WorldWideScience

Sample records for centre anticipated benefits

  1. Exploring the potential benefit of adult day centre exercise programs

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Lara Joanne

    2006-01-01

    This thesis explores the potential physical benefit of exercise programs offered to clients from 54 Adult Day Centres in British Columbia, Canada. The purpose of the research was to determine characteristics of clients, exercise programs and leaders and to establish their relative influence on an exercise classification system (ECS) score, which categorized each program as offering minimal, moderate or optimal potential benefit.

  2. Electronic medical record systems in critical access hospitals: leadership perspectives on anticipated and realized benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Troy R; Vavroch, Jared; Bahensky, James A; Ward, Marcia M

    2010-04-01

    The growth of electronic medical records (EMRs) is driven by the belief that EMRs will significantly improve healthcare providers' performance and reduce healthcare costs. Evidence supporting these beliefs is limited, especially for small rural hospitals. A survey that focused on health information technology (HIT) capacity was administered to all hospitals in Iowa. Structured interviews were conducted with the leadership at 15 critical access hospitals (CAHs) that had implemented EMRs in order to assess the perceived benefits of operational EMRs. The results indicate that most of the hospitals implemented EMRs to improve efficiency, timely access, and quality. Many CAH leaders also viewed EMR implementation as a necessary business strategy to remain viable and improve financial performance. While some reasons reflect external influences, such as perceived future federal mandates, other reasons suggest that the decision was driven by internal forces, including the hospital's culture and the desires of key leaders to embrace HIT. Anticipated benefits were consistent with goals; however, realized benefits were rarely obvious in terms of quantifiable results. These findings expand the limited research on the rationale for implementing EMRs in critical access hospitals.

  3. How to anticipate the assessment of the public health benefit of new medicines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massol, Jacques; Puech, Alain; Boissel, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The Public Health Benefit (PHB) of new medicines is a recent and French-specific criterion (October 1999 decree) which is often only partially documented in the transparency files due to a lack of timely information. At the time of the first reimbursement application for a new medicine to the "Transparency Committee", the file is exclusively based on data from randomised clinical trials. These data are generated from a global clinical development plan which was designed a long time before the new medicine's submission for reimbursement. And this plan does not systematically provide the data needed to assess the PHB. Thus, one easily understands the difficulty to anticipate and document this recent French criterion. In France, the PHB is both one of the necessary criteria for the reimbursement submission and an indicator for the national health policy management. Its assessment also helps to identify the needs and objectives of the post-registration studies (nowadays in the scope of responsibilities of the "Drug Economics Committee"). The assessment of the PHB criterion is carried through after the marketing authorization process and is an addition to it. To understand how to anticipate the assessment of the new medicines' PHB, one needs to consider how it differs from the preliminary step of the marketing authorization process. Whereas the evaluation for marketing authorization seeks to determine if the new medicine could be useful in a specific indication, the PHB assessment aims at quantifying the therapeutic benefit in a population, taking into account the reference treatments in this population. A new medicine receives a marketing authorization based on the data of the registration file which provides information on the clinical benefit of the new medicine in the populations of the trials and in the context of the trials. On the other side, the PHB looks at the effects of the new medicine at the scale of the general population, in real practice. The PHB

  4. The programme benefits of improving project team communication through a contact centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bond-Barnard, T. J.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A South African national programme to repair government infrastructure uses a contact centre (or call centre to facilitate and manage communication. An important question is: How does the contact centre benefit the programme and its projects? This study discusses the findings of a survey that quantified the benefits of the programme when the communication between team members in the programme was improved by using a contact centre. The results show that, by using a contact centre to improve the communication between project team members, their perception of communication effectiveness, quality of project deliverables, service delivery, and customer satisfaction of the programme dramatically increases.

  5. Benefits of human-centred design in open innovation projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M.G.D.; Aarts, O.A.J.; Broekman, C.C.M.T.

    2012-01-01

    Human-centred design (HCD) is a form of open innovation in which researchers and designers cooperate with (potential) users or customers, e.g. in co-design workshops, interviews, user tests and trials. Based on a case study of two open innovation projects in which HCD activities were organized (TA2

  6. Anticipated Job Benefits, Career Aspiration, and Generalized Self-efficacy as Predictors for Migration Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Annekatrin; Fujishiro, Kaori

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to identify person-level factors, rather than economic situations, that influence migration decision-making and actual migration. Building on the theory of planned behavior, this study investigated potential migrants' expectations and attitudes toward migration and career (i.e., anticipated job benefits of migration, career aspiration) as well as beliefs (i.e., generalized self-efficacy) as predictors of migration decision-making conceptualized in three phases: the pre-decisional, pre-actional, and actional phases. This was examined with cross-sectional pre-migration questionnaire data from 1163 potential migrants from Spain to Germany. We also examined whether the migration decision-making phases predicted actual migration with a subsample (n=249) which provided follow-up data within twelve months. For the cross-sectional sample, multinomial logistic regressions revealed that anticipated job benefits and career aspiration are predictive for all migration phases. Self-efficacy predicts the preactional (e.g., gathering information) and actional phases (e.g., making practical arrangements). Finally, for those with low self-efficacy, anticipated job benefits play a stronger role for taking action. For the longitudinal subsample, a logistic regression revealed that being in the preactional and actional phases at baseline is predictive of actual migration within twelve months. This study expands previous research on migration intentions and behaviors by focusing on expectations, values, and beliefs as person-level predictors for migration decision-making. With a longitudinal sample, it shows that international migration is a process that involves multiple phases.

  7. Anticipated Job Benefits, Career Aspiration, and Generalized Self-efficacy as Predictors for Migration Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Annekatrin; Fujishiro, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify person-level factors, rather than economic situations, that influence migration decision-making and actual migration. Building on the theory of planned behavior, this study investigated potential migrants’ expectations and attitudes toward migration and career (i.e., anticipated job benefits of migration, career aspiration) as well as beliefs (i.e., generalized self-efficacy) as predictors of migration decision-making conceptualized in three phases: the pre-decisional, pre-actional, and actional phases. This was examined with cross-sectional pre-migration questionnaire data from 1163 potential migrants from Spain to Germany. We also examined whether the migration decision-making phases predicted actual migration with a subsample (n=249) which provided follow-up data within twelve months. For the cross-sectional sample, multinomial logistic regressions revealed that anticipated job benefits and career aspiration are predictive for all migration phases. Self-efficacy predicts the preactional (e.g., gathering information) and actional phases (e.g., making practical arrangements). Finally, for those with low self-efficacy, anticipated job benefits play a stronger role for taking action. For the longitudinal subsample, a logistic regression revealed that being in the preactional and actional phases at baseline is predictive of actual migration within twelve months. This study expands previous research on migration intentions and behaviors by focusing on expectations, values, and beliefs as person-level predictors for migration decision-making. With a longitudinal sample, it shows that international migration is a process that involves multiple phases. PMID:26379343

  8. Function, anticipation, representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickhard, Mark. H.

    2001-06-01

    Function emerges in certain kinds of far-from-equilibrium systems. One important kind of function is that of interactive anticipation, an adaptedness to temporal complexity. Interactive anticipation is the locus of the emergence of normative representational content, and, thus, of representation in general: interactive anticipation is the naturalistic core of the evolution of cognition. Higher forms of such anticipation are involved in the subsequent macro-evolutionary sequence of learning, emotions, and reflexive consciousness.

  9. Inverse anticipating chaos synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahverdiev, E M; Sivaprakasam, S; Shore, K A

    2002-07-01

    We derive conditions for achieving inverse anticipating synchronization where a driven time-delay chaotic system synchronizes to the inverse future state of the driver. The significance of inverse anticipating chaos in delineating synchronization regimes in time-delay systems is elucidated. The concept is extended to cascaded time-delay systems.

  10. Using economic benefits for recycling in a separate collection centre managed as a "reverse supermarket": a sociological survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feo, Giovanni; Polito, Anna Rita

    2015-04-01

    Separate collection centres (SCCs), where citizens can deliver recyclable fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW), in an "urban mining" perspective, can be considered a sort of "reverse supermarket", where people can deliver their recyclables in order to either obtain a waste fee reduction or shopping vouchers. The latter is the case of Baronissi, a town of around 17,000 inhabitants in the Province of Salerno, in the Campania region of Italy. The principal aim of the study was to investigate by means of a sociological survey the relationship between citizens and the separate collection program, with particular emphasis on the role played by the SCC. The separate collection system was evaluated either good or very good by 95.8% of the sample, while 99.2% expressed a good or very good evaluation of the quality of the service inside the separate collection centre: SCC users acted as a community as highlighted by the negative response of the Chi-square test for independence. Respecting the environment prevailed over saving time, obtaining eco-points, or saving money as the main reason why people went to the SCC. The majority of the respondents agreed if only putrescibles and residue should be collected directly from their homes, while all the other materials should be collected exclusively at the SCC, allowing to save money for the management of the kerbside collection system with a consequent further waste fee reduction for the residents.

  11. The Health and Safety Benefits of New Technologies in Mining: A Review and Strategy for Designing and Deploying Effective User-Centred Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Horberry

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mining is currently experiencing a rapid growth in the development and uptake of automation and other new technologies (such as collision detection systems; however, they are often developed from a technology-centred perspective that does not explicitly consider the end-user. This paper first presents a review of the technologies currently available (or near-market and the likely human factors issues associated with them. The second part of the paper presents a potential long term strategy for research and development that aims to maximise the safety and health benefits for operators of such new technologies. The strategy includes a four stage research and development process, this covers: better understanding the needs for technology, user requirements and risk/cost analysis; human element design, procurement and deployment processes; evaluation and verification of the strategy; and dissemination of it to relevant stakeholders (including equipment manufacturers, mine site purchasers and regulators. The paper concludes by stressing the importance of considering the human element with respect to new mining technologies and the likely benefits of adopting the type of strategy proposed here. The overall vision is for mining to become safer and healthier through effective user-centred design and deployment of new technologies that serve both operator needs and the demands of the workplace.

  12. Anticipation and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    In this book, practicing physicians and experts in anticipation present arguments for a new understanding of medicine. Their contributions make it clear that medicine is the decisive test for anticipation. The reader is presented with a provocative hypothesis: If medicine will align itself with the anticipatory condition of life, it can prompt the most important revolution in our time. To this end, all stakeholders—medical practitioners, patients, scientists, and technology developers—will have to engage in the conversation. The book makes the case for the transition from expensive, and only marginally effective, reactive treatment through “spare parts” (joint replacements, organ transplants) and reliance on pharmaceuticals (antibiotics, opiates) to anticipation-informed healthcare. Readers will understand why the current premise of treating various behavioral conditions (attention deficit disorder, hyperactivity, schizophrenia) through drugs has to be re-evaluated from the perspective of anticipation...

  13. Management benefits and safety of computed tomography in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy: experience of a single centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepson, S.L., E-mail: steven.jepson@uhl-tr.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester (United Kingdom); Harvey, C. [Heart Link ECMO Centre, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester (United Kingdom); Entwisle, J.J. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester (United Kingdom); Peek, G.J. [Heart Link ECMO Centre, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    Aim: To evaluate the benefits and logistical safety of computed tomography (CT) imaging in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy in a single institution. Materials and methods: Over a period of 25 months, 134 patients (80 neonates, 19 children, and 35 adults) underwent ECMO therapy at this institution. The imaging of these patients was reviewed to identify patients who had undergone CT imaging whilst on ECMO. Patient notes were retrospectively reviewed. CT findings and subsequent decisions were analysed to assess the benefit of CT imaging. Complications arising due to the logistics of performing the scan were analysed to assess the safety of performing CT in ECMO patients. Results: Of 134 patients, 14 (10%) had a total of 15 CT examinations whilst undergoing ECMO therapy. Indications for CT included new neurology, increased respiratory demand, and increasing requirement for high ECMO flows. There were no major complications and two minor complications associated with the logistics of performing a CT examination on an ECMO patient. Significant findings resulted from 73.3% (11/15) of the CT examinations, and in all 15 examinations information was provided that was used in making further management decisions, including, in some cases, withdrawal of ECMO therapy. Conclusion: With an experienced team, CT imaging of patients on ECMO can be performed safely. CT provides valuable information for subsequent management of patients undergoing ECMO therapy.

  14. Anticipation across disciplines

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Never before was anticipation more relevant to the life and activity of humankind than it is today. “It is no overstatement to suggest that humanity’s future will be shaped by its capacity to anticipate….” (Research Agenda for the 21st Century, National Science Foundation). The sciences and the humanities can no longer risk explaining away the complexity and interactivity that lie at the foundation of life and living. The perspective of the world that anticipation opens justifies the descriptor “the post-Cartesian Revolution.” If anticipation is a valid research domain, what practical relevance can we await? Indeed, anticipation is more than just the latest catch-word in marketing the apps developed by the digital technology industry. Due to spectacular advances in the study of the living, anticipation can claim a legitimate place in current investigations and applications in the sciences and the humanities. Biology, genetics, medicine, as well as politics and cognitive, behavioral, and social sci...

  15. Anticipating Organizational Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Simon

    of organizational members waiting for changes to take effect. The 3-year period leading up to the ‘go-live’ of Sundhedsplatformen has been a unique opportunity to study the anticipatory phase in connection with large scale IT project and has resulted in the development of a theoretical / conceptual framework......This study reports on the extended time period prior to the introduction of the largest ever Health IT implementation in Denmark – Sundhedsplatformen. The focus of the dissertation is on organizational implications of introducing new technology and more specifically the anticipation...

  16. Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-25

    The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.

  17. L'anticipation comme actualisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondeme, Chloé

    2017-01-01

    It is commonly stated that anticipation is a phenomenon that is prior to a given action or situation, both time-wise and logically speaking. In this article, we focus in detail on how anticipation reconfigures the very action being anticipated. By ‘in detail’, we mean through the meticulous...... observation and analysis of ordinary interactions. The corpus is constituted of learning interactions, between dog educator and dogs in formation, in which anticipating an action, notably by assessing it before it happens, contributes in a large part to (re)configure it. This point leads us to develop...

  18. Evidence for anticipation in schizophrenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bassett, A. S.; Honer, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Anticipation, or increasing severity of a disorder across successive generations, is a genetic phenomenon with an identified molecular mechanism: expansion of unstable trinucleotide repeat sequences. This study examined anticipation in familial schizophrenia. Three generations of siblines from the affected side of families selected for unilineal, autosomal dominant-like inheritance of schizophrenia were studied (n = 186). Across generations more subjects were hospitalized with psychotic illne...

  19. Palatable meal anticipation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia T Hsu

    Full Text Available The ability to sense time and anticipate events is a critical skill in nature. Most efforts to understand the neural and molecular mechanisms of anticipatory behavior in rodents rely on daily restricted food access, which induces a robust increase of locomotor activity in anticipation of daily meal time. Interestingly, rats also show increased activity in anticipation of a daily palatable meal even when they have an ample food supply, suggesting a role for brain reward systems in anticipatory behavior, and providing an alternate model by which to study the neurobiology of anticipation in species, such as mice, that are less well adapted to "stuff and starve" feeding schedules. To extend this model to mice, and exploit molecular genetic resources available for that species, we tested the ability of wild-type mice to anticipate a daily palatable meal. We observed that mice with free access to regular chow and limited access to highly palatable snacks of chocolate or "Fruit Crunchies" avidly consumed the snack but did not show anticipatory locomotor activity as measured by running wheels or video-based behavioral analysis. However, male mice receiving a snack of high fat chow did show increased food bin entry prior to access time and a modest increase in activity in the two hours preceding the scheduled meal. Interestingly, female mice did not show anticipation of a daily high fat meal but did show increased activity at scheduled mealtime when that meal was withdrawn. These results indicate that anticipation of a scheduled food reward in mice is behavior, diet, and gender specific.

  20. The benefits of using a mixed methods approach--quantitative with qualitative--to identify client satisfaction and unmet needs in an HIV healthcare centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, M Y K; Quine, S; Li, M

    2010-04-01

    Research into patient satisfaction with HIV ambulatory healthcare facilities is limited due to confidentiality restraints, the short history of the condition and the stigma attached. Furthermore, most satisfaction studies of this client group have not used mixed methods (quantitative with qualitative) despite its increasing use since the 1990s in healthcare research. This cross-sectional study demonstrates how a mixed methods approach is beneficial in assessing HIV client satisfaction and in identifying unmet needs in HIV healthcare. Conducted at the largest ambulatory HIV healthcare centre in Australia, this study consisted of two phases conducted sequentially: Phase One, a quantitative self-administered questionnaire survey, provided an overall statistical picture of satisfaction levels. This was followed by Phase Two, qualitative semi-structured face-to-face interviews, which enabled in-depth investigation of the reasons for satisfaction/dissatisfaction. Phase One had 166 respondents, giving a high response rate of 71%, while Phase Two had 22 participants. The study demonstrates the three advantages of using a mixed methods approach. Firstly, it increased the comprehensiveness of overall findings, by showing how qualitative data (Phase Two) provided explanations for statistical data (Phase One). Secondly, it expanded the dimensions of the research topic, as Phase Two enabled investigation of the determinants of satisfaction/dissatisfaction more broadly after assessing the client satisfaction levels in Phase One. Thirdly, it increased the methodological rigour as findings in both phases could be checked for consistency. Thus using a mixed methods approach can greatly enhance our understanding of client satisfaction in HIV/AIDS research.

  1. Liturgy as space for anticipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Cilliers

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes that the notion of liturgical space, understood in conjunction with the original Greek concept of space, is not only a quantitative, physical locality, but also a primary qualitative possibility for existence, a meaningful womb, a neighbourhood for imagination and a space for anticipation. Three consequences of this proposal are discussed, namely liturgy as waiting on the elusive presence (presence of absence of God, celebration as (metaphorical dance of hope, and the need for liturgical refiguring.

  2. Benefício Antecipado: uma nova abordagem para o tratamento com cirurgia ortognática que elimina o preparo ortodôntico convencional Anticipated Benefit: a new protocol for orthognathic surgery treatment that eliminates the need for conventional orthodontic preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Faber

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: o tratamento ortodôntico-cirúrgico convencional para correção de deformidades dentofaciais apresenta um elevado tempo de preparo ortodôntico do paciente, que, por vezes, ocasiona uma piora temporária em sua aparência. Isso fundamentou o desenvolvimento de uma nova técnica de tratamento que se destina a solucionar essas dificuldades. OBJETIVOS: apresentar esse novo protocolo, denominado Benefício Antecipado, e ilustrá-lo com um caso clínico. MÉTODOS: as etapas do planejamento são apresentadas e, posteriormente, ilustradas com o tratamento de um paciente portador de uma deformidade de Classe III. Nesse método, após um criterioso planejamento, o aparelho ortodôntico é montado e a cirurgia ortognática é realizada em seguida. CONCLUSÃO: apesar de ambas as técnicas - a tradicional e a de Benefício Antecipado - propiciarem excelentes resultados tanto funcionais quanto estéticos, o novo protocolo permite alcançar melhoras significativas logo ao início do tratamento. Isso é vantajoso, em especial, para os pacientes.INTRODUCTION: Conventional orthodontic-surgical treatment for the correction of dentofacial deformities takes up a lengthy period of time preparing the patient orthodontically, which sometimes causes a temporary deterioration in the patient's appearance. This fact has set the stage for the development of a new treatment technique aimed at addressing these issues. OBJECTIVES: To introduce a new protocol - named Anticipated Benefit - and to illustrate it with a clinical case. METHODS: The planning stages are presented and then illustrated by treating a patient with a Class III deformity. According to this method, after some careful planning the orthodontic appliance is fixed and subsequently orthognathic surgery is performed. CONCLUSION: Although both the traditional and the Anticipated Benefit techniques provide excellent functional and aesthetic results, the new protocol achieves significant improvements

  3. Anticipated regret and precautionary sexual behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Richard; N.K. de Vries; J. van der Pligt

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of anticipated regret on precautionary sexual behavior. 317 female and 134 male 18-48 yr old college students completed questionnaires assessing behavioral expectations regarding casual sexual behavior, anticipated regret, perceived behavioral control, attitudes, s

  4. Time discounting and pain anticipation. Experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brañas Garza, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with pain anticipation experienced before medical procedures. our experimental results show that individuals with lower time discount factors are more prone to suffer pain in advance. We provide a framework to rationalize the connection between pain anticipation and impatience. in this set up, more impatient subjects, who only value very near events, mainly take into account the present negative effects of medical procedures (the costs, whereas more patient individuals have a net positive valuation of medical events, given that they are able to value both the cost incurred now and all the benefits to be accrued in the future.

    Este artículo trata de la anticipación del dolor experimentada antes de los procedimientos médicos. nuestros resultados experimentales muestran que los individuos con factor de descuento temporal más bajo son más proclives a sufrir dolor por adelantado. el artículo proporciona un marco en el que racionalizar la relación existente entre impaciencia y anticipación del dolor. en este marco, los sujetos más impacientes, que evalúan sólo los eventos muy próximos en el tiempo, focalizan su atención principalmente en los efectos negativos de los procedimientos médicos (sólo los costes, mientras que los individuos más pacientes tienen una valoración neta positiva de los actos médicos puesto que valoran tanto el coste en el que se incurre en el presente como los beneficios que se obtendrán en el futuro.

  5. Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Help for an Eating Disorder: The Role of Stigma and Anticipated Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackler, Ashley H.; Vogel, David L.; Wade, Nathaniel G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between self-stigma, anticipated risks and benefits associated with seeking counseling, and attitudes toward seeking counseling among college students with disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. The results of hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that self-stigma and the anticipated risks and…

  6. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anticipation (ie, an earlier age at onset in successive generations) is linked to repeat expansion in neurodegenerative syndromes, whereas its role in hereditary cancer is unclear. We assessed anticipation in Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer [HNPCC]), in which DN...... to initiate surveillance programs at young age. It should also stimulate research into the genetic mechanisms that determine age at onset and whether the genetic instability that characterizes Lynch syndrome can be linked to anticipation....

  7. David Barker: the revolution that anticipates existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Farnetani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available David Barker is the man who “anticipated" the existence of babies by focusing attention on the importance of the fetus and what takes place during intrauterine life. Barker was one of the physicians who in the last decades brought about the greatest changes in medicine, changes so important as to represent a veritable revolution in medical thought. According to Barker's studies, the embryo obviously has a genetic complement coming from the mother and father, but from the very first stages of development it begins to undergo the influence of the outside environment, just as occurs for adults whose biological, psychological and pathological aspects are influenced by the environment to a not well-established percentage between genetic complement and epigenetics. Much of our future lives as adults is decided in our mothers' wombs. If Barker's discovery was revolutionary from the cultural standpoint, it was even more so from the strictly medical one. Barker's research method was rigid from the methodological standpoint, but innovative and speculative in its working hypotheses, with a humanistic slant. Barker's idea has another practical corollary: it is evident that the role of obstetricians, perinatologists and neonatologists is more and more relevant in medicine and future prevention. Unquestionably, besides the enormous merits of his clinical research, among the benefits that Barker has contributed there is that of having helped us to see things from new points of view. Not only is the neonate (and even more so the fetus not an adult of reduced proportions, but perhaps the neonate is the "father" of the adult person.

  8. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge;

    2009-01-01

    parent-child pairs in which age at the first cancer diagnosis was assessed. A paired t-test and a specifically developed bivariate model were used to assess a possible role of anticipation. RESULTS: Both methods revealed anticipation with children developing cancer mean 9.8 years (P ... parents using the paired t-test and 5.5 years (P ... to initiate surveillance programs at young age. It should also stimulate research into the genetic mechanisms that determine age at onset and whether the genetic instability that characterizes Lynch syndrome can be linked to anticipation....

  9. Anticipation Behavior Upstream of a Bottleneck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duives, D.C.; Daamen, W.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Whether pedestrian movements do or do not follow similar patterns as vehicular traffic while experiencing congestion is not entirely understood. Using data gathered during bottleneck experiments under laboratory conditions, the phenomenon of anticipation before entering congestion is studied. This p

  10. The impact of anticipation in dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gerlee, P; Lundh, T; Wennberg, B

    2016-01-01

    The flocking of animals is often modelled as a dynamical system, in which individuals are represented as particles whose interactions are determined by the current state of the system. Many animals, however, including humans, have predictive capabilities, and presumably base their behavioural decisions---at least partially---upon an anticipated state of their environment. We explore a minimal version of this idea in the context of particles that interact according to a pairwise potential. Anticipation enters the picture by calculating the interparticle forces from linear extrapolation of the positions some time $\\tau$ into the future. Our analysis shows that for intermediate values of $\\tau$ the particles rapidly form milling structures, induced by velocity alignment that emerges from the prediction. We also show that for $\\tau > 0$, any dynamical system governed by an even potential becomes dissipative. These results suggest that anticipation could play an important role in collective behaviour, since it ind...

  11. Why the Economic Crisis Was Not Anticipated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    An article in the October 11 "New York Times" attributed the almost universal failure to anticipate the current economic crisis to "insanity"--more precisely, to a psychological inability to give proper weight to past events, so that if there is prosperity today people assume that it will last forever, even though they know that in the past booms…

  12. CMS Centre at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A new "CMS Centre" is being established on the CERN Meyrin site by the CMS collaboration. It will be a focal point for communications, where physicists will work together on data quality monitoring, detector calibration, offline analysis of physics events, and CMS computing operations. Construction of the CMS Centre begins in the historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room. The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room, Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. TThe LHC@FNAL Centre, in operation at Fermilab in the US, will work very closely with the CMS Centre, as well as the CERN Control Centre. (Photo Fermilab)The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room is about to start a new life. Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, the room will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. When finished, it will resemble the CERN Contro...

  13. Velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-yun; WENG Xu-dan; LI Qing-ding

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model (OVM) is investigated.The driver adjusts the velocity of his vehicle by the desired headway,which depends on both instantaneous headway and relative velocity.The effect of relative velocity is measured by a sensitivity function.A specific form of the sensitivity function is supposed and the involved parameters are determined by the both numerical simulation and empirical data.It is shown that inclusion of velocity anticipation enhances the stability of traffic flow.Numerical simulations show a good agreement with empirical data.This model provides a better description of real traffic,including the acceleration process from standing states and the deceleration process approaching a stopped car.

  14. Investigating the Reinforcing Value of Binge Anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Carolyn M.; Chester, David S.; Powell, David; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Smith, Gregory T.

    2017-01-01

    Binge eating is a hallmark feature of several types of eating disorders, including bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa (binge/purge type), and binge-eating disorder, and is associated with numerous harmful consequences. For decades, researchers have sought to understand what maintains and reinforces this behavior in the face of such profound negative consequences. In this context, researchers have focused on the binge-eating behavior itself, and given little consideration to what may be a crucial part of the process: anticipating or planning binge-eating episodes. In this article, we discuss binge anticipation, its potential reinforcing value, and methodologies which would allow researchers to investigate this potentially critical process in individuals who binge eat. PMID:27184737

  15. Young people's anticipation regarding education and job

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Tilde Mette; Lundby, Astrid Arbjerg

    struggle in the decision making process because they see educational and vocational choices as definitive and therefore are afraid to take a ‘wrong’ turn. They seem to think of their educational pathway as linear with no room for detours. This can appear paradoxical on a labour market described as both...... of the reason why young people choose gymnasium instead of vocational education. In the paper we discuss the foundation we outline of young people’s anticipation regarding education and job....

  16. Anticipation: beyond synthetic biology and cognitive robotics

    OpenAIRE

    Slawomir J. Nasuto; Hayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose that current robotic technologies cannot have intentional states any more than is feasible within the sensorimotor variant of embodied cognition. It argues that anticipation is an emerging concept that can provide a bridge between both the deepest philosophical theories about the nature of life and cognition and the empirical biological and cognitive sciences steeped in reductionist and Newtonian conceptions of causality. The paper advocates that in order t...

  17. Intentionality, self-reference and anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julià, Pere

    1998-07-01

    The conceptual analysis of anticipation inherits all the difficulties associated with intentionality. These can be reduced to: (1) the unwillingness to recognize the dispositional nature of the organism-environment interaction; (2) a reluctance to treat language and perception as bona fide forms of activity, thus blocking an effective approach to self-reference, among other things; (3) the general tendency to accept the ascriptional mode of research as a way out of these difficulties. The stage is then set for the assimilation of animal and human behavior studies to machine simulation; also, for the unnecessary reductionism and largely speculative physiologizing that go with mind-brain analogies in lieu of a holistic approach to the facts. This paper argues for a naturalistic approach. Anticipation is about "bringing the future into the present" as part of adaptation; it involves special activities of a cognitive nature, sometimes automatic and probably shared with other species, at other times self-generated and only possible due to some unique properties of human language. Anticipation is best conceptualized as a component in self-regulation. An account in terms of "etiology" serves to recast the notion of "context"; the importance of conative factors is stressed. The emphasis is on experimentally determined variables and processes rather than on abstract idealization or post facto reconstruction. Incursion and hyperincursion techniques are discussed in connection with a possible formulation centered on the synergistic influence of environmental and organismic factors.

  18. Five year old preschoolers’ sharing is influenced by anticipated reciprocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingrui eXiong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Whether children share in anticipation of future benefits returned by a partner is an interesting question. In this study, 5-year-old children and an adult partner played a sharing game, in which children donated first and the partner donated afterward. In Experiment 1, the partner’s resources were more attractive than the child’s. In the reciprocal condition, the child was told that s/he would be a recipient when the partner played as a donor. In the nonreciprocal condition, however, the child was told that an anonymous child would be the recipient when the partner donated. Results showed that children shared more with the partner when they knew that they would be a recipient later. In Experiment 2, the child was always the recipient when the partner donated, but the partner’s resources were more desirable than the child’s in the high-value condition, and less desirable in the low-value condition. We found that children were more generous when the partner’s resources were valued higher. These findings demonstrate that 5-year-old preschoolers’ sharing choices take into account the anticipated reciprocity of the recipient, suggesting either self-interested tactical sharing or direct reciprocity in advance of receiving. Specifically, they adjust their sharing behavior depending on whether a partner has the potential to reciprocate, and whether it is worth sharing relative to the value of the payback.

  19. Design models for anticipating future usage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooden, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    In usage centred design designers need to consider a variety of users operating the intended product in a variety of ways in a variety of contexts. By tuning their design to potential ways of operation designers can prevent usability problems from occurring. In the project it was explored how design

  20. Anticipated effects of climate change on estuarine and coastal fisheries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, V.S. (Univ. of Maryland, Cambridge (USA))

    Although the timing and magnitude of global climate change is in dispute, the possible effects of such charge merit consideration to allow for discussion of policy ramification and mitigative actions. Climate change may result in sea level rise; water temperature increase; and deviations from present patterns of precipitation, wind, and water circulation. Estuaries may experience loss of marsh habitat, intrusion of marine waters and associated organisms, changes in circulation patterns that affect retention of some indigenous species, and increased hypoxia and storm surges. Estuarine and coastal systems could experience poleward retreat of cold-tolerant species and range expansion of warm-tolerant species. Some fisheries and aquacultural enterprises and communities would benefit from the results of climate change and others would suffer losses, with economic and population dislocations probably inevitable in many parts of the world. Thus, flexibility in policy-making and planning will be vital if global climate is modified as rapidly as is anticipated by some scientists.

  1. Client Centred Desing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Nielsen, Janni; Levinsen, Karin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we argue for the use of Client Centred preparation phases when designing complex systems. Through Client Centred Design human computer interaction can extend the focus on end-users to alse encompass the client's needs, context and resources....

  2. Postmodern Anticipations with E. A. Poe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian-Vasile SZABO

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to serve as an introduction to a postmodern reading of Edgar Allan Poe’s short prose. Adventurous approach, as the author manifested himself as a writer in the first part of the 19th century, when romanticism revived and modern paradigm was founded. Based on the assessments expressed on postmodernism and using the tools proposed by various field researchers, we discover in Poe’s work anticipations of the narrative structure method specific for our present times. His concern for the newspaper reader, the insertion of general press topics and articles in his prose, the use of the sensational side of events in his newspaper reports, the ironic approach of real and diegetic facts allow a fresh reading, revaluating this surprising writer. Remarkable are his projections which come close to the SF genre, his confidence in the progress of science and the permanent impairment of this confidence, generated by the fear of world destruction. The conclusion would be that Poe’s prose allows certain postmodern anticipative projections to be decoded and the research to be extended beyond the conventional boundaries of modernity.

  3. The Bionic Anticipation of Natural Disasters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helmut Tributsch

    2005-01-01

    After major natural disasters, such as the recent earthquake-tsunami event in South Asia, reports appear about the mysterious ability of animals to anticipate and to escape the impending danger. This is an opportunity to recall the long history of this phenomenon in the traditions of different civilizations, to evaluate Chinese efforts, 30 -40 years ago, to use this phenomenon for earthquake prediction, and to judge its state of acceptance in modern science. An effort is made to introduce this phenomenon as a research field of modern bionics. The timing is favorable since, increasingly, infrared thermal anomalies, monitored from satellite, suggesting litho-atmospheric processes, are found to precede earthquakes.They were unexpected by seismologists and are here suggested to essentially reflect the energy conversion patterns responsible for the signals monitored by animals. The aim is to learn from animals in the long term how natural disasters can better be anticipated, and how simple technical warning systems can be developed. Some challenges are analyzed. One is interpretation of the nature of energy release prior to the main earthquake disaster resulting in "macro-anomaly" precursors,another is better to understand the effect on animal senses. The role of non-linear cooperative phenomena including tsunamitype waves is emphasized.

  4. Anticipation: Beyond synthetic biology and cognitive robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuto, Slawomir J; Hayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose that current robotic technologies cannot have intentional states any more than is feasible within the sensorimotor variant of embodied cognition. It argues that anticipation is an emerging concept that can provide a bridge between both the deepest philosophical theories about the nature of life and cognition and the empirical biological and cognitive sciences steeped in reductionist and Newtonian conceptions of causality. The paper advocates that in order to move forward, cognitive robotics needs to embrace new platforms and a conceptual framework that will enable it to pursue, in a meaningful way, questions about autonomy and purposeful behaviour. We suggest that hybrid systems, part robotic and part cultures of neurones, offer experimental platforms where different dimensions of enactivism (sensorimotor, constitutive foundations of biological autonomy, including anticipation), and their relative contributions to cognition, can be investigated in an integrated way. A careful progression, mindful to the deep philosophical concerns but also respecting empirical evidence, will ultimately lead towards unifying theoretical and empirical biological sciences and may offer advancement where reductionist sciences have been so far faltering.

  5. Anticipation learning from the past the Russian/Soviet contributions to the science of anticipation

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the work of leading scientists from Russia, Georgia, Estonia, Lithuania, Israel, and the USA, revealing major insights long unknown to the scientific community. Without any doubt their work will provide a springboard for further research in anticipation. Until recently, Robert Rosen (Anticipatory Systems) and Mihai Nadin (MIND – Anticipation and Chaos) were deemed forerunners in this still new knowledge domain. The distinguished neurobiologist, Steven Rose, pointed to the fact that Soviet neuropsychological theories have not on the whole been well received by Western science. These earlier insights as presented in this volume make an important contribution to the foundation of the science of anticipation. It is shown that the daring hypotheses and rich experimental evidence produced by Bernstein, Beritashvili, Ukhtomsky, Anokhin, and Uznadze, among others—extend foundational work to aspects of neuroscience, physiology, motorics, education.

  6. Anticipated Activities in Maritime Work, Process Control, and Business Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2004-01-01

    Most activities are anticipated before they are executed. The paper presents methods for describing this anticipated state and the processes that may lead to a new state where the activities are executed. The method builds on linguistic case-theory.......Most activities are anticipated before they are executed. The paper presents methods for describing this anticipated state and the processes that may lead to a new state where the activities are executed. The method builds on linguistic case-theory....

  7. Anticipated synchronization in neuronal network motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, F. S.; Gollo, L. L.; Carelli, P. V.; Copelli, M.; Mirasso, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Two identical dynamical systems coupled unidirectionally (in a so called master-slave configuration) exhibit anticipated synchronization (AS) if the one which receives the coupling (the slave) also receives a negative delayed self-feedback. In oscillatory neuronal systems AS is characterized by a phase-locking with negative time delay τ between the spikes of the master and of the slave (slave fires before the master), while in the usual delayed synchronization (DS) regime τ is positive (slave fires after the master). A 3-neuron motif in which the slave self-feedback is replaced by a feedback loop mediated by an interneuron can exhibits both AS and DS regimes. Here we show that AS is robust in the presence of noise in a 3 Hodgkin-Huxley type neuronal motif. We also show that AS is stable for large values of τ in a chain of connected slaves-interneurons.

  8. Intent, Future, Anticipation: A Semiotic, Transdisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeckenhoff, Hellmut

    2008-10-01

    Encouraged e.g. by chaos theory and (bio-)semiotics science is trying to attempt a deeper understanding of life. The paradigms of physics alone prove not sufficient to explain f. ex. evolution or phylogenesis and ontogenesis. In complement, research on life systems reassesses paradigmatic models not only for living systems and not only on the strict biological level. The ontological as well as the epistemological base of science in toto is to be reconsidered. Science itself proves a historical and cultural phenomenon and can be seen as shaped by evolution and semiosis. -Living systems are signified by purpose, intent and, necessarily, by the faculty to anticipate e.g. the cyclic changes of their environment. To understand the concepts behind a proposal is developed towards a model set constituting a transdisciplinary approach. It rests e.g. on concepts of systems, evolution, complexity and semiodynamics.

  9. Parallel Error Detection for Leading Zero Anticipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Zhang; Wei-Wu Hu; Zi-Chu Qi

    2006-01-01

    The algorithm and its implementation of the leading zero anticipation (LZA) are very vital for the performance of a high-speed floating-point adder in today's state of art microprocessor design. Unfortunately, in predicting "shift amount"by a conventional LZA design, the result could be off by one position. This paper presents a novel parallel error detection algorithm for a general-case LZA. The proposed approach enables parallel execution of conventional LZA and its error detection, so that the error-indication signal can be generated earlier in the stage of normalization, thus reducing the critical path and improving overall performance. The circuit implementation of this algorithm also shows its advantages of area and power compared with other previous work.

  10. The IGU Knowledge Centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, Bernardus

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an innovative service for members of the International Gas Union - IGU. The IGU Knowledge Centre provides members with relevant information and data. In this article is described why, how and where.

  11. Virtual particle therapy centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Particle therapy is an advanced technique of cancer radiation therapy, using protons or other ions to target the cancerous mass. This advanced technique requires a multi-disciplinary team working in a specialised centre. 3D animation: Nymus3D

  12. Cardiac fluid dynamics anticipates heart adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Martiniello, Alfonso R; Bianchi, Valter; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Caso, Pio; Tonti, Giovanni

    2015-01-21

    Hemodynamic forces represent an epigenetic factor during heart development and are supposed to influence the pathology of the grown heart. Cardiac blood motion is characterized by a vortical dynamics, and it is common belief that the cardiac vortex has a role in disease progressions or regression. Here we provide a preliminary demonstration about the relevance of maladaptive intra-cardiac vortex dynamics in the geometrical adaptation of the dysfunctional heart. We employed an in vivo model of patients who present a stable normal heart function in virtue of the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, bi-ventricular pace-maker) and who are expected to develop left ventricle remodeling if pace-maker was switched off. Intra-ventricular fluid dynamics is analyzed by echocardiography (Echo-PIV). Under normal conditions, the flow presents a longitudinal alignment of the intraventricular hemodynamic forces. When pacing is temporarily switched off, flow forces develop a misalignment hammering onto lateral walls, despite no other electro-mechanical change is noticed. Hemodynamic forces result to be the first event that evokes a physiological activity anticipating cardiac changes and could help in the prediction of longer term heart adaptations.

  13. Academic Drug Discovery Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Henriette Schultz; Valentin, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic and organi......Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic...... their performance....

  14. Town Centre Redevelopment Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagnby, Bo Hellisen

    After many years of urban growth Danish downtowns are facing some important choices. Shall the stake one-sidedly be on the town centres as driving forces for growth and 'city marketing', or do they still have a role to play in a broader socio-economic context? In the paper we look back on eight...... during late years, where increased internationalisation is in focus and where it seems as if the social dimension of the town centre planning is slipping out of the hands of the urban planners....

  15. Anticipated and experienced emotions in environmental risk perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Bohm

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective forecasting with respect to two environmental risks (ozone depletion, air pollution was investigated by studying tourists who travelled to either Australia or Bangkok and were thus confronted with one of these risks. We measured anticipated outcome and anticipated emotions before the journey, actually experienced outcome and actually experienced emotions during the journey, and anticipated outcome and emotions concerning a future encounter with the same risk after the journey. Results indicate that tourists underestimate (air pollution or correctly predict (ozone depletion both the seriousness of the outcome and their emotional reactions. The relationship between actual outcome and actual emotions is stronger than that between anticipated outcome and anticipated emotions. Furthermore, tourists learn from their travel experience and adjust their anticipations concerning future encounters with the environmental risk. Findings suggest that the domain of environmental risks differs from personal outcomes with respect to the process of affective forecasting.

  16. The GSO Data Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Paletou, F; Génot, V; Rouillard, A; Petit, P; Palacios, A; Caux, E; Wakelam, V

    2015-01-01

    Hereafter we describe the activities of the $Grand \\, Sud-Ouest$ Data Centre operated for INSU/CNRS by the OMP-IRAP and the Universit\\'e Paul Sabatier (Toulouse), in a collaboration with the OASU-LAB (Bordeaux) and OREME-LUPM (Montpellier).

  17. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  18. ATLAS Visitors Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS Visitors Centre has opened its shiny new doors to the public. Officially launched on Monday February 23rd, 2009, the permanent exhibition at Point 1 was conceived as a tour resource for ATLAS guides, and as a way to preserve the public’s opportunity to get a close-up look at the experiment in action when the cavern is sealed.

  19. A parametric model for analyzing anticipation in genetically predisposed families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Klaus; Petersen, Janne; Bernstein, Inge;

    2009-01-01

    Anticipation, i.e. a decreasing age-at-onset in subsequent generations has been observed in a number of genetically triggered diseases. The impact of anticipation is generally studied in affected parent-child pairs. These analyses are restricted to pairs in which both individuals have been affect...

  20. Client Anticipations about Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Debra S.; Peterson, Gary W.; Sampson, James P., Jr.; Reardon, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    This study describes how 55 clients from a career center at a large, southeastern university anticipated using computer-assisted career guidance (CACG) systems to help in their career decision making and problem solving. Responses to a cued and a free response survey indicated that clients' most frequent anticipations included increased career…

  1. LINEAR ISOMETRIC NON-ANTICIPATIVE TRANSFORMATIONS OF WIENER PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The necessary and sufficient conditions are given so that a non-anticipative transformation in Hilbert space is isometric. In terms of second order Wiener process, these conditions assure that a non-anticipative transformation of Wiener process is a Wiener process, too.

  2. A new car-following model considering velocity anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun-Fang; Jia, Bin; Li, Xin-Gang; Gao, Zi-You

    2010-01-01

    The full velocity difference model proposed by Jiang et al. [2001 Phys. Rev. E 64 017101] has been improved by introducing velocity anticipation. Velocity anticipation means the follower estimates the future velocity of the leader. The stability condition of the new model is obtained by using the linear stability theory. Theoretical results show that the stability region increases when we increase the anticipation time interval. The mKdV equation is derived to describe the kink-antikink soliton wave and obtain the coexisting stability line. The delay time of car motion and kinematic wave speed at jam density are obtained in this model. Numerical simulations exhibit that when we increase the anticipation time interval enough, the new model could avoid accidents under urgent braking cases. Also, the traffic jam could be suppressed by considering the anticipation velocity. All results demonstrate that this model is an improvement on the full velocity difference model.

  3. Anticipated Guilt for not Helping and Anticipated Warm Glow for Helping are Differently Impacted by Personal Responsibility to Help

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvid Erlandsson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One important motivation for people behaving prosocially is that they want to avoid negative and obtain positive emotions. In the prosocial behavior literature however, the motivations to avoid negative emotions (e.g. guilt and to approach positive emotions (e.g. warm glow are rarely separated, and sometimes even aggregated into a single mood-management construct. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anticipated guilt if not helping and anticipated warm glow if helping are influenced similarly or differently when varying situational factors related to personal responsibility to help. Helping scenarios were created and pilot tests established that each helping scenario could be formulated both in a high-responsibility version and in a low-responsibility version. In Study 1 participants read high-responsibility and low-responsibility helping scenarios, and rated either their anticipated guilt if not helping or their anticipated warm glow if helping (i.e. separate evaluation. Study 2 was similar but here participants rated both their anticipated guilt if not helping and their anticipated warm glow if helping (i.e. joint evaluation. Anticipated guilt was clearly higher in the high-responsibility versions, but anticipated warm glow was unaffected (in Studies 1a and 1b, or even higher in the low-responsibility versions (Study 2. In Studies 3 (where anticipated guilt and warm glow were evaluated separately and 4 (where they were evaluated jointly, personal responsibility to help was manipulated within-subjects. Anticipated guilt was again constantly higher in the high-responsibility versions but for many types of responsibility-manipulations, anticipated warm glow was higher in the low-responsibility versions. The results suggest that we anticipate guilt if not fulfilling our responsibility but that we anticipate warm glow primarily when doing over and beyond our responsibility. We argue that future studies investigating motivations for

  4. Elderly Care Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagiman, Aliani; Haja Bava Mohidin, Hazrina; Ismail, Alice Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The demand for elderly centre has increased tremendously abreast with the world demographic change as the number of senior citizens rose in the 21st century. This has become one of the most crucial problems of today's era. As the world progress into modernity, more and more people are occupied with daily work causing the senior citizens to lose the care that they actually need. This paper seeks to elucidate the best possible design of an elderly care centre with new approach in order to provide the best service for them by analysing their needs and suitable activities that could elevate their quality of life. All these findings will then be incorporated into design solutions so as to enhance the living environment for the elderly especially in Malaysian context.

  5. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  6. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M; Field, Martin J; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-25

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  7. Tele-centres in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten

    2004-01-01

    Tele-centres offer a low cost opportunity for the many who cannot afford their own phone or Internet connection. This paper presents a field study of tele-centres in Ghana and analyses how they contribute to universal access.......Tele-centres offer a low cost opportunity for the many who cannot afford their own phone or Internet connection. This paper presents a field study of tele-centres in Ghana and analyses how they contribute to universal access....

  8. Anticipating Human Activities Using Object Affordances for Reactive Robotic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppula, Hema S; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of human perception is anticipation, which we use extensively in our day-to-day activities when interacting with other humans as well as with our surroundings. Anticipating which activities will a human do next (and how) can enable an assistive robot to plan ahead for reactive responses. Furthermore, anticipation can even improve the detection accuracy of past activities. The challenge, however, is two-fold: We need to capture the rich context for modeling the activities and object affordances, and we need to anticipate the distribution over a large space of future human activities. In this work, we represent each possible future using an anticipatory temporal conditional random field (ATCRF) that models the rich spatial-temporal relations through object affordances. We then consider each ATCRF as a particle and represent the distribution over the potential futures using a set of particles. In extensive evaluation on CAD-120 human activity RGB-D dataset, we first show that anticipation improves the state-of-the-art detection results. We then show that for new subjects (not seen in the training set), we obtain an activity anticipation accuracy (defined as whether one of top three predictions actually happened) of 84.1, 74.4 and 62.2 percent for an anticipation time of 1, 3 and 10 seconds respectively. Finally, we also show a robot using our algorithm for performing a few reactive responses.

  9. A magnetoencephalography study of visual processing of pain anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Andre G; Gopalakrishnan, Raghavan; Plow, Ela B; Burgess, Richard C; Mosher, John C

    2014-07-15

    Anticipating pain is important for avoiding injury; however, in chronic pain patients, anticipatory behavior can become maladaptive, leading to sensitization and limiting function. Knowledge of networks involved in pain anticipation and conditioning over time could help devise novel, better-targeted therapies. With the use of magnetoencephalography, we evaluated in 10 healthy subjects the neural processing of pain anticipation. Anticipatory cortical activity elicited by consecutive visual cues that signified imminent painful stimulus was compared with cues signifying nonpainful and no stimulus. We found that the neural processing of visually evoked pain anticipation involves the primary visual cortex along with cingulate and frontal regions. Visual cortex could quickly and independently encode and discriminate between visual cues associated with pain anticipation and no pain during preconscious phases following object presentation. When evaluating the effect of task repetition on participating cortical areas, we found that activity of prefrontal and cingulate regions was mostly prominent early on when subjects were still naive to a cue's contextual meaning. Visual cortical activity was significant throughout later phases. Although visual cortex may precisely and time efficiently decode cues anticipating pain or no pain, prefrontal areas establish the context associated with each cue. These findings have important implications toward processes involved in pain anticipation and maladaptive pain conditioning.

  10. Fertility and apparent genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupart, Douglas; Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark; Winship, Ingrid M; Goldberg, Paul; Ramesar, Rajkumar

    2014-09-01

    Genetic anticipation is the phenomenon in which age of onset of an inherited disorder decreases in successive generations. Inconsistent evidence suggests that this occurs in Lynch syndrome. A possible cause for apparent anticipation is fecundity bias, which occurs if the disease adversely affects fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of age of diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) on lifetime fertility in Lynch syndrome, and whether this can falsely create the appearance of genetic anticipation. A computer model simulated age of diagnosis of CRC in hypothetical Lynch syndrome carriers and their offspring. The model assumed similar age distribution of CRC across generations (i.e. that there was no true anticipation). Age distribution of CRC diagnosis, and lifetime fertility rates (grouped by age of diagnosis of CRC) were determined from the Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (ACCFR). Apparent anticipation was calculated by comparing ages of diagnosis of CRC in affected parent-child pairs. A total of 1,088 patients with CRC were identified from the ACCFR. Total lifetime (cohort) fertility was related to age of diagnosis of CRC (correlation coefficient 0.13, P = 0.0001). In the simulation, apparent anticipation was 1.8 ± 0.54 years (P = 0.0044). Observed apparent anticipation in the ACCFR cohort was 4.8 ± 1.73 years (P = 0.0064). There was no difference in apparent anticipation between the simulate d and observed parent-child pairs (P = 0.89). The appearance of genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome can be falsely created due to changes in fertility.

  11. Visual Benefits in Apparent Motion Displays: Automatically Driven Spatial and Temporal Anticipation Are Partially Dissociated.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merle-Marie Ahrens

    Full Text Available Many behaviourally relevant sensory events such as motion stimuli and speech have an intrinsic spatio-temporal structure. This will engage intentional and most likely unintentional (automatic prediction mechanisms enhancing the perception of upcoming stimuli in the event stream. Here we sought to probe the anticipatory processes that are automatically driven by rhythmic input streams in terms of their spatial and temporal components. To this end, we employed an apparent visual motion paradigm testing the effects of pre-target motion on lateralized visual target discrimination. The motion stimuli either moved towards or away from peripheral target positions (valid vs. invalid spatial motion cueing at a rhythmic or arrhythmic pace (valid vs. invalid temporal motion cueing. Crucially, we emphasized automatic motion-induced anticipatory processes by rendering the motion stimuli non-predictive of upcoming target position (by design and task-irrelevant (by instruction, and by creating instead endogenous (orthogonal expectations using symbolic cueing. Our data revealed that the apparent motion cues automatically engaged both spatial and temporal anticipatory processes, but that these processes were dissociated. We further found evidence for lateralisation of anticipatory temporal but not spatial processes. This indicates that distinct mechanisms may drive automatic spatial and temporal extrapolation of upcoming events from rhythmic event streams. This contrasts with previous findings that instead suggest an interaction between spatial and temporal attention processes when endogenously driven. Our results further highlight the need for isolating intentional from unintentional processes for better understanding the various anticipatory mechanisms engaged in processing behaviourally relevant stimuli with predictable spatio-temporal structure such as motion and speech.

  12. U.S. Dental Specialty Residents' Expectations and Anticipated Benefits of Academic Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarova, Elena; Martin-Peele, Melanie; Fifield, Judith

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were to assess features of an academic career that dental specialty residents, as a group and by gender, find most attractive and to identify what determines their expectations for responsibilities and professional growth in academic employment. In November 2013, an invitation to participate in the study along with a link to an online survey was sent to the 407 U.S. program directors of six of the dental specialties (endodontics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, pediatric dentistry, periodontics, prosthodontics, and orthodontics), asking them to forward the survey to their residents. A total of 287 residents responded (112 [41.3%] female and 159 [58.7%] male) out of 4,400 enrolled in these specialty training programs (6.5% response rate). The female respondents were significantly more interested in joining academia than were the male respondents (female 48%; male 31.5%; pcareer for the female respondents was the ability to have a good balance between career and personal life. While opportunity to conduct research was a positive feature for all residents interested in academia and both male and female respondents agreed strongly on the need for collaboration between faculty members for productive research, male respondents agreed significantly more than female respondents that faculty members should conduct independent research. Faculty members' feedback about academic employment were a significantly positive influence on those planning an academic career compared to those planning to enter private practice. This study found that the female and male residents differed in their expectations of responsibilities and professional growth in academic employment. These results may be useful for academic dental institutions and organizations when developing faculty recruitment and retention programs.

  13. Low energy use at Vaestervik sports centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-05-15

    Vaestervik, in south Sweden, has saved both energy and money since modern energy efficiency equipment was installed in its swimming pool and bowling alley. Energy use in the sports centre has so far fallen by around 830 MWh/year, and operating costs have been reduced by efficient heat recovery. Energy efficiency at the Vaestervik sports centre is a good example of how a local authority can save energy and money by installing modern equipment for ventilation and heat recovery in a facility with high energy consumption. The well-used sports centre, including a swimming pool and bowling alley, is in central Vaestervik. In 1999 the Municipality received grants from the local investment programme (LIP) to improve the facility's energy efficiency. An efficient ventilation system with a dehumidifier and heat exchanger was installed at the swimming pool, reducing the need to introduce cold air. In addition the bowling alley, which did not have heat recovery, was given a modern heat-recovery plant. - Lower operating costs due to efficient heat recovery. - Reduced energy use (electricity and district heating) for the plant at around 830 MWh/year. The modern and highly efficient units for heat recovery, dehumidification and heat exchange result in lower operating costs and reduced energy use, which means that the Municipality of Vaestervik saves energy and money. Installation at the swimming pool resulted in slightly higher air humidity, but a relative humidity of 60% is common in swimming pools and difficult to reduce without inconveniencing bathers. A new fan room installed in the roof contributed to higher than anticipated costs, but the financial and economic gains outweigh these. New frequency-controlled circulation pumps for the pool water were installed in 2007. They are to have occupancy control capability, giving a further improvement of energy saving and heat recovery

  14. Anticipating the Environmental Impacts and Behavioral Drivers of Deep Decarbonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is seeking regular and early career applications proposing research that will contribute to an improved ability to understand and anticipate the public health and environmental impacts and behavioral drivers of significant changes in energy consumption

  15. Social Security's special minimum benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, K A; Hoffmeyer, D

    Social Security would modify and strengthen the current-law special minimum benefit. Interest in the special minimum benefit may also increase because of labor force participation and marital trends that suggest that enhancing workers' benefits may be a more effective means of reducing older women's poverty rates than enhancing spousal or widow's benefits. By understanding the Social Security program's experience with the special minimum benefit, policymakers will be able to better anticipate the effectiveness of other initiatives to enhance benefits for long-term low earners. This article presents the most recent and comprehensive information available about the special minimum benefit in order to help policymakers make informed decisions about the provision's future. Highlights of the current special minimum benefit include the following: Very few persons receive the special minimum benefit. As of December 2001, about 134,000 workers and their dependents and survivors were entitled to a benefit based on the special minimum. Of those, only about 79,000 received a higher total benefit because of the special minimum; the other 55,000 were dually entitled. (In effect, when persons are eligible for more than one type of benefit--that is, they are dually eligible--the highest benefit payable determines total benefits. If the special minimum benefit is not the highest benefit payable, it does not increase total benefits paid.) As of February 2000, retired workers who were special minimum beneficiaries with unreduced benefits and were not dually entitled were receiving, on average, a monthly benefit of $510 per month. That amount is approximately $2,000 less than the annual poverty threshold for an aged individual. Special minimum benefits provide small increases in total benefits. For special minimum beneficiaries who were not dually entitled as of December 2001, the average special minimum monthly PIA was just $39 higher than the regular PIA. Most special minimum

  16. The CERN Control Centre is up and running!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CERN Control Centre (CCC) that combines all the control rooms for the accelerators, the cryogenic system and the technical infrastructure came into operation on 1st February. This is not a mock-up but the real thing! The CERN Control Centre has been built and put into operation in only 15 months.On 1st February, at 2.00 p.m., Patrick Villeton Pachot started the first Technical Infrastructure shift at the brand new CERN Control Centre. From now on, when you dial 72201 to report a leak or an electrical fault, your call will ring out in the brand new CERN Control Centre. The much anticipated CCC came on line on 1st February, exactly as planned. The 2.00 p.m. shift by the operators of the former Technical Control Room (TCR), now renamed TI for Technical Infrastructure, marked the start of operations at the Centre. The PCR, MCR, TCR and QCR are no more, and all the individual control rooms have been merged into one. And what a control room it is! True to the streamlined image announced when the project was f...

  17. A cancer help centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, R

    1996-06-01

    The diagnosis of cancer can be shattering to all involved. The treatment of cancer is intense and often very challenging. Prevailing attitudes to cancer are sometimes fearful, negative and depressing. This combination may leave those affected by cancer shocked, disorientated and without hope. Even worse than this, on asking consultants 'What can I do to help myself?' patients are frequently told 'Absolutely nothing'--crushing in one fell swoop their remaining fighting spirit. Not so in the case of Penny Brohn, who, when faced with the diagnosis of breast cancer, travelled the world to find alternative cancer treatments, and having successfully brought her own cancer under control, dedicated her life to creating a Centre for others wishing to fight their disease.

  18. Stavanger Squash Centre, Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostvik, H. [Sunlab/ABB, Stavanger (Norway)

    1999-07-01

    Although Stavanger is the technological and financial oil-capital of Norway, the Stavanger Squash Centre was until recently the largest solar building in Norway, with 120 m{sup 2} of collectors. The active, building-integrated, solar air collector in the 45 {sup o} roof facing 15 {sup o} east of due south, has now been delivering solar-heated hot water for the showers for 15 years. The solar system consists of several standard products put together in a new way. Monitoring has shown that the system produced 18,000 kWh/m{sup 2} a (150 kWh/m{sub coll} {sup 2}a). If operated as planned, it could have had a solar contribution of 45,000 kWh/a) (375 kWh/m{sub coll} {sup 2}a), resulting in a 19% solar fraction of total demand. (author)

  19. Call Centre- Computer Telephone Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Kovačević

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Call centre largely came into being as a result of consumerneeds converging with enabling technology- and by the companiesrecognising the revenue opportunities generated by meetingthose needs thereby increasing customer satisfaction. Regardlessof the specific application or activity of a Call centre, customersatisfaction with the interaction is critical to the revenuegenerated or protected by the Call centre. Physical(v, Call centreset up is a place that includes computer, telephone and supervisorstation. Call centre can be available 24 hours a day - whenthe customer wants to make a purchase, needs information, orsimply wishes to register a complaint.

  20. Differences in gaze anticipation for locomotion with and without vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colas Nils Authié

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous experimental studies have shown a spontaneous anticipation of locomotor trajectory by the head and gaze direction during human locomotion. This anticipatory behavior could serve several functions: an optimal selection of visual information, for instance through landmarks and optic flow, as well as trajectory planning and motor control. This would imply that anticipation remains in darkness but with different characteristics.We asked ten participants to walk along two predefined complex trajectories (limacon and figure eight without any cue on the trajectory to follow. Two visual conditions were used: (i in light and (ii in complete darkness with eyes open. The whole body kinematics were recorded by motion capture, along with the participant's right eye movements.We showed that in darkness and in light, horizontal gaze anticipates the orientation of the head which itself anticipates the trajectory direction. However, the horizontal angular anticipation decreases by a half in darkness for both gaze and head. In both visual conditions we observed an eye nystagmus with similar properties (frequency and amplitude. The main difference comes from the fact that in light, there is a shift of the orientations of the eye nystagmus and the head in the direction of the trajectory.These results suggest that a fundamental function of gaze is to represent self motion, stabilize the perception of space during locomotion, and to simulate the future trajectory, regardless of the vision condition.

  1. Anticipated Changes in Conducting Scientific Data-Analysis Research in the Big-Data Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Seablom, Michael; Clune, Thomas; Ramachandran, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    A Big-Data environment is one that is capable of orchestrating quick-turnaround analyses involving large volumes of data for numerous simultaneous users. Based on our experiences with a prototype Big-Data analysis environment, we anticipate some important changes in research behaviors and processes while conducting scientific data-analysis research in the near future as such Big-Data environments become the mainstream. The first anticipated change will be the reduced effort and difficulty in most parts of the data management process. A Big-Data analysis environment is likely to house most of the data required for a particular research discipline along with appropriate analysis capabilities. This will reduce the need for researchers to download local copies of data. In turn, this also reduces the need for compute and storage procurement by individual researchers or groups, as well as associated maintenance and management afterwards. It is almost certain that Big-Data environments will require a different "programming language" to fully exploit the latent potential. In addition, the process of extending the environment to provide new analysis capabilities will likely be more involved than, say, compiling a piece of new or revised code.We thus anticipate that researchers will require support from dedicated organizations associated with the environment that are composed of professional software engineers and data scientists. A major benefit will likely be that such extensions are of higherquality and broader applicability than ad hoc changes by physical scientists. Another anticipated significant change is improved collaboration among the researchers using the same environment. Since the environment is homogeneous within itself, many barriers to collaboration are minimized or eliminated. For example, data and analysis algorithms can be seamlessly shared, reused and re-purposed. In conclusion, we will be able to achieve a new level of scientific productivity in the Big

  2. The Visual Advice Centre, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. An intervenient evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, J J; Korten, W E; Jorritsma, F F; Kinds, G F; Legein, C P

    1992-01-01

    On referral by ophthalmologists, the Visual Advice Centre provides the partially sighted with advice and prescriptions for illumination and visual aids. In this paper the multidisciplinary structure of the centre is presented and the results obtained in the first 18 months of its existence are discussed. Two hundred and ninety-eight patients were referred to the centre in this period. The majority of these patients (79.2%) were older than 60 years. The main cause of visual impairment was macular disease (45.3% of the patients). An interesting finding is that, although reading is an important need, reading problems only constituted 35.9% of the total number of demands for help. From an inquiry into the situation of 125 patients 6 months after prescription, it appears that more than 90% of the aids prescribed are used regularly. The conclusion is drawn that patients referred to the Visual Advice Centre benefit from the multi-disciplinary approach to their problems.

  3. Conformism moderates the relations between values, anticipated regret, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnqvist, Jan-Erik; Leikas, Sointu; Paunonen, Sampo; Nissinen, Vesa; Verkasalo, Markku

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the moderating effect of Conformism values on the relations between other values and behavior. The authors expected people low, but not high, in Conformism to behave in a manner that is consistent with their personal values related to self-transcendence versus self-enhancement. In Study 1 (N = 199), such values predicted actual altruistic behavior, as estimated by other-reports, but only if Conformism values were low. In Study 2 (N = 189), only people who considered Conformism values to be relatively unimportant showed expected connections between self-transcendence values and anticipated regret in hypothetical scenarios having negative consequences. The data are interpreted as supporting the view that (a) anticipated regret motivates value-consistent behavior, (b) self-transcendence values in particular are connected to altruistic behavior and to anticipated regret, but (c) conformity to social norms moderates these connections.

  4. Adaptive and Rational Anticipations in Risk Management Systems and Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Daniel M.; Holmberg, Stig C.

    2010-11-01

    The global financial crisis of year 2009 is explained as a result of uncoordinated risk management decisions in business firms and economic organisations. The underlying reason for this can be found in the current financial system. As the financial market has lost much of its direct coupling to the concrete economy it provides misleading information to economic decision makers at all levels. Hence, the financial system has moved from a state of moderate and slow cyclical fluctuations into a state of fast and chaotic ones. Those misleading decisions can further be described, but not explained, by help of adaptive and rational expectations from macroeconomic theory. In this context, AE, the Adaptive Expectations are related to weak passive Exo-anticipation, and RE, the Rational expectations can be related to a strong, active and design oriented anticipation. The shortcomings of conventional cures, which builds on a reactive paradigm, have already been demonstrated in economic literature and are here further underlined by help of Ashby's "Law of Requisite Variety", Weaver's distinction between systems of "Disorganized Complexity" and those of "Organized Complexity", and Klir's "Reconstructability Analysis". Anticipatory decision-making is hence here proposed as a replacement to current expectation based and passive risk management. An anticipatory model of the business cycle is presented for supporting that proposition. The model, which is an extension of the Kaldor-Kalecki model, includes both retardation and anticipation. While cybernetics with the feedback process in control system deals with an explicit goal or purpose given to a system, the anticipatory system discussed here deals with a behaviour for which the future state of the system is built by the system itself, without explicit goal. A system with weak anticipation is based on a predictive model of the system, while a system with strong anticipation builds its own future by itself. Numerical simulations on

  5. Council celebrates CERN Control Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the unveiling of its new sign, the CERN Control Centre was officially inaugurated on Thursday 16 March. To celebrate its startup, CERN Council members visited the sleek centre, a futuristic-looking room filled with a multitude of monitoring screens.

  6. The Centres for Environment-friendly Energy Research (FME)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    public administration and various types of organisations. Uniting the strongest players within a specific area under the aegis of a single centre gives each centre a very high level of overall expertise. The FME centres do not comprise an institution in a single geographic location but rather represent a grouping of entities with unique competencies in relevant areas. Adequate funding is critical to the centres success and further development. The centres each receive NOK 8-20 million annually for a five-year period, with the potential for a three-year extension. The Research Council will evaluate each centre individually and determine whether to grant further funding beyond the initial five-year period. The FME centres are expected to keep on boosting Norwegian energy-related expertise well into the future, with the benefits of their activities extending far beyond the actual lifecycle of the centres themselves. Individually and together, the FME centres will help to provide a secure energy future for Norway and the world at large.(Author)

  7. New scheme of anticipating synchronization for arbitrary anticipation time and its application to long-term prediction of chaotic states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Zhong-Kui; Xu Wei; Yang Xiao-Li

    2007-01-01

    How to predict the dynamics of nonlinear chaotic systems is still a challenging subject with important real-life applications. The present paper deals with this important yet difficult problem via a new scheme of anticipating synchronization. A global, robust, analytical and delay-independent sufficient condition is obtained to guarantee the existence of anticipating synchronization manifold theoretically in the framework of the Krasovskii-Lyapunov theory.that the receiver system can synchronize with the future state of a transmitter system for an arbitrarily long anticipation time, which allows one to predict the dynamics of chaotic transmitter at any point of time if necessary. Also it is simple to implement in practice. A classical chaotic system is employed to demonstrate the application of the proposed scheme to the long-term prediction of chaotic states.

  8. CMCC Data Distribution Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisio, Giovanni; Fiore, Sandro; Negro, A.

    2010-05-01

    The CMCC Data Distribution Centre (DDC) is the primary entry point (web gateway) to the CMCC. It is a Data Grid Portal providing a ubiquitous and pervasive way to ease data publishing, climate metadata search, datasets discovery, metadata annotation, data access, data aggregation, sub-setting, etc. The grid portal security model includes the use of HTTPS protocol for secure communication with the client (based on X509v3 certificates that must be loaded into the browser) and secure cookies to establish and maintain user sessions. The CMCC DDC is now in a pre-production phase and it is currently used only by internal users (CMCC researchers and climate scientists). The most important component already available in the CMCC DDC is the Search Engine which allows users to perform, through web interfaces, distributed search and discovery activities by introducing one or more of the following search criteria: horizontal extent (which can be specified by interacting with a geographic map), vertical extent, temporal extent, keywords, topics, creation date, etc. By means of this page the user submits the first step of the query process on the metadata DB, then, she can choose one or more datasets retrieving and displaying the complete XML metadata description (from the browser). This way, the second step of the query process is carried out by accessing to a specific XML document of the metadata DB. Finally, through the web interface, the user can access to and download (partially or totally) the data stored on the storage device accessing to OPeNDAP servers and to other available grid storage interfaces. Requests concerning datasets stored in deep storage will be served asynchronously.

  9. Linear stochastic differential equations with anticipating initial conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalifa, Narjess; Kuo, Hui-Hsiung; Ouerdiane, Habib

    In this paper we use the new stochastic integral introduced by Ayed and Kuo (2008) and the results obtained by Kuo et al. (2012b) to find a solution to a drift-free linear stochastic differential equation with anticipating initial condition. Our solution is based on well-known results from...

  10. Patients' Anticipation of Stress in Nursing Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Shayna; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined anticipation of stresses in 223 patients recently admitted to nursing homes, who completed the stresses in Institutional Care Scale (SIC). Factor analysis revealed five factors significantly related to psychological and physical variables. Suggests using SIC for admission screening in nursing homes. Appendix contains the SIC. (NRB)

  11. Anticipated identification costs: Improving assortment evaluation by diagnostic attributes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, van E.; Pieters, F.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Consumers often make quick assessments of product assortments, to determine if these are worthwhile for further investigation. They anticipate how difficult it will be to distinguish the various options in the assortment, which will influence their assortment evaluations. We reason that the

  12. Probing the Neural Correlates of Anticipated Peer Evaluation in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, Amanda E.; McClure-Tone, Erin B.; Shiffrin, Nina D.; Pine, Daniel S.; Nelson, Eric E.

    2009-01-01

    Neural correlates of social-cognition were assessed in 9- to- 17-year-olds (N = 34) using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Participants appraised how unfamiliar peers they had previously identified as being of high or low interest would evaluate them for an anticipated online chat session. Differential age- and sex-related activation…

  13. Anticipating change : sustainable water policy pathways for an uncertain future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, M.

    2013-01-01

    Water management should preferably bring solutions that sustain even if conditions change. In anticipating change, a sustainable plan should not only achieve economic, environmental, and social targets, but it should also be robust to uncertainty and able to be adapted over time to (unforeseen) futu

  14. Person x Context Effects on Anticipated Moral Emotions Following Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Sanna; Salmivalli, Christina; Hodges, Ernest V. E.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated person (sex, aggression level), context (witness type, victim reactions), and person x context effects on children's anticipated moral emotions following hypothetical acts of aggression against a peer. Children (N = 378, mean age = 11.3 years) were presented a series of hypothetical vignettes in which the presence of witnesses (no…

  15. 25 years Nuclear Research Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harde, R.

    1981-07-01

    On June 12, the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre celebrated its 25th anniversary. The Centre was founded on July 19, 1956. The importance of this institution became apparent by the large number of prominent guests, at the head, the Federal President, Karl Carstens. Minister President Spaeth and the Federal Minister for Research and Technology, von Buelow, appreciated the achievements obtained by this big science centre of nuclear technology. The ceremony held in the State theatre of Baden-Wuerttemberg gave testimony of an impressing confession in favour of nuclear energy. Excerpts from the speech of the Chairman of the Managing Board, Prof. Harde, are quoted.

  16. Minister unveils new nanotech centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumé, Belle

    2009-06-01

    Three new nanotechnology research centres are to be set up in France as part of a €70m government plan to help French companies in the sector. Researchers at the new centres, which will be located in Grenoble, Saclay (near Paris) and Toulouse, will be encouraged to collaborate with industry to develop new nanotech-based products. Dubbed NANO-INNOV, the new plan includes €46m for two new buildings at Saclay, with the rest being used to buy new equipment at the three centres and to fund grant proposals from staff to the French National Research Agency (ANR).

  17. The World Heritage Centr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman G. Abdel Tawab

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available New Gourna Village, which is located inside one of the World Heritage Sites in Egypt, has never been recognized as an element contributing to the site’s Outstanding Universal Value. The recognition of the village as a contributing element is reliant on the successful assessment of its authenticity and integrity. Responding to the dramatically declining integrity of the village, the World Heritage Centre has carried out an architectural study to guide the potential conservation works in the property. The study has recommended that a group of objectives and two approaches to the conservation of the village should be adopted. One of these two approaches has been concerned with the conservation of the village according to the architect’s original intentions and principles. The previous approach can be called the principles-based approach. The main aim of this study was to examine the agreement of the World Heritage Centre’s objectives and their proposed principles-based approach to the conservation of the village with the aim to improve its chance in meeting the conditions of authenticity and integrity. The study approached the previous aim by assessing, by means of a proposed methodology; the level of significance, authenticity and integrity of the property. Based on the previous assessment, a list of conservation interventions was proposed to improve the property’s chance in meeting the conditions of authenticity and integrity. Finally, the World Heritage Centre’s recommended approaches and objectives were examined against the previous proposed conservation interventions. The findings indicated the possibility to adopt the principles-based approach to the conservation of New Gourna Village, as well as the other World Heritage Centre’s objectives, without limiting the property’s chance in meeting the conditions of authenticity and integrity. The study recommends to carry out further studies that are concerned with the identification

  18. The centre of the action

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Control Centre (CCC) has all the ingredients of an action movie control room: hundreds of screens, technicians buzzing in and out, huge floor-to-ceiling windows revealing the looming vista of a mountain range, flashing lights, microphones… This is the place where not just the LHC, but the whole of CERN’s accelerator complex and technical support is based - truly the centre of the action at CERN.

  19. Neural basis of reward anticipation and its genetic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tianye; Macare, Christine; Desrivières, Sylvane; Gonzalez, Dante A; Tao, Chenyang; Ji, Xiaoxi; Ruggeri, Barbara; Nees, Frauke; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia J; Dove, Rachel; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny A; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lemaitre, Hervé; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor; Smolka, Michael N; Müller, Christian P; Feng, Jianfeng; Rothenfluh, Adrian; Flor, Herta; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-04-05

    Dysfunctional reward processing is implicated in various mental disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and addictions. Such impairments might involve different components of the reward process, including brain activity during reward anticipation. We examined brain nodes engaged by reward anticipation in 1,544 adolescents and identified a network containing a core striatal node and cortical nodes facilitating outcome prediction and response preparation. Distinct nodes and functional connections were preferentially associated with either adolescent hyperactivity or alcohol consumption, thus conveying specificity of reward processing to clinically relevant behavior. We observed associations between the striatal node, hyperactivity, and the vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 4A (VPS4A) gene in humans, and the causal role of Vps4 for hyperactivity was validated in Drosophila Our data provide a neurobehavioral model explaining the heterogeneity of reward-related behaviors and generate a hypothesis accounting for their enduring nature.

  20. The role of anticipated regret in escalation of commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kin Fai Ellick; Kwong, Jessica Y Y

    2007-03-01

    This research tests the general proposition that people are motivated to reduce future regret under escalation situations. This is supported by the findings that (a) escalation of commitment is stronger when the possibility of future regret about withdrawal is high than when this possibility is low (Studies 1a and 1b) and (b) escalation of commitment increases as the net anticipated regret about withdrawal increases (Studies 2a and 2b). Furthermore, the regret effects in the 4 studies were above and beyond the personal responsibility effects on escalation. This research indicates that people in escalation situations are simultaneously influenced by the emotions they expect to experience in the future (e.g., anticipated regret) and by events that have happened in the past (e.g., responsibility for the initiating previous decision).

  1. ANTICIPATING WPS PIN VULNERABILITY TO SECURE WIRELESS NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Dwi Rianto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available WiFi Protected Setup (WPS is a standardized function supported by numerous vendors of wireless routers and access point to help set up connection to a wireless local area network. It is designed to simplify the set up and generally enabled by default. Due to design flaw, the WPS or QSS PIN is susceptible to a brute force attack. In this paper, we test the security vulnerability occurred, evaluate the performance and give recommendations to anticipate the attack.

  2. Anticipating early fatality: friends', schoolmates' and individual perceptions of fatality on adolescent risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynie, Dana L; Soller, Brian; Williams, Kristi

    2014-02-01

    Past research indicates that anticipating adverse outcomes, such as early death (fatalism), is associated positively with adolescents' likelihood of engaging in risky behaviors. Health researchers and criminologists have argued that fatalism influences present risk taking in part by informing individuals' motivation for delaying gratification for the promise of future benefits. While past findings highlight the association between the anticipation of early death and a number of developmental outcomes, no known research has assessed the impact of location in a context characterized by high perceptions of fatality. Using data from Add Health and a sample of 9,584 adolescents (51% female and 71% white) nested in 113 schools, our study builds upon prior research by examining the association between friends', school mates', and individual perceptions of early fatality and adolescent risk behaviors. We test whether friends' anticipation of being killed prior to age 21 or location in a school where a high proportion of the student body subscribes to attitudes of high fatality, is associated with risky behaviors. Results indicate that friends' fatalism is positively associated with engaging in violent delinquency, non-violent delinquency, and drug use after controlling for individual covariates and prior individual risk-taking. Although friends' delinquency accounts for much of the effect of friends' fatalism on violence, none of the potential intervening variables fully explain the effect of friends' fatalism on youth involvement in non-violent delinquency and drug use. Our results underscore the importance of friendship contextual effects in shaping adolescent risk-taking behavior and the very serious consequences perceptions of fatality have for adolescents' involvement in delinquency and drug use.

  3. Self-care and anticipated transition into retirement and later life in a Nordic welfare context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderhamn O

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Olle Söderhamn1–3, Anne Skisland1,2, Margaretha Herrman31Department of Health and Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad and Kristiansand, Norway; 2Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Grimstad, Norway; 3Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, SwedenAbstract: Few studies have appeared in the health care literature on the meaning of transition into retirement and later life. However, this predictable-involuntary transition may influence personal health and well-being, and studying it from a self-care perspective could be useful. The aim of this study was to illuminate aspects of self-care in a group of middle-aged individuals in relation to their anticipated transition into retirement in the Nordic welfare context. A total of 13 individuals, aged 55 to 65 years, were randomly chosen from the total number of inhabitants in three municipalities in mid-west Sweden. Conversational interviews took place, during which the informants shared important events in their lives that had occurred from early childhood until the present time, together with thoughts about their anticipated future developmental transition into later life. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. After content analyses and interpretation, a comprehensive picture of the phenomenon was revealed. The results showed that there were opportunities, expectations, wishes, concerns, and worries related to the transition into retirement and old age among informants from both rural and urban municipalities. Self-care, in connection with this, depended on motivating and demotivating factors. Autonomy and mature dependence seemed to be positive driving forces for reaching a successful transition into later life. Supporting autonomy should be a way of facilitating the transition into retirement and later life.Keywords: aging, autonomy, motivation, older people, successful aging

  4. Public health measures during an anticipated influenza pandemic: Factors influencing willingness to comply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Taylor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanie Taylor1, Beverley Raphael1, Margo Barr2, Kingsley Agho1, Garry Stevens1, Louisa Jorm11School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 2Centre for Epidemiology and Research, New South Wales Department of Health, Sydney, AustraliaAbstract: This research assessed factors associated with willingness to comply with vaccination, isolation, and face mask wearing during an anticipated influenza pandemic. Data were collected from 2081 adults (16+ using a module of questions incorporated into the NSW Health Adult Population Health Survey. High levels of willingness to comply were reported with 73% either very or extremely willing to receive vaccination, 67% willing to isolate themselves, 58% willing to wear a face mask, and 48% willing to comply with all three behaviors. Further analysis indicated concern for self and family and higher levels of education were associated with high levels of willingness to comply. Younger people (16–24 were the least willing to comply; especially with wearing a face mask. Those with children reported higher levels of willingness to receive vaccination, and respondents who speak a language other than English at home were less willing to isolate themselves or comply with all behaviors. These findings provide a baseline measure of anticipated public compliance with key public health behaviors in the event of an influenza pandemic in the Australian population, and help to identify groups that may be more resistant to individual measures and may require additional attention in terms of risk communication strategies or health education.Keywords: risk perception, pandemic influenza, compliance, health behaviors

  5. Neural response to reward anticipation is modulated by Gray's impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Tim; Dresler, Thomas; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Plichta, Michael M; Heinzel, Sebastian; Polak, Thomas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Breuer, Felix; Jakob, Peter M; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2009-07-15

    According to the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST), Gray's dimension of impulsivity, reflecting human trait reward sensitivity, determines the extent to which stimuli activate the Behavioural Approach System (BAS). The potential neural underpinnings of the BAS, however, remain poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the association between Gray's impulsivity as defined by the RST and event-related fMRI BOLD-response to anticipation of reward in twenty healthy human subjects in brain regions previously associated with reward processing. Anticipation of reward during a Monetary Incentive Delay Task elicited activation in key components of the human reward circuitry such as the ventral striatum, the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex. Interindividual differences in Gray's impulsivity accounted for a significant amount of variance of the reward-related BOLD-response in the ventral striatum and the orbitofrontal cortex. Specifically, higher trait reward sensitivity was associated with increased activation in response to cues indicating potential reward. Extending previous evidence, here we show that variance in functional brain activation during anticipation of reward is attributed to interindividual differences regarding Gray's dimension of impulsivity. Thus, trait reward sensitivity contributes to the modulation of responsiveness in major components of the human reward system which thereby display a core property of the BAS. Generally, fostering our understanding of the neural underpinnings of the association of reward-related interindividual differences in affective traits might aid researchers in quest for custom-tailored treatments of psychiatric disorders, further disentangling the complex relationship between personality traits, emotion, and health.

  6. Health, Anticipated Partner Infidelity, and Jealousy in Men and Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Arnocky

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Health has been identified as an important variable involved in mate choice. Unhealthy organisms are generally less able to provide reproductively important resources to partners and offspring and are more likely to pass on communicable disease. Research on human mate preferences has shown that both men and women prefer healthy mates. Yet to date, little research has examined how health relates to one’s own mating experiences. In the present study, 164 participants (87 women who were currently in heterosexual romantic relationships completed measures of frequency and severity of health problems, anticipated partner infidelity, and intensity of jealousy felt in their current relationship. Mediation analyses showed that health problems predicted greater anticipated partner infidelity and jealousy scores and that anticipated partner infidelity mediated the links between health and jealousy for both frequency and severity of health problems, controlling for both sex and relationship duration. These findings suggest that unhealthy people perceive themselves to be at a mating disadvantage, experiencing associated differences in perceptions and emotions surrounding their romantic partners’ fidelity.

  7. Apparent anticipation in SOD1 familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic, Steve; Nicholson, Garth A; Chio, Adriano; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2013-09-01

    Although anticipation has been previously reported in the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) associated familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), some have argued that this may represent ascertainment bias. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to determine whether anticipation was a feature in SOD1 FALS. From a cohort of 112 individuals, the clinical and genetic history of 34 SOD1 patients was assessed. Clinical history was collected with the age of death and disease duration determined in successive generations (generation 1, grandparent; generation 2, parents; generation 3, children), from five large SOD1 families. Results showed that the age of death was significantly less in generation 3 (40.1 ± 2.8 years) compared to generation 2 (46.2 ± 2.0 years, p < 0.05) and generation 1 (56.7 ± 4.5 years, p < 0.01). Furthermore, disease duration was longer in generation 1 (18.4 ± 3.7 months) compared to the disease duration in generation 2 (12.6 ± 2.6 months) and generation 3 (12.3 ± 1.9 months, p = 0.08). Positive intergenerational differences were evident in 92% of parent-offspring transmissions in the present SOD1 FALS cohort (c(2) = 70.6, p < 0.001). In conclusion, the present study supports anticipation as a phenomenon in FALS, possibly due to co-inheritance of modifier genes.

  8. The ideal Atomic Centre; Le Centre Atomique ideal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The author presents considerations which should prove to be of interest to all those who have to design, to construct and to operate a nuclear research centre. A large number of the ideas presented can also be applied to non-nuclear scientific research centres. In his report the author reviews: various problems with which the constructor is faced: ground-plan, infrastructure, buildings and the large units of scientific equipment in the centre, and those problems facing the director: maintenance, production, supplies, security. The author stresses the relationship which ought to exist between the research workers and the management. With this aim in view he proposes the creation of National School for Administration in Research which would train administrative executives for public or private organisations; they would be specialised in the fields of fundamental or applied research. (author) [French] L'auteur propose une base de reflexions a tous ceux qui doivent concevoir, realiser et faire vivre un Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires. Un grand nombre des idees exprimees peut d'ailleurs s'appliquer a un Centre d'Etudes Scientifiques non nucleaires. Dans son ouvrage, l'auteur passe en revue les differents problemes qui se posent au constructeur: plan, masse, infrastructure, batiments et grands appareils du Centre, et ceux qu'a a resoudre le directeur: entretien, fabrication, approvisionnements, securite. L'auteur insiste sur l'aspect des rapports qui doivent exister entre les chercheurs et ceux qui les administrent. Il propose a cette fin la creation d'une Ecole Nationale d'Administration de la Recherche qui formerait des cadres administratifs pour les organismes publics ou prives, specialises dans la Recherche fondamentale ou appliquee. (auteur)

  9. Who benefits?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Frederik Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cross-border welfare rights for citizens of European Union member states are intensely contested, yet there is limited research into voter opposition to such rights, sometimes denoted ‘welfare chauvinism’. We highlight an overlooked aspect in scholarly work: the role of stereotypes about...... beneficiaries of cross-border welfare. We present results from an original large-scale survey experiment (N=2525) among Swedish voters, randomizing exposure to cues about recipients' country of origin and family size. Consistent with a model emphasizing the role of stereotypes, respondents react to cues about...... recipient identity. These effects are strongest among respondents high in ethnic prejudice and economic conservatism. The findings imply that stereotypes about who benefits from cross-border welfare rights condition public support for those rights....

  10. Immune anticipation of mating in Drosophila: Turandot M promotes immunity against sexually transmitted fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weihao; McClure, Colin D; Evans, Cara R; Mlynski, David T; Immonen, Elina; Ritchie, Michael G; Priest, Nicholas K

    2013-12-22

    Although it is well known that mating increases the risk of infection, we do not know how females mitigate the fitness costs of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). It has recently been shown that female fruitflies, Drosophila melanogaster, specifically upregulate two members of the Turandot family of immune and stress response genes, Turandot M and Turandot C (TotM and TotC), when they hear male courtship song. Here, we use the Gal4/UAS RNAi gene knockdown system to test whether the expression of these genes provides fitness benefits for females infected with the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium robertsii under sexual transmission. As a control, we also examined the immunity conferred by Dorsal-related immunity factor (Dif), a central component of the Toll signalling pathway thought to provide immunity against fungal infections. We show that TotM, but not TotC or Dif, provides survival benefits to females following STIs, but not after direct topical infections. We also show that though the expression of TotM provides fecundity benefits for healthy females, it comes at a cost to their survival, which helps to explain why TotM is not constitutively expressed. Together, these results show that the anticipatory expression of TotM promotes specific immunity against fungal STIs and suggest that immune anticipation is more common than currently appreciated.

  11. The CERN Data Centre readies for Run 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    While the world waits for Run 2 data with growing anticipation, the CERN Data Centre is battening down the hatches. Run 2 is set to see a significant increase in the amount of data produced by the LHC experiments, with more than one hundred additional petabytes expected over the next three years. How will CERN manage this flood of results? The Bulletin checks in with the IT Department to find out...   The CERN Data Centre: the heart of CERN's entire scientific, administrative, and computing infrastructure. With every second of run-time, gigabytes of data will come pouring into the CERN Data Centre to be stored, sorted and shared with physicists worldwide. To cope with this massive influx of Run 2 data, the CERN Data and Storage Services group focused on three areas: speed, capacity and reliability. First on the list, the group set out to increase the rate at which they could store data. "During Run 1, we were storing 1 gigabyte-per-second, with the occasional peak of 6 giga...

  12. Person-centred reflective practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenny, Bob; Duffy, Kathleen

    Person-centred health and person-centred care have gained prominence across the UK following the publication of reports on public inquiries exploring failings in care. Self-awareness and participation in reflective practice are recognised as vital to supporting the person-centred agenda. This article presents an education framework for reflective practice, developed and used in one NHS board in Scotland, and based on the tenets of the clinical pastoral education movement. Providing an insight into the usefulness of a spiritual component in the reflective process, the framework provides an opportunity for nurses and other healthcare professionals to examine the spiritual dimensions of patient encounters, their own values and beliefs, and the effect these may have on their practice.

  13. Construction of the Wigner Data Centre

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    A remote extension of the CERN data centre has recently been inaugurated. Hosted at the Wigner Research Centre for Physics in Hungary, it provides extra computing power required to cover CERN’s needs. This video presents the construction of the Wigner Data Centre from initial demolishing work through to its completion and details the major technical characteristics of the Data Centre.

  14. Anticipating the use of future things: towards a framework for prospective use analysis in innovation design projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Julien; Buisine, Stéphanie; Aoussat, Améziane

    2013-11-01

    Anticipation of future product use is a persistent issue in User-Centered Design. In this paper, we argue that one obstacle to early integration of use analysis in innovation design is overreliance on retrospective use analysis, i.e. that which is based on clear references to existing products or activities. In contrast, innovation design projects are full of uncertainty, leading to a need for prospective analysis. After having described some limitations of prospective use analysis, we contend that creativity tools may be used to assist the anticipation of future product use, by allowing designers to approach the variability of situations of future use in a structured manner rather than by "muddling through". We illustrate the expected benefits of this approach with two case studies, and describe some prospects for future research and practice in ergonomics.

  15. Increasing titration speed by using an end paint anticipator device

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    A simple device is described for use in any titrations with the objective of rapidly locating the vicinity of the end point of a titration. The device stores inside about 10% of a 10 mL titrand solution. The titration itself proceeds with rapid addition of titrant until the end point is passed. The anticipator device now starts to rotate, using a dc motor, which is turned on by a micro-computer. The solution stored in the device is mixed with the already titrated solution and the property bei...

  16. Hi-Tech Skills Anticipation for Sustainable Development in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Gurtov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is evident that there is a heightened importance in Russia attributed to ensuring that students develop skills, which will enable them to be more productive and engaged citizens. This article deals with a skills anticipation methodology for seven hi-tech industries in Russia that resulted in the development of models for both soft and hard skills. There is a variety of widely applied methods – qualitative projection of labor market parameters, desk studies, documents analysis, foresight sessions, employers' and experts' surveys. As a result, new skills models are to help the specialists to effectively overcome the challenges, apply innovative decisions, and increase their technological knowledge.

  17. tsk tsk tsk and Beyond: Anticipating Distributed Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Tofts

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers some important precursory events in the formative history of Australian media arts. These events have anticipated the post-object, serial conception of arts practice that Nicholas Bourriaud has called relational aesthetics. Relational aesthetics interpret both artwork and audience in differential, highly idiosyncratic ways; ways that have become important to our contemporary vocabulary of interactive, immersive and interfaced art. This paper will consider the ways in which the concept of the network was important to artists such as Philip Brophy & Tsk-tsk-tsk in the early 1980s. It will also explore related notions of “audience manipulation” in the work of Martine Corompt.

  18. Speciality preferences in Dutch medical students influenced by their anticipation on family responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alers, Margret; Pepping, Tess; Bor, Hans; Verdonk, Petra; Hamberg, Katarina; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine

    2014-12-01

    Physician gender is associated with differences in the male-to-female ratio between specialities and with preferred working hours. We explored how graduating students' sex or full-time or part-time preference influences their speciality choice, taking work-life issues into account. Graduating medical students at Radboud University Medical Centre, the Netherlands participated in a survey (2008-2012) on career considerations. Logistic regression tested the influence of sex or working hour preference on speciality choice and whether work-life issues mediate. Of the responding students (N = 1,050, response rate 83, 73.3 % women), men preferred full-time work, whereas women equally opted for part time. More men chose surgery, more women family medicine. A full-time preference was associated with a preference for surgery, internal medicine and neurology, a part-time preference with psychiatry and family medicine. Both male and female students anticipated that foremost the career of women will be negatively influenced by family life. A full-time preference was associated with an expectation of equality in career opportunities or with a less ambitious partner whose career would affect family life. This increased the likelihood of a choice for surgery and reduced the preference for family medicine among female students. Gender specifically plays an important role in female graduates' speciality choice making, through considerations on career prospects and family responsibilities.

  19. LDE centres: sprint or marathon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonger, S.; Van Rein, E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Strategic Leiden-Delft-Erasmus Alliance, established by the three universities in 2012, was to improve research and education and competitiveness. Projects are intended to develop from the ground up, which led to the establishment of eight joint centres in 2013. A quick look around re

  20. Subjective illusion of control modulates striatal reward anticipation in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Robert C; Gleich, Tobias; Kühn, Simone; Pöhland, Lydia; Pelz, Patricia; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Raufelder, Diana; Heinz, Andreas; Beck, Anne

    2015-08-15

    The perception of control over the environment constitutes a fundamental biological adaptive mechanism, especially during development. Previous studies comparing an active choice condition with a passive no-choice condition showed that the neural basis of this mechanism is associated with increased activity within the striatum and the prefrontal cortex. In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether subjective belief of control in an uncertain gambling situation induces elevated activation in a cortico-striatal network. We investigated 79 adolescents (age range: 13-16years) during reward anticipation with a slot machine task using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We assessed post-experimentally whether the participants experienced a subjective illusion of control on winning or losing in this task that was objectively not given. Nineteen adolescents experienced an illusion of control during slot machine gambling. This illusion of control group showed an increased neural activity during reward anticipation within a cortico-striatal network including ventral striatum (VS) as well as right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) relative to the group reporting no illusion of control. The rIFG activity was inversely associated with impulsivity in the no illusion of control group. The subjective belief about control led to an elevated ventral striatal activity, which is known to be involved in the processing of reward. This finding strengthens the notion that subjectively perceived control, not necessarily the objective presence of control, affects striatal reward-related processing.

  1. Time to Tango: expertise and contextual anticipation during action observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoruso, Lucía; Sedeño, Lucas; Huepe, David; Tomio, Ailin; Kamienkowski, Juan; Hurtado, Esteban; Cardona, Juan Felipe; Álvarez González, Miguel Ángel; Rieznik, Andrés; Sigman, Mariano; Manes, Facundo; Ibáñez, Agustín

    2014-09-01

    Predictive theories of action observation propose that we use our own motor system as a guide for anticipating and understanding other people's actions through the generation of context-based expectations. According to this view, people should be better in predicting and interpreting those actions that are present in their own motor repertoire compared to those that are not. We recorded high-density event-related potentials (ERPs: P300, N400 and Slow Wave, SW) and source estimation in 80 subjects separated by their level of expertise (experts, beginners and naïves) as they observed realistic videos of Tango steps with different degrees of execution correctness. We also performed path analysis to infer causal relationships between ongoing anticipatory brain activity, evoked semantic responses, expertise measures and behavioral performance. We found that anticipatory activity, with sources in a fronto-parieto-occipital network, early discriminated between groups according to their level of expertise. Furthermore, this early activity significantly predicted subsequent semantic integration indexed by semantic responses (N400 and SW, sourced in temporal and motor regions) which also predicted motor expertise. In addition, motor expertise was a good predictor of behavioral performance. Our results show that neural and temporal dynamics underlying contextual action anticipation and comprehension can be interpreted in terms of successive levels of contextual prediction that are significantly modulated by subject's prior experience.

  2. Strong anticipation: Multifractal cascade dynamics modulate scaling in synchronization behaviors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen, Damian G., E-mail: foovian@gmail.co [Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, 3 Blackfan Circle, Floor 5, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Dixon, James A. [Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, 406 Babbidge Rd., Unit 1020, Storrs, CT 06269-1020 (United States); Haskins Laboratories, 300 George St., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: We investigated anticipatory behaviors in response to chaotic metronomes. We assessed multifractal structure in tap intervals and onset intervals. Strength of multifractality in tap intervals appears to match that in onset intervals. - Abstract: Previous research on anticipatory behaviors has found that the fractal scaling of human behavior may attune to the fractal scaling of an unpredictable signal [Stephen DG, Stepp N, Dixon JA, Turvey MT. Strong anticipation: Sensitivity to long-range correlations in synchronization behavior. Physica A 2008;387:5271-8]. We propose to explain this attunement as a case of multifractal cascade dynamics [Schertzer D, Lovejoy S. Generalised scale invariance in turbulent phenomena. Physico-Chem Hydrodyn J 1985;6:623-5] in which perceptual-motor fluctuations are coordinated across multiple time scales. This account will serve to sharpen the contrast between strong and weak anticipation: whereas the former entails a sensitivity to the intermittent temporal structure of an unpredictable signal, the latter simply predicts sensitivity to an aggregate description of an unpredictable signal irrespective of actual sequence. We pursue this distinction through a reanalysis of Stephen et al.'s data by examining the relationship between the widths of singularity spectra for intertap interval time series and for each corresponding interonset interval time series. We find that the attunement of fractal scaling reported by Stephen et al. was not the trivial result of sensitivity to temporal structure in aggregate but reflected a subtle sensitivity to the coordination across multiple time scales of fluctuation in the unpredictable signal.

  3. Coincidence-anticipation timing requirements are different in racket sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Selçuk; Devrilmez, Erhan; Kirazci, Sadettin

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coincidence-anticipation timing accuracy of athletes of different racket sports with various stimulus velocity requirements. Ninety players (15 girls, 15 boys for each sport) from tennis (M age = 12.4 yr., SD = 1.4), badminton (M age = 12.5 yr., SD = 1.4), and table tennis (M age = 12.4 yr., SD = 1.2) participated in this study. Three different stimulus velocities, low, moderate, and high, were used to simulate the velocity requirements of these racket sports. Tennis players had higher accuracy when they performed under the low stimulus velocity compared to badminton and table tennis players. Badminton players performed better under the moderate speed comparing to tennis and table tennis players. Table tennis players had better performance than tennis and badminton players under the high stimulus velocity. Therefore, visual and motor systems of players from different racket sports may adapt to a stimulus velocity in coincidence-anticipation timing, which is specific to each type of racket sports.

  4. The Boxing Day Tsunami: Could the Disaster have been Anticipated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, P. R.; Burbdige, D.

    2005-05-01

    The occurrence of the 26 December, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake and the accompanying "Boxing Day" Tsunami, which killed over 280,00, has been described as one of the most lethal natural disasters in human history. Many lives could have been saved had a tsunami warning system, similar to that which exists for the Pacific Ocean, been in operation for the Indian Ocean. The former exists because great subduction zone earthquakes have generated destructive, Pacific-wide tsunami in the Pacific Ocean with some frequency. Prior to 26 December, 2004, all of the world's earthquakes with magnitude > 9 were widely thought to have occurred in the Pacific Ocean, where they caused destructive tsunami. Could the occurrence of similar earthquakes and tsunami in the Indian Ocean been predicted prior to the 2004 Box Day Tragedy? This presentation will argue that the answer is "Yes". Almost without exception (the exception being the 1952 Kamchatka earthquake) the massive subduction zone earthquakes and tsunami of the Pacific Ocean have been associated with the subduction of relatively young ocean lithosphere (Boxing day event, the effects in the Bay of Bengal would not have been as severe. Thus, it seems to this author that the Boxing Day event could and should have been anticipated. This presentation will further consider why it was not, and what steps can be taken to anticipate and mitigate the effects of future events that may occur in the Indian Ocean and elsewhere.

  5. Investigating the effects of 6 months extended duration, in-centre nocturnal versus conventional haemodialysis treatment: a non-randomised, controlled feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Brown, Matthew P M; Preston, Robert; Pickering, Warren; McCann, Gerry P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In-centre nocturnal haemodialysis (INHD) is an underutilised dialysis regimen that can potentially provide patients with better clinical outcomes due to extended treatment times. We have established an INHD programme within our clinical network, fulfilling a previously unmet patient need. This feasibility study aims to gather sufficient data on numerous outcome measures to inform the design of a multicentre randomised controlled trial that will establish the potential benefits of INHD and increase the availability of this service nationally and internationally. Methods and analysis This will be a non-randomised controlled study. Prevalent patients on haemodialysis (HD) will electively change from a conventional in-centre HD regimen of 4 hours thrice weekly to a regimen of extended treatment times (5–8 hours) delivered in-centre overnight thrice weekly. After recruitment of the INHD cohort, a group of patients matched for age, gender and dialysis vintage will be selected from patients remaining on a conventional daytime dialysis programme. Outcome measures will include left ventricular mass as measured by MRI, physical performance measured by the short physical performance battery and physical activity measured by accelerometry. Additionally we will measure quality of life using validated questionnaires, nutritional status by bioimpedance spectroscopy and food diaries, and blood sampling for markers of cardiovascular disease, systemic inflammation. Suitable statistical tests shall be used to analyse the data. We will use omnibus tests to observe changes over the duration of the intervention and between groups. We will also look for associations between outcome measures that may warrant further investigation. These data will be used to inform the power calculation for future studies. Ethics and dissemination A favourable opinion was granted by Northampton Research Ethics Committee (15/EM/0268). It is anticipated that results of this study will be

  6. The CCCB is a cultural centre, not a tourist centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Xirau

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Last February, Barcelona's Centre of Contemporary Culture (CCCB celebrated its first ten years in existence. During this time, this institution has looked to be a showcase to the most modern and innovative cultural expressions focused on reflecting on the concept of the city. In this interview, Josep Ramoneda offers his personal view, as the CCCB's director. He talks of how this cultural project was born, of how the concept of the institution took shape in the CCCB, of its relations with Barcelona's Strategic Plan, of how the project has evolved, of the architectural remodelling of the Casa de la Caritat building for its conversion into a cultural centre, of the relations with other institutions and its future.

  7. Anticipating Installation Natural Resource Climate Change Concerns: The Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    2006 data). Country Acronym Model Name Beijing Climate Center China BCC CM1 Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research Norway BCCR BCM2.0 Canadian...Model and Data Groupe at MPI-M Germany M&D Institute of Atmospheric Physics China LASG FGOALS-g1.0 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory USA GFDL CM2.0...concerns that would have a stressing effect on the flora and fauna in a locality. They are derived directly from the base temperature and

  8. Revitalizing the United Nations. Anticipation and Prevention as Primary Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Novosseloff

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In tackling the on-going topic of UN reform, one should be honest with the analysis of the problems at stakes. It is necessary to first take into account the profound changes that have occurred since the end of the Cold War, as well as acknowledging the limits of an international organization and the shape of the UN system. It is only from that analysis that proposals can be made to rationalize and to make more efficient the functioning of the United Nations. What the Organization needs is not only a rationalization, it primarily needs a vision that gives it purpose and meaning. This article proposes that its primary goals should be anticipation and prevention – it should be the advanced guard and the conscience of the world. In this context, the United Nations is an indispensable and priceless instrument in international relations.

  9. A Complex Data Warehouse for Personalized, Anticipative Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Jérôme

    2008-01-01

    With the growing use of new technologies, healthcare is nowadays undergoing significant changes. Information-based medicine has to exploit medical decision-support systems and requires the analysis of various, heterogeneous data, such as patient records, medical images, biological analysis results, etc. In this paper, we present the design of the complex data warehouse relating to high-level athletes. It is original in two ways. First, it is aimed at storing complex medical data. Second, it is designed to allow innovative and quite different kinds of analyses to support: (1) personalized and anticipative medicine (in opposition to curative medicine) for well-identified patients; (2) broad-band statistical studies over a given population of patients. Furthermore, the system includes data relating to several medical fields. It is also designed to be evolutionary to take into account future advances in medical research.

  10. Anticipative Stochastic Differential Equations with Non-smooth Diffusion Coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong Xia LIANG

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we prove the existence and uniqueness of the solutions to the one-dimensional linear stochastic differential equation with Skorohod integralXt(ω) = η(ω) + ∫t0 asXs(ω)dWs + bsXs(ω)ds, t ∈ [0, 1],where (Ws) is the canonical Wiener process defined on the standard Wiener space ((W), (H),μ), a is non-smooth and adapted, but η and b may be anticipating to the filtration generated by (Ws). The intention of the paper is to eliminate the regularity of the diffusion coefficient a in the Malliavin sense, in the existing literature. The idea is to approach the non-smooth diffusion coefficient a by smooth ones.

  11. Systems and models with anticipation in physics and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, A.

    2012-11-01

    Investigations of recent physics processes and real applications of models require the new more and more improved models which should involved new properties. One of such properties is anticipation (that is taking into accounting some advanced effects).It is considered the special kind of advanced systems - namely a strong anticipatory systems introduced by D. Dubois. Some definitions, examples and peculiarities of solutions are described. The main feature is presumable multivaluedness of the solutions. Presumable physical examples of such systems are proposed: self-organization problems; dynamical chaos; synchronization; advanced potentials; structures in micro-, meso- and macro- levels; cellular automata; computing; neural network theory. Also some applications for modeling social, economical, technical and natural systems are described.

  12. Psychological capital, work engagement and organisational commitment amongst call centre employees in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet C. Simons

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The development of psychological capital amongst call centre employees could have an impact on positive work-related attitudes and behaviour; such as work engagement and organisational commitment.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to determine the relationship between psychological capital, work engagement and organisational commitment amongst call centre employees; and further, to determine whether psychological capital and work engagement hold predictive value for the organisational commitment of call centre employees.Motivation for the study: There is a gap in research in understanding and enabling positive resource capacities in highly stressful work contexts such as call centres.Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional survey design was used. A sample of 106 call centre employees from a South African organisation participated in the research. The measuring instruments included a demographic questionnaire, the Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ, the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES and the Organisational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ.Main findings: Significant positive relationships were found between psychological capital, work engagement and organisational commitment. The results showed work engagement as being the only significant predictor of organisational commitment.Practical/managerial implications: Call centre employers need to develop and implement workplace interventions that would increase the psychological capital of call centre employees.Contribution/value-add: The research findings will benefit both call centre employees and management. The study highlighted the importance of the role of optimism as a subdimension of psychological capital in developing work engagement and organisational commitment amongst call centre employees.

  13. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z > Exercise: Benefits of Exercise: Health Benefits In This Topic Health Benefits Benefits for Everyday Life ... Try Exercise: How to Stay Active The information in this topic was provided by the National Institute ...

  14. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Roger

    2014-11-04

    The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control was set up in 2005 to strengthen Europe's defences against infectious diseases. The centre is an independent agency of the European Union and is based in Stockholm, Sweden.

  15. Representational momentum reveals visual anticipation differences in the upper and lower visual fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, Victoria M; Lawrence, Gavin P; Hayes, Amy E; Khan, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Recent empirical research has revealed differences in functional capacity between the upper and lower visual fields (VFs), with the lower VF exhibiting superiority in visual perception skills. Similarly, functional differences between the left and right hemispheres elicit a predominance for visuospatial processing in the left visual field (left VF). Both anatomical as well as evolutionary arguments have been adopted in accounting for these variations in function. Preceding upper and lower VF research has typically investigated either static stimulus perception or the visual processing of upper limb action. The aim of the current research was to investigate whether the lower VF benefits associated with limb control transcend to visual anticipation (the perception of motion). Methods were based on Khan and Lawrence (Exp Brain Res 164:395-398, 2005), who investigated upper/lower VF differences in visuomotor control, but utilising a representational momentum paradigm to isolate perceptual processes. Thirty-two participants were randomised into either a left or right VF group and completed a perceptual computer-based task in the upper and lower VF, where they were required to judge the final position of a moving object before it disappeared. Two aspects of the distributions of same responses were then analysed; the central tendency (weighted means) and the variability. Results revealed that in the left VF, weighted means for the lower VF were significantly greater than for the upper VF [t(14) = 2.242, p = 0.042]. In both left and right VFs, variability was greater in the upper compared to lower VF. This provides new findings regarding visual processes in the different visual fields. While visual search and large scene perception has been found to be superior in the upper VF, here we find that visual anticipation, like target-directed visuomotor skill, is superior in the lower VF.

  16. Anticipating the Future, Influencing the Present: Assessing the Societal Implications of Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Evan S.

    A growing challenge for the American policymaking system is to respond effectively to a wide range of interconnected, complex, long-term science and technology issues. Simultaneously, current approaches and institutions of governance are ill suited to address these multidimensional challenges. As the next generation of innovations in science and technology is arriving at an accelerating rate, the governance system is lagging behind. This realization leads to a vital overarching consideration that steers this study: What approaches are well suited to anticipate the longer-term societal implications of emerging technologies in the 21st Century? This study identifies and examines strategies for anticipating the longer-term societal implications of emerging technologies by way of a qualitative case study. It explores one area of technology (nanotechnology), in one particular governance system (the United States), and with a focus on one high profile non-governmental organization (NGO) involved in addressing a range of nanotechnology's societal and policy implications: the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (PEN). Based at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, PEN's goal was to ensure "that as nanotechnologies advance, possible risks are minimized, public and consumer engagement remains strong, and the potential benefits of these new technologies are realized." The conceptual framework of anticipatory governance guides the research, which offers a real-world example about how anticipatory governance applies in the nongovernmental sector and shows how this idea links to broader theoretical debates about the policymaking process. The study's main conclusion is that PEN utilized a set of interconnected strategies related to advancing foresight, operating in a boundary-spanning role, and promoting communications and public engagement in its attempt to influence, anticipate, and shape the societal implications of emerging technologies. The findings are

  17. Mathematical Modeling and Analysis of Network Service Failure in DataCentre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FaizaAyub Syed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available World has become a global village. With the advent of technology, the concept of Cloud Computing has evolved a lot. Cloud computing offers various benefits in terms of storage, computation, cost and flexibility. It focuses on delivering combination of technological components such as applications, platforms, infrastructure, security and web hosted services over the internet. One of the major elements of Cloud Computing infrastructure is Data centre. Companies host there applications and services online through Data centres, whose probability of downtime is expected to be very low. Since, data centre consists of number of servers; the rate of service failure is usually high. In this paper we have analysed service failure rate of a conventional data centre. The Fault Trend of network failure by assuming there occurrence as a Poisson Process was made. The accurate prediction of fault rate helps in managing the up gradation, replacement and other administrative issues of data centre components.

  18. Anticipation - the underlying science of sport. Report on research in progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadin, Mihai

    2015-05-01

    Professional sport practitioners intuitively acknowledge anticipation. Sports researchers sometimes discuss it. Still, there is little data-based evidence to characterize the role anticipation plays in human performance. Even less documented is the distinction between reaction and anticipation. This text presents the real-time quantification environment developed as an AnticipationScope™. Based on a very large data harvest from this experimental set-up, hypotheses regarding the role of anticipation in sport are advanced. The conclusion is that while preparation and reaction play an important role in sports performance, in the final analysis anticipation distinguishes the professional from other sport practitioners. Work in progress is presented with the aim of engaging the community of researchers in the design of alternative methods for quantifying anticipation and for processing the data. Generalization from sport to human performance is one of the intended outcomes of this research.

  19. Overcoming the Educational Time Warp: Anticipating a Different Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Jacobs

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Education abridges the time required for individual and social progress by preserving and propagating the essence of human experience. It delivers to youth the accumulated knowledge of countless past generations in an organized and abridged form, so that future generations can start off with all the capacities acquired by their predecessors. However, today education confronts a serious dilemma. We are living in an educational time warp. There is a growing gap between contemporary human experience and what is taught in our educational system and that gap is widening rapidly with each passing year. Today humanity confronts challenges of unprecedented scope, magnitude and intensity. The incremental development of educational content and pedagogy in recent decades has not kept with the ever-accelerating pace of technological and social evolution. Education is also subject to a generational time warp resulting from the fact that many of today’s teachers were educated decades ago during very different times and based on different values and perspectives. The challenge of preparing youth for the future is exasperated by the fact that the future for which we are educating youth does not yet exist and to a large extent is unknown or unknowable. The resulting gap between the content of education and societal needs inhibits our capacity to anticipate and effectively respond to social problems. All these factors argue for a major reorientation of educational content and pedagogy from transmission of acquired knowledge based on past experience to development of the knowledge, skills and capacities of personality needed in a future we cannot clearly envision. We may not be able to anticipate the precise nature of the future, but we can provide an education based on the understanding that it will be very different from the present. In terms of content, the emphasis needs to shift from facts regarding the actual state of affairs in the past, present and

  20. Perceptions of an Anticipated Bilingual Education Program in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozfidan, Burhan; Burlbaw, Lynn; Kuo, Li-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Bilingual education is globally an important aspect within the educational community in recent years. The purpose of the study is to explore perceptions towards a bilingual education program and investigate factors that may affect the development of a bilingual education program in Turkey. This study also identifies the benefits of bilingualism in…

  1. Scheduling participants of Assessment Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jens; Løber, Janni

      Assessment Centres are used as a tool for psychologists and coaches to observe a number of dimensions in a person's behaviour and test his/her potential within a number of chosen focus areas. This is done in an intense course, with a number of different exercises which expose each participant......'s ability level in the chosen focus areas. The participants are observed by assessors with the purpose of gathering material for reaching a conclusion on each participant's personal profile. We consider the particular case that arises at the company Human Equity (www.humanequity.dk), where Assessment...

  2. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity in dysphoria during reward and punishment anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Jessica; Brinkmann, Kerstin

    2015-03-01

    Hyposensitivity to reward in depression and dysphoria has been found in behavioral and neuroimaging studies. For punishment responsiveness, some studies showed hyposensitivity to punishment while other studies demonstrated hypersensitivity. Only few studies have addressed the motivational question as to whether depressed individuals mobilize less effort in anticipation of a positive or a negative consequence. The present study aimed at investigating reward and punishment responsiveness in subclinical depression from an effort mobilization perspective. Working on a recognition memory task, one third of the participants could earn small amounts of money, one third could lose small amounts of money, and one third could neither earn nor lose money. Effort mobilization was operationalized as participants' cardiovascular reactivity during task performance. As expected, reactivity of cardiac pre-ejection period and heart rate was higher in both incentive conditions compared to the neutral condition for nondysphorics, while it was blunted across conditions for dysphorics. Moreover, the present study found that dysphorics show an altered behavioral response to punishment. These findings thus show that dysphorics present a reduced motivation to obtain a reward or to avoid a punishment in terms of reduced effort-related cardiac reactivity.

  3. Current and anticipated uses of thermal hydraulic codes in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Doo; Chang, Won-Pyo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    In Korea, the current uses of thermal hydraulic codes are categorized into 3 areas. The first application is in designing both nuclear fuel and NSSS. The codes have usually been introduced based on the technology transfer programs agreed between KAERI and the foreign vendors. Another area is in the supporting of the plant operations and licensing by the utility. The third category is research purposes. In this area assessments and some applications to the safety issue resolutions are major activities using the best estimate thermal hydraulic codes such as RELAP5/MOD3 and CATHARE2. Recently KEPCO plans to couple thermal hydraulic codes with a neutronics code for the design of the evolutionary type reactor by 2004. KAERI also plans to develop its own best estimate thermal hydraulic code, however, application range is different from KEPCO developing code. Considering these activities, it is anticipated that use of the best estimate hydraulic analysis code developed in Korea may be possible in the area of safety evaluation within 10 years.

  4. A Bayesian belief network of threat anticipation and terrorist motivations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Davenport, Kristen M.; Schryver, Jack C.

    2010-04-01

    Recent events highlight the need for efficient tools for anticipating the threat posed by terrorists, whether individual or groups. Antiterrorism includes fostering awareness of potential threats, deterring aggressors, developing security measures, planning for future events, halting an event in process, and ultimately mitigating and managing the consequences of an event. To analyze such components, one must understand various aspects of threat elements like physical assets and their economic and social impacts. To this aim, we developed a three-layer Bayesian belief network (BBN) model that takes into consideration the relative threat of an attack against a particular asset (physical layer) as well as the individual psychology and motivations that would induce a person to either act alone or join a terrorist group and commit terrorist acts (social and economic layers). After researching the many possible motivations to become a terrorist, the main factors are compiled and sorted into categories such as initial and personal indicators, exclusion factors, and predictive behaviors. Assessing such threats requires combining information from disparate data sources most of which involve uncertainties. BBN combines these data in a coherent, analytically defensible, and understandable manner. The developed BBN model takes into consideration the likelihood and consequence of a threat in order to draw inferences about the risk of a terrorist attack so that mitigation efforts can be optimally deployed. The model is constructed using a network engineering process that treats the probability distributions of all the BBN nodes within the broader context of the system development process.

  5. Isolating neural correlates of the pacemaker for food anticipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian David Blum

    Full Text Available Mice fed a single daily meal at intervals within the circadian range exhibit food anticipatory activity. Previous investigations strongly suggest that this behaviour is regulated by a circadian pacemaker entrained to the timing of fasting/refeeding. The neural correlate(s of this pacemaker, the food entrainable oscillator (FEO, whether found in a neural network or a single locus, remain unknown. This study used a canonical property of circadian pacemakers, the ability to continue oscillating after removal of the entraining stimulus, to isolate activation within the neural correlates of food entrainable oscillator from all other mechanisms driving food anticipatory activity. It was hypothesized that continued anticipatory activation of central nuclei, after restricted feeding and a return to ad libitum feeding, would elucidate a neural representation of the signaling circuits responsible for the timekeeping component of the food entrainable oscillator. Animals were entrained to a temporally constrained meal then placed back on ad libitum feeding for several days until food anticipatory activity was abolished. Activation of nuclei throughout the brain was quantified using stereological analysis of c-FOS expressing cells and compared against both ad libitum fed and food entrained controls. Several hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei remained activated at the previous time of food anticipation, implicating them in the timekeeping mechanism necessary to track previous meal presentation. This study also provides a proof of concept for an experimental paradigm useful to further investigate the anatomical and molecular substrates of the FEO.

  6. A Bayesian Belief Network of Threat Anticipation and Terrorist Motivations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Allgood, Glenn O [ORNL; Davenport, Kristen M [ORNL; Schryver, Jack C [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Recent events highlight the need for efficient tools for anticipating the threat posed by terrorists, whether individual or groups. Antiterrorism includes fostering awareness of potential threats, deterring aggressors, developing security measures, planning for future events, halting an event in process, and ultimately mitigating and managing the consequences of an event. To analyze such components, one must understand various aspects of threat elements like physical assets and their economic and social impacts. To this aim, we developed a three-layer Bayesian belief network (BBN) model that takes into consideration the relative threat of an attack against a particular asset (physical layer) as well as the individual psychology and motivations that would induce a person to either act alone or join a terrorist group and commit terrorist acts (social and economic layers). After researching the many possible motivations to become a terrorist, the main factors are compiled and sorted into categories such as initial and personal indicators, exclusion factors, and predictive behaviors. Assessing such threats requires combining information from disparate data sources most of which involve uncertainties. BBN combines these data in a coherent, analytically defensible, and understandable manner. The developed BBN model takes into consideration the likelihood and consequence of a threat in order to draw inferences about the risk of a terrorist attack so that mitigation efforts can be optimally deployed. The model is constructed using a network engineering process that treats the probability distributions of all the BBN nodes within the broader context of the system development process.

  7. Early effects of reward anticipation are modulated by dopaminergic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thore Apitz

    Full Text Available The abilities to predict future rewards and assess the value of reward delivery are crucial aspects of adaptive behavior. While the mesolimbic system, including dopaminergic midbrain, ventral striatum and prefrontal cortex have long been associated with reward processing, recent studies also indicate a prominent role of early visual brain regions. However, the precise underlying neural mechanisms still remain unclear. To address this issue, we presented participants with visual cues predicting rewards of high and low magnitudes and probability (2 × 2 factorial design, while neural activity was scanned using magnetoencephalography. Importantly, one group of participants received 150 mg of the dopamine precursor levodopa prior to the experiment, while another group received a placebo. For the placebo group, neural signals of reward probability (but not magnitude emerged at ∼ 100 ms after cue presentation at occipital sensors in the event-related magnetic fields. Importantly, these probability signals were absent in the levodopa group indicating a close link. Moreover, levodopa administration reduced oscillatory power in the high (20-30 Hz and low (13-20 Hz beta band during both reward anticipation and delivery. Taken together, our findings indicate that visual brain regions are involved in coding prospective reward probability but not magnitude and that these effects are modulated by dopamine.

  8. [Circadian regulation of sleep-wake cycles and food anticipation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Wataru

    2012-06-01

    The circadian clock is crucial for efficient physiological function and drives the temporal regulation of the sleep-wake state, metabolism, and behavior. The timing of food intake and the accompanying behavior are both controlled by the internal clock, which is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN is considered as the master clock because the circadian rhythms for most physiological and behavioral processes are terminated after SCN ablation. The molecular framework of circadian oscillations can be best studied in the SCN. A "core" set of circadian clock genes form autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loops that are believed to drive daily rhythms in individual cells. These clock genes are expressed in a circadian manner not only in the SCN but also in other parts of the brain and many peripheral tissues. Mammals can anticipate a predictable daily mealtime through entrainment of circadian oscillators. Because the restriction of food availability to a specific time of the day elicits anticipatory behavior even after ablation of the SCN, such behaviour is assumed to be controlled by another circadian oscillator. In this paper, we have (1) reviewed studies involving the identification of the circadian clock and (2) aimed to elucidate the complex mechanism underlying feeding-associated rhythms by achieving a deep understanding of the circadian phenotypes of the SCN.

  9. Neighbourhood Centres – Organisation, Management and Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    public subsidy. Some of the centres have high number of users on a daily basis, whereas others are only rarely used. It is explored how organisation, management and financial set-up differs among the centres. Quantitative data on financial issues and annual accounts of fifteen centres were analysed......From the late 1990s neighbourhood centres were brought to the fore of public urban regen-eration policy, because they were seen as a means to accelerate the formation of social capital in deprived urban neighbourhoods. A number of such local community centres were established with substantial...... to identify different financial models and analyse economic sustainability. As regards organisational and management models data were collected through documentary sources and by means of personal interviews and field visits to ten centres. Even within the analysed limited population of centres economic...

  10. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  11. Regulating emotion in the context of interpersonal decisions: The role of anticipated pride and regret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Job eVan Der Schalk

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent theories about the relation between emotion and behavior hold that social behavior is influenced not only by the experience of emotion, but also by the anticipation of emotion. We argue that anticipating future emotional states is an emotion regulation strategy when it leads to a change in behavior. In the current studies we examined how construal of a fair or an unfair situation in terms of positive or negative anticipated emotions influences the fairness of subsequent behavior. We used the Ultimatum Bargaining Game--an experimental game in which participants divide a resource between themselves and another person--as a social situation that offers the opportunity to engage in fair and unfair behavior. In Study 1 we used an autobiographical recall task to manipulate anticipated emotions. Although the task did not influence anticipated emotions directly, results showed that anticipated pride about fair behavior increased levels of fairness, whereas anticipated pride about unfair behavior decreased levels of fairness. Similarly, anticipated regret about fair behavior decreased levels of fairness, whereas anticipated regret about unfair behavior increased levels of fairness. In Study 2 we replicated this pattern of findings, and found that participants who thought about their anticipated emotions (pride or regret in relation to unfair behavior behaved more fairly. We discuss these findings in relation to theories of emotion regulation and economic decision-making.

  12. The new AMS control centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    Construction work for the future AMS control room began in November 2010 and should be finished this June. The new building, which will have been completed in record time thanks to the professionalism of the project team, will soon be ready to receive the initial data from the AMS experiment.     Luigi Scibile and Michael Poehler, from the GS department, at the AMS control centre construction site.   The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is due to wing its way towards the International Space Station (ISS) on board the shuttle Discovery in April. Mainly intended for research on antimatter and dark matter, the data collected by AMS will be sent to Houston in the United States and then directly to CERN’s new Building 946. Construction work for the AMS control centre building on the Route Gentner at CERN’s Prévessin site started in November 2010 and must be completed in time to receive the first data from the spectrometer in June. “It normall...

  13. THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE SPECIFIC TO THE STUDENT-CENTRED EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remus Dorel Rosca

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present socio-economic realities demand the necessity of a paradigm change in the Romanian academic education, in order to promote the student centred education at strategic and operational level. This could not be accomplished without promoting a specific organizational culture. This would change the role of the universities from the diploma providers to value competence and providers for the employee and/or entrepreneur status of the students and also for their status as responsible citizens. The conclusions of the paper will help the decision factors of the upper educational system in Romania to be aware of the importance of promoting the organizational culture specific to the student-centred education as a condition of increasing the satisfaction of all the stakeholders involved (employer, teacher, student with considerable benefits for the universities and the Romanian economy's competitiveness.

  14. School uniforms: tradition, benefit or predicament?

    OpenAIRE

    Van Aardt, Annette Marie; Wilken, Ilani

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the controversies surrounding school uniforms. Roleplayers in this debate in South Africa are parents, learners and educators, and arguments centre on aspects such as identity, economy and the equalising effect of school uniforms, which are considered in the literature to be benefits. Opposing viewpoints highlight the fact that compulsory uniforms infringe on learners’ constitutional rights to self-expression. The aim of this research was to determine the perspectives ...

  15. THE TIME DOMAIN SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: VARIABLE SELECTION AND ANTICIPATED RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Eracleous, Michael; Brandt, William Nielsen [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kelly, Brandon [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Badenes, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Bañados, Eduardo [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Borissova, Jura [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Casilla 5030, and Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS), Santiago (Chile); Burgett, William S. [GMTO Corp, Suite 300, 251 S. Lake Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Chambers, Kenneth, E-mail: emorganson@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2015-06-20

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg{sup 2} selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  16. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can ... yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a ...

  17. Anticipating market effects of new uses for whey and evaluating returns to research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagtas, J V; Hutchinson, F M; Krochta, J M; Sumner, D A

    2003-05-01

    As U.S. dairy farms continue to become more productive, increasing demand is a key to improved economic prospects for the dairy industry. One way to expand demand for dairy products is to find new, economically viable uses for milk. Ex ante economic analysis of new uses for agricultural products anticipates the potential market effects of innovations, and provides a basis for evaluating investment in research and development and setting research priorities. This study evaluated potential economic effects of new applications of films and coatings made from whey protein. An economic simulation model was used to predict the likely effects of the innovations on dairy markets. Cost comparisons with existing technologies and interviews with industry officials were the basis for evaluating potential for commercial adoption of the innovations. The economic simulation model traces the projected increased demand for whey through the markets for dairy products and milk. The associated increased demand for milk could result in benefits to U.S. milk producers of $123.0 million in present value terms, compared to a research cost of $ 4.9 million, with the dairy industry, consumers, and taxpayers all contributing. Interpreting the cost of the research program as an investment on behalf of milk producers, the benefits to producers from development of new whey uses represent an annual rate of return between 28 and 33%. These results are useful for evaluating further investment in the whey research program. The methods illustrated here are applicable to the evaluation of a wide range of research and promotion efforts.

  18. Powering the Future Data Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe

    2010-01-01

    . Considering the input impendence of fuel cell and super-cap, the small-signal stability of cascaded converter is analyzed. The system small-signal model is rebuilt and controllers for current loop and voltage loop are designed to obtain good transient performance. Through analysis and synthesis......The extended run Uninterruptible Power Supply system (UPSs) which powered by fuel cells and supercapcitors, is a promising solution for future data centre to obtain environmentfriendly energy efficient and cost effective. There are many challenges in power electronic interface circuits, because...... of the characteristics of these two power sources: long warm-up stage and low dynamics for fuel cell, and variable terminal voltage for supercapacitors. The motivation for this project was to find ways which can overcome those limitations to integrate fuel cells and supercapcitors to the system with high efficiency...

  19. Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator (EEBC) was developed to assist organizations in estimating the environmental benefits of greening their purchase,...

  20. Criteria of Categorizing Logistics and Distribution Centres

    OpenAIRE

    Darko Babić; Anđelko Šćukanec; Kristijan Rogic

    2011-01-01

    Logistics and distribution centres represent very significant infrastructure elements of the macro-logistic system. The creation of the logistics and distribution centres and their connection into a wide (global) network have resulted in the creation of conditions for an adequate distribution of labour and significant increase in the productivity of all the logistics elements and processes, noting that the logistics and distribution centres in this concept have a superregional significance. ...

  1. Smart work centres in rural areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Anne Birte

    This paper discusses the establishment of telework centres as an element in local development strategies in rural areas, with a particular view to two new telework centres in region North Denmark. The paper argues that telework centres do not represent an easy solution to problems of local develo...... development and environmental sustainability, and further, that technology may not even be the most important feature needed to make them function as such....

  2. Activities of Radiation Protection Centre in 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Radiat. Prot. Cent. Vilnius

    2001-01-01

    Description of the activities of Radiation Protection Centre in 2000 is presented. Radiation Protection Centre is responsible for radiation protection issues. Currently there are six departments at Radiation Protection Centre: two in Vilnius - Department of Radiation Protection Supervision and Control and Department of Programs and Expertise, and four in the districts. Brief information on subject controlled by each departments is provided focusing on main achievements and events.

  3. A promising poison information centre model for Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Marks

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: A number of benefits might result from such a poisons centre network hub, including: (1 Improved cooperation between countries on poisoning problems; (2 Harmonisation and strengthening of research and surveillance; (3 Common standards and best practices e.g. regulating chemicals, data management, and staff training; and (4 Greater bargaining power to secure resources. Further investigation is needed to identify the most suitable location for the network hub, the activities it should fulfil, and the availability of specialists in poisons information who could become members of the hub.

  4. Crater Morphologies on Pluto and Charon: Anticipating New Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P.; Bray, V. J.; McKinnon, W. B.; White, O. L.; Moore, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Impact craters are among the few geologic features we have some confidence will be present in the Pluto/Charon system. Crater morphologies are important as tracers of thermal history (through the mechanism of viscous relaxation), and can be used to probe through icy crusts (in terms of excavating deeper layers as on Ganymede or penetrating through floating ice shells as on Europa). New Horizons will have the opportunity to examine crater morphologies on Pluto to resolutions Charon to ~250 meters over significant areas. Stereo-derived topography maps are anticipated over 20-35% of each body. The first task will be to place the observed craters (assuming they are not deeply eroded) into Solar System context. Crater morphology on icy satellites is controlled primarily by surface gravity. Charon has similar surface gravity to the icy Saturnian satellites and we expect craters on Charon to resemble those seen by Cassini, where the dominant landform will be prominent central peaks. Pluto surface gravity is midway between Ganymede and Rhea. Triton, with similar surface gravity and internal composition to Pluto, is of no help due to the paucity of resolved craters there. This opens the possibility of observing landforms seen on Ganymede, such as central dome craters, palimpsests and perhaps even a multiring basin or two, albeit at larger diameters than we would see on Ganymede. Several issues complicate our rosy picture. A key unresolved concern is that impact velocities in the Pluto system are only a few km/s, in the low end of the hypervelocity range. Numerical models imply possible differences during excavation, producing deeper simple craters than on the icy satellites. Impacts occurring at velocities well below the mean (topographic data sets is unclear. Any viscous relaxation (driven by internal or modest tidal heating) or mass wasting erosion (by volatile redistribution) will also work to reduce crater depths on Pluto in different ways, but cratering onto the likely

  5. Anticipating Interruptions. Security and risk in a liberalized electricity infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvast, A.

    2013-11-01

    During the past ten years, a number of social scientists have emphasized the importance of material infrastructures like electricity supply as a research topic for the social sciences. The developing of such new perspectives concerning infrastructures also includes uncertainties and risks. This research analyzes the management of uncertainties in the Finnish electricity infrastructure by posing the following research question: how are electricity interruptions, or blackouts, anticipated in Finland and how are these interruptions managed as risks? The main research methodology of the work is multi-sited field work. The empirical materials include interviews with experts and lay people (33 interviews); participant observation in two electricity control rooms; an electricity consumer survey (115 respondents); and also a number of infrastructure and security policy documents and observations from electricity security seminars. The materials were primarily gathered between 2004 and 2008. Social science research often links risks with major current social changes or socio-cultural risk perceptions. In recent international social science discussions, however, a new research topic has emerged - those styles of reasoning and techniques of governance that are deployed to manage risk as a practical matter. My study explores these themes empirically by focusing on the specific habitual practices of risk management in the Finnish electricity infrastructure. The work develops various also semi-ethnographic inquiries into infrastructure risk techniques like monitor screening of real-time risks in electricity control rooms; the management of risks in a liberalized electricity market; the emergence of Finnish reasoning about blackouts from a specific historical background; and the ways in which electricity consumers respond to blackouts in their homes. In addition, the work reflects upon the position of a risk researcher in those situations when the research subjects do not define

  6. CLIMATE CHANGE – BETWEEN COSTS AND BENEFITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN VALENTINA RĂDULESCU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change – between costs and benefits. At global and regional levels the effects of climate change start to show up. While some of the countries make efforts to alleviate these effects and to find solutions, others are facing economic or political restrains that prevent them in applying the principle of common responsibility. The complex social, economic, and environmental implications of climate change’s effects focused a growing part of research on the analysis of costs and benefits. Although controversial, one of the methods used – the cost-benefit analysis – revealed that in most of the cases the prevention costs are lower than the costs of inaction. Prevention measures bring benefits by anticipating the impact and minimizing the risks for ecosystems and economy. The paper presents in its first part the controversies regarding the cost-benefit analysis, and continues, in the second part, with estimations on costs and benefits of certain policy instruments that target emission reduction.

  7. Criteria of Categorizing Logistics and Distribution Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Babić

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Logistics and distribution centres represent very significant infrastructure elements of the macro-logistic system. The creation of the logistics and distribution centres and their connection into a wide (global network have resulted in the creation of conditions for an adequate distribution of labour and significant increase in the productivity of all the logistics elements and processes, noting that the logistics and distribution centres in this concept have a superregional significance. This paper represents the summary (results of the research that was carried out on a large number of logistics and distribution centres with the aim of considering the complexity and the issues related to the logistics and distribution centres and the distribution network, their elements and action of the subsystems according to the following criteria: spatial, technical, technological, and organizational, with the aim of defining the categorisation model of the logistics and distribution centres. The analysis of the selected data collected during the research has resulted in defining of the categorisation model of the logistics and distribution centres which foresees six categories. Each of the foreseen categories has been defined according to the set model by the mentioned traffic, technical and technological, and organisational characteristics and the level of service. This is precisely where the application of the categorisation model of the logistics and distribution centres can be found, which will define the relevant categories of the centres applicable in the creation of effective distribution

  8. Anticipation or ascertainment bias in schizophrenia? Penrose`s familial mental illness sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, A.S. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)]|[Queen Street Mental health Centre, Toronto (Canada); Husted, J. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-03-01

    Several studies have observed anticipation (earlier age at onset [AAO] in successive generations) in familial schizophrenia. However, whether true anticipation or ascertainment bias is the principal originating mechanism remains unclear. In 1944 L.S. Penrose collected AAO data on a large, representative sample of familial mental illness, using a broad ascertainment strategy. These data allowed examination of anticipation and ascertainment biases in five two-generation samples of affected relative pairs. The median intergenerational difference (MID) in AAO was used to assess anticipation. Results showed significant anticipation in parent-offspring pairs with schizophrenia (n = 137 pairs; MID 15 years; P = .0001) and in a positive control sample with Huntington disease (n = 11; P = .01). Broadening the diagnosis of the schizophrenia sample suggested anticipation of severity of illness. However, other analyses provided evidence for ascertainment bias, especially in later-AAO parents, in parent-offspring pairs. Aunt/uncle-niece/nephew schizophrenia pairs showed anticipation (n = 111; P = .0001), but the MID was 8 years and aunts/uncles had earlier median AAO than parents. Anticipation effects were greatest in pairs with late-AAO parents but remained significant in a subgroup of schizophrenia pairs with early parental AAO (n = 31; P = .03). A small control sample of other diseases had MID of 5 years but no significant anticipation (n = 9; F = .38). These results suggest that, although ascertainment-bias effects were observed in parent-offspring pairs, true anticipation appears to be inherent in the transmission of familial schizophrenia. The findings support investigations of unstable mutations and other mechanisms that may contribute to true anticipation in schizophrenia. 37 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Pioneering better science through the 3Rs: an introduction to the national centre for the replacement, refinement, and reduction of animals in research (NC3Rs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Natalie; Chapman, Kathryn; Sewell, Fiona; Robinson, Vicky

    2015-03-01

    The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement, and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) is an independent scientific organization that is based in the United Kingdom, which was set up by the government to lead the discovery and application of new technologies and approaches that minimize the use of animals in research and improve animal welfare. The NC3Rs uses a range of strategies to improve and advance science through application of the 3Rs. These include funding basic research, open innovation (CRACK IT), and programs run by inhouse scientists. We present several case studies from the NC3Rs portfolio, featuring asthma research, the use of nonhuman primates in monoclonal antibody development, and CRACK IT. Finally, we anticipate the future, as we use our experience to move into new research fields and expand toward international collaboration. Here we highlight how equipping scientists with relevant and emerging 3Rs tools can help overcome the challenges and limitations of the use of animals in research to the benefit of the whole bioscience community.

  10. Conserving critical sites for biodiversity provides disproportionate benefits to people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank W Larsen

    Full Text Available Protecting natural habitats in priority areas is essential to halt the loss of biodiversity. Yet whether these benefits for biodiversity also yield benefits for human well-being remains controversial. Here we assess the potential human well-being benefits of safeguarding a global network of sites identified as top priorities for the conservation of threatened species. Conserving these sites would yield benefits--in terms of a climate change mitigation through avoidance of CO(2 emissions from deforestation; b freshwater services to downstream human populations; c retention of option value; and d benefits to maintenance of human cultural diversity--significantly exceeding those anticipated from randomly selected sites within the same countries and ecoregions. Results suggest that safeguarding sites important for biodiversity conservation provides substantial benefits to human well-being.

  11. How stakeholders frame dam removal: The role of current and anticipated future ecosystem service use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Kate; Adamowski, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Many river restoration projects, including dam removal, are controversial and can trigger conflicts between stakeholders who are for and against the proposed project. The study of environmental conflicts suggests that differences in how stakeholders 'frame', or make sense of a situation based on their prior knowledge and experiences, can perpetuate conflicts. Understanding different stakeholders' frames, particularly how they converge, can form the basis of successful conflict resolution. In the case of dam removals, it is often assumed that emphasising increased provision of ecosystem services can be a point of convergence between those advocating for ecological restoration and those opposed to removal because of negative human impacts. However, how exactly stakeholders frame a contentious proposed dam removal and how those frames relate to ecosystem services has been little studied. Here we used the case of a potential dam removal in New Brunswick to investigate how people frame the issue and how that relates to their current and anticipated future use of ecosystem services. Based on in-depth interviews with 30 stakeholders in the area, including both people for and against dam removal, we found that both groups currently used ecosystem services and were in favour of ecosystem protection. However, they differed in how they framed the issue of the potential dam removal. The group against dam removal framed the issue as one of loss and risk - they thought that any potential benefits to the ecosystem would be outweighed by the high risk of negative social impacts caused by a loss of access to ecosystem services, such as recreation and aesthetic enjoyment. By contrast, the group in favour of the dam framed the issue as one of opportunity and justice. They thought that following a short transition period, all stakeholders would benefit from the restored river, particularly from a restored salmon fishery, improved aesthetic appeal and the long-term sustainability of an

  12. The impact of group composition and attitudes towards diversity on anticipated outcomes of diversity in groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oudenhoven-van der Zee, Karen; Paulus, Paul; Vos, Menno; Parthasarathy, Niveditha

    2009-01-01

    In two studies, students evaluated group pictures of workgroups of varying ethnic and gender composition with respect to anticipated affective and productive outcomes. The impact of level of diversity, faultlines and individual differences in diversity attitudes on anticipated outcomes were examined

  13. Contributions from eye movement potentials to stimulus preceding negativity during anticipation of auditory stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engdahl, Lis; Bjerre, Vicky K; Christoffersen, Gert R J

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive anticipation of a stimulus has been associated with an ERP called "stimulus preceding negativity" (SPN). A new auditory delay task without stimulus-related motor activity demonstrated a prefrontal SPN, present during attentive anticipation of sounds with closed eyes, but absent during...

  14. The relative importance of different perceptual-cognitive skills during anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Jamie S; Hope, Ed; Williams, A Mark

    2016-10-01

    We examined whether anticipation is underpinned by perceiving structured patterns or postural cues and whether the relative importance of these processes varied as a function of task constraints. Skilled and less-skilled soccer players completed anticipation paradigms in video-film and point light display (PLD) format. Skilled players anticipated more accurately regardless of display condition, indicating that both perception of structured patterns between players and postural cues contribute to anticipation. However, the Skill×Display interaction showed skilled players' advantage was enhanced in the video-film condition, suggesting that they make better use of postural cues when available during anticipation. We also examined anticipation as a function of proximity to the ball. When participants were near the ball, anticipation was more accurate for video-film than PLD clips, whereas when the ball was far away there was no difference between viewing conditions. Perceiving advance postural cues appears more important than structured patterns when the ball is closer to the observer, whereas the reverse is true when the ball is far away. Various perceptual-cognitive skills contribute to anticipation with the relative importance of perceiving structured patterns and advance postural cues being determined by task constraints and the availability of perceptual information.

  15. Effects of component-subscription network topology on large-scale data centre performance scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Sriram, Ilango

    2010-01-01

    Modern large-scale date centres, such as those used for cloud computing service provision, are becoming ever-larger as the operators of those data centres seek to maximise the benefits from economies of scale. With these increases in size comes a growth in system complexity, which is usually problematic. There is an increased desire for automated "self-star" configuration, management, and failure-recovery of the data-centre infrastructure, but many traditional techniques scale much worse than linearly as the number of nodes to be managed increases. As the number of nodes in a median-sized data-centre looks set to increase by two or three orders of magnitude in coming decades, it seems reasonable to attempt to explore and understand the scaling properties of the data-centre middleware before such data-centres are constructed. In [1] we presented SPECI, a simulator that predicts aspects of large-scale data-centre middleware performance, concentrating on the influence of status changes such as policy updates or ...

  16. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy: Single centre experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Farrell, N J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is an attractive alternative to the traditional open approach in the surgical excision of an adrenal gland. It has replaced open adrenalectomy in our institution and we review our experience to date. METHODS: All cases of laparoscopic adrenalectomies in our hospital over eight years (from 2001 to May 2009) were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, diagnosis, length of hospital stay, histology and all operative and post-operative details were evaluated. RESULTS: Fifty-five laparoscopic adrenalectomies (LA) were performed on 51 patients over eight years. The mean age was 48 years (Range 16-86 years) with the male: female ratio 1:2. Twenty-three cases had a right adrenalectomy, 24 had a left adrenalectomy and the remaining four patients had bilateral adrenalectomies. 91% were successfully completed laparoscopically with five converted to an open approach. Adenomas (functional and non functional) were the leading indication for LA, followed by phaeochromocytomas. Other indications for LA included Cushing\\'s disease, adrenal malignancies and rarer pathologies. There was one mortality from necrotising pancreatitis following a left adrenalectomy for severe Cushing\\'s disease, with subsequent death 10 days later. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is effective for the treatment of adrenal tumours, fulfilling the criteria for the ideal minimally invasive procedure. It has replaced the traditional open approach in our centre and is a safe and effective alternative. However, in the case of severe Cushing\\'s disease, laparoscopic adrenalectomy has the potential for significant adverse outcomes and mortality.

  17. Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre - preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, L H; Roed-Petersen, J; Menné, T

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anaphylactoid reactions in anaesthesia are rare and should ideally be investigated in specialist centres. At Gentofte University Hospital, we established such a centre in 1998 as a joint venture between the Departments of Anaesthesiology and Dermatology. We present the methodology, di...

  18. Oil Trading Centre to Reopen in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Chinese oil companies will likely resume activities at the oil trading centre in Shanghai this year, a move to further liberalize the once tightly controlled oil market. The centre will trade forward contracts for refined oil products,including gasoline, diesel oil, kerosene and fuel oil, industrial sources said.

  19. The Press Research Centre, 1956-1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press Research Centre, Krakow (Poland).

    In 1956, the Press Research Centre was established in Cracow, Poland by a group of journalists and publishers, for the purpose of instituting press research that would have practical applications. The aims of the Centre were to conduct studies on the history of the Polish press, the contemporary press, press readership, and editorial techniques.…

  20. Anticipation Driving Behavior and Related Reduction of Energy Consumption in Traffic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Wei, Yan-Fang; Song, Tao; Dai, Shi-Qiang; Dong, Li-Yun

    In view that drivers would pay attention to the variation of headway on roads, an extended optimal velocity model is proposed by considering anticipation driving behavior. A stability criterion is given through linear stability analysis of traffic flows. The mKdV equation is derived with the reductive perturbation method for headway evolution which could be used to describe the stop-and-go traffic phenomenon. The results show a good effect of anticipation driving behavior on the stabilization of car flows and the anticipation driving behavior can improve the numerical stability of the model as well. In addition, the fluctuation of kinetic energy and the consumption of average energy in congested traffic flows are systematically analyzed. The results show that the reasonable level of anticipation driving behavior can save energy consumption in deceleration process effectively and lead to an associated relation like a "bow-tie" between the energy-saving and the value of anticipation factor.

  1. Showing Your Pride: A National Survey of Queer Student Centres in Canadian Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, John; Rae, Jennifer; Bassi, Amandeep

    2015-01-01

    The presence of queer student centres (QSCs) across Canadian universities and colleges is largely unknown. It is an important area of investigation since queer-identified students have previously identified several benefits of these services, including receiving support from other queer individuals. The focus of the current study was to determine…

  2. The role of the sexual assault centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Eogan, Maeve

    2013-02-01

    Sexual Assault Centres provide multidisciplinary care for men and women who have experienced sexual crime. These centres enable provision of medical, forensic, psychological support and follow-up care, even if patients chose not to report the incident to the police service. Sexual Support Centres need to provide a ring-fenced, forensically clean environment. They need to be appropriately staffed and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to allow prompt provision of medical and supportive care and collection of forensic evidence. Sexual Assault Centres work best within the context of a core agreed model of care, which includes defined multi-agency guidelines and care pathways, close links with forensic science and police services, and designated and sustainable funding arrangements. Additionally, Sexual Assault Centres also participate in patient, staff and community education and risk reduction. Furthermore, they contribute to the development, evaluation and implementation of national strategies on domestic, sexual and gender-based violence.

  3. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  4. Anticipation-related brain connectivity in bipolar and unipolar depression: a graph theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manelis, Anna; Almeida, Jorge R C; Stiffler, Richelle; Lockovich, Jeanette C; Aslam, Haris A; Phillips, Mary L

    2016-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is often misdiagnosed as major depressive disorder, which leads to inadequate treatment. Depressed individuals versus healthy control subjects, show increased expectation of negative outcomes. Due to increased impulsivity and risk for mania, however, depressed individuals with bipolar disorder may differ from those with major depressive disorder in neural mechanisms underlying anticipation processes. Graph theory methods for neuroimaging data analysis allow the identification of connectivity between multiple brain regions without prior model specification, and may help to identify neurobiological markers differentiating these disorders, thereby facilitating development of better therapeutic interventions. This study aimed to compare brain connectivity among regions involved in win/loss anticipation in depressed individuals with bipolar disorder (BDD) versus depressed individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) versus healthy control subjects using graph theory methods. The study was conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and included 31 BDD, 39 MDD, and 36 healthy control subjects. Participants were scanned while performing a number guessing reward task that included the periods of win and loss anticipation. We first identified the anticipatory network across all 106 participants by contrasting brain activation during all anticipation periods (win anticipation + loss anticipation) versus baseline, and win anticipation versus loss anticipation. Brain connectivity within the identified network was determined using the Independent Multiple sample Greedy Equivalence Search (IMaGES) and Linear non-Gaussian Orientation, Fixed Structure (LOFS) algorithms. Density of connections (the number of connections in the network), path length, and the global connectivity direction ('top-down' versus 'bottom-up') were compared across groups (BDD/MDD/healthy control subjects) and conditions (win/loss anticipation). These analyses showed that

  5. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Sory Diarra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics in feed (growth promoters need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2,600 regulated chicken producers. There are several antibiotics approved as feed additives available for poultry farmers. Feed recipes and mixtures greatly vary geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While sporadic reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno

  6. Improving the layout of recycling centres by use of lean production principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, Erik; Björkman, Mats; Eklund, Mats; Eklund, Jörgen; Engkvist, Inga-Lill

    2011-06-01

    There has been increased focus on recycling in Sweden during recent years. This focus can be attributed to external environmental factors such as tougher legislation, but also to the potential gains for raw materials suppliers. Recycling centres are important components in the Swedish total recycling system. Recycling centres are manned facilities for waste collection where visitors can bring, sort and discard worn products as well as large-sized, hazardous, and electrical waste. The aim of this paper was to identify and describe the main flows and layout types at Swedish recycling centres. The aim was also to adapt and apply production theory for designing and managing recycling centre operations. More specifically, this means using lean production principles to help develop guidelines for recycling centre design and efficient control. Empirical data for this research was primarily collected through interviews and questionnaires among both visitors and employees at 16 Swedish recycling centres. Furthermore, adapted observation protocols have been used in order to explore visitor activities. There was also close collaboration with a local recycling centre company, which shared their layout experiences with the researchers in this project. The recycling centres studied had a variety of problems such as queues of visitors, overloading of material and improper sorting. The study shows that in order to decrease the problems, the recycling centres should be designed and managed according to lean production principles, i.e. through choosing more suitable layout choices with visible and linear flows, providing better visitor information, and providing suitable technical equipment. Improvements can be achieved through proper planning of the layout and control of the flow of vehicles, with the result of increased efficiency and capacity, shorter visits, and cleaner waste fractions. The benefits of a lean production mindset include increased visitor capacity, waste

  7. Holistic design : learning from the Learning Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, C. [Charles Simon Architect and Planner, Eden Mills, ON, (Canada); McKee, C. [Kitchener-Waterloo YMCA Outdoor Services, ON (Canada)

    2004-08-01

    The energy efficiency of several solar technologies currently in operation at the Kitchener-Waterloo YMCA's Environmental Learning Centre was evaluated. The off-grid earth-sheltered building dug into a south-facing slope features a sod roof, and protection from north winds by coniferous tree plantations. Passive solar strategies are evaluated, including average indoor temperatures and lighting requirements in both summer and winter. Also evaluated were the centre's ventilation systems, windows and passive heat recovery ventilators (HRVs), solar collectors, masonry heaters, and photovoltaic panels. The centre's composting toilets and use of the Living Machine{sup TM} were also discussed and details of the centre's building materials were provided. Ten straw-bale cabins are currently under construction at the centre, using passive solar strategies for heating, ventilation and cooling and combination propane fired/solar hot water heaters, straw bale building envelope and wood frame roof. Further suggestions for the centre's potential uses, and an outline of the centre's ongoing priorities were outlined. 4 refs.

  8. The relationship between action anticipation and emotion recognition in athletes of open skill sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Ling; Lin, Chia-Yen

    2016-08-01

    Action anticipation plays an important role in the successful performance of open skill sports, such as ball and combat sports. Evidence has shown that elite athletes of open sports excel in action anticipation. Most studies have targeted ball sports and agreed that information on body mechanics is one of the key determinants for successful action anticipation in open sports. However, less is known about combat sports, and whether facial emotions have an influence on athletes' action anticipation skill. It has been suggested that the understanding of intention in combat sports relies heavily on emotional context. Based on this suggestion, the present study compared the action anticipation performances of taekwondo athletes, weightlifting athletes, and non-athletes and then correlated these with their performances of emotion recognition. This study primarily found that accurate action anticipation does not necessarily rely on the dynamic information of movement, and that action anticipation performance is correlated with that of emotion recognition in taekwondo athletes, but not in weightlifting athletes. Our results suggest that the recognition of facial emotions plays a role in the action prediction in such combat sports as taekwondo.

  9. How Anticipated and Experienced Stigma Can Contribute to Self-Stigma: The Case of Problem Gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, Nerilee; Russell, Alex M. T.

    2017-01-01

    The degree to which anticipated and experienced public stigma contribute to self-stigma remains open to debate, and little research has been conducted into the self-stigma of problem gambling. This study aimed to examine which aspects of anticipated and experienced stigma (if any) predict the anticipated level of public stigma associated with problem gambling and the degree of self-stigma felt by people experiencing problem gambling. An online survey of 177 Australians experiencing problem gambling examined whether aspects of the public characterization of problem gambling, anticipated reactions to problem gamblers, and experiences of devaluation and discrimination predicted anticipated level of public stigma and self-stigma. The study found that self-stigma increases with expectations that the public applies a range of negative stereotypes to people with gambling problems, holds demeaning and discriminatory attitudes toward them, and considers them to lead highly disrupted lives. These variables directly predicted anticipated level of public stigma and indirectly predicted self-stigma. These findings lend weight to conceptualizations of self-stigma as an internalization of actual or anticipated public stigma. They also highlight the need for stigma reduction efforts, particularly those that lower negative stereotyping and prejudicial attitudes, to improve currently low rates of help-seeking amongst people with gambling problems. PMID:28270787

  10. Regulatory Mode and Risk-Taking: The Mediating Role of Anticipated Regret.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Panno

    Full Text Available We propose that decision maker's regulatory mode affects risk-taking through anticipated regret. In the Study 1 either a locomotion or an assessment orientation were experimentally induced, and in the Studies 2 and 3 these different orientations were assessed as chronic individual differences. To assess risk-taking we used two behavioral measures of risk: BART and hot-CCT. The results show that experimentally induced assessment orientation--compared to locomotion--leads to decreased risk-taking through increased anticipated regret (Study 1. People chronically predisposed to be in the assessment state take less risk through increased anticipated regret (Study 2 and Study 3. Study 2 results also show a marginally non-significant indirect effect of chronic locomotion mode on BART through anticipated regret. Differently, Study 3 shows that people chronically predisposed to be in the locomotion state take greater risk through decreased anticipated regret, when play a dynamic risk task triggering stronger emotional arousal. Through all three studies, the average effect size for the relationship of assessment with anticipated regret was in the moderate-large range, whereas for risk-taking was in the moderate range. The average effect size for the relationship of locomotion with anticipated regret was in the moderate range, whereas for risk-taking was in the small-moderate range. These results increase our understanding of human behavior under conditions of risk obtaining novel insights into regulatory mode theory and decision science.

  11. Regulatory Mode and Risk-Taking: The Mediating Role of Anticipated Regret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panno, Angelo; Lauriola, Marco; Pierro, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We propose that decision maker's regulatory mode affects risk-taking through anticipated regret. In the Study 1 either a locomotion or an assessment orientation were experimentally induced, and in the Studies 2 and 3 these different orientations were assessed as chronic individual differences. To assess risk-taking we used two behavioral measures of risk: BART and hot-CCT. The results show that experimentally induced assessment orientation--compared to locomotion--leads to decreased risk-taking through increased anticipated regret (Study 1). People chronically predisposed to be in the assessment state take less risk through increased anticipated regret (Study 2 and Study 3). Study 2 results also show a marginally non-significant indirect effect of chronic locomotion mode on BART through anticipated regret. Differently, Study 3 shows that people chronically predisposed to be in the locomotion state take greater risk through decreased anticipated regret, when play a dynamic risk task triggering stronger emotional arousal. Through all three studies, the average effect size for the relationship of assessment with anticipated regret was in the moderate-large range, whereas for risk-taking was in the moderate range. The average effect size for the relationship of locomotion with anticipated regret was in the moderate range, whereas for risk-taking was in the small-moderate range. These results increase our understanding of human behavior under conditions of risk obtaining novel insights into regulatory mode theory and decision science.

  12. Medicare Hospice Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Medicare Hospice Benefits This official government booklet includes information about Medicare hospice benefits: Who’s eligible for hospice care What services are included in hospice ...

  13. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You ... activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging. Exercise or Physical Activity? Some people may wonder what ...

  14. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do Like most people, ... active on a regular basis is one of the healthiest things you can do for yourself. Studies ...

  15. The Economic Benefits Analysis of the Carbon Sink Effect on the Reforestation Project in the Centre Guizhou Province%黔中喀斯特地区退耕还林项目的碳汇经济效益分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦树林; 艾其帅

    2011-01-01

    The increasing unceasingly of the global atmospheric CO2 concentration will lead to global climate change caused by the greenhouse effect of the atmospheric CO2, which sharply challenges the sustainable development of the human society. Atmospheric carbon reduction has become the consensus of human society. As China's carbon sinks market development and gradually improvement, returning farmland to forest carbon sinks in the economic value of benefits will become increasingly prominent. In this study, the program of the returning farmland to forests were surveyed in the Hongfenghu Basin Drainage area,mainly tree species in the region of Lin Chinese fir, cedar, peach, plum, apricot, camptothecin, such as seven kinds of bungei Carbon trees a preliminary estimate of net reserves during the time from 2000 to 2006. There would be 1.05x104kg forest carbon storage in all of the Hongfenghu Basin Drainage during the next 5 years from 2000 to 2006. The carbon storage and carbon density of the forest, especially the young growth forest have an increasing trend with the plants growing time lengthened, and the young growth will play an increasing potential for the carbon sequestration. The volumes of the forest carbon sequestration were calculated through the trees on the forecast volume, the study in the seven kinds of trees, the fir is to examine the regional carbon sink function of strong trees, Japanese cedar, followed by fruit trees of the carbon sink function of the weakest. There would be 2.21 × 104kg forest carbon storage in all of the Hongfenghu Basin Drainage during the next 10 years, and would generate the economic benefits of 7.17×106 yuan according to the analysis on the economic benefits of the carbon sequestration by 305 yuan per a ton in prices.%由大气CO2浓度不断增加引起的温室效应而导致全球气候变化对人类社会的可持续发展构成了巨大挑战,大气碳的减排增汇已经成为人类社会的共识.随着我国碳汇交易市

  16. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, P; van Eldik, J; McCance, G; Panzer-Steindel, B; Coelho dos Santos, M; Traylen, S; Schwickerath, U

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project’s motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  17. Modelling total energy costs of sports centres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussabaine, A.H.; Kirkham, R.J.; Grew, R.J. [Liverpool Univ., School of Architecture and Building Engineering, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-07

    Providing and maintaining safe and comfortable conditions in sport centres raises many issues, particularly cost. The paper gives an overview of the factors associated with sport centre servicing and attempts to highlight the governing factors associated with this, particularly energy costs. A total of 19 sport centres in the City of Liverpool in the UK are investigated, using data elicited from the Liverpool Leisure Services Directorate. The energy operating costs were analysed using statistical methods. Six models were developed to predict total energy costs. Testing and validation results showed a high level of model accuracy. The models would be of use to professionals involved in feasibility studies at the design stage. (Author)

  18. Potential of Natural Ventilation in Shopping Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Alice; Friis, Kristina; Brohus, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is a fundamental requirement for a well performing shopping centre. This paper contains a pilot study of the potential of using hybrid ventilation (a combination of automatically controlled natural and mechanical ventilation - respectively NV and MV......) in shopping centres with focus on both the achieved IEQ and energy consumptions for air movement. By thermal building simulations it is found that there exists an interesting potential for hybrid ventilation of shopping centres, which can lead to great savings in the electrical energy consumptions...... for ventilation and cooling without compromising IEQ....

  19. New centre for intelligent mining systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, W.

    2002-10-01

    A Centre for Intelligent Mining Systems has been opened by the University of Alberta's Computing Science Department, a collaborative effort by the University and Syncrude Canada Ltd. The objective of the new Centre is to apply technologies in the area of artificial intelligence and robotics to the problems of surface mining. The Centre has already attracted attention from other players within the industry and a long-term funding proposal by a consortium that includes Syncrude is in the works. Noranda Inc and Inco Inc have also shown interest.

  20. Planetary Radars Operating Centre PROC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catallo, C.; Flamini, E.; Seu, R.; Alberti, G.

    2007-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) plays an important role in Italy. Numerous scientific international space programs are currently carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry), provided by ASI either as contribution to ESA programs either within a NASA/ASI joint venture framework, are now operating: MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation three Italian dedicated operational centers have been realized, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD ( Processing Altimetry Data). Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution. Although they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). PROC is conceived in order to include the three operational centers, namely SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD, either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view. The Planetary Radar Processing Center shall be conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs. Therefore, scalability, easy use and management shall be the design drivers. The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. Furthermore, in the frame of

  1. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do ... can do for yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a lot ...

  2. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do ... can do for yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a lot ...

  3. A new lattice hydrodynamic traffic flow model with a consideration of multi-anticipation effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Chuan; Sun Di-Hua; Yang Shu-Hong

    2011-01-01

    We present a new multi-anticipation lattice hydrodynamic model based on the traffic anticipation effect in the real world.Applying the linear stability theory,we obtain the linear stability condition of the model.Through nonlinear analysis,we derive the modified Korteweg-de Vries equation to describe the propagating behaviour of a traffic density wave near the critical point.The good agreement between the simulation results and the analytical results shows that the stability of traffic flow can be enhanced when the multi-anticipation effect is considered.

  4. Anticipation in the synchronization of chaotic semiconductor lasers with optical feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoller, C

    2001-03-26

    The synchronization of chaotic semiconductor lasers with optical feedback is studied numerically in a one-way coupling configuration, in which a small amount of the intensity of one laser (master laser) is injected coherently into the other (slave laser). A regime of anticipated synchronization is found, in which the intensity of the slave laser is synchronized to the future chaotic intensity of the master laser. Anticipation is robust to small noise and parameter mismatches, but in this case the synchronization is not complete. It is also shown that anticipated synchronization occurs in coupled time-delay systems, when the coupling has a delay that is less than the delay of the systems.

  5. Anticipation and subjectivity: A commentary on an early text by Lacan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomme, David; Hoens, Dominiek

    2000-05-01

    In his 1945 paper Lacan discusses a sophism to exemplify crucial moments in the becoming of a human subject. One of these moments is the anticipation of an identity. This anticipatory decision is confirmed in a subsequent logical reasoning. In our paper we will present the sophism in its details and will focus on the essential moment of anticipation. The further (and sometimes implicit) reworking of this notion by Lacan shows that, according to psychoanalysis, anticipation is an important mechanism that involves time and the presence of the other.

  6. Density waves in a lattice hydrodynamic traffic flow model with the anticipation effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Min; Sun Di-Hua; Tian Chuan

    2012-01-01

    By introducing the traffic anticipation effect in the real world into the original lattice hydrodynamic model,we present a new anticipation effect lattice hydrodynamic (AELH) model,and obtain the linear stability condition of the model by applying the linear stability theory.Through nonlinear analysis,we derive the Burgers equation and Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation,to describe the propagating behaviour of traffic density waves in the stable and the metastable regions,respectively.The good agreement between simulation results and analytical results shows that the stability of traffic flow can be enhanced when the anticipation effect is considered.

  7. Scenario drafting to anticipate future developments in technology assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retèl Valesca P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health Technology Assessment (HTA information, and in particular cost-effectiveness data is needed to guide decisions, preferably already in early stages of technological development. However, at that moment there is usually a high degree of uncertainty, because evidence is limited and different development paths are still possible. We developed a multi-parameter framework to assess dynamic aspects of a technology -still in development-, by means of scenario drafting to determine the effects, costs and cost-effectiveness of possible future diffusion patterns. Secondly, we explored the value of this method on the case of the clinical implementation of the 70-gene signature for breast cancer, a gene expression profile for selecting patients who will benefit most from chemotherapy. Methods To incorporate process-uncertainty, ten possible scenarios regarding the introduction of the 70-gene signature were drafted with European experts. Out of 5 most likely scenarios, 3 drivers of diffusion (non-compliance, technical failure, and uptake were quantitatively integrated in a decision-analytical model. For these scenarios, the cost-effectiveness of the 70-gene signature expressed in Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs was compared to clinical guidelines, calculated from the past (2005 until the future (2020. Results In 2005 the ICER was €1,9 million/quality-adjusted-life-year (QALY, meaning that the 70-gene signature was not yet cost-effective compared to the current clinical guideline. The ICER for the 70-gene signature improved over time with a range of €1,9 million to €26,145 in 2010 and €1,9 million to €11,123/QALY in 2020 depending on the separate scenario used. From 2010, the 70-gene signature should be cost-effective, based on the combined scenario. The uptake-scenario had strongest influence on the cost-effectiveness. Conclusions When optimal diffusion of a technology is sought, incorporating process

  8. Towards Human-Centred Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Liam J.

    The field of HCI has evolved and expanded dramatically since its origin in the early 1980’s. The HCI community embraces a large community of researchers and practitioners around the world, from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds in the human and social sciences, engineering and informatics, and more recently, the arts and design disciplines. This kaleidoscope of cultures and disciplines as seen at INTERACT Conferences provides a rich pool of resources for examining our field. Applications are increasingly exploring our full range of sensory modalities, and merging the digital and physical worlds. WiFi has opened up a huge design space for mobile applications. A focus on usability of products and services has been complemented by an emphasis on engagement, enjoyment and experience. With the advent of ubiquitous computing, and the emergence of “The Internet of Things”, new kinds of more open infrastructures make possible radically new kinds of applications. The sources of innovation have also broadened, to include human and social actors outside of the computing and design organizations. The question is to what extent is our mainstream thinking in the HCI field ready for the challenges of this Brave New World? Do the technological and social innovations that we see emerging require us to re-shape, or even, re-create, our field, or is it a case of a more gradual evolution and development of that which we already know? In this closing Keynote, I will provide a perspective on the evolution and development of the HCI field, looking backwards as well as forwards, in order to determine what are some of the changes of significance in the field. This “broad-brush” approach to what I term “ human-centred design” will be complemented by the examination of specific projects and applications, to help anchor some of the discussion. Areas such as user-centred design, participatory design, computer-supported cooperative work and learning, and interaction design, in

  9. Occupational deprivation in an asylum centre:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morville, Anne-Le; Erlandsson, Lena-Karin

    2013-01-01

    explored the participants’ occupational history and its influence on their occupations in the asylum centre. A thematic analysis showed that the participants had been subjected to occupational disruption and deprivation by politically oppressive systems even before their flight. Their occupations...

  10. Symmetric centres of braided monoidal categories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of‘symmetric centres' of braided monoidal categories. Let H be a Hopf algebra with bijective antipode over a field k. We address the symmetric centre of the Yetter-Drinfel'd module category HH(yD) and show that a left Yetter-Drinfel'd module M belongs to the symmetric centre of HH(yD) if and only if M is trivial. We also study the symmetric centres of categories of representations of quasitriangular Hopf algebras and give a sufficient and necessary condition for the braid of H(M) to induce the braid of (H(H)(A),(○)A,A,φ,l,r), or equivalently, the braid of (A#H(H),(○)A,A,φ,l,r), where A is a quantum commutative H-module algebra.

  11. Identity Theft: A Study in Contact Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, Iain; Weir, George R. S.

    This paper explores the recent phenomenon of identity theft. In particular, it examines the contact centre environment as a mechanism for this to occur. Through a survey that was conducted amongst forty-five contact centre workers in the Glasgow area we determined that contact centres can and do provide a mechanism for identity theft. Specifically, we found a particularly high incidence of agents who had previously dealt with phone calls that they considered suspicious. Furthermore, there are agents within such environments who have previously been offered money in exchange for customers' details, or who know of fellow workers who received such offers. Lastly, we identify specific practices within contact centres that may contribute to the likelihood of identity theft.

  12. Social innovation for People-Centred Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars; P.K., Shajahan

    2013-01-01

    Social innovation is closely related to the people-centred development (PCD) framework of knowledge production. The discussion of PCD in this chapter particularly expands on the feature of empowerment and socio-political mobilization of people in social innovation......Social innovation is closely related to the people-centred development (PCD) framework of knowledge production. The discussion of PCD in this chapter particularly expands on the feature of empowerment and socio-political mobilization of people in social innovation...

  13. Blunted ventral striatal responses to anticipated rewards foreshadow problematic drug use in novelty-seeking adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchel, Christian; Peters, Jan; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Bromberg, Uli; Conrod, Patricia J.; Flor, Herta; Papadopoulos, Dimitri; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Walter, Henrik; Ittermann, Bernd; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paillère-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Poustka, Luise; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael N.; Gallinat, Juergen; Schumann, Gunter; Knutson, Brian; Arroyo, Mercedes; Artiges, Eric; Aydin, Semiha; Bach, Christine; Barbot, Alexis; Barker, Gareth; Bruehl, Ruediger; Cattrell, Anna; Constant, Patrick; Crombag, Hans; Czech, Katharina; Dalley, Jeffrey; Decideur, Benjamin; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Fadai, Tahmine; Fauth-Buhler, Mira; Feng, Jianfeng; Filippi, Irinia; Frouin, Vincent; Fuchs, Birgit; Gemmeke, Isabel; Genauck, Alexander; Hanratty, Eanna; Heinrichs, Bert; Heym, Nadja; Hubner, Thomas; Ihlenfeld, Albrecht; Ing, Alex; Ireland, James; Jia, Tianye; Jones, Jennifer; Jurk, Sarah; Kaviani, Mehri; Klaassen, Arno; Kruschwitz, Johann; Lalanne, Christophe; Lanzerath, Dirk; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Lemaitre, Hervé; Macare, Christine; Mallik, Catherine; Mar, Adam; Martinez-Medina, Lourdes; Mennigen, Eva; de Carvahlo, Fabiana Mesquita; Mignon, Xavier; Millenet, Sabina; Miranda, Ruben; Müller, Kathrin; Nymberg, Charlotte; Parchetka, Caroline; Pena-Oliver, Yolanda; Pentilla, Jani; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Quinlan, Erin Burke; Rapp, Michael; Ripke, Stephan; Ripley, Tamzin; Robert, Gabriel; Rogers, John; Romanowski, Alexander; Ruggeri, Barbara; Schmäl, Christine; Schmidt, Dirk; Schneider, Sophia; Schubert, Florian; Schwartz, Yannick; Sommer, Wolfgang; Spanagel, Rainer; Speiser, Claudia; Spranger, Tade; Stedman, Alicia; Stephens, Dai; Strache, Nicole; Ströhle, Andreas; Struve, Maren; Subramaniam, Naresh; Theobald, David; Vetter, Nora; Vulser, Helene; Weiss, Katharina; Whelan, Robert; Williams, Steve; Xu, Bing; Yacubian, Juliana; Yu, Tao; Ziesch, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Novelty-seeking tendencies in adolescents may promote innovation as well as problematic impulsive behaviour, including drug abuse. Previous research has not clarified whether neural hyper- or hypo-responsiveness to anticipated rewards promotes vulnerability in these individuals. Here we use a longitudinal design to track 144 novelty-seeking adolescents at age 14 and 16 to determine whether neural activity in response to anticipated rewards predicts problematic drug use. We find that diminished BOLD activity in mesolimbic (ventral striatal and midbrain) and prefrontal cortical (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) regions during reward anticipation at age 14 predicts problematic drug use at age 16. Lower psychometric conscientiousness and steeper discounting of future rewards at age 14 also predicts problematic drug use at age 16, but the neural responses independently predict more variance than psychometric measures. Together, these findings suggest that diminished neural responses to anticipated rewards in novelty-seeking adolescents may increase vulnerability to future problematic drug use. PMID:28221370

  14. Students' anticipated situational engagement: the roles of teacher behavior, personal engagement, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Jochem; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2009-09-01

    Among 9th-grade students (248 girls, 255 boys) from a large multiethnic school, the authors examined 2 aspects of anticipated situational engagement in relation to 3 types of hypothetical teacher behavior: authoritarian, authoritative, permissive. Furthermore, the authors investigated the moderating roles of students' personal (trait-like) engagement and gender. Multilevel analyses showed differential effects of teacher behavior type. Anticipated situational engagement was generally highest with the authoritative teacher and lowest with the authoritarian teacher. However, students' personal engagement and gender qualified these effects. The effects of the authoritative and authoritarian teachers versus the permissive teachers on anticipated situational engagement were more positive (or less negative) for students with high versus low personal engagement. Also, the positive effects of the authoritative and permissive teachers versus the authoritarian teacher were stronger for female students than for male students. Results show that anticipated situational engagement should be understood by examining the combined influences of contextual and individual characteristics.

  15. Perturbation and Stability Analysis of the Multi-Anticipative Intelligent Driver Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi-Qun; Xie, Wei-Jun; Shi, Jing; Shi, Qi-Xin

    This paper discusses three kinds of IDM car-following models that consider both the multi-anticipative behaviors and the reaction delays of drivers. Here, the multi-anticipation comes from two ways: (1) the driver is capable of evaluating the dynamics of several preceding vehicles, and (2) the autonomous vehicles can obtain the velocity and distance information of several preceding vehicles via inter-vehicle communications. In this paper, we study the stability of homogeneous traffic flow. The linear stability analysis indicates that the stable region will generally be enlarged by the multi-anticipative behaviors and reduced by the reaction delays. The temporal amplification and the spatial divergence of velocities for local perturbation are also studied, where the results further prove this conclusion. Simulation results also show that the multi-anticipative behaviors near the bottleneck will lead to a quicker backwards propagation of oscillations.

  16. Protecting against natural hazards - Information seeking behaviour in anticipation of severe weather events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuring, Jelmer

    2011-01-01

    Protection against natural hazards - Information seeking behaviour in anticipation of severe weather events Severe weather events can have considerable impact on society, including tourism organisations and tourists. Providing accurate and timely information about possible risks due to environmental

  17. How Stakeholder Sensing and Anticipations Shape the Firm’s Strategic Response Capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Carina Antonia; Andersen, Torben Juul; Ooi, Can-Seng

    We outline a strategic response capability framework drawing on cognitive neuroscience to explain stakeholder sensing and anticipations as essential input to environmental analysis. Stakeholders receive stimuli from ongoing interactions with the firm and thereby sense current environmental changes...

  18. Predicting dynamic behavior via anticipating synchronization in coupled pendulum-like systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiyun; Yang, Ying

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, the regime of anticipating synchronization (sometimes called predicted synchronization) in a class of nonlinear dynamical systems is investigated by testing the global asymptotical stability of time-delayed error dynamics. Sufficient conditions in terms of linear matrix inequalities are established for anticipating synchronization between such systems with and without state time delay. These results allow one to predict the dynamic behavior of the systems by using a copy of the same system that performs as a slave. Moreover, the cascaded anticipating synchronization is concerned such that several slave systems could anticipate the same master system with different delays. Concrete applications to phase-locked loops demonstrate the applicability and validity of the proposed results.

  19. Neurobiological underpinnings of reward anticipation and outcome evaluation in gambling disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Gambling disorder is characterized by persistent and recurrent maladaptive gambling behavior, which leads to clinically significant impairment or distress. The disorder is associated with dysfunctions in the dopamine system. The dopamine system codes reward anticipation and outcome evaluation. Re...

  20. The Imperial College Thermophysical Properties Data Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, S.; Cole, W. A.; Craven, R.; de Reuck, K. M.; Trengove, R. D.; Wakeham, W. A.

    1986-07-01

    The IUPAC Thermodynamic Tables Project Centre in London has at its disposal considerable expertise on the production and utilization of high-accuracy equations of state which represent the thermodynamic properties of substances. For some years they have been content to propagate this information by the traditional method of book production, but the increasing use of the computer in industry for process design has shown that an additional method was needed. The setting up of the IUPAC Transport Properties Project Centre, also at Imperial College, whose products would also be in demand by industry, afforded the occasion for a new look at the problem. The solution has been to set up the Imperial College Thermophysical Properties Data Centre, which embraces the two IUPAC Project Centres, and for it to establish a link with the existing Physical Properties Data Service of the Institution of Chemical Engineers, thus providing for the dissemination of the available information without involving the Centres in problems such as those of marketing and advertising. This paper outlines the activities of the Centres and discusses the problems in bringing their products to the attention of industry in suitable form.

  1. Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engkvist, I-L; Eklund, J; Krook, J; Björkman, M; Sundin, E

    2016-11-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to draw combined, all-embracing conclusions based on a long-term multidisciplinary research programme on recycling centres in Sweden, focussing on working conditions, environment and system performance. A second aim is to give recommendations for their development of new and existing recycling centres and to discuss implications for the future design and organisation. Several opportunities for improvement of recycling centres were identified, such as design, layout, ease with which users could sort their waste, the work environment, conflicting needs and goals within the industry, and industrialisation. Combining all results from the research, which consisted of different disciplinary aspects, made it possible to analyse and elucidate their interrelations. Waste sorting quality was recognized as the most prominent improvement field in the recycling centre system. The research identified the importance of involving stakeholders with different perspectives when planning a recycling centre in order to get functionality and high performance. Practical proposals of how to plan and build recycling centres are given in a detailed checklist.

  2. The role of medial frontal gyrus in action anticipation in professional badminton players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Xu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Some studies show that the medial frontal cortex is associated with more skilled action anticipation, while similar findings are not observed in some other studies, possibly due to the stimuli employed and the participants used as the control group. In addition, no studies have investigated whether there is any functional connectivity between the medial frontal cortex and other brain regions in more skilled action anticipation. Therefore, the present study aimed to re-investigate how the medial frontal cortex is involved in more skilled action anticipation by circumventing the limitations of previous research and to investigate that the medial frontal cortex functionally connected with other brain regions involved in action processing in more skilled action anticipation. To this end, professional badminton players and novices were asked to anticipate the landing position of the shuttlecock while watching badminton match videos or to judge the gender of the players in the matches. The video clips ended right at the point that the shuttlecock and the racket came into contact to reduce the effect of information about the trajectory of the shuttlecock. Novices who lacked training and watching experience were recruited for the control group to reduce the effect of sport-related experience on the medial frontal cortex. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD activation was assessed by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Compared to novices, badminton players exhibited stronger activation in the left medial frontal cortex during action anticipation and greater functional connectivity between left medial frontal cortex and some other brain regions (e.g., right posterior cingulate cortex. Therefore, the present study supports the position that the medial frontal cortex plays a role in more skilled action anticipation and that there is a specific brain network for more skilled action anticipation that involves right posterior cingulate

  3. Know Before You Do: Anticipating Maneuvers via Learning Temporal Driving Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    features/index.htm. Accessed: 2014-09-30. [3] Google self driving car . http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Google driverless car . Accessed: 2014-10-11. [4...anticipation a challenging problem. In this work we anticipate driving maneuvers a few seconds before they occur. For this purpose we equip a car with...cameras and a computing device to capture the context from both inside and outside of the car . We represent the context with expressive features and

  4. On the interactions between top-down anticipation and bottom-up regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Tani

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance of anticipation and regression in modeling cognitive behavior. The meanings of these cognitive functions are explained by describing our proposed neural network model which has been implemented on a set of cognitive robotics experiments. The reviews of these experiments suggest that the essences of embodied cognition may reside in the phenomena of the break-down between the top-down anticipation and the bottom-up regression and in its recovery process.

  5. Conceptual Approximations to Juvenile Politics: Demodernization, Moral Anticipation and Life Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eliécer Martínez Posada

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The central thesis of this essay is the understanding of juvenile collective dynamics as political forms of demodernization, moral anticipation and life politics, viewing its academic productions as zombie categories, unable to understand the dynamics of new times and the juvenile collective dynamics, interpreted as the moral anticipation and distanciation from forms of social proscription or deviation label. Emphasis is placed on the alternative political dimension of the juvenile collective dynamics, noted as political forms of life.

  6. Visualization in a Climate Computing Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Fleischer, Karin; Röber, Niklas; Böttinger, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Today, the extensive numerical simulations of climate models require elaborate visualization for understanding and communicating the results. Typical data sets of climate models are 3-dimensional, multivariate and time dependent, and can hence be very large. Interactive visual data analysis improves and accelerates the comprehension of these vast amounts of data. At DKRZ, the German Climate Computing Centre, a central high end visualization server, various domain specific visualization applications, and a remote 3D rendering solution enable users to interactively visualize their extensive model results right at their desktops. The DKRZ's visualization server is a heterogeneous Linux cluster, currently consisting of 10 state of the art visualization nodes equipped with 96 -256 GB RAM and high end NVidia GPUs. Since the parallel file system of the DKRZ's supercomputer is directly mounted over a powerful network, the model data can directly be analyzed and visualized. VirtualGL and TurboVNC are used for utilizing the server's GPUs for 3D rendering, while the TurboVNC client on the user's local computer continuously displays the resulting video stream. By using this central visualization server instead of a local computer, three main benefits are achieved: Time consuming transfers of large data sets from the supercomputer to the local computer are not needed. The hardware of the user's local workstation doesn't need to be powerful, no expensive GPU is required. Users don't have to install or buy visualization software. On the visualization server, a wide range of visualization software is installed. Avizo Green, a powerful commercial software customized for interactive 3D visualization of climate model data, is available, as well as SimVis and ParaView, which focus more on an exploratory visualization of data. SimVis and ParaView provide techniques like Linking & Brushing to emphasize or de-emphasize portions of the data. Furthermore, some domain specific 2D graphics

  7. Benefits from Network "Parasitology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornudd, Elin

    1976-01-01

    Discussion of experience gained by the Finnish central library for technology in off-line use of computer-based services, both selective dissemination of information and retrospective searches offered by the Royal Institute of Technology Library and the Biomedical Documentation Centre in Stockholm, as well as the Technological Library of Denmark…

  8. Neural correlates of anticipation and processing of performance feedback in social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Carina Y; Peterburs, Jutta; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Hallfarth, Marlit C; Böhme, Stephanie; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Straube, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Fear of negative evaluation, such as negative social performance feedback, is the core symptom of social anxiety. The present study investigated the neural correlates of anticipation and perception of social performance feedback in social anxiety. High (HSA) and low (LSA) socially anxious individuals were asked to give a speech on a personally relevant topic and received standardized but appropriate expert performance feedback in a succeeding experimental session in which neural activity was measured during anticipation and presentation of negative and positive performance feedback concerning the speech performance, or a neutral feedback-unrelated control condition. HSA compared to LSA subjects reported greater anxiety during anticipation of negative feedback. Functional magnetic resonance imaging results showed deactivation of medial prefrontal brain areas during anticipation of negative feedback relative to the control and the positive condition, and medial prefrontal and insular hyperactivation during presentation of negative as well as positive feedback in HSA compared to LSA subjects. The results indicate distinct processes underlying feedback processing during anticipation and presentation of feedback in HSA as compared to LSA individuals. In line with the role of the medial prefrontal cortex in self-referential information processing and the insula in interoception, social anxiety seems to be associated with lower self-monitoring during feedback anticipation, and an increased self-focus and interoception during feedback presentation, regardless of feedback valence.

  9. Long Term Effects of Hazard Anticipation Training on Novice Drivers Measured on the Open Road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Thalia G G; Masserang, Kathleen M; Pradhan, Anuj K; Divekar, Gautam; Samuel, Siby; Muttart, Jeffrey W; Pollatsek, Alexander; Fisher, Donald L

    2011-01-01

    (a) The purpose of this study was to determine whether novice drivers that were trained to anticipate hazards did so better than novice drivers who were not so trained immediately after training and up to one year after training occurred. (b) Novice drivers who had held their restricted license for about one month were randomly assigned to a PC-based hazard anticipation training program (RAPT) or a placebo (control) training program. The programs took about one hour to complete. The effects of training were assessed in a field drive by using patterns of eye movements to assess whether drivers anticipated a potential unseen hazard. (c) The effects of training persisted over time. In the field test immediately after training, the RAPT group anticipated the hazards 65.8% of the time whereas; the control group anticipated them only 47.3% of the time. Six or more months later, the groups were brought back for a second field test and the effects of training did not diminish; the RAPT group anticipated the hazards 61.9% of the time compared to 37.7% for the control group.

  10. A magnetoencephalography study of multi-modal processing of pain anticipation in primary sensory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, R; Burgess, R C; Plow, E B; Floden, D P; Machado, A G

    2015-09-24

    Pain anticipation plays a critical role in pain chronification and results in disability due to pain avoidance. It is important to understand how different sensory modalities (auditory, visual or tactile) may influence pain anticipation as different strategies could be applied to mitigate anticipatory phenomena and chronification. In this study, using a countdown paradigm, we evaluated with magnetoencephalography the neural networks associated with pain anticipation elicited by different sensory modalities in normal volunteers. When encountered with well-established cues that signaled pain, visual and somatosensory cortices engaged the pain neuromatrix areas early during the countdown process, whereas the auditory cortex displayed delayed processing. In addition, during pain anticipation, the visual cortex displayed independent processing capabilities after learning the contextual meaning of cues from associative and limbic areas. Interestingly, cross-modal activation was also evident and strong when visual and tactile cues signaled upcoming pain. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and mid-cingulate cortex showed significant activity during pain anticipation regardless of modality. Our results show pain anticipation is processed with great time efficiency by a highly specialized and hierarchical network. The highest degree of higher-order processing is modulated by context (pain) rather than content (modality) and rests within the associative limbic regions, corroborating their intrinsic role in chronification.

  11. Analysis of the question-answer service of the Emma Children's Hospital information centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruisinga, Frea H; Heinen, Richard C; Heymans, Hugo S A

    2010-07-01

    The information centre of the Emma Children's Hospital AMC (EKZ AMC) is a specialised information centre where paediatric patients and persons involved with the patient can ask questions about all aspects of disease and its social implications. The aim of the study was to evaluate the question-answer service of this information centre in order to determine the role of a specialised information centre in an academic children's hospital, identify the appropriate resources for the service and potential positive effects. For this purpose, a case management system was developed in MS ACCESS. The characteristics of the requester and the question, the time it took to answer questions, the information sources used and the extent to which we were able to answer the questions were registered. The costs of the service were determined. We analysed all questions that were asked in the year 2007. Fourteen hundred thirty-four questions were asked. Most questions were asked by parents (23.3%), healthcare workers (other than nurses; 16.5%) and nurses (15.3%). The scope of the most frequently asked questions include disease (20.2%) and treatment (13.0%). Information on paper was the main information source used. Most questions could be solved within 15 min. Twelve percent to 28% of total working hours are used for the question-answer service. Total costs including staff salary are rather large. In conclusions, taking over the task of providing additional medical information and by providing readily available, good quality information that healthcare professionals can use to inform their patients will lead to less time investment of these more expensive staff members. A specialised information service can anticipate on the information need of parents and persons involved with the paediatric patient. It improves information by providing with relatively simple resources that has the potential to improve patient and parent satisfaction, coping and medical results. A specialised

  12. Transmission of HIV in dialysis centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velandia, M; Fridkin, S K; Cárdenas, V; Boshell, J; Ramirez, G; Bland, L; Iglesias, A; Jarvis, W

    1995-06-01

    In August, 1993, 13 dialysis patients at one dialysis centre in Colombia, South America, were found to be HIV positive, and this prompted an epidemiological investigation. We carried out a cohort study of all dialysis centre patients during January, 1992 to December, 1993 (epidemic period) to determine risk factors for HIV seroconversion. Haemodialysis and medical records were reviewed, dialysis centre staff and surviving patients were interviewed, and dialysis practices were observed. Stored sera from all dialysis centre patients were tested for HIV antibody. 12 (52%) of 23 patients tested positive for HIV antibody by enzyme immunoassay and western blot during the epidemic period. Of the 23 tested, 9 (39%) converted from HIV antibody negative to positive (seroconverters) and 10 (44%) remained HIV negative (seronegatives). The HIV seroconversion rate was higher among patients dialysed at the centre while a new patient, who was HIV seropositive, was dialysed there (90% vs 0%; p dialysis centre reprocessed access needles, dialysers, and bloodlines (60% vs 0%). While 2 of 9 HIV seroconverters had had sex with prostitutes, none had received unscreened blood products or had other HIV risk factors. No surgical or dental procedures were associated with HIV seroconversion. Dialysers were reprocessed separately with 5% formaldehyde and were labelled for use on the same patient. Access needles were reprocessed by soaking them in a common container with a low-level disinfectant, benzalkonium chloride; 4 pairs of needles were placed in one pan creating the potential for cross-contamination or use of one patient's needles on another patient. HIV transmission at the dialysis centre was confirmed. Improperly reprocessed patient-care equipment, most probably access needles, is the likely mechanism of transmission. This outbreak was discovered by accident and similar transmission may be occurring in many other countries where low-level disinfectants are used to sterilise critical

  13. Transit Benefit Program Data -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data set contains information about any US government agency participating in the transit benefits program, funding agreements, individual participating Federal...

  14. Altered brain activity during reward anticipation in pathological gambling and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Seok Choi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathological gambling (PG and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD are conceptualized as a behavioral addiction, with a dependency on repetitive gambling behavior and rewarding effects following compulsive behavior, respectively. However, no neuroimaging studies to date have examined reward circuitry during the anticipation phase of reward in PG compared with in OCD while considering repetitive gambling and compulsion as addictive behaviors. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate the neural activities specific to the anticipation phase of reward, we performed event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in young adults with PG and compared them with those in patients with OCD and healthy controls. Fifteen male patients with PG, 13 patients with OCD, and 15 healthy controls, group-matched for age, gender, and IQ, participated in a monetary incentive delay task during fMRI scanning. Neural activation in the ventromedial caudate nucleus during anticipation of both gain and loss decreased in patients with PG compared with that in patients with OCD and healthy controls. Additionally, reduced activation in the anterior insula during anticipation of loss was observed in patients with PG compared with that in patients with OCD which was intermediate between that in OCD and healthy controls (healthy controls < PG < OCD, and a significant positive correlation between activity in the anterior insula and South Oaks Gambling Screen score was found in patients with PG. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased neural activity in the ventromedial caudate nucleus during anticipation may be a specific neurobiological feature for the pathophysiology of PG, distinguishing it from OCD and healthy controls. Correlation of anterior insular activity during loss anticipation with PG symptoms suggests that patients with PG fit the features of OCD associated with harm avoidance as PG symptoms deteriorate. Our findings have identified functional disparities and

  15. Scavenger hunt in the CERN Computing Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    Hidden among the racks of servers and disks in the CERN Computing Centre, you’ll find Hawaiian dancers, space aliens, gorillas… all LEGO® figurines! These characters were placed about the Centre for the arrival of Google’s Street View team for the world to discover.   PLEASE NOTE THAT THE COMPETITION IS OVER. ONLY FOR REFERENCE, HERE IS THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE. We’re pleased to announce our first global scavenger hunt! Spot three LEGO® figurines using Google’s Street View and you’ll be entered to win a gift of your choice from our CERN Gift Guide. A LEGO® figurine in the CERN Computing Centre, as seen on Google Street View. Here are the details: Find at least three LEGO® figurines hidden around the CERN Computing Centre using Google Street View.   Take screencaps of the figurines and e-mail the pictures to TreasureHunt-ComputingCentre@cern.ch. This email is no longer active.   The...

  16. Visits to Tier-1 Computing Centres

    CERN Multimedia

    Dario Barberis

    At the beginning of 2007 it became clear that an enhanced level of communication is needed between the ATLAS computing organisation and the Tier-1 centres. Most usual meetings are ATLAS-centric and cannot address the issues of each Tier-1; therefore we decided to organise a series of visits to the Tier-1 centres and focus on site issues. For us, ATLAS computing management, it is most useful to realize how each Tier-1 centre is organised, and its relation to the associated Tier-2s; indeed their presence at these visits is also very useful. We hope it is also useful for sites... at least, we are told so! The usual participation includes, from the ATLAS side: computing management, operations, data placement, resources, accounting and database deployment coordinators; and from the Tier-1 side: computer centre management, system managers, Grid infrastructure people, network, storage and database experts, local ATLAS liaison people and representatives of the associated Tier-2s. Visiting Tier-1 centres (1-4). ...

  17. The Aube centre. 1997 statement; Le centre de l`Aube. Bilan 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Since January 1992 the Aube centre ensures the storage of 90% of the short life radioactive wastes produced in France. This educational booklet describes the organization of the activities in the centre from the storage of wastes to the radioactivity surveillance of the environment (air, surface and ground waters, river sediments, plants and milk). (J.S.)

  18. Hospital benefit segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, D W; Lamb, C W

    1986-12-01

    Market segmentation is an important topic to both health care practitioners and researchers. The authors explore the relative importance that health care consumers attach to various benefits available in a major metropolitan area hospital. The purposes of the study are to test, and provide data to illustrate, the efficacy of one approach to hospital benefit segmentation analysis.

  19. Wellbeing or welfare benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Kristiansen, Maria; Nørredam, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    This debate article debunks the myth that migrants are driven primarily by the size of the welfare benefits in the host country, when they decide where to migrate to. We show that instead of welfare benefits, migrants are driven by a desire for safety, wellbeing, social networks and opportunities...

  20. Learning Styles of Independent Learning Centre Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Uzun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning style research has been a significant field within language teaching and learning. There have been very few attempts, however, to seek possible links between independent learning and learning style preferences. This paper aims to identify the learning styles of students who use the Independent Learning Centre (ILC on a regular basis at a state university in Turkey (n=102. The findings of the learning style analysis revealed that, contrary to expectations, most of the regular users of the centre were synoptic learners, which implies that these learners might not necessarily have conscious control over their own learning processes. An in-depth analysis of learning styles and recommendations to improve the services offered in the centre are also included in the paper.

  1. A day in the CERN Control Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Control Centre (CCC) is the nerve centre of the CERN beam systems. From this room, the experts prepare, monitor, adjust, and control the particle beams that circulate throughout the accelerator complex while ensuring that the services and the technical infrastructure work flawlessly. Buttons, screens, telephones, lights (but no sound): in the CCC, everything is ready to make it possible for the LHC to reach the unprecedented energies expected at Run 2.   Seen from above, the CERN Control Centre resembles the shape of a quadrupole magnet. The consoles are distributed in four circles, called “islands”, dedicated to the LHC, the SPS, the PS Complex and the Technical Infrastructure (TI) respectively. Spread between TI and LHC are the Cryogenics consoles. Being in the same room allows the 24h-manned islands to be constantly in touch with one another, thus ensuring the best performance of the machines. At the LHC island, operators are currently busy training the magnet...

  2. Reflecting on the methodological challenges of recruiting to a United Kingdom-wide, multi-centre, randomised controlled trial in gynaecology outpatient settings

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Successful recruitment of participants to any trial is central to its success. Trial results are routinely published, and recruitment is often cited to be slower and more difficult than anticipated. This article reflects on the methodological challenges of recruiting women with prolapse attending United Kingdom (UK) gynaecology outpatient clinics to a multi-centre randomised controlled trial (RCT) of physiotherapy, and the systems put in place in an attempt to address them. Methods...

  3. Neural signal during immediate reward anticipation in schizophrenia: Relationship to real-world motivation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Karuna; Hooker, Christine I; Biagianti, Bruno; Fisher, Melissa; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Vinogradov, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Amotivation in schizophrenia is a central predictor of poor functioning, and is thought to occur due to deficits in anticipating future rewards, suggesting that impairments in anticipating pleasure can contribute to functional disability in schizophrenia. In healthy comparison (HC) participants, reward anticipation is associated with activity in frontal-striatal networks. By contrast, schizophrenia (SZ) participants show hypoactivation within these frontal-striatal networks during this motivated anticipatory brain state. Here, we examined neural activation in SZ and HC participants during the anticipatory phase of stimuli that predicted immediate upcoming reward and punishment, and during the feedback/outcome phase, in relation to trait measures of hedonic pleasure and real-world functional capacity. SZ patients showed hypoactivation in ventral striatum during reward anticipation. Additionally, we found distinct differences between HC and SZ groups in their association between reward-related immediate anticipatory neural activity and their reported experience of pleasure. HC participants recruited reward-related regions in striatum that significantly correlated with subjective consummatory pleasure, while SZ patients revealed activation in attention-related regions, such as the IPL, which correlated with consummatory pleasure and functional capacity. These findings may suggest that SZ patients activate compensatory attention processes during anticipation of immediate upcoming rewards, which likely contribute to their functional capacity in daily life.

  4. Neural signal during immediate reward anticipation in schizophrenia: Relationship to real-world motivation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuna Subramaniam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amotivation in schizophrenia is a central predictor of poor functioning, and is thought to occur due to deficits in anticipating future rewards, suggesting that impairments in anticipating pleasure can contribute to functional disability in schizophrenia. In healthy comparison (HC participants, reward anticipation is associated with activity in frontal–striatal networks. By contrast, schizophrenia (SZ participants show hypoactivation within these frontal–striatal networks during this motivated anticipatory brain state. Here, we examined neural activation in SZ and HC participants during the anticipatory phase of stimuli that predicted immediate upcoming reward and punishment, and during the feedback/outcome phase, in relation to trait measures of hedonic pleasure and real-world functional capacity. SZ patients showed hypoactivation in ventral striatum during reward anticipation. Additionally, we found distinct differences between HC and SZ groups in their association between reward-related immediate anticipatory neural activity and their reported experience of pleasure. HC participants recruited reward-related regions in striatum that significantly correlated with subjective consummatory pleasure, while SZ patients revealed activation in attention-related regions, such as the IPL, which correlated with consummatory pleasure and functional capacity. These findings may suggest that SZ patients activate compensatory attention processes during anticipation of immediate upcoming rewards, which likely contribute to their functional capacity in daily life.

  5. A novel macro model of traffic flow with the consideration of anticipation optimal velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, G. H.; Song, W.; Peng, Y. J.; Wang, S. H.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a novel macro model which can investigate wide moving jams is derived from car-following model by applying the relationship between the micro and macro variables with the consideration of anticipation optimal velocity on single lane. The theoretic analysis and numerical simulation show that the new macro model of traffic flow can correctly reproduce common evolution of shock, rarefaction wave and local cluster effect under small perturbation, which shows that the congested traffic patterns about wide moving jam propagation are in accordance with empirical results. Furthermore, the results uncover that the anticipation effect can smooth the front of the shock wave and the rarefaction wave, which means that anticipation effect hasten the diffusion process of congregate in the shock wave and dissolution in rarefaction wave. The key improvement of this new macro model over the previous ones lies in the fact that the anticipation traffic behaviors can improve the stability of traffic flow with the consideration of the proper anticipation effect.

  6. Neural responsivity during soft drink intake, anticipation, and advertisement exposure in habitually consuming youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kyle S.; Stice, Eric

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although soft drinks are heavily advertised, widely consumed, and have been associated with obesity, little is understood regarding neural responsivity to soft drink intake, anticipated intake, and advertisements. METHODS Functional MRI was used to assess examine neural response to carbonated soft drink intake, anticipated intake and advertisement exposure as well as milkshake intake in 27 adolescents that varied on soft drink consumer status. RESULTS Intake and anticipated intake of carbonated Coke® activated regions implicated in gustatory, oral somatosensory, and reward processing, yet high-fat/sugar milkshake intake elicited greater activation in these regions versus Coke intake. Advertisements highlighting the Coke product vs. non-food control advertisements, but not the Coke logo, activated gustatory and visual brain regions. Habitual Coke consumers vs. non-consumers showed greater posterior cingulate responsivity to Coke logo ads, suggesting that the logo is a conditioned cue. Coke consumers exhibited less ventrolateral prefrontal cortex responsivity during anticipated Coke intake relative to non-consumers. CONCLUSIONS Results indicate that soft drinks activate reward and gustatory regions, but are less potent in activating these regions than high-fat/sugar beverages, and imply that habitual soft drink intake promotes hyper-responsivity of regions encoding salience/attention toward brand specific cues and hypo-responsivity of inhibitory regions while anticipating intake. PMID:23836764

  7. A negative relationship between ventral striatal loss anticipation response and impulsivity in borderline personality disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maike C. Herbort

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD frequently exhibit impulsive behavior, and self-reported impulsivity is typically higher in BPD patients when compared to healthy controls. Previous functional neuroimaging studies have suggested a link between impulsivity, the ventral striatal response to reward anticipation, and prediction errors. Here we investigated the striatal neural response to monetary gain and loss anticipation and their relationship with impulsivity in 21 female BPD patients and 23 age-matched female healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Participants performed a delayed monetary incentive task in which three categories of objects predicted a potential gain, loss, or neutral outcome. Impulsivity was assessed using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11. Compared to healthy controls, BPD patients exhibited significantly reduced fMRI responses of the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (VS/NAcc to both reward-predicting and loss-predicting cues. BIS-11 scores showed a significant positive correlation with the VS/NAcc reward anticipation responses in healthy controls, and this correlation, while also nominally positive, failed to reach significance in BPD patients. BPD patients, on the other hand, exhibited a significantly negative correlation between ventral striatal loss anticipation responses and BIS-11 scores, whereas this correlation was significantly positive in healthy controls. Our results suggest that patients with BPD show attenuated anticipation responses in the VS/NAcc and, furthermore, that higher impulsivity in BPD patients might be related to impaired prediction of aversive outcomes.

  8. The Effects of Anticipated Negative Feedback on Psychological States Among Narcissists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Matsuo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although narcissism has long been researched in relation to anger, previous research examined narcissistic anger toward negative feedback that had already occurred. In this study, we investigated the effects of anticipation of evaluation (present vs. absent and negative feedback (present vs. absent, using a creativity task paradigm, on state anger scores among 231 U.S. undergraduates (76% White, 60% women. We also measured undergraduates’ narcissistic tendencies and impressions of the creativity task. Multiple regression analyses revealed a significant interaction between narcissism and negative feedback on total anger scores, with narcissists responding with more anger than non-narcissists in the condition of negative feedback. We also found a significant two-way interaction between narcissism and anticipation of evaluation on total enjoyment scores. Anticipation of feedback inhibited narcissist-prone individuals from enjoying the task in the anticipation condition, but this pattern was not present in the no-anticipation condition. Implications and recommendations to better understand the nature of narcissism are discussed.

  9. THE ELUSIVENESS OF LEARNER-CENTRED TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin Kovačević

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research will explore teaching styles of university professors. Teaching style is an umbrella term for teaching decisions made during the entire teaching process – planning, delivery, and evaluation. Contemporary university teachers are advised to adopt the learner-centred teaching style which is assumed to produce remarkable possibilities. In the Fall Semester 2015 fifty-two respondents in different faculties of International University of Sarajevo were surveyed using The Principles of Adult Learning Scale inventory designed by Gary J. Conti. Inventory scores were calculated according to guidelines suggested by the author of the inventory. The scores revealed that majority of respondents strongly supported teacher-centred rather than learner-centred styles of instruction. Scores were analysed on gender lines and across three different faculties, namely: Arts and Social Sciences; Business and Administration; Engineering and Natural Sciences. In all five groups none of the seven teaching style indicators was found to conform with the learner-centred teaching criteria. There was no statistically significant difference between the two genders’ preference for a teaching style. And there was no statistically significant difference between teaching style preference across the three different faculties.The results of this research imply that the learner-centred style of instruction is not frequently implemented. Secondly, the results indicate that the requirements necessary for proper application of the learner-centred teaching style are not easy to meet in current written and unwritten norms. Finally, the results show that traditional teaching styles, which have been preserved in different scientific fields, still predominate in universities.

  10. Enhancing person-centred communication in NICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Janne; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Egerod, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Aims of this article were (a) to explore how parents of premature infants experience guided family-centred care (GFCC), and (b) to compare how parents receiving GFCC versus standard care (SC) describe nurse-parent communication in the neonatal intensive care unit.......Aims of this article were (a) to explore how parents of premature infants experience guided family-centred care (GFCC), and (b) to compare how parents receiving GFCC versus standard care (SC) describe nurse-parent communication in the neonatal intensive care unit....

  11. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory as Cultural Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    NAS RA V. Ambartsumian Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory is presented as a cultural centre for Armenia and the Armenian nation in general. Besides being scientific and educational centre, the Observatory is famous for its unique architectural ensemble, rich botanical garden and world of birds, as well as it is one of the most frequently visited sightseeing of Armenia. In recent years, the Observatory has also taken the initiative of the coordination of the Cultural Astronomy in Armenia and in this field, unites the astronomers, historians, archaeologists, ethnographers, culturologists, literary critics, linguists, art historians and other experts.

  12. Anticipating species distributions: Handling sampling effort bias under a Bayesian framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchini, Duccio; Garzon-Lopez, Carol X; Marcantonio, Matteo; Amici, Valerio; Bacaro, Giovanni; Bastin, Lucy; Brummitt, Neil; Chiarucci, Alessandro; Foody, Giles M; Hauffe, Heidi C; He, Kate S; Ricotta, Carlo; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Rosà, Roberto

    2017-04-15

    Anticipating species distributions in space and time is necessary for effective biodiversity conservation and for prioritising management interventions. This is especially true when considering invasive species. In such a case, anticipating their spread is important to effectively plan management actions. However, considering uncertainty in the output of species distribution models is critical for correctly interpreting results and avoiding inappropriate decision-making. In particular, when dealing with species inventories, the bias resulting from sampling effort may lead to an over- or under-estimation of the local density of occurrences of a species. In this paper we propose an innovative method to i) map sampling effort bias using cartogram models and ii) explicitly consider such uncertainty in the modeling procedure under a Bayesian framework, which allows the integration of multilevel input data with prior information to improve the anticipation species distributions.

  13. A review of statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation: looking for an answer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Gruber, Stephen B; Raymond, Victoria M;

    2010-01-01

    Anticipation, manifested through decreasing age of onset or increased severity in successive generations, has been noted in several genetic diseases. Statistical methods for genetic anticipation range from a simple use of the paired t-test for age of onset restricted to affected parent-child pairs......, and this right truncation effect is more pronounced in children than in parents. In this study, we first review different statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation in affected parent-child pairs that address the issue of bias due to right truncation. Using affected parent-child pair data, we compare...... to a recently proposed random effects model which includes extended pedigree data and unaffected family members [Larsen et al., 2009]. A naive use of the paired t-test is biased for the simple reason that age of onset has to be less than the age at ascertainment (interview) for both affected parent and child...

  14. Functional MRI reveals expert-novice differences during sport-related anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael J; Bishop, Daniel T; Jackson, Robin C; Abernethy, Bruce

    2010-01-27

    We examined the effect of expertise on cortical activation during sports anticipation using functional MRI. In experiment 1, recreational players predicted badminton stroke direction and the pattern of active clusters was consistent with a proposed perception-of-action network. This pattern was not replicated in a stimulus-matched, action-unrelated control task. In experiment 2, players of three different skill levels anticipated stroke direction from clips occluded either 160 ms before or 80 ms after racquet-shuttle contact. Early-occluded sequences produced more activation than late-occluded sequences overall, in most cortical regions of interest, but experts showed an additional enhancement in medial, dorsolateral and ventrolateral frontal cortex. Anticipation in open-skill sports engages cortical areas integral to observing and understanding others' actions; such activity is enhanced in experts.

  15. Differences in anticipated interaction drive own group biases in face memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paul Wilson

    Full Text Available According to much research, the Own Group Bias (OGB in face memory occurs as a consequence of social categorization - ingroup members are more likely than outgroup members to be encoded as individuals and remembered well. The current work is an examination of the role of anticipated future interaction in the OGB. We conducted two studies showing that anticipated interaction influences group-based face memory. In Study 1, we provided correlational evidence that beliefs about the amount and importance of future interaction one will have with racial outgroup members is associated with the OGB, such that people expecting more interaction with outgroup members show a reduced OGB. In Study 2, we manipulated expectations about future interactions with lab-created groups and observed that high levels of anticipated future interaction with the outgroup eliminated the OGB. Thus, social group categorization drives face memory biases to the extent that group membership affords the expectation of interpersonal interaction.

  16. Perceptual training effects on anticipation of direct and deceptive 7-m throws in handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharji, Khaled E; Wade, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of perceptual training on the performance of handball goalkeepers when anticipating the direction of both direct and deceptive 7-m throws. Skilled goalkeepers were assigned equally to three matched-ability groups based on their pre-test performance: a perceptual training group (n = 14) received video-based perceptual training, a placebo training group (n = 14) received video-based regular training and a control group received no training. Participants in the perceptual training group significantly improved their performance compared to both placebo and control groups; however, anticipation of deceptive throws improved less than for direct throws. The results confirm that although anticipating deception in handball is a challenging task for goalkeepers, task-specific perceptual training can minimise its effect and improve performance.

  17. Coexistence of anticipated and layered chaotic synchronization in time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H J; Huang, H B; Qi, G X

    2005-09-01

    We study the dynamic stabilities of unidirectionally coupled linear arrays of chaotic oscillators with time-delay feedbacks in star configuration, and find that if all oscillators in the network are identical, then the oscillators in the linear arrays can anticipate the driving oscillators, and simultaneously the oscillators in the linear arrays with the same position with respect to the central one are in synchronous chaotic state. Compared with the anticipated synchronization, the layered synchronization is first generated and last destroyed as the coupling constant is increased. This coexistence of anticipated and layered chaotic synchronization is destroyed by long time feedback. If the driving and driven oscillators are different, then only layered chaotic synchronization is possible.

  18. Differences in anticipated interaction drive own group biases in face memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John Paul; See, Pirita E; Bernstein, Michael J; Hugenberg, Kurt; Chartier, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    According to much research, the Own Group Bias (OGB) in face memory occurs as a consequence of social categorization - ingroup members are more likely than outgroup members to be encoded as individuals and remembered well. The current work is an examination of the role of anticipated future interaction in the OGB. We conducted two studies showing that anticipated interaction influences group-based face memory. In Study 1, we provided correlational evidence that beliefs about the amount and importance of future interaction one will have with racial outgroup members is associated with the OGB, such that people expecting more interaction with outgroup members show a reduced OGB. In Study 2, we manipulated expectations about future interactions with lab-created groups and observed that high levels of anticipated future interaction with the outgroup eliminated the OGB. Thus, social group categorization drives face memory biases to the extent that group membership affords the expectation of interpersonal interaction.

  19. Effects of Spike Anticipation on the Spiking Dynamics of Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel ede Santos-Sierra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Synchronization is one of the central phenomena involved in information processing in living systems. It is known that the nervous system requires the coordinated activity of both local and distant neural populations. Such an interplay allows to merge different information modalities in a whole processing supporting high-level mental skills as understanding, memory, abstraction, etc. Though the biological processes underlying synchronization in the brain are not fully understood there have been reported a variety of mechanisms supporting different types of synchronization both at theoretical and experimental level. One of the more intriguing of these phenomena is the anticipating synchronization, which has been recently reported in a pair of unidirectionally coupled artificial neurons under simple conditions cite{Pyragas}, where the slave neuron is able to anticipate in time the behaviour of the master one. In this paper we explore the effect of spike anticipation over the information processing performed by a neural network at functional and structural level. We show that the introduction of intermediary neurons in the network enhances spike anticipation and analyse how these variations in spike anticipation can significantly change the firing regime of the neural network according to its functional and structural properties. In addition we show that the interspike interval (ISI, one of the main features of the neural response associated to the information coding, can be closely related to spike anticipation by each spike, and how synaptic plasticity can be modulated through that relationship. This study has been performed through numerical simulation of a coupled system of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons.

  20. Moral Disengagement, Anticipated Social Outcomes and Adolescents' Alcohol Use: Parallel Latent Growth Curve Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Catherine A; Bussey, Kay

    2015-10-01

    Moral disengagement is a social cognitive process that has been extensively applied to transgressive behaviors, including delinquency, aggression and illicit substance use. However, there has been limited research on moral disengagement as it relates to underage drinking. The current study aimed to examine moral disengagement contextualized to underage drinking and its longitudinal relationship to alcohol use. Moreover, the social context in which adolescent alcohol use typically occurs was also considered, with a specific emphasis on the social sanctions, or social outcomes, that adolescents anticipate receiving from friends for their alcohol use. Adolescents were assessed across three time-points, 8 months apart. The longitudinal sample consisted of 382 (46% female) underage drinkers (12-16 years at T1). Parallel latent growth curve analysis was used to examine the bi-directional influence of initial moral disengagement, anticipated social outcomes, and alcohol use on subsequent growth in moral disengagement, anticipated social outcomes and alcohol use. The interrelation of initial scores and growth curves was also assessed. The findings revealed that, in the binary parallel analyses, initial moral disengagement and anticipated social outcomes both significantly predicted changes in alcohol use across time. Moreover, initial anticipated social outcomes predicted changes in moral disengagement. These findings were not consistently found when all three process analyses were included in a single model. The results emphasize the impact of social context on moral disengagement and suggest that by targeting adolescents' propensity to justify or excuse their drinking, as well as the social outcomes adolescents anticipate for being drunk, it may be possible to reduce their underage drinking.

  1. Dissociating the influence of response selection and task anticipation on corticospinal suppression during response preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Julie; Labruna, Ludovica; Cazares, Christian; Ivry, Richard B

    2014-12-01

    Motor behavior requires selecting between potential actions. The role of inhibition in response selection has frequently been examined in tasks in which participants are engaged in some advance preparation prior to the presentation of an imperative signal. Under such conditions, inhibition could be related to processes associated with response selection, or to more general inhibitory processes that are engaged in high states of anticipation. In Experiment 1, we manipulated the degree of anticipatory preparation. Participants performed a choice reaction time task that required choosing between a movement of the left or right index finger, and used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to elicit motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the left hand agonist. In high anticipation blocks, a non-informative cue (e.g., fixation marker) preceded the imperative; in low anticipation blocks, there was no cue and participants were required to divide their attention between two tasks to further reduce anticipation. MEPs were substantially reduced before the imperative signal in high anticipation blocks. In contrast, in low anticipation blocks, MEPs remained unchanged before the imperative signal but showed a marked suppression right after the onset of the imperative. This effect occurred regardless of whether the imperative had signalled a left or right hand response. After this initial inhibition, left MEPs increased when the left hand was selected and remained suppressed when the right hand was selected. We obtained similar results in Experiment 2 except that the persistent left MEP suppression when the left hand was not selected was attenuated when the alternative response involved a non-homologous effector (right foot). These results indicate that, even in the absence of an anticipatory period, inhibitory mechanisms are engaged during response selection, possibly to prevent the occurrence of premature and inappropriate responses during a competitive selection process.

  2. [Accreditation criteria and quality standards for Poisons centres: development of a quality management system within the Milan Poisons centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Puppa, Tiziana; Manfrè, Sergio; Grezzi, Marinella

    2006-01-01

    Poisons centres throughout Italy and Europe vary considerably in terms of their institutions and organisation. The European Association of Poisons Centres and Clinical Toxicologists (EAPCCT) has laid down the activities that a poisons centre must carry out, specifying minimum and maximum standards required. These directions allow an evaluation of the service provided. In 2002 Milan Poisons Centre began a project aiming to introduce concepts and methodology proper of the quality systems within poisons centres' institutional activity. Concluded, the project resulted in the centre's certification and the documentation of its procedures: this may now contribute to help define the status and activity of poisons centres in Italy.

  3. RURAL HIGHWAY SERVICE CENTRES AND RURAL LIVELIHOODS DIVERSITY: A CASE OF NGUNDU HALT IN ZIMBABWE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Chazovachii

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to assess the impact of rural high way service centres on livelihood diversity. The establishment of Ngundu rural highway service centre was an approach to assist highway travelers and local residents in accessing essential services without going off-route. Since the establishment of these highway service centers, little has been realized in terms of their utility. Data was collected using questionnaires; participatory observation and interviews and presented in the form of graphs; pie charts and tables. The rural highway service centre benefited local residents in its sphere of influence through social welfare provision; employment creation; recreation and as agricultural inputs collection centres. However the opportunity on livelihoods diversity by locals and travelers to enjoy their need has been abused .Both locals and travelers have turned the centre into risk livelihood strategies arena, crime and deviant behavior proliferated turning it into life threatening zone. Therefore need is there to reinforce overnight surveillance through the neighborhood watch for security and welfare of genuine dealers and travelers for sustainable and investment confident and promotion climate.

  4. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola;

    2009-01-01

    Optimal prevention of hereditary cancer is central and requires initiation of surveillance programmes and/or prophylactic measures at a safe age. Anticipation, expressed as an earlier age at onset in successive generations, has been demonstrated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC...... the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated...

  5. [The coordination of care in health centres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribardière, Olivia

    2016-06-01

    Health centres are structurally designed to facilitate the coordination of care. However, evolutions in society have resulted in forms of consumption of health care which are not necessarily compatible with efficient care coordination. On a local level, teams are nevertheless organising and structuring themselves to offer the right form of care, to the right patient and at the right time.

  6. Tensions in human-centred design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M.G.D.

    2011-01-01

    In human-centred design (HCD), researchers and designers attempt to cooperate with and learn from potential users of the products or services which they are developing. Their goal is to develop products or services that match users' practices, needs and preferences. In this position paper it is argu

  7. Frequency selectivity at very low centre frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Carlos Andrés Jurado; Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Marquardt, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    -3638 (2007)]. Recent experiments showed that the exact frequency varies from individual to individual. Besides, the helicotrema region in the METF has been found to highly influence frequency selectivity for centre frequencies (CFs) below 80 Hz (Jurado and Moore in prep). By using individual METF...

  8. Visiting a science centre: what's on offer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Ian

    1990-09-01

    Science centres are a valuable resource, used more frequently by family groups and primary school parties than by secondary schools. The importance of affective learning, involving attitude changes, is stressed. Provided the right approach is used, accompanying adults can help children get the most out of a visit.

  9. Mandibular trauma: a two-centre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Kommers, S.C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Gallesio, C.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess and compare epidemiological data on mandibular fractures from two European centres and to perform a review of the literature. Between 2001 and 2010, a total of 752 patients with a total of 1167 mandibular fractures were admitted to a hospital in Turin, and 245 p

  10. Renovation of the CERN Computer Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The Computer Centre at CERN is seen after half of the equipment is the large ground floor room has been removed. A large-scale spring-cleaning operation took place before renovation work for the new CERN Grid system began. Fifteen kilometres of cables that were no longer needed were removed from the cavity floor for recycling.

  11. Cactus: The Centres of a Triangle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Hartley

    2009-01-01

    This is the first of two articles which describe how to use "JavaSketchPad" to explore the centres of a triangle. This introductory exercise is suggested in the GSP "Workshop Guide". Students can use "JavaSketchPad Interactive Geometry" (JSP) at home at no cost. They are likely to impress their parents with their enthusiasm for geometry and all…

  12. Unemployment Benefit Exhaustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Pico Geerdsen, Lars; Knudsen, Anne-Sofie Due

    2015-01-01

    studies for final analysis and interpretation. Twelve studies could be included in the data synthesis. Results: We found clear evidence that the prospect of exhaustion of benefits results in a significantly increased incentive for finding work. Discussion: The theoretical suggestion that the prospect......This systematic review studied the impact of exhaustion of unemployment benefits on the exit rate out of unemployment and into employment prior to benefit exhaustion or shortly thereafter. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to prepare this review, and ultimately located 12...... of exhaustion of benefits results in an increased incentive for finding work has been confirmed empirically by measures from seven different European countries, the United States, and Canada. The results are robust in the sense that sensitivity analyses evidenced no appreciable changes in the results. We found...

  13. Attitude Formation of Benefits Satisfaction: Knowledge and Fit of Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Gery Markova, Foard Jones

    2011-01-01

    Using the theoretical framework of the Theory of Reasoned Action [6], we examine benefits satisfactionas an attitude formed by the beliefs about benefits (i.e., benefits knowledge) and the perceived value ofthese benefits (i.e., fit of benefits to individual needs). We use questionnaires to gather data from arandom sample of 591 employees in a large county agency in the South-eastern United States. The datasupport that knowledge of benefits is associated with enhanced benefits satisfaction an...

  14. Benefits for handicapped children

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of long-term care benefits within the CERN Health Insurance Scheme requires the coordination of the benefits foreseen for handicapped children. Measures were adopted by the Management following the recommendation made by the Standing Concertation Committee on 26 March 2003. A document clarifying these measures is available on the Web at the following address: http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/soc/Social_affairs/social_affairs.asp Social Affairs Service 74201

  15. Person-centred care in nursing documentation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Broderick, Margaret C

    2012-12-07

    BACKGROUND: Documentation is an essential part of nursing. It provides evidence that care has been carried out and contains important information to enhance the quality and continuity of care. Person-centred care (PCC) is an approach to care that is underpinned by mutual respect and the development of a therapeutic relationship between the patient and nurse. It is a core principle in standards for residential care settings for older people and is beneficial for both patients and staff (International Practice Development in Nursing and Healthcare, Chichester, Blackwell, 2008 and The Implementation of a Model of Person-Centred Practice in Older Person Settings, Dublin, Health Service Executive, 2010a). However, the literature suggests a lack of person-centredness within nursing documentation (International Journal of Older People Nursing 2, 2007, 263 and The Implementation of a Model of Person-Centred Practice in Older Person Settings, Dublin, Health Service Executive, 2010a). AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore nursing documentation in long-term care, to determine whether it reflected a person-centred approach to care and to describe aspects of PCC as they appeared in nursing records. METHOD: A qualitative descriptive study using the PCN framework (Person-centred Nursing; Theory and Practice, Oxford, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010) as the context through which nursing assessments and care plans were explored. RESULTS: Findings indicated that many nursing records were incomplete, and information regarding psychosocial aspects of care was infrequent. There was evidence that nurses engaged with residents and worked with their beliefs and values. However, nursing documentation was not completed in consultation with the patient, and there was little to suggest that patients were involved in decisions relating to their care. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The structure of nursing documentation can be a major obstacle to the recording of PCC and appropriate care planning. Documentation

  16. Producing the BEANs needed for person-centred healthcare decision making requires translating the wisdom of the clinical crowd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Eiring, Øystein; Nielsen, Jesper Bo

    to online version). The criteria included (Response, Remission, and Tolerability) were determined by data availability in trials and are not those that would be produced by a survey of person-as-patient important outcomes. Minimally the latter would distinguish different types of side effects and adverse...... research practical relevance for person-centred care. Major benefits in the form of establishing priorities for person-centred research will follow by way of ‘backward translation’ of the need for better BEANs for many person-as-patient important outcomes.......Producing the BEANs needed for person-centred healthcare decision making requires translating the wisdom of the clinical crowd Mette Kjer Kaltoft, University of Southern Denmark Øystein Eiring, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services Jesper Bo Nielsen, University of Southern Denmark...

  17. The Influence of Anticipation of Word Misrecognition on the Likelihood of Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Paul H.; Lickley, Robin J.; Corley, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether the experience of stuttering can result from the speaker's anticipation of his words being misrecognized. Twelve adults who stutter (AWS) repeated single words into what appeared to be an automatic speech-recognition system. Following each iteration of each word, participants provided a self-rating of whether they…

  18. Will Marriage Matter? Effects of Marriage Anticipated by Same-Sex Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Julie L.; Gotta, Gabrielle; Green, Robert-Jay

    2012-01-01

    The current study used an online survey to explore the anticipated impact of legalized marriage on partners in same-sex couples living in California. These data were gathered prior to the California Supreme Court decision in May 2008 legalizing same-sex marriage, which held sway for 5 months before California Proposition 8 eliminating same-sex…

  19. New kind of phase separation in a CA traffic model with anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lárraga, M. E.; del Río, J. A.; Schadschneider, A.

    2004-03-01

    A cellular automaton model of traffic flow taking into account velocity anticipation is introduced. The strength of anticipation can be varied to describe different driving schemes. We find a new phase separation into a free-flow regime and a so-called v-platoon in an intermediate density regime. In a v-platoon all cars move with velocity v and have vanishing headway. The velocity v of a platoon only depends on the strength of anticipation. At high densities, a congested state characterized by the coexistence of a 0-platoon with several v-platoons is reached. The results are not only relevant for automated highway systems, but also help to elucidate the effects of anticipation that play an essential role in realistic traffic models. From a physics point of view the model is interesting because it exhibits phase separation with a condensed phase in which particles move coherently with finite velocity coexisting with either a non-condensed (free-flow) phase or another condensed phase that is non-moving.

  20. Awake fiberoptic or awake video laryngoscopic tracheal intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Thøgersen, Bente; Afshari, Arash;

    2012-01-01

    Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation (FFI) is the gold standard for management of anticipated difficult tracheal intubation. The purpose of this study was to compare awake FFI to awake McGrath® video laryngoscope, (MVL), (Aircraft Medical, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom) intubation in patien...

  1. Women’s Work and Divorce : A Matter of Anticipation? A Research Note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortman, Anne-Rigt

    2005-01-01

    The most common hypothesis on the positive association between wives’ work and divorce is that the wife’s work increases the risk of divorce. Critics argue that the causal direction is the other way around and that women adjust their working hours in anticipation of divorce. These competing hypothes

  2. Attack on a Chaos-Based Random Number Generator Using Anticipating Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniçeri, Ramazan; Kilinç, Selçuk; Yalçin, Müştak E.

    Chaotic systems have been used in random number generation, owing to the property of sensitive dependence on initial conditions and hence the possibility to produce unpredictable signals. Within the types of chaotic systems, those which are defined by only one delay-differential equation are attractive due to their simple model. On the other hand, it is possible to synchronize to the future states of a time-delay chaotic system by anticipating synchronization. Therefore, random number generator (RNG), which employs such a system, might not be immune to the attacks. In this paper, attack on a chaos-based random number generator using anticipating synchronization is investigated. The considered time-delay chaotic system produces binary signals, which can directly be used as a source of RNG. Anticipating synchronization is obtained by incorporating other systems appropriately coupled to the original one. Quantification of synchronization is given by the bit error between the streams produced by the original and coupled systems. It is shown that the bit streams generated by the original system can be anticipated by the coupled systems beforehand.

  3. A review of statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation: looking for an answer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Gruber, Stephen B; Raymond, Victoria M

    2010-01-01

    in one of the three main mismatch repair (MMR) genes. In contrast to the clinic-based population, we re-analyze data on a population-based Lynch syndrome cohort, derived from the Danish HNPCC-register. Both datasets indicate evidence of genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome. We then expand our review...

  4. Students’ anticipated situational engagement : the roles of teacher behaviour, personal engagement, and gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, J.T.; Verkuyten, M.J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Among 9th-grade students (248 girls, 255 boys) from a large multiethnic school, the authors examined 2 aspects of anticipated situational engagement in relation to 3 types of hypothetical teacher behavior: authoritarian, authoritative, permissive. Furthermore, the authors investigated the moderating

  5. Under stochastic dominance choquet-expected utility and anticipated utility are identical

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Wakker

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to convince the reader that Choquet-expected utility, as initiated by Schmeidler (1982) for decision making under uncertainty, when formulated for decision making under risk naturally leads to Yaari (1987)'s anticipated utility. Thus the two generalizations of expected utili

  6. Under stochastic dominance Choquet-expected utility and anticipated utility are identical

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Wakker (Peter)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this paper is to convince the reader that Choquet-expected utility, as initiated by Schmeidler (1982, 1989) for decision making under uncertainty, when formulated for decision making under risk naturally leads to anticipated utility, as initiated by Quiggin/Yaari. Thus the two

  7. Initial and sustained brain responses to threat anticipation in blood-injection-injury phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Brinkmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood-injection-injury (BII phobia differs from other subtypes of specific phobia in that it is associated with elevated disgust-sensitivity as well as specific autonomic and brain responses during processing of phobia-relevant stimuli. To what extent these features play a role already during threat anticipation is unclear. In the current fMRI experiment, 16 female BII phobics and 16 female healthy controls anticipated the presentation of phobia-specific and neutral pictures. On the behavioral level, anxiety dominated the anticipatory period in BII phobics relative to controls, while both anxiety and disgust were elevated during picture presentation. By applying two different models for the analysis of brain responses to anticipation of phobia-specific versus neutral stimuli, we found initial and sustained increases of activation in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, insula, lateral and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC, thalamus and visual areas, as well as initial activation in the amygdala for BII phobics as compared to healthy controls. These results suggest that BII phobia is characterized by activation of a typical neural defense network during threat anticipation, with anxiety as the predominant emotion.

  8. Perceptual Training Methods Compared: The Relative Efficacy of Different Approaches to Enhancing Sport-Specific Anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Bruce; Schorer, Jorg; Jackson, Robin C.; Hagemann, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The comparative efficacy of different perceptual training approaches for the improvement of anticipation was examined using a goalkeeping task from European handball that required the rapid prediction of shot direction. Novice participants (N = 60) were assigned equally to four different training groups and two different control groups (a placebo…

  9. Time to Separate the Men From the Beasts: Symbolic Anticipation as the Typically Human Subjective Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grave, Dieter

    2004-08-01

    In this paper it is argued that the dividing line that runs between the human psyche as opposed to any other complex system is made up by symbolic anticipation. The functionality of the human mind as an anticipatory system is entirely caught up in the crucial role that finiteness, shortage or lack plays for human beings. Anticipation for us is the way by which this negative finiteness or lack is translated into a positive longing, want or desire. We take a look at the three dimensional view of Jacques Lacan regarding these matters in a sophistical example and we illustrate how anticipation as a Symbolic phenomenon is distinct from the Imaginary or the Real register. As Lacan points out anticipation creates a symbolic social link which binds two or more interacting humans together in an anticipatory relationship. Beliefs, expectations and convictions are the typically human social links which ground human interaction and set it apart from other forms of social interaction we can observe in other complex biological entities.

  10. Age associations with neural processing of reward anticipation in adolescents with bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urošević, Snežana; Luciana, Monica; Jensen, Jonathan B; Youngstrom, Eric A; Thomas, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Reward/behavioral approach system hypersensitivity is implicated in bipolar disorders (BD) and in normative development during adolescence. Pediatric onset of BD is associated with a more severe illness course. However, little is known about neural processing of rewards in adolescents with BD or developmental (i.e., age) associations with activation of these neural systems. The present study aims to address this knowledge gap. The present sample included 21 adolescents with BD and 26 healthy adolescents, ages 13 to 19. Participants completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) protocol using the Monetary Incentive Delay (MID) task. Behavioral performance was similar between groups. Group differences in BOLD activation during target anticipation and feedback anticipation periods of the task were examined using whole-brain analyses, as were group differences in age effects. During both target anticipation and feedback anticipation, adolescents with BD, compared to adolescents without psychopathology, exhibited decreased engagement of frontal regions involved in cognitive control (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). Healthy adolescents exhibited age-related decreases, while adolescents with BD exhibited age-related increases, in activity of other cognitive control frontal areas (i.e., right inferior frontal gyrus), suggesting altered development in the BD group. Longitudinal research is needed to examine potentially abnormal development of cognitive control during reward pursuit in adolescent BD and whether early therapeutic interventions can prevent these potential deviations from normative development.

  11. Measurement of Eccentricity of the Centre of Mass from the Geometric Centre of a Sphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭俊起; 胡忠坤; 顾邦明; 罗俊

    2004-01-01

    The eccentricity of the centre of mass from the geometric centre of a spherical attracting mass in determining the Newtonian gravitational constant G is tested by means of an electronic balance. The experimental result shows that the eccentricity of the sample is about 0.31 μm with uncertainty of 0.05 μm. Two density distribution models are discussed to estimate the uncertainty to G by the eccentricities of the attracting masses.

  12. Increasing organ donation via anticipated regret (INORDAR: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Carroll Ronan E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout the world there is an insufficient supply of donor organs to meet the demand for organ transplantations. This paper presents a protocol for a randomised controlled trial, testing whether a simple, theory-based anticipated regret manipulation leads to a significant increase in posthumous organ donor registrations. Methods We will use a between-groups, prospective randomised controlled design. A random sample of 14,520 members of the adult Scottish general public will be contacted via post. These participants will be randomly allocated into 1 of the 4 conditions. The no questionnaire control (NQC group will simply receive a letter and donor registration form. The questionnaire control (QC arm will receive a questionnaire measuring their emotions and non-cognitive affective attitudes towards organ donation. The theory of planned behavior (TPB group will complete the emotions and affective attitudes questionnaire plus additional items assessing their cognitive attitudes towards organ donation, perceived control over registration and how they think significant others view this action. Finally, the anticipated regret (AR group will complete the same indices as the TPB group, plus two additional anticipated regret items. These items will assess the extent to which the participant anticipates regret for not registering as an organ donor in the near future. The outcome variable will be NHS Blood and Transplant verified registrations as an organ donor within 6 months of receiving our postal intervention. Discussion This study will assess whether simply asking people to reflect on the extent to which they may anticipate regret for not registering as an organ donor increases organ donor registration 6 months later. If successful, this simple and easy to administer theory-based intervention has the potential to save lives and money for the NHS by reducing the number of people receiving treatments such as dialysis. This

  13. Effects of unstratified and centre-stratified randomization in multi-centre clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Vladimir V

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of randomization effects in multi-centre clinical trials. The two randomization schemes most often used in clinical trials are considered: unstratified and centre-stratified block-permuted randomization. The prediction of the number of patients randomized to different treatment arms in different regions during the recruitment period accounting for the stochastic nature of the recruitment and effects of multiple centres is investigated. A new analytic approach using a Poisson-gamma patient recruitment model (patients arrive at different centres according to Poisson processes with rates sampled from a gamma distributed population) and its further extensions is proposed. Closed-form expressions for corresponding distributions of the predicted number of the patients randomized in different regions are derived. In the case of two treatments, the properties of the total imbalance in the number of patients on treatment arms caused by using centre-stratified randomization are investigated and for a large number of centres a normal approximation of imbalance is proved. The impact of imbalance on the power of the study is considered. It is shown that the loss of statistical power is practically negligible and can be compensated by a minor increase in sample size. The influence of patient dropout is also investigated. The impact of randomization on predicted drug supply overage is discussed.

  14. Measuring Quality of Life in Prosthetic Practice: Benefits and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Pamela; Desmond, Deirdre

    2007-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that the inclusion of quality of life as an outcome measure is important in ensuring a client-centred and holistic assessment. This review outlines the benefits of quality of life as an outcome measurement in the field of prosthetics. It introduces the key concepts and challenges in the definition and assessment of quality of life post-amputation, including the relative advantages and disadvantages of adopting generic, disease/condition specific, dimension spe...

  15. Danish Polymer Centre annual report 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, O.; Hvilsted, S.; Mortensen, Kell

    The centre is a collaboration between the Risø National Laboratory and the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). At the DTU the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management participate in the centre.From 2001 the Polymer Department at Risø coo....... The Annual Report for 2001 represents therefore the first report from a period in which the new facilitieshave been utilized to full advantage....... coordinates the activities at Risø From the outset it was considered important with common laboratories to obtain the full effect of the collaboration between the two departments at the DTU and Risø NationalLaboratory. In 2001 new laboratories for polymer research and education were established at the DTU...

  16. Patient-centred Prevention among PAD Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pii, Kathrine Hoffmann

    2014-01-01

    Intro: This paper discusses a central professional dilemma in patient-centred education: on one hand the concern for ensuring patients autonomy and right to make their own decisions regarding their treatment and, on the other hand, a concern for getting patients to make the “right” decisions......-centredness is thus promoted as a way to organize health more effectively (in terms of cost and treatment outcomes) and as a way to ensure patients’ autonomy and fundamental right to make their own decisions regarding their treatment. Critical voices within social and nursing theory have however argued...... of a patient-centred prevention programme aimed at PAD patients, which includes medical treatment as well as individual nurse-led lifestyle-oriented conversations (inspired by psychological theory and methods such as Motivational Interviewing). Method: The findings are based on four months ethnographic field...

  17. JOB CENTRE FOR DOMESTIC STAFF IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service; http://www.cern.ch/relations/

    2001-01-01

    The Permanent mission of Switzerland to the International Organisations in Geneva has informed CERN that the Geneva Welcome Centre has set up an employment registration desk for the domestic staff of international civil servants. The aim of this pilot project is, on the one hand, to help international civil servants find domestic staff and, on the other hand, to help domestic staff holding an 'F'-type carte de légitimation find employment within 30 days after the expiry of a contract. For more information, please contact the Geneva Welcome Centre, La Pastorale, 106, route de Ferney, Case postale 103, 1211 Genève 20, tel. (+41.22) 918 02 70, fax (+41.22) 918 02 79), http://geneva-international.org/Welcome.E.html.

  18. Institutional profile: the London Centre for Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, David; Bontoux, Thierry

    2009-12-01

    Located in the London neighborhoods of Bloomsbury and South Kensington, the London Centre for Nanotechnology is a UK-based multidisciplinary research center that operates at the forefront of science and technology. It is a joint venture between two of the world's leading institutions, UCL and Imperial College London, uniting their strong capabilities in the disciplines that underpin nanotechnology: engineering, the physical sciences and biomedicine. The London Centre for Nanotechnology has a unique operating model that accesses and focuses the combined skills of the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, Materials, Medicine, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Biochemical Engineering and Earth Sciences across the two universities. It aims to provide the nanoscience and nanotechnology required to solve major problems in healthcare, information processing, energy and the environment.

  19. Emergency Centre Organization and Automated Triage System

    CERN Document Server

    Golding, Dan; Marwala, Tshilidzi

    2008-01-01

    The excessive rate of patients arriving at accident and emergency centres is a major problem facing South African hospitals. Patients are prioritized for medical care through a triage process. Manual systems allow for inconsistency and error. This paper proposes a novel system to automate accident and emergency centre triage and uses this triage score along with an artificial intelligence estimate of patient-doctor time to optimize the queue order. A fuzzy inference system is employed to triage patients and a similar system estimates the time but adapts continuously through fuzzy Q-learning. The optimal queue order is found using a novel procedure based on genetic algorithms. These components are integrated in a simple graphical user interface. Live tests could not be performed but simulations reveal that the average waiting time can be reduced by 48 minutes and priority is given to urgent patients

  20. Achieving competences in patient-centred care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomborg, Kirsten; Nielsen, Else Skånning; Jensen, Annesofie Lunde

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To document the efficacy of a training programme in patient-centred care in which the nursing staff was trained to involve chronic obstructive pulmonary patients in assisted personal body care (APBC). The objectives were to describe the programme and uncover the outcomes. Background: Chronic...... obstructive pulmonary patients suffer from breathlessness and may need comprehensive assistance with personal body care. The patients’ wellbeing may be improved and their integrity safeguarded if nurses are able to involve the patients in accordance with their illness conditions and personal preferences....... The training was time-consuming. Conclusion: A comprehensive training programme can improve nursing competences to action patient-centred and involve severely ill respiratory patients in APBC. Further studies are needed to investigate the efficacy from the patients’ perspective. Relevance to clinical practice...

  1. It's all change at the Computer Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    The IT and EN Departments are modernising the infrastructure of the Computer Centre to improve the conditions in which the equipment has to operate and to increase capacity. The construction work has already begun and is due to be completed in October 2012.   Every year CERN experiences around ten power cuts lasting from less than a second to several hours. In most cases the two protection systems - the UPS* and the diesel generators – are able to ensure that the operation of the Computer Centre is not affected. As Vincent Doré, the project leader for the IT Department, and Paul Pepinster, the EN Department's technical coordinator in charge of modernising the infrastructure, explains: "Building 513 has two types of computing facilities – the "non-critical" ones, such as the servers for "off-line" computing, which have UPS systems ensuring that they can operate for 10 minutes after a power cut, and the "critical&...

  2. [The development process of colon cancer centres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahm, M; Wesselmann, S; Kube, R; Schöffel, N; Pross, M; Lippert, H; Kahl, S

    2013-02-01

    Colon carcinomas are the most common malignant tumours in the Western world. Important findings about the overall quality of medical care have been reported in multi-centre observational studies. A quality enhancement of therapeutic care can be achieved by an additional increase in diagnostic and therapeutic measures in the interdisciplinary setting. The development of colon cancer centres improves the chance to objectively observe the results of medical care induced by the development of an interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral unit that includes a comprehensive medical care for patients. The implementation of the current medical findings based on evidence in clinical routine, the inspection of the usage of guidelines by external specialists as part of an audit and the continuous correction of analysed deficits in the course of treatment guarantee a continuous improvement of service.

  3. Anticipating and Managing Future Trade-offs and Complementarities between Ecosystem Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Reed

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how, with the aid of computer models developed in close collaboration with decision makers and other stakeholders, it is possible to quantify and map how policy decisions are likely to affect multiple ecosystem services in future. In this way, potential trade-offs and complementarities between different ecosystem services can be identified, so that policies can be designed to avoid the worst trade-offs, and where possible, enhance multiple services. The paper brings together evidence from across the Rural Economy and Land Use Programme's Sustainable Uplands project for the first time, with previously unpublished model outputs relating to runoff, agricultural suitability, biomass, heather cover, age, and utility for Red Grouse (Lagopus scotica, grass cover, and accompanying scenario narratives and video. Two contrasting scenarios, based on policies to extensify or intensify land management up to 2030, were developed through a combination of interviews and discussions during site visits with stakeholders, literature review, conceptual modeling, and process-based computer models, using the Dark Peak of the Peak District National Park in the UK as a case study. Where extensification leads to a significant reduction in managed burning and grazing or land abandonment, changes in vegetation type and structure could compromise a range of species that are important for conservation, while compromising provisioning services, amenity value, and increasing wildfire risk. However, where extensification leads to the restoration of peatlands damaged by former intensive management, there would be an increase in carbon sequestration and storage, with a number of cobenefits, which could counter the loss of habitats and species elsewhere in the landscape. In the second scenario, land use and management was significantly intensified to boost UK self-sufficiency in food. This would benefit certain provisioning services but would have negative

  4. Birth of a science centre. Italian phenomenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rodari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In May 2004 the Balì Museum, Planetarium and interactive science museum, was opened to the public in Italy: 35 hands-on exhibits designed according to the interactive tradition of the Exploratorium in San Francisco, an astronomic observatory for educational activities, a Planetarium with 70 places. With a total investment of about three million euros, about two thirds of which were spent on restructuring the splendid eighteenth-century villa in which it is housed, the undertaking may be considered a small one in comparison with other European science centres. Three million euros: perhaps enough to cover the cost of only the splendid circular access ramp to the brand-new Cosmocaixa in Barcelona, an investment of one hundred million euros. But the interesting aspect of the story of the Balì Museum (but also of other Italian stories, as we shall see lies in the fact that this lively and advanced science centre stands in the bucolic region of the Marches, next to a small town of only 800 inhabitants (Saltara, in the Province of Pesaro and Urbino, in a municipal territory that has a total of 5000. Whereas in Italy the projects for science centres comparable with the Catalan one, for example projects for Rome and Turin, never get off the ground, smaller ones are opening in small and medium-sized towns: why is this? And what does the unusual location of the centres entail for science communication in Italy? This Focus does not claim to tell the whole truth about Italian interactive museums, but it does offer some phenomenological cues to open a debate on the cultural, economic and political premises that favour their lives.

  5. User-Centred Design Using Gamestorming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    User-centered design (UX) is becoming a standard in software engineering and has tremendous potential in healthcare. The purpose of this tutorial will be to demonstrate and provide participants with practice in user-centred design methods that involve 'Gamestorming', a form of brainstorming where 'the rules of life are temporarily suspended'. Participants will learn and apply gamestorming methods including persona development via empathy mapping and methods to translate artefacts derived from participatory design sessions into functional and design requirements.

  6. CMS Centres Worldwide - a New Collaborative Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Lucas

    2011-01-01

    Webcasts, and generic Web tools such as CMS-TV for broadcasting live monitoring and outreach information. Being Web-based and experiment-independent, these systems could easily be extended to other organizations. We describe the experiences of using CMS Centres Worldwide in the CMS data-taking operations as well as for major media events with several hundred TV channels, radio stations, and many more press journalists simultaneously around the world.

  7. Enhancing Safety at Airline Operations Control Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Řasa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a new term of Safety Management System (SMS has been introduced into aviation legislation. This system is being adopted by airline operators. One of the groundbased actors of everyday operations is Operations Control Centre (OCC. The goal of this article has been to identify and assess risks and dangers which occur at OCC and create a template for OCC implementation into SMS.

  8. Training science centre Explainers. The Techniquest experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Johnson

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Techniquest was established in 1986, and in 1995 moved to its current premises at Cardiff Bay, South Wales. This was the first purpose-built science centre in the UK. It receives around 200,000 visitors every year to its exhibition, and to its programmes for schools and public audiences in the theatre, laboratory, discovery room and planetarium. The author joined the Techniquest project in 1985, became a staff member in 1990 and was the Chief Executive from 1997 until his retirement in 2004. Techniquest has three “out-stations” in Wales, and is responsible for the supply and maintenance of exhibits to the Look Out Discovery Centre in Bracknell, England. There is a Techniquest gallery at the Lisbon Pavilhão do Conhecimento - Ciência Viva, and a traveling exhibition, SciQuest, in South Africa which was also supplied by Techniquest. All these centres rely on the effective intervention of “Explainers” (at Techniquest we call them “Helpers” to provide the best possible experience for visitors. At its most demanding, the tasks of an Explainer are varied and intensive, yet there may be times when the duties are mundane or even dull. When you rely on people to act as both hosts and housekeepers, to provide both support and stimulus, and to be both welcoming and watchful, you are asking a great deal. This article raises some of the issues concerned with the recruitment and retention of Explainers, their training and management, and the way in which their role is recognized and valued by the science centre as a whole.

  9. Bismuth centred magnetic perovskite: A projected multiferroic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Asish K., E-mail: asish.k@gmail.com [Discipline of Physics, Indian Institute of Information Technology, Design and Manufacturing, Dumna Airport Road, Jabalpur 482005 (India); Seikh, Md. Motin [Department of Chemistry, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan, West Bengal 731235 (India); Nautiyal, Pranjal [Discipline of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Information Technology, Design and Manufacturing, Dumna Airport Road, Jabalpur 482005 (India)

    2015-03-15

    In recent time substantial attention has been initiated to understand the physics behind multiferroism and to design new multiferroic materials. BiMnO{sub 3} and BiFeO{sub 3} are the well-studied Bi-centred multiferroic oxides. BiMnO{sub 3} is a ferromagnetic–ferroelectric (metastable) phase and require drastic conditions to synthesize. However, lanthanum substituted BiMnO{sub 3} phases stabilized at ambient pressure. It is thus of major importance to increase the number of ferromagnetic perovskites with Bi cations that could be designed under ambient conditions. In this article, we have presented an up to date report of investigations on Bi-centred magnetic perovskites, a prospective material for multiferroic application. Central focus is concentrated on La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} perovskite with various substitutions at different levels. A few of these perovskites are found to be of practical importance e.g. La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.67}Co{sub 0.33}O{sub 3} with high dielectric permittivity coupled with ferromagnetism. A comprehensive analysis of different physical functionalities and their interrelation for a wide range of compositions of these Bi-centred perovskites is presented. It has been found that the complex magnetic behaviour originates from mixed valence metal ions. The ferroelectricity is associated with the 6s{sup 2} lone pair of Bi{sup 3+} cations. The magnetic ground state influences the dielectric properties reflecting the multiferroism in a single material. - Highlights: • Multiferroics have attracted increasing attention due to their possible device applications. • Bismuth centred magnetic perovskite is one kind of such promising multiferroic materials. • Ferromagnetic Bi-perovskites, which are synthesized at ambient conditions, have been discussed.

  10. Upcoming opening of CERN's new Mobility Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    On 29 February, CERN’s brand new Mobility Centre opened in the Globe car park. The Centre has been created to cater to the transport needs of everyone at CERN, to simplify procedures and to centralise all the transport services on offer: the rental of CERN bikes and cars, the CERN car-sharing scheme and SIXT car rental.   From 29 February onwards, the Mobility Centre in the Globe car park will be the place to go for all your duty travel needs: rental of CERN cars (with or without the CERN logo), SIXT car rental, CERN bike rental, distribution of cards allowing the use of CERN’s self-service bike- and car-sharing schemes. That same day, the premises currently housing the Car Pool in Building 130 will become the CERN garage, responsible for: upkeep and repairs on CERN bikes, minor maintenance work on CERN vehicles (e.g. replacing windscreen wipers, bulbs and fuses, refilling windscreen washer fluid, pumping up tyres, etc.), arranging and following up the repair and maintenan...

  11. Bismuth centred magnetic perovskite: A projected multiferroic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Asish K.; Seikh, Md. Motin; Nautiyal, Pranjal

    2015-03-01

    In recent time substantial attention has been initiated to understand the physics behind multiferroism and to design new multiferroic materials. BiMnO3 and BiFeO3 are the well-studied Bi-centred multiferroic oxides. BiMnO3 is a ferromagnetic-ferroelectric (metastable) phase and require drastic conditions to synthesize. However, lanthanum substituted BiMnO3 phases stabilized at ambient pressure. It is thus of major importance to increase the number of ferromagnetic perovskites with Bi cations that could be designed under ambient conditions. In this article, we have presented an up to date report of investigations on Bi-centred magnetic perovskites, a prospective material for multiferroic application. Central focus is concentrated on La0.5Bi0.5MnO3 perovskite with various substitutions at different levels. A few of these perovskites are found to be of practical importance e.g. La0.5Bi0.5Mn0.67Co0.33O3 with high dielectric permittivity coupled with ferromagnetism. A comprehensive analysis of different physical functionalities and their interrelation for a wide range of compositions of these Bi-centred perovskites is presented. It has been found that the complex magnetic behaviour originates from mixed valence metal ions. The ferroelectricity is associated with the 6s2 lone pair of Bi3+ cations. The magnetic ground state influences the dielectric properties reflecting the multiferroism in a single material.

  12. Social Security and Medicare Benefits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Annual cash benefits and rehabilitation benefits paid in each year from the Old-Age and Survivors Insurance, and Disability Insurance Trust Funds, and benefits paid...

  13. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. Exercise also helps people ... or difficulty walking. To learn about exercise and diabetes, see "Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes" from Go4Life®, ...

  14. PENSION FUND BENEFITS SERVICE

    CERN Document Server

    Benefits Service

    2002-01-01

    Please note that from now on, our offices will be opened to members and beneficiaries on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 10 to 12 a.m. and from 3 to 5 p.m. We are otherwise available but by appointment only. Benefits Service 5-1-030 tel. 79194 / 72738

  15. PENSION FUND BENEFITS SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Benefits Service

    2002-01-01

    Please note that from now on, our offices (5-1-030) will be opened to members and beneficiaries on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 10 to 12 a.m. and from 3 to 5 p.m. We are otherwise available but by appointment only. Benefits Service (tel. 79194 / 72738)

  16. Benefits at risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jesper; Sandøe, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Herbicide resistant GM plants have been promoted as a tool in the development of more environment-friendly agriculture. The environmental benefits here, however, depend not only on farmer's acceptance of GM crops as such, but also on their willingness to use herbicides in accordance with altered...

  17. More Benefits of Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Malcolm

    1988-01-01

    Describes a study that measured the benefits of an automated catalog and automated circulation system from the library user's point of view in terms of the value of time saved. Topics discussed include patterns of use, access time, availability of information, search behaviors, and the effectiveness of the measures used. (seven references)…

  18. Public services, personal benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bob Kuhry; Evert Pommer; Jedid-Jah Jonker; John Stevens

    2006-01-01

    Original title: Publieke productie & persoonlijk profijt. This report looks in detail at the costs of public services (such as care, education, public administration and safety) and the benefits that citizens derive from the government expenditure involved in delivering those services. In 2003,

  19. The Benefits of Latin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Lisa R.

    2012-01-01

    Classicists have long claimed that the study of Latin has benefits that exceed knowledge of the language itself, and in the current economic times, these claims are made with urgency. Indeed, many contend that Latin improves English grammar and writing skills, cognitive abilities, and develops transferable skills necessary for success in the…

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvements Using DC in Data Centres

    OpenAIRE

    Bergqvist, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    The installed power usage in a data centre will often amount to several megawatts (MW). Thetotal power consumption of the data centres in the world is comparable to that of the airtraffic. The high energy costs and carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the operation of adata centre call for alternative, more efficient, solutions for the power supply design. Oneproposed solution to decrease the energy usage is to use a direct current power supply (DCUPS) for all the servers in the data centr...

  1. WHEAT GRASS HEALTH BENEFITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nutraceutical is a food or food product that provides health and medical benefits, including the preventionand treatment of disease. Nutraceuticals are the products typically claim to prevent chronic diseases, improve health,delay the aging process, and increase life expectancy.Let us know something about one such nutraceutical.Wheatgrass is a commonly found herb in India contains enzymes like protease, cytrochrome, amylase, lipase,transhydrogenase and SOD (super oxide dismutase. Besides these enzymes, it also contains all the essential aminoacids especially alanine, asparatic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and serine, which are helpful in providing good amountof protein in body which builds and repair tissues. Wheatgrass contains chlorophyll and flavonoids in good amount.It also contains vitamins like vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin E and minerals like iron, calcium and magnesium.Chlorophyll has been shown to build red blood cells quickly,cures anemia, normalise blood pressure by dilating theblood vessels. Chlorophyll has been shown to produce an unfavourable environment for bacterial growth in the bodyand therefore effective in increasing the body's resistance to illness. Probably the most important benefit ofwheatgrass is, it is a cancer fighting agent. Many people strongly believe that the benefits of wheatgrass on cancerare real and that consuming wheat grass can help in the treatment and even in the prevention of cancer. Wheatgrassproduces an immunization effect against many dietary carcinogens..Additional benefits of wheatgrass are bettercomplexion and a healthy glow. The slowing of graying hair is also a benefit believed to come from wheatgrass. Wecan grow wheat grass in small cups, pots and trays very conveniently in our homes, so that we will have fresh juiceand powder with minimum cost.

  2. Optimal catchment area and primary PCI centre volume revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Mikkel Malby; Pedersen, Frants; Holmvang, Lene;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The currently stated optimal catchment population for a pPCI centre is 300,000-1,100,000, resulting in 200-800 procedures/year. pPCI centres are increasing in number even within small geographic areas. We describe the organisation and quality of care after merging two high-volume centres...

  3. Tele-centres as a way of achieving universal access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Anyimadu, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The success of tele-centres in Ghana is discussed. The tele-centres offer a low cost opportunity to empower local communities in developed and developing countries to meet the challenges of the information society. The tele-centres can also contribute more directly to the supply of non-commercial...

  4. Enhanced interoceptive awareness during anticipation of public speaking is associated with fear of negative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durlik, Caroline; Brown, Gary; Tsakiris, Manos

    2014-04-01

    Interoceptive awareness (IA)--the ability to detect internal body signals--has been linked to various aspects of emotional processing. However, it has been examined mostly as a trait variable, with few studies also investigating state dependent fluctuations in IA. Based on the known positive correlation between IA and emotional reactivity, negative affectivity, and trait anxiety, the current study examined whether IA, as indexed by heartbeat detection accuracy, would change during an anxiety-provoking situation. Participants in the experimental condition, in which they anticipated giving a speech in front of a small audience, displayed significant IA increases from baseline to anticipation. Enhancement in IA was positively correlated with fear of negative evaluation. Implications of the results are discussed in relation to the role of trait and state IA in emotional experience.

  5. The anticipation of converging industries a concept applied to nutraceuticals and functional foods

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, Clive-Steven

    2013-01-01

    The blurring of boundaries between hitherto distinct scientific disciplines, technologies or markets is a common and powerful phenomenon. Subjects of this convergence often change consumer behaviours, favouring products and platforms with multiple functions. The Anticipation of Converging Industries provides a detailed focus on the triggers, drivers and consequences of convergence to create a more concise definition of convergence.   This detailed analysis includes a specifically developed toolbox for ‘convergence foresight’, creating a forecasting method for convergence trends. With the focus on the chemical, biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries, several indicators of convergence in the areas of Nutraceuticals/Functional Foods, Cosmeceuticals and ICT are derived from samples including over 1million patents and scientific publications.   By supporting this methodical approach with real world data, The Anticipation of Converging Industries is perfect for industry practitioners looking for a com...

  6. [Living a good live with e-health: anticipating ethical consequences and monitoring them].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Klasien

    2014-01-01

    E-health incorporates a range of digital techniques that are interlinked because they promise to improve people's health and quality of life. The question of how these techniques actually contribute to "living a good live" is not so easy to answer, because scientific, commercial and patients' perspectives all come into play. Research on the unintended consequences of e-health applications clearly shows that it is necessary to anticipate social consequences as early as in the design phase. However, because it is not possible to predict some outcomes, it is also necessary to properly monitor how these techniques affect daily life. It is crucial to pay attention to how these techniques affect people with different educational backgrounds.. Digital techniques have a great capacity to democratise healthcare, but may also unintentionally increase health inequalities. The ethical consequences of e-health applications need to be anticipated and monitored in order to prevent this happening as much as possible.

  7. Work capacity and anticipation in A.A. Ukhtomsky's concept of dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, L. P.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental investigations of human activity and anticipation based on A.A. Ukhtomsky's concept of brain dominance - a non-equilibrium system-forming factor in living systems. Facts on the stages of dominance formation are presented in relation to the creative abilities of the human brain and the role of fatigue as a "lever" for increasing systems' work capacity on the basis of "trace exaltation". Individually, specific features of dominantogenesis are compared with variations in behavioural types. On the basis of chronotopic EEG analysis, we delineate cortical dominants that underlie individual specifics of cognitive processes. The relation is shown between anticipation and the "expansion of dominants" - the broadening of "distal perception" in time and space, as framed by A.A. Ukhtomsky.

  8. Autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy and speech dyspraxia: a new syndrome with anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, I E; Jones, L; Pozzebon, M; Howell, R A; Saling, M M; Berkovic, S F

    1995-10-01

    We describe a family of 9 affected individuals in three generations with nocturnal oro-facio-brachial partial seizures, secondarily generalized partial seizures, and centro-temporal epileptiform discharges, associated with oral and speech dyspraxia and cognitive impairment. The speech disorder was prominent, but differed from that of Landau-Kleffner syndrome and of epilepsy with continuous spike and wave during slow-wave sleep. The electroclinical features of this new syndrome of autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy resemble those of benign rolandic epilepsy, a common inherited epilepsy of childhood. This family shows clinical anticipation of the seizure disorder, the oral and speech dyspraxia, and cognitive dysfunction, suggesting that the genetic mechanism could be expansion of an unstable triplet repeat. Molecular studies on this syndrome, where the inheritance pattern is clear, could also be relevant to identifying a gene for benign rolandic epilepsy where anticipation does not occur and the mode of inheritance is uncertain.

  9. Anticipation and the Non-linear Dynamics of Meaning-Processing in Social Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2009-01-01

    Social order does not exist as a stable phenomenon, but can be considered as "an order of reproduced expectations." When anticipations operate upon one another, they can generate a non-linear dynamics which processes meaning. Although specific meanings can be stabilized, for example in social institutions, all meaning arises from a global horizon of possible meanings. Using Luhmann's (1984) social systems theory and Rosen's (1985) theory of anticipatory systems, I submit algorithms for modeling the non-linear dynamics of meaning in social systems. First, a self-referential system can use a model of itself for the anticipation. Under the condition of functional differentiation, the social system can be expected to entertain a set of models; each model can also contain a model of the other models. Two anticipatory mechanisms are then possible: a transversal one between the models, and a longitudinal one providing the system with a variety of meanings. A system containing two anticipatory mechanisms can become h...

  10. University Benefits Survey. Part I (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of a 1984 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: questions on general benefits, such as insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, and maternity leave policy;…

  11. A new multi-anticipative car-following model with consideration of the desired following distance

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, J.; Liu, R.; Ngoduy, D; Shi, Z.

    2016-01-01

    We propose in this paper an extension of the multi-anticipative optimal velocity car-following model to consider explicitly the desired following distance. The model on the following vehicle’s acceleration is formulated as a linear function of the optimal velocity and the desired distance, with reaction-time delay in elements. The linear stability condition of the model is derived. The results demonstrate that the stability of traffic flow is improved by introducing the desired following dist...

  12. Too Hard to Control: Compromised Pain Anticipation and Modulation in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-07

    instrumental for both facilitation and inhibition of ascending nociceptive input.52,53 In previous studies of acute pain stimulations, the anticipatory...OPEN ORIGINAL ARTICLE Too hard to control: compromised pain anticipation and modulation in mild traumatic brain injury IA Strigo1,2,3, AD Spadoni1,2...J Lohr1,2 and AN Simmons1,2 Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a vulnerability factor for the development of pain -related conditions above and

  13. Current and anticipated uses of thermal-hydraulic codes in NFI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, K. [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Takayasu, M. [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Sennann-gun (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents the thermal-hydraulic codes currently used in NFI for the LWR fuel development and licensing application including transient and design basis accident analyses of LWR plants. The current status of the codes are described in the context of code capability, modeling feature, and experience of code application related to the fuel development and licensing. Finally, the anticipated use of the future thermal-hydraulic code in NFI is briefly given.

  14. Anticipated stigma in chronic illness patients in Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and relationship of anticipated chronic illness stigma among patients diagnosed with a variety of chronic diseases in three Southeast Asian countries (Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam). A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 4,803 adult chronic disease patients (mean age 49.3 years; SD=16.5) recruited systematically from health facilities. Overall, the results indicate that 20.7% of patients reported that for any of the 12 stigma items, they anticipated they were likely or very likely to experience chronic disease stigma. A multivariate analysis of sociodemographics revealed the following were associated with anticipated chronic disease stigma: older versus younger age, OR (odds ratio) = 0.71; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [0.58, 0.87]; higher versus lower education, OR = 2.23; 95% CI [1.81, 2.75]; origin from Myanmar or Vietnam, being single, divorced or widowed, rural residence, and health status (having three or more chronic conditions versus having one chronic condition), OR = 1.93; 95% CI [1.58, 2.35]; lower versus higher quality of life, OR = 0.73; 95% CI [0.63, 0.85]); health risk behavior (physical inactivity, poor diet, current smoking, and problem drinking) and low versus medium or high medication adherence (OR = 0.69; 95% CI [0.55,0.86]). This study demonstrated the possible consequences of anticipated stigma on the health and behavior of people living with chronic diseases, and several factors for chronic disease stigma were identified that can help guide interventions to reduce chronic illness stigma in this population.

  15. Dynamic Analytical Capability to Better Understand and Anticipate Extremist Shifts Within Populations under Authoritarian Regimes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Michael Lewis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to create a generalizable data- and theory-supported capability to better understand and anticipate (with quantifiable uncertainty): 1) how the dynamics of allegiance formations between various groups and society are impacted by active conflict and by third-party interventions and 2) how/why extremist allegiances co-evolve over time due to changing geopolitical, sociocultural, and military conditions.

  16. Altered interoceptive awareness in anorexia nervosa: effects of meal anticipation, consumption and bodily arousal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Sahib S.; Craske, Michelle G.; Li, Wei; Vangala, Sitaram; Strober, Michael; Feusner, Jamie D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Impaired interoceptive awareness (IA), the subjective perception of internal body sensations, has been proposed as a vulnerability or maintaining factor in anorexia nervosa (AN). We examined whether IA of heartbeat and breathing sensations was impaired in AN across a range of arousal levels, and whether it was influenced by meal anticipation and consumption. Method IA was assessed using randomized, double-blinded, bolus intravenous infusions of isoproterenol, a peripheral beta-adrenergic sympathetic agonist, and saline. Fifteen women with AN and 15 age-, and sex- matched healthy comparisons were evaluated before and after consumption of a 1000 Calorie meal. During each infusion participants rated their moment-to-moment intensity of heartbeat and breathing sensations with a dial. To measure IA we evaluated interoceptive detection thresholds, retrospective ratings of palpitation and dyspnea intensity, and interoceptive accuracy via correlations between subjective dial ratings and observed heart rate responses. Results Contrary to prediction the AN group was more likely to report detection of interoceptive sensations across all conditions, an effect driven by false discriminations at low arousal levels. Concordant with prediction, meal anticipation was associated with intensified interoceptive sensations, particularly dyspnea. There were no differences in interoceptive accuracy. Discussion This represents the first demonstration of interoceptive prediction errors in AN. Although IA is unimpaired at high arousal levels in AN, prediction signals are abnormal at low arousal levels, especially during meal anticipation. Altered interoceptive prediction signaling during meal anticipation could contribute to phenotypes of high anxiety in AN or alternatively, might be explained by enhanced meal associated anxiety. PMID:25712775

  17. Role of affective attitudes and anticipated affective reactions in predicting health behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Conner, M; McEachan, R; Taylor, N.; O'Hara, J; Lawton, R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Two measures of affect-affective attitude (AA) and anticipated affective reaction (AAR)- have frequently been used individually, but rarely simultaneously, in correlational studies predicting health behaviors. This research assessed their individual and combined impact in predicting intention and action for a range of health behaviors, controlling for theory of planned behavior (TPB) variables. Method: Self-reported intentions and performance of health behaviors were the main outco...

  18. Daily life stress and the cortisol awakening response: testing the anticipation hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Powell

    Full Text Available The cortisol awakening response (CAR is a distinct facet of the circadian cortisol rhythm associated with various health conditions and risk factors. It has repeatedly been suggested that the CAR could be a result of the anticipated demands of the upcoming day (stress anticipation and could support coping with daily life stress. In a sample of 23 healthy participants CARs were assessed on two consecutive days by measures of salivary cortisol upon awakening (S1 and 30 and 45 minutes later, which were aggregated to the area under the curve increase (AUCI. Stress anticipation was assessed immediately after awakening. On the same days, daily life stress and distress were assessed six times per day based on a quasi-randomized design using handheld computers. Associations were tested by day using regression analysis and standard multilevel/mixed effects models for longitudinal data. The CAR AUCI moderated the effect of daily life stress on distress; higher CAR increases were associated with attenuated distress responses to daily life stress on both days (day 1: p = .039; day 2: p = .004 adjusted for age, gender, sleep quality, time of awakening and oral contraceptive use. Lagged-effects and redundancy models showed that this effect was not due to prior-day CAR increases but specific for same day CARs. On day 2, associations between daily life stress and distress were stronger when individuals showed a higher S1 cortisol level, but this effect was similar for S1 on day 1, and the day 2 effect of S1 became non-significant when S1 on day 1 was controlled. No associations were found between stress anticipation and CARs. Findings indicate that the CAR increase is associated with successful coping with same-day daily life stress.

  19. Reacting to anticipations : energy crises and energy policy in the 1970s ; an introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Bösch, Frank; Graf, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the energy sector cannot be sufficiently described as reactions to past and present energy problems. Rather, politicians and companies alike always react to the anticipation of future challenges. Sharing this assumption, the articles in this HSR Special Issue reexamine the energy crises of the 1970s. Their assessments broaden the temporal and spatial scope of analysis and integrate various energy resources into the picture, while examining how to situate the first...

  20. KdV-Burgers equation in the modified continuum model considering anticipation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaqing; Zheng, Pengjun; Zhu, Keqiang; Ge, Hongxia

    2015-11-01

    The new continuum model mentioned in this paper is developed based on optimal velocity car-following model, which takes the drivers' anticipation effect into account. The critical condition for traffic flow is derived, and nonlinear analysis shows density waves occur in traffic flow because of the small disturbance. Near the neutral stability line, the KdV-Burgers equation is derived and one of the solutions is given. Numerical simulation is carried out to show the local cluster described by the model.

  1. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manley, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.manley@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au; Last, Andrew; Fu, Kenneth; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P [North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients.

  2. Instruction in learning a temporal pattern on an anticipation-coincidence task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albinet, C; Fezzani, K

    2003-08-01

    Using a computer-simulated anticipation-coincidence task, the main aim of the study was to examine the effect of the type of instruction on learning a temporal pattern. For this task, participants must learn to anticipate the appropriate time to launch a projectile to hit a moving target. The experiment involved three instructional conditions. In the Explicit-rule Discover Instruction Condition participants were informed that target speed could change from trial to trial and that change is controlled by a regular pattern. Their task was then to search, to identify, and to use such pattern to enhance their anticipation. In the Explicit-Informative Instruction Condition, participants were, however, allowed before practice to examine attentively the regular pattern. Participants were also explicitly urged to use the pattern they observed to ensure a better interception of the target. Finally, in the Implicit Instruction Condition, participants were only informed that their task was to hit, or at least, to place the projectile as near as possible to the target. No additional information was provied about the target's behaviour. Analysis indicated that learning the temporal pattern was more important in Implicit than in Explicit-rule Discover Instruction Condion. However, the Explicit-Informative Instruction Condition produced unambiguouslly the highest learning. Overall, the study highlights the role of information over guidance in the understanding of the effect of the instructions on learning. Finally, we discussed the implications of these results on the comprehension of the variability of the effects of the instruction on learning.

  3. Bayesian modeling for genetic anticipation in presence of mutational heterogeneity: a case study in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Nilbert, Mef; Moreno, Victor; Gruber, Stephen B

    2011-12-01

    Genetic anticipation, described by earlier age of onset (AOO) and more aggressive symptoms in successive generations, is a phenomenon noted in certain hereditary diseases. Its extent may vary between families and/or between mutation subtypes known to be associated with the disease phenotype. In this article, we posit a Bayesian approach to infer genetic anticipation under flexible random effects models for censored data that capture the effect of successive generations on AOO. Primary interest lies in the random effects. Misspecifying the distribution of random effects may result in incorrect inferential conclusions. We compare the fit of four-candidate random effects distributions via Bayesian model fit diagnostics. A related statistical issue here is isolating the confounding effect of changes in secular trends, screening, and medical practices that may affect time to disease detection across birth cohorts. Using historic cancer registry data, we borrow from relative survival analysis methods to adjust for changes in age-specific incidence across birth cohorts. Our motivating case study comes from a Danish cancer register of 124 families with mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes known to cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome (LS). We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this article. Our model predicts family-level anticipation effects that are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high-risk families.

  4. Insular activation during reward anticipation reflects duration of illness in abstinent pathological gamblers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke eTsurumi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pathological gambling (PG is a chronic mental disorder characterized by a difficulty restraining gambling behavior despite negative consequences. Although brain abnormalities in patients with substance use disorders are caused by repetitive drug use and recover partly with drug abstinence, the relationship between brain activity and duration of illness or abstinence of gambling behavior in PG patients remains unclear. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared the brain activity of 23 PG patients recruited from a treatment facility with 27 demographically-matched healthy control subjects during reward anticipation, and examined the correlations between brain activity and duration of illness or abstinence in PG patients. During reward anticipation, PG patients showed decreased activity compared to healthy controls in a broad range of the reward system regions, including the insula cortex. In PG patients, activation in the left insula showed a significant negative correlation with illness duration. Our findings suggest that insular activation during reward anticipation may serve as a marker of progression of pathological gambling.

  5. Anticipation of novelty recruits reward system and hippocampus while promoting recollection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Bianca C; Bunzeck, Nico; Dolan, Raymond J; Düzel, Emrah

    2007-10-15

    The dopaminergic midbrain, which comprises the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA), plays a central role in reward processing. This region is also activated by novel stimuli, raising the possibility that novelty and reward have shared functional properties. It is currently unclear whether functional aspects of reward processing in the SN/VTA, namely, activation by unexpected rewards and cues that predict reward, also characterize novelty processing. To address this question, we conducted an fMRI experiment during which subjects viewed symbolic cues that predicted either novel or familiar images of scenes with 75% validity. We show that SN/VTA was activated by cues predicting novel images as well as by unexpected novel images that followed familiarity-predictive cues, an 'unexpected novelty' response. The hippocampus, a region implicated in detecting and encoding novel stimuli, showed an anticipatory novelty response but differed from the response profile of SN/VTA in responding at outcome to expected and 'unexpected' novelty. In a behavioral extension of the experiment, recollection increased relative to familiarity when comparing delayed recognition memory for anticipated novel stimuli with unexpected novel stimuli. These data reveal commonalities in SN/VTA responses to anticipating reward and anticipating novel stimuli. We suggest that this anticipatory response codes a motivational exploratory novelty signal that, together with anticipatory activation of the hippocampus, leads to enhanced encoding of novel events. In more general terms, the data suggest that dopaminergic processing of novelty might be important in driving exploration of new environments.

  6. Foveal and peripheral fields of vision influences perceptual skill in anticipating opponents' attacking position in volleyball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorer, Jörg; Rienhoff, Rebecca; Fischer, Lennart; Baker, Joseph

    2013-09-01

    The importance of perceptual-cognitive expertise in sport has been repeatedly demonstrated. In this study we examined the role of different sources of visual information (i.e., foveal versus peripheral) in anticipating volleyball attack positions. Expert (n = 11), advanced (n = 13) and novice (n = 16) players completed an anticipation task that involved predicting the location of volleyball attacks. Video clips of volleyball attacks (n = 72) were spatially and temporally occluded to provide varying amounts of information to the participant. In addition, participants viewed the attacks under three visual conditions: full vision, foveal vision only, and peripheral vision only. Analysis of variance revealed significant between group differences in prediction accuracy with higher skilled players performing better than lower skilled players. Additionally, we found significant differences between temporal and spatial occlusion conditions. Both of those factors interacted separately, but not combined with expertise. Importantly, for experts the sum of both fields of vision was superior to either source in isolation. Our results suggest different sources of visual information work collectively to facilitate expert anticipation in time-constrained sports and reinforce the complexity of expert perception.

  7. The cortisol response to anticipated intergroup interactions predicts self-reported prejudice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Bijleveld

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: While prejudice has often been shown to be rooted in experiences of threat, the biological underpinnings of this threat-prejudice association have received less research attention. The present experiment aims to test whether activations of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, due to anticipated interactions with out-group members, predict self-reported prejudice. Moreover, we explore potential moderators of this relationship (i.e., interpersonal similarity; subtle vs. blatant prejudice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants anticipated an interaction with an out-group member who was similar or dissimilar to the self. To index HPA activation, cortisol responses to this event were measured. Then, subtle and blatant prejudices were measured via questionnaires. Findings indicated that only when people anticipated an interaction with an out-group member who was dissimilar to the self, their cortisol response to this event significantly predicted subtle (r = .50 and blatant (r = .53 prejudice. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that prejudicial attitudes are linked to HPA-axis activity. Furthermore, when intergroup interactions are interpreted to be about individuals (and not so much about groups, experienced threat (or its biological substrate is less likely to relate to prejudice. This conclusion is discussed in terms of recent insights from social neuroscience.

  8. Anxiety, anticipation and contextual information: A test of attentional control theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Adam J; Jackson, Robin C; Bishop, Daniel T; Williams, A Mark

    2016-09-01

    We tested the assumptions of Attentional Control Theory (ACT) by examining the impact of anxiety on anticipation using a dynamic, time-constrained task. Moreover, we examined the involvement of high- and low-level cognitive processes in anticipation and how their importance may interact with anxiety. Skilled and less-skilled tennis players anticipated the shots of opponents under low- and high-anxiety conditions. Participants viewed three types of video stimuli, each depicting different levels of contextual information. Performance effectiveness (response accuracy) and processing efficiency (response accuracy divided by corresponding mental effort) were measured. Skilled players recorded higher levels of response accuracy and processing efficiency compared to less-skilled counterparts. Processing efficiency significantly decreased under high- compared to low-anxiety conditions. No difference in response accuracy was observed. When reviewing directional errors, anxiety was most detrimental to performance in the condition conveying only contextual information, suggesting that anxiety may have a greater impact on high-level (top-down) cognitive processes, potentially due to a shift in attentional control. Our findings provide partial support for ACT; anxiety elicited greater decrements in processing efficiency than performance effectiveness, possibly due to predominance of the stimulus-driven attentional system.

  9. Lower neighborhood quality in adolescence predicts higher mesolimbic sensitivity to reward anticipation in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlen Z. Gonzalez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Life history theory suggests that adult reward sensitivity should be best explained by childhood, but not current, socioeconomic conditions. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, 83 participants from a larger longitudinal sample completed the monetary incentive delay (MID task in adulthood (∼25 years old. Parent-reports of neighborhood quality and parental SES were collected when participants were 13 years of age. Current income level was collected concurrently with scanning. Lower adolescent neighborhood quality, but neither lower current income nor parental SES, was associated with heightened sensitivity to the anticipation of monetary gain in putative mesolimbic reward areas. Lower adolescent neighborhood quality was also associated with heightened sensitivity to the anticipation of monetary loss activation in visuo-motor areas. Lower current income was associated with heightened sensitivity to anticipated loss in occipital areas and the operculum. We tested whether externalizing behaviors in childhood or adulthood could better account for neighborhood quality findings, but they did not. Findings suggest that neighborhood ecology in adolescence is associated with greater neural reward sensitivity in adulthood above the influence of parental SES or current income and not mediated through impulsivity and externalizing behaviors.

  10. When math hurts: math anxiety predicts pain network activation in anticipation of doing math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ian M; Beilock, Sian L

    2012-01-01

    Math can be difficult, and for those with high levels of mathematics-anxiety (HMAs), math is associated with tension, apprehension, and fear. But what underlies the feelings of dread effected by math anxiety? Are HMAs' feelings about math merely psychological epiphenomena, or is their anxiety grounded in simulation of a concrete, visceral sensation - such as pain - about which they have every right to feel anxious? We show that, when anticipating an upcoming math-task, the higher one's math anxiety, the more one increases activity in regions associated with visceral threat detection, and often the experience of pain itself (bilateral dorso-posterior insula). Interestingly, this relation was not seen during math performance, suggesting that it is not that math itself hurts; rather, the anticipation of math is painful. Our data suggest that pain network activation underlies the intuition that simply anticipating a dreaded event can feel painful. These results may also provide a potential neural mechanism to explain why HMAs tend to avoid math and math-related situations, which in turn can bias HMAs away from taking math classes or even entire math-related career paths.

  11. When math hurts: math anxiety predicts pain network activation in anticipation of doing math.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Lyons

    Full Text Available Math can be difficult, and for those with high levels of mathematics-anxiety (HMAs, math is associated with tension, apprehension, and fear. But what underlies the feelings of dread effected by math anxiety? Are HMAs' feelings about math merely psychological epiphenomena, or is their anxiety grounded in simulation of a concrete, visceral sensation - such as pain - about which they have every right to feel anxious? We show that, when anticipating an upcoming math-task, the higher one's math anxiety, the more one increases activity in regions associated with visceral threat detection, and often the experience of pain itself (bilateral dorso-posterior insula. Interestingly, this relation was not seen during math performance, suggesting that it is not that math itself hurts; rather, the anticipation of math is painful. Our data suggest that pain network activation underlies the intuition that simply anticipating a dreaded event can feel painful. These results may also provide a potential neural mechanism to explain why HMAs tend to avoid math and math-related situations, which in turn can bias HMAs away from taking math classes or even entire math-related career paths.

  12. Anticipated discrimination is related to symptom severity, functionality and quality of life in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üçok, Alp; Karadayı, Gülşah; Emiroğlu, Birgül; Sartorius, Norman

    2013-10-30

    The aim of this study is to evaluate a possible relationship between the level of anticipated discrimination with severity of symptoms and functionality. We included 103 patients with schizophrenia. Severity of symptoms was measured by PANSS and Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia. Quality of life (QL) and functionality were measured by using QLS, PSP and Functional Remission of General Schizophrenia Scale (FROGS). Anticipated/experienced discrimination was evaluated with four selected items from Discrimination and Stigma Scale. First, variables related to each item were determined by using t-test and later the variables that have an independent contribution to anticipated discrimination subscale of DISC were evaluated with linear regression analysis. Results showed that those who stated that they felt the need to conceal their diagnosis more had shorter duration of illness, lower PANNS scores, higher scores on professional performance subscale of QLS, a lower number of suicide attempts and higher current employment rates. Participants who reported that they had been avoided or shunned more had higher depression scores. While patients with lower level of functionality tended to stop themselves more, patients with high level of functionality tended to conceal their diagnosis.

  13. Integrated mechanisms of anticipation and rate-of-change computations in cortical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccini, Gabriel D; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V; Compte, Albert

    2007-05-01

    Local neocortical circuits are characterized by stereotypical physiological and structural features that subserve generic computational operations. These basic computations of the cortical microcircuit emerge through the interplay of neuronal connectivity, cellular intrinsic properties, and synaptic plasticity dynamics. How these interacting mechanisms generate specific computational operations in the cortical circuit remains largely unknown. Here, we identify the neurophysiological basis of both the rate of change and anticipation computations on synaptic inputs in a cortical circuit. Through biophysically realistic computer simulations and neuronal recordings, we show that the rate-of-change computation is operated robustly in cortical networks through the combination of two ubiquitous brain mechanisms: short-term synaptic depression and spike-frequency adaptation. We then show how this rate-of-change circuit can be embedded in a convergently connected network to anticipate temporally incoming synaptic inputs, in quantitative agreement with experimental findings on anticipatory responses to moving stimuli in the primary visual cortex. Given the robustness of the mechanism and the widespread nature of the physiological machinery involved, we suggest that rate-of-change computation and temporal anticipation are principal, hard-wired functions of neural information processing in the cortical microcircuit.

  14. Integrated mechanisms of anticipation and rate-of-change computations in cortical circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel D Puccini

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Local neocortical circuits are characterized by stereotypical physiological and structural features that subserve generic computational operations. These basic computations of the cortical microcircuit emerge through the interplay of neuronal connectivity, cellular intrinsic properties, and synaptic plasticity dynamics. How these interacting mechanisms generate specific computational operations in the cortical circuit remains largely unknown. Here, we identify the neurophysiological basis of both the rate of change and anticipation computations on synaptic inputs in a cortical circuit. Through biophysically realistic computer simulations and neuronal recordings, we show that the rate-of-change computation is operated robustly in cortical networks through the combination of two ubiquitous brain mechanisms: short-term synaptic depression and spike-frequency adaptation. We then show how this rate-of-change circuit can be embedded in a convergently connected network to anticipate temporally incoming synaptic inputs, in quantitative agreement with experimental findings on anticipatory responses to moving stimuli in the primary visual cortex. Given the robustness of the mechanism and the widespread nature of the physiological machinery involved, we suggest that rate-of-change computation and temporal anticipation are principal, hard-wired functions of neural information processing in the cortical microcircuit.

  15. Establishing the macular grading grid by means of fovea centre detection using anatomical-based and visual-based features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Arturo

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a methodology for establishing the macular grading grid in digital retinal images by means of fovea centre detection. To this effect, visual and anatomical feature-based criteria are combined with the aim of exploiting the benefits of both techniques. First, acceptable fovea centre estimation is obtained by using a priori known anatomical features with respect to the optic disc and the vascular tree. Second, a type of morphological processing is employed in an attempt to improve the obtained fovea centre estimation when the fovea is detectable in the image; otherwise, it is declared indistinguishable and the first result is retained. The methodology was tested on the MESSIDOR and DIARETDB1 databases making use of a distance criterion between the obtained and the real fovea centre. Fovea centres in the brackets between the categories Excellent and Fair (fovea centres primarily accepted as valid in the literature) made up for 98.24% and 94.38% of the cases in the MESSIDOR and DIARETDB1, respectively.

  16. THE BENEFITS OF NEUROECONOMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Krawczyk

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper serves as a brief introduction into the methods, results and problems of the new interdisciplinary field of neuroecomics (and its relatives. The focus is on the practical benefits that may result from it for the economic profession. These primarily involve the possibility of setting new promising research directions and providing novel tools raising hopes of enabling direct observation of human preference. The author also discusses methodological and ethical challenges that neuroeconomics is or will soon be facing

  17. WHEAT GRASS HEALTH BENEFITS

    OpenAIRE

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-01-01

    Nutraceutical is a food or food product that provides health and medical benefits, including the preventionand treatment of disease. Nutraceuticals are the products typically claim to prevent chronic diseases, improve health,delay the aging process, and increase life expectancy.Let us know something about one such nutraceutical.Wheatgrass is a commonly found herb in India contains enzymes like protease, cytrochrome, amylase, lipase,transhydrogenase and SOD (super oxide dismutase). Besides the...

  18. ¿Y ahora qué? Anticipated immigration status barriers and Latina/o high school students' future expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Ellen Hawley; Ramos, Karina; Medina, Cynthia

    2013-07-01

    Latina/o high school students without documentation face a challenging situation when they graduate from high school, with pathways to work and postsecondary education stymied by their immigration status. We examined the effects of anticipated barriers associated with immigration status, age, and sex on the dependent variables of vocational outcome expectations, anticipated external and internal barriers, and postsecondary schooling plans in a sample of 475 Latina/o high school students. Findings include that students anticipating immigration status problems had lower vocational outcome expectations and anticipated more external barriers to pursuing their postsecondary plans. Latina girls and older high school students anticipating immigration status problems were more likely to plan to attend 2-year rather than 4-year colleges, and less likely to plan on postsecondary education, respectively. Implications for practice, policy, and research are discussed.

  19. Biological Inspiration in Human Centred Robotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Huo-sheng; LIU Jin-dong; Calderon Carlos A

    2004-01-01

    Human centred robotics (HCR) concerns with the development of various kinds of intelligent systems and robots that will be used in environments coexisting with humans. These systems and robots will be interactive and useful assistants/companions for people in different ages, situations, activities and environments in order to improve the quality of life. This paper presents the autors' current research work toward the development of advanced theory and technologies for HCR applications, based on inspiration from biological systems. More specifically, both bio-mimetic system modelling and robot learning by imitation are discussed respectively, and some preliminary results are demonstrated.

  20. Dynamics of B cells in germinal centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Nilushi S; Klein, Ulf

    2015-03-01

    Humoral immunity depends on the germinal centre (GC) reaction during which somatically mutated high-affinity memory B cells and plasma cells are generated. Recent studies have uncovered crucial cues that are required for the formation and the maintenance of GCs and for the selection of high-affinity antibody mutants. In addition, it is now clear that these events are promoted by the dynamic movements of cells within and between GCs. These findings have resolved the complexities of the GC reaction in greater detail than ever before. This Review focuses on these recent advances and discusses their implications for the establishment of humoral immunity.

  1. The INTEGRAL science data centre (ISDC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courvoisier, T.J.L.; Walter, Rasmus; Beckmann, V.;

    2003-01-01

    The INTEGRAL Science Data Centre (ISDC) provides the INTEGRAL data and means to analyse them to the scientific community. The ISDC runs a gamma ray burst alert system that provides the position of gamma ray bursts on the sky within seconds to the community. It operates a quick-look analysis...... of the data within few hours that detects new and unexpected sources as well as it monitors the instruments. The ISDC processes the data through a standard analysis the results of which are provided to the observers together with their data....

  2. Managing social impact in design: tools and methods for anticipating consequences of technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    The use of email communication, mobile phones and cars has had wide-ranging social consequences. What is more, designers are plainly not always aware of all social consequences of technology, despite practicing user-centred design. Modern technology creates possibilities to influence social behaviou

  3. A Building as a Catalyst for Change: the New British Library Centre for Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Shenton

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The new Centre for Conservation at the British Library (BLCC opened in London this year. This 2600 square metre, purpose-built Centre is connected to the main British Library by a new public terrace and is adjacent to the new St Pancras Eurostar station opening in November 2007. The Centre houses state-of-the-art book conservation studios and sound preservation studios, together with facilities for an extensive training and public outreach programme. The public programme includes a permanent, free exhibition and education suite at the entrance to the new Centre, linked to the rotation of iconic collection items within the BL’s Treasures Gallery. There are to be free, behind-the-scenes tours of the conservation studios for the public as well as demonstrations, workshops and talks. The professional outreach includes partnering with the University of the Arts on setting up a new two-year Foundation Degree in Book Conservation, setting up funded internships for book and sound preservation, and steps to furthering the BL in conservation research. From the beginning, there were three main, intertwined elements at the core of the Centre for Conservation project, namely construction, fund-raising and a ‘change programme’. The paper describes the construction project and highlights features such as the ‘floating’ sound studios, the natural north light that bathes the majority of the conservation studios and describes how the needs of visitors and circulation were anticipated. Secondly it describes the nature of the fund-raising for the €19.65 (£13.25 million project, which was the first such capital fund-raising project undertaken by the BL. The money has been raised from a combination of public and private sources. The mixture of conservation, professional training and public access has been key to the success in raising the funds. Thirdly, the paper describes how the impetus for providing appropriate accommodation for those areas not

  4. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia.

  5. CMS tracker slides into centre stage

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As preparations for the magnet test and cosmic challenge get underway, a prototype tracker has been carefully inserted into the centre of CMS. The tracker, in its special platform, is slowly inserted into the centre of CMS. The CMS prototype tracker to be used for the magnet test and cosmic challenge coming up this summer has the same dimensions -2.5 m in diameter and 6 m in length- as the real one and tooling exactly like it. However, the support tube is only about 1% equipped, with 2 m2 of silicon detectors installed out of the total 200 m2. This is already more than any LEP experiment ever used and indicates the great care needed to be taken by engineers and technicians as these fragile detectors were installed and transported to Point 5. Sixteen thousand silicon detectors with a total of about 10 million strips will make up the full tracker. So far, 140 modules with about 100 000 strips have been implanted into the prototype tracker. These silicon strips will provide precision tracking for cosmic muon...

  6. ALICE opens its new nerve centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-nine fully equipped and ergonomic workstations, one meeting area and 11 large format screens in a completely refurbished room: the ALICE Run Control Centre (ARC) implements the best and newest solutions for its shift workers and expert operators, including access for persons with reduced mobility and very soon a magic window for Point 2 visitors.   The ALICE Run Control Centre. “Our initial intention was just to optimise the old layout,” says Federico Ronchetti from Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy), a CERN scientific associate currently appointed as ALICE Run Coordinator and person in charge of the ALICE Consolidation Task Force. “However, during the review process, we carried out a study of all the existing control rooms at CERN and became aware we needed a radical change. Hence we started planning a complete redesign of the workspace.” Designed and equipped over many years, the old ALICE control room did not have enough space to fit al...

  7. KNMI Data Centre: Easy access for all

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vegte, John; Som de Cerff, Wim; Plieger, Maarten; de Vreede, Ernst; Sluiter, Raymond; Willem Noteboom, Jan; van der Neut, Ian; Verhoef, Hans; van Versendaal, Robert; van Binnendijk, Martin; Kalle, Henk; Knopper, Arthur; Spit, Jasper; Mastop, Joeri; Klos, Olaf; Calis, Gijs; Ha, Siu-Siu; van Moosel, Wim; Klein Ikkink, Henk-Jan; Tosun, Tuncay

    2013-04-01

    KNMI is the Dutch institute for weather, climate research and seismology. It disseminates weather information to the public at large, the government, aviation and the shipping industry in the interest of safety, the economy and a sustainable environment. To gain insight into long-term developments KNMI conducts research on climate change. Making the knowledge, data and information on hand at KNMI accessible is one core activity. A huge part of the KNMI information is from numerical models, insitu sensor networks and remote sensing satellites. This digital collection is mostly internal only available and is a collection of non searchable , non standardized file formats, lacking documentation and has no references to scientific publications. With the KNMI Data Centre (KDC) project these issues are tackled. In the project a user driven development approach with SCRUM was chosen to get maximum user involvement in a relative short development timeframe. Building on open standards and proven open source technology (which includes in-house developed software like ADAGUC WMS and Portal) resulted in a first release in December 2012 This presentation will focus on the aspects of KDC relating to its technical challenges, the development strategy and the initial usage results of the data centre.

  8. A multi-dimensional framework to assist in the design of successful shared services centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Borman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Organisations are increasingly looking to realise the benefits of shared services yet there is little guidance available as to the best way to proceed. A multi-dimensional framework is presented that considers the service provided, the design of the shared services centre and the organisational context it sits within. Case studies are then used to determine what specific attributes from each dimension are associated with success and how they should be aligned. It is concluded that there appears to be a single, broadly standard pattern of attributes for successful Shared Services Centres (SSCs across the proposed dimensions of Activity, Environment, History, Resources, Strategy, Structure, Management, Technology and Individual Skills. It should also be noted though that some deviation from the identified standard along some dimensions is possible without adverse effect – ie that the alignment identified appears to be relatively soft.

  9. Developing a person-centred approach to carer assessment and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Gail; Austin, Lynn; Diffin, Janet; Grande, Gunn

    2015-12-01

    Community nurses play an important role in providing palliative care and support for patients and carers at home. The Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) provides practitioners with an evidence-based comprehensive tool to use with carers in palliative home care. As a practice tool, the CSNAT uses a person-centred approach-that is, the process of carer assessment and support is facilitated by practitioners but is carerled. In this paper, the CSNAT research team provides an overview of the development of the tool and the benefits for both carers and practitioners arising from using the CSNAT as a person-centred approach in practice. The authors outline the five stages of the CSNAT approach to assist practitioners wishing to implement the CSNAT in practice.

  10. Developing benefits management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Markus

    if they do realize the value of their IT investments (Bradley, 2010; Hunter & Westerman, 2009; Legris & Collerette, 2006), although the relationship between IT and business performance has been known for many years (Melville et al., 2004; Kohli & Grover, 2008). A starting point for any organization is thus......An old quote goes “Rome wasn’t built in a day” which is similar to the practices comprehended by benefits management (BM) in today’s organizations; they mature as organizations improve practices (Ward & Daniel, 2012). The implication is that many organizations are still not realizing or are unsure...

  11. Organisational and Infrastructure Prerequisites of Creation of an International Logistic Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarnavska Nataliya P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article lies in the study of organisational and infrastructure prerequisites of creation and functioning of integration structures capable, on the basis of logistics, of assisting subjects of economy in structuring and optimisation of material flows and also accompanying financial and information flows. In the result of the study the article identifies irregularities of the transition of national economies to new models of development and prospects of development of logistic provision of the innovation economy connected with them, transformation possibilities and prospects of international integration of the logistic market of Ukraine; it analyses prerequisites and substantiates expediency and shows benefits of formation of an international logistic centre in the city of Ternopil. The mission of the planned international logistic centre is ensuring a qualitatively new level of logistic provision of market participants, which would correspond with the existing world standards. The logistic centre performs realisation of its tasks and conduct of functions in the process of interaction with partners – participants of the logistic chain. The logistic centre should become an operator of flows of transit and export-import cargoes and it would perform important logistic functions connected not only with organisation of shipping operations but also with sorting, storing, packing and some other functions at the level of the best world representatives of the logistic servicing. In order to ensure successful activity of such a centre, it is required to adapt tariff policy of the state to international standards, to expand a list of relevant services, to reduce terms of cargo handling and to introduce modern technologies of information processing intensively.

  12. Fear of the unknown: uncertain anticipation reveals amygdala alterations in childhood anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lisa E; Oler, Jonathan A; Fox, Andrew S; McFarlin, Daniel R; Rogers, Gregory M; Jesson, Maria A L; Davidson, Richard J; Pine, Daniel S; Kalin, Ned H

    2015-05-01

    Children with anxiety disorders (ADs) experience persistent fear and worries that are highly debilitating, conferring risk for lifelong psychopathology. Anticipatory anxiety is a core clinical feature of childhood ADs, often leading to avoidance of uncertain and novel situations. Extensive studies in non-human animals implicate amygdala dysfunction as a critical substrate for early life anxiety. To test specific amygdala-focused hypotheses in preadolescent children with ADs, we used fMRI to characterize amygdala activation during uncertain anticipation and in response to unexpected stimuli. Forty preadolescent (age 8-12 years) children, 20 unmedicated AD patients and 20 matched controls completed an anticipation task during an fMRI scan. In the task, symbolic cues preceded fear or neutral faces, such that 'certain' cues always predicted the presentation of fear or neutral faces, whereas 'uncertain' cues were equally likely to be followed by fear or neutral faces. Both AD children and controls showed robust amygdala response to faces. In response to the uncertain cues, AD children had increased amygdala activation relative to controls. Moreover, in the AD children, faces preceded by an 'uncertain' cue elicited increased amygdala activation, as compared with the same faces following a 'certain' cue. Children with ADs experience distress both in anticipation of and during novel and surprising events. Our findings suggest that increased amygdala activation may have an important role in the generation of uncertainty-related anxiety. These findings may guide the development of neuroscientifically informed treatments aimed at relieving the suffering and preventing the lifelong disability associated with pediatric ADs.

  13. Beyond face value: does involuntary emotional anticipation shape the perception of dynamic facial expressions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia Palumbo

    Full Text Available Emotional facial expressions are immediate indicators of the affective dispositions of others. Recently it has been shown that early stages of social perception can already be influenced by (implicit attributions made by the observer about the agent's mental state and intentions. In the current study possible mechanisms underpinning distortions in the perception of dynamic, ecologically-valid, facial expressions were explored. In four experiments we examined to what extent basic perceptual processes such as contrast/context effects, adaptation and representational momentum underpinned the perceptual distortions, and to what extent 'emotional anticipation', i.e. the involuntary anticipation of the other's emotional state of mind on the basis of the immediate perceptual history, might have played a role. Neutral facial expressions displayed at the end of short video-clips, in which an initial facial expression of joy or anger gradually morphed into a neutral expression, were misjudged as being slightly angry or slightly happy, respectively (Experiment 1. This response bias disappeared when the actor's identity changed in the final neutral expression (Experiment 2. Videos depicting neutral-to-joy-to-neutral and neutral-to-anger-to-neutral sequences again produced biases but in opposite direction (Experiment 3. The bias survived insertion of a 400 ms blank (Experiment 4. These results suggested that the perceptual distortions were not caused by any of the low-level perceptual mechanisms (adaptation, representational momentum and contrast effects. We speculate that especially when presented with dynamic, facial expressions, perceptual distortions occur that reflect 'emotional anticipation' (a low-level mindreading mechanism, which overrules low-level visual mechanisms. Underpinning neural mechanisms are discussed in relation to the current debate on action and emotion understanding.

  14. Reward anticipation dynamics during cognitive control and episodic encoding: implications for dopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Sarah Chiew

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine modulatory activity critically supports motivated behavior. This modulation operates at multiple timescales, but the functional roles of these distinct dynamics on cognition are still being characterized. Reward processing has been robustly linked to dopamine activity; thus, examining behavioral effects of reward anticipation at different timing intervals, corresponding to different putative dopaminergic dynamics, may help in characterizing the functional role of these dynamics. Towards this end we present two research studies investigating reward motivation effects on cognitive control and episodic memory, converging in their manipulation of rapid versus multi-second reward anticipation (consistent with timing profiles of phasic versus ramping dopamine, respectively on performance. Under prolonged reward anticipation, both control and memory performances were enhanced, specifically when combined with other experimental factors: task-informative cues (control task and reward uncertainty (memory task. Given observations of ramping dopamine under uncertainty (Fiorillo et al., 2003 and arguments that uncertainty may act as a control signal increasing environmental monitoring (Mushtaq et al., 2011, we suggest that task information and reward uncertainty can both serve as ‘need for control’ signals that facilitate learning via enhanced monitoring, and that this activity may be supported by a ramping profile of dopaminergic activity. Observations of rapid (i.e., phasic reward on control and memory performance can be interpreted in line with prior evidence, but review indicates that contributions of different dopaminergic timescales in these processes are not well-understood. Future experimental work to clarify these dynamics and characterize a cross-domain role for reward motivation and dopamine in goal-directed behavior is suggested.

  15. Beyond face value: does involuntary emotional anticipation shape the perception of dynamic facial expressions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Letizia; Jellema, Tjeerd

    2013-01-01

    Emotional facial expressions are immediate indicators of the affective dispositions of others. Recently it has been shown that early stages of social perception can already be influenced by (implicit) attributions made by the observer about the agent's mental state and intentions. In the current study possible mechanisms underpinning distortions in the perception of dynamic, ecologically-valid, facial expressions were explored. In four experiments we examined to what extent basic perceptual processes such as contrast/context effects, adaptation and representational momentum underpinned the perceptual distortions, and to what extent 'emotional anticipation', i.e. the involuntary anticipation of the other's emotional state of mind on the basis of the immediate perceptual history, might have played a role. Neutral facial expressions displayed at the end of short video-clips, in which an initial facial expression of joy or anger gradually morphed into a neutral expression, were misjudged as being slightly angry or slightly happy, respectively (Experiment 1). This response bias disappeared when the actor's identity changed in the final neutral expression (Experiment 2). Videos depicting neutral-to-joy-to-neutral and neutral-to-anger-to-neutral sequences again produced biases but in opposite direction (Experiment 3). The bias survived insertion of a 400 ms blank (Experiment 4). These results suggested that the perceptual distortions were not caused by any of the low-level perceptual mechanisms (adaptation, representational momentum and contrast effects). We speculate that especially when presented with dynamic, facial expressions, perceptual distortions occur that reflect 'emotional anticipation' (a low-level mindreading mechanism), which overrules low-level visual mechanisms. Underpinning neural mechanisms are discussed in relation to the current debate on action and emotion understanding.

  16. Supporting the Development of Autonomous Learning Skills in Reading and Writing in an Independent Language Learning Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel L. W. Chiu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article draws on observations, examples and findings from previous action research and teaching experiences gathered in an independent language learning centre in a university in Hong Kong to explore strategies for supporting independent learning. The learning centre offers one-to-one and small-group learning sessions to support the development of independent learning skills in various areas. This discussion will explore particularly the focuses of reading and writing skills development. These learner-centred support sessions aim to develop awareness of different types of learning strategies to suit individual learning needs, and cultivate interest and ability for continuous self-learning. The benefits of a semi-structured scaffolding format with attention to individual learning differences and supported by technology will be highlighted.

  17. Stable anticipation synchronization in mutually coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Two vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers(VCSELs) are mutually coupled through a partially transparent mirror (PTM) placed in the pathway. The PTM plays the role of external mirror,which controls the feedback strength and coupling strength.We numerically simulate this system by establishing a visible SIMULINK model.The results demonstrate that the anticipation synchronization is achieved and it can tolerate some extent frequency detuning.Moreover,the system shows similar chaos-pass filtering effect on unidirectionally coupled system even both VCSELs are modulated.This system allows simultaneously bidirectional secure message transmission on public channels.

  18. Modelling Of Water Resources in Bakaru Hydropower Plant in Anticipating Load Increment in Sulselbar Power System

    OpenAIRE

    Said, Sri Mawar

    2015-01-01

    Bakaru hydro power plan water resources model will describe a model in anticipating load growth in Sulselbar Power System until year 2030. Bakaru hydro power plan is supplied by Mamasa, Sumarorong, and Lembang watershed, water supply is influenced with rain fall volume, topography condition (steep slope, type of soil, and land use) of a water catchment area. A model is constructed using Fuzzy logic in water water inflow is Y = 0,0687X2 ??? 4,279X + 82,917 and erosion inflow is Y = - 0.0001X2 ...

  19. Leading-zero anticipator (LZA) in the IBM RISC System/6000 floating-point execution unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokenek, E.; Montoye, R.K. (International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (USA). Thomas J. Watson Research Center)

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a technique used in the multiply-add-fused (MAF) unit of the IBM RISC System/6000 (RS/6000) processor for normalizing the floating-point results. Unlike the conventional procedures applied thus far, the so-called leading-zero anticipator (LZA) of the RS/6000 carries out processing of the leading zeros and ones in parallel with floating-point addition. Therefore, the new circuitry reduces the total latency of the MAF unit by enabling the normalization and addition to take place in a single cycle.

  20. Oocyte banking for anticipated gamete exhaustion (AGE) is a preventive intervention, neither social nor nonmedical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Dominic; van der Veen, Fulco; Deneyer, Michel; Nekkebroeck, Julie; Tournaye, Herman

    2014-05-01

    The scope of female fertility preservation through cryopreservation of oocytes or ovarian cortex has widened from mainly oncological indications to a variety of fertility-threatening conditions. So far, no specific universally accepted denomination name has been given to cryopreservation of oocytes or ovarian cortex for the prevention of age-related fertility decline. We argue that the commonly used phrases 'social' and 'nonmedical freezing' to denote the indication for cryopreservation are not entirely correct. We suggest 'AGE banking', as this has not only the advantage of being catchy but also depicts the exact indication for the strategy, anticipated gamete exhaustion.

  1. University Benefits Survey. Part 1 (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of a 1983 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: whether the university self-administers insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, maternity leave policy,…

  2. Children's Centre "3 in 1 - together"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancheva, Hristina

    2013-04-01

    "There are only two ways to life your live. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle." Albert Einstein Children's Centre "3 in 1" is an extracurricular unit linked to the High School of Zlatartitsa, St. Cyril and St. Methodius, accomplished with the help of the municipality and many volunteers from the local community. With its activity it forms in children patriotic spirit, love for nature, active citizenship, and an impulse for a healthy life through communication with nature, saving the traditions and history, insurance of equality of the kids of the local five ethnicities and participation in activities in the sphere of science, art, sport and tourism. The educational work is mainly directed towards kids with difficulties with communication, hyperactivity, aggression, problems in their families, or those deprived of parental care. For a few years in the Children's Centre there have been clubs of interests: "Gardeners" - kids cultivate a garden. They plow, dig, plant, put in, irrigate and weed under the watch of Ms Stafka Nikolova, parents, and volunteers of the local community. The ecologically clean products - vegetables and fruits, kids use to cook delicious meals, sell, or give away. Weeds are also utilized; they are making herbarium out of them. "Cooks" - "What to have for lunch, when mom is out?". One can learn a lot of wonderful recipes from the club "Cooks". Products are own made, raised with love. In 2010, on the on the annual traditional holiday of the garden soup in Zlataritsa, the little cooks won third prize for making a delicious vegetable soup. On the same day, the 26 years old Nadezhda Savova, Cultural and Social Anthropology PhD in Princeton, founded the second community bakery in Bulgaria in Children's Centre "3 in1". Nadezhda Savova was declared traveler of 2012 by National Geographic. After the baking house in Gabrovo and Zlataritsa, Nadezhda also founded such projects in Sofia, Varna and Ruse

  3. Data communication at the CERN computer centre

    CERN Document Server

    Bruins, T; Pieters, R; Slettenhaar, Hendrik J; Van de Kerk, P

    1972-01-01

    The growing interest for on-line computer service and process control at CERN decentralises certain computer activities. Small process computers, remote batch stations and user terminals are to be backed by a powerful central computer. The present data network is principally star shaped. At the centre of it is a CDC 6600-6500 computer combination. It has a front end CDC 3100 computer with a Hewlett Packard 2116 as multiplexer. Some details about the fast parallel connections between the CDC 3100 and the HP 2116B are given in the paper, as well as descriptions of some computer simulation techniques used to test the present systems. Finally some plans on a future network are given. (12 refs).

  4. Learner-Centred Education in International Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Schweisfurth

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article provides an overview of Learner-Centred ducation (LCE as a travelling policy and outlines some of the arguments and pathways that have been used to fuel its travel. Despite the rich promises it offers and its proliferation as a global phenomenon and national policy, there is evidence that implementation and changes to classroom practice have proved to be problematic in many contexts. This seems particularly true in developing countries, and the article explores some of the reasons behind these perennial gaps. It concludes by arguing for the importance of both a birds-eye view and local understandings in researching and operationalising LCE, and suggests ways that the local and the global might be reconciled so that the promise of LCE is not lost in translation.

  5. MATERNAL MORTALITY IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Maternal Mortality in A Tertiary Care Centre. OBJECTIVE: To study maternal mortality and the complications leading to maternal death. METHODS: A retrospective study of hospital record to study maternal mortality and its causes over 3 years from January 2010 to December 2012. RESULTS: There were a total of 58 maternal deaths out of 2823 live births giving a maternal mortality ratio of 2054.55 per one lakh live births. Unbooked and late referrals account for 77.58% of maternal deaths. The majority of deaths around 75.86% were in 20-30 years age group. Haemorrhage was the commonest causes of death (24.12% followed by sepsis (18.96% and pregnancy induced hypertension 15.51% Anemia contributed to the most common indirect cause of maternal morality. CONCLUSION: Haemorrhage, sepsis and pregnancy induced hypertension including eclampsia were the direct major causes of death. Anaemia and cardiac diseases were other indirect causes of death.

  6. Stimulated emission from NV centres in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Jeske, Jan; McGuinness, Liam P; Reineck, Philip; Johnson, Brett C; McCallum, Jeffrey C; Jelezko, Fedor; Volz, Thomas; Cole, Jared H; Gibson, Brant C; Greentree, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated emission is the process fundamental to laser operation, thereby producing coherent photon output. Despite negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV$^-$) centres being discussed as a potential laser medium since the 1980's, there have been no definitive observations of stimulated emission from ensembles of NV$^-$ to date. Reasons for this lack of demonstration include the short excited state lifetime and the occurrence of photo-ionisation to the neutral charge state by light around the zero-phonon line. Here we show both theoretical and experimental evidence for stimulated emission from NV$^-$ states using light in the phonon-sidebands. Our system uses a continuous wave pump laser at 532 nm and a pulsed stimulating laser that is swept across the phononic sidebands of the NV$^-$. Optimal stimulated emission is demonstrated in the vicinity of the three-phonon line at 700 nm. Furthermore, we show the transition from stimulated emission to photoionisation as the stimulating laser wavelength is reduced fro...

  7. Project for a renewable energy research centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Giachetta

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In Liguria, where sustainable approaches to the design, construction and management of buildings enjoy scant currency, the idea of a company from Milan (FERA s.r.l. setting up a research centre for studies into renewable energy resources, could well open up very interesting development opportunities.The project includes: environmental rehabilitation (restoration projects; strategies for the protection of water resources and waste management systems; passive and active solar systems (solar thermal and experiments with thermodynamic solar energy; hyperinsulation systems, passive cooling of buildings; use of natural materials; bio-climatic use of vegetation. The author describes the project content within the context of the multidisciplinary work that has gone into it.

  8. Assessment of Capacity Building by UN Centre For Space Science and Technology Education in Asia and Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, Rao; Deekshatulu, B. L.; Sundarramiah, V.; Kasturirangan, K.

    2002-01-01

    Space technology has introduced new dimensions into the study and understanding of Earth's processes and in improving the quality of life for the humanity. The benefits from the space technology are mostly confined to the space faring nations. United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UN-OOSA) has taken initiative to disseminate the scientific and technology knowledge to developing countries through the establishment of regional Centres mainly dedicated to the education, training and research. The establishment of the UN Centre for Space Science and Technology Education in Asia and the Pacific (UN CSSTE-AP), in 1995 in India, has opened up new vistas for sharing and learning from experiences and also in capacity building in the region. The Centre has education and research programmes in the field of Remote Sensing, Satellite Communications, Satellite Meteorology and Space Sciences. The education courses are comprising of two phases viz. Phase I, of 9 months duration and is a resident programme in India. The 9 months programme is modular in structure dealing with fundamentals, applications and pilot projects. The Phase II, of 12 months duration, concludes with the submission of a project work assignment in the home country institution. The research programmes are oriented towards carrying out advanced research and development in these fields and provides an opportunity to Asia Pacific students to build their academic capabilities. The education course curriculum is primarily aimed to disseminate the Space Science and Technology in the Asia Pacific region and draws on the experiences and needs of the region. The Centre also assists in research and consultancy in environmental analysis, monitoring, judicious exploitation, rural/urban communication, understanding weather system, conservation of natural resources and sustainable development. The issues are of utmost importance in the backdrop of high population density, unstable economic status, depleting natural

  9. Communications Centre Model in Insurance Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijel Bara

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to define a communications centre model in an insurance company that essentially has two objectives. The first objective is focused on providing quality support with the sales process thereby creating a strategic advantage over the competition while the second objective is focused on improving the link between internal organizational units whose behaviour can often render decision-making at all levels difficult. The function of sales is fundamental for an insurance company. Whether an insurance company will fulfil its basic function, which is transfer of risk from the insured party to the insurer who agrees tonreimburse incidental damages to the damaged party and distribute them among all members of the risk group on the principles of reciprocity and solidarity, depends on successful sales and billing (Andrijašević & Petranović, 1999. For an insurance company to operate successfully in a demanding market, it is necessary to meet the needs of potential clients who then must be at the centre of all the activities of the insurer. A satisfied policy holder, who is respected by the insurer as a partner, is a guarantee that the sales of insurance services will be successful and that the insured party will come back to the same insurance company. In the era of globalization and all-pervading new technologies and modes of communication, policy holders need to be able to communicate with insurance company employees. Quality communication is a good foundation for a sales conversation. A fast flow of all types of information within an organisation using a single communication module makes decision-making at all levels quicker and easier.

  10. Being in the Users' Shoes: Anticipating Experience while Designing Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanta, Chrysi; Cantoni, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    While user-centred design and user experience are given much attention in the e-learning design field, no research has been found on how users are actually represented in the discussions during the design of online courses. In this paper we identify how and when end-users' experience--be they students or tutors--emerges in designers'…

  11. Speciality preferences in Dutch medical students influenced by their anticipation on family responsibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Alers, M.; Pepping, T.; Bor, H.; Verdonk, P.; Hamberg, K.; Lagro-Janssen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Physician gender is associated with differences in the male-to-female ratio between specialities and with preferred working hours. We explored how graduating students’ sex or full-time or part-time preference influences their speciality choice, taking work-life issues into account. Graduating medical students at Radboud University Medical Centre, the Netherlands participated in a survey (2008–2012) on career considerations. Logistic regression tested the influence of sex or working hour prefe...

  12. Collaborating at a distance: operations centres, tools, and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, Erik E.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Successful operation of the LHC and its experiments is crucial to the future of the worldwide high-energy physics program. Remote operations and monitoring centres have been established for the CMS experiment in several locations around the world. The development of remote centres began with the LHC{at}FNAL ROC and has evolved into a unified approach with distributed centres that are collectively referred to as 'CMS Centres Worldwide'. An overview of the development of remote centres for CMS will be presented, along with a synopsis of collaborative tools that are used in these centres today and trends in the development of remote operations capabilities for high-energy physics.

  13. NASA Benefits Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews several ways in which NASA research has benefited Earth and made life on Earth better. These innovations include: solar panels, recycled pavement, thermometer pill, invisible braces for straightening teeth, LASIK, aerodynamic helmets and tires for bicycles, cataract detection, technology that was used to remove Anthrax spores from mail handling facilities, study of atomic oxygen erosion of materials has informed the restoration of artwork, macroencapsulation (a potential mechanism to deliver anti cancer drugs to specific sites), and research on a salmonella vaccine. With research on the International Space Station just beginning, there will be opportunities for entrepreneurs and other government agencies to access space for their research and development. As well as NASA continuing its own research on human health and technology development.

  14. Making benefit transfers work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, I.J.; Brouwer, R.; Ferrini, S.

    We develop and test guidance principles for benefits transfers. These argue that when transferring across relatively similar sites, simple mean value transfers are to be preferred but that when sites are relatively dissimilar then value function transfers will yield lower errors. The paper also...... provides guidance on the appropriate specification of transferable value functions arguing that these should be developed from theoretical rather than ad-hoc statistical principles. These principles are tested via a common format valuation study of water quality improvements across five countries. Results...... support our various hypotheses providing a set of principles for future transfer studies. The application also considers new ways of incorporating distance decay, substitution and framing effects within transfers and presents a novel water quality ladder....

  15. Making benefit transfers work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, I. J.; Brouwer, R.; Ferrini, S.

    2011-01-01

    We develop and test guidance principles for benefits transfers. These argue that when transferring across relatively similar sites, simple mean value transfers are to be preferred but that when sites are relatively dissimilar then value function transfers will yield lower errors. The paper also...... provides guidance on the appropriate specification of transferable value functions arguing that these should be developed from theoretical rather than ad-hoc statistical principles. These principles are tested via a common format valuation study of water quality improvements across five countries. Results...... support our various hypotheses providing a set of principles for future transfer studies. The application also considers new ways of incorporating distance decay, substitution and framing effects within transfers and presents a novel water quality ladder....

  16. Predicting Anthracycline Benefit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, John M S; McConkey, Christopher C; Munro, Alison F

    2015-01-01

    as measured with a centromere enumeration probe (CEP17) predicted sensitivity to anthracyclines, we report here an individual patient-level pooled analysis of data from five trials comparing anthracycline-based chemotherapy with CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil) as adjuvant chemotherapy.......6% (TOP2A) of 3,846 patient cases with available tissue. Both CEP17and TOP2A treatment-by-marker interactions remained significant in adjusted analyses for recurrence-free and overall survival, whereas HER2 did not. A combined CEP17 and TOP2A-adjusted model predicted anthracycline benefit across all five...... trials for both recurrence-free (hazard ratio, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.82; P = .001) and overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.85; P = .005). CONCLUSION: This prospectively planned individual-patient pooled analysis of patient cases from five adjuvant trials confirms that patients whose...

  17. China Benefits from FDI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华民

    2007-01-01

    While China’s opening up policy has brought about rapid economic growth,it has also resulted in a certain loss of welfare.Many scholars have debated this issue extensively from different perspectives.An article entitled"An Open Economy Calls for New Development Theories"by Zhang Youwen (published in the Sept.2006 issue of China Economist) proposed a"new approach to opening up"-a reflection of the views held by some Chinese scholars. Disagreeing with these views,the author of this article believes that China should give more consideration to her resource endowment and economic growth stages and evaluate scientifically the benefits of"opening up".

  18. Analyses of Observed and Anticipated Changes in Extreme Climate Events in the Northwest Himalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmaveer Singh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, past (1970-2005 as well as future long term (2011-2099 trends in various extreme events of temperature and precipitation have been investigated over selected hydro-meteorological stations in the Sutlej river basin. The ensembles of two Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3 models: third generation Canadian Coupled Global Climate Model and Hadley Centre Coupled Model have been used for simulation of future daily time series of temperature (maximum and minimum and precipitation under A2 emission scenario. Large scale atmospheric variables of both models and National Centre for Environmental Prediction/National Centre for Atmospheric Research reanalysis data sets have been downscaled using statistical downscaling technique at individual stations. A total number of 25 extreme indices of temperature (14 and precipitation (11 as specified by the Expert Team of the World Meteorological Organization and Climate Variability and Predictability are derived for the past and future periods. Trends in extreme indices are detected over time using the modified Mann-Kendall test method. The stations which have shown either decrease or no change in hot extreme events (i.e., maximum TMax, warm days, warm nights, maximum TMin, tropical nights, summer days and warm spell duration indicators for 1970–2005 and increase in cold extreme events (cool days, cool nights, frost days and cold spell duration indicators are predicted to increase and decrease respectively in the future. In addition, an increase in frequency and intensity of extreme precipitation events is also predicted.

  19. The european paediatric legislation: benefits and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocchi Francesca

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lack of availability of appropriate medicines for children is an extensive and well known problem. Paediatricians and Physicians who take care of the paediatric population are primarily exposed to cope with this negative situation very often as more than half of the children are prescribed off-label or unlicensed medicines. Discussion Medicinal products used to treat this population should be subjected to ethical research of high quality and be explicitly authorised for use in children as it happens in adults. For that reason, and following the US experience, the European Paediatric Regulation has been amended in January 2007 by the European Commission. The objective of the Paediatric Regulation is to improve the development of high quality and ethically researched medicines for children aged 0 to 17 years, to facilitate the availability of information on the use of medicines for children, without subjecting children to unnecessary trials, or delaying the authorisation of medicines for use in adults. Summary The Paediatric Regulation is dramatically changing the regulatory environment for paediatric medicines in Europe and is fuelling an increased number of clinical trials in the paediatric population. Nevertheless, there are some risks and pitfalls that need to be anticipated and controlled in order to ensure that children will ultimately benefit from this European initiative.

  20. Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit Manual

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Part D Prescription Drug Benefit Manual (PDBM) is user guide to Part D Prescription Drug Program. It includes information on general provisions, benefits,...

  1. Potential benefits and risks of clinical xenotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper DKC

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available David KC Cooper,1 David Ayares21Thomas E Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Revivicor, Blacksburg, VA, USAAbstract: The transplantation of organs and cells from pigs into humans could overcome the critical and continuing problem of the lack of availability of deceased human organs and cells for clinical transplantation. Developments in the genetic engineering of pigs have enabled considerable progress to be made in the experimental laboratory in overcoming the immune barriers to successful xenotransplantation. With regard to pig organ xenotransplantation, antibody- and cell-mediated rejection have largely been overcome, and the current major barrier is the development of coagulation dysregulation. This is believed to be due to a combination of immune activation of the vascular endothelial cells of the graft and molecular incompatibilities between the pig and primate coagulation–anticoagulation systems. Pigs with new genetic modifications specifically directed to this problem are now becoming available. With regard to less complex tissues, such as islets (for the treatment of diabetes, neuronal cells (for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and corneas, the remaining barriers are less problematic, and graft survival in nonhuman primate models extends for >1 year in all three cases. In planning the initial clinical trials, consideration will be concentrated on the risk–benefit ratio, based to a large extent on the results of preclinical studies in nonhuman primates. If the benefit to the patient is anticipated to be high, eg, insulin-independent control of glycemia, and the potential risks low, eg, minimal risk of transfer of a porcine infectious agent, then a clinical trial would be justified.Keywords: infection, pigs, genetically-engineered, xenotransplantation, islets, xenotransplantation, organs

  2. VIA Ageing and Dementia, Research Centre, VIA University College, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Karen Pallesgaard; Maibom, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    New research environments are evolving in Denmark. Following a legislative change in 2013, the conditions for research in University Colleges have been improved. University Colleges (professionshøjskoler) includes the undergraduate-level educations such as nursing, occupational therapy and physio...... and physiotherapy and related research centres. The article describes such a research centre, namely VIA Ageing and Dementia, Research Centre, VIA University College, Denmark....

  3. Oral health screening of elderly people attending a community care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, S; Gelbier, S

    1989-08-01

    A socio-dental survey was carried out to determine the level of dental disease and treatment requirement among elderly people attending a Community Care Centre. A screening programme involving 293 elderly people demonstrated a normative need of 82% and a felt need of 53%. Seventy-six per cent would have benefited from dental care. Many individuals who both needed and wanted dental care were not receiving it because they were discouraged from doing so predominantly because of poor mobility. It is recommended, therefore, that dentists be included in multi-disciplinary teams caring for elderly people so that they can be screened and given the opportunity to obtain dental care.

  4. Healthier Than Thou? "Practicing What You Preach" Backfires by Increasing Anticipated Devaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Lauren C; Monin, Benoît

    2017-02-27

    Should experts always practice what they preach? When an expert displays exemplary behavior, individuals who fear negative devaluation sometimes anticipate that this expert will look down on them. As a result, displays of excellence can paradoxically turn off the very people they are trying to inspire. Five studies document this in the medical domain, showing that individuals who are overweight or obese and concerned about their weight avoid physicians who advertise their fitness, for fear that these doctors will judge them negatively. People (erroneously) believe that doctors have healthier habits than other individuals (Study 1), doctors advertise healthy habits (Study 2), and overweight individuals anticipate devaluation from, and thus avoid and feel less comfortable with, doctors who portray themselves as fitness-focused (Study 3). Studies 4 and 5 test strategies for physicians to emphasize their own fitness without turning off weight-sensitive patients. This work demonstrates that it is critical to take into account ego-defensive processes when attempting to lead by example. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. The lack of focused anticipation of verbal information in stutterers: a magnetoencephalographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walla, Peter; Mayer, Dagmar; Deecke, Lüder; Thurner, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    The motivation of this work was to investigate stuttering--a disorder of speech motor control--in the light of preparatory neural activity of voluntary movements related to speech. To this end, brain activity was recorded with a whole cortex magnetoencephalograph (MEG) in developmental stutterers and nonstutterers while three different tasks of single-word reading were performed. Visually presented words had to be silently read immediately after word presentation (condition 1), spoken aloud immediately after word presentation (condition 2), or spoken aloud after a delay of 1.3 s as indicated by a second visual stimulus (condition 3). Condition 2 clearly showed marked neurophysiological differences between stutterers and nonstutterers. Only nonstutterers showed clear neural activity before speech onset, which is interpreted as being linked to visual word presentation and to reflect focused verbal anticipation. This prespeech activity might reflect the "Bereitschaftsfeld2" (BF2) that is the later component of the "Bereitschaftsfeld", a well-known preparatory activity described for many other voluntary movements. Our results strongly link the lack of such preparatory brain activity at the single-word level to the disability of fluent speech in stutterers. The present results strongly support the notion that stuttering is related to impaired focused attention or anticipation.

  6. Anticipated Degradation Modes of Metallic Engineered Barriers for High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Martín A.

    2014-03-01

    Metallic engineered barriers must provide a period of absolute containment to high-level radioactive waste in geological repositories. Candidate materials include copper alloys, carbon steels, stainless steels, nickel alloys, and titanium alloys. The national programs of nuclear waste management have to identify and assess the anticipated degradation modes of the selected materials in the corresponding repository environment, which evolves in time. Commonly assessed degradation modes include general corrosion, localized corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, hydrogen-assisted cracking, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. Laboratory testing and modeling in metallurgical and environmental conditions of similar and higher aggressiveness than those expected in service conditions are used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the materials. This review focuses on the anticipated degradation modes of the selected or reference materials as corrosion-resistant barriers in nuclear repositories. These degradation modes depend not only on the selected alloy but also on the near-field environment. The evolution of the near-field environment varies for saturated and unsaturated repositories considering backfilled and unbackfilled conditions. In saturated repositories, localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking may occur in the initial aerobic stage, while general corrosion and hydrogen-assisted cracking are the main degradation modes in the anaerobic stage. Unsaturated repositories would provide an oxidizing environment during the entire repository lifetime. Microbiologically influenced corrosion may be avoided or minimized by selecting an appropriate backfill material. Radiation effects are negligible provided that a thick-walled container or an inner shielding container is used.

  7. Single Phase PV Grid-Connected in Smart Household Energy System with Anticipation on Fault Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feri Yusivar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an algorithm of Smart household energy systems to anticipate fault conditions in power system grid. Single phase PV grid-connected in smart household energy system is a smart system that determines electrical supply conditions to the load in residential electrical system. The smart system is consisted of two voltage source, conventional electricity system from national electricity provider as preferred source and photovoltaic as the alternative source. In smart system, fault conditions can be anticipated by selecting the appropriate voltage sources to supply the load. The condition of smart system can be described in power flow regulation to the load by detection and identification of amplitude, phase angle, and frequency of the voltage source compared to the system reference. The system mechanism is based on detection of voltage source using static transfer switch (STS with phase locked loop (PLL as voltage detection algorithm which output is used to determine decision logic algorithm for switching conditions. The results show that conditions of smart power system flow can be obtained based on voltage source selection in decision logic when fault condition occurs.

  8. Diminishing striatal activation across adolescent development during reward anticipation in offspring of schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Matthijs; de Leeuw, Max; Pouwels, Ruby; van den Munkhof, Hanna E; Kahn, René S; Hillegers, Manon

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder associated with impaired fronto-striatal functioning. Similar deficits are observed in unaffected siblings of patients, indicating that these deficits are linked to a familial risk for the disorder. Fronto-striatal deficits may arise during adolescence and precede clinical manifestation of the disorder. However, the development of the fronto-striatal network in adolescents at increased familial risk for schizophrenia is still poorly understood. In this cross-sectional study, we investigate the impact of familial risk on fronto-striatal functioning across age related to reward anticipation and receipt in 25 adolescent offspring of schizophrenia patients (SZ offspring) and 36 age-matched healthy controls (range 10-19years). Subjects performed a reward task while being scanned with functional MRI. Overall response times and the amount of money won did not differ between the groups. Striatal activation during reward anticipation decreased across age in the SZ offspring, while it did not in the healthy controls. Activation in the orbitofrontal cortex during reward receipt did not differ between the groups. These results, taken together with data from adult schizophrenia patients and their siblings, indicate that the diminishing striatal activation across adolescence may signify a familial vulnerability for schizophrenia.

  9. The Effects of Body Action and Attentive Anticipation on Oculomotor Fixation Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyosun Choi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Tiny eye movements, such as micro-saccades, ocular tremor, and drifts, occur involuntarily during fixation. We found evidence that involvement of body action and anticipation of visual stimuli modulates them. While eye movements were monitored, subjects performed the working memory task with a touch-screen display in two different conditions. In the passive condition, each number was shown for 400-ms and spaced in time by 500-ms automatically. In the active condition, touching action was required to trigger the appearance of each number. The delay between the touch and stimulus onset was constant within a block as 200, 500, or 800-ms. Subjects were prompted to type in the number sequence after five numbers were shown. As a measure of fixation instability, deviation of eye position was analyzed by comparing eye positions with those during the reference interval (0∼50ms time period after the number onset. We observed two results: first, the deviation was smaller in pre-reference time than in post-reference time. Second, the deviation was smaller in the active condition. These results show that micro eye movements are influenced by attentive anticipation of upcoming events, which becomes more pronounced with bodily interactions. These findings suggest a cross-modal interaction among visual, motor, and oculomotor systems.

  10. The Empowerment Strategy for The Food Crop Farmers in Anticipating The Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efriyani Sumastuti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia, the climate change and the global warming like changes in the pattern and distribution of the rainfall give impacts on agricultural production at large, especially in the food crops. These also cause droughts, floods, landslides, forest fires, rising temperatures in urban areas, and rising sea levels. The above impacts are felt by the farmers because those can lead to a decrease in production even the crop failure. This research aims to develop an empowerment strategy of the food crop farmers in anticipating the climate change in Central Java. The data used is the primary data obtained through in-depth interviews with key-person and the Focus Group Discussion (FGD. The Analysis Hierarchy Process (AHP is conducted to determine the program priorities and strate gies. The result of research shows that anticipating the climate change should be synergistically conducted in four aspects: human resources, technology, institutional and production, by involving various groups in the society. Various groups can be grouped into academics, businessmen / private sectors, government and community of food crop farmers / society.

  11. Factors associated with pregnant women's anticipations and experiences of HIV-related stigma in rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuca, Yvette P; Onono, Maricianah; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Turan, Janet M

    2012-01-01

    Pregnant women who fear or experience HIV-related stigma may not get care for their own health or medications to reduce perinatal transmission of HIV. This study examined factors associated with anticipating and experiencing HIV-related stigma among 1777 pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics in rural Kenya. Women were interviewed at baseline, offered HIV testing and care, and a sub-set was re-interviewed at 4-8 weeks postpartum. Women who were older, had less education, whose husbands had other wives, and who perceived community discrimination against people with HIV had significantly greater adjusted odds of anticipating HIV stigma. Over half of the HIV-positive women interviewed postpartum reported having experienced stigma, much of which was self-stigma. Women experiencing minor depression, and those whose family knew of their HIV status had significantly greater adjusted odds of experiencing stigma. Lack of women's empowerment, as well as depression, may be important risk factors for HIV-related stigma and discrimination.

  12. Anticipating flash-floods: Multi-scale aspects of the social response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutoff, Céline; Creutin, Jean-Dominique; Ruin, Isabelle; Borga, Marco

    2016-10-01

    This paper aims at exploring the anticipation phase before a flash flood, corresponding to the time between the first climatic signs and the peak-flow. We focus the analysis on people's behaviors observing how they use this period to organize themselves for facing the event. The analysis is made through the definition of three specific scales: the timeliness scale, an analytical scale of anticipatory actions and the scale of human response network. Using a cross-scale and cross level analysis enables to define different phases in the anticipation period where different kind of environmental precursors are mobilized by the actors in order to make sense of the situation and adapt. Three main points deserve attention at the end: firstly, the concepts of timeliness, anticipatory actions and crisis network scales enable to understand differently what happens both physically and socially during an extreme event; secondly, analyzing the precursors shows that each level of crisis network uses different kinds of signs for estimating the situation, organizing and reacting; thirdly, there is a potential for improvement in observation on both social and physical processes at different scales, for verifying the theory of the anticipatory phases.

  13. Anticipation versus adaptation in Evolutionary Algorithms: The case of Non-Stationary Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A. I.; Graña, M.; D'Anjou, A.; Torrealdea, F. J.

    1998-07-01

    From the technological point of view is usually more important to ensure the ability to react promptly to changing environmental conditions than to try to forecast them. Evolution Algorithms were proposed initially to drive the adaptation of complex systems to varying or uncertain environments. In the general setting, the adaptive-anticipatory dilemma reduces itself to the placement of the interaction with the environment in the computational schema. Adaptation consists of the estimation of the proper parameters from present data in order to react to a present environment situation. Anticipation consists of the estimation from present data in order to react to a future environment situation. This duality is expressed in the Evolutionary Computation paradigm by the precise location of the consideration of present data in the computation of the individuals fitness function. In this paper we consider several instances of Evolutionary Algorithms applied to precise problem and perform an experiment that test their response as anticipative and adaptive mechanisms. The non stationary problem considered is that of Non Stationary Clustering, more precisely the adaptive Color Quantization of image sequences. The experiment illustrates our ideas and gives some quantitative results that may support the proposition of the Evolutionary Computation paradigm for other tasks that require the interaction with a Non-Stationary environment.

  14. Systems in a Retardation and Anticipation Relation: Mathematical Developments, Interpretations, Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlacan, Eufrosina

    2008-10-01

    The starting point of the paper is the system of differential equations proposed by D. M. Dubois to express conjugate retardation and anticipation variables. The research proposes to find the relation between time shift, the constant parameters of the equations and the solutions of these equations. The 2nd and 3rd parts of the paper present mathematical calculus to solve the case when the current state of the slave system is an exponential function, then this state is presumed to be a linear function. There are demonstrated four theorems, especially by means of classical methods to solve ordinary differential equations. Conclusions are presented about each hypothesis which was considered. It is also studied the case when the time shift for the anticipation is different from the time shift of the retardation. The 4th part deals with the problem of systems which have an oscillating movement. The last part of the paper introduces man and his environment as advanced—retarded conjugate systems and makes links with the results of the mathematical calculus.

  15. Crystalline roof glazing - Westside shopping centre, Berne; Kristalline Dachverglasungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enkerli, W.

    2009-07-01

    This illustrated article takes a look at the new shopping and leisure centre on the western outskirts of Berne, Switzerland. In particular, the roof of this unusual building over the motorway with its sloping walls and zig-zag design is looked at. The centre's shopping mall, adventure baths and spa, a multiplex cinema, an old peoples' home and a hotel are briefly discussed, as is the embedding of the centre in its suburban environment. The roof construction with its crystalline skylights is examined and discussed in detail. The centre's building technical services are also briefly commented on.

  16. Benefit / Cost priorities : achieving commensurability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedley, W.C.; Choo, E.U.; Wijnmalen, D.J.D.

    2003-01-01

    Traditional Benefit/Cost analysis requires benefits and costs to be expressed in a common currency, usually dollars. More recently, benefits and costs have been expressed and compared as relative priorities. This process has been criticized because there is no guarantee that the two sources of prior

  17. Whole-genome sequencing analysis of phenotypic heterogeneity and anticipation in Li–Fraumeni cancer predisposition syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ariffin, Hany; Hainaut,Pierre; Puzio-Kuter, Anna; Choong, Soo Sin; Chan, Adelyne Sue Li; Tolkunov, Denis; Rajagopal, Gunaretnam; Kang, Wenfeng; Lim, Leon Li Wen; Krishnan, Shekhar; Chen, Kok-Siong; Achatz, Maria Isabel; Karsa, Mawar; Shamsani, Jannah; Levine, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    Germ-line mutation in the tumor suppressor TP53 causes Li–Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), a complex predisposition to multiple cancers. Types of cancers and ages at diagnosis vary among subjects and families, with apparent genetic anticipation: i.e., earlier cancer onset with successive generations. It has been proposed that anticipation is caused by accumulation of copy-number variations (CNV) in a context of TP53 haploinsufficiency. Using genome/exome sequencing, we found no evidence of increased ...

  18. The influence of expertise on brain activation of the action observation network during anticipation of tennis and volleyball serves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balser, Nils; Lorey, Britta; Pilgramm, Sebastian; Naumann, Tim; Kindermann, Stefan; Stark, Rudolf; Zentgraf, Karen; Williams, A Mark; Munzert, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    In many daily activities, and especially in sport, it is necessary to predict the effects of others' actions in order to initiate appropriate responses. Recently, researchers have suggested that the action-observation network (AON) including the cerebellum plays an essential role during such anticipation, particularly in sport expert performers. In the present study, we examined the influence of task-specific expertise on the AON by investigating differences between two expert groups trained in different sports while anticipating action effects. Altogether, 15 tennis and 16 volleyball experts anticipated the direction of observed tennis and volleyball serves while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The expert group in each sport acted as novice controls in the other sport with which they had only little experience. When contrasting anticipation in both expertise conditions with the corresponding untrained sport, a stronger activation of AON areas (SPL, SMA), and particularly of cerebellar structures, was observed. Furthermore, the neural activation within the cerebellum and the SPL was linearly correlated with participant's anticipation performance, irrespective of the specific expertise. For the SPL, this relationship also holds when an expert performs a domain-specific anticipation task. Notably, the stronger activation of the cerebellum as well as of the SMA and the SPL in the expertise conditions suggests that experts rely on their more fine-tuned perceptual-motor representations that have improved during years of training when anticipating the effects of others' actions in their preferred sport. The association of activation within the SPL and the cerebellum with the task achievement suggests that these areas are the predominant brain sites involved in fast motor predictions. The SPL reflects the processing of domain-specific contextual information and the cerebellum the usage of a predictive internal model to solve the anticipation task.

  19. The influence of expertise on brain activation of the Action Observation Network during anticipation of tennis and volleyball serves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils eBalser

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In many daily activities, and especially in sport, it is necessary to predict the effects of others’ actions in order to initiate appropriate responses. Recently, researchers have suggested that the action–observation network (AON including the cerebellum plays an essential role during such anticipation, particularly in sport expert performers. In the present study, we examined the influence of task-specific expertise on the AON by investigating differences between two expert groups trained in different sports while anticipating action effects. Altogether, 15 tennis and 16 volleyball experts anticipated the direction of observed tennis and volleyball serves while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The expert group in each sport acted as novice controls in the other sport with which they had only little experience. When contrasting anticipation in both expertise conditions with the corresponding untrained sport, a stronger activation of AON areas (SPL, SMA, and particularly of cerebellar structures, was observed. Furthermore, the neural activation within the cerebellum and the SPL was linearly correlated with participant’s anticipation performance, irrespective of the specific expertise. For the SPL, this relationship also holds when an expert performs a domain-specific anticipation task. Notably, the stronger activation of the cerebellum as well as of the SMA and the SPL in the expertise conditions suggests that experts rely on their more fine-tuned perceptual-motor representations that have improved during years of training when anticipating the effects of others’ actions in their preferred sport. The association of activation within the SPL and the cerebellum with the task achievement suggests that these areas are the predominant brain sites involved in fast motor predictions. The SPL reflects the processing of domain-specific contextual information and the cerebellum the usage of a predictive internal model to

  20. Anticipation and experience of emotions in patients with schizophrenia and negative symptoms. An experimental study in a social context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maike; Fritzsche, Anja; Lincoln, Tania M

    2016-01-01

    Negative symptoms play a central role in the impairment of social functioning in schizophrenia. Healthy individuals use anticipated emotions to guide their decisions to seek out social interactions. It is unknown whether social withdrawal in negative symptoms is related to a biased anticipation of emotions that will arise in social situations. This study thus examined differences between patients with negative symptoms of schizophrenia and healthy controls in the anticipation and experience of positive and negative emotions related to a social interaction. In a between-subject factorial design, participants were instructed to either predict or to experience emotions related to a simulated social inclusion and exclusion interaction. Overall, patients anticipated more intense negative emotions than controls. Divided by the type of social situation, however, patients reported less intense positive emotions than controls with regard to social inclusion, but not with regard to social exclusion. The lack of an overall deficit in anticipation of positive emotions speaks against the assumption that anticipation abnormalities in negative symptoms are due to a neurocognitive deficit. Rather, the findings seem to reflect negative beliefs about potentially rewarding social situations in people with negative symptoms.

  1. Mentoring practices benefiting pediatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese, Meghan M; Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Huth, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining predictors of pediatric nurse protégé mentoring benefits demonstrated that protégé perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations promoting mutual mentoring benefits. This descriptive correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet® recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital advances nursing science by demonstrating how mentoring practices benefit pediatric nurse protégés.

  2. Ecological Restoration for Community Benefit: People and Landscapes in Northern California, 1840-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Diekmann, Lucy Ontario

    2011-01-01

    Restoration has important ecological work to do, particularly maintaining biological diversity and repairing impaired ecological functions. In addition, many people anticipate and hope that restoration will also produce changes in and provide benefits to human communities. Although these expectations are widespread, relatively little is known about how well restoration projects achieve their goals generally, and even less about the social and cultural consequences of restoration work.This dis...

  3. Cardiovascular benefits of exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal SK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Shashi K AgarwalMedical Director, Agarwal Health Center, NJ, USAAbstract: Regular physical activity during leisure time has been shown to be associated with better health outcomes. The American Heart Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine all recommend regular physical activity of moderate intensity for the prevention and complementary treatment of several diseases. The therapeutic role of exercise in maintaining good health and treating diseases is not new. The benefits of physical activity date back to Susruta, a 600 BC physician in India, who prescribed exercise to patients. Hippocrates (460–377 BC wrote “in order to remain healthy, the entire day should be devoted exclusively to ways and means of increasing one's strength and staying healthy, and the best way to do so is through physical exercise.” Plato (427–347 BC referred to medicine as a sister art to physical exercise while the noted ancient Greek physician Galen (129–217 AD penned several essays on aerobic fitness and strengthening muscles. This article briefly reviews the beneficial effects of physical activity on cardiovascular diseases.Keywords: exercise, cardiovascular disease, lifestyle changes, physical activity, good health

  4. HEALTH BENEFITS OF BARLEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of lifestyle diseases is increasing day by day. Mostly the younger generation do not have much awareness about healthy nutritional supplements. One such important cereal grain not used mostly by youngsters is barley It is a good old grain with so many health benefits like weight reduction, decreasing blood pressure, blood cholesterol, blood glucose in Type 2 diabetes and preventing colon cancer. It is easily available and cheap grain. It contains both soluble and insoluble fiber, protein, vitamins B and E, minerals selenium, magnesium and iron, copper, flavonoids and anthocynins. Barley contains soluble fiber, beta glucan binds to bile acids in the intestines and thereby decreasing plasma cholesterol levels. Absorbed soluble fiber decreases cholesterol synthesis by liver and cleansing blood vessels. Insoluble fiber provides bulkiness in the intestines, thereby satiety. decreased appetite. It promotes intestinal movements relieving constipation, cleansing colonic harmful bacteria and reduced incidence of colonic cancer. It is a good source of niacin ,reducing LDL levels and increasing HDL levels. Selenium and vitamin E providing beneficial antioxidant effects. Magnesium, a cofactor for many carbohydrate metabolism enzymes and high fiber content contributes for its blood glucose reducing effect in Type 2 diabetes. It is having good diuretic activity and is useful in urinary tract infections. Barley contains gluten, contraindicated in celiac disease.

  5. Harms and benefits: collecting ethnicity data in a clinical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varcoe, Colleen; Browne, Annette J; Wong, Sabrina; Smye, Victoria L

    2009-05-01

    Although ethnicity data are collected in most countries at the population level, it has become more common to collect such data in healthcare settings, partially in response to growing health and social inequities worldwide. However, the implications of doing so have not been studied. This two-year study was designed to critically examine the implications of collecting ethnicity data in healthcare settings. Using a critical ethnographic approach, we interviewed 104 patients, community and healthcare leaders, and healthcare workers within diverse clinical contexts in a large city in Western Canada in 2006-2007. This paper presents an interpretive thematic analysis, using an ethical lens, of the harms and benefits associated with the process of data collection in a clinical context. While most leaders and healthcare workers and some patients envisioned potential benefits associated with having ethnicity data, these benefits were seen as largely contingent upon action being taken to ameliorate inequities. Overwhelmingly, however, leaders from ethno-cultural communities and patients of diverse identities anticipated potential harm arising both from having ethnicity data and the process of collection. The analysis illustrates that in today's sociopolitical context, collecting ethnicity data in clinical contexts may engender considerable harm, particularly for racialized, vulnerable patients. If ethnicity data are currently collected at the population level, evidence of benefit is required before proceeding to collect these data at the point of care.

  6. Mass Segregation in the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Hopman, Clovis

    2010-01-01

    Two-body energy exchange between stars orbiting massive black holes (MBHs) leads to the formation of a power-law density distribution n(r)~r^(-a) that diverges towards the MBH. For a single mass population, a=7/4 and the flow of stars is much less than N(centre (GC) is t_r ~2-3 * 10^(10) yr, a cusp should form in less than a Hubble time. The absence of a visible cusp of old stars in the GC poses a challenge to these models, ...

  7. Detecting pulsars in the Galactic centre

    CERN Document Server

    Rajwade, Kaustubh; Anderson, Loren

    2016-01-01

    Although high-sensitivity surveys have revealed a number of highly dispersed pulsars in the inner Galaxy, none have so far been found in the Galactic centre (GC) region, which we define to be within a projected distance of 1~pc from Sgr~A*. This null result is surprising given that several independent lines of evidence predict a sizeable population of neutron stars in the region. Here, we present a detailed analysis of both the canonical and millisecond pulsar populations in the GC and consider free-free absorption and multi-path scattering to be the two main sources of flux mitigation. We demonstrate the sensitivity limits of previous surveys are not sufficient to detect GC pulsar population, and investigate the optimum observing frequency for future surveys. Depending on the degree of scattering and free-free absorption in the GC, current surveys constrain the size of the potentially observable population (i.e. those beaming towards us) to be up to 50 canonical pulsars and 1430 millisecond pulsars. We find ...

  8. The Galactic Centre in the Far Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Etxaluze, M; Tolls, V; Stark, A A; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the far infrared dust emission from the Galactic Centre region, including the Circumnuclear Disk (CND) and other structures, using Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric observations. These Herschel data are complemented by unpublished observations by the Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO LWS), which used parallel mode scans to obtain photometric images of the region with a larger beam than Herschel but with a complementary wavelength coverage and more frequent sampling with ten detectors observing at ten different wavelengths in the range from 46 to 180 \\mum, where the emission peaks. We also include data from the MSX at 21.3 \\mum for completeness. We model the combined ISO LWS continuum plus Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric data toward the central 2 pc in Sgr A*, a region that includes the CND. We find that the FIR spectral energy distribution is best represented by a continuum that is the sum of three greybody curves from dust at temperatures of 90, 44.5, and 23 K. We ...

  9. Rockshire Care Centre, Rockshire Road, Ferrybank, Waterford.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bushe, Chris J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Weight gain is commonly observed during psychotropic treatments for chronic forms of severe mental illness and is most rapid during the early treatment phases. All formats of behavioural weight intervention programmes have suggested that weight gain can be prevented or reversed in some patients. There is no data on these programmes in acutely unwell inpatients whom may be the major beneficiaries. METHODS: A modular behavioural intervention programme (Solutions for Wellness) used in SMI outpatients since 2002 in Ireland has been adapted for inpatient use. Preliminary data is reported from 5 centres in Ireland. RESULTS: In 47 inpatients the mean weight change was +0.26 kg (SD 2.02) with a median change of 0 kg. Mean follow-up was 23.7 (SD 21.6) days, and median 14 days (range 6-98 days). There was no difference in mean weight change in those patients involved for > 35 days compared with < 35 days (+0.26 kg; 0.25 kg; p = 0.5). Weight loss or maintenance was seen in 70% of patients. CONCLUSION: These preliminary data are supportive of the concept that acutely unwell inpatients with SMI may engage with a behavioural weight programme. Weight change observed contrasts with the significant weight gain often seen in most subjects. Further clinical trials are warranted.

  10. The LHC Physics Centre at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    As the LHC goes on line for its first exploration of the new high-energy frontier, CERN is also getting ready to enhance the support it provides for the analysis and interpretation of the emerging data.    The LHC Physics Centre at CERN (LPCC) has started up over the past couple of months, beginning with a series of initiatives ranging from Workshops to lectures for students. More details about the LPCC will be featured in a forthcoming Bulletin article. In the meantime, you can consult the LPCC web page, now available at http://cern.ch/lpcc. This offers the high energy physics community a portal to the LPCC's activities, as well as to useful resources, tools and information about the LHC physics programme, the progress of accelerator operations, relevant workshops and events around the world, and much more. The LPCC will shortly begin issuing a weekly bulletin of its own, distributed by e-mail. Members of the CERN physics community and subscribers to the CERN Bulletin will receive the ...

  11. The LHC Physics Centre at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Although raw physics data is produced at CERN, thanks to the GRID its analysis is performed in various institutes worldwide. In addition, workshops, conferences and meetings take place all over the world. The physicist community is decentralized, and CERN must continue to provide intellectual leadership. The LHC Physics Centre is the tool that will make this possible.   Until the early days of LEP, a large part of the scientific activity related to CERN’s experiments was strongly centered at the Laboratory. Few places had the infrastructure to host activities such as the working groups preparing the Yellow Reports, and the limited access to information in the pre-web era made CERN the natural place to learn what was happening in the field. “I remember the days when we, the theorists, would come to CERN just to read the most recent preprints, which were reaching CERN's Library before we could get them in our institutes”, says Michelangelo Mangano, a member of the Theo...

  12. The Charles Perkins Centre's Twins Research Node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lucas C; Craig, Jeffrey M; Hopper, John L; Carrick, Susan E

    2016-08-01

    Twins can help researchers disentangle the roles of genes from those of the environment on human traits, health, and diseases. To realize this potential, the Australian Twin Registry (ATR), University of Melbourne, and the Charles Perkins Centre (CPC), University of Sydney, established a collaboration to form the Twins Research Node, a highly interconnected research facility dedicated specifically to research involving twins. This collaboration aims to foster the adoption of twin designs as important tools for research in a range of health-related domains. The CPC hosted their Twins Research Node's launch seminar entitled 'Double the power of your research with twin studies', in which experienced twin researchers described how twin studies are supporting scientific discoveries and careers. The launch also featured twin pairs who have actively participated in research through the ATR. Researchers at the CPC were surveyed before the event to gauge their level of understanding and interest in utilizing twin research. This article describes the new Twins Research Node, discusses the survey's main results and reports on the launch seminar.

  13. Radio polarimetry of Galactic centre pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Schnitzeler, D H F M; Ferrière, K; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Noutsos, A; Shannon, R M

    2016-01-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic centre (GC) we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A*. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ~ 16-33 microgauss; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (~ 12 degrees). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsar...

  14. Estimation of Social Benefits in Cost-benefit Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Beáta Fodor

    2012-01-01

    While examining the cost-benefit analysis related to public policy decisions in the Hungarian and international literature, this paper is looking for the answer to the question of what the methodological principles are according to which the benefit impacts can be determined. The processed Hungarian and English-language studies indicate that the theoretical-methodological questions of the determination of benefit impacts are not clear cut. The author has constructed a model that contains the ...

  15. The Discharge Coefficient of a Centre-Pivot Roof Window

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Ahsan; Afshari, Alireza; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2012-01-01

    value of discharge coefficient is used. The constant value of discharge coefficient leads to deceptive airflow estimation in the cases of centre-pivot roof windows. The object of this paper is to study and evaluate the discharge coefficient of the centre pivot roof window. Focus is given...

  16. Importance of patient centred care for various patient groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Boer, D. de

    2010-01-01

    Background: Though patient centred care is a somewhat ‘fuzzy’ concept, in general it is considered as something to strive for. However, preliminary evidence suggests that the importance of elements of patient-centred care (PCC), such as communication, information and shared decision making, may vary

  17. Opportunity Centred Learning: An Innovation in Enterprise Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, David

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an approach called opportunity centred learning that has been developed by the author and applied in the field of enterprise education. The relationship between opportunity centred learning and existing theory and practice in learning and education is outlined in comparison with problem-based learning and action learning, and…

  18. Low-Income Parents' Adult Interactions at Childcare Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jeanne L.; Martin, Anne; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the extent and nature of low-income parents' interactions with other parents and staff at childcare centres, despite the potential for these interactions to provide emotional, informational, and instrumental support. This study interviewed 51 parents at three childcare centres in low-income neighbourhoods in New York City.…

  19. Science Centres: A Resource for School and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, Miranda; Mantero, Alfonso; Marasco, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    We present a science centre established in Genoa on an agreement between Municipality of Genoa and Department of Physics of University of Genoa. The aim is to offer children, young people and community an opportunity to approach science in a playful way. The centre staffs guide the visitors through the exhibits, attracting their interests towards…

  20. The CERN Control Centre is up and running!

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The CERN Control Centre (CCC) that combines all the control rooms for the accelerators, the cryogenic system and the technical infrastructure came into operation on 1st February. On 1st February, at 2.00 p.m., Patrick Villeton Pachot started the first Technical Infrastructure shift at the brand new CERN Control Centre.

  1. The Hierarchy Model of the Size Distribution of Centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tinbergen (Jan)

    1968-01-01

    textabstractWe know that human beings live in centres, that is, cities, towns and villages of different size. Both large and small centres have a number of advantages and disadvantages, different for different people and this is why we have a whole range of sizes. Statistically, we even find that th

  2. The internal anticipation of sensory action effects: when action induces FFA and PPA activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Kühn

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary action – in particular the ability to produce desired effects in the environment – is fundamental to human existence. According to ideomotor theory we can achieve goals in the environment by means of anticipating their outcomes. We aimed at providing neurophysiological evidence for the assumption that performing actions calls for the activation of brain areas associated with the sensory effects usually evoked by the actions. We conducted an fMRI study in which right and left button presses lead to the presentation of face and house pictures. We compared a baseline phase with the same phase after participants experienced the association between button presses and pictures. We found an increase in the parahippocampal place area (PPA for the response that has been associated with house pictures and fusiform face area (FFA for the response that has been coupled with face pictures. This observation constitutes support for ideomotor theory.

  3. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case Study in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G

    2011-01-01

    . In this article, we posit a Bayesian approach to infer genetic anticipation under flexible random effects models for censored data that capture the effect of successive generations on AOO. Primary interest lies in the random effects. Misspecifying the distribution of random effects may result in incorrect...... inferential conclusions. We compare the fit of four-candidate random effects distributions via Bayesian model fit diagnostics. A related statistical issue here is isolating the confounding effect of changes in secular trends, screening, and medical practices that may affect time to disease detection across...... birth cohorts. Using historic cancer registry data, we borrow from relative survival analysis methods to adjust for changes in age-specific incidence across birth cohorts. Our motivating case study comes from a Danish cancer register of 124 families with mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes known...

  4. Deconstructing the "reign of error": interpersonal warmth explains the self-fulfilling prophecy of anticipated acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Danu Anthony; Cameron, Jessica J; Wood, Joanne V; Gaucher, Danielle; Holmes, John G

    2009-09-01

    People's expectations of acceptance often come to create the acceptance or rejection they anticipate. The authors tested the hypothesis that interpersonal warmth is the behavioral key to this acceptance prophecy: If people expect acceptance, they will behave warmly, which in turn will lead other people to accept them; if they expect rejection, they will behave coldly, which will lead to less acceptance. A correlational study and an experiment supported this model. Study 1 confirmed that participants' warm and friendly behavior was a robust mediator of the acceptance prophecy compared to four plausible alternative explanations. Study 2 demonstrated that situational cues that reduced the risk of rejection also increased socially pessimistic participants' warmth and thus improved their social outcomes.

  5. PARRHESIA, PHAEDRA, AND THE POLIS: ANTICIPATING PSYCHOANALYTIC FREE ASSOCIATION AS DEMOCRATIC PRACTICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Jill

    2015-07-01

    This essay explores the mostly unexamined analogy of psychoanalytic free association to democratic free speech. The author turns back to a time when free speech was a matter of considerable discussion: the classical period of the Athenian constitution and its experiment with parrhesia. Ordinarily translated into English as "free speech," parrhesia is startlingly relevant to psychoanalysis. The Athenian stage-in particular, Hippolytus (Euripides, 5th century BCE)-illustrates this point. Euripides's tragic tale anticipates Freud's inquiries, exploring the fundamental link between free speech and female embodiment. The author suggests that psychoanalysis should claim its own conception of a polis as a mediated and ethical space between private and public spheres, between body and mind, and between speaking and listening communities.

  6. Five-Year-Old Preschoolers’ Sharing is Influenced by Anticipated Reciprocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Mingrui; Jiannong, Shi; Wu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    that children shared more with the partner when they knew that they would be a recipient later. In Experiment 2, the child was always the recipient when the partner donated, but the partner’s resources were more desirable than the child’s in the high-value condition, and less desirable in the low-value...... condition. We found that children were more generous when the partner’s resources were valued higher. These findings demonstrate that 5-year-old preschoolers’ sharing choices take into account the anticipated reciprocity of the recipient, suggesting either self-interested tactical sharing or direct...... reciprocity in advance of receiving. Specifically, they adjust their sharing behavior depending on whether a partner has the potential to reciprocate, and whether it is worth sharing relative to the value of the payback....

  7. Heightened anxiety in Army Reserve nurses anticipating mobilization during Operation Desert Storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynd, C A; Dziedzicki, R E

    1992-12-01

    Research was conducted in January 1991 to compare anxiety levels of Army Reserve and civilian registered nurses and to identify factors contributing to high anxiety. It was predicted that anxiety would be greater in reservist nurses who were anticipating mobilization during Operation Desert Storm. This hypothesis was supported through the examination of t test statistical analyses and stepwise multiple regression, which demonstrated that years of military service, gender, and the presence and number of children in nurses' families related to higher anxiety levels. Army Reserve nurses identified separation from loved ones and financial concerns as the largest contributors to anxiety, while significant interventions for alleviating anxiety included detailed and consistent information from Army commands.

  8. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case Study in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G;

    2011-01-01

    inferential conclusions. We compare the fit of four-candidate random effects distributions via Bayesian model fit diagnostics. A related statistical issue here is isolating the confounding effect of changes in secular trends, screening, and medical practices that may affect time to disease detection across...... to cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome (LS). We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this article. Our model predicts family-level anticipation effects that are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high-risk families....... birth cohorts. Using historic cancer registry data, we borrow from relative survival analysis methods to adjust for changes in age-specific incidence across birth cohorts. Our motivating case study comes from a Danish cancer register of 124 families with mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes known...

  9. Rediscovering Einstein's legacy: How Einstein anticipates Kuhn and Feyerabend on the nature of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberheim, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Thomas Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend promote incommensurability as a central component of their conflicting accounts of the nature of science. This paper argues that in so doing, they both develop Albert Einstein's views, albeit in different directions. Einstein describes scientific revolutions as conceptual replacements, not mere revisions, endorsing 'Kant-on-wheels' metaphysics in light of 'world change'. Einstein emphasizes underdetermination of theory by evidence, rational disagreement in theory choice, and the non-neutrality of empirical evidence. Einstein even uses the term 'incommensurable' specifically to apply to challenges posed to comparatively evaluating scientific theories in 1949, more than a decade before Kuhn and Feyerabend. This analysis shows how Einstein anticipates substantial components of Kuhn and Feyerabend's views, and suggests that there are strong reasons to suspect that Kuhn and Feyerabend were directly inspired by Einstein's use of the term 'incommensurable', as well as his more general methodological and philosophical reflections.

  10. COMPETITIVE INVESTMENT STRATEGIES IN NEW TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION WITH A FURTHER NEW TECHNOLOGY ANTICIPATED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baojian YIN; Shigeng HU

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies a general dynamic duopoly in which two firms compete in the adoption of current technology with a further new technology anticipated. Three kinds of equilibria may occur in technology adoption, namely the preemptive, sequential, and simultaneous equilibrium, depending on the level of operating costs and the first-move advantage. It shows that the faster technological innovation encourages the leader to invest earlier, while induces the follower to invest later. Furthermore,like the investment costs, with the increase of the operating costs, the follower tends to invest later,while the leader tends to invest earlier. However, the investment thresholds are more sensitive to the change of the operating costs than that of the investment costs.

  11. Pragmatic expectations and linguistic evidence: Listeners anticipate but do not integrate common ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Dale J

    2008-10-01

    When listeners search for the referent of a speaker's expression, they experience interference from privileged knowledge, knowledge outside of their 'common ground' with the speaker. Evidence is presented that this interference reflects limitations in lexical processing. In three experiments, listeners' eye movements were monitored as they searched for the target of a speaker's referring expression in a display that also contained a phonological competitor (e.g., bucket/buckle). Listeners anticipated that the speaker would refer to something in common ground, but they did not experience less interference from a competitor in privileged ground than from a matched competitor in common ground. In contrast, interference from the competitor was eliminated when it was ruled out by a semantic constraint. These findings support a view of comprehension as relying on multiple systems with distinct access to information and present a challenge for constraint-based views of common ground.

  12. Anticipated future of Latvia and Russia during a global economic crisis: A mixed methods perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesovs Aleksandrs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-cultural study explored subjective predictors of more positive evaluation of the future of the country during a global socioeconomic crisis. A sequential mixed-method design was chosen for an exploration of students’ expectations in Russia and Latvia as countries contrasting in macro-contextual conditions. In 2009, Study 1 was designed as a thematic analysis of essays on topic “The Future of Latvia/Russia”. The results demonstrated that the future of a country is anticipated by taking into account external influences, the present of the country, and its perceived power and stability. In 2011, Study 2 involved these themes as independent variables in a multiple regression model. The results demonstrated that positive evaluation of the present and higher perceived power of the country are individuallevel predictors of more positive evaluation of its future. Observed concordance of models indicates relatively high importance of subjective view of the country in the changing world.

  13. Anticipated Ethics and Regulatory Challenges in PCORnet: The National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Joseph; Califf, Robert; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    PCORnet, the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network, seeks to establish a robust national health data network for patient-centered comparative effectiveness research. This article reports the results of a PCORnet survey designed to identify the ethics and regulatory challenges anticipated in network implementation. A 12-item online survey was developed by leadership of the PCORnet Ethics and Regulatory Task Force; responses were collected from the 29 PCORnet networks. The most pressing ethics issues identified related to informed consent, patient engagement, privacy and confidentiality, and data sharing. High priority regulatory issues included IRB coordination, privacy and confidentiality, informed consent, and data sharing. Over 150 IRBs and five different approaches to managing multisite IRB review were identified within PCORnet. Further empirical and scholarly work, as well as practical and policy guidance, is essential if important initiatives that rely on comparative effectiveness research are to move forward.

  14. High ratings of satisfaction with fertility treatment are common: findings from the Copenhagen Multi-centre Psychosocial Infertility (COMPI) Research Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J

    2003-01-01

    /delivery and the report of marital benefits resulting from the infertility experience. Lower social class was a significant predictor for satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: Both men and women in fertility treatment had high ratings on medical and patient-centred care. It seemed that satisfaction with the psychosocial services...

  15. Primary and secondary somatosensory cortex responses to anticipation and pain: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthen, Siân F; Hobson, Anthony R; Hall, Stephen D; Aziz, Qasim; Furlong, Paul L

    2011-03-01

    Several brain regions, including the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices (SI and SII, respectively), are functionally active during the pain experience. Both of these regions are thought to be involved in the sensory-discriminative processing of pain and recent evidence suggests that SI in particular may also be involved in more affective processing. In this study we used MEG to investigate the hypothesis that frequency-specific oscillatory activity may be differentially associated with the sensory and affective components of pain. In eight healthy participants (four male), MEG was recorded during a visceral pain experiment comprising baseline, anticipation, pain and post-pain phases. Pain was delivered via intraluminal oesophageal balloon distension (four stimuli at 1 Hz). Significant bilateral but asymmetrical changes in neural activity occurred in the β-band within SI and SII. In SI, a continuous increase in neural activity occurred during the anticipation phase (20-30 Hz), which continued during the pain phase but at a lower frequency (10-15 Hz). In SII, oscillatory changes only occurred during the pain phase, predominantly in the 20-30 Hz β band, and were coincident with the stimulus. These data provide novel evidence of functional diversity within SI, indicating a role in attentional and sensory aspects of pain processing. In SII, oscillatory changes were predominantly stimulus-related, indicating a role in encoding the characteristics of the stimulus. We therefore provide objective evidence of functional heterogeneity within SI and functional segregation between SI and SII, and suggest that the temporal and frequency dynamics within cortical regions may offer valuable insights into pain processing.

  16. Identification of a candidate biomarker from perfusion MRI to anticipate glioblastoma progression after chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, J. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); Institut Claudius Regaud/Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Tensaouti, F. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); Chaltiel, L. [Institut Claudius Regaud/Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse - Oncopole, Department of Biostatistics, Toulouse (France); Lotterie, J.A. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); CHU Rangueil, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Toulouse (France); Catalaa, I. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); CHU Rangueil, Department of Radiology, Toulouse (France); Sunyach, M.P. [Centre Leon Berard, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lyon (France); Ibarrola, D. [CERMEP - Imagerie du Vivant, Lyon (France); Noel, G. [EA 3430, University of Strasbourg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Paul Strauss, Strasbourg (France); Truc, G. [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dijon (France); Walker, P. [University of Burgundy, Laboratory of Electronics, Computer Science and Imaging (Le2I), UMR 6306 CNRS, Dijon (France); Magne, N. [Institut de cancerologie Lucien-Neuwirth, Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Priest-en-Jarez (France); Charissoux, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France); Ken, S. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); Institut Claudius Regaud/Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse - Oncopole, Department of Medical Physics, Toulouse (France); Peran, P. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); Universite Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, UMR 1214, Toulouse (France); Berry, I. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); CHU Rangueil, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Toulouse (France); Universite Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, UMR 1214, Toulouse (France); Moyal, E.C. [Institut Claudius Regaud/Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Universite Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); INSERM U1037, Centre de Recherches contre le Cancer de Toulouse, Toulouse (FR); Laprie, A. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (FR); Institut Claudius Regaud/Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (FR); Universite Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (FR)

    2016-11-15

    To identify relevant relative cerebral blood volume biomarkers from T2* dynamic-susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging to anticipate glioblastoma progression after chemoradiation. Twenty-five patients from a prospective study with glioblastoma, primarily treated by chemoradiation, were included. According to the last follow-up MRI confirmed status, patients were divided into: relapse group (n = 13) and control group (n = 12). The time of last MR acquisition was t{sub end}; MR acquisitions performed at t{sub end-2M}, t{sub end-4M} and t{sub end-6M} (respectively 2, 4 and 6 months before t{sub end}) were analyzed to extract relevant variations among eleven perfusion biomarkers (B). These variations were assessed through R(B), as the absolute value of the ratio between ∇B from t{sub end-4M} to t{sub end-2M} and ∇B from t{sub end-6M} to t{sub end-4M}. The optimal cut-off for R(B) was determined using receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis. The fraction of hypoperfused tumor volume (F{sub h}P{sub g}) was a relevant biomarker. A ratio R(F{sub h}P{sub g}) ≥ 0.61 would have been able to anticipate relapse at the next follow-up with a sensitivity/specificity/accuracy of 92.3 %/63.6 %/79.2 %. High R(F{sub h}Pg) (≥0.61) was associated with more relapse at t{sub end} compared to low R(F{sub h}Pg) (75 % vs 12.5 %, p = 0.008). Iterative analysis of F{sub h}P{sub g} from consecutive examinations could provide surrogate markers to predict progression at the next follow-up. (orig.)

  17. Mathematical Physics Framework SustainingNatural Anticipation and Selection of Attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfons Salden

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available An ambient intelligent environment is definitely a prerequisite for anticipating the needs and catching the attention of systems. But how to endow such an environment with natural anticipatory and attentive features is still a hardly ever properly addressed question. Before providing a roadmap towards such an ambient intelligent environment we first give cognitive-ergonomic accounts for how natural anticipation and selection of attention (NASA emerge in living organisms. In particular, we describe why, when and how exploratory and goal-directed acts by living organisms are controlled while optimizing their changing and limited structural and functional capabilities of multimodal sensor, cognitive and actuator systems. Next, we describe how NASA can be embedded and embodied in sustainable intelligent multimodal systems (SIMS. Such systems allow an ambient intelligent environment to (self- interact taking its contexts into account. In addition, collective intelligent agents (CIA distribute, store, extend, maintain, optimize, diversify and sustain the NASA embedded and embodied in the ambient intelligent environment. Finally, we present the basic ingredients of a mathematical-physical framework for empirically modeling and sustaining NASA within SIMS by CIA in an ambient intelligent environment. An environment which is modeled this way, robustly and reliably over time aligns multi-sensor detection and fusion; multimodal fusion, dialogue planning and fission; multi actuator fission, rendering and presentation schemes. NASA residing in such an environment are then active within every phase of perception-decision-action cycles, and are gauged and renormalized to its physics. After determining and assessing across several evolutionary dynamic scales appropriate fitness, utility and measures, NASA can be realized by reinforcement learning and self-organization.

  18. Anticipation in myotonic dystrophy type 1 parents with small CTG expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratte, Annabelle; Prévost, Claude; Puymirat, Jack; Mathieu, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy and has the world's highest prevalence in the Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean region, due to a founder effect. This autosomal dominant disorder results from an unstable CTG repeat expansion in DMPK. This region of Canada has had a family screening and predictive testing program for this disorder since 1988. Heterozygotes for small expansions (50-100 CTG repeats) can be asymptomatic or minimally affected. The aim of this study was to assess anticipation for these individuals. At the time of this study, the molecular data of 40 individuals and their 76 affected children were available. We compared 76 parent-child pairs. Most offspring (92.1%) had a larger number of repeats than their parent and the median number of repeats in the offspring was 325 (range, 57-2000). The number of CTG repeats was significantly greater when the mutation was transmitted by a father (median, 425 repeats; range, 70-2000), than when it was transmitted by a mother (median, 200 repeats; range, 57-1400). The majority (65.8%) of children also had a more severe phenotype than their parent but the sex of the parent had no significant influence on the severity of the child's phenotype. No congenital phenotype was observed. These results confirm that anticipation is present even when the parent is heterozygous for a small CTG expansion. The parental sex has an impact on the size of the repeat in the next generation, larger increases being transmitted by males with a small expansion.

  19. Stromal networking: cellular connections in the germinal centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Alice E; Linterman, Michelle A

    2017-03-17

    Secondary lymphoid organs are organized into distinct zones, governed by different types of mesenchymal stromal cells. These stromal cell subsets are critical for the generation of protective humoral immunity because they direct the migration of, and interaction between, multiple immune cell types to form the germinal centre. The germinal centre response generates long-lived antibody-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells which can provide long-term protection against re-infection. Stromal cell subsets mediate this response through control of immune cell trafficking, activation, localization and antigen access within the secondary lymphoid organ. Further, distinct populations of stromal cells underpin the delicate spatial organization of immune cells within the germinal centre. Because of this, the interactions between immune cells and stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs are fundamental to the germinal centre response. Herein we review how this unique relationship leads to effective germinal centre responses.

  20. The "magic" of tutorial centres in Hong Kong: An analysis of media marketing and pedagogy in a tutorial centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-12-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask these questions. This paper examines the phenomenon of tutorial centres in Hong Kong and seeks to understand what draws students to these centres. Combining theories of marketing semiotics and emotion studies, the author investigates the pivotal role of media marketing in generating the "magic" of tutorial centres, whose advertising strategy includes, for example, a display of billboard posters featuring stylishly-dressed "celebrity teachers". The author reviews some of the literature available on the subject of tutorial centres. In a case study approach, he then maps out the pedagogy he observed in an English tutorial class, seeking heuristic insights into the kind of teaching students in the study were looking for. He argues that part of the "magical" attraction of what are essentially "cram schools" is their formulaic pedagogy of teaching and reinforcing exam skills. Finally, the paper considers the social implications of the tutorial centre industry in terms of media marketing of education and unequal access to tutorial services.

  1. Student-Centred and Teacher-Centred Learning Environment in Pre-Vocational Secondary Education: Psychological Needs, and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Karin; de Brabander, Cornelis J.; Martens, Rob L.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the perception of psychological needs and motivation in a student-centred and a teacher-centred learning environment are compared, using Self Determination Theory as a framework. The self-report Intrinsic Motivation Inventory was completed by 230 students (mean age 16.1 years) in pre-vocational secondary education. School records on…

  2. Hillary Clinton impressed by the Centre's work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    In April 1994, US First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, her daughter Chelsea, the Bangladesh Minister for Women and Children's Affairs, and the US Ambassador to Bangladesh visited the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B). The First Lady remarked that ICDDR,B's research programs on health and family planning have many important lessons for the developing and developed regions alike. She noted the development successes in Bangladesh that can be applied in the US and other countries: the Grameen Bank, oral rehydration solution (ORS), and the community outreach programs for health and family planning services. The First Lady was especially interested in ORS and its cost-effectiveness. Most of the 220,000 children hospitalized each year in the US for severe gastrointestinal illness are treated with expensive intravenous (IV) drips (average cost = $2300), while a few ORS packets would be a small fraction of the cost. The average cost of treatment per patient at ICDDR,B was only $12. Patients receive care free of charge. Less than 0.6% of the patients die. The previous year, a USAID administrator asked ICDDR,B for its expertise in fighting cholera at the Rwandan refugee camps in Goma, Zaire. ICDDR,B staff developed diagnostic antisera for the new cholera strain responsible for the epidemic in the Americas, described its pathophysiology, and established its mode of transmission in surface waters. ICDDR,B also provides technical support to the national family planning and maternal and child health programs. In the Matlab, ICDDR,B's work has contributed to a high contraceptive prevalence rate of more than 64% among poor and largely illiterate persons.

  3. Who Benefits from Volunteering? Variations in Perceived Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Hong, Song-Iee; Tang, Fengyan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document the benefits of volunteering perceived by older adults and to explain variation in these self-perceived benefits. Design and Methods: This is a quantitative study of 13 volunteer programs and 401 older adults serving in those programs. Program directors completed telephone interviews, and older…

  4. Electronic commerce, automation and online banking in Nigeria: challenges and benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sc., M. Sc. Stephen A. Ojeka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Electronic banking has been around for some time in the form of automatic teller machines and telephone transactions. More recently, it has been metamorphosed by the Internet; a new look and delivery channel for banking services that benefits both customers and banks. The objective of this paper is to find out the correlation between the anticipated benefits/challenges and encountered benefits/challenges. This paper therefore empirically, adopted the use of survey research to explore in quantitative terms the various challenges and benefits e-business poses to Nigeria businesses, with particular reference to Banking and Finance Industry. It was found out that there is statistically significant difference between the anticipated and encountered benefits and major challenge is the security breach faced the customers. We therefore recommend that workshops should be organized for customers periodically on how to keep their data secret especially on how to combine numbers to form password and Constant training of employees both local and international on new development in online trading should be encouraged.

  5. The medial orbitofrontal cortex encodes a general unsigned value signal during anticipation of both appetitive and aversive events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metereau, Elise; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2015-02-01

    The medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC)/ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) has been proposed to signal the expected value of rewards when learning stimuli-rewards associations. Yet, it is still unclear whether identical or distinct orbitofrontal cortex regions encode expected rewards and punishments at the time of the cue during appetitive and aversive classical conditioning. Moreover, it is unknown whether anticipation of different types of positive and negative reinforcers differentially influence specific orbitofrontal cortex regions. To answer these questions, this study investigated whether the human mOFC/vmPFC region encodes a general unsigned anticipatory value signal for different types of rewards and punishments (responding in a positive fashion in anticipation of both appetitive and aversive events) or a signed expected value signal (responding positively in anticipation of rewards and negatively in anticipation of punishments) when learning cue-outcomes associations. Using a model-based fMRI approach implementing a reinforcement learning model to compute the expected values of two types of rewards (pleasant juice, monetary gain) and two types of punishments (aversive juice, aversive picture), we found that mOFC/vmPFC activity correlated positively with the expected value of the cues, in anticipation of both rewards and punishments. This finding indicates that the mOFC/vmPFC encodes a general unsigned anticipatory value signal, regardless of reinforcers valence (positive/negative) and types (gustatory, visual).

  6. The effects of methylphenidate on cerebral responses to conflict anticipation and unsigned prediction error in a stop-signal task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manza, Peter; Hu, Sien; Ide, Jaime S; Farr, Olivia M; Zhang, Sheng; Leung, Hoi-Chung; Li, Chiang-shan R

    2016-03-01

    To adapt flexibly to a rapidly changing environment, humans must anticipate conflict and respond to surprising, unexpected events. To this end, the brain estimates upcoming conflict on the basis of prior experience and computes unsigned prediction error (UPE). Although much work implicates catecholamines in cognitive control, little is known about how pharmacological manipulation of catecholamines affects the neural processes underlying conflict anticipation and UPE computation. We addressed this issue by imaging 24 healthy young adults who received a 45 mg oral dose of methylphenidate (MPH) and 62 matched controls who did not receive MPH prior to performing the stop-signal task. We used a Bayesian Dynamic Belief Model to make trial-by-trial estimates of conflict and UPE during task performance. Replicating previous research, the control group showed anticipation-related activation in the presupplementary motor area and deactivation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and parahippocampal gyrus, as well as UPE-related activations in the dorsal anterior cingulate, insula, and inferior parietal lobule. In group comparison, MPH increased anticipation activity in the bilateral caudate head and decreased UPE activity in each of the aforementioned regions. These findings highlight distinct effects of catecholamines on the neural mechanisms underlying conflict anticipation and UPE, signals critical to learning and adaptive behavior.

  7. Decrease of old age population mortality in Yugoslavia: Chance to increase anticipated life expectancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivojević Biljana M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the level and structure of old age population mortality in Yugoslavia with an aim to determine the intensity of realized changes and to provide an answer to how much they are significant and to approach the positive trends noted in developed countries in the latest period. Although it was insufficiently represented in the demographic analysis, the analysis of mortality in old people is gaining importance in the world. Apart from the reasons which result from the increase in the number of old people and thus their greater participation in the total number of deceased, enviable results have been achieved in decreasing old age mortality, which are more and more in focus of interest. While earlier research reported on the dominant influence of the decrease of younger age mortality to the increase of the expectation of life at birth, recent analysis precisely confirm the importance of decreasing mortality in old people. In mortality conditions from 1997/98, an additional 13.4 years of life in average is expected for men in Yugoslavia, and 15.2 for women. During more than five decades, the anticipated life expectancy for people over the age of 65 increased for only 1.2 years for men and 1.9 years for women. Out of that, the greatest increase was realized in the period 1950/51 - 1960/61 in both sexes. A small decrease in the average life expectancy was marked with men in the period 1960/61 - 1970/71, and with women in the latest period. Otherwise, all up to the eighties, the annual rate of increase was considerably lower than the rate of increase for zero year. It was only in the period 1980/81-1990/91 that faster growth had an anticipated life expectancy for the 65 years old. However, during the nineties unfavorable changes continued with the older, especially, female population. When comparing the values of the average life expectancy for people over 65 in Yugoslavia with corresponding values in developed countries, the lagging in

  8. A Framework for the Evaluation of the Cost and Benefits of Microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Greg Young; Abbey, Chad; Joos, Geza; Marnay, Chris

    2011-07-15

    A Microgrid is recognized as an innovative technology to help integrate renewables into distribution systems and to provide additional benefits to a variety of stakeholders, such as offsetting infrastructure investments and improving the reliability of the local system. However, these systems require additional investments for control infrastructure, and as such, additional costs and the anticipated benefits need to be quantified in order to determine whether the investment is economically feasible. This paper proposes a methodology for systematizing and representing benefits and their interrelationships based on the UML Use Case paradigm, which allows complex systems to be represented in a concise, elegant format. This methodology is demonstrated by determining the economic feasibility of a Microgrid and Distributed Generation installed on a typical Canadian rural distribution system model as a case study. The study attempts to minimize the cost of energy served to the community, considering the fixed costs associated with Microgrids and Distributed Generation, and suggests benefits to a variety of stakeholders.

  9. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by St Aidan's Day Care Centre Ltd., Wexford

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, C

    2015-02-01

    Ireland has seen a steady increase in paediatric sickle cell disease (SCD). In 2005, only 25% of children with SCD were referred to the haemoglobinopathy service in their first year. A non-funded screening programme was implemented. This review aimed to assess the impact screening has had. All children referred to the haemoglobinopathy service born in Ireland after 2005 were identified. Data was collected from the medical chart and laboratory system. Information was analysed using Microsoft Excel. 77 children with SCD were identified. The median age at antibiotic commencement in the screened group was 56 days compared with 447 days in the unscreened group, p = < 0.0003. 22 (28%) of infants were born in centre\\'s that do not screen and 17 (81%) were over 6 months old at referral, compared with 14 (21%) in the screened group. 6 (27%) of those in the unscreened group presented in acute crisis compared with 2 (3%) in the screened population. The point prevalence of SCD in Ireland is 0.2% in children under 15 yr of African and Asian descent. We identified delays in referral and treatment, which reflect the lack of government funded support and policy. We suggest all maternity units commence screening for newborns at risk of SCD. It is a cost effective intervention with a number needed to screen of just 4 to prevent a potentially fatal crisis.

  10. The 'W' prawn-trawl with emphasised drag-force transfer to its centre line to reduce overall system drag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheslav Balash

    Full Text Available For prawn trawling systems, drag reduction is a high priority as the trawling process is energy intensive. Large benefits have occurred through the use of multiple-net rigs and thin twine in the netting. An additional positive effect of these successful twine-area reduction strategies is the reduced amount of otter board area required to spread the trawl systems, which leads to further drag reduction. The present work investigated the potential of redirecting the drag-strain within a prawn trawl away from the wings and the otter boards to the centre line of the trawl, where top and bottom tongues have been installed, with an aim to minimise the loading/size of the otter boards required to spread the trawl. In the system containing the new 'W' trawl, the drag redirected to the centre-line tongues is transferred forward through a connected sled and towing wires to the trawler. To establish the extent of drag redirection to the centre-line tongues and the relative drag benefits of the new trawl system, conventional and 'W' trawls of 3.65 m headline length were tested firstly over a range of spread ratios in the flume tank, and subsequently at optimum spread ratio in the field. The developed 'W' trawl effectively directed 64% of netting-drag off the wings and onto the centre tongues, which resulted in drag savings in the field of ∼20% for the associated 'W' trawl/otter-board/sled system compared to the traditional trawl/otter-board arrangement in a single trawl or twin rig configuration. Furthermore, based on previously published data, the new trawl when used in a twin rig system is expected to provide approximately 12% drag reduction compared to quad rig. The twin 'W' trawl system also has benefits over quad rig in that a reduced number of cod-end/By-catch Reduction Device units need to be installed and attended each tow.

  11. Benefits for People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about whether or not you meet Social Security's definition of disability . Use the Benefits Eligibility Screening Tool to find out which programs may be able to pay you benefits. If your application has recently been denied, the Internet Appeal is a starting point to request a ...

  12. Increasing Enrollment through Benefit Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnow, Betty

    1982-01-01

    The applicability of benefit segmentation, a market research technique which groups people according to benefits expected from a program offering, was tested at the College of DuPage. Preferences and demographic characteristics were analyzed and program improvements adopted, increasing enrollment by 20 percent. (Author/SK)

  13. Taxability of Educational Benefits Trusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple Law Quarterly, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Corporations have found the promise of providing a college education to the children of employees--without the recognition of income to the parent-employee--to be a popular fringe benefit. The Internal Revenue Service has attacked educational benefit trusts in Revenue Ruling 75-448. Implications are discussed. (LBH)

  14. Role of logistics centres in national logistics system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a division of logistics centres according to various criteria and specifies their role in a national logistics system. It provides a classification of the main logistics network nodes. It also describes those features of logistics centres that have an impact on zoning development of towns and regions. The current situation in the national logistics system has been presented here against theoretical analyses and also a concept for the development of a logistics centre network in Poland has been formulated.

  15. Negotiating active ageing at a Danish activity centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    and practices active ageing. The paper uses an activity centre in Copenhagen as its site of negotiation. Methods: These questions have been explored with the use of ethnographic fieldwork and through a documentary study. The ethnographic fieldwork has been conducted at an activity centre with 4 months...... of participatory observation in 2011 and 2012, as well as 11 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with users of the centre. 4 of these users have been followed around during everyday activities such as doing groceries, picking up grandchildren, etc. The documentary study consists of documents and statements...

  16. The experience of work in a call centre environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanet Hauptfleisch

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research study explored the work experience in a call centre environment in an information technology call centre based in South Africa, which service foreign customers exclusively. Three data collection methods were used, namely narratives, in-depth interviews with call centre consultants, and observation. Following a grounded theory approach, four themes were elicited, namely the perceptions of team members, uncertainty created by a constantly changing environment, perceived distances due to management practices, and depersonalisation experienced while actually dealing with customers. In addition to this, the reported impact of these themes on work performance was explored and compared to existing research.

  17. Don't look at me in anger! Enhanced processing of angry faces in anticipation of public speaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Matthias J; Pauli, Paul; Reicherts, Philipp; Mühlberger, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Anxiety is supposed to enhance the processing of threatening information. Here, we investigated the cortical processing of angry faces during anticipated public speaking. To elicit anxiety, a group of participants was told that they would have to perform a public speech. As a control condition, another group was told that they would have to write a short essay. During anticipation of these tasks, participants saw facial expressions (angry, happy, and neutral) while electroencephalogram was recorded. Event-related potential analysis revealed larger N170 amplitudes for angry compared to happy and neutral faces in the anxiety group. The early posterior negativity as an index of motivated attention was also enhanced for angry compared to happy and neutral faces in participants anticipating public speaking. These results indicate that fear of public speaking influences early perceptual processing of faces such that especially the processing of angry faces is facilitated.

  18. Possible anticipation in familial epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma with the p.R163W mutation of Keratin 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y; Shi, M; Tan, Z P; Shi, X L

    2014-10-07

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by diffuse hyperkeratosis of the epidermis of the palm and sole with an erythematous margin. The Keratin 9 (KRT9) and Keratin 1 genes are responsible for EPPK. Several previous studies have focused on the genetic basis of EPPK; however, genetic anticipation has not yet been reported. We described a four-generation family with EPPK and identified a p.R163W mutation of KRT9. We observed a decrease in the age of onset in three consecutive generations in the family of the proband, indicating possible genetic anticipation in this familial EPPK. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms of anticipation in EPPK.

  19. Mental fatigue negatively influences manual dexterity and anticipation timing but not repeated high-intensity exercise performance in trained adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Fowler, Nicholas; George, Oliver; Joyce, Samuel; Hankey, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a period of mental fatigue on manual dexterity, anticipation timing and repeated high intensity exercise performance. Using a randomised, repeated measures experimental design, eight physically trained adults (mean age = 24.8 ± 4.1 years) undertook a 40 minute vigilance task to elicit mental fatigue or a control condition followed by four repeated Wingate anaerobic performance tests. Pre, post fatigue/control and post each Wingate test, manual dexterity (Seconds), coincidence anticipation (absolute error) were assessed. A series of two (condition) by six (time) ways repeated measures ANOVAs indicated a significant condition by time interactions for manual dexterity time (p = 0.021) and absolute error (p = 0.028). Manual dexterity and coincidence anticipation were significantly poorer post mental fatigue compared with control. There were no significant differences in mean power between conditions or across trials (all p > 0.05).

  20. CWTC business plan; Wind turbine component centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjuler Jensen, P.; Hillestroem, A.; Markou, H.; Berring, P.; Friis, P.

    2011-04-15

    This report presents the Business Plan for the establishment of the Wind Turbine Component Centre (CWTC) to meet the objectives of performing theoretical research and experimental testing. The core idea of a CWTC is to support the Danish wind energy industry and research activities at the component level improving the competitive advantage of that industry. The CWTC will in itself operate its activities, including access to test and experimental facilities, on a semi commercial basis. The business model for the CWTC presented is based on revenues coming from component manufacturers as well as research grants, and will include membership fees as well as hourly payment and larger projects where payment is a limited project sum. The presented roadmap model clarifies the development path towards a fully developed CWTC, which will cover test of all important components along the drive-train as well as offering a comprehensive systematic understanding of the entire drive-train. The CWTC will over time market and sell its products and services on a global scale, but first and foremost the CWTC is established to support and strengthen the Danish wind energy industry and specifically the Danish sub suppliers to the Danish wind turbine industry and also the Danish research establishments. The presented organizational structure reflects that there are certain functions that are separated from the operations and it also reflects that scientific staffing are hired in on a project basis. Machine operators will be hired in on a permanent basis. The breakdown of the cost for running the rig, both for R and D and commercial projects is presented. The income from the other activities is calculated based on the cost for the research staff, both for R and D activities and commercial. In the first year the income will be 100% from R and D activities, which is the cost for the staff to set-up the test-rig, the guidelines and test procedures, and partly for running the rig. Within 3

  1. Upgrade Opportunities for Buildings in City Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This proposal focus on the potential of the existing buildings upgrade process in achieving the 20-20-20 goals, as these are the biggest energy consumers, the most significant built area and the better placed buildings within our cities. These buildings frequently lack basic maintenance and need intervention, but include within themselves a vast amount of incorporated energy and centuries of construction knowledge. Beyond the advantages that may result from re-attracting people back into the city centre, upgrading these existing buildings can also have positive bounce-back effect on the reduction of the energy needs related to transportation, as demonstrated in studies that alert to the impact of the building sprawl in the total energy use. As “buildings account for 40 % of total energy consumption in the Union”, the better performance of this sector has a significant role, remembering that “these requirements shall take account of general indoor climate conditions, in order to avoid possible negative effects such as inadequate ventilation, as well as local conditions and the designated function and the age of the building” [1]. The importance of “upgrading” the existing buildings resides on the fact that new buildings represent only approximately 1 or 2% of the total usable area, an estimate that is bound to decrease due to the current construction crisis. While the recent buildings tend to be more efficient, the numerous existing buildings are important stakeholders due to their massive consumptions and incorporated energy. The ongoing Annex 56 on “Energy & Greenhouse Gas Optimized Building Renovation” assumes that “Current standards do not respond effectively to the numerous constraints imposed by existing buildings and in many cases, the requirements result in very expensive measures and complex procedures, seldom accepted by occupants, owners or developers. It is then urgent for the new standards to respond to these

  2. Target preparation at the ANTARES AMS Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, G.E.; Hua, Q.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M.A.C.; Lawson, E.M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Antares Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy Centre at ANSTO has two chemistry labs dedicated to preparing targets for measurement. Target preparation encompasses a variety of activities ranging from the curation of incoming samples to the numerous steps involved in the purification and processing of dissimilar samples. One of the two laboratories is set up for the physical and chemical pretreatment of {sup 14}C samples. Treatments include cleaning by sonification, sorting, grinding and sieving, and chemical treatments such as the standard AAA treatment, and solvent extraction. Combustion and graphitization are also carried out in this laboratory. The second laboratory is a clean room and is dedicated to the combustion, hydrolysis and graphitization of {sup 14}C samples as well as the process of the targets for the other isotopes. Combustion is achieved by heating the sample to 900 deg C in the presence of CuO, the resulting gas is purified by passing over Ag and Cu wire at 600 deg C. Graphitization is carried out by reducing the CO{sub 2} with an iron catalyst (600 deg C) in the presence of zinc (400 deg C) and a small amount of hydrogen. Samples such as charcoal, shell bone, wood, sediment, seawater and groundwater, containing 0.3-1 mg or more of original carbon, are processed routinely for radiocarbon analysis. The current {sup 14}C chemistry background for 1 mg carbon is {approx} 0.3 percent of modern carbon (pMC) enabling us to date materials up to 45 000 BP. Samples of 0.5 - 3 mg carbon or more are routinely performed with a precision < 1% At present, procedures are being tested for the treatment of samples containing a minimum of 20 {mu}g original carbon. Such small samples sre more likely to be affected by contamination with modern carbon. These laboratories are also being expanded to cater for the processing of a variety of samples for the measurement of other isotopes, ie {sup 129}I, {sup 10}Be, {sup 36}CI and {sup 26}Al. Initial tests for the extraction of

  3. Quantification and visualization of the human impacts of anticipated precipitation extremes in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. T.; Sabesan, A.; Khan, S.; Kuhn, G.; Ganguly, A. R.; Erickson, D. J.; Ostrouchov, G.

    2006-12-01

    The research described here quantifies and visualizes the human impacts of extreme events, which in turn can lead to enhanced disaster readiness levels as well as response or mitigation strategies. Specifically, we investigate the space-time impact of anticipated precipitation extremes on human population in South America. The research attempts to integrate two recent and ongoing lines of research. In the first study (Sabesan et al., 2006; Abercrombie et al, 2006) LandScan® high-resolution population data sets were used to develop threat metrics in space and time. In the second study (Khan et al, 2006; Kuhn and Ganguly, 2006), grid-based observations of precipitation time series in South America were utilized to quantify the probability of precipitation extremes in space and time and define a geo-referenced "extremes volatility ratio" (EVR) for unanticipated, or the "truly unusual", extremes. Here we define an "extremes volatility index" (EVI) which scales from zero to unity and provides an anticipated measure of surprise corresponding to the truly unusual extremes. An EVI of zero indicates no possibility of surprise with the truly unusual extremes statistically identical to the "typical extremes", or the extremes considered, for example, in engineering design. We investigate the EVI in conjunction with maps for ambient population in South America obtained from a high- resolution global population database called LandScan® to produce a "human risk index" (HRI) in space and time. The EVI is roughly interpreted as a probability number which is multiplied with the population at each grid in space and time to obtain a measure of risk. Future research needs to explore measures of risk that consider other costs of disasters, for example impacts on critical infrastructures. A geo-referenced index, the "disaster impact index" (DII) is proposed. The DII at each grid is computed by dividing the HRI with the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for each country. The GDP is utilized

  4. Science Prospects And Benefits with Exascale Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL

    2007-12-01

    Scientific computation has come into its own as a mature technology in all fields of science. Never before have we been able to accurately anticipate, analyze, and plan for complex events that have not yet occurred from the operation of a reactor running at 100 million degrees centigrade to the changing climate a century down the road. Combined with the more traditional approaches of theory and experiment, scientific computation provides a profound tool for insight and solution as we look at complex systems containing billions of components. Nevertheless, it cannot yet do all we would like. Much of scientific computation s potential remains untapped in areas such as materials science, Earth science, energy assurance, fundamental science, biology and medicine, engineering design, and national security because the scientific challenges are far too enormous and complex for the computational resources at hand. Many of these challenges are of immediate global importance. These challenges can be overcome by a revolution in computing that promises real advancement at a greatly accelerated pace. Planned petascale systems (capable of a petaflop, or 1015 floating point operations per second) in the next 3 years and exascale systems (capable of an exaflop, or 1018 floating point operations per second) in the next decade will provide an unprecedented opportunity to attack these global challenges through modeling and simulation. Exascale computers, with a processing capability similar to that of the human brain, will enable the unraveling of longstanding scientific mysteries and present new opportunities. Table ES.1 summarizes these scientific opportunities, their key application areas, and the goals and associated benefits that would result from solutions afforded by exascale computing.

  5. [Costs and benefits of smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polder, J J; van Gils, P F; Kok, L; Talhout, R; Feenstra, T L

    2017-01-01

    - Two recent societal cost-benefit analyses have documented the costs of smoking and the cost-effectiveness of preventing smoking.- Smoking costs the Netherlands society EUR 33 billion per year.- The majority of this is the monetary value of health loss; these are "soft" euros that cannot be re-spent.- There is not a great deal of difference between costs and benefits when expressed in "hard" euros, which means that there is no clear business case for anti-smoking policy.- The greatest benefit of discouraging smoking is improved health for the individual and increased productivity for the business sector; however, the benefits cannot be easily realised, because even in the most favourable scenario the number of smokers will decrease slowly.- Excise duties seem to offer the most promising avenue for combating smoking. The benefits of anti-smoking policy, therefore, consist mainly of tax revenues for the government.- Stringent policy is required to transform tax revenues into health gains.

  6. Expectancy-Value models of health behaviour: the role of salience and anticipated affect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pligt, J.; de Vries, N.K.

    1998-01-01

    Expectancy-value models of health behaviour are based upon the assumption that this behaviour is determined by a subjective cost-benefit analysis. Generally, these models emphasize cognitive appraisal processes focusing on the likelihood and evaluation of the consequences of health-related behaviour

  7. A refugee camp in the centre of Europe: clinical characteristics of asylum seekers arriving in Brussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berlaer, Gerlant; Bohle Carbonell, Francisca; Manantsoa, Sofie; de Béthune, Xavier; Buyl, Ronald; Debacker, Michel; Hubloue, Ives

    2016-01-01

    Background In the summer of 2015, the exodus of Syrian war refugees and saturation of refugee camps in neighbouring countries led to the influx of asylum-seekers in European countries, including Belgium. This study aims to describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of asylum seekers who arrived in a huddled refugee camp, in the centre of a well-developed country with all medical facilities. Methods Using a descriptive cross-sectional study design, physicians of Médecins du Monde prospectively registered age, gender, origin, medical symptoms and diagnoses of all patients presenting to an erected field hospital in Brussels in September 2015. Diagnoses were post hoc categorised according to the International Classification of Diseases. Results Of 4037 patients examined in the field hospital, 3907 were included and analysed for this study. Over 11% of patients suffered from injuries, but these were outnumbered by the proportion of patients with respiratory (36%), dental (9%), skin (9%) and digestive (8%) diagnoses. More than 49% had features of infections at the time of the consultation. Conclusions Asylum seekers arriving in a refugee camp in Brussels after a long and hazardous journey suffer mostly from respiratory, dental, skin and digestive diseases. Still, one in seven suffers from injury. These findings, consistent with other reports, should be anticipated when composing emergency medical teams and interagency emergency health or similar kits to be used in a field hospital, even in a Western European country. Trial registration number ISRCTN13523620, Results. PMID:27884856

  8. Understanding kangaroo care and its benefits to preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell-Yeo ML

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Marsha L Campbell-Yeo,1–4 Timothy C Disher,1 Britney L Benoit,1 C Celeste Johnston,2,4,5 1School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, 2Department of Pediatrics, IWK Health Centre, 3Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, 4Centre for Pediatric Pain Research, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, 5Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: The holding of an infant with ventral skin-to-skin contact typically in an upright position with the swaddled infant on the chest of the parent, is commonly referred to as kangaroo care (KC, due to its simulation of marsupial care. It is recommended that KC, as a feasible, natural, and cost-effective intervention, should be standard of care in the delivery of quality health care for all infants, regardless of geographic location or economic status. Numerous benefits of its use have been reported related to mortality, physiological (thermoregulation, cardiorespiratory stability, behavioral (sleep, breastfeeding duration, and degree of exclusivity domains, as an effective therapy to relieve procedural pain, and improved neurodevelopment. Yet despite these recommendations and a lack of negative research findings, adoption of KC as a routine clinical practice remains variable and underutilized. Furthermore, uncertainty remains as to whether continuous KC should be recommended in all settings or if there is a critical period of initiation, dose, or duration that is optimal. This review synthesizes current knowledge about the benefits of KC for infants born preterm, highlighting differences and similarities across low and higher resource countries and in a non-pain and pain context. Additionally, implementation considerations and unanswered questions for future research are addressed. Keywords: kangaroo care, skin-to-skin contact, infant, preterm, review

  9. A comparison of subtalar joint motion during anticipated medial cutting turns and level walking using a multi-segment foot model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkyn, T R; Shultz, R; Giffin, J R; Birmingham, T B

    2010-02-01

    The weight-bearing in-vivo kinematics and kinetics of the talocrural joint, subtalar joint and joints of the foot were quantified using optical motion analysis. Twelve healthy subjects were studied during level walking and anticipated medial turns at self-selected pace. A multi-segment model of the foot using skin-mounted marker triads tracked four foot segments: the hindfoot, midfoot, lateral and medial forefoot. The lower leg and thigh were also tracked. Motion between each of the segments could occur in three degrees of rotational freedom, but only six inter-segmental motions were reported in this study: (1) talocrural dorsi-plantar-flexion, (2) subtalar inversion-eversion, (3) frontal plane hindfoot motion, (4) transverse plane hindfoot motion, (5) forefoot supination-pronation twisting and (6) the height-to-length ratio of the medial longitudinal arch. The motion at the subtalar joint during stance phase of walking (eversion then inversion) was reversed during a turning task (inversion then eversion). The external subtalar joint moment was also changed from a moderate eversion moment during walking to a larger inversion moment during the turn. The kinematics of the talocrural joint and the joints of the foot were similar between these two tasks. During a medial turn, the subtalar joint may act to maintain the motions in the foot and talocrural joint that occur during level walking. This is occurring despite the conspicuously different trajectory of the centre of mass of the body. This may allow the foot complex to maintain its function of energy absorption followed by energy return during stance phase that is best suited to level walking.

  10. Will I Regret It? Anticipated Negative Emotions Modulate Choices in Moral Dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletti, Carolina; Lotto, Lorella; Tasso, Alessandra; Sarlo, Michela

    2016-01-01

    We tested if post-decisional emotions of regret, guilt, shame, anger, and disgust can account for individuals' choices in moral dilemmas depicting the choice of letting some people die (non-utilitarian option) or sacrificing one person to save them (utilitarian option). We collected participants' choices and post-decisional emotional ratings for each option using Footbridge-type dilemmas, in which the sacrifice of one person is the means to save more people, and Trolley-type dilemmas, in which the sacrifice is only a side effect. Moreover, we computed the EEG Readiness Potential to test if the neural activity related to the last phase of decision-making was related to the emotional conflict. Participants reported generally stronger emotions for the utilitarian as compared to the non-utilitarian options, with the exception of anger and regret, which in Trolley-type dilemmas were stronger for the non-utilitarian option. Moreover, participants tended to choose the option that minimized the intensity of negative emotions, irrespective of dilemma type. No significant relationship between emotions and the amplitude of the Readiness Potential emerged. It is possible that anticipated post-decisional emotions play a role in earlier stages of decision-making.

  11. Will I regret it? Anticipated negative emotions modulate choices in moral dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Pletti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We tested if post-decisional emotions of regret, guilt, shame, anger, and disgust can account for individuals’ choices in moral dilemmas depicting the choice of letting some people die (non-utilitarian option or sacrificing one person to save them (utilitarian option. We collected participants’ choices and post-decisional emotional ratings for each option using Footbridge-type dilemmas, in which the sacrifice of one person is the means to save more people, and Trolley-type dilemmas, in which the sacrifice is only a side effect. Moreover, we computed the EEG Readiness Potential to test if the neural activity related to the last phase of decision-making was related to the emotional conflict. Participants reported generally stronger emotions for the utilitarian as compared to the non-utilitarian options, with the exception of anger and regret, which in Trolley-type dilemmas were stronger for the non-utilitarian option. Moreover, participants tended to choose the option that minimized the intensity of negative emotions, irrespective of dilemma type. No significant relationship between emotions and the amplitude of the Readiness Potential emerged. It is possible that anticipated post-decisional emotions play a role in earlier stages of decision-making.

  12. Seemingly irrational driving behavior model: The effect of habit strength and anticipated affective reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yi-Shih

    2015-09-01

    An increasing amount of evidence suggests that aberrant driving behaviors are not entirely rational. On the basis of the dual-process theory, this study postulates that drivers may learn to perform irrational aberrant driving behaviors, and these behaviors could be derived either from a deliberate or an intuitive decision-making approach. Accordingly, a seemingly irrational driving behavior model is proposed; in this model, the theory of planned behavior (TPB) was adopted to represent the deliberate decision-making mechanism, and habit strength was incorporated to reflect the intuitive decision process. A multiple trivariate mediation structure was designed to reflect the process through which driving behaviors are learned. Anticipated affective reactions (AARs) were further included to examine the effect of affect on aberrant driving behaviors. Considering the example of speeding behaviors, this study developed scales and conducted a two-wave survey of students in two departments at a university in Northern Taiwan. The analysis results show that habit strength consists of multiple aspects, and frequency of past behavior cannot be a complete repository for accumulating habit strength. Habit strength appeared to be a crucial mediator between intention antecedents (e.g., attitude) and the intention itself. Including habit strength in the TPB model enhanced the explained variance of speeding intention by 26.7%. In addition, AARs were different from attitudes; particularly, young drivers tended to perform speeding behaviors to reduce negative feelings such as regret. The proposed model provides an effective alternative approach for investigating aberrant driving behaviors; corresponding countermeasures are discussed.

  13. The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Variable Object Selection and Anticipated Results

    CERN Document Server

    Morganson, Eric; Anderson, Scott F; Ruan, John J; Myers, Adam D; Eracleous, Michael; Kelly, Brandon; Badenes, Carlos; Banados, Eduardo; Blanton, Michael R; Bershady, Matthew A; Borissova, Jura; Brandt, William Nielsen; Burgett, William S; Chambers, Kenneth; Draper, Peter W; Davenport, James R A; Flewelling, Heather; Garnavich, Peter; Hawley, Suzanne L; Hodapp, Klaus W; Isler, Jedidah C; Kaiser, Nick; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kudritzki, Rolf P; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S; Paris, Isabelle; Parvizi, Mahmoud; Poleski, Radoslaw; Price, Paul A; Salvato, Mara; Shanks, Tom; Schlafly, Eddie F; Schneider, Donald P; Shen, Yue; Stassun, Keivan; Tonry, John T; Walter, Fabian; Waters, Chris Z

    2015-01-01

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an SDSS-IV eBOSS subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and AGN) across 7,500 square degrees selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate (KDE) analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4,000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-sele...

  14. A VISION OF THE FUTURE THROUGH PROSPECTIVE SCENARIOS: A TOOL FOR THE ANTICIPATION OF DISRUPTIVE INNOVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Domicio da Silva Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Future events are unknown, unexpected and even if forecasts may offer some estimation, there is no way to predict the behavior of unprecedented events. Therefore, looking into the future and drafting a strategy is not a simple activity. All this process is even more fastidious in a period of uncertainties, changes and world crises. However, a method named Scenario Planning may contribute to the formulation of strategies in turbulent environments. In this paper it is reviewed and consolidated the theories and reports in the literature, in order to elucidate the use of prospective scenarios as a tool to anticipate disruptive innovation. In this sense, it is presented and discussed some considerations about the origin of scenarios, the relation between scenarios and strategy, the typologies of scenarios, the tools for scenarios construction, the traditional methods in scenarios development and the advantages and disadvantages of this method. Indeed, scenario planning is a flexible and stimulative method which allows one to identify opportunities for innovation, so as to favor resilient strategic planning and future visioning in threatening environments.

  15. Preventive Maintenance of Railway Tracks: Ballast Performance Anticipation in the Cameroon Railway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lezin Seba Minsili

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research study is to produce a methodology that provides an understanding of the mechanical behaviour of ballast and its degradation in order to reflect field performance of different ballast materials used by CAMRAIL in their railway network, and to better anticipate an efficient planning of the railway track maintenance. Based on existed literature, on collected data of different railway sections, and on the finite element analysis of the vehicle-track mechanical interaction, a preventive ballast cleaning and renewal strategy, formulated through ballast deterioration indexes is proposed. Comparing to the ongoing dayto- day maintenance strategy the proposed functionality-based preventive maintenance offers the following advantages: security and comfort of users; forecasting of ballast corrective measures; planned maintenance actions; higher functional and exploitation level of the track and availability of needed materials and mechanisms. The administration of CAMRAIL has promised to extend further the findings of this work in other to fully optimized the track maintenance cost in each railway section.

  16. Taï chimpanzees anticipate revisiting high-valued fruit trees from further distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Simone D; Boesch, Christophe; Janmaat, Karline R L

    2014-11-01

    The use of spatio-temporal memory has been argued to increase food-finding efficiency in rainforest primates. However, the exact content of this memory is poorly known to date. This study investigated what specific information from previous feeding visits chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus), in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, take into account when they revisit the same feeding trees. By following five adult females for many consecutive days, we tested from what distance the females directed their travels towards previously visited feeding trees and how previous feeding experiences and fruit tree properties influenced this distance. To exclude the influence of sensory cues, the females' approach distance was measured from their last significant change in travel direction until the moment they entered the tree's maximum detection field. We found that chimpanzees travelled longer distances to trees at which they had previously made food grunts and had rejected fewer fruits compared to other trees. In addition, the results suggest that the chimpanzees were able to anticipate the amount of fruit that they would find in the trees. Overall, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that chimpanzees act upon a retrieved memory of their last feeding experiences long before they revisit feeding trees, which would indicate a daily use of long-term prospective memory. Further, the results are consistent with the possibility that positive emotional experiences help to trigger prospective memory retrieval in forest areas that are further away and have fewer cues associated with revisited feeding trees.

  17. Using EMG to anticipate head motion for virtual-environment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barniv, Yair; Aguilar, Mario; Hasanbelliu, Erion

    2005-01-01

    In virtual environment (VE) applications, where virtual objects are presented in a see-through head-mounted display, virtual images must be continuously stabilized in space in response to user's head motion. Time delays in head-motion compensation cause virtual objects to "swim" around instead of being stable in space which results in misalignment errors when overlaying virtual and real objects. Visual update delays are a critical technical obstacle for implementing head-mounted displays in applications such as battlefield simulation/training, telerobotics, and telemedicine. Head motion is currently measurable by a head-mounted 6-degrees-of-freedom inertial measurement unit. However, even given this information, overall VE-system latencies cannot be reduced under about 25 ms. We present a novel approach to eliminating latencies, which is premised on the fact that myoelectric signals from a muscle precede its exertion of force, thereby limb or head acceleration. We thus suggest utilizing neck-muscles' myoelectric signals to anticipate head motion. We trained a neural network to map such signals onto equivalent time-advanced inertial outputs. The resulting network can achieve time advances of up to 70 ms.

  18. Early metabolic markers that anticipate loss of insulin independence in type 1 diabetic islet allograft recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, D; Odorico, J; Danobeitia, J S; Alejandro, R; Rickels, M R; Hanson, M; Radke, N; Baidal, D; Hullett, D; Naji, A; Ricordi, C; Kaufman, D; Fernandez, L

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify predictors of insulin independence and to establish the best clinical tools to follow patients after pancreatic islet transplantation (PIT). Sequential metabolic responses to intravenous (I.V.) glucose (I.V. glucose tolerance test [IVGTT]), arginine and glucose-potentiated arginine (glucose-potentiated arginine-induced insulin secretion [GPAIS]) were obtained from 30 patients. We determined the correlation between transplanted islet mass and islet engraftment and tested the ability of each assay to predict return to exogenous insulin therapy. We found transplanted islet mass within an average of 16 709 islet equivalents per kg body weight (IEQ/kg BW; range between 6602 and 29 614 IEQ/kg BW) to be a poor predictor of insulin independence at 1 year, having a poor correlation between transplanted islet mass and islet engraftment. Acute insulin response to IVGTT (AIR(GLU) ) and GPAIS (AIR(max) ) were the most accurate methods to determine suboptimal islet mass engraftment. AIR(GLU) performed 3 months after transplant also proved to be a robust early metabolic marker to predict return to insulin therapy and its value was positively correlated with duration of insulin independence. In conclusion, AIR(GLU) is an early metabolic assay capable of anticipating loss of insulin independence at 1 year in T1D patients undergoing PIT and constitutes a valuable, simple and reliable method to follow patients after transplant.

  19. Outreach activities in anticipation of the 2016 solar eclipse in Sorong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra Raharja, Endra; Pramudya, Yudhiakto

    2016-11-01

    Sorong is located outside the narrow path of total solar eclipse on March 9th, 2016. The predicted obscuration of the sun was 94.2%. The public outreach to anticipate the solar eclipse was intended to educate students in junior and senior high school in Sorong Regency. Some of them are located in the remote area where the educational materials are difficult to find. The public outreach is unique, since it was run by the local person who is student of physics education. The student has both the ability to explain the solar eclipse phenomenon and able to adapt to knowledge level of students. The materials that were given to the schools are brochure and the eclipse glasses. Beside solar eclipse lectures in class, the pinhole workshop and observation practice were held. The limited materials and resources were faced during the public outreach. However, the enthusiasm was shown by the students and teachers. At least one of the schools held the solar eclipse observation on the day of the eclipse.

  20. Exploring the Potential of Anticipated Regret as an Emotional Cue to Improve Bowel Cancer Screening Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Amy; Freegard, Suzana; Wilson, Carlene; Flight, Ingrid; Turnbull, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Bowel cancer is currently the second leading cause of cancer-related death in Australia and screening participation is suboptimal. This study examined the role of emotion in the form of anticipated regret (AR) and its relationship to screening intentions. Methods. N = 173 persons aged 45 to 80 years completed a survey measuring demographic variables, readiness to screen, relative importance of health by comparison to other life priorities, satisfaction with current health, and AR if not participating in future bowel cancer screening. Results. AR was a significant predictor of future screening intentions. Those with higher levels of AR were seven times more likely (OR = 7.18) to intend to screen in the future compared to those with lower AR. This relationship was not compromised when controlling for other variables including gender and satisfaction with one's health. AR levels were significantly lower in people who had been screened previously and in those with full health insurance. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that AR is uniquely related to future bowel cancer screening intentions. Future studies should continue to consider this as a useful target for behavioural interventions and identify new ways of delivering these interventions to improve their reach. PMID:28261608