detection and tracking without any user interaction. The proposed framework includes fast blob detection, shape-constrained searching and model-based detection. In addition, catheter tracking methods were designed based on the customized catheter models input from the detection method. Three real-time detection and tracking methods are derived from the computational framework to detect or track the three most common types of catheters in EP procedures: the ablation catheter, the CS catheter, and the lasso catheter. Since the proposed methods use the same blob detection method to extract key information from x-ray images, the ablation, CS, and lasso catheters can be detected and tracked simultaneously in real-time.Results: The catheter detection methods were tested on 105 different clinical fluoroscopy sequences taken from 31 clinical procedures. Two-dimensional (2D) detection errors of 0.50 {+-} 0.29, 0.92 {+-} 0.61, and 0.63 {+-} 0.45 mm as well as success rates of 99.4%, 97.2%, and 88.9% were achieved for the CS catheter, ablation catheter, and lasso catheter, respectively. With the tracking method, accuracies were increased to 0.45 {+-} 0.28, 0.64 {+-} 0.37, and 0.53 {+-} 0.38 mm and success rates increased to 100%, 99

  12. Real-time x-ray fluoroscopy-based catheter detection and tracking for cardiac electrophysiology interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: X-ray fluoroscopically guided cardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures are commonly carried out to treat patients with arrhythmias. X-ray images have poor soft tissue contrast and, for this reason, overlay of a three-dimensional (3D) roadmap derived from preprocedural volumetric images can be used to add anatomical information. It is useful to know the position of the catheter electrodes relative to the cardiac anatomy, for example, to record ablation therapy locations during atrial fibrillation therapy. Also, the electrode positions of the coronary sinus (CS) catheter or lasso catheter can be used for road map motion correction.Methods: In this paper, the authors present a novel unified computational framework for image-based catheter detection and tracking without any user interaction. The proposed framework includes fast blob detection, shape-constrained searching and model-based detection. In addition, catheter tracking methods were designed based on the customized catheter models input from the detection method. Three real-time detection and tracking methods are derived from the computational framework to detect or track the three most common types of catheters in EP procedures: the ablation catheter, the CS catheter, and the lasso catheter. Since the proposed methods use the same blob detection method to extract key information from x-ray images, the ablation, CS, and lasso catheters can be detected and tracked simultaneously in real-time.Results: The catheter detection methods were tested on 105 different clinical fluoroscopy sequences taken from 31 clinical procedures. Two-dimensional (2D) detection errors of 0.50 ± 0.29, 0.92 ± 0.61, and 0.63 ± 0.45 mm as well as success rates of 99.4%, 97.2%, and 88.9% were achieved for the CS catheter, ablation catheter, and lasso catheter, respectively. With the tracking method, accuracies were increased to 0.45 ± 0.28, 0.64 ± 0.37, and 0.53 ± 0.38 mm and success rates increased to 100%, 99.2%, and 96

  13. Predictors of Self-Care Behaviors among Diabetic Patients Referred to Yazd Diabetes Research Centre Based on Extended Health Belief Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Baghianimoghadam

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes is the most common disease related to metabolism disorders with long term complications. It needs lifelong specific self-care, as it causes a promotion in quality of life and decreases disease costs. The Health Belief Model (HBM is a psychological model that attempts to explain and predict health behaviors. This is done by focusing on the attitudes and beliefs of individuals. The model has been used for studying diabetes self care behaviors. The aim of this study was determination of predictors of self-care behaviors among diabetes patients referred to Yazd diabetes research centre based on extended health belief model. Methods: This cross-sectional study carried out on 120 diabetic patients referred to Yazd diabetes research centre who were entered in the study by convenience sampling. A questionnaire was used for data collection with a private interview which included questions regarding extended health belief model constructs including perceived benefits, barriers, severity, sensitivity, threat, self-efficacy, social support, metabolic control and locus of control and some demographic variables. Results: There was a positive significant correlation between model variable of perceived benefits, severity, sensitivity, threat, self-efficacy, social support, metabolic control and internal locus of control with self-care behaviors, and also a negative significant correlation between perceived barriers (P=0.001,chance locus of control (P=0.037 and self-care behaviors. The above variables explained 45.3 % of variance in diabetes self-care behaviors, with self-efficacy as the strongest predictor. Conclusion: The results of this study approved the effectiveness of extended health belief model in predicting self-care behaviors among diabetic patients, which can therefore be used as a framework for designing and implementing educational intervention programs for control of diabetes.

  14. Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chlumský, Jaromír; Holá, Dana; Hlaváček, Karel; Michal, Michal; Švec, Alexander; Špatenka, Jaroslav; Dušek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical stain...

  15. A knowledge-based method for reducing attenuation artefacts caused by cardiac appliances in myocardial PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamill, James J [Siemens Medical Solutions, Molecular Imaging, 810 Innovation Dr., Knoxville, TN (United States); Brunken, Richard C [Department of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH (United States); Bybel, Bohdan [Department of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH (United States); DiFilippo, Frank P [Department of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH (United States); Faul, David D [Siemens Medical Solutions, Molecular Imaging, 810 Innovation Dr., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2006-06-07

    Attenuation artefacts due to implanted cardiac defibrillator leads have previously been shown to adversely impact cardiac PET/CT imaging. In this study, the severity of the problem is characterized, and an image-based method is described which reduces the resulting artefact in PET. Automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD) leads cause a moving-metal artefact in the CT sections from which the PET attenuation correction factors (ACFs) are derived. Fluoroscopic cine images were measured to demonstrate that the defibrillator's highly attenuating distal shocking coil moves rhythmically across distances on the order of 1 cm. Rhythmic motion of this magnitude was created in a phantom with a moving defibrillator lead. A CT study of the phantom showed that the artefact contained regions of incorrect, very high CT values and adjacent regions of incorrect, very low CT values. The study also showed that motion made the artefact more severe. A knowledge-based metal artefact reduction method (MAR) is described that reduces the magnitude of the error in the CT images, without use of the corrupted sinograms. The method modifies the corrupted image through a sequence of artefact detection procedures, morphological operations, adjustments of CT values and three-dimensional filtering. The method treats bone the same as metal. The artefact reduction method is shown to run in a few seconds, and is validated by applying it to a series of phantom studies in which reconstructed PET tracer distribution values are wrong by as much as 60% in regions near the CT artefact when MAR is not applied, but the errors are reduced to about 10% of expected values when MAR is applied. MAR changes PET image values by a few per cent in regions not close to the artefact. The changes can be larger in the vicinity of bone. In patient studies, the PET reconstruction without MAR sometimes results in anomalously high values in the infero-septal wall. Clinical performance of MAR is assessed by

  16. Preliminary results of linac-based radiosurgery in arteriovenous malformations and cerebral tumours in the Oncology Centre in Bydgoszcz

    OpenAIRE

    Sokal, Paweł; Lebioda, Andrzej; Harat, Maciej; Furtak, Jacek; Grzela, Monika; Kabacińska, Renata; Makarewicz, Roman; Zieliński, Piotr; Windorbska, Wiesława

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study Efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment in cerebral AVM's, mennigiomas, metastases, acoustic neuromas and recurrent anaplastic gliomas is well documented. The object of this work was the analysis of the results of the treatment of AVM and selected cerebral lesions with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery. Material and methods The lesions included: 12 AVMs, 2 cavernomas, 27 meningiomas, 16 metastases, 5 acoustic neuromas, 16 gliomas in 78 pa...

  17. Pattern-based approach to fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies using the transverse aortic arch view on prenatal cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Su-Zhen; Zhu, Ming [Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Children' s Medical Center, Shanghai (China)

    2015-05-01

    Fetal echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for prenatal diagnosis of congenital cardiovascular anomalies. However, echocardiography has limitations. Fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to complement US in detecting congenital cardiovascular anomalies. This article draws on our experience; it describes the transverse aortic arch view on fetal cardiac MRI and important clues on an abnormal transverse view at the level of the aortic arch to the diagnosis of fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies. (orig.)

  18. The ideal Atomic Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents considerations which should prove to be of interest to all those who have to design, to construct and to operate a nuclear research centre. A large number of the ideas presented can also be applied to non-nuclear scientific research centres. In his report the author reviews: various problems with which the constructor is faced: ground-plan, infrastructure, buildings and the large units of scientific equipment in the centre, and those problems facing the director: maintenance, production, supplies, security. The author stresses the relationship which ought to exist between the research workers and the management. With this aim in view he proposes the creation of National School for Administration in Research which would train administrative executives for public or private organisations; they would be specialised in the fields of fundamental or applied research. (author)

  19. Developing a User-Centred Planning Tool for Young Adults with Development Disorders: A Research-Based Teaching Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribu, Kirsten; Patel, Tulpesh

    2016-01-01

    People with development disorders, for instance autism, need structured plans to help create predictability in their daily lives. Digital plans can facilitate enhanced independency, learning, and quality of life, but existing apps are largely general purpose and lack the flexibility required by this specific but heterogeneous user group. Universal design is both a goal and a process and should be based on a holistic approach and user-centered design, interacting with the users in all stages of the development process. At Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA) we conducted a research-based teaching project in co-operation with the Department of Neuro-habilitation at Oslo University Hospital (OUS) with two employees acting as project managers and students as developers. Three groups of Computer Science bachelor students developed digital prototypes for a planning tool for young adults with pervasive development disorders, who live either with their families or in supervised residences, and do not receive extensive public services. The students conducted the initial planning phase of the software development process, focusing on prototyping the system requirements, whilst a professional software company programmed the end solution. The goal of the project was to develop flexible and adaptive user-oriented and user-specific app solutions for tablets that can aid this diverse user group in structuring daily life, whereby, for example, photos of objects and places known to the individual user replace general pictures or drawings, and checklists can be elaborate or sparse as necessary. The three student groups worked independently of each other and created interactive working prototypes based on tests, observations and short interviews with end users (both administrators and residents) and regular user feedback from the project managers. Three very different solutions were developed that were of high enough quality that an external software company were able to

  20. Developing a User-Centred Planning Tool for Young Adults with Development Disorders: A Research-Based Teaching Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribu, Kirsten; Patel, Tulpesh

    2016-01-01

    People with development disorders, for instance autism, need structured plans to help create predictability in their daily lives. Digital plans can facilitate enhanced independency, learning, and quality of life, but existing apps are largely general purpose and lack the flexibility required by this specific but heterogeneous user group. Universal design is both a goal and a process and should be based on a holistic approach and user-centered design, interacting with the users in all stages of the development process. At Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA) we conducted a research-based teaching project in co-operation with the Department of Neuro-habilitation at Oslo University Hospital (OUS) with two employees acting as project managers and students as developers. Three groups of Computer Science bachelor students developed digital prototypes for a planning tool for young adults with pervasive development disorders, who live either with their families or in supervised residences, and do not receive extensive public services. The students conducted the initial planning phase of the software development process, focusing on prototyping the system requirements, whilst a professional software company programmed the end solution. The goal of the project was to develop flexible and adaptive user-oriented and user-specific app solutions for tablets that can aid this diverse user group in structuring daily life, whereby, for example, photos of objects and places known to the individual user replace general pictures or drawings, and checklists can be elaborate or sparse as necessary. The three student groups worked independently of each other and created interactive working prototypes based on tests, observations and short interviews with end users (both administrators and residents) and regular user feedback from the project managers. Three very different solutions were developed that were of high enough quality that an external software company were able to

  1. Lidar Calibration Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  2. Implementation of a phase detection algorithm for dynamic cardiac computed tomography analysis based on time dependent contrast agent distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Kendziorra

    Full Text Available This paper presents a phase detection algorithm for four-dimensional (4D cardiac computed tomography (CT analysis. The algorithm detects a phase, i.e. a specific three-dimensional (3D image out of several time-distributed 3D images, with high contrast in the left ventricle and low contrast in the right ventricle. The purpose is to use the automatically detected phase in an existing algorithm that automatically aligns the images along the heart axis. Decision making is based on the contrast agent distribution over time. It was implemented in KardioPerfusion--a software framework currently being developed for 4D CT myocardial perfusion analysis. Agreement of the phase detection algorithm with two reference readers was 97% (95% CI: 82-100%. Mean duration for detection was 0.020 s (95% CI: 0.018-0.022 s, which was 800 times less than the readers needed (16±7 s, p<03001. Thus, this algorithm is an accurate and fast tool that can improve work flow of clinical examinations.

  3. Population-based evaluation of a suggested anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart defects based on the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goffinet François

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classification of the overall spectrum of congenital heart defects (CHD has always been challenging, in part because of the diversity of the cardiac phenotypes, but also because of the oft-complex associations. The purpose of our study was to establish a comprehensive and easy-to-use classification of CHD for clinical and epidemiological studies based on the long list of the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC. Methods We coded each individual malformation using six-digit codes from the long list of IPCCC. We then regrouped all lesions into 10 categories and 23 subcategories according to a multi-dimensional approach encompassing anatomic, diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. This anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart disease (ACC-CHD was then applied to data acquired from a population-based cohort of patients with CHD in France, made up of 2867 cases (82% live births, 1.8% stillbirths and 16.2% pregnancy terminations. Results The majority of cases (79.5% could be identified with a single IPCCC code. The category "Heterotaxy, including isomerism and mirror-imagery" was the only one that typically required more than one code for identification of cases. The two largest categories were "ventricular septal defects" (52% and "anomalies of the outflow tracts and arterial valves" (20% of cases. Conclusion Our proposed classification is not new, but rather a regrouping of the known spectrum of CHD into a manageable number of categories based on anatomic and clinical criteria. The classification is designed to use the code numbers of the long list of IPCCC but can accommodate ICD-10 codes. Its exhaustiveness, simplicity, and anatomic basis make it useful for clinical and epidemiologic studies, including those aimed at assessment of risk factors and outcomes.

  4. Curbing Malnutrition and Micronutrient Defi ciencies in India… Food Based Strategies at the Centre of a Holistic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Prakash Upadhyay

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available India has the largest number of undernourished people in the world. Malnutrition is a major problem with nearly 55% of the pre-school children and one-third of women in the age group 15–49 years being underweight. The problem of malnutrition is causing an economic pullback as India tends to lose 3–4% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP in terms of loss of productivity. This glaring problem of malnutrition and micronutrient defi ciencies is multi-factorial. Important causes include lack of improvement in agricultural productivity owing to inadequate resources, lack of education and inadequate job opportunities. Increased informal workforce due to rural-urban migration along with unplanned growth of slums is one of the key issues in the urban set-up. Other factors catalyzing the problem include overpopulation, gender inequality, inadequate distribution of food through public distribution mechanisms and lack of coherent nutrition policies. The government policies should focus on growth in agriculture and on improving the food storing facilities. An accurate targeting of “in need” population, so that they get food at substantially low price along with introduction of holistic employment schemes is required. Nutrition based programmes should have in-built system of evaluation based on key nutritional indicators. Social determinants of health such as water, sanitation and women empowerment also have to be addressed to achieve long term gains in the health of the community. Community awareness and mass movement is required to ensure that demographic dividend might not turn into demographic nightmare. Keeping in view that nutrition is not a ‘stand alone’ subject, a multisectoral approach is needed.

  5. Cardiac effects of vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; Dicken, Bryan; Bigam, David; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Vasopressin is an essential hormone involved in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. It has been in use therapeutically for many decades, with an emphasis on its vasoconstrictive and antidiuretic properties. However, this hormone has a ubiquitous influence and has specific effects on the heart. Although difficult to separate from its powerful vascular effects in the clinical setting, a better understanding of vasopressin's direct cardiac effects could lead to its more effective clinical use for a variety of shock states by maximizing its therapeutic benefit. The cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin are complex and require further elucidation. Complicating our understanding include the various receptors and secondary messengers involved in vasopressin's effects, which may lead to various results based on differing doses and varying environmental conditions. Thus, there have been contradictory reports on vasopressin's action on the coronary vasculature and on its effect on inotropy. However, beneficial results have been found and warrant further study to expand the potential therapeutic role of vasopressin. This review outlines the effect of vasopressin on the coronary vasculature, cardiac contractility, and on hypertrophy and cardioprotection. These cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin represent an interesting area for further study for potentially important therapeutic benefits. PMID:24621650

  6. International research centre launched

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The first scientific research and educational institution to be set up on a completely international basis was officially inaugurated in Trieste on 5 October 1964 by the Director General of IAEA, Dr. Sigvard Eklund, when he opened the first seminar of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics. As evidence of the international nature of the institution he noted that the scientists who would work and teach there during the first year represented sixteen different countries. By the end of 1964, the Centre building was nearing completion and three of the five floors were occupied. A successful symposium had been held on the subject of plasma physics, and a score of professors and fellows were at work, from Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Greece, India, Japan, Jordan, the Netherlands, Norway, Pakistan, Poland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. A dozen scientific papers had been issued as preprints. The main purpose of the Centre is to foster the advancement of theoretical physics through training and research; at first the chief subject will be high-energy and elementary particle physics. Plasma physics, low energy physics and solid-state physics will also be dealt with. Special attention is paid to the needs of the developing countries. Of the 25 fellows selected for the academic year 1964-65, more than half are from South America, Africa and Asia. In conjunction with the Research Centre, there is an Advanced School for theoretical Physics to provide graduate training for fellows who need such preparation before they embark upon research. The Centre works under the guidance of a Scientific Council comprising the president, Prof. M. Sandoval-Vallarta (Nuclear Energy Commission of Mexico); Prof. A. Abragam (Saclay, France); Prof. R. Oppenheimer (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, USA); Dr. V. Soloviev (Dubna, USSR); Prof V.F. Weiskopf (Director General, CERN) ; Prof Abdus Salam (Imperial College, London) ; Prof. P. Budini (University of Trieste

  7. NIPS–NORMA station—A combined facility for neutron-based nondestructive element analysis and imaging at the Budapest Neutron Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kis, Zoltán, E-mail: kis.zoltan@energia.mta.hu; Szentmiklósi, László; Belgya, Tamás

    2015-04-11

    Neutron attenuation, scattering or radiative capture are used in various non-destructive methods to gain morphological, structural, elemental or isotopic information about the sample under study. The combined use of position-sensitive prompt gamma-ray detection (i.e. prompt gamma-ray activation imaging, PGAI) and neutron radiography/tomography (NR/NT) makes it possible to determine the 3D distribution of major elements and to visualize internal structures of heterogeneous objects in a non-destructive way. Based on earlier experience, the first ever permanent facility for this purpose, NIPS–NORMA, was constructed at the Budapest Neutron Centre, Hungary in 2012. The installation consists of a well-shielded, Compton-suppressed HPGe detector; a CCD-camera based imaging equipment and a motorized positioning system with sample support. Conventional PGAA measurements and NR/NT imaging using guided cold neutrons are the basic methods that form the basis of the more sophisticated experimental method called NR/NT-driven PGAI. The current status of the experimental station and its characteristics are described in the present paper.

  8. NIPS–NORMA station—A combined facility for neutron-based nondestructive element analysis and imaging at the Budapest Neutron Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron attenuation, scattering or radiative capture are used in various non-destructive methods to gain morphological, structural, elemental or isotopic information about the sample under study. The combined use of position-sensitive prompt gamma-ray detection (i.e. prompt gamma-ray activation imaging, PGAI) and neutron radiography/tomography (NR/NT) makes it possible to determine the 3D distribution of major elements and to visualize internal structures of heterogeneous objects in a non-destructive way. Based on earlier experience, the first ever permanent facility for this purpose, NIPS–NORMA, was constructed at the Budapest Neutron Centre, Hungary in 2012. The installation consists of a well-shielded, Compton-suppressed HPGe detector; a CCD-camera based imaging equipment and a motorized positioning system with sample support. Conventional PGAA measurements and NR/NT imaging using guided cold neutrons are the basic methods that form the basis of the more sophisticated experimental method called NR/NT-driven PGAI. The current status of the experimental station and its characteristics are described in the present paper

  9. NIPS-NORMA station-A combined facility for neutron-based nondestructive element analysis and imaging at the Budapest Neutron Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Zoltán; Szentmiklósi, László; Belgya, Tamás

    2015-04-01

    Neutron attenuation, scattering or radiative capture are used in various non-destructive methods to gain morphological, structural, elemental or isotopic information about the sample under study. The combined use of position-sensitive prompt gamma-ray detection (i.e. prompt gamma-ray activation imaging, PGAI) and neutron radiography/tomography (NR/NT) makes it possible to determine the 3D distribution of major elements and to visualize internal structures of heterogeneous objects in a non-destructive way. Based on earlier experience, the first ever permanent facility for this purpose, NIPS-NORMA, was constructed at the Budapest Neutron Centre, Hungary in 2012. The installation consists of a well-shielded, Compton-suppressed HPGe detector; a CCD-camera based imaging equipment and a motorized positioning system with sample support. Conventional PGAA measurements and NR/NT imaging using guided cold neutrons are the basic methods that form the basis of the more sophisticated experimental method called NR/NT-driven PGAI. The current status of the experimental station and its characteristics are described in the present paper.

  10. Hand-movement-based in-vehicle driver/front-seat passenger discrimination for centre console controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Enrico; Makrushin, Andrey; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Langnickel, Mirko; Kraetzer, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Successful user discrimination in a vehicle environment may yield a reduction of the number of switches, thus significantly reducing costs while increasing user convenience. The personalization of individual controls permits conditional passenger enable/driver disable and vice versa options which may yield safety improvement. The authors propose a prototypic optical sensing system based on hand movement segmentation in near-infrared image sequences implemented in an Audi A6 Avant. Analyzing the number of movements in special regions, the system recognizes the direction of the forearm and hand motion and decides whether driver or front-seat passenger touch a control. The experimental evaluation is performed independently for uniformly and non-uniformly illuminated video data as well as for the complete video data set which includes both subsets. The general test results in error rates of up to 14.41% FPR / 16.82% FNR and 17.61% FPR / 14.77% FNR for driver and passenger respectively. Finally, the authors discuss the causes of the most frequently occurring errors as well as the prospects and limitations of optical sensing for user discrimination in passenger compartments.

  11. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by SOS Kilkenny Ltd, Kilkenny

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient\\'s cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulseless

  12. Perceptions and Expectations of Staffs from Training Services Provided by NISOC's Training centre Based on SERVQUAL Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain Hamzeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The evaluation of training services quality in training centers is one of the major steps in improving quality. Deciding the amount of difference between the present condition and expected condition can facilitate the promotion of training services quality. Methods: This study was a descriptive–survey. The population size was the 1217 learners attending the on-the-job training courses in training centers (computer, Technical-specific and management in the Training and Development Department of National Iranian South Oil Company (NISOC in the second half of 2014. The sample volume was decided 292 people using the Cochran Formula (1977.The sample size of each training center was chosen based on the percentage of the learners in the population size using the random-stratified method. The data collection was done via SERVQUAL standard questionnaire. The questionnaire measured the gap in the five dimensions of service quality. The data were analyzed using SPSS software as well as conducting descriptive statistics, Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis Test. Results and Analysis: The findings showed no gaps for the two dimensions of empathy and reliability and a negative one for the tangible (-0.66, responsiveness (-0.41 and assurance (-1.44. No difference was found between the quality of training services in training centers. Conclusion: Although the mean of percent condition is higher than the average(4.01 but the observed gap between the expectations and perceptions proves that the learners expectation for the provided services were not fulfilled. As a result it is suggested that for establishing the customer-care culture, the dimensions which had the biggest gap be prioritized when allocating the budget.

  13. Comparison Between Effects of Home Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs Versus Usual Care on the Patients’ Health Related Quality of Life After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    OpenAIRE

    Salavati, Mohsen; Falahinia, Gholamhossein; Vardanjani, Ali Esmaeili; Rafiei, Hossein; Moosavi, Saeid; Torkamani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aim: To compare home-based cardiac rehabilitation with usual care on the patients’ Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) after coronary artery bypass graft in patients with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods: In a randomized controlled clinical conducted from March 2013 to June 2013, 110 patients with CABG surgery were randomly assigned into two groups. While patients in group I, were received usual care and patients in group II, in addition to the usual care w...

  14. Feasibility and Acceptability of Utilizing a Smartphone Based Application to Monitor Outpatient Discharge Instruction Compliance in Cardiac Disease Patients around Discharge from Hospitalization

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, Aimee M.; James Whitworth; James Peacock; Bartels, Matthew N.; Jellen, Patricia A.; Thomashow, Byron M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of utilizing a smartphone based application to monitor compliance in patients with cardiac disease around discharge. For 60 days after discharge, patients’ medication compliance, physical activity, follow-up care, symptoms, and reading of education material were monitored daily with the application. 16 patients were enrolled in the study (12 males, 4 females, age 55 ± 18 years) during their hospital stay. Five parti...

  15. Academic Drug Discovery Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Henriette Schultz; Valentin, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic...

  16. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  17. ATLAS Visitors Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS Visitors Centre has opened its shiny new doors to the public. Officially launched on Monday February 23rd, 2009, the permanent exhibition at Point 1 was conceived as a tour resource for ATLAS guides, and as a way to preserve the public’s opportunity to get a close-up look at the experiment in action when the cavern is sealed.

  18. Problem-Based Learning Used in the Context of Cardiac Rehabilitation: Different Scenes and Different Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmfors, Lisa; Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine; Kärner, Anita; Tingström, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Several studies show that how patients have difficulties in changing lifestyle even though such changes are essential because they are suffering from a life-threatening disease. Coronary artery disease (CAD) patients met 13 times during a year and used problem-based learning (PBL) to improve their empowerment and self-efficacy in making lifestyle…

  19. Rapid, high sensitivity, point-of-care test for cardiac troponin based on optomagnetic biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittmer, W.U.; Evers, T.H.; Hardeman, W.M.; Huijnen-Keur, W.M.; Kamps, R.; De Kievit, P.; Neijzen, J.H.M.; Sijbers, M.J.J.; Nieuwenhuis, J.H.; Hefti, M.H.; Dekkers, D.; Martens, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present a handheld integrated device based on a novel magnetic-optical technology for the sensitive detection of cardiactroponin I, a biomarker for the positive diagnosis of myocardial infarct, in a finger-prick blood sample. The test can be performed with a turn-around time of 5 min

  20. Two centre problems in relativistic atomic physics

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, Sean R.

    2012-01-01

    The work contained within this thesis is concerned with the explanation and usage of a set of theoretical procedures for the study of static and dynamic two–centre problems in the relativistic framework of Dirac’s equation. Two distinctly different theories for handling time–dependent atomic interactions are reviewed, namely semi–classical perturbation theory and a non–perturbative numerical technique based on the coupled channel equation to directly solve the time–dependent, two–centre Dirac...

  1. Incidence and management of diaphragmatic palsy in patients after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Yatin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diaphragm is the most important part of the respiratory system. Diaphragmatic palsy following cardiac surgery is not uncommon and can cause deterioration of pulmonary functions and attendant pulmonary complications. Objectives: Aim of this study was to observe the incidence of diaphragmatic palsy after off pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB as compared to conventional CABG and to assess the efficacy of chest physiotherapy on diaphragmatic palsy in post cardiac surgical patients. Design and Setting: An observational prospective interventional study done at a tertiary care cardiac centre. Patients: 2280 consecutive adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery from February 2005 to august 2005. Results: 30 patients out of 2280 (1.31% developed diaphragmatic palsy. Patients were divided based on the presence or absence of symptoms viz. breathlessness at rest or exertion or with the change of posture along with hypoxemia and / or hypercapnia. Group I included 14 patients who were symptomatic (CABG n=13, post valve surgery n=1, While Group II included 16 asymptomatic patients (CABG n=12, post valve surgery n=4, 9 patients (64% from Group I (n=14 and 4 patients (25% from group II showed complete recovery from diaphragmatic palsy as demonstrated ultrasonographically. Conclusion: The incidence of diaphragmatic palsy was remarkably less in our adult cardiac surgical patients because most of the cardiac surgeries were performed off pump and intensive chest physiotherapy beginning shortly after extubation helped in complete or near complete recovery of diaphragmatic palsy. Chest Physiotherapy led to marked improvement in functional outcome following post cardiac surgery diaphragmatic palsy. We also conclude that ultrasonography is a simple valuable bed-side tool for rapid diagnosis of diaphragmatic palsy

  2. Complexity-Measure-Based Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Real-Time Detection of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Szi-Wen Chen

    2007-01-01

    A novel approach that employs a complexity-based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) technique for real-time detection of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) is presented. A dataset consisting of a number of VF and VT electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings drawn from the MIT-BIH database was adopted for such an analysis. It was split into two smaller datasets for algorithm training and testing, respectively. Each ECG recording was measured in a 10-second interval. For ...

  3. Label-free cardiac contractility monitoring for drug screening applications based on compact high-speed lens-free imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwelyn, Thomas; Reumers, Veerle; Vanmeerbeeck, Geert; Stahl, Richard; Janssens, Stefan; Lagae, Liesbet; Braeken, Dries; Lambrechts, Andy

    2015-03-01

    Cardiotoxicity is the major cause of drug withdrawal from the market, despite rigorous toxicity testing during the drug development process. Existing safety screening techniques, some of which are based on simplified cellular assays, others on electrical (impedance) or optical (fluorescent microscopy) measurements, are either too limited in throughput or offer too poor predictability of toxicity to be applied on large numbers of compounds in the early stage of drug development. We present a compact optical system for direct (label-free) monitoring of fast cellular movements that enable low cost and high throughput drug screening. Our system is based on a high-speed lens-free in-line holographic microscope. When compared to a conventional microscope, the system can combine adequate imaging resolution (5.5 μm pixel pitch) with a large field-of-view (63.4 mm2) and high speed (170 fps) to capture physical cell motion in real-time. This combination enables registration of cardiac contractility parameters such as cell contraction frequency, total duration, and rate and duration of both contraction and relaxation. The system also quantifies conduction velocity, which is challenging in existing techniques. Additionally, to complement the imaging hardware we have developed image processing software that extracts all the contractility parameters directly from the raw interference images. The system was tested with varying concentration of the drug verapamil and at 100 nM, showed a decrease in: contraction frequency (-23.3% +/- 13%), total duration (-21% +/- 5%), contraction duration (-19% +/- 6%) and relaxation duration (-21% +/- 8%). Moreover, contraction displacement ceased at higher concentrations.

  4. Using learned under-sampling pattern for increasing speed of cardiac cine MRI based on compressive sensing principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Pooria; Kayvanrad, Mohammad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2012-12-01

    This article presents a compressive sensing approach for reducing data acquisition time in cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In cardiac cine MRI, several images are acquired throughout the cardiac cycle, each of which is reconstructed from the raw data acquired in the Fourier transform domain, traditionally called k-space. In the proposed approach, a majority, e.g., 62.5%, of the k-space lines (trajectories) are acquired at the odd time points and a minority, e.g., 37.5%, of the k-space lines are acquired at the even time points of the cardiac cycle. Optimal data acquisition at the even time points is learned from the data acquired at the odd time points. To this end, statistical features of the k-space data at the odd time points are clustered by fuzzy c-means and the results are considered as the states of Markov chains. The resulting data is used to train hidden Markov models and find their transition matrices. Then, the trajectories corresponding to transition matrices far from an identity matrix are selected for data acquisition. At the end, an iterative thresholding algorithm is used to reconstruct the images from the under-sampled k-space datasets. The proposed approaches for selecting the k-space trajectories and reconstructing the images generate more accurate images compared to alternative methods. The proposed under-sampling approach achieves an acceleration factor of 2 for cardiac cine MRI.

  5. Combination of CD34-positive cell subsets with infarcted myocardium-like matrix stiffness: a potential solution to cell-based cardiac repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuning; Ma, Xin; Yao, Kang; Zhu, Hong; Huang, Zheyong; Shen, Li; Qian, Juying; Zou, Yunzeng; Sun, Aijun; Ge, Junbo

    2014-06-01

    Detection of the optimal cell transplantation strategy for myocardial infarction (MI) has attracted a great deal of attention. Commitment of engrafted cells to angiogenesis within damaged myocardium is regarded as one of the major targets in cell-based cardiac repair. Bone marrow-derived CD34-positive cells, a well-characterized population of stem cells, might represent highly functional endothelial progenitor cells and result in the formation of new blood vessels. Recently, physical microenvironment (extracellular matrix stiffness) around the engrafted cells was found to exert an essential impact on their fate. Stem cells are able to feel and respond to the tissue-like matrix stiffness to commit to a relevant lineage. Notably, the infarct area after MI experiences a time-dependent stiffness change from flexible to rigid. Our previous observations demonstrated myocardial stiffness-dependent differentiation of the unselected bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) along endothelial lineage cells. Myocardial stiffness (~42 kPa) within the optimal time domain of cell engraftment (at week 1 to 2) after MI provided a more favourable physical microenvironment for cell specification and cell-based cardiac repair. However, the difference in tissue stiffness-dependent cell differentiation between the specific cell subsets expressing and no expressing CD34 phenotype remains uncertain. We presumed that CD34-positive cell subsets facilitated angiogenesis and subsequently resulted in cardiac repair under induction of infarcted myocardium-like matrix stiffness compared with CD34-negative cells. If the hypothesis were true, it would contribute greatly to detect the optimal cell subsets for cell therapy and to establish an optimized therapy strategy for cell-based cardiac repair.

  6. Examining the relationship between exercise tolerance and isoproterenol-based cardiac reserve in murine models of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Daniel A; Bao, Weike; Rambo, Mary V; Burgert, Mark; Jucker, Beat M; Lenhard, Stephen C

    2013-05-01

    The loss of cardiac reserve is, in part, responsible for exercise intolerance in late-stage heart failure (HF). Exercise tolerance testing (ETT) has been performed in mouse models of HF; however, treadmill performance and at-rest cardiac indexes determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rarely correlate. The present study adopted a stress-MRI technique for comparison with ETT in HF models, using isoproterenol (ISO) to evoke cardiac reserve responses. Male C57BL/6J mice were randomly subjected to myocardial infarction (MI), transverse aortic constriction (TAC), or sham surgery under general anesthesia. Mice underwent serial ETT on a graded treadmill with follow-up ISO stress-MRI. TAC mice showed consistent exercise intolerance, with a 16.2% reduction in peak oxygen consumption vs. sham at 15-wk postsurgery (WPS). MI and sham mice had similar peak oxygen consumption from 7 WPS onward. Time to a respiratory exchange ratio of 1.0 correlated with ETT distance (r = 0.64; P WPS [10.1 ± 3.9% change (Δ) and 8.9 ± 3.5%Δ in MI and TAC, respectively, compared with 32.0 ± 3.5%Δ in sham; P WPS in terms of ejection fraction or cardiac output. In addition, ETT did not correlate with cardiac indexes under ISO stress. In conclusion, ISO stress was unable to reflect consistent differences in ETT between HF and healthy mice, suggesting cardiac-specific indexes are not the sole factors in defining exercise intolerance in mouse HF models.

  7. Individual-, Family-, Community-, and Policy-Level Impact of a School-Based Cardiovascular Risk Detection Screening Program for Children in Underserved, Rural Areas: The CARDIAC Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Cottrell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Coronary Artery Risk Detection In Appalachian Communities (CARDIAC Project has screened more than 80,000 children (10–12 years for cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors over the past 15 years. Simultaneous referral and intervention efforts have also contributed to the overall program impact. In this study, we examined evidence of programmatic impact in the past decade at the individual, family, community, and policy levels from child screening outcomes, referral rates, participation in subsequent services, and policies that embed the activities of the project as a significant element. Within this period of time, fifth-grade overweight and obesity rates were maintained at a time when rates elsewhere increased. 107 children were referred for additional screening and treatment for probable familial hypercholesterolemia (FH; 82 family members were subsequently screened in family-based screening efforts. 58 grants were distributed throughout the state for community-appropriate obesity intervention. A state wellness policy embedded CARDIAC as the method of assessment and national child cholesterol screening guidelines were impacted by CARDIAC findings. The sustainability and successful impact of this school-based program within a largely underserved, rural Appalachian state are also discussed.

  8. Left Ventricle: Fully Automated Segmentation Based on Spatiotemporal Continuity and Myocardium Information in Cine Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (LV-FAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijia Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CMR quantification of LV chamber volumes typically and manually defines the basal-most LV, which adds processing time and user-dependence. This study developed an LV segmentation method that is fully automated based on the spatiotemporal continuity of the LV (LV-FAST. An iteratively decreasing threshold region growing approach was used first from the midventricle to the apex, until the LV area and shape discontinued, and then from midventricle to the base, until less than 50% of the myocardium circumference was observable. Region growth was constrained by LV spatiotemporal continuity to improve robustness of apical and basal segmentations. The LV-FAST method was compared with manual tracing on cardiac cine MRI data of 45 consecutive patients. Of the 45 patients, LV-FAST and manual selection identified the same apical slices at both ED and ES and the same basal slices at both ED and ES in 38, 38, 38, and 41 cases, respectively, and their measurements agreed within -1.6±8.7 mL, -1.4±7.8 mL, and 1.0±5.8% for EDV, ESV, and EF, respectively. LV-FAST allowed LV volume-time course quantitatively measured within 3 seconds on a standard desktop computer, which is fast and accurate for processing the cine volumetric cardiac MRI data, and enables LV filling course quantification over the cardiac cycle.

  9. Cardiac Arrhythmias Classification Method Based on MUSIC, Morphological Descriptors, and Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available An electrocardiogram (ECG beat classification scheme based on multiple signal classification (MUSIC algorithm, morphological descriptors, and neural networks is proposed for discriminating nine ECG beat types. These are normal, fusion of ventricular and normal, fusion of paced and normal, left bundle branch block, right bundle branch block, premature ventricular concentration, atrial premature contraction, paced beat, and ventricular flutter. ECG signal samples from MIT-BIH arrhythmia database are used to evaluate the scheme. MUSIC algorithm is used to calculate pseudospectrum of ECG signals. The low-frequency samples are picked to have the most valuable heartbeat information. These samples along with two morphological descriptors, which deliver the characteristics and features of all parts of the heart, form an input feature vector. This vector is used for the initial training of a classifier neural network. The neural network is designed to have nine sample outputs which constitute the nine beat types. Two neural network schemes, namely multilayered perceptron (MLP neural network and a probabilistic neural network (PNN, are employed. The experimental results achieved a promising accuracy of 99.03% for classifying the beat types using MLP neural network. In addition, our scheme recognizes NORMAL class with 100% accuracy and never misclassifies any other classes as NORMAL.

  10. Cardiac Arrhythmias Classification Method Based on MUSIC, Morphological Descriptors, and Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghsh-Nilchi, Ahmad R.; Kadkhodamohammadi, A. Rahim

    2009-12-01

    An electrocardiogram (ECG) beat classification scheme based on multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm, morphological descriptors, and neural networks is proposed for discriminating nine ECG beat types. These are normal, fusion of ventricular and normal, fusion of paced and normal, left bundle branch block, right bundle branch block, premature ventricular concentration, atrial premature contraction, paced beat, and ventricular flutter. ECG signal samples from MIT-BIH arrhythmia database are used to evaluate the scheme. MUSIC algorithm is used to calculate pseudospectrum of ECG signals. The low-frequency samples are picked to have the most valuable heartbeat information. These samples along with two morphological descriptors, which deliver the characteristics and features of all parts of the heart, form an input feature vector. This vector is used for the initial training of a classifier neural network. The neural network is designed to have nine sample outputs which constitute the nine beat types. Two neural network schemes, namely multilayered perceptron (MLP) neural network and a probabilistic neural network (PNN), are employed. The experimental results achieved a promising accuracy of 99.03% for classifying the beat types using MLP neural network. In addition, our scheme recognizes NORMAL class with 100% accuracy and never misclassifies any other classes as NORMAL.

  11. Complexity-Measure-Based Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Real-Time Detection of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Szi-Wen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach that employs a complexity-based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT technique for real-time detection of ventricular fibrillation (VF and ventricular tachycardia (VT is presented. A dataset consisting of a number of VF and VT electrocardiogram (ECG recordings drawn from the MIT-BIH database was adopted for such an analysis. It was split into two smaller datasets for algorithm training and testing, respectively. Each ECG recording was measured in a 10-second interval. For each recording, a number of overlapping windowed ECG data segments were obtained by shifting a 5-second window by a step of 1 second. During the windowing process, the complexity measure (CM value was calculated for each windowed segment and the task of pattern recognition was then sequentially performed by the SHT procedure. A preliminary test conducted using the database produced optimal overall predictive accuracy of . The algorithm was also implemented on a commercial embedded DSP controller, permitting a hardware realization of real-time ventricular arrhythmia detection.

  12. Complexity-Measure-Based Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Real-Time Detection of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szi-Wen

    2006-12-01

    A novel approach that employs a complexity-based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) technique for real-time detection of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) is presented. A dataset consisting of a number of VF and VT electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings drawn from the MIT-BIH database was adopted for such an analysis. It was split into two smaller datasets for algorithm training and testing, respectively. Each ECG recording was measured in a 10-second interval. For each recording, a number of overlapping windowed ECG data segments were obtained by shifting a 5-second window by a step of 1 second. During the windowing process, the complexity measure (CM) value was calculated for each windowed segment and the task of pattern recognition was then sequentially performed by the SHT procedure. A preliminary test conducted using the database produced optimal overall predictive accuracy of[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]. The algorithm was also implemented on a commercial embedded DSP controller, permitting a hardware realization of real-time ventricular arrhythmia detection.

  13. Complexity-Measure-Based Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Real-Time Detection of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szi-Wen Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach that employs a complexity-based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT technique for real-time detection of ventricular fibrillation (VF and ventricular tachycardia (VT is presented. A dataset consisting of a number of VF and VT electrocardiogram (ECG recordings drawn from the MIT-BIH database was adopted for such an analysis. It was split into two smaller datasets for algorithm training and testing, respectively. Each ECG recording was measured in a 10-second interval. For each recording, a number of overlapping windowed ECG data segments were obtained by shifting a 5-second window by a step of 1 second. During the windowing process, the complexity measure (CM value was calculated for each windowed segment and the task of pattern recognition was then sequentially performed by the SHT procedure. A preliminary test conducted using the database produced optimal overall predictive accuracy of 96.67%. The algorithm was also implemented on a commercial embedded DSP controller, permitting a hardware realization of real-time ventricular arrhythmia detection.

  14. Cardiac autonomic changes in middle-aged women: identification based on principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevizani, Gabriela A; Nasario-Junior, Olivassé; Benchimol-Barbosa, Paulo R; Silva, Lilian P; Nadal, Jurandir

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the application of the principal component analysis (PCA) technique on power spectral density function (PSD) of consecutive normal RR intervals (iRR) aiming at assessing its ability to discriminate healthy women according to age groups: young group (20-25 year-old) and middle-aged group (40-60 year-old). Thirty healthy and non-smoking female volunteers were investigated (13 young [mean ± SD (median): 22·8 ± 0·9 years (23·0)] and 17 Middle-aged [51·7 ± 5·3 years (50·0)]). The iRR sequence was collected during ten minutes, breathing spontaneously, in supine position and in the morning, using a heart rate monitor. After selecting an iRR segment (5 min) with the smallest variance, an auto regressive model was used to estimate the PSD. Five principal component coefficients, extracted from PSD signals, were retained for analysis according to the Mahalanobis distance classifier. A threshold established by logistic regression allowed the separation of the groups with 100% specificity, 83·2% sensitivity and 93·3% total accuracy. The PCA appropriately classified two groups of women in relation to age (young and Middle-aged) based on PSD analysis of consecutive normal RR intervals. PMID:25532598

  15. Elderly Care Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagiman, Aliani; Haja Bava Mohidin, Hazrina; Ismail, Alice Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The demand for elderly centre has increased tremendously abreast with the world demographic change as the number of senior citizens rose in the 21st century. This has become one of the most crucial problems of today's era. As the world progress into modernity, more and more people are occupied with daily work causing the senior citizens to lose the care that they actually need. This paper seeks to elucidate the best possible design of an elderly care centre with new approach in order to provide the best service for them by analysing their needs and suitable activities that could elevate their quality of life. All these findings will then be incorporated into design solutions so as to enhance the living environment for the elderly especially in Malaysian context.

  16. Ultra-bright and efficient single photon generation based on N-V centres in nanodiamonds on a solid immersion lens

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, Tim; Banholzer, Moritz Julian; Benson, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Single photons are fundamental elements for quantum information technologies such as quantum cryptography, quantum information storage and optical quantum computing. Colour centres in diamond have proven to be stable single photon sources and thus essential components for reliable and integrated quantum information technology. A key requirement for such applications is a large photon flux and a high efficiency. Paying tribute to various attempts to maximise the single photon flux we show that collection efficiencies of photons from colour centres can be increased with a rather simple experimental setup. To do so we spin-coated nanodiamonds containing single nitrogen-vacancy colour centres on the flat surface of a ZrO2 solid immersion lens. We found stable single photon count rates of up to 853 kcts/s at saturation under continuous wave excitation while having excess to more than 100 defect centres with count rates from 400 kcts/s to 500 kcts/s. For a blinking defect centre we found count rates up to 2.4 Mcts/...

  17. A new classifier-based strategy for in-silico ion-channel cardiac drug safety assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh eMistry

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is currently a strong interest in using high-throughput in-vitro ion-channel screening data to make predictions regarding the cardiac toxicity potential of a new compound in both animal and human studies. A recent FDA think tank encourages the use of biophysical mathematical models of cardiac myocytes for this prediction task. However, it remains unclear whether this approach is the most appropriate. Here we examine five literature data-sets that have been used to support the use of four different biophysical models and one statistical model for predicting cardiac toxicity in numerous species using various endpoints. We propose a simple model that represents the balance between repolarisation and depolarisation forces and compare the predictive power of the model against the original results (leave-one-out cross-validation. Our model showed equivalent performance when compared to the four biophysical models and one statistical model. We therefore conclude that this approach should be further investigated in the context of early cardiac safety screening when in-vitro potency data is generated.

  18. Expanding the Limits of Evidence-Based Medicine: A Discourse Analysis of Cardiac Rehabilitation Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Meg

    Heart attacks are the leading cause of death in the United States, and cardiac rehabilitation, a form of post-MI (myocardial infarction) education, accounts for at most 20% of improved lifestyle behavior that can effectively manage symptoms, delay or prevent subsequent attacks, and lower mortality and morbidity rates. In an attempt to improve…

  19. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  20. Tele-centres in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten

    2004-01-01

    Tele-centres offer a low cost opportunity for the many who cannot afford their own phone or Internet connection. This paper presents a field study of tele-centres in Ghana and analyses how they contribute to universal access.......Tele-centres offer a low cost opportunity for the many who cannot afford their own phone or Internet connection. This paper presents a field study of tele-centres in Ghana and analyses how they contribute to universal access....

  1. The group-based social skills training SOSTA-FRA in children and adolescents with high functioning autism spectrum disorder - study protocol of the randomised, multi-centre controlled SOSTA - net trial

    OpenAIRE

    Freitag Christine M; Cholemkery Hannah; Elsuni Leyla; Kroeger Anne K; Bender Stephan; Kunz Cornelia Ursula; Kieser Meinhard

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Group-based social skills training (SST) has repeatedly been recommended as treatment of choice in high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD). To date, no sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial has been performed to establish efficacy and safety of SST in children and adolescents with HFASD. In this randomised, multi-centre, controlled trial with 220 children and adolescents with HFASD it is hypothesized, that add-on group-based SST using the 12 weeks manu...

  2. Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engkvist, I-L; Eklund, J; Krook, J; Björkman, M; Sundin, E

    2016-11-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to draw combined, all-embracing conclusions based on a long-term multidisciplinary research programme on recycling centres in Sweden, focussing on working conditions, environment and system performance. A second aim is to give recommendations for their development of new and existing recycling centres and to discuss implications for the future design and organisation. Several opportunities for improvement of recycling centres were identified, such as design, layout, ease with which users could sort their waste, the work environment, conflicting needs and goals within the industry, and industrialisation. Combining all results from the research, which consisted of different disciplinary aspects, made it possible to analyse and elucidate their interrelations. Waste sorting quality was recognized as the most prominent improvement field in the recycling centre system. The research identified the importance of involving stakeholders with different perspectives when planning a recycling centre in order to get functionality and high performance. Practical proposals of how to plan and build recycling centres are given in a detailed checklist. PMID:26826952

  3. Flipping the advanced cardiac life support classroom with team-based learning: comparison of cognitive testing performance for medical students at the University of California, Irvine, United State

    OpenAIRE

    Boysen-Osborn, Megan; Anderson, Craig L.; Navarro, Roman; Yanuck, Justin; Strom, Suzanne; McCoy, Christopher E.; Youm, Julie; Ypma-Wong, Mary Frances; Langdorf, Mark I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: It aimed to find if written test results improved for advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) taught in flipped classroom/team-based Learning (FC/TBL) vs. lecture-based (LB) control in University of California-Irvine School of Medicine, USA. Methods: Medical students took 2010 ACLS with FC/TBL (2015), compared to 3 classes in LB (2012-14) format. There were 27.5 hours of instruction for FC/TBL model (TBL 10.5, podcasts 9, small-group simulation 8 hours), and 20 (12 lecture, simulation 8...

  4. Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred; Stohlberg-Rohr, Thomine;

    2010-01-01

    report the heart toxicities in locally-regionally advanced NSCLC (LA-NSCLC) patients (pts) treated with RT in our centre.   Methods and material: From 01.01.1995-30.11.2007, 287 pts with LA-NSCLC (stage IIB-IIIB) were treated with RT at our centre with planned dose 60-66 Gy. All RT was applied as 3D RT......    Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC Tine Schytte, Olfred Hansen, Thomine Stolberg-Rohr* and Carsten Brink*. Dept. Oncology and Radiophysic Lab.* Odense University Hospital, Denmark   Keyword: Radiotherapy, Locally advanced NSCLC, Cardiac toxicity...

  5. Electrocardiographically Determination of Cardiac Enlargements in Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Gönül, Remzi; OR, Mehmet Erman; DODURKA, Tamer

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the electrocardiographic parameters necessary to determine cardiac enlargements and to establish and distinguish such complaints from each other in the early stage in dogs with circulatory problems were assessed. The material of the study consisted of 33 dogs 1.5-15 years of age with cardiac enlargements determined from 140 dogs suspected of having cardiac disease based on clinical, radiographic and electrocardiographic analyses. In these dogs, 12 cases of left atrial hypert...

  6. Evaluation of cardiac blood blow, metabolism and sympathetic nerve function in patients with cardiac failure using PET and SPECT. Prognostic diagnosis based on the analysis of aggravating factors of the disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Shimozu, Junko; Yasumura, Yoshio; Nagatani, Kenzo; Miyatake, Kunio [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    Focusing on the failure of energy metabolism, which is assumed to be attributed to the cardiac muscle disorder of a patient with cardiac failure, the characteristics and diagnostic significance of the metabolic disorders of cadiac muscles were investigated in those patients. The diagnostic efficacy of {beta}-methyl iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) which is a imaging agent for lipid metabolism in the cardiac muscle was assessed in the clinical states of cardiac failure due to pulmonary hypertension. Even if there was a considerable increase in the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), the initial accumulation of BMIPP linearly increased, similarly to the increase in the accumulation of MIBI, a blood flow agent. The initial accumulation of BMIPP was thought to reflect a thicken cardiac muscle and/or increased blood flow. Also, its washing-out rate was suggested to be usable as an clinical indicator to estimate the loading of ventricular pressure. (M.N.)

  7. Multi-centre evaluation of the Determine HIV Combo assay when used for point of care testing in a high risk clinic-based population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian P Conway

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Determine HIV Combo (DHC is the first point of care assay designed to increase sensitivity in early infection by detecting both HIV antibody and antigen. We conducted a large multi-centre evaluation of DHC performance in Sydney sexual health clinics. METHODS: We compared DHC performance (overall, by test component and in early infection with conventional laboratory HIV serology (fourth generation screening immunoassay, supplementary HIV antibody, p24 antigen and Western blot tests when testing gay and bisexual men attending four clinic sites. Early infection was defined as either acute or recent HIV infection acquired within the last six months. RESULTS: Of 3,190 evaluation specimens, 39 were confirmed as HIV-positive (12 with early infection and 3,133 were HIV-negative by reference testing. DHC sensitivity was 87.2% overall and 94.4% and 0% for the antibody and antigen components, respectively. Sensitivity in early infection was 66.7% (all DHC antibody reactive and the DHC antigen component detected none of nine HIV p24 antigen positive specimens. Median HIV RNA was higher in false negative than true positive cases (238,025 vs. 37,591 copies/ml; p = 0.022. Specificity overall was 99.4% with the antigen component contributing to 33% of false positives. CONCLUSIONS: The DHC antibody component detected two thirds of those with early infection, while the DHC antigen component did not enhance performance during point of care HIV testing in a high risk clinic-based population.

  8. Cardiac imaging. A multimodality approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, Manfred [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany); Erbel, Raimund [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany). Clinic and Polyclinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Barkhausen, Joerg (eds.) [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    An excellent atlas on modern diagnostic imaging of the heart Written by an interdisciplinary team of experts, Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach features an in-depth introduction to all current imaging modalities for the diagnostic assessment of the heart as well as a clinical overview of cardiac diseases and main indications for cardiac imaging. With a particular emphasis on CT and MRI, the first part of the atlas also covers conventional radiography, echocardiography, angiography and nuclear medicine imaging. Leading specialists demonstrate the latest advances in the field, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The book's second part features clinical chapters on heart defects, endocarditis, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, cardiac tumors, pericardial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, and diseases of the thoracic aorta. The authors address anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical features, and evaluate the various diagnostic options. Key features: - Highly regarded experts in cardiology and radiology off er image-based teaching of the latest techniques - Readers learn how to decide which modality to use for which indication - Visually highlighted tables and essential points allow for easy navigation through the text - More than 600 outstanding images show up-to-date technology and current imaging protocols Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach is a must-have desk reference for cardiologists and radiologists in practice, as well as a study guide for residents in both fields. It will also appeal to cardiac surgeons, general practitioners, and medical physicists with a special interest in imaging of the heart. (orig.)

  9. Cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan Liu; Dongmei Chen; Yonggang Wang; Xin Zhao; Yang Zheng

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the distribution characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves and to explore the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia.DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed for papers examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerves, using "heart, autonomic nerve, sympathetic nerve, vagus nerve, nerve distribution, rhythm and atrial fibrillation" as the key words.SELECTION CRITERIA: A total of 165 studies examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerve were screened, and 46 of them were eventually included.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The distribution and characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves were observed, and immunohistochemical staining was applied to determine the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase (main markers of cardiac autonomic nerve distribution). In addition, the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and cardiac arrhythmia was investigated.RESULTS: Cardiac autonomic nerves were reported to exhibit a disordered distribution in different sites, mainly at the surface of the cardiac atrium and pulmonary vein, forming a ganglia plexus. The distribution of the pulmonary vein autonomic nerve was prominent at the proximal end rather than the distal end, at the upper left rather than the lower right, at the epicardial membrane rather than the endocardial membrane, at the left atrium rather than the right atrium, and at the posterior wall rather than the anterior wall. The main markers used for cardiac autonomic nerves were tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase. Protein gene product 9.5 was used to label the immunoreactive nerve distribution, and the distribution density of autonomic nerves was determined using a computer-aided morphometric analysis system.CONCLUSION: The uneven distribution of the cardiac autonomic nerves is the leading cause of the occurrence of arrhythmia, and the cardiac autonomic nerves play an important role in the

  10. DGNB certified Healthcare Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsgaard, Camilla; Larsen, Tine Steen

    2015-01-01

    for sustainability and wants a certification. This research investigates the decision‐making and design process (DMaDP) behind four DGNB certified Healthcare Centres (HCC) in Northern Jutland in Denmark. In general, knowledge about the DMaDP is important. However it is important to know what part DGNB plays...... a dialog about DGNB and energy concept is important even before anyone start sketching. Experiences with the different approaches will be further outlined in the paper.Future research has the intention to collect further knowledge about DGNB and DMaDP in practise. This project was limited to Healthcare...

  11. Centre liikekeskuksen digital signage

    OpenAIRE

    Bincl, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Opinnäytetyöni tarkastelee digital signagen suunnittelussa huomioitavia tekijöitä ja sen arvoa markkinointikanavana. Työ on toteutettu tilaustyönä Lappeenrantalaiselle mainostoimisto Mediakolmiolle. Työ sisältää teoriaosuuden lisäksi sisältösuunnitelman rakenteilla olevalle Centre liikekeskukselle. Tavoitteena oli luoda liikekeskukselle sen brändiä tukeva digital signage konsepti. Työ ei sisällä valmista tuotetta, vaan se toimii ehdotelmana myöhemmin alkavalle tuotanno...

  12. Town Centre Redevelopment Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagnby, Bo Hellisen

    urban planning and design strategieswhich have been practised in most of the larger Danish towns: pedestrian streets, shopping centres, preservation of historic features, waterfronts, concentration of offices, conference and sports facilities, improvement og traffic and transport conditions as well...... as slum clearence and urban renewal. To a certain extent parallels are drawn to international experiences, especially where these are of such a nature that they can be assumed transferred to Danish connctions. Conclusively, the strategies are discussed in the light of the turn of Danish urban planning...

  13. MATERNAL MORTALITY IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Maternal Mortality in A Tertiary Care Centre. OBJECTIVE: To study maternal mortality and the complications leading to maternal death. METHODS: A retrospective study of hospital record to study maternal mortality and its causes over 3 years from January 2010 to December 2012. RESULTS: There were a total of 58 maternal deaths out of 2823 live births giving a maternal mortality ratio of 2054.55 per one lakh live births. Unbooked and late referrals account for 77.58% of maternal deaths. The majority of deaths around 75.86% were in 20-30 years age group. Haemorrhage was the commonest causes of death (24.12% followed by sepsis (18.96% and pregnancy induced hypertension 15.51% Anemia contributed to the most common indirect cause of maternal morality. CONCLUSION: Haemorrhage, sepsis and pregnancy induced hypertension including eclampsia were the direct major causes of death. Anaemia and cardiac diseases were other indirect causes of death.

  14. Derivation of cardiac output and alveolar ventilation rate based on energy expenditure measurements in healthy males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochu, Pierre; Brodeur, Jules; Krishnan, Kannan

    2012-08-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and occupational exposure assessment studies often use minute ventilation rates (VE), alveolar ventilation rates (VA) and cardiac outputs (Q) that are not reflective of the physiological variations encountered during the aggregate daytime activities of individuals from childhood to adulthood. These variations of VE, VA and Q values were determined for healthy normal-weight individuals aged 5-96 years by using two types of published individual data that were measured in the same subjects (n = 902), namely indirect calorimetry measurements and the disappearance rates of oral doses of deuterium (²H) and heavy-oxygen (¹⁸O) in urine monitored by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Arteriovenous oxygen content differences (0.051-0.082 ml of O₂ consumed ml⁻¹ of blood) and ratios of the physiological dead space to the tidal volume (0.232-0.419) were determined for oxygen consumption rates (0.157-0.806 l min⁻¹) required by minute energy expenditures ranging from 0.76 to 3.91 kcal min⁻¹. Generally higher values for the 2.5th up to the 99th percentile for VE (0.132-0.774 l kg⁻¹ min⁻¹, 4.42-21.69 l m⁻² min⁻¹), VA (0.093-0.553 l kg⁻¹ min⁻¹, 3.09-15.53 l m⁻² min⁻¹), Q (0.065-0.330 l kg⁻¹ min⁻¹, 2.17 to 9.46 l m⁻² min⁻¹) and ventilation-perfusion ratios (1.12-2.16) were found in children and teenagers aged 5-<16.5 years compared with older individuals. The distributions of cardiopulmonary parameters developed in this study should be useful in facilitating a scientifically sound characterization of the inter-individual differences in the uptake and health risks of lipophilic air pollutants, particularly as they relate to younger children.

  15. Morphological and Volumetric Analysis of Left Atrial Appendage and Left Atrium: Cardiac Computed Tomography-Based Reproducibility Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taina, Mikko; Korhonen, Miika; Haataja, Mika; Muuronen, Antti; Arponen, Otso; Hedman, Marja; Jäkälä, Pekka; Sipola, Petri; Mustonen, Pirjo; Vanninen, Ritva

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Left atrial appendage (LAA) dilatation and morphology may influence an individual's risk for intracardiac thrombi and ischemic stroke. LAA size and morphology can be evaluated using cardiac computed tomography (cCT). The present study evaluated the reproducibility of LAA volume and morphology assessments. Methods A total of 149 patients (47 females; mean age 60.9±10.6 years) with suspected cardioembolic stroke/transient ischemic attack underwent cCT. Image quality was rated based on four categories. Ten patients were selected from each image quality category (N = 40) for volumetric reproducibility analysis by two individual readers. LAA and left atrium (LA) volume were measured in both two-chamber (2CV) and transversal view (TV) orientation. Intertechnique reproducibility was assessed between 2CV and TV (200 measurement pairs). LAA morphology (A = Cactus, B = ChickenWing, C = WindSock, D = CauliFlower), LAA opening height, number of LAA lobes, trabeculation, and orientation of the LAA tip was analysed in all study subjects by three individual readers (447 interobserver measurement pairs). The reproducibility of volume measurements was assessed by intra-class correlation (ICC) and the reproducibility of LAA morphology assessments by Cohen's kappa. Results The intra-observer and interobserver reproducibility of LAA and LA volume measurements was excellent (ICCs>0.9). The LAA (ICC = 0.954) and LA (ICC = 0.945) volume measurements were comparable between 2CV and TV. Morphological classification (ĸ = 0.24) and assessments of LAA opening height (ĸ = 0.1), number of LAA lobes (ĸ = 0.16), trabeculation (ĸ = 0.15), and orientation of the LAA tip (ĸ = 0.37) was only slightly to fairly reproducible. Conclusions LA and LAA volume measurements on cCT provide excellent reproducibility, whereas visual assessment of LAA morphological features is challenging and results in unsatisfactory agreement between readers

  16. Morphological and volumetric analysis of left atrial appendage and left atrium: cardiac computed tomography-based reproducibility assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Taina

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Left atrial appendage (LAA dilatation and morphology may influence an individual's risk for intracardiac thrombi and ischemic stroke. LAA size and morphology can be evaluated using cardiac computed tomography (cCT. The present study evaluated the reproducibility of LAA volume and morphology assessments. METHODS: A total of 149 patients (47 females; mean age 60.9±10.6 years with suspected cardioembolic stroke/transient ischemic attack underwent cCT. Image quality was rated based on four categories. Ten patients were selected from each image quality category (N = 40 for volumetric reproducibility analysis by two individual readers. LAA and left atrium (LA volume were measured in both two-chamber (2CV and transversal view (TV orientation. Intertechnique reproducibility was assessed between 2CV and TV (200 measurement pairs. LAA morphology (A = Cactus, B = ChickenWing, C = WindSock, D = CauliFlower, LAA opening height, number of LAA lobes, trabeculation, and orientation of the LAA tip was analysed in all study subjects by three individual readers (447 interobserver measurement pairs. The reproducibility of volume measurements was assessed by intra-class correlation (ICC and the reproducibility of LAA morphology assessments by Cohen's kappa. RESULTS: The intra-observer and interobserver reproducibility of LAA and LA volume measurements was excellent (ICCs>0.9. The LAA (ICC = 0.954 and LA (ICC = 0.945 volume measurements were comparable between 2CV and TV. Morphological classification (ĸ = 0.24 and assessments of LAA opening height (ĸ = 0.1, number of LAA lobes (ĸ = 0.16, trabeculation (ĸ = 0.15, and orientation of the LAA tip (ĸ = 0.37 was only slightly to fairly reproducible. CONCLUSIONS: LA and LAA volume measurements on cCT provide excellent reproducibility, whereas visual assessment of LAA morphological features is challenging and results in unsatisfactory agreement between readers.

  17. Algorithms Based on CWT and Classifiers to Control Cardiac Alterations and Stress Using an ECG and a SCR

    OpenAIRE

    Amaia Méndez Zorrilla; Begoña García Zapirain; María Viqueira Villarejo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of using a commercial pulsimeter as an electrocardiogram (ECG) for wireless detection of cardiac alterations and stress levels for home control. For these purposes, signal processing techniques (Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) and J48) have been used, respectively. The designed algorithm analyses the ECG signal and is able to detect the heart rate (99.42%), arrhythmia (93.48%) and extrasystoles (99.29%). The detection of stress level is complemented with Ski...

  18. Assessment and Utility of Frailty Measures in Critical Illness, Cardiology, and Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabali, Naheed; Rolfson, Darryl; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-09-01

    Frailty is a clearly emerging theme in acute care medicine, with obvious prognostic and health resource implications. "Frailty" is a term used to describe a multidimensional syndrome of loss of homeostatic reserves that gives rise to a vulnerability to adverse outcomes after relatively minor stressor events. This is conceptually simple, yet there has been little consensus on the operational definition. The gold standard method to diagnose frailty remains a comprehensive geriatric assessment; however, a variety of validated physical performance measures, judgement-based tools, and multidimensional scales are being applied in critical care, cardiology, and cardiac surgery settings, including open cardiac surgery and transcatheter aortic value replacement. Frailty is common among patients admitted to the intensive care unit and correlates with an increased risk for adverse events, increased resource use, and less favourable patient-centred outcomes. Analogous findings have been described across selected acute cardiology and cardiac surgical settings, in particular those that commonly intersect with critical care services. The optimal methods for screening and diagnosing frailty across these settings remains an active area of investigation. Routine assessment for frailty conceivably has numerous purported benefits for patients, families, health care providers, and health administrators through better informed decision-making regarding treatments or goals of care, prognosis for survival, expectations for recovery, risk of complications, and expected resource use. In this review, we discuss the measurement of frailty and its utility in patients with critical illness and in cardiology and cardiac surgery settings. PMID:27476983

  19. Differences Between Women and Men in Phase I Cardiac Rehabilitation After Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Nationwide Population-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Chih; Ho, Chung-Han; Tung, Li-Chen; Ho, Chi-Che; Chou, Willy; Wang, Chun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous studies have investigated gender-related differences in patients who have had an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), few studies have examined the gender-related differences among inpatients receiving Phase I inpatient cardiac rehabilitation following AMI.Using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, this study analyzed 6713 adult patients who received inpatient cardiac rehabilitation following AMI between 2002 and 2011. The differences in comorbidity, medical service use, and prognosis between the male and female patients were analyzed to determine whether the comorbidities affecting their prognoses differed.Female patients accounted for 23.18% of the sample, had a higher average age, and exhibited severe comorbidities; furthermore, they had significantly more days of hospitalization and days in an intensive care unit than did male patients. The gender-related differences in hospital mortality rate and 30-day mortality rate were nonsignificant, but female patients exhibited a significantly higher 1-year mortality rate. Moreover, the risk for 1-year mortality was higher among female patients with moderate or severe renal disease (odds ratio: 1.94, 95% confidence interval: 1.29-2.92) than among their male counterparts. However, the 1-year mortality rate for the female patients did not increase after all risk factors were adjusted.Gender-related differences in age, comorbidity, and prognosis were confirmed in AMI patients receiving Phase I inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. In addition, gender-related differences were observed in the comorbidity risk factors affecting prognosis. However, being female did not affect the prognosis.

  20. Cardiac perception and cardiac control. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D

    1977-12-01

    The evidence regarding specific cardiac perception and discrimination, and its relationship to voluntary cardiac control, is critically reviewed. Studies are considered in three sections, depending on the method used to assess cardiac perception: questionnaire assessment, discrimination procedures, and heartbeat tracking. The heartbeat tracking procedure would appear to suffer least from interpretative difficulties. Recommendations are made regarding the style of analysis used to assess heartbeat perception in such tracking tasks. PMID:348240

  1. Frequent Premature Ventricular Complexes Originating from the Left Ventricular Summit Successfully Ablated from the Proximal Great Cardiac Vein Using an Impedance-based Electroanatomical Mapping System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yoshihisa; Ogawa, Masahiro; Goto, Shunichiro; Morii, Joji; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Yasuda, Tomoo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a 58-year-old woman with frequent premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) originating from the left ventricular summit. The earliest ventricular activation of spontaneous PVCs was recorded in the proximal site of the great cardiac vein, which was simultaneously mapped and conducted using an impedance-based electroanatomical mapping system. Irrigated radiofrequency with a starting power output of 20 W and maximal temperature set at 40°C was applied with 10 Ω impedance fall, resulting in total disappearance of the frequent PVCs. The patient has remained free from PVCs for 18 months without requiring antiarrhythmic drug therapy. PMID:27374677

  2. Field programmable gate array-based real-time optical Doppler tomography system for in vivo imaging of cardiac dynamics in the chick embryo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars; Larsen, Henning Engelbrecht; Norozi, Kambiz;

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a field programmable gate-array-based real-time optical Doppler tomography system. A complex-valued bandpass filter is used for the first time in optical coherence tomography signal processing to create the analytic signal. This method simplifies the filter design, and allows...... digital computer (CORDIC) algorithm, which is an efficient algorithm that maps well to the field programmable gate array. Flow phantom experiments, and the use of this system for in vivo imaging of cardiac dynamics in the chick embryo, are presented. We demonstrate the visualization of blood flow...

  3. AN EXPERIENCE OF FACILITY-BASED MANAGEMENT OF SEVERE ACUTE MALNUTRITION IN CHILDREN AGED BETWEEN 0-59 MONTHS ADOPTING THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION RECOMMENDATIONS AT NUTRITION REHABILITATION CENTRE, ANANTHAPURAMU

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen Deen Kumar; Praveena

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) increases significantly the risk of death in children under five years of age. It can be an indirect cause of child death by increasing the case fatality rate in children suffering from common illness such as diarrhoea, pneumonia. AIMS The aim of this study is to know the effectiveness of facility based management of children with Severe Acute Malnutrition at Nutrition Rehabilitation Centres (NRCs). SETTINGS AND DESIGN The stud...

  4. Design Considerations for an Intensive Autism Treatment Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deochand, Neil; Conway, Alissa A.; Fuqua, R. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) who display severe and challenging behaviour sometimes require centre-based intensive applied behaviour analysis (ABA) therapy to meet their health, safety and educational needs. Unfortunately, despite the need for centre-based treatment, there is a paucity of empirical research on building and…

  5. Call Centres in Denmark 2004 - Strategy, HR Practices & Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole H.; El-Salanti, Nadia

    This survey is the first scientifically based benchmarking study of the Danish call centre industry. The main results from the study are based on answers from 128 call centres, which correspond to a response rate of 65%. The Danish study is part of a global project coordinated by researchers at C...

  6. Feasibility of free-breathing, GRAPPA-based, real-time cardiac cine assessment of left-ventricular function in cardiovascular patients at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaomei, E-mail: xiaomeizhunanjing@163.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, 300, Guangzhou Road, 210029 Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schwab, Felix, E-mail: flixschwab@googlemail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Marcus, Roy, E-mail: Roy.Marcus@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Hetterich, Holger, E-mail: Holger.Hetterich@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Theisen, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.theisen@me.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Kramer, Harald, E-mail: Harald.Kramer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Notohamiprodjo, Mike, E-mail: Mike.Notohamiprodjo@med.lmu.de [Department of Radiology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Schlett, Christopher L., E-mail: Christopher.Schlett@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Nikolaou, Konstantin, E-mail: Konstantin.Nikolaou@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Radiology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F., E-mail: Maximilian.Reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); and others

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Grappa-based real time cine cardiac MRI is feasible for assessment of left ventricular function. • Significant underestimation of systolic function, peak ejection and filling rates needs to be considered. • Heart rate is the only positive predictor of the deviation of obtained parameters. - Abstract: Objectives: To determine the feasibility of free-breathing, GRAPPA-based, real-time (RT) cine 3 T cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high acceleration factors for the assessment of left-ventricular function in a cohort of patients as compared to conventional segmented cine imaging. Materials and methods: In this prospective cohort study, subjects with various cardiac conditions underwent MRI involving two RT cine sequences (high resolution and low resolution) and standard segmented cine imaging. Standard qualitative and quantitative parameters of left-ventricular function were quantified. Results: Among 25 subjects, 24 were included in the analysis (mean age: 50.5 ± 21 years, 67% male, 25% with cardiomyopathy). RT cine derived quantitative parameters of volumes and left ventricular mass were strongly correlated with segmented cine imaging (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]: >0.72 for both RT cines) but correlation for peak ejection and filling rates were moderate to poor for both RT cines (ICC < 0.40). Similarly, RT cines significantly underestimated peak ejection and filling rates (>103.2 ± 178 ml/s). Among patient-related factors, heart rate was strongly predictive for deviation of measurements (p < 0.05). Conclusions: RT cine MRI at 3 T is feasible for qualitative and quantitative assessment of left ventricular function for low and high-resolution sequences but results in significant underestimation of systolic function, peak ejection and filling rates.

  7. Role of Biological Sex in Normal Cardiac Function and in its Disease Outcome – A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhavathi, K.; Selvi, K.Tamarai; Poornima, K.N.; Sarvanan, A.

    2014-01-01

    Biological sex plays an important role in normal cardiac physiology as well as in the heart‘s response to cardiac disease. Women generally have better cardiac function and survival than do men in the face of cardiac disease; however, this is progressively lost when comparing postmenopausal women with age matched men. Animal model of cardiac disease mirror what is seen in humans. Sex hormones contribute significantly to sex based difference in cardiac functioning and in its disease outcome. Es...

  8. Conditional shape models for cardiac motion estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metz, C.T.; Baka, N.; Kirisli, H.A.;

    2010-01-01

    We propose a conditional statistical shape model to predict patient specific cardiac motion from the 3D end-diastolic CTA scan. The model is built from 4D CTA sequences by combining atlas based segmentation and 4D registration. Cardiac motion estimation is, for example, relevant in the dynamic al...

  9. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roccio, M.; Goumans, M. J.; Sluijter, J. P. G.; Doevendans, P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyo

  10. [The primary healthcare centres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature. PMID:24770539

  11. Ultra-bright and efficient single photon generation based on N-V centres in nanodiamonds on a solid immersion lens

    OpenAIRE

    Schröder, Tim; Gädeke, Friedemann; Banholzer, Moritz Julian; Benson, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Single photons are fundamental elements for quantum information technologies such as quantum cryptography, quantum information storage and optical quantum computing. Colour centres in diamond have proven to be stable single photon sources and thus essential components for reliable and integrated quantum information technology. A key requirement for such applications is a large photon flux and a high efficiency. Paying tribute to various attempts to maximise the single photon flux we show that...

  12. Update on System Coordination Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stangl, W. [Power Pool of Alberta, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    The new System Coordination Centre at the Power Pool of Alberta was designed to meet the unique requirements of Alberta`s electric industry under the new regulatory regime. Development of the Centre, key provisions of the energy management system (EMS) are highlighted. The centre will provide an energy management system for the Pool`s system controller function and interface with the Power Pool Administrator`s market functions and the operations of the Transmission Administrator. System controllers are expected to be operating from the new location by the end of 1998. Unique EMS features of the centre include: (1) real-time management of energy market and network operations using diverse SCADA/EMS, (2) inter-control centre protocol used to accommodate the unique participant information requirements, and (3) special custom applications. The Centre is expected to be fully functioning by July 1999. 1 fig.

  13. A model-based time-reversal of left ventricular motion improves cardiac motion analysis using tagged MRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook Larry T

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial motion is an important observable for the assessment of heart condition. Accurate estimates of ventricular (LV wall motion are required for quantifying myocardial deformation and assessing local tissue function and viability. Harmonic Phase (HARP analysis was developed for measuring regional LV motion using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI data. With current computer-aided postprocessing tools including HARP analysis, large motions experienced by myocardial tissue are, however, often intractable to measure. This paper addresses this issue and provides a solution to make such measurements possible. Methods To improve the estimation performance of large cardiac motions while analyzing tMRI data sets, we propose a two-step solution. The first step involves constructing a model to describe average systolic motion of the LV wall within a subject group. The second step involves time-reversal of the model applied as a spatial coordinate transformation to digitally relax the contracted LV wall in the experimental data of a single subject to the beginning of systole. Cardiac tMRI scans were performed on four healthy rats and used for developing the forward LV model. Algorithms were implemented for preprocessing the tMRI data, optimizing the model parameters and performing the HARP analysis. Slices from the midventricular level were then analyzed for all systolic phases. Results The time-reversal operation derived from the LV model accounted for the bulk portion of the myocardial motion, which was the average motion experienced within the overall subject population. In analyzing the individual tMRI data sets, removing this average with the time-reversal operation left small magnitude residual motion unique to the case. This remaining residual portion of the motion was estimated robustly using the HARP analysis. Conclusion Utilizing a combination of the forward LV model and its time reversal improves the performance of

  14. Comparison of total variation with a motion estimation based compressed sensing approach for self-gated cardiac cine MRI in small animal studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F P J Abascal

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Compressed sensing (CS has been widely applied to prospective cardiac cine MRI. The aim of this work is to study the benefits obtained by including motion estimation in the CS framework for small-animal retrospective cardiac cine. METHODS: We propose a novel B-spline-based compressed sensing method (SPLICS that includes motion estimation and generalizes previous spatiotemporal total variation (ST-TV methods by taking into account motion between frames. In addition, we assess the effect of an optimum weighting between spatial and temporal sparsity to further improve results. Both methods were implemented using the efficient Split Bregman methodology and were evaluated on rat data comparing animals with myocardial infarction with controls for several acceleration factors. RESULTS: ST-TV with optimum selection of the weighting sparsity parameter led to results similar to those of SPLICS; ST-TV with large relative temporal sparsity led to temporal blurring effects. However, SPLICS always properly corrected temporal blurring, independently of the weighting parameter. At acceleration factors of 15, SPLICS did not distort temporal intensity information but led to some artefacts and slight over-smoothing. At an acceleration factor of 7, images were reconstructed without significant loss of quality. CONCLUSION: We have validated SPLICS for retrospective cardiac cine in small animal, achieving high acceleration factors. In addition, we have shown that motion modelling may not be essential for retrospective cine and that similar results can be obtained by using ST-TV provided that an optimum selection of the spatiotemporal sparsity weighting parameter is performed.

  15. [Cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, H; Seki, S; Mizuguchi, A; Tsuchida, H; Watanabe, H; Namiki, A

    1990-04-01

    The cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography, NCCOM3, was evaluated in adult patients (n = 12) who were subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting. Values of cardiac output measured by impedance cardiography were compared to those by the thermodilution method. Changes of base impedance level used as an index of thoracic fluid volume were also investigated before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Correlation coefficient (r) of the values obtained by thermodilution with impedance cardiography was 0.79 and the mean difference was 1.29 +/- 16.9 (SD)% during induction of anesthesia. During the operation, r was 0.83 and the mean difference was -14.6 +/- 18.7%. The measurement by impedance cardiography could be carried out through the operation except when electro-cautery was used. Base impedance level before CPB was significantly lower as compared with that after CPB. There was a negative correlation between the base impedance level and central venous pressure (CVP). No patients showed any signs suggesting lung edema and all the values of CVP, pulmonary artery pressure and blood gas analysis were within normal ranges. From the result of this study, it was concluded that cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography was useful in cardiac surgery, but further detailed examinations will be necessary on the relationship between the numerical values of base impedance and the clinical state of the patients. PMID:2362347

  16. Health Literacy Predicts Cardiac Knowledge Gains in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Colleen C.; Rawson, Katherine; Hughes, Joel W.; Waechter, Donna; Rosneck, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Health literacy is increasingly recognised as a potentially important patient characteristic related to patient education efforts. We evaluated whether health literacy would predict gains in knowledge after completion of patient education in cardiac rehabilitation. Method: This was a re-post observational analysis study design based on…

  17. Gene transfer to promote cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collesi, Chiara; Giacca, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    There is an impelling need to develop new therapeutic strategies for patients with myocardial infarction and heart failure. Leading from the large quantity of new information gathered over the last few years on the mechanisms controlling cardiomyocyte proliferation during embryonic and fetal life, it is now possible to devise innovative therapies based on cardiac gene transfer. Different protein-coding genes controlling cell cycle progression or cardiomyocyte specification and differentiation, along with microRNA mimics and inhibitors regulating pre-natal and early post-natal cell proliferation, are amenable to transformation in potential therapeutics for cardiac regeneration. These gene therapy approaches are conceptually revolutionary, since they are aimed at stimulating the intrinsic potential of differentiated cardiac cells to proliferate, rather than relying on the implantation of exogenously expanded cells to achieve tissue regeneration. For efficient and prolonged cardiac gene transfer, vectors based on the Adeno-Associated Virus stand as safe, efficient and reliable tools for cardiac gene therapy applications.

  18. Hierarchical Organization of Data Centre to Improve Quality of Services (QoS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Devi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The cloud computing has become the buzz topic in today IT industry because it provides services at lower cost and high availability of services and supports the sharing of hardware and software simultaneously with multiple users. This paper exploits the coordination between data centre (DC and user base (UB to enhance the performance of data centre by determining the position of data centre relative to user base. Computing architecture is based on weak client (user base and powerful data centre.

  19. Cardiac sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Amin; A. Asghari-Roodsari; H.L. Tan

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (I-Na) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of I-Na for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of

  20. Diffuse infiltrative cardiac tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the cardiac magnetic resonance images of an unusual form of cardiac tuberculosis. Nodular masses in a sheet-like distribution were seen to infiltrate the outer myocardium and pericardium along most of the cardiac chambers. The lesions showed significant resolution on antitubercular therapy

  1. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  2. Echocardiography and cardiac resynchronisation therapy, friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Everdingen, W M; Schipper, J C; van 't Sant, J; Ramdat Misier, K; Meine, M; Cramer, M J

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is used in cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) to assess cardiac function, and in particular left ventricular (LV) volumetric status, and prediction of response. Despite its widespread applicability, LV volumes determined by echocardiography have inherent measurement errors, interobserver and intraobserver variability, and discrepancies with the gold standard magnetic resonance imaging. Echocardiographic predictors of CRT response are based on mechanical dyssynchrony. However, parameters are mainly tested in single-centre studies or lack feasibility. Speckle tracking echocardiography can guide LV lead placement, improving volumetric response and clinical outcome by guiding lead positioning towards the latest contracting segment. Results on optimisation of CRT device settings using echocardiographic indices have so far been rather disappointing, as results suffer from noise. Defining response by echocardiography seems valid, although re-assessment after 6 months is advisable, as patients can show both continuous improvement as well as deterioration after the initial response. Three-dimensional echocardiography is interesting for future implications, as it can determine volume, dyssynchrony and viability in a single recording, although image quality needs to be adequate. Deformation patterns from the septum and the derived parameters are promising, although validation in a multicentre trial is required. We conclude that echocardiography has a pivotal role in CRT, although clinicians should know its shortcomings. PMID:26645707

  3. Pneumothorax in cardiac pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors for pneumothorax treated with a chest tube after cardiac pacing device implantation in a population-based cohort.METHODS AND RESULTS: A nationwide cohort study was performed based on data on 28 860 patients from the Danish Pacemaker Register, which included all Danish...... patients who received their first pacemaker (PM) or cardiac resynchronization device from 1997 to 2008. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals for the association between risk factors and pneumothorax treated with a chest tube. The median...... age was 77 years (25th and 75th percentile: 69-84) and 55% were male (n = 15 785). A total of 190 patients (0.66%) were treated for pneumothorax, which was more often in women [aOR 1.9 (1.4-2.6)], and in patients with age >80 years [aOR 1.4 (1.0-1.9)], a prior history of chronic obstructive pulmonary...

  4. Council celebrates CERN Control Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the unveiling of its new sign, the CERN Control Centre was officially inaugurated on Thursday 16 March. To celebrate its startup, CERN Council members visited the sleek centre, a futuristic-looking room filled with a multitude of monitoring screens.

  5. Opportunity Centred Learning: An Innovation in Enterprise Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, David

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an approach called opportunity centred learning that has been developed by the author and applied in the field of enterprise education. The relationship between opportunity centred learning and existing theory and practice in learning and education is outlined in comparison with problem-based learning and action learning, and…

  6. In vitro expansion of human cardiac progenitor cells: exploring 'omics tools for characterization of cell-based allogeneic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Alves, P; Serra, M; Brito, C; Ricardo, C P; Cunha, R; Sousa, M F; Sanchez, B; Bernad, A; Carrondo, M J T; Rodriguez-Borlado, L; Alves, P M

    2016-05-01

    Human cardiac stem/progenitor cells (hCPCs) have been shown to be capable to regenerate contractile myocardium. However, because of their relative low abundance in the heart, in vitro expansion of hCPC is mandatory to achieve necessary quantities for allogeneic or autologous cardiac regeneration therapy applications (10(6)-10(9) cells/patient). Up to now, cell number requirements of ongoing phase I/IIa trials have been fulfilled with production in static monolayer cultures. However, this manufacturing process poses critical limitations when moving to the following clinical phases where hundreds of patients will be enrolled. For this, increased process yield is required, while guaranteeing the quality of the cell-based products. In this work, we developed and validated a robust, scalable, and good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible bioprocess for the expansion of high-quality hCPC. We applied platforms extensively used by the biopharmaceutical industry, such as microcarrier technology and stirred systems, and assessed culture conditions' impact on hCPC's quality and potency, as required by regulatory agencies. Complementary analytical assays including gene expression microarrays and mass spectrometry-based approaches were explored to compare transcriptome, proteome, surface markers, and secretion profiles of hCPC cultured in static monolayers and in stirred microcarrier-based systems. Our results show that stirred microcarrier-based culture systems enabled achieving more than 3-fold increase in hCPC expansion, when compared with traditional static monolayers, while retaining cell's phenotype and similar "omics" profiles. These findings demonstrate that this change in the production process does not affect cell's identity and quality, with potential to be translated into a transversal production platform for clinical development of stem-cell therapies. PMID:26924043

  7. Holter monitoring for the screening of cardiac disease in diabetes mellitus: The non-invasive Holter monitoring observation of new cardiac events in diabetics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Yoko M; Ueshima, Kenji; Nohara, Ryuji; Mizunuma, Yoshimi; Segawa, Ikuo; Tanaka-Mizuno, Sachiko; Yasuno, Shinji; Nakao, Kazuwa; Hiramori, Katsuhiko; Kihara, Yasuki

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the usefulness of Holter monitoring to detect cardiac disease and predict future cardiovascular risk in asymptomatic diabetic patients. This is a multi-centre, prospective study in 406 asymptomatic diabetic patients. They were categorized into three groups based on findings of Holter monitoring. A total of 377 met inclusion criteria and were classified as low (n = 172), moderate (n = 136) and high risk (n = 69). In total, 86 in moderate and 53 in high risk receive further evaluation. In total, 29 in moderate and 25 in high risk were diagnosed as cardiac disease and 12 required additional treatment, including coronary intervention. Over 1.8 years of mean follow-up, 11 (16.5 per 1000 person-years) experienced cardiovascular events. The cumulative incidence in moderate and high risk was higher than that in low risk (p = 0.029 and p = 0.014, respectively). Our study suggests that Holter monitoring may be a useful screening tool to detect cardiac disease and predict future cardiovascular risk in asymptomatic diabetic patients.

  8. Cardiac tumours in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac tumours are benign or malignant neoplasms arising primarily in the inner lining, muscle layer, or the surrounding pericardium of the heart. They can be primary or metastatic. Primary cardiac tumours are rare in paediatric practice with a prevalence of 0.0017 to 0.28 in autopsy series. In contrast, the incidence of cardiac tumours during foetal life has been reported to be approximately 0.14%. The vast majority of primary cardiac tumours in children are benign, whilst approximately 10% are malignant. Secondary malignant tumours are 10–20 times more prevalent than primary malignant tumours. Rhabdomyoma is the most common cardiac tumour during foetal life and childhood. It accounts for more than 60% of all primary cardiac tumours. The frequency and type of cardiac tumours in adults differ from those in children with 75% being benign and 25% being malignant. Myxomas are the most common primary tumours in adults constituting 40% of benign tumours. Sarcomas make up 75% of malignant cardiac masses. Echocardiography, Computing Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the heart are the main non-invasive diagnostic tools. Cardiac catheterisation is seldom necessary. Tumour biopsy with histological assessment remains the gold standard for confirmation of the diagnosis. Surgical resection of primary cardiac tumours should be considered to relieve symptoms and mechanical obstruction to blood flow. The outcome of surgical resection in symptomatic, non-myxomatous benign cardiac tumours is favourable. Patients with primary cardiac malignancies may benefit from palliative surgery but this approach should not be recommended for patients with metastatic cardiac tumours. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy may prolong survival. The prognosis for malignant primary cardiac tumours is generally extremely poor.

  9. Algorithms Based on CWT and Classifiers to Control Cardiac Alterations and Stress Using an ECG and a SCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaia Méndez Zorrilla

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of using a commercial pulsimeter as an electrocardiogram (ECG for wireless detection of cardiac alterations and stress levels for home control. For these purposes, signal processing techniques (Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT and J48 have been used, respectively. The designed algorithm analyses the ECG signal and is able to detect the heart rate (99.42%, arrhythmia (93.48% and extrasystoles (99.29%. The detection of stress level is complemented with Skin Conductance Response (SCR, whose success is 94.02%. The heart rate variability does not show added value to the stress detection in this case. With this pulsimeter, it is possible to prevent and detect anomalies for a non-intrusive way associated to a telemedicine system. It is also possible to use it during physical activity due to the fact the CWT minimizes the motion artifacts.

  10. Optical control of cardiac cell excitability based on two-photon infrared absorption of AzoTAB

    CERN Document Server

    Shcherbakov, D; Erofeev, I; Astafiev, A

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies of AzoTAB activity in excitable cell cultures have shown that this substance is able to control excitability depending on isomer, cis or trans, predominating in the cellular membrane. Control of isomerization can be performed noninvasively by UV-visual radiation. At the same time it is well-known that azobenezenes can be effectively transformed from one isomer into another by two-photon absorption. Current work is devoted to the study of trans-AzoTAB two-photon transformation in aqueous solution and inside primal neonatal contractive rat cardiomyocytes. In accordance with results obtained Azo-TAB can be used as a probe for two-photon optical control of cardiac excitability.

  11. Algorithms based on CWT and classifiers to control cardiac alterations and stress using an ECG and a SCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarejo, María Viqueira; Zapirain, Begoña García; Zorrilla, Amaia Méndez

    2013-05-10

    This paper presents the results of using a commercial pulsimeter as an electrocardiogram (ECG) for wireless detection of cardiac alterations and stress levels for home control. For these purposes, signal processing techniques (Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) and J48) have been used, respectively. The designed algorithm analyses the ECG signal and is able to detect the heart rate (99.42%), arrhythmia (93.48%) and extrasystoles (99.29%). The detection of stress level is complemented with Skin Conductance Response (SCR), whose success is 94.02%. The heart rate variability does not show added value to the stress detection in this case. With this pulsimeter, it is possible to prevent and detect anomalies for a non-intrusive way associated to a telemedicine system. It is also possible to use it during physical activity due to the fact the CWT minimizes the motion artifacts.

  12. The group-based social skills training SOSTA-FRA in children and adolescents with high functioning autism spectrum disorder - study protocol of the randomised, multi-centre controlled SOSTA - net trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freitag Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group-based social skills training (SST has repeatedly been recommended as treatment of choice in high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD. To date, no sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial has been performed to establish efficacy and safety of SST in children and adolescents with HFASD. In this randomised, multi-centre, controlled trial with 220 children and adolescents with HFASD it is hypothesized, that add-on group-based SST using the 12 weeks manualised SOSTA–FRA program will result in improved social responsiveness (measured by the parent rated social responsiveness scale, SRS compared to treatment as usual (TAU. It is further expected, that parent and self reported anxiety and depressive symptoms will decline and pro-social behaviour will increase in the treatment group. A neurophysiological study in the Frankfurt HFASD subgroup will be performed pre- and post treatment to assess changes in neural function induced by SST versus TAU. Methods/design The SOSTA – net trial is designed as a prospective, randomised, multi-centre, controlled trial with two parallel groups. The primary outcome is change in SRS score directly after the intervention and at 3 months follow-up. Several secondary outcome measures are also obtained. The target sample consists of 220 individuals with ASD, included at the six study centres. Discussion This study is currently one of the largest trials on SST in children and adolescents with HFASD worldwide. Compared to recent randomised controlled studies, our study shows several advantages with regard to in- and exclusion criteria, study methods, and the therapeutic approach chosen, which can be easily implemented in non-university-based clinical settings. Trial registration ISRCTN94863788 – SOSTA – net: Group-based social skills training in children and adolescents with high functioning autism spectrum disorder.

  13. Correlation of CT-based regional cardiac function (SQUEEZ) with myocardial strain calculated from tagged MRI: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmorteza, Amir; Chen, Marcus Y; van der Pals, Jesper; Arai, Andrew E; McVeigh, Elliot R

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between local myocardial function estimates from CT and myocardial strain from tagged MRI in the same heart. Accurate detection of regional myocardial dysfunction can be an important finding in the diagnosis of functionally significant coronary artery disease. Tagged MRI is currently a reference standard for noninvasive regional myocardial function analysis; however, it has practical drawbacks. We have developed a CT imaging protocol and automated image analysis algorithm for estimating regional cardiac function from a few heartbeats. This method tracks the motion of the left ventricular (LV) endocardial surface to produce local function maps: we call the method Stretch Quantification of Endocardial Engraved Zones (SQUEEZ). Myocardial infarction was created by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery for 2 h followed by reperfusion in canine models. Tagged and cine MRI scans were performed during the reperfusion phase and first-pass contrast enhanced CT scans were acquired. The average delay between the CT and MRI scans was myocardial strain (Ecc) was calculated from the tagged MRI data. The agreement between peak systolic Ecc and SQUEEZ was investigated in 162 segments in the 9 hearts. Linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the correlation between the two metrics of local LV function. The results show good agreement between SQUEEZ and Ecc: (r = 0.71, slope = 0.78, p function. The good agreement between the estimates of local myocardial function obtained from CT SQUEEZ and tagged MRI provides encouragement to investigate the use of SQUEEZ for measuring regional cardiac function at a low clinical dose in humans.

  14. Yoga based cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery: One-year results on LVEF, lipid profile and psychological states – A randomized controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuram, Nagarathna; Parachuri, Venkateshwara Rao; Swarnagowri, M.V.; Babu, Suresh; Chaku, Ritu; Kulkarni, Ravi; Bhuyan, Bhagavan; Bhargav, Hemant; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the long term effects of yoga based cardiac rehabilitation program with only physiotherapy based program as an add-on to conventional rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) on risk factors. Methods In this single blind prospective randomized parallel two armed active control study, 1026 patients posted for CABG at Narayana Hrudayalaya Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Bengaluru (India) were screened. Of these, 250 male participants (35–65 years) who satisfied the selection criteria and consented were randomized into two groups. Within and between group comparisons were done at three points of follow up (i.e. 6th week, 6th month, and 12th month) by using Wilcoxon's signed ranks test and Mann Whitney U test respectively. Results Yoga group had significantly (p = 0.001, Mann Whitney) better improvement in LVEF than control group in those with abnormal baseline EF (<53%) after 1 year. There was a better reduction in BMI in the yoga group (p = 0.038, between groups) in those with high baseline BMI (≥23) after 12 months. Yoga group showed significant (p = 0.008, Wilcoxon's) reduction in blood glucose at one year in those with high baseline FBS ≥110 mg/dl. There was significantly better improvement in yoga than the control group in HDL (p = 0.003), LDL (p = 0.01) and VLDL (p = 0.03) in those with abnormal baseline values. There was significantly better improvement (p = 0.02, between groups) in positive affect in yoga group. Within Yoga group, there was significant decrease in perceived stress (p = 0.001), anxiety (p = 0.001), depression (p = 0.001), and negative affect (p = 0.03) while in the control group there was reduction (p = 0.003) only in scores on anxiety. Conclusion Addition of yoga based relaxation to conventional post-CABG cardiac rehabilitation helps in better management of risk factors in those with abnormal baseline values and may help in preventing recurrence. PMID:25443601

  15. MR-based attenuation correction for cardiac FDG PET on a hybrid PET/MRI scanner: comparison with standard CT attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vontobel, Jan; Liga, Riccardo; Possner, Mathias; Clerc, Olivier F.; Mikulicic, Fran; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Voert, Edwin E.G.W. ter; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Stehli, Julia; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Benz, Dominik C.; Graeni, Christoph; Gaemperli, Oliver; Herzog, Bernhard; Buechel, Ronny R.; Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of attenuation correction (AC) for cardiac {sup 18}F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) using MR-based attenuation maps. We included 23 patients with no known cardiac history undergoing whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging for oncological indications on a PET/CT scanner using time-of-flight (TOF) and subsequent whole-body PET/MR imaging on an investigational hybrid PET/MRI scanner. Data sets from PET/MRI (with and without TOF) were reconstructed using MR AC and semi-quantitative segmental (20-segment model) myocardial tracer uptake (per cent of maximum) and compared to PET/CT which was reconstructed using CT AC and served as standard of reference. Excellent correlations were found for regional uptake values between PET/CT and PET/MRI with TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.913; p < 0.0001) with narrow Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-8.5 to +12.6 %). Correlation coefficients were slightly lower between PET/CT and PET/MRI without TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.851; p < 0.0001) with broader Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-12.5 to +15.0 %). PET/MRI with and without TOF showed minimal underestimation of tracer uptake (-2.08 and -1.29 %, respectively), compared to PET/CT. Relative myocardial FDG uptake obtained from MR-based attenuation corrected FDG PET is highly comparable to standard CT-based attenuation corrected FDG PET, suggesting interchangeability of both AC techniques. (orig.)

  16. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  17. The Aube centre; Le Centre de l`Aube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This educational booklet is devoted to a general presentation of the Aube radioactive wastes storage centre. After a short presentation of the Andra, the French national agency for the management of radioactive wastes, it gives some general information about radioactive wastes (origin, classification), containers (quality assurance and different types), wastes transportation (planning, safety), and about the Aube centre itself: description, treatment and conditioning of drums (compacting and injection), storage facilities, geological situation of the site, and environmental controls. (J.S.)

  18. Non-cardiac QTc-prolonging drugs and the risk of sudden cardiac death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straus, SMJM; Sturkenboom, MCJM; Bleumink, GS; van der Lei, J; de Graeff, PA; Kingma, JH; Stricker, BHC

    2005-01-01

    Aims To assess the association between the use of non-cardiac QTc-prolonging drugs and the risk of sudden cardiac death. Methods and results A population-based case-control study was performed in the Integrated Primary Care Information (IPCI) project, a longitudinal observational database with compl

  19. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient\\'s cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulseless

  20. Contemporary design for 'landmark' centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    As one of the UK's largest builders of healthcare facilities, construction company Morgan Ashurst is accustomed to delivering complex, challenging hospital projects. The construction of a new oncology centre at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton for Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust-- said to be the first new stand-alone radiotherapy centre to be built in the UK for almost 20 years--was no exception. Health Estate Journal reports. PMID:19711668

  1. A High-Performance Fluorescence Immunoassay Based on the Relaxation of Quenching, Exemplified by Detection of Cardiac Troponin I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Wan Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The intramolecular fluorescence self-quenching phenomenon is a major drawback in developing high-performance fluorometric biosensors which use common fluorophores as signal generators. We propose two strategies involving liberation of the fluorescent molecules by means of enzymatic fragmentation of protein or dehybridization of double-stranded DNA. In the former, bovine serum albumin (BSA was coupled with the fluorescent BODIPY dye (Red BSA, and then immobilized on a solid surface. When the insolubilized Red BSA was treated with proteinase K (10 units/mL for 30 min, the fluorescent signal was significantly increased (3.5-fold compared to the untreated control. In the second case, fluorophore-tagged DNA probes were linked to gold nanoparticles by hybridization with capture DNA strands densely immobilized on the surface. The quenched fluorescence signal was recovered (3.7-fold by thermal dehybridization, which was induced with light of a specific wavelength (e.g., 530 nm for less than 1 min. We next applied the Red BSA self-quenching relaxation technique employing enzymatic fragmentation to a high-performance immunoassay of cardiac troponin I (cTnI in a microtiter plate format. The detection limit was 0.19 ng/mL cTnI, and the fluorescent signal was enhanced approximately 4.1-fold compared with the conventional method of direct measurement of the fluorescent signal from a non-fragmented fluorophore-labeled antibody.

  2. A High-Performance Fluorescence Immunoassay Based on the Relaxation of Quenching, Exemplified by Detection of Cardiac Troponin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Wan; Cho, Il-Hoon; Park, Ji-Na; Seo, Sung-Min; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular fluorescence self-quenching phenomenon is a major drawback in developing high-performance fluorometric biosensors which use common fluorophores as signal generators. We propose two strategies involving liberation of the fluorescent molecules by means of enzymatic fragmentation of protein or dehybridization of double-stranded DNA. In the former, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was coupled with the fluorescent BODIPY dye (Red BSA), and then immobilized on a solid surface. When the insolubilized Red BSA was treated with proteinase K (10 units/mL) for 30 min, the fluorescent signal was significantly increased (3.5-fold) compared to the untreated control. In the second case, fluorophore-tagged DNA probes were linked to gold nanoparticles by hybridization with capture DNA strands densely immobilized on the surface. The quenched fluorescence signal was recovered (3.7-fold) by thermal dehybridization, which was induced with light of a specific wavelength (e.g., 530 nm) for less than 1 min. We next applied the Red BSA self-quenching relaxation technique employing enzymatic fragmentation to a high-performance immunoassay of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in a microtiter plate format. The detection limit was 0.19 ng/mL cTnI, and the fluorescent signal was enhanced approximately 4.1-fold compared with the conventional method of direct measurement of the fluorescent signal from a non-fragmented fluorophore-labeled antibody.

  3. Training centres - organization and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the lecture 'Training centres - organization and management' some principles and requirements which influence the organization, management and activity pattern of nuclear training centres, are briefly introduced. It is demonstrated, step by step, how these general principles are implemented in the development of the Czechoslovak nuclear power programme, it means, how the training of the NPP personnel proceeds in Czechoslovak nuclear training centres. General principles which are selected: a connection between the capacity of the training centre and the scope and needs of the nuclear power programme, a position of the training center within the institutional set-up, a structure and organization of the training system which complies with the system of NPP construction, reflect the pattern and the activity of the nuclear training centre and nuclear power technical level, a research group of workers in the nuclear training centre, main tasks and technical facilities, management of the training process and a transfer of knowledge and research results into the training process. The lecture is supplemented by pictures and slides. (orig.)

  4. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  5. The Centres for Environment-friendly Energy Research (FME)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    High expectations for Norway's Centres for Environment-friendly Energy Research (FME).The FME centres address a broad range of areas, allcentral to developing the energy sector of the future. The activities of the eight centres established in 2009 focus on renewable energy, raising energy efficiency, energy planning, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). In 2011 three new FME centres were established which focus on social science-related energy research. The FME scheme is a direct follow-up of the broad-based political agreement on climate policy achieved in the Storting in January 2008, and of the national RandD Energi21 strategy submitted in February 2008 to the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. In April 2008 the Research Council of Norway's Executive Board decided to launch a process to establish centres for environment-friendly energy research, and a funding announcement was issued that same year. In 2010 it was decided that additional FME centres would be established in the field of social science-related energy research. After a thorough assessment of each project (based on feasibility, scientific merit, potential to generate value creation and innovation, and composition of the consortium) eight applicants were selected to become FME centres in February 2009. A new call for proposals was issued in 2010, and three more centres were awarded FME status in February 2011. The objective of the FME scheme is to establish time-limited research centres which conduct concentrated, focused and long-term research of high international calibre in order to solve specific challenges in the energy sphere. The selected centres must exhibit higher goals, a longer-term perspective and a more concentrated focus than is required under other funding instruments for the same scientific area. The make-up of the centres is critical to achieving this objective. The centres bring together Norway's leading research institutions and key players in private enterprise, the

  6. Evolution of the CANDU control centre design process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the CANDU NPP control centre and the associated control centre design process has evolved considerably over several generations of plants, from Douglas Point through Darlington, and beyond, to new designs like CANDU 3. In the early plants, the control centre configuration had to be based on designers' projections of control interface requirements. With succeeding generations of designs, along with the introduction of advancing computer control technology, a larger based of operational experience has been factored into the control interface design, and increasing attention has been given to more formal requirements definition, and more systematic consideration of human factors aspects of the design

  7. CMS Centres Worldwide - a New Collaborative Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Lucas

    2011-01-01

    Webcasts, and generic Web tools such as CMS-TV for broadcasting live monitoring and outreach information. Being Web-based and experiment-independent, these systems could easily be extended to other organizations. We describe the experiences of using CMS Centres Worldwide in the CMS data-taking operations as well as for major media events with several hundred TV channels, radio stations, and many more press journalists simultaneously around the world.

  8. Image-based view-angle independent cardiorespiratory motion gating and coronary sinus catheter tracking for x-ray-guided cardiac electrophysiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of the cardiorespiratory phase of the heart has numerous applications during cardiac imaging. In this article we propose a novel view-angle independent near-real time cardiorespiratory motion gating and coronary sinus (CS) catheter tracking technique for x-ray fluoroscopy images that are used to guide cardiac electrophysiology procedures. The method is based on learning CS catheter motion using principal component analysis and then applying the derived motion model to unseen images taken at arbitrary projections, using the epipolar constraint. This method is also able to track the CS catheter throughout the x-ray images in any arbitrary subsequent view. We also demonstrate the clinical application of our model on rotational angiography sequences. We validated our technique in normal and very low dose phantom and clinical datasets. For the normal dose clinical images we established average systole, end-expiration and end-inspiration gating success rates of 100%, 85.7%, and 92.3%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the technique was able to track the CS catheter with median errors not exceeding 1 mm for all tracked electrodes. Average gating success rates of 80.3%, 71.4%, and 69.2% were established for the application of the technique on clinical datasets, even with a dose reduction of more than 10 times. In rotational sequences at normal dose, CS tracking median errors were within 1.2 mm for all electrodes, and the gating success rate was 100%, for view angles from RAO 90° to LAO 90°. This view-angle independent technique can extract clinically useful cardiorespiratory motion information using x-ray doses significantly lower than those currently used in clinical practice. (paper)

  9. RF-based two-dimensional cardiac strain estimation: a validation study in a tissue-mimicking phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeland, Stian; D'hooge, Jan; Claessens, Tom; Claus, Piet; Verdonck, Pascal; Suetens, Paul; Sutherland, George R; Bijnens, Bart

    2004-11-01

    Strain and strain rate imaging have been shown to be useful techniques for the assessment of cardiac function. However, one of the major problems of these techniques is their angle dependency. In order to overcome this problem, a new method for estimating the strain (rate) tensor had previously been proposed by our lab. The aim of this study was to validate this methodology in a phantom setup. A tubular thick-walled tissue-mimicking phantom was fixed in a water tank. Varying the intraluminal pressure resulted in a cyclic radial deformation. The 2D strain was calculated from the 2D velocity estimates, obtained from 2D radio frequency (RF) tracking using a 1D kernel. Additionally, ultrasonic microcrystals were implanted on the outer and inner walls of the tube in order to give an independent measurement of the instantaneous wall thickness. The two methods were compared by means of linear regression, the correlation coefficient, and Bland-Altman statistics. As expected, the strain estimates dominated by the azimuth velocity component were less accurate than the ones dominated by the axial velocity component. Correlation coefficients were found to be r = 0.78 for the former estimates and r = 0.83 was found for the latter. Given that the overall shape and timing of the 2D deformation were very accurate (r = 0.95 and r = 0.84), these results were within acceptable limits for clinical applications. The 2D RF-tracking using a 1D kernel thus allows for 2D, and therefore angle-independent, strain estimation. PMID:15600099

  10. Is levosimendan effective in paediatric heart failure and post-cardiac surgeries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angadi, Ullas; Westrope, Claire; Chowdhry, Mohammed F

    2013-10-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'do children with heart failure post-cardiac surgery undergoing treatment with levosimendan have an acceptable haemodynamic improvement?' The use of levosimendan as a vasoactive drug is an accepted intervention for patients with altered haemodynamics post-cardiac surgeries. However, the role of levosimendan and its efficacy have been debated. Eleven relevant papers were identified, which represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date, country of publication and relevant outcomes are tabulated. The 11 studies comprised 3 randomized trials, 2 of which compared levosimendan and milrinone. A single-centre randomized study that included 40 infants showed that cardiac output (CO) and cardiac index (CI) increased overtime in the levosimendan group compared with the milrinone group. The significant interaction for CO (P = 0.005) and CI (P = 0.007) indicated different time courses in the two groups. A similar, European randomized study undertaken on neonates (n = 63) showed better lactate levels [P = 0.015 (intensive care admission); P = 0.048 (after 6 h) with low inotropic scores in the levosimendan group. Although the length of mechanical ventilation and mortality were less, this was statistically insignificant. A retrospective cohort analysis (n = 13) in children reported a reduced use of dobutamine and improvement in the ejection fraction from 29.8 to 40.5% (P = 0.015) with the use of levosimendan. In a questionnaire-based study from Finland, 61.1% of respondents felt that it had saved the lives of some children when the other treatments had failed. No study reported any adverse effect attributable to use of levosimendan. In conclusion, the above studies were in favour of levosimendan as a safe and feasible drug providing potential clinical benefit in low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) and post-cardiac surgeries when

  11. Child Care Centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Dept. of Labour and National Service, Melbourne. Women's Bureau.

    Based on a survey of legislation relating to full-day care for preschool children of working mothers and a study of records, this report: (1) covers the number of registered child care centers in Australia and the number of children being served, (2) sets the conditions applying to registration of centers, (3) indicates the extent and levels of…

  12. Sexual Dysfunction before and after Cardiac Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Jörg Schumann; Zellweger, Michael J.; Marcello Di Valentino; Simone Piazzalonga; Andreas Hoffmann

    2010-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess sexual function before and after cardiac rehabilitation in relation to medical variables. Methods. Analysis of patients participating in a 12-week exercise-based outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (OCR) between April 1999 and December 2007. Exercise capacity (ExC) and quality of life including sexual function were assessed before and after OCR. Results. Complete data were available in 896 male patients. No sexual activity at all was indic...

  13. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  14. Frequency selectivity at very low centre frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Carlos Andrés Jurado; Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Marquardt, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    A significant factor in the decrease of sensitivity to low-frequency sound is the helicotrema shunt effect. In humans, it causes a slope increase of the middle-ear transfer function (METF) from 6 dB/oct to 12 dB/oct below approximately 50 Hz [Marquardt et al., J.Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 3628...... measurements based on OAE suppression techniques and notched-noise masking data psychophysically measured for centre frequencies in the range 50-125 Hz, this study examines how individual differences in frequency selectivity, as well as in masking, may occur at very low CFs due to individual differences......-3638 (2007)]. Recent experiments showed that the exact frequency varies from individual to individual. Besides, the helicotrema region in the METF has been found to highly influence frequency selectivity for centre frequencies (CFs) below 80 Hz (Jurado and Moore in prep). By using individual METF...

  15. Assessment on 900–1300 MWe PWRs of the ASTEC-based simulation tool of SGTR thermal-hydraulics for the IRSN Emergency Technical Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foucher, L., E-mail: laurent.foucher@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SAG, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France); Cousin, F.; Fleurot, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SAG, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France); Brethes, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-CRI/SESUC, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France)

    2014-06-01

    In the event of an accident occurring in a nuclear power plant (NPP), being able to predict the amount of released radioactive substances in the environment is of prime importance. Depending on the severity of the accident, it can be necessary to quickly and efficiently protect the population and the surrounding environment from the associated radiological consequences. In France, the IRSN Emergency Technical Centre provides a technical support in decision making in case of a nuclear accident. The main objectives are to evaluate and predict the plant behaviour and radioactive releases during the accident. Different types of complementary tools are used: expert assessments, pre-calculated databases, simulation tools, etc. In the case of Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) accidents that may lead to significant radioactive releases to the atmosphere through the steam generator relief valves, IRSN is currently improving the simulation tools for diagnosis in crisis management. The objective is to adapt the thermal-hydraulic and FP behaviour modules of the severe accident integral code ASTEC V2.0, jointly developed by IRSN and its German counterpart GRS, to crisis management requirements. These requirements impose a fast running, highly reliable (accurate physical results), flexible and simple tool. This paper summarizes the results of the benchmarks between the ASTEC V2.0 thermal-hydraulic module and the CATHARE 2 (V2.5) French reference thermal-hydraulics code on several SGTR scenarios both for PWR 900 and 1300 MWe, with a particular emphasis on the computational time and physical models assessment. The overall agreement between both codes is good on the primary and secondary circuit thermal-hydraulic parameters. Moreover, the reliability and fast computational time of the thermal-hydraulic module of ASTEC V2.0 code appeared very satisfactory and in accordance with the requirements of an emergency tool.

  16. The Galactic centre pulsar population

    CERN Document Server

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of a magnetar in the Galactic centre region has allowed Spitler et al. to characterize the interstellar scattering in that direction. They find that the temporal broadening of the pulse profile of the magnetar is substantially less than that predicted by models of the electron density of that region. This raises the question of what the plausible limits for the number of potentially observable pulsars - i.e., the number of pulsars beaming towards the Earth - in the Galactic centre region are. In this paper, using realistic assumptions, we show that the potentially observable population of pulsars in the inner parsec has a conservative upper limit of $\\sim$950, and that it is premature to conclude that the number of pulsars in this region is small. We also show that the observational results so far are consistent with this number and make predictions for future radio pulsar surveys of the Galactic centre.

  17. Construction of the Wigner Data Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    A remote extension of the CERN data centre has recently been inaugurated. Hosted at the Wigner Research Centre for Physics in Hungary, it provides extra computing power required to cover CERN’s needs. This video presents the construction of the Wigner Data Centre from initial demolishing work through to its completion and details the major technical characteristics of the Data Centre.

  18. The experience of work in a call centre environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanet Hauptfleisch

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research study explored the work experience in a call centre environment in an information technology call centre based in South Africa, which service foreign customers exclusively. Three data collection methods were used, namely narratives, in-depth interviews with call centre consultants, and observation. Following a grounded theory approach, four themes were elicited, namely the perceptions of team members, uncertainty created by a constantly changing environment, perceived distances due to management practices, and depersonalisation experienced while actually dealing with customers. In addition to this, the reported impact of these themes on work performance was explored and compared to existing research.

  19. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  20. [Cardiac evaluation before non-cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzenbach, Jan; Boehm, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    Before non-cardiac surgery, evaluation of cardiac function is no frequent part of surgical treatment. European societies of anesthesiology and cardiology published consensus-guidelines in 2014 to present a reasonable approach for preoperative evaluation. This paper intends to differentiate the composite of perioperative risk and to display the guidelines methodical approach to handle it. Features to identify patients at risk from an ageing population with comorbidities, are the classification of surgical risk, functional capacity and risk indices. Application of diagnostic means, should be used adjusted to this risk estimation. Cardiac biomarkers are useful to discover risk of complications or mortality, that cannot be assessed by clinical signs. After preoperative optimization and perioperative cardiac protection, the observation of the postoperative period remains, to prohibit complications or even death. In consideration of limited resources of intensive care department, postoperative ward rounds beyond intensive care units are considered to be an appropriate instrument to avoid or recognize complications early to reduce postoperative mortality. PMID:27479258

  1. Cardiac assessment of African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Peter A; Marshall, Cecilia; Seyfried, Alice W; Bartin, Anne M

    2011-03-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a common finding in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) at postmortem exam. To date, treatment attempts have been mostly empirical and unrewarding. The objective of this study was to determine reference cardiac values for captive African hedgehogs based on echocardiogram, electrocardiogram (ECG), and radiographs. Adult African hedgehogs with no clinical signs of cardiac disease (n = 13) were selected. Each animal was anesthetized with isoflurane via facemask and an echocardiogram, ECG, and radiographs were performed. Standard measurements were taken and the descriptive statistics performed. Values were comparable to limited data available in other hedgehog species and other similar-sized exotic species. Two animals were removed from consideration of reference values due to valvular defects that were considered significant. These data are the first establishing cardiac parameters in normal African hedgehogs using radiographic cardiac measurement, echocardiogram, and ECG. Evaluating animals with possible cardiomyopathy may allow for earlier diagnosis and more successful treatment. PMID:22946370

  2. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...... is based on determination of the left-ventricular endocardial and epicardial borders. Since manual border detection is laborious, automated segmentation is highly desirable as a fast, objective and reproducible alternative. Automated segmentation will thus enhance comparability between and within cardiac...... studies and increase accuracy by allowing acquisition of thinner MRI-slices. This abstract demonstrates that statistical models of shape and appearance, namely the deformable models: Active Appearance Models, can successfully segment cardiac MRIs....

  3. Iterative deconvolution of simultaneous {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 201}Tl projection data measured on a CdZnTe-based cardiac SPECT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacperski, Krzysztof; Erlandsson, Kjell; Ben-Haim, Simona; Hutton, Brian F, E-mail: k.kacperski@zfm.coi.pl [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-07

    We present a method of correcting self-scatter and crosstalk effects in simultaneous technetium-99m/thallium-201 stress/rest myocardial perfusion (single photon emission computed tomography) SPECT scans. The method, which is in essence a hybrid between the triple energy window method and scatter modelling, is based on a model of spatial and spectral distribution of projection counts in several selected energy windows. The parameters of the model are determined from measurements of thin rod sources in air when no in-object scatter or attenuation effects are present. The model equations are solved using the iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm in the projection space to find estimates of the primary photopeak counts of both radionuclides. The method has been developed particularly for a novel dedicated cardiac camera based on CdZnTe pixellated detectors, although it can also be adapted to a conventional scintillator camera. The method has been validated in anthropomorphic phantom experiments. Significant improvement in defect contrast has been observed with only moderate increase in image noise. The application of the method to patient data is illustrated.

  4. Iterative deconvolution of simultaneous 99mTc and 201Tl projection data measured on a CdZnTe-based cardiac SPECT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacperski, Krzysztof; Erlandsson, Kjell; Ben-Haim, Simona; Hutton, Brian F.

    2011-03-01

    We present a method of correcting self-scatter and crosstalk effects in simultaneous technetium-99m/thallium-201 stress/rest myocardial perfusion (single photon emission computed tomography) SPECT scans. The method, which is in essence a hybrid between the triple energy window method and scatter modelling, is based on a model of spatial and spectral distribution of projection counts in several selected energy windows. The parameters of the model are determined from measurements of thin rod sources in air when no in-object scatter or attenuation effects are present. The model equations are solved using the iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm in the projection space to find estimates of the primary photopeak counts of both radionuclides. The method has been developed particularly for a novel dedicated cardiac camera based on CdZnTe pixellated detectors, although it can also be adapted to a conventional scintillator camera. The method has been validated in anthropomorphic phantom experiments. Significant improvement in defect contrast has been observed with only moderate increase in image noise. The application of the method to patient data is illustrated.

  5. Flipping the advanced cardiac life support classroom with team-based learning: comparison of cognitive testing performance for medical students at the University of California, Irvine, United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen-Osborn

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: It aimed to find if written test results improved for advanced cardiac life support (ACLS taught in flipped classroom/team-based Learning (FC/TBL vs. lecture-based (LB control in University of California-Irvine School of Medicine, USA. Methods: Medical students took 2010 ACLS with FC/TBL (2015, compared to 3 classes in LB (2012-14 format. There were 27.5 hours of instruction for FC/TBL model (TBL 10.5, podcasts 9, small-group simulation 8 hours, and 20 (12 lecture, simulation 8 hours in LB. TBL covered 13 cardiac cases; LB had none. Seven simulation cases and didactic content were the same by lecture (2012-14 or podcast (2015 as was testing: 50 multiple-choice questions (MCQ, 20 rhythm matchings, and 7 fill-in clinical cases. Results: 354 students took the course (259 [73.1%] in LB in 2012-14, and 95 [26.9%] in FC/TBL in 2015. Two of 3 tests (MCQ and fill-in improved for FC/TBL. Overall, median scores increased from 93.5% (IQR 90.6, 95.4 to 95.1% (92.8, 96.7, P=0.0001. For the fill-in test: 94.1% for LB (89.6, 97.2 to 96.6% for FC/TBL (92.4, 99.20 P=0.0001. For MC: 88% for LB (84, 92 to 90% for FC/TBL (86, 94, P=0.0002. For the rhythm test: median 100% for both formats. More students failed 1 of 3 tests with LB vs. FC/TBL (24.7% vs. 14.7%, and 2 or 3 components (8.1% vs. 3.2%, P=0.006. Conversely, 82.1% passed all 3 with FC/TBL vs. 67.2% with LB (difference 14.9%, 95% CI 4.8-24.0%. Conclusion: A FC/TBL format for ACLS marginally improved written test results.

  6. Flipping the advanced cardiac life support classroom with team-based learning: comparison of cognitive testing performance for medical students at the University of California, Irvine, United State

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: It aimed to find if written test results improved for advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) taught in flipped classroom/team-based Learning (FC/TBL) vs. lecture-based (LB) control in University of California-Irvine School of Medicine, USA. Methods: Medical students took 2010 ACLS with FC/TBL (2015), compared to 3 classes in LB (2012-14) format. There were 27.5 hours of instruction for FC/TBL model (TBL 10.5, podcasts 9, small-group simulation 8 hours), and 20 (12 lecture, simulation 8 hours) in LB. TBL covered 13 cardiac cases; LB had none. Seven simulation cases and didactic content were the same by lecture (2012-14) or podcast (2015) as was testing: 50 multiple-choice questions (MCQ), 20 rhythm matchings, and 7 fill-in clinical cases. Results: 354 students took the course (259 [73.1%] in LB in 2012-14, and 95 [26.9%] in FC/TBL in 2015). Two of 3 tests (MCQ and fill-in) improved for FC/TBL. Overall, median scores increased from 93.5% (IQR 90.6, 95.4) to 95.1% (92.8, 96.7, P=0.0001). For the fill-in test: 94.1% for LB (89.6, 97.2) to 96.6% for FC/TBL (92.4, 99.20 P=0.0001). For MC: 88% for LB (84, 92) to 90% for FC/TBL (86, 94, P=0.0002). For the rhythm test: median 100% for both formats. More students failed 1 of 3 tests with LB vs. FC/TBL (24.7% vs. 14.7%), and 2 or 3 components (8.1% vs. 3.2%, P=0.006). Conversely, 82.1% passed all 3 with FC/TBL vs. 67.2% with LB (difference 14.9%, 95% CI 4.8-24.0%). Conclusion: A FC/TBL format for ACLS marginally improved written test results. PMID:26893399

  7. The Australian centre for RF bioeffects research (ACRBR) - an NHMRC centre of research excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    research are already adequately covered the internationally based IARC study. However, epidemiological research investigating associations of mobile phone exposure and non-malignant health outcomes in the general community is less well treated. A cohort study of teenage school children, an age group identified as a priority research area, will be monitored for an initial period of three years. Dosimetry: Technical reviews consistently identified rigorous dosimetry as a key issue for ensuring the validity of results within a given study and consistency of results between studies. This requires that a well-characterised standard methodology and suite of tools be utilised for the provision of dosimetry to research programs that are run within the Centre. The technical reviews have also raised concerns regarding the application of compliance techniques in RF human exposure standards, based on adult models, to children. Further, there remain questions as to applicability of current compliance techniques to the rapidly changing new communications technologies, particularly as they relate to nonhandset issues (wireless LANs, mobile data enabled palmtops and laptops etc). The Centre will undertake both physical and computational studies to improve the understanding of dosimetric sensitivity to normal population variations such as size, ethnicity, and age and how these impact on current compliance techniques employing standard human models cited in many protocols The Centre will not only advance the international body of knowledge on this subject, but also train new scientists in this multifaceted area of research. Outcomes of the research will be input into public policy and standards setting and regulatory processes. The Centre will also act as a publicly accessible information resource centre on this highly sensitive issue for the general community. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  8. Environmental gamma radiation levels around various DAE research centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the gamma radiation levels of four research centres viz. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay; Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata; Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore; and an industry Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT), Vashi. BARC is India's premier nuclear research facility and is a multi-disciplinary research centre with extensive infrastructure for advanced research and development (R and D). IGCAR, Kalpakkam is engaged in scientific research and advanced engineering programme towards the development of Fast Breeder Reactor technology. VECC Kolkata is dedicated to carry out frontier R and D in the fields of Accelerator Science and Technology, Nuclear Science (Theoretical and Experimental), and Material Science etc. RRCAT, Indore has rapidly grown into a premier institute for R and D in lasers, accelerators and their applications. BRIT, Vashi unit is involved in production, development, and supply of radioisotope based products and provision of isotope applications, radiation processing, radio analytical services etc. With an objective to keep a watch on the prevailing environmental background gamma radiation level around all the DAE installations, routine monitoring programme are being carried out using the Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLDs). TLDs provide the simple, inexpensive and precise measurement of small, integrated, external gamma radiation dose rate. The general practice of this programme is to observe the outdoor gamma radiation levels. This paper summarizes the methodology and gamma radiation levels of four research centres viz. BARC, IGCAR, VECC, RRCAT and an industry BRIT, Vashi

  9. Cardiac metabolism and arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Barth, Andreas S.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.

    2009-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death remains a leading cause of mortality in the Western world, accounting for up to 20% of all deaths in the U.S.1, 2 The major causes of sudden cardiac death in adults age 35 and older are coronary artery disease (70–80%) and dilated cardiomyopathy (10–15%).3 At the molecular level, a wide variety of mechanisms contribute to arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death, ranging from genetic predisposition (rare mutations and common polymorphisms in ion channels and structural...

  10. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed...... and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  11. LDE centres: sprint or marathon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonger, S.; Van Rein, E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Strategic Leiden-Delft-Erasmus Alliance, established by the three universities in 2012, was to improve research and education and competitiveness. Projects are intended to develop from the ground up, which led to the establishment of eight joint centres in 2013. A quick look around re

  12. Multi-atlas-based segmentation with local decision fusion--application to cardiac and aortic segmentation in CT scans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isgum, I.; Staring, M.; Rutten, A.; Prokop, M.; Viergever, M.A.; Ginneken, B. van

    2009-01-01

    A novel atlas-based segmentation approach based on the combination of multiple registrations is presented. Multiple atlases are registered to a target image. To obtain a segmentation of the target, labels of the atlas images are propagated to it. The propagated labels are combined by spatially varyi

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a Biological Drug for Heart Disease: Where Are We With Cardiac Cell-Based Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanina, Cristina; Hare, Joshua M

    2015-07-17

    Cell-based treatment represents a new generation in the evolution of biological therapeutics. A prototypic cell-based therapy, the mesenchymal stem cell, has successfully entered phase III pivotal trials for heart failure, signifying adequate enabling safety and efficacy data from phase I and II trials. Successful phase III trials can lead to approval of a new biological therapy for regenerative medicine.

  14. High resolution three-dimensional cardiac perfusion imaging using compartment-based k-t principal component analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitanis, Viton; Manka, Robert; Giese, Daniel;

    2011-01-01

    -t principal component analysis reconstructions. Comparison of the two methods based on rest and stress three-dimensional perfusion data acquired with 2.3 × 2.3 × 10 mm(3) during a 225 msec acquisition window in patients confirms the findings and demonstrates the potential of compartment-based k-t principal...

  15. The role of the Czechoslovak Nuclear Information Centre as a reference centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Information Centre (NIC) is the sector information centre for the Czechoslovak nuclear programme which comprises the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, ionizing radiation and isotopes. Briefly characterized are the different types of services provided which include search processing, librarian services, study analytical work, publishing activity, the sector inventory of research reports, searches, trip reports and translations and of late the provision of factual data. In this respect this includes the following systems: Economics of Nuclear Power Plants, and Nuclear Power Plant Indicators. The NIC also processes computer-based analyses of selected topics from a document retrieval base. For these analyses the use of the COMMODORE personal computer and foreign firm software is being envisaged. In the first stage the analyses will be made from the INIS data base. (Z.M.)

  16. Generation of bioartificial heart tissue by combining a three-dimensional gel-based cardiac construct with decellularized small intestinal submucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukadinovic-Nikolic, Zlata; Andrée, Birgit; Dorfman, Suzanne E; Pflaum, Michael; Horvath, Tibor; Lux, Marco; Venturini, Letizia; Bär, Antonia; Kensah, George; Lara, Angelica Roa; Tudorache, Igor; Cebotari, Serghei; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres

    2014-02-01

    The in vitro generation of a bioartificial cardiac construct (CC) represents a promising tool for the repair of ischemic heart tissue. Several approaches to engineer cardiac tissue in vitro have been conducted. The main drawback of these studies is the insufficient size of the resulting construct for clinical applications. The focus of this study was the generation of an artificial three-dimensional (3D), contractile, and suturable myocardial patch by combining a gel-based CC with decellularized porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS), thereby engineering an artificial tissue of 11 cm² in size. The alignment and morphology of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (rCMs) in SIS-CC complexes were investigated as well as the re-organization of primary endothelial cells which were co-isolated in the rCM preparation. The ability of a rat heart endothelial cell line (RHE-A) to re-cellularize pre-existing vessel structures within the SIS or a biological vascularized matrix (BioVaM) was determined. SIS-CC contracted spontaneously, uniformly, and rhythmically with an average rate of 200 beats/min in contrast to undirected contractions observed in CC without SIS support. rCM exhibited an elongated morphology with well-defined sarcomeric structures oriented along the longitudinal axis in the SIS-CC, whereas round-shaped and random-arranged rCM were observed in CC. Electric coupling of rCM was demonstrated by microelectrode array measurements. A dense network of CD31⁺/eNOS⁺ cells was detected as permeating the whole construct. Superficial supplementation of RHE-A cells to SIS-CC led to the migration of these cells through the CC, resulting in the re-population of pre-existing vessel structures within the decelluarized SIS. By infusion of RHE-A cells into the BioVaM venous and arterial pedicles, a re-population of the BioVaM vessel bed as well as distribution of RHE-A cells throughout the CC was achieved. Rat endothelial cells within the CC were in contact with RHE-A cells

  17. Left-handed surgical instruments - a guide for cardiac surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Clare; Theakston, Maureen; Dunning, Joel; Goodwin, Andrew; Kendall, Simon William Henry

    2016-08-19

    For ease of use and to aid precision, left-handed instruments are invaluable to the left-handed surgeon. Although they exist, they are not available in many surgical centres. As a result, most operating theatre staff (including many left-handers) have little knowledge of their value or even application. With specific reference to cardiac surgery, this article addresses the ways in which they differ, why they are needed and what is required - with tips on use.

  18. Feasibility and Acceptability of Utilizing a Smartphone Based Application to Monitor Outpatient Discharge Instruction Compliance in Cardiac Disease Patients around Discharge from Hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee M. Layton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of utilizing a smartphone based application to monitor compliance in patients with cardiac disease around discharge. For 60 days after discharge, patients’ medication compliance, physical activity, follow-up care, symptoms, and reading of education material were monitored daily with the application. 16 patients were enrolled in the study (12 males, 4 females, age 55 ± 18 years during their hospital stay. Five participants were rehospitalized during the study and did not use the application once discharged. Seven participants completed 1–30 days and four patients completed >31 days. For those 11 patients, medication reminders were utilized 37% (1–30-day group and 53% (>31-day group of the time, education material was read 44% (1–30 and 53% (>31 of the time, and physical activity was reported 25% (1–30 and 42% (>31 of the time. Findings demonstrated that patients with stable health utilized the application, even if only minimally. Patients with decreased breath sounds by physical exam and who reported their health as fair to poor on the day of discharge were less likely to utilize the application. Acceptability of the application to report health status varied among the stable patients.

  19. [Czech paediatric cardiac surgery - history and presence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hučín, Bohumil

    2012-01-01

    The beginnings of the Paediatric Cardiac Surgery in the Czech Republic date back to the period immediately after the end of World War II. Its protagonists were Prof. Emerich Polák from the Surgical Clinic in Prague, Vinohrady, Prof. Jan Bedrna from Surgical Clinic in Hradec Kralove, Prof. Vladislav Rapant from Surgical Clinic in Olomouc and Prof. Václav Kafka from the Second Surgical Clinic in Prague. They started with operations of the patent ductus arteriosus, the Blalock-Taussig shunt in cyanotic heart defects and resection of coarctation of the aorta. Operations of congenital heart defects, on the open heart were elaborated namely by cardiosurgeons in Brno, under the leadership of Professor Jan Navrátil. On the extension of those methods participated Professor Jaroslav Procházka in Hradec Kralove and Prof. Václav Kafka at the newly opened department of Paediatric surgery in Prague. In the next period, attention of paediatric cardiac surgery was directed at operations of critical congenital heart defects in the smallest children. Palliative operations of the critical heart defects in newborns and infants were first introduced at the clinic of paediatric surgery of the Paediatric University Hospital in Prague. Radical operations of infants and newborns with extra-corporal circulation were elaborated in the Children's heart centre in Prague, Motol. Initiative in the further development of paediatric cardiac surgery was taken over by the Children's heart centre in Prague since its founding in 1977. There was concentrated all medical care of children born with a congenital heart defect in the Czech Republic. This concentration of specialized care at one institution allowed to accumulate extremely large experience with the diagnostics and surgical treatment of congenital heart defects in all age groups with the decrease of patients mortality after operations to 1% even for the smallest children and enabled continuously monitor the quality of life of patients

  20. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to assess cardiac risk include: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) : Studies have shown that measuring ... LDL-C but does not respond to typical strategies to lower LDL-C such as diet, exercise, ...

  1. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Risk Factors & Prevention Heart Diseases & Disorders Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) SCA: Who's At Risk? Prevention of SCA What Causes SCA? SCA Awareness Atrial Flutter Heart Block Heart Failure Sick Sinus Syndrome Substances & Heart Rhythm Disorders Symptoms & ...

  2. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt;

    2012-01-01

    to a standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements......%. Patients were equally distributed to the SRP and the ERP. No inequality was found in attendance and adherence among referred patients. Conclusions: It seems possible to overcome unequal referral, attendance, and adherence in cardiac rehabilitation by organisation of systematic screening and social......Aim: The comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme after myocardial infarction (MI) improves quality of life and results in reduced cardiac mortality and recurrence of MI. Hospitals worldwide face problems with low participation rates in rehabilitation programmes. Inequality...

  3. Preliminary experience on the implementation of computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 source in University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalludin, Z.; Min, U. N.; Ishak, W. Z. Wan; Malik, R. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our preliminary work of the computed tomography (CT) image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) implementation on cervical cancer patients. We developed a protocol in which patients undergo two Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examinations; a) prior to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and b) prior to intra-cavitary brachytherapy for tumour identification and delineation during IGBT planning and dosimetry. For each fraction, patients were simulated using CT simulator and images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The HR-CTV, IR-CTV, bladder and rectum were delineated on CT-based contouring for cervical cancer. Plans were optimised to achieve HR-CTV and IR-CTV dose (D90) of total EQD2 80Gy and 60Gy respectively, while limiting the minimum dose to the most irradiated 2cm3 volume (D2cc) of bladder and rectum to total EQD2 90Gy and 75Gy respectively. Data from seven insertions were analysed by comparing the volume-based with traditional point- based doses. Based on our data, there were differences between volume and point doses of HR- CTV, bladder and rectum organs. As the number of patients having the CT-based IGBT increases from day to day in our centre, it is expected that the treatment and dosimetry accuracy will be improved with the implementation.

  4. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccio, M; Goumans, M J; Sluijter, J P G; Doevendans, P A

    2008-03-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyocytes to ameliorate the injured myocardium, compensate for the loss of ventricular mass and contractility and eventually restore cardiac function. An array of cell types has been explored in this respect, including skeletal muscle, bone marrow derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and more recently cardiac progenitor cells. The best-studied cell types are mouse and human ESC cells, which have undisputedly been demonstrated to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and vascular lineages and have been of great help to understand the differentiation process of pluripotent cells. However, due to their immunogenicity, risk of tumor development and the ethical challenge arising from their embryonic origin, they do not provide a suitable cell source for a regenerative therapy approach. A better option, overcoming ethical and allogenicity problems, seems to be provided by bone marrow derived cells and by the recently identified cardiac precursors. This report will overview current knowledge on these different cell types and their application in cardiac regeneration and address issues like implementation of delivery methods, including tissue engineering approaches that need to be developed alongside.

  5. Surface Electrocardiogram Predictors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghani, Samy A.; Rosenthal, Todd M.; Morin, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is a major cause of death in industrialized nations, with approximately 50% of these deaths attributable to sudden cardiac arrest. If patients at high risk for sudden cardiac arrest can be identified, their odds of surviving fatal arrhythmias can be significantly improved through prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement. This review summarizes the current knowledge pertaining to surface electrocardiogram (ECG) predictors of sudden cardiac arrest. Methods: We conducted a literature review focused on methods of predicting sudden cardiac arrest through noninvasive electrocardiographic testing. Results: Several electrocardiographic-based methods of risk stratification of sudden cardiac arrest have been studied, including QT prolongation, QRS duration, fragmented QRS complexes, early repolarization, Holter monitoring, heart rate variability, heart rate turbulence, signal-averaged ECG, T wave alternans, and T-peak to T-end. These ECG findings have shown variable effectiveness as screening tools. Conclusion: At this time, no individual ECG finding has been found to be able to adequately stratify patients with regard to risk for sudden cardiac arrest. However, one or more of these candidate surface ECG parameters may become useful components of future multifactorial risk stratification calculators. PMID:27660578

  6. Role of Circulating Fibrocytes in Cardiac Fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Jie Lin; Zi-Zhuo Su; Shu-Min Liang; Yu-Yang Chen; Xiao-Rong Shu; Ru-Qiong Nie; Jing-Feng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It is revealed that circulating fibrocytes are elevated in patients/animals with cardiac fibrosis, and this review aims to provide an introduction to circulating fibrocytes and their role in cardiac fibrosis.Data Sources: This review is based on the data from 1994 to present obtained from PubMed.The search terms were "circulating fibrocytes" and "cardiac fibrosis".Study Selection: Articles and critical reviews, which are related to circulating fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis, were selected.Results: Circulating fibrocytes, which are derived from hematopoietic stem cells, represent a subset of peripheral blood mononuclear cells exhibiting mixed morphological and molecular characteristics ofhematopoietic and mesenchymal cells (CD34+/CD45+/collagen I+).They can produce extracellular matrix and many cytokines.It is shown that circulating fibrocytes participate in many fibrotic diseases, including cardiac fibrosis.Evidence accumulated in recent years shows that aging individuals and patients with hypertension, heart failure, coronary heart disease, and atrial fibrillation have more circulating fibrocytes in peripheral blood and/or heart tissue, and this elevation of circulating fibrocytes is correlated with the degree of fibrosis in the hearts.Conclusions: Circulating fibrocytes are effector cells in cardiac fibrosis.

  7. Stem cells for cardiac repair: an introduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bastiaan C du Pr(e); Pieter A Doevendans; Linda W van Laake

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Most cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy, are associated with loss of functional cardiomyocytes. Unfortunately, the heart has a limited regenerative capacity and is not able to replace these cardiomyocytes once lost. In recent years, stem cells have been put forward as a potential source for cardiac regeneration. Pre-clinical studies that use stem cell-derived cardiac cells show promising results. The mechanisms, though, are not well understood, results have been variable, sometimes transient in the long term, and often without a mechanistic explanation. There are still several major hurdles to be taken. Stem cell-derived cardiac cells should resemble original cardiac cell types and be able to integrate in the damaged heart. Integration requires administration of stem cell-derived cardiac cells at the right time using the right mode of delivery. Once delivered, transplanted cells need vascularization, electrophysiological coupling with the injured heart, and prevention of immunological rejection. Finally, stem cell therapy needs to be safe, reproducible, and affordable. In this review, we will give an introduction to the principles of stem cell based cardiac repair.

  8. Telocytes in cardiac regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Yihua; Zhou, Qiulian; Sun, Qi; Xiao, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are a novel type of stromal cells reported by Popescu's group in 2010. The unique feature that distinguishes TCs from other "classical" stromal cells is their extremely long and thin telopodes (Tps). As evidenced by electron microscopy, TCs are widely distributed in almost all tissues and organs. TCs contribute to form a three-dimensional interstitial network and play as active regulators in intercellular communication via homocellular/heterocellular junctions or shed vesicles. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests the potential role of TCs in regenerative medicine. Although the heart retains some limited endogenous regenerative capacity, cardiac regenerative and repair response is however insufficient to make up the loss of cardiomyocytes upon injury. Developing novel strategies to increase cardiomyocyte renewal and repair is of great importance for the treatment of cardiac diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of TCs in cardiac regeneration and repair. We particularly describe the intercellular communication between TCs and cardiomyocytes, stem/progenitor cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Also, we discuss the current knowledge about TCs in cardiac repair after myocardial injury, as well as their potential roles in cardiac development and aging. TC-based therapy or TC-derived exosome delivery might be used as novel therapeutic strategies to promote cardiac regeneration and repair. PMID:26826525

  9. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  10. Cardiac tumours in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yadava, O.P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac tumours in infancy are rare and are mostly benign with rhabdomyomas, fibromas and teratomas accounting for the majority. The presentation depends on size and location of the mass as they tend to cause cavity obstruction or arrhythmias. Most rhabdomyomas tend to regress spontaneously but fibromas and teratomas generally require surgical intervention for severe haemodynamic or arrhythmic complications. Other relatively rare cardiac tumours too are discussed along with an Indian perspect...

  11. Infected cardiac hydatid cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Ceviz, M; Becit, N; Kocak, H.

    2001-01-01

    A 24 year old woman presented with chest pain and palpitation. The presence of a semisolid mass—an echinococcal cyst or tumour—in the left ventricular apex was diagnosed by echocardiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The infected cyst was seen at surgery. The cyst was removed successfully by using cardiopulmonary bypass with cross clamp.


Keywords: cardiac hydatid cyst; infected cardiac hydatid cyst

  12. Automatic Intensity-based 3D-to-2D Registration of CT Volume and Dual-energy Digital Radiography for the Detection of Cardiac Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Gilkeson, Robert; Fei, Baowei

    2013-01-01

    We are investigating three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D) registration methods for computed tomography (CT) and dual-energy digital radiography (DR) for the detection of coronary artery calcification. CT is an established tool for the diagnosis of coronary artery diseases (CADs). Dual-energy digital radiography could be a cost-effective alternative for screening coronary artery calcification. In order to utilize CT as the “gold standard” to evaluate the ability of DR images for the detection and localization of calcium, we developed an automatic intensity-based 3D-to-2D registration method for 3D CT volumes and 2D DR images. To generate digital rendering radiographs (DRR) from the CT volumes, we developed three projection methods, i.e. Gaussian-weighted projection, threshold-based projection, and average-based projection. We tested normalized cross correlation (NCC) and normalized mutual information (NMI) as similarity measurement. We used the Downhill Simplex method as the search strategy. Simulated projection images from CT were fused with the corresponding DR images to evaluate the localization of cardiac calcification. The registration method was evaluated by digital phantoms, physical phantoms, and clinical data sets. The results from the digital phantoms show that the success rate is 100% with mean errors of less 0.8 mm and 0.2 degree for both NCC and NMI. The registration accuracy of the physical phantoms is 0.34 ± 0.27 mm. Color overlay and 3D visualization of the clinical data show that the two images are registered well. This is consistent with the improvement of the NMI values from 0.20 ± 0.03 to 0.25 ± 0.03 after registration. The automatic 3D-to-2D registration method is accurate and robust and may provide a useful tool to evaluate the dual-energy DR images for the detection of coronary artery calcification. PMID:24386527

  13. Cardiac applications of optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics.

  14. Historical perspectives of cardiac electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüderitz, Berndt

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of clinical electrophysiology has a long and fascinating history. From earliest times, no clinical symptom impressed the patient (and the physician) more than an irregular heart beat. Although ancient Chinese pulse theory laid the foundation for the study of arrhythmias and clinical electrophysiology in the 5th century BC, the most significant breakthrough in the identification and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias first occurred in this century. In the last decades, our knowledge of electrophysiology and pharmacology has increased exponentially. The enormous clinical significance of cardiac rhythm disturbances has favored these advances. On the one hand, patients live longer and thus are more likely to experience arrhythmias. On the other hand, circulatory problems of the cardiac vessels have increased enormously, and this has been identified as the primary cause of cardiac rhythm disorders. Coronary heart disease has become not just the most significant disease of all, based on the statistics for cause of death. Arrhythmias are the main complication of ischemic heart disease, and they have been directly linked to the frequently arrhythmogenic sudden death syndrome, which is now presumed to be an avoidable "electrical accident" of the heart. A retrospective look--often charming in its own right--may not only make it easier to sort through the copious details of this field and so become oriented in this universe of important and less important facts: it may also provide the observer with a chronological vantage point from which to view the subject. The study of clinical electrophysiology is no dry compendium of facts and figures, but rather a dynamic field of study evolving out of the competition between various ideas, intentions and theories. PMID:19196616

  15. Improvement of cardiac contractile function by peptide-based inhibition of NF-κB in the utrophin/dystrophin-deficient murine model of muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guttridge Denis C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an inherited and progressive disease causing striated muscle deterioration. Patients in their twenties generally die from either respiratory or cardiac failure. In order to improve the lifespan and quality of life of DMD patients, it is important to prevent or reverse the progressive loss of contractile function of the heart. Recent studies by our labs have shown that the peptide NBD (Nemo Binding Domain, targeted at blunting Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB signaling, reduces inflammation, enhances myofiber regeneration, and improves contractile deficits in the diaphragm in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Methods To assess whether cardiac function in addition to diaphragm function can be improved, we investigated physiological and histological parameters of cardiac muscle in mice deficient for both dystrophin and its homolog utrophin (double knockout = dko mice treated with NBD peptide. These dko mice show classic pathophysiological hallmarks of heart failure, including myocyte degeneration, an impaired force-frequency response and a severely blunted β-adrenergic response. Cardiac contractile function at baseline and frequencies and pre-loads throughout the in vivo range as well as β-adrenergic reserve was measured in isolated cardiac muscle preparations. In addition, we studied histopathological and inflammatory markers in these mice. Results At baseline conditions, active force development in cardiac muscles from NBD treated dko mice was more than double that of vehicle-treated dko mice. NBD treatment also significantly improved frequency-dependent behavior of the muscles. The increase in force in NBD-treated dko muscles to β-adrenergic stimulation was robustly restored compared to vehicle-treated mice. However, histological features, including collagen content and inflammatory markers were not significantly different between NBD-treated and vehicle-treated dko mice. Conclusions We conclude

  16. A method for accurate localisation of EBSD pattern centres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurice, Claire, E-mail: maurice@emse.fr [SMS Centre, UMR CNRS 5146, Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 2 (France); Dzieciol, Krzysztof, E-mail: dzieciol@emse.fr [SMS Centre, UMR CNRS 5146, Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 2 (France); Fortunier, Roland, E-mail: fortunier@emse.fr [SMS Centre, UMR CNRS 5146, Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-01-15

    The moving screen technique for pattern centre localisation is revisited. A cross-correlation based iterative procedure is developed to find both the zoom factor and the zoom centre (which is also the pattern centre) between two EBSD diffraction patterns acquired at two camera positions. The procedure involves two steps: first, a rough estimate of the pattern centre position and zoom factor (the ratio of the two detector distances) is obtained by cross-correlating the entire images. Then, based on this first estimate, cross-correlation of smaller regions of interest (ROIs) gives the displacement field which is interpreted as a zoom factor misfit coupled with a zoom centre position misfit. These misfits are iteratively decreased until the displacement field is reduced to the noise level. The procedure is first applied to simulated patterns and it is shown that the iterative procedure converges very rapidly to the exact solution with an accuracy better than 1/100th of pixel. The potential of this technique for experimental patterns is discussed and recommendations for new EBSD detectors are proposed. -- Research Highlights: {yields}Numerical and experimental study of measuring the pattern centre of EBSD patterns. {yields}Advanced moving screen technique coupled with sub-pixel cross-correlation. {yields}In theory, using simulated patterns, the precision is of the order of 1/100th pixel. {yields}In practice, the precision is drastically reduced due to camera imperfections. {yields}Methods of improving camera design for high resolution EBSD are outlined.

  17. A relational conceptual framework for multidisciplinary health research centre infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Joy L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although multidisciplinary and team-based approaches are increasingly acknowledged as necessary to address some of the most pressing contemporary health challenges, many researchers struggle with a lack of infrastructure to facilitate and formalise the requisite collaborations. Specialised research centres have emerged as an important organisational solution, yet centre productivity and sustainability are frequently dictated by the availability and security of infrastructure funds. Despite being widely cited as a core component of research capacity building, infrastructure as a discrete concept has been rather analytically neglected, often treated as an implicit feature of research environments with little specification or relegated to a narrow category of physical or administrative inputs. The terms research infrastructure, capacity, and culture, among others, are deployed in overlapping and inconsistent ways, further obfuscating the crucial functions of infrastructure specifically and its relationships with associated concepts. The case is made for an expanded conceptualisation of research infrastructure, one that moves beyond conventional 'hardware' notions. Drawing on a case analysis of NEXUS, a multidisciplinary health research centre based at the University of British Columbia, Canada, a conceptual framework is proposed that integrates the tangible and intangible structures that interactively underlie research centre functioning. A relational approach holds potential to allow for more comprehensive accounting of the returns on infrastructure investment. For those developing new research centres or seeking to reinvigorate existing ones, this framework may be a useful guide for both centre design and evaluation.

  18. Research projects of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research activities of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are based on the Centre's primary task of preventing and restricting adverse effects of radiation. As a rule, studies concerning nuclear safety (part 1 of the publication) are studies originating from the regulatory function of STUK; these are directed and funded by the Centre but the Centre does not carry them out itself. In contrast, studies dealing with radiation exposure and health risks (part 2 of the publication) are conducted by the Centre itself, often in cooperation with some other research institute or university. Results of these studies are published in open scientific literature

  19. Biological Inspiration in Human Centred Robotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUHuo-sheng; LIUJin-dong; CalderonCarlosA

    2004-01-01

    Human centred robotics (HCR) concerns with the development of various kinds of intelligent systems and robots that will be used in environments coexisting with humans. These systems and robots will be interactive and useful assistants/companions for people in different ages, situations, activities and environments in order to improve the quality of life. This paper presents the autors' current research work toward the development of advanced theory and technologies for HCR applications, based on inspiration from biological systems. More specifically, both bio-mimetic system modelling and robot learning by imitation are discussed respectively, and some preliminary results are demonstrated.

  20. The INTEGRAL Science Data Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Beckmann, V.

    2002-01-01

    The INTEGRAL Science Data Centre (ISDC) processes, archives and distributes data from the INTEGRAL mission. At the ISDC incoming data from the satellite are processed and searched for transient sources and Gamma-Ray bursts. The data are archived and distributed to the guest observers. As soon as the data are public, any astronomer can access the data via the internet. ISDC also provides the tools which are necessary for the data analysis and offers user support concerning questions related to...

  1. Radwaste Treatment Centre Jaslovske Bohunice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this leaflet the Bohunice Radwaste Treatment Centre (BSC RAO) is presented. BSC RAO is designed to process and treat liquid and solid radwaste, arising from the NPP A-1 decommissioning, from NPPs V-1, V-2, and Mochovce operations, as well as institutional radwaste of diverse institutional (hospitals, research institutes) in the Slovak Republic. Transport, sorting, incineration, compacting, concentration and cementation of radwaste as well as monitoring of emission are described

  2. Efficient generation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitors based on tissue-specific enhanced green fluorescence protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebényi, Kornélia; Péntek, Adrienn; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Várady, György; Orbán, Tamás I; Sarkadi, Balázs; Apáti, Ágota

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) are committed to the cardiac lineage but retain their proliferative capacity before becoming quiescent mature cardiomyocytes (CMs). In medical therapy and research, the use of human pluripotent stem cell-derived CPCs would have several advantages compared with mature CMs, as the progenitors show better engraftment into existing heart tissues, and provide unique potential for cardiovascular developmental as well as for pharmacological studies. Here, we demonstrate that the CAG promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) reporter system enables the identification and isolation of embryonic stem cell-derived CPCs. Tracing of CPCs during differentiation confirmed up-regulation of surface markers, previously described to identify cardiac precursors and early CMs. Isolated CPCs express cardiac lineage-specific transcripts, still have proliferating capacity, and can be re-aggregated into embryoid body-like structures (CAG-EGFP(high) rEBs). Expression of troponin T and NKX2.5 mRNA is up-regulated in long-term cultured CAG-EGFP(high) rEBs, in which more than 90% of the cells become Troponin I positive mature CMs. Moreover, about one third of the CAG-EGFP(high) rEBs show spontaneous contractions. The method described here provides a powerful tool to generate expandable cultures of pure human CPCs that can be used for exploring early markers of the cardiac lineage, as well as for drug screening or tissue engineering applications.

  3. Occupational therapy in hospital based care in the Netherlands: a comparison of occupational therapy in general care (nursing homes, rehabilitation centres and general hospitals) and psychiatric care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.J.; Dekker, J.; Zee, J. van der; Lankhorst, G.

    1996-01-01

    The case of a 26-year old woman with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is presented. Multidimensional assessment showing severe debilitating fatigue and considerable psychological, social and occupational impairment confirmed the diagnosis. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) was based on a tested causal

  4. Measuring Gender (In)Equality: Introducing the Gender, Institutions and Development Data Base (GID). OECD Development Centre Working Paper No. 247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutting, Johannes P.; Morrisson, Christian; Dayton-Johnson, Jeff; Drechsler, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Efforts to establish, test and analyse hypotheses regarding cross-country variations in women's economic status are hampered by the lack of a readily accessible and easily used information resource on the various dimensions of gender inequality. Addressing this gap, this paper introduces the Gender, Institutions and Development data base (GID)…

  5. Human-centred approaches in slipperiness measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönqvist, Raoul; Abeysekera, John; Gard, Gunvor; Hsiang, Simon M.; Leamon, Tom B.; Newman, Dava J.; Gielo-Perczak, Krystyna; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Pai, Clive Y.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A number of human-centred methodologies—subjective, objective, and combined—are used for slipperiness measurement. They comprise a variety of approaches from biomechanically-oriented experiments to psychophysical tests and subjective evaluations. The objective of this paper is to review some of the research done in the field, including such topics as awareness and perception of slipperiness, postural and balance control, rating scales for balance, adaptation to slippery conditions, measurement of unexpected movements, kinematics of slipping, and protective movements during falling. The role of human factors in slips and falls will be discussed. Strengths and weaknesses of human-centred approaches in relation to mechanical slip test methodologies are considered. Current friction-based criteria and thresholds for walking without slipping are reviewed for a number of work tasks. These include activities such as walking on a level or an inclined surface, running, stopping and jumping, as well as stair ascent and descent, manual exertion (pushing and pulling, load carrying, lifting) and particular concerns of the elderly and mobility disabled persons. Some future directions for slipperiness measurement and research in the field of slips and falls are outlined. Human-centred approaches for slipperiness measurement do have many applications. First, they are utilized to develop research hypotheses and models to predict workplace risks caused by slipping. Second, they are important alternatives to apparatus-based friction measurements and are used to validate such methodologies. Third, they are used as practical tools for evaluating and monitoring slip resistance properties of foot wear, anti-skid devices and floor surfaces. PMID:11794763

  6. Using the intervention mapping protocol to develop a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in a multi-centre European project: the IDEFICS intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Verbestel Vera; De Henauw Stefaan; Maes Lea; Haerens Leen; Mårild Staffan; Eiben Gabriele; Lissner Lauren; Moreno Luis A; Frauca Natalia; Barba Gianvincenzo; Kovács Éva; Konstabel Kenn; Tornaritis Michael; Gallois Katharina; Hassel Holger

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased during the past decades and is now considered an urgent public health problem. Although stabilizing trends in obesity prevalence have been identified in parts of Europe, preventive efforts in children are still needed. Using the socio-ecological approach as the underlying theoretical perspective, the IDEFICS project aimed to develop, implement and evaluate a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesi...

  7. Occupational therapy in hospital based care in the Netherlands: a comparison of occupational therapy in general care (nursing homes, rehabilitation centres and general hospitals) and psychiatric care.

    OpenAIRE

    Driessen, M.J.; Dekker, J.; Van der Zee, J.; Lankhorst, G

    1996-01-01

    The case of a 26-year old woman with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is presented. Multidimensional assessment showing severe debilitating fatigue and considerable psychological, social and occupational impairment confirmed the diagnosis. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) was based on a tested causal model of CFS and individual behavioral analyses. Key elements in CBT were process variables from the CFS model, like sense of control, causal attributions, physical activity and focusing on bodily ...

  8. The Notting Dale Urban Studies Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Chris; Lynas, Sue

    1976-01-01

    Founded in 1974, the Centre is one of the most intensively used resource centres in the United Kingdom. Adults and students from elementary to college level use its facilities to learn about the urban environment. (BD)

  9. Using the intervention mapping protocol to develop a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in a multi-centre European project: the IDEFICS intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verbestel Vera

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased during the past decades and is now considered an urgent public health problem. Although stabilizing trends in obesity prevalence have been identified in parts of Europe, preventive efforts in children are still needed. Using the socio-ecological approach as the underlying theoretical perspective, the IDEFICS project aimed to develop, implement and evaluate a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in eight European countries. The aim of the present manuscript was to describe the content and developmental process of the IDEFICS intervention. Methods The intervention mapping protocol (IMP was used to develop the community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in 3 to 10 years old children. It is a theory- and evidence-based tool for the structured planning and development of health promotion programs that requires the completion of six different steps. These steps were elaborated by two coordinating centers and discussed with the other participating centers until agreement was reached. Focus group research was performed in all participating centers to provide an informed basis for intervention development. Results The application of the IMP resulted in an overall intervention framework with ten intervention modules targeting environmental and personal factors through the family, the school and the community. The summary results of the focus group research were used to inform the development of the overall intervention. The cultural adaptation of the overall intervention was realised by using country specific focus group results. The need for cultural adaptation was considered during the entire process to improve program adoption and implementation. A plan was developed to evaluate program effectiveness and quality of implementation. Conclusions The IDEFICS project developed a community-based intervention for the prevention of

  10. Development of a competency-based formative progress test with student-generated MCQs: Results from a multi-centre pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagener, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Progress tests provide students feedback on their level of proficiency over the course of their medical studies. Peer-assisted learning and competency-based education have become increasingly important in medical education. Although progress tests have been proven to be useful as a longitudinal feedback instrument, there are currently no progress tests that have been created in cooperation with students or that focus on competency in medical education.In this study, we investigated the extent to which students can be included in the development of a progress test and demonstrated that aspects of knowledge related to competency can be represented on a competency-based progress test.Methods: A two-dimensional blueprint for 144 multiple-choice questions (MCQs covering groups of medical subjects and groups of competency areas was generated by three expert groups for developing the competency-based progress test. A total of 31 students from seven medical schools in Germany actively participated in this exercise. After completing an intensive and comprehensive training programme, the students generated and reviewed the test questions for the competency-based progress test using a separate platform of the ItemManagementSystem (IMS. This test was administered as a formative test to 469 students in a pilot study in November 2013 at eight medical schools in Germany. The scores were analysed for the overall test and differentiated according to the subject groups and competency areas.Results: A pool of more than 200 MCQs was compiled by the students for pilot use, of which 118 student-generated MCQs were used in the progress test. University instructors supplemented this pool with 26 MCQs, which primarily addressed the area of scientific skills. The post-review showed that student-generated MCQs were of high quality with regard to test statistic criteria and content. Overall, the progress test displayed a very high reliability. When the

  11. Management based on exhaled nitric oxide levels adjusted for atopy reduces asthma exacerbations in children: A dual centre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsky, Helen L; Li, Albert M; Au, Chun T; Kynaston, Jennifer A; Turner, Catherine; Chang, Anne B

    2015-06-01

    While several randomized control trials (RCTs) have evaluated the use of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) to improve asthma outcomes, none used FeNO cut-offs adjusted for atopy, a determinant of FeNO levels. In a dual center RCT, we assessed whether a treatment strategy based on FeNO levels, adjusted for atopy, reduces asthma exacerbations compared with the symptoms-based management (controls). Children with asthma from hospital clinics of two hospitals were randomly allocated to receive an a-priori determined treatment hierarchy based on symptoms or FeNO levels. There was a 2-week run-in period and they were then reviewed 10 times over 12-months. The primary outcome was the number of children with exacerbations over 12-months. Sixty-three children were randomized (FeNO = 31, controls = 32); 55 (86%) completed the study. Although we did achieve our planned sample size, significantly fewer children in the FeNO group (6 of 27) had an asthma exacerbation compared to controls (15 of 28), P = 0.021; number to treat for benefit = 4 (95% CI 3-24). There was no difference between groups for any secondary outcomes (quality of life, symptoms, FEV1 ). The final daily inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) dose was significantly (P = 0.037) higher in the FeNO group (median 400 µg, IQR 250-600) compared to the controls (200, IQR100-400). Taking atopy into account when using FeNO to tailor asthma medications is likely beneficial in reducing the number of children with severe exacerbations at the expense of increased ICS use. However, the strategy is unlikely beneficial for improving asthma control. A larger study is required to confirm or refute our findings.

  12. The endothelial function in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranucci, M

    2006-06-01

    Cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass exerts many different actions which modify the natural function of endothelial cells. The main determinant is the activation of the coagulation system both through the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, leading to an overwhelming thrombin formation. To counteract the coagulant effects of thrombin, heparin is used in large doses. As a result, the endothelium is asked to promote all its anticoagulant properties, basically through the AT release from the surface, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor release, and the activation of the protein C protein S system. At the end of cardiac operations, all these systems are depleted, and low levels of antithrombin, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, protein C are available for further anticoagulant effects. There is the evidence that levels of antithrombin activity below 50% at the end of cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass are associated to bad outcomes in terms of surgical revision rate, thromboembolic events, and neurological events. Exogenous antithrombin administration has a well defined action in limiting thrombin formation during cardiac operations; however, we are still lacking an evidence-based information about the clinical impact of this and others possible preventive strategies based on exogenous administration of antithrombin before or during cardiac operations. PMID:16682923

  13. Cardiac Health Risk Stratification System (CHRiSS: a Bayesian-based decision support system for left ventricular assist device (LVAD therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha A Loghmanpour

    Full Text Available This study investigated the use of Bayesian Networks (BNs for left ventricular assist device (LVAD therapy; a treatment for end-stage heart failure that has been steadily growing in popularity over the past decade. Despite this growth, the number of LVAD implants performed annually remains a small fraction of the estimated population of patients who might benefit from this treatment. We believe that this demonstrates a need for an accurate stratification tool that can help identify LVAD candidates at the most appropriate point in the course of their disease. We derived BNs to predict mortality at five endpoints utilizing the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS database: containing over 12,000 total enrolled patients from 153 hospital sites, collected since 2006 to the present day, and consisting of approximately 230 pre-implant clinical variables. Synthetic minority oversampling technique (SMOTE was employed to address the uneven proportion of patients with negative outcomes and to improve the performance of the models. The resulting accuracy and area under the ROC curve (% for predicted mortality were 30 day: 94.9 and 92.5; 90 day: 84.2 and 73.9; 6 month: 78.2 and 70.6; 1 year: 73.1 and 70.6; and 2 years: 71.4 and 70.8. To foster the translation of these models to clinical practice, they have been incorporated into a web-based application, the Cardiac Health Risk Stratification System (CHRiSS. As clinical experience with LVAD therapy continues to grow, and additional data is collected, we aim to continually update these BN models to improve their accuracy and maintain their relevance. Ongoing work also aims to extend the BN models to predict the risk of adverse events post-LVAD implant as additional factors for consideration in decision making.

  14. Prevalence and risk factors for vitamin C deficiency in north and south India: a two centre population based study in people aged 60 years and over.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravilla D Ravindran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies from the UK and North America have reported vitamin C deficiency in around 1 in 5 men and 1 in 9 women in low income groups. There are few data on vitamin C deficiency in resource poor countries. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of vitamin C deficiency in India. DESIGN: We carried out a population-based cross-sectional survey in two areas of north and south India. Randomly sampled clusters were enumerated to identify people aged 60 and over. Participants (75% response rate were interviewed for tobacco, alcohol, cooking fuel use, 24 hour diet recall and underwent anthropometry and blood collection. Vitamin C was measured using an enzyme-based assay in plasma stabilized with metaphosphoric acid. We categorised vitamin C status as deficient (28 µmol/L. We investigated factors associated with vitamin C deficiency using multivariable Poisson regression. RESULTS: The age, sex and season standardized prevalence of vitamin C deficiency was 73.9% (95% confidence Interval, CI 70.4,77.5 in 2668 people in north India and 45.7% (95% CI 42.5,48.9 in 2970 from south India. Only 10.8% in the north and 25.9% in the south met the criteria for adequate levels. Vitamin C deficiency varied by season, and was more prevalent in men, with increasing age, users of tobacco and biomass fuels, in those with anthropometric indicators of poor nutrition and with lower intakes of dietary vitamin C. CONCLUSIONS: In poor communities, such as in our study, consideration needs to be given to measures to improve the consumption of vitamin C rich foods and to discourage the use of tobacco.

  15. Cerebral oximetry in cardiac anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vretzakis, George; Georgopoulou, Stauroula; Stamoulis, Konstantinos; Stamatiou, Georgia; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogianis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Mpakas, Andreas; Beleveslis, Thomas; Koletas, Alexander; Siminelakis, Stavros N.; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral oximetry based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is increasingly used during the perioperative period of cardiovascular operations. It is a noninvasive technology that can monitor the regional oxygen saturation of the frontal cortex. Current literature indicates that it can stratify patients preoperatively according their risk. Intraoperatively, it provides continuous information about brain oxygenation and allows the use of brain as sentinel organ indexing overall organ perfusion and injury. This review focuses on the clinical validity and applicability of this monitor for cardiac surgical patients. PMID:24672700

  16. Cardiac mitochondria exhibit dynamic functional clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Tobias Kurz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-oscillatory behavior of mitochondrial inner membrane potential ΔΨm in self-organized cardiac mitochondrial networks can be triggered by metabolic or oxidative stress. Spatio-temporal analyses of cardiac mitochondrial networks have shown that mitochondria are heterogeneously organized in synchronously oscillating clusters in which the mean cluster frequency and size are inversely correlated, thus suggesting a modulation of cluster frequency through local inter-mitochondrial coupling. In this study, we propose a method to examine the mitochondrial network's topology through quantification of its dynamic local clustering coefficients. Individual mitochondrial ΔΨm oscillation signals were identified for each cardiac myocyte and cross-correlated with all network mitochondria using previously described methods (Kurz et al., 2010. Time-varying inter-mitochondrial connectivity, defined for mitochondria in the whole network whose signals are at least 90% correlated at any given time point, allowed considering functional local clustering coefficients. It is shown that mitochondrial clustering in isolated cardiac myocytes changes dynamically and is significantly higher than for random mitochondrial networks that are constructed using the Erdös-Rényi model based on the same sets of vertices. The network's time-averaged clustering coefficient for cardiac myocytes was found to be 0.500 ± 0.051 (N=9 versus 0.061 ± 0.020 for random networks, respectively. Our results demonstrate that cardiac mitochondria constitute a network with dynamically connected constituents whose topological organization is prone to clustering. Cluster partitioning in networks of coupled oscillators has been observed in scale-free and chaotic systems and is therefore in good agreement with previous models of cardiac mitochondrial networks (Aon et al., 2008.

  17. The cardiac anxiety questionnaire: cross-validation among cardiac inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, M.H. van; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Deelen, F.M. van; Balkom, A.J. van; Pop, G.A.; Speckens, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: General anxiety symptoms are common in patients with cardiac disease and considered to have an adverse effect on cardiac prognosis. The role of specific cardiac anxiety, however, is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the D

  18. THE CARDIAC ANXIETY QUESTIONNAIRE : CROSS-VALIDATION AMONG CARDIAC INPATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, M. H. C. T.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude; van Deelen, F. M.; van Balkom, A. J. L. M.; Pop, G.; Speckens, A. E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: General anxiety symptoms are common in patients with cardiac disease and considered to have an adverse effect on cardiac prognosis. The role of specific cardiac anxiety, however, is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the D

  19. Research projects of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety 1996-1997; Saeteilyturvakeskuksen tutkimushankkeet 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustonen, R.; Koponen, H. [eds.

    1996-02-01

    The research activities of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are based on the Centre`s primary task of preventing and restricting adverse effects of radiation. As a rule, studies concerning nuclear safety (part 1 of the publication) are studies originating from the regulatory function of STUK; these are directed and funded by the Centre but the Centre does not carry them out itself. In contrast, studies dealing with radiation exposure and health risks (part 2 of the publication) are conducted by the Centre itself, often in cooperation with some other research institute or university. Results of these studies are published in open scientific literature.

  20. New approach for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion correction in cardiac PET (NAMC-CPET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory and cardiac motions are inevitable during the relatively long acquisition time of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The correction of the resultant motion blur has become a significant challenge due to recent spatial resolution improvement of the PET scanners. The majority of current motion compensation algorithms are based on gating as a primary step. A new approach based on temporal basis functions is developed to correct respiratory and cardiac motion simultaneously in cardiac PET within the normal scanning time (NAMC-CPET). Simulation and experimental studies are conducted to evaluate and validate the final outputs in comparison to the existing gating methods. A dynamic digital phantom is used to simulate realistic human thorax and abdomen with respiratory and cardiac motions. GATE simulation was run at China National Grid Center to obtain realistic PET data in a reasonable time. Moreover, Tibet minipig experiments were conducted using a preclinical small animal PET scanner developed at HUST to validate the performance of the NAMC-CPET in real data. The results reveal that NAMC-CPET outperformed the existing gating methods (respiratory, cardiac, and dual) in cardiac imaging in term of noise reduction and contrast, especially in short acquisition duration. NAMC-CPET obtained better results in the conducted experiments in terms of contrast and the visibility of the heart. In contrast, the dual gating failed to obtain valuable images in the normal scan time due to the low 18F-FDG uptake. NAMC-CPET is advantageous in the low-statistic situation. The results are promising with great potential implications in cardiac PET imaging in terms of the radioactive dose and scan time reduction. (paper)

  1. Association between high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in a community based population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Ruyi; Ye Ping; Luo Leiming; Sheng Li; Wu Hongmei; Xiao Wenkai; Zheng Jin

    2014-01-01

    Background N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) are excellent biomarkers for detecting heart failure and subclinical myocardial injury.However,it remains unclear whether subclinical myocardial injury is associated with NT-proBNP elevation in a community based population.Methods In a community based study,levels of hs-cTnT and of NT-proBNP were determined in 1 497 participants older than 45 years.The lower detection limit of the hs-cTnT assay used in the present study was 0.003 ng/ml.The association of hs-cTnT levels and NT-proBNP levels was analyzed.Results When the subjects with undetectable (<0.003 ng/ml),intermediate (0.003-0.014 ng/ml),and elevated (≥0.014 ng/ml) levels of hs-cTnT were compared (r=0.175,P <0.001),a strong association between the hs-cTnT levels and NT-proBNP levels was observed (β=-0.206,P <0.001; β=-0.118,P <0.001,respectively).In multivariable analyses,older age and hs-cTnT were positively and independently associated with NT-proBNP levels (β=0.341,P <0.001; β=0.143,P <0.001,respectively),and male gender and the levels of eGFR were inversely and independently associated with NT-proBNP levels.When the subjects with normal or elevated NT-proBNP were analyzed separately,the hs-cTnT level was not an independent predictor for the NT-proBNP level in the normal NT-proBNP group,whereas the hs-cTnT level was the only independent predictor for NT-proBNP level in the elevated NT-proBNP group (β=0.399,P <0.01).Conclusions In this community based population,NT-proBNP elevation was common.In addition to female gender and older age,subclinical myocardial injury indicated by the hs-cTnT level was another important factor in NT-proBNP elevation.

  2. Facilitating needs based cancer care for people with a chronic disease: Evaluation of an intervention using a multi-centre interrupted time series design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibbritt David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palliative care should be provided according to the individual needs of the patient, caregiver and family, so that the type and level of care provided, as well as the setting in which it is delivered, are dependent on the complexity and severity of individual needs, rather than prognosis or diagnosis 1. This paper presents a study designed to assess the feasibility and efficacy of an intervention to assist in the allocation of palliative care resources according to need, within the context of a population of people with advanced cancer. Methods/design People with advanced cancer and their caregivers completed bi-monthly telephone interviews over a period of up to 18 months to assess unmet needs, anxiety and depression, quality of life, satisfaction with care and service utilisation. The intervention, introduced after at least two baseline phone interviews, involved a training medical, nursing and allied health professionals at each recruitment site on the use of the Palliative Care Needs Assessment Guidelines and the Needs Assessment Tool: Progressive Disease - Cancer (NAT: PD-C; b health professionals completing the NAT: PD-C with participating patients approximately monthly for the rest of the study period. Changes in outcomes will be compared pre-and post-intervention. Discussion The study will determine whether the routine, systematic and regular use of the Guidelines and NAT: PD-C in a range of clinical settings is a feasible and effective strategy for facilitating the timely provision of needs based care. Trials registration ISRCTN21699701

  3. Scheduling participants of Assessment Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jens; Løber, Janni

      Assessment Centres are used as a tool for psychologists and coaches to observe a number of dimensions in a person's behaviour and test his/her potential within a number of chosen focus areas. This is done in an intense course, with a number of different exercises which expose each participant......'s ability level in the chosen focus areas. The participants are observed by assessors with the purpose of gathering material for reaching a conclusion on each participant's personal profile. We consider the particular case that arises at the company Human Equity (www.humanequity.dk), where Assessment...

  4. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  5. Impact of Dispatcher‐Assisted Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on Neurological Outcomes in Children With Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Prospective, Nationwide, Population‐Based Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Maeda, Tetsuo; GOTO, YUMIKO

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of dispatcher‐assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on neurological outcomes in children is unclear. We investigated whether dispatcher‐assisted bystander CPR shows favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2) in children with out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods and Results Children (n=5009, age

  6. Incidence, Causes, and Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children A Comprehensive, Prospective, Population-Based Study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bardai; J. Berdowski; C. van der Werf; M.T. Blom; M. Ceelen; I.M. van Langen; J.G.P. Tijssen; A.A.M. Wilde; R.W. Koster; H.L. Tan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine comprehensively the incidence of pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and its contribution to total pediatric mortality, the causes of pediatric OHCA, and the outcome of resuscitation of pediatric OHCA patients. Background There is a paucity of co

  7. Structural and functional cardiac adaptations to a 10-week school-based football intervention for 9-10-year-old children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Hansen, Peter Riis; Nielsen, Claus Malta;

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the cardiac effects of a 10-week football training intervention for school children aged 9-10 years using comprehensive transthoracic echocardiography as a part of a larger ongoing study. A total of 97 pupils from four school classes were cluster-randomized into a c...

  8. EVALUATION OF NEONATAL CARDIAC MURMURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaiah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular malformations are the most common cause of congenital malformations, the diagnosis of which requires a close observation in the neonatal period. Early recognition of CHD is important in the neonatal period, as many of them may be fatal if undiagnosed and may require immediate intervention. The objectives of this study are to study the epidemiology of neonatal cardiac murmurs, to identify clinical characteristics which differentiate pathological murmur from functional murmurs and to assess the reliability of clinical evaluation in diagnosing CHD. Method of study included all neonates admitted to the NICU, postnatal ward, attending pediatric OPD or neonatal follow up clinic and were detected to have cardiac murmurs. It was a cross sectional study over a period of 16months. A clinical diagnosis was made based on history and clinical examination. Then Chest X-ray and ECG, Echocardiography was done in all neonates for confirmation of the diagnosis. These neonates were again examined daily till they were in hospital and during the follow-up visit at 6 weeks. The results of 70 neonates in this study conducted over a period of 24 months included the incidence of cardiac murmurs among intramural neonates which was 13.5 for 1000 live births. Most frequent symptom was fast breathing in 10(14.3% cases. VSD was the most common diagnosis clinically in 23 (33% babies. The most frequent Echo diagnosis was acyanotic complex congenital heart disease in 25(36% cases followed by 12(17% cases each of VSD and ASD respectively. Overall in our study 77.1% (54cases of the murmurs were diagnosed correctly and confirmed by Echocardiography The study concluded that it is possible to make clinical diagnosis in many cases of congenital heart diseases, the functional murmurs could be differentiated from those arising from structural heart disease and evaluation of the infants based only on murmurs, few congenital heart diseases can be missed.

  9. Patch in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Alizadeh Ghavidel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Excessive bleeding presents a risk for the patient in cardiovascular surgery. Local haemostatic agents are of great value to reduce bleeding and related complications. TachoSil (Nycomed, Linz, Austria is a sterile, haemostatic agent that consists of an equine collagen patchcoated with human fibrinogen and thrombin. This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of TachoSil compared to conventional technique.Methods: Forty-two patients scheduled for open heart surgeries, were entered to this study from August 2010 to May 2011. After primary haemostatic measures, patients divided in two groups based on surgeon’s judgment. Group A: 20 patients for whom TachoSil was applied and group B: 22 patients that conventional method using Surgicel (13 patients or wait and see method (9 cases, were performed in order to control the bleeding. In group A, 10 patients were male with mean age of 56.95±15.67 years and in group B, 9 cases were male with mean age of 49.95±14.41 years. In case group 70% (14/20 of the surgeries were redo surgeries versus 100% (22/22 in control group.Results: Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. In TachoSil group 75% of patients required transfusion versus 90.90% in group B (P=0.03.Most transfusions consisted of packed red blood cell; 2±1.13 units in group A versus 3.11±1.44 in group B (P=0.01, however there were no significant differences between two groups regarding the mean total volume of intra and post-operative bleeding. Re-exploration was required in 10% in group A versus 13.63% in group B (P=0.67.Conclusion: TachoSil may act as a superior alternative in different types of cardiac surgery in order to control the bleeding and therefore reducing transfusion requirement.

  10. Perioperative management of cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aresti, N A; Malik, A A; Ihsan, K M; Aftab, S M E; Khan, W S

    2014-01-01

    Pre-existing cardiac disease contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality amongst patients undergoing non cardiac surgery. Patients with pre-existing cardiac disease or with risk factors for it, have as much as a 3.9% risk of suffering a major perioperative cardiac event (Lee et al 1999, Devereaux 2005). Furthermore, the incidence of perioperative myocardial infarction (MI) is increased 10 to 50 fold in patients with previous coronary events (Jassal 2008).

  11. Core Competencies Of A Call Centre AgentCore Competencies Of A Call Centre Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Christine White; Vera Roos

    2005-01-01

    Call centre agents are becoming increasingly important in the call centre context. They act as a contact point between the customer and the company. Call centre agents should have certain competencies to perform their duties sufficiently. Identifying competencies, required to be effective agents, will ease the task of training and recruitment. Due to the interrelatedness of the call centre agent, the management of a call centre and customers, all relevant role players’ perceptions were taken ...

  12. The new AMS control centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    Construction work for the future AMS control room began in November 2010 and should be finished this June. The new building, which will have been completed in record time thanks to the professionalism of the project team, will soon be ready to receive the initial data from the AMS experiment.     Luigi Scibile and Michael Poehler, from the GS department, at the AMS control centre construction site.   The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is due to wing its way towards the International Space Station (ISS) on board the shuttle Discovery in April. Mainly intended for research on antimatter and dark matter, the data collected by AMS will be sent to Houston in the United States and then directly to CERN’s new Building 946. Construction work for the AMS control centre building on the Route Gentner at CERN’s Prévessin site started in November 2010 and must be completed in time to receive the first data from the spectrometer in June. “It normall...

  13. Association of glomerular filtration rate with high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T in a community-based population study in Beijing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reduced renal function is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality, and persistently elevated cardiac troponin T (cTnT is frequently observed in patients with end-stage renal disease. In the general population the relationship between renal function and cTnT levels may not be clear because of the low sensitivity of the assay. In this study, we investigated the level of cTnT using a highly sensitive assay (hs-cTnT and evaluated the association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR with detectable hs-cTnT levels in a community-based population. METHODS: The serum hs-cTnT levels were measured in 1365 community dwelling population aged ≥45 years in Beijing, China. eGFR was determined by the Chinese modifying modification of diet in renal disease (C-MDRD equation. RESULTS: With the highly sensitive assay, cTnT levels were detectable (≥3pg/mL in 744 subjects (54.5%. The result showed that eGFR was associated with Log hs-cTnT (r = -0.14, P20% and other prognostic indicators, moderate to severe reduced eGFR was independently associated with detectable hs-cTnT, whereas normal to mildly reduced eGFR was not independently associated with detectable hs-cTnT. In addition, after adjustment for other risk factors, the high predicted Framingham CHD risk was associated with detectable hs-cTnT in the subjects with different quartile levels of eGFR. CONCLUSION: The levels of hs-cTnT are detectable in a community-based Chinese population and low eGFR is associated with detectable hs-cTnT. Moreover, eGFR and high predicted Framingham CHD risk are associated with detectable hs-cTnT in subjects with moderate-to-severe reduced renal function.

  14. Improving cardiac myocytes performance by CNTs platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eMartinelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of nanotechnology to the cardiovascular system has increasingly caught scientists’ attention as a potentially powerful tool for the development of new generation devices able to interface, repair or boost the performance of cardiac tissue. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered as promising materials for nanomedicine applications in general and have been recently tested towards excitable cell growth. CNTs are cylindrically shaped structures made up of rolled-up graphene sheets, with unique electrical, thermal and mechanical properties, able to effectively conducting electrical current in electrochemical interfaces. CNTs-based scaffolds have been recently found to support the in vitro growth of cardiac cells: in particular, their ability to improve cardiomyocytes proliferation, maturation and electrical behavior are making CNTs extremely attractive for the development and exploitation of interfaces able to impact on cardiac cells physiology and function.

  15. Cardiac nonrigid motion analysis from image sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Huafeng

    2006-01-01

    Noninvasive estimation of the soft tissue kinematics properties from medical image sequences has many important clinical and physiological implications, such as the diagnosis of heart diseases and the understanding of cardiac mechanics. In this paper, we present a biomechanics based strategy, framed as a priori constraints for the ill-posed motion recovery problema, to realize estimation of the cardiac motion and deformation parameters. By constructing the heart dynamics system equations from biomechanics principles, we use the finite element method to generate smooth estimates.of heart kinematics throughout the cardiac cycle. We present the application of the strategy to the estimation of displacements and strains from in vivo left ventricular magnetic resonance image sequence.

  16. An automated procedure for the assessment of white matter hyperintensities by multispectral (T1, T2, PD) MRI and an evaluation of its between-centre reproducibility based on two large community databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automated procedure for the detection, quantification, localization and statistical mapping of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images is presented and validated based on the results of a between-centre reproducibility study. The first step is the identification of white matter (WM) tissue using a multispectral (T1, T2, PD) segmentation. In a second step, WMH are identified within the WM tissue by segmenting T2 images, isolating two different classes of WMH voxels - low- and high-contrast WMH voxels, respectively. The reliability of the whole procedure was assessed by applying it to the analysis of two large MR imaging databases (n = 650 and n710, respectively) of healthy elderly subjects matched for demographic characteristics. Average overall WMH load and spatial distribution were found to be similar in the two samples, (1.81 and 1.79% of the WM volume, respectively). White matter hyperintensity load was found to be significantly associated with both age and high blood pressure, with similar effects in both samples. With specific reference to the 650 subject cohort, we also found that WMH load provided by this automated procedure was significantly associated with visual grading of the severity of WMH, as assessed by a trained neurologist. The results show that this method is sensitive, well correlated with semi-quantitative visual rating and highly reproducible. (orig.)

  17. Totally laparoscopic versus conventional ileoanal pouch procedure – design of a single-centre, expertise based randomised controlled trial to compare the laparoscopic and conventional surgical approach in patients undergoing primary elective restorative proctocolectomy- LapConPouch-Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitz Jürgen

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restorative proctocolectomy is increasingly being performed minimal invasively but a totally laparoscopic technique has not yet been compared to the standard open technique in a randomized study. Methods/design This is a two armed, single centre, expertise based, preoperatively randomized, patient blinded study. It is designed as a two-group parallel superiority study. Power calculation revealed 80 patients per group in order to recruit the 65 patients to be analysed for the primary endpoint. The primary objective is to investigate intra-operative blood loss and the need for blood transfusions. We hypothesise that intra-operative blood loss and the need for peri-operative blood transfusions are significantly higher in the conventional group. Additionally a set of surgical and non-surgical parameters related to the operation will be analysed as secondary objectives. These will include operative time, complications, postoperative pain, lung function, postoperative length of hospital stay, a cosmetic score and pre-and postoperative quality of life. Discussion The trial will answer the question whether there is indeed an advantage in the laparoscopic group in regard to blood loss and the need for blood transfusions. Moreover, it will generate data on the safety and potential advantages and disadvantages of the minimally invasive approach. Trial registration : ISCRTN61411448

  18. The cardiac malpositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloff, Joseph K

    2011-11-01

    Dextrocardia was known in the 17th century and was 1 of the first congenital malformations of the heart to be recognized. Fifty years elapsed before Matthew Baillie published his account of complete transposition in a human of the thoracic and abdominal viscera to the opposite side from what is natural. In 1858, Thomas Peacock stated that "the heart may be congenitally misplaced in various ways, occupying either an unusual position within the thorax, or being situated external to that cavity." In 1915, Maude Abbott described ectopia cordis, and Richard Paltauf's remarkable illustrations distinguished the various types of dextrocardia. In 1928, the first useful classification of the cardiac malpositions was proposed, and in 1966, Elliott et al's radiologic classification set the stage for clinical recognition. The first section of this review deals with the 3 basic cardiac malpositions in the presence of bilateral asymmetry. The second section deals with cardiac malpositions in the presence of bilateral left-sidedness or right-sidedness. Previous publications on cardiac malpositions are replete with an arcane vocabulary that confounds rather than clarifies. Even if the terms themselves are understood, inherent complexity weighs against clarity. This review was designed as a guided tour of an unfamiliar subject.

  19. Hepato-cardiac disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasser; Mahrous; Fouad; Reem; Yehia

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationship between the liver and the heart is important for both hepatologists and cardiologists. Hepato-cardiac diseases can be classified into heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions affecting the heart and the liver at the same time. Differential diagnoses of liver injury are extremely important in a cardiologist’s clinical practice calling for collaboration between cardiologists and hepatologists due to the many other diseases that can affect the liver and mimic haemodynamic injury. Acute and chronic heart failure may lead to acute ischemic hepatitis or chronic congestive hepatopathy. Treatment in these cases should be directed to the primary heart disease. In patients with advanced liver disease, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may develop including hemodynamic changes, diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, reduced cardiac performance and electrophysiological abnormalities. Cardiac evaluation is important for patients with liver diseases especially before and after liver transplantation. Liver transplantation may lead to the improvement of all cardiac changes and the reversal of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. There are systemic diseases that may affect both the liver and the heart concomitantly including congenital, metabolic and inflammatory diseases as well as alcoholism. This review highlights these hepatocardiac diseases

  20. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...

  1. Cardiac pacemaker power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of chemical and radioisotope batteries used in cardiac pacemakers is presented. The battery systems are examined in terms of longevity, reliability, cost, size and shape, energy density, weight, internal resistance versus time, end-of-life voltage, chemical compatibility, and potential failure mechanisms

  2. Perceptions of cardiac rehabilitation patients, specialists and rehabilitation programs regarding cardiac rehabilitation wait times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Sherry L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2006, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS Access to Care Working Group recommended a 30-day wait time benchmark for cardiac rehabilitation (CR. The objectives of the current study were to: (1 describe cardiac patient perceptions of actual and ideal CR wait times, (2 describe and compare cardiac specialist and CR program perceptions of wait times, as well as whether the recommendations are appropriate and feasible, and (3 investigate actual wait times and factors that CR programs perceive to affect these wait times. Methods Postal and online surveys to assess perceptions of CR wait times were administered to CR enrollees at intake into 1 of 8 programs, all CCS member cardiac specialists treating patients indicated for CR, and all CR programs listed in Canadian directories. Actual wait times were ascertained from the Canadian Cardiac Rehabilitation Registry. The design was cross-sectional. Responses were described and compared. Results Responses were received from 163 CR enrollees, 71 cardiac specialists (9.3% response rate, and 92 CR programs (61.7% response rate. Patients reported that their wait time from hospital discharge to CR initiation was 65.6 ± 88.4 days (median, 42 days, while their ideal median wait time was 28 days. Most patients (91.5% considered their wait to be acceptable, but ideal wait times varied significantly by the type of cardiac indication for CR. There were significant differences between specialist and program perceptions of the appropriate number of days to wait by most indications, with CR programs perceiving shorter waits as appropriate (p  Conclusions Wait times following access to cardiac rehabilitation are prolonged compared with consensus recommendations, and yet are generally acceptable to most patients. Wait times following percutaneous coronary intervention in particular may need to be shortened. Future research is required to provide an evidence base for wait time

  3. Pre-transplantation specification of stem cells to cardiac lineage for regeneration of cardiac tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Maritza; Finan, Amanda; Penn, Marc

    2009-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a lead cause of mortality in the Western world. Treatment of acute MI is focused on restoration of antegrade flow which inhibits further tissue loss, but does not restore function to damaged tissue. Chronic therapy for injured myocardial tissue involves medical therapy that attempts to minimize pathologic remodeling of the heart. End stage therapy for chronic heart failure (CHF) involves inotropic therapy to increase surviving cardiac myocyte function or mechanical augmentation of cardiac performance. Not until the point of heart transplantation, a limited resource at best, does therapy focus on the fundamental problem of needing to replace injured tissue with new contractile tissue. In this setting, the potential for stem cell therapy has garnered significant interest for its potential to regenerate or create new contractile cardiac tissue. While to date adult stem cell therapy in clinical trials has suggested potential benefit, there is waning belief that the approaches used to date lead to regeneration of cardiac tissue. As the literature has better defined the pathways involved in cardiac differentiation, preclinical studies have suggested that stem cell pretreatment to direct stem cell differentiation prior to stem cell transplantation may be a more efficacious strategy for inducing cardiac regeneration. Here we review the available literature on pre-transplantation conditioning of stem cells in an attempt to better understand stem cell behavior and their readiness in cell-based therapy for myocardial regeneration.

  4. Echocardiography to magnetic resonance image registration for use in image-guided cardiac catheterization procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Yingliang; Penney, Graeme P; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S [Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Rinaldi, C Aldo; Cooklin, Mike [Department of Cardiology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: y.ma@kcl.ac.uk

    2009-08-21

    We present a robust method to register three-dimensional echocardiography (echo) images to magnetic resonance images (MRI) based on anatomical features, which is designed to be used in the registration pipeline for overlaying MRI-derived roadmaps onto two-dimensional live x-ray images during cardiac catheterization procedures. The features used in image registration are the endocardial surface of the left ventricle and the centre line of the descending aorta. The MR-derived left ventricle surface is generated using a fully automated algorithm, and the echo-derived left ventricle surface is produced using a semi-automatic segmentation method provided by the QLab software (Philips Healthcare) that it is routinely used in clinical practice. We test our method on data from six volunteers and four patients. We validated registration accuracy using two methods: the first calculated a root mean square distance error using expert identified anatomical landmarks, and the second method used catheters as landmarks in two clinical electrophysiology procedures. Results show a mean error of 4.1 mm, which is acceptable for our clinical application, and no failed registrations were observed. In addition, our algorithm works on clinical data, is fast and only requires a small amount of manual input, and so it is applicable for use during cardiac catheterization procedures.

  5. Centre for nuclear engineering University of Toronto annual report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report of the Centre for Nuclear Engineering, University of Toronto covers the following subjects: message from the Dean; Chairman's message; origins of the centre; formation of the centre; new nuclear appointments; and activities of the centre, 1984

  6. Lung transplantation from donor of cardiac death and donation after brain death in one centre Ⅲ: 4 cases report%单中心心脏死亡和脑死亡供肺肺移植临床经验总结

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛文君; 陈静瑜; 郑明峰; 吴波; 叶书高; 刘峰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To summarize the clinical experience ot harvesting and using the lungs from donation after brain death (DBD) and donation after cardiac death (DCD,Maastricht category Ⅳ) in China.Methods Eleven potential DBDs and DCDs were evaluated by our transplant group preoperatively,including 6 cases of DCDs and 5 cases of DBDs,and all of them received the tests of sputum culture bedside bronchoscopy,chest X rays,and blood gas analysis.After clear evaluation,1 case of DCD and 2 cases of DBD were discharged from the group for bilateral inflammatory infiltration and poor oxygenation index,and one case of DCD was precluded due to long warm ischemic time (>60min).The donor lungs from remaining 7 cases were harvested successfully after the declaration of brain death or cardiac death.The preoperative lymphocytotoxic cross match test was negative,ABO blood types were compatible,and the donors were all suitable for the transplant procedure.Results Seven lung transplants were performed successfully under ECMO support,including 5 cases of bilateral lung transplantation and 2 cases of single lung transplantation.One patient was complicated with severe infection and died of sepsis on postoperative day (POD) 39,and one was succumbed to multiple organ failure.Two patients suffered of acute rejection on POD 30 and POD 19,respectively,and obtained improvements by bolus steroid therapy.The remaining 3 patients all recovered uneventfully.During a follow up period,all the patients lived an active life style with high quality of life.The mean survival time was 23.3 months (3-51 months).Conclusion The DCD and DBD may be one of the available donor resources for lung transplantation after efficient management of the potential donors and detailed preoperative evaluation in China.%目的 总结单中心脑死亡器官捐赠(DBD)和心脏死亡器官捐赠(DCD)的供肺获取以及肺移植的临床经验.方法 11例潜在器官捐献供者进行了术前评估,所有供者均进行痰

  7. Screening and risk evaluation for sudden cardiac death in ischaemic and non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Lewalter, Thorsten; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia;

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this EHRA survey was to examine the current clinical practice of screening and risk evaluation for sudden cardiac death in ischaemic and non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy with a focus on selection of candidates for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy, timing of ICD...... implantation, and use of non-invasive and invasive diagnostic tests across Europe. A systematic screening programme for sudden cardiac death existed in 19 out of 31 centres (61.3%). Implantation of ICDs according to the inclusion criteria of MADIT-II and SCD-HeFT trials was reported in 30 and 29% of centres......, respectively, followed by MADIT-CRT (18%), COMPANION (16%), and combined MADIT and MUSTT (7%) indications. In patients with severe renal impairment, ICD implantation for primary prevention of sudden death was always avoided in 8 centres (33.3%), was not used only if creatinine level was >2.5 mg/dL in 10...

  8. IAEA RANET Capacity Building Centre in Fukushima Begins Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The designation of the IAEA Response and Assistance Network (RANET) Capacity Building Centre, which will coordinate several training activities related to nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response, was marked with a ceremony today. Ambassador Shin Maruo, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Masao Uchibori, Deputy Governor of Fukushima Prefecture, and Elena Buglova, IAEA Incident and Emergency Centre Head, delivered remarks during the ceremony. The Centre will be home to training courses, workshops and exercises aimed at enhancing nuclear emergency preparedness and response capacity, both in Japan and worldwide, in light of the March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The Centre is supported by the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) and Fukushima Prefecture. The first activity in the Centre, an IAEA RANET Workshop, will start tomorrow and conclude on 31 May 2013. More than 40 experts from 18 countries will participate in the workshop, which will involve a field exercise in Fukushima Prefecture. During this exercise, participants will conduct radiation monitoring and environmental sampling and analysis. They will monitor beta and gamma dose rate, the contamination level of the ground surface and conduct gamma spectrum analysis and vehicle-based monitoring. Through RANET, the IAEA can mobilize the provision of expert support and equipment by request under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. The Centre forms part of the IAEA's work to further strengthen international emergency preparedness and response, as guided by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety which was unanimously endorsed by IAEA Member States in September 2011. ''Working together, the IAEA's Member States have already made significant progress in this area, but we can never stop working to improve it further, Ms. Buglova said at the ceremony. Through efforts here at the IAEA RANET Capacity

  9. Powering the Future Data Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe

    2010-01-01

    The extended run Uninterruptible Power Supply system (UPSs) which powered by fuel cells and supercapcitors, is a promising solution for future data centre to obtain environmentfriendly energy efficient and cost effective. There are many challenges in power electronic interface circuits, because......: • Optimized design method for dual active bridge (DAB) converter and its derived circuits; • A novel hybrid dc-dc converter and its corresponding optimal design method are proposed; • An improved dual input current-fed DC-DC converter with bidirectional power conversion ability is investigated; • Extend...... the circuit level decoupling modulation scheme into 3LNPC inverter. As to the DAB converter, through the power factor and harmonics analysis, the dominated loss factor is found in variable input voltage range. Optimized parameter choosing method is used to decide the ac inductance and switching frequency...

  10. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Strength and Balance in Patients after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Nazari

    Full Text Available Background: The most common method for improving the quality of life especially in chronic heart disease is rehabilitation. For increasing the level of knowledge about effect of rehabilitation and its' impression on improving the quality of life in patients. This study evaluates effect of one month cardiac rehabilitation on lower limb strength and the static and dynamic balance of CABG patients. Materials and Methods: This study is based on clinical trial before and after rehabilitation. the exercise protocol lasted for one month, three times per week, each session lasting 1 hour, on 30 male patients in two groups in control (N=15 and experimental group (N=15 after CABG in the centre of rehabilitation in Javad-Alaeme Heart Hospital, Mashhad. The strength of lower limb by chair standing test, the static balance by standing on one leg and dynamic balance by time up and go (TUG test, was evaluated before and after 1 month rehabilitation in training group and detraining in control group. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 and used t-test analysis (p≤0.05.Results: The strength of lower limb (p=0.001, static balance (p=0.023 and dynamic balance (p=0.037 increased significantly after one month of cardiac rehabilitation.Conclusion: The result of this study indicates that cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery causes significant increase in strength of lower limb and balance in patients, the more muscle strength is associated with an increase in ability of performing daily activities and so it causes improved quality of life.

  11. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Strength and Balance in Patients after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Nazari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common method for improving the quality of life especially in chronic heart disease is rehabilitation. For increasing the level of knowledge about effect of rehabilitation and its' impression on improving the quality of life in patients. This study evaluates effect of one month cardiac rehabilitation on lower limb strength and the static and dynamic balance of CABG patients. Materials and Methods: This study is based on clinical trial before and after rehabilitation. the exercise protocol lasted for one month, three times per week, each session lasting 1 hour, on 30 male patients in two groups in control (N=15 and experimental group (N=15 after CABG in the centre of rehabilitation in Javad-Alaeme Heart Hospital, Mashhad. The strength of lower limb by chair standing test, the static balance by standing on one leg and dynamic balance by time up and go (TUG test, was evaluated before and after 1 month rehabilitation in training group and detraining in control group. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 and used t-test analysis (p≤0.054T. Results: The strength of lower limb (p=0.001, static balance (p=0.023 and dynamic balance (p=0.037 increased significantly after one month of cardiac rehabilitation4T. Conclusion: The result of this study indicates that cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery causes significant increase in strength of lower limb and balance in patients, the more muscle strength is associated with an increase in ability of performing daily activities and so it causes improved quality of life4T.

  12. Association of Early Repolarization Pattern on ECG with Risk of Cardiac and All-Cause Mortality: A Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study (MONICA/KORA)

    OpenAIRE

    Sinner, Moritz F.; Wibke Reinhard; Martina Müller; Britt-Maria Beckmann; Eimo Martens; Siegfried Perz; Arne Pfeufer; Janina Winogradow; Klaus Stark; Christa Meisinger; H-Erich Wichmann; Annette Peters; Riegger, Günter A. J.; Gerhard Steinbeck; Christian Hengstenberg

    2010-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Cardiovascular diseases—disorders that affect the heart and the circulation—are the leading cause of death in the developed world. About half of cardiovascular deaths occur when the heart suddenly stops pumping (sudden cardiac arrest). The muscular walls of the four heart chambers contract in a set pattern to pump blood around the body. The heart's internal electrical system controls the rate and rhythm of these contractions and, if this system goes wrong, an abnor...

  13. Irradiation of left breast and cardiac risk: fundamentals for a prospective study; Irradiation du sein gauche et risque cardiaque: bases pour une etude prospective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Untereiner, M.; Frederick, B.; Burie, D.; Philippi, S.; Joseph, S.; Harzee, L.; Hoziel, D.; Eschenbrenner, A.; Meyer, P. [Centre Francois-Baclesse, Esch-sur-Alzette (Luxembourg); Gibeau, L.; Laurent-Daniel, F.; Libert, S.; Fressancourt, C. [Centre Gray, 59 - Maubeuge (France)

    2010-10-15

    As the delineation of the anterior interventricular artery and of the heart is to be taken into account during irradiations of the left beast, in order to limit cardiotoxicity, the authors discuss the results of previous studies which highlighted this risk, and notably in a retrospective assessment of dose-volume histograms of the anterior interventricular artery and of the heart which concerned 162 left breast irradiations. This last study allowed cardiac tolerance thresholds to be defined. Short communication

  14. A population-based study relevant to seasonal variations in causes of death in children undergoing surgery for congenital cardiac malformations

    OpenAIRE

    Eskedal, Leif T.; Hagemo, Petter S.; Eskild, Anne; Frøslie, Kathrine F; Seiler, Stephen; Thaulow, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Aims: Our objectives were, first, to study seasonal distribution of perioperative deaths within 30 days after surgery, and late death, in children undergoing surgery for congenitally malformed hearts, and second, to study the causes of late death. Methods: We analysed a retrospective cohort of 1,753 children with congenital cardiac malformations born and undergoing surgery in the period from 1990 through 2002 with a special focus on the causes of late death. The data was obtained from the...

  15. Early atherosclerosis and cardiac autonomic responses to mental stress: a population-based study of the moderating influence of impaired endothelial function

    OpenAIRE

    Juonala Markus; Ravaja Niklas; Hintsa Taina; Hintsanen Mirka; Chumaeva Nadja; Raitakari Olli T; Keltikangas-Järvinen Liisa

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute mental stress may contribute to the cardiovascular disease progression via autonomic nervous system controlled negative effects on the endothelium. The joint effects of stress-induced sympathetic or parasympathetic activity and endothelial function on atherosclerosis development have not been investigated. The present study aims to examine the interactive effect of acute mental stress-induced cardiac reactivity/recovery and endothelial function on the prevalence of c...

  16. Improvement of cardiac contractile function by peptide-based inhibition of NF-κB in the utrophin/dystrophin-deficient murine model of muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Guttridge Denis C; Peterson Jennifer M; Xu Ying; Delfín Dawn A; Rafael-Fortney Jill A; Janssen Paul ML

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited and progressive disease causing striated muscle deterioration. Patients in their twenties generally die from either respiratory or cardiac failure. In order to improve the lifespan and quality of life of DMD patients, it is important to prevent or reverse the progressive loss of contractile function of the heart. Recent studies by our labs have shown that the peptide NBD (Nemo Binding Domain), targeted at blunting Nuclear F...

  17. A New Technique for the Estimation of Cardiac Motion in Echocardiography Based on Transverse Oscillations: a preliminary evaluation in silico and a feasibility demonstration in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandrini, Martino; Basarab, Adrian; Boussel, Loic; Guo, Xinxin; Serusclat, André; Friboulet, Denis; Kouamé, Denis; Bernard, Olivier; Liebgott, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    International audience Quantification of regional myocardial motion and deformation from cardiac ultrasound is fostering considerable research efforts. Despite the tremendous improvements done in the field, all existing approaches still face a common limitation which is intrinsically connected with the formation of the ultrasound images. Specifically, the reduced lateral resolution and the absence of phase information in the lateral direction highly limit the accuracy in the computation of...

  18. Plasma tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1): an independent predictor of poor response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tolosana, Jose María; Mont, Lluís; Sitges, Marta; Berruezo, Antonio; Delgado, Victoria; Vidal, Bàrbara; Tamborero, David; Morales, Manel; Batlle, Montserrat; Roig, Eulalia; Castel, M. Angeles; Pérez-Villa, Félix; Godoy, Miguel; Brugada, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Aims Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) play a role in left ventricular structural remodelling. The aim of our study was to analyse MMP-2 and TIMP-1 levels as predictors of poor response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods and results A cohort of 42 CRT patients from our centre was prospectively evaluated at baseline and after 12-month follow-up. MMP-2 and TIMP-1 assays were performed prior to CRT implant. Cardiac resynchronization therapy res...

  19. Toward microendoscopy-inspired cardiac optogenetics in vivo: technical overview and perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Aleksandra; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    The ability to perform precise, spatially localized actuation and measurements of electrical activity in the heart is crucial in understanding cardiac electrophysiology and devising new therapeutic solutions for control of cardiac arrhythmias. Current cardiac imaging techniques (i.e. optical mapping) employ voltage- or calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes to visualize the electrical signal propagation through cardiac syncytium in vitro or in situ with very high-spatiotemporal resolution. The extension of optogenetics into the cardiac field, where cardiac tissue is genetically altered to express light-sensitive ion channels allowing electrical activity to be elicited or suppressed in a precise cell-specific way, has opened the possibility for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology. In vivo application of cardiac optogenetics faces multiple challenges and necessitates suitable optical systems employing fiber optics to actuate and sense electrical signals. In this technical perspective, we present a compendium of clinically relevant access routes to different parts of the cardiac electrical conduction system based on currently employed catheter imaging systems and determine the quantitative size constraints for endoscopic cardiac optogenetics. We discuss the relevant technical advancements in microendoscopy, cardiac imaging, and optogenetics and outline the strategies for combining them to create a portable, miniaturized fiber-based system for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology in vivo.

  20. Operational improvements in the CANDU 9 control centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has adopted an evolutionary approach to the design of the CANDU 9 control centre. Several factors have contributed to this decision including the desire to build on the successes of the current generation of CANDU stations, the changing roles and responsibilities of operations staff, an improved understanding of human error in operational situations, the opportunity for improved plant performance through the introduction of new technologies, and evolving customer and regulatory requirements. Underlying this approach is a refined engineering design process that cost-effectively integrates operational feedback and human factors engineering to define the operating staff information and information presentation requirements. Based on this approach, the CANDU 9 control centre will provide utility operating staff with a layout and information organization that is better matched to operational tasks, thereby leading to reduced operations, maintenance and administration (OM and A) costs. Significant design features that contribute to the improved operational capabilities of the CANDU 9 control centre include: a control centre layout with improved functionality; a new Plant Display System that is separated from the digital control computer system; and an enhanced computerized reactor shutdown system. The paper will present a summary of the design process, a detailed description of the CANDU 9 control centre layout and features, a description of the plant control and display systems design, including findings from a regulatory review, and other improvements to enhance operability. (author)