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Sample records for centre anticipated benefits

  1. A case study evaluation of implementation of a care pathway to support normal birth in one English birth centre: anticipated benefits and unintended consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rycroft-Malone Jo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The policy drive for the UK National Health Service (NHS has focused on the need for high quality services informed by evidence of best practice. The introduction of care pathways and protocols to standardise care and support implementation of evidence into practice has taken place across the NHS with limited evaluation of their impact. A multi-site case study evaluation was undertaken to assess the impact of use of care pathways and protocols on clinicians, service users and service delivery. One of the five sites was a midwifery-led Birth Centre, where an adapted version of the All Wales Clinical Pathway for Normal Birth had been implemented. Methods The overarching framework was realistic evaluation. A case study design enabled the capture of data on use of the pathway in the clinical setting, use of multiple methods of data collection and opportunity to study and understand the experiences of clinicians and service users whose care was informed by the pathway. Women attending the Birth Centre were recruited at their 36 week antenatal visit. Episodes of care during labour were observed, following which the woman and the midwife who cared for her were interviewed about use of the pathway. Interviews were also held with other key stakeholders from the study site. Qualitative data were content analysed. Results Observations were undertaken of four women during labour. Eighteen interviews were conducted with clinicians and women, including the women whose care was observed and the midwives who cared for them, senior midwifery managers and obstetricians. The implementation of the pathway resulted in a number of anticipated benefits, including increased midwifery confidence in skills to support normal birth and promotion of team working. There were also unintended consequences, including concerns about a lack of documentation of labour care and negative impact on working relationships with obstetric and other midwifery

  2. Electronic medical record systems in critical access hospitals: leadership perspectives on anticipated and realized benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Troy R; Vavroch, Jared; Bahensky, James A; Ward, Marcia M

    2010-04-01

    The growth of electronic medical records (EMRs) is driven by the belief that EMRs will significantly improve healthcare providers' performance and reduce healthcare costs. Evidence supporting these beliefs is limited, especially for small rural hospitals. A survey that focused on health information technology (HIT) capacity was administered to all hospitals in Iowa. Structured interviews were conducted with the leadership at 15 critical access hospitals (CAHs) that had implemented EMRs in order to assess the perceived benefits of operational EMRs. The results indicate that most of the hospitals implemented EMRs to improve efficiency, timely access, and quality. Many CAH leaders also viewed EMR implementation as a necessary business strategy to remain viable and improve financial performance. While some reasons reflect external influences, such as perceived future federal mandates, other reasons suggest that the decision was driven by internal forces, including the hospital's culture and the desires of key leaders to embrace HIT. Anticipated benefits were consistent with goals; however, realized benefits were rarely obvious in terms of quantifiable results. These findings expand the limited research on the rationale for implementing EMRs in critical access hospitals.

  3. How to anticipate the assessment of the public health benefit of new medicines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massol, Jacques; Puech, Alain; Boissel, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The Public Health Benefit (PHB) of new medicines is a recent and French-specific criterion (October 1999 decree) which is often only partially documented in the transparency files due to a lack of timely information. At the time of the first reimbursement application for a new medicine to the "Transparency Committee", the file is exclusively based on data from randomised clinical trials. These data are generated from a global clinical development plan which was designed a long time before the new medicine's submission for reimbursement. And this plan does not systematically provide the data needed to assess the PHB. Thus, one easily understands the difficulty to anticipate and document this recent French criterion. In France, the PHB is both one of the necessary criteria for the reimbursement submission and an indicator for the national health policy management. Its assessment also helps to identify the needs and objectives of the post-registration studies (nowadays in the scope of responsibilities of the "Drug Economics Committee"). The assessment of the PHB criterion is carried through after the marketing authorization process and is an addition to it. To understand how to anticipate the assessment of the new medicines' PHB, one needs to consider how it differs from the preliminary step of the marketing authorization process. Whereas the evaluation for marketing authorization seeks to determine if the new medicine could be useful in a specific indication, the PHB assessment aims at quantifying the therapeutic benefit in a population, taking into account the reference treatments in this population. A new medicine receives a marketing authorization based on the data of the registration file which provides information on the clinical benefit of the new medicine in the populations of the trials and in the context of the trials. On the other side, the PHB looks at the effects of the new medicine at the scale of the general population, in real practice. The PHB

  4. The programme benefits of improving project team communication through a contact centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bond-Barnard, T. J.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A South African national programme to repair government infrastructure uses a contact centre (or call centre to facilitate and manage communication. An important question is: How does the contact centre benefit the programme and its projects? This study discusses the findings of a survey that quantified the benefits of the programme when the communication between team members in the programme was improved by using a contact centre. The results show that, by using a contact centre to improve the communication between project team members, their perception of communication effectiveness, quality of project deliverables, service delivery, and customer satisfaction of the programme dramatically increases.

  5. ERS/EBAP European Accreditation of Training Centres in Adult Respiratory Medicine: how could it benefit your centre?

    OpenAIRE

    Sandy Sutter; Daiana Stolz; Gernot Rohde

    2015-01-01

    In June 2014, the European Respiratory Society (ERS) launched an accreditation programme for training centres in adult respiratory medicine in Europe, in partnership with the European Board for Accreditation in Pneumology (EBAP). The European Accreditation of Training Centres in Adult Respiratory Medicine forms part of the overall objective for harmonised education in respiratory medicine for European specialists (HERMES).

  6. Shopping centres and on-street shops : the benefits to developers and local shoppers

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Yuen-ting; 戴婉婷

    2014-01-01

    Shopping is a daily necessary activity to most of the people in Hong Kong. From the old days when people went shopping in the bazaars to the recent days when most people go shopping in shopping centres, the dominant mode of shopping changed. The effects brought by different kinds of shopping facilities to people are worth studying. It is not difficult to observe the trend that old retail developments in old districts are mainly shopping streets while new retail developments in new towns are m...

  7. Inverse anticipating chaos synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahverdiev, E M; Sivaprakasam, S; Shore, K A

    2002-07-01

    We derive conditions for achieving inverse anticipating synchronization where a driven time-delay chaotic system synchronizes to the inverse future state of the driver. The significance of inverse anticipating chaos in delineating synchronization regimes in time-delay systems is elucidated. The concept is extended to cascaded time-delay systems.

  8. Using economic benefits for recycling in a separate collection centre managed as a "reverse supermarket": a sociological survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feo, Giovanni; Polito, Anna Rita

    2015-04-01

    Separate collection centres (SCCs), where citizens can deliver recyclable fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW), in an "urban mining" perspective, can be considered a sort of "reverse supermarket", where people can deliver their recyclables in order to either obtain a waste fee reduction or shopping vouchers. The latter is the case of Baronissi, a town of around 17,000 inhabitants in the Province of Salerno, in the Campania region of Italy. The principal aim of the study was to investigate by means of a sociological survey the relationship between citizens and the separate collection program, with particular emphasis on the role played by the SCC. The separate collection system was evaluated either good or very good by 95.8% of the sample, while 99.2% expressed a good or very good evaluation of the quality of the service inside the separate collection centre: SCC users acted as a community as highlighted by the negative response of the Chi-square test for independence. Respecting the environment prevailed over saving time, obtaining eco-points, or saving money as the main reason why people went to the SCC. The majority of the respondents agreed if only putrescibles and residue should be collected directly from their homes, while all the other materials should be collected exclusively at the SCC, allowing to save money for the management of the kerbside collection system with a consequent further waste fee reduction for the residents.

  9. Using economic benefits for recycling in a separate collection centre managed as a "reverse supermarket": a sociological survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feo, Giovanni; Polito, Anna Rita

    2015-04-01

    Separate collection centres (SCCs), where citizens can deliver recyclable fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW), in an "urban mining" perspective, can be considered a sort of "reverse supermarket", where people can deliver their recyclables in order to either obtain a waste fee reduction or shopping vouchers. The latter is the case of Baronissi, a town of around 17,000 inhabitants in the Province of Salerno, in the Campania region of Italy. The principal aim of the study was to investigate by means of a sociological survey the relationship between citizens and the separate collection program, with particular emphasis on the role played by the SCC. The separate collection system was evaluated either good or very good by 95.8% of the sample, while 99.2% expressed a good or very good evaluation of the quality of the service inside the separate collection centre: SCC users acted as a community as highlighted by the negative response of the Chi-square test for independence. Respecting the environment prevailed over saving time, obtaining eco-points, or saving money as the main reason why people went to the SCC. The majority of the respondents agreed if only putrescibles and residue should be collected directly from their homes, while all the other materials should be collected exclusively at the SCC, allowing to save money for the management of the kerbside collection system with a consequent further waste fee reduction for the residents. PMID:25681946

  10. The Health and Safety Benefits of New Technologies in Mining: A Review and Strategy for Designing and Deploying Effective User-Centred Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Horberry

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mining is currently experiencing a rapid growth in the development and uptake of automation and other new technologies (such as collision detection systems; however, they are often developed from a technology-centred perspective that does not explicitly consider the end-user. This paper first presents a review of the technologies currently available (or near-market and the likely human factors issues associated with them. The second part of the paper presents a potential long term strategy for research and development that aims to maximise the safety and health benefits for operators of such new technologies. The strategy includes a four stage research and development process, this covers: better understanding the needs for technology, user requirements and risk/cost analysis; human element design, procurement and deployment processes; evaluation and verification of the strategy; and dissemination of it to relevant stakeholders (including equipment manufacturers, mine site purchasers and regulators. The paper concludes by stressing the importance of considering the human element with respect to new mining technologies and the likely benefits of adopting the type of strategy proposed here. The overall vision is for mining to become safer and healthier through effective user-centred design and deployment of new technologies that serve both operator needs and the demands of the workplace.

  11. Anticipation across disciplines

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Never before was anticipation more relevant to the life and activity of humankind than it is today. “It is no overstatement to suggest that humanity’s future will be shaped by its capacity to anticipate….” (Research Agenda for the 21st Century, National Science Foundation). The sciences and the humanities can no longer risk explaining away the complexity and interactivity that lie at the foundation of life and living. The perspective of the world that anticipation opens justifies the descriptor “the post-Cartesian Revolution.” If anticipation is a valid research domain, what practical relevance can we await? Indeed, anticipation is more than just the latest catch-word in marketing the apps developed by the digital technology industry. Due to spectacular advances in the study of the living, anticipation can claim a legitimate place in current investigations and applications in the sciences and the humanities. Biology, genetics, medicine, as well as politics and cognitive, behavioral, and social sci...

  12. Cells anticipate periodic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-01

    We show that an amoeboid organism can anticipate the timing of periodic events. The plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum moves rapidly under favourable conditions, but stops moving when transferred to less-favourable conditions. Plasmodia exposed to unfavourable conditions, presented in three consecutive pulses at constant intervals, reduced their locomotive speed in response to each episode. When subsequently subjected to favourable conditions, the plasmodia spontaneously reduced their locomotive speed at the time point when the next unfavourable episode would have occurred. This implied anticipation of impending environmental change. After this behaviour had been evoked several times, the locomotion of the plasmodia returned to normal; however, the anticipatory response could subsequently be induced by a single unfavourable pulse, implying recall of the memorized periodicity. We explored the mechanisms underlying these behaviours from a dynamical systems perspective. Our results hint at the cellular origins of primitive intelligence and imply that simple dynamics might be sufficient to explain its emergence.

  13. Amoebae Anticipate Periodic Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigusa, Tetsu; Tero, Atsushi; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Kuramoto, Yoshiki

    2008-01-01

    When plasmodia of the true slime mold Physarum were exposed to unfavorable conditions presented as three consecutive pulses at constant intervals, they reduced their locomotive speed in response to each episode. When the plasmodia were subsequently subjected to favorable conditions, they spontaneously reduced their locomotive speed at the time when the next unfavorable episode would have occurred. This implied the anticipation of impending environmental change. We explored the mechanisms underlying these types of behavior from a dynamical systems perspective.

  14. Environmental and social benefits of the targeted intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer: data from UK TARGIT-A trial centres and two UK NHS hospitals offering TARGIT IORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Nathan J; Coombs, Joel M; Vaidya, Uma J; Singer, Julian; Bulsara, Max; Tobias, Jeffrey S; Wenz, Frederik; Joseph, David J; Brown, Douglas A; Rainsbury, Richard; Davidson, Tim; Adamson, Douglas J A; Massarut, Samuele; Morgan, David; Potyka, Ingrid; Corica, Tammy; Falzon, Mary; Williams, Norman; Baum, Michael; Vaidya, Jayant S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the journeys and CO2 emissions if women with breast cancer are treated with risk-adapted single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) rather than several weeks' course of external beam whole breast radiotherapy (EBRT) treatment. Setting (1) TARGIT-A randomised clinical trial (ISRCTN34086741) which compared TARGIT with traditional EBRT and found similar breast cancer control, particularly when TARGIT was given simultaneously with lumpectomy, (2) 2 additional UK centres offering TARGIT. Participants 485 UK patients (249 TARGIT, 236 EBRT) in the prepathology stratum of TARGIT-A trial (where randomisation occurred before lumpectomy and TARGIT was delivered simultaneously with lumpectomy) for whom geographical data were available and 22 patients treated with TARGIT after completion of the TARGIT-A trial in 2 additional UK breast centres. Outcome measures The shortest total journey distance, time and CO2 emissions from home to hospital to receive all the fractions of radiotherapy. Methods Distances, time and CO2 emissions were calculated using Google Maps and assuming a fuel efficiency of 40 mpg. The groups were compared using the Student t test with unequal variance and the non-parametric Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test. Results TARGIT patients travelled significantly fewer miles: TARGIT 21 681, mean 87.1 (SE 19.1) versus EBRT 92 591, mean 392.3 (SE 30.2); had lower CO2 emissions 24.7 kg (SE 5.4) vs 111 kg (SE 8.6) and spent less time travelling: 3 h (SE 0.53) vs 14 h (SE 0.76), all p<0.0001. Patients treated with TARGIT in 2 hospitals in semirural locations were spared much longer journeys (753 miles, 30 h, 215 kg CO2 per patient). Conclusions The use of TARGIT intraoperative radiotherapy for eligible patients with breast cancer significantly reduces their journeys for treatment and has environmental benefits. If widely available, 5 million miles (8 000 000 km) of travel, 170 000 woman-hours and 1200

  15. Anticipated backward stochastic differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Shige; Yang, Zhe

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss new types of differential equations which we call anticipated backward stochastic differential equations (anticipated BSDEs). In these equations the generator includes not only the values of solutions of the present but also the future. We show that these anticipated BSDEs have unique solutions, a comparison theorem for their solutions, and a duality between them and stochastic differential delay equations.

  16. Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-25

    The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.

  17. Young people's anticipation regarding education and job

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Tilde Mette; Lundby, Astrid Arbjerg

    In Denmark there is significant political attention towards leading young people faster through the education system. Through new policies and benefit structures the government aims to reduce the number of gap years in the transition between general upper secondary education (‘gymnasium’) and hig...... of the reason why young people choose gymnasium instead of vocational education. In the paper we discuss the foundation we outline of young people’s anticipation regarding education and job....

  18. Anticipated affect and behavioral choice.

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, R.; Pligt, van der, J.; Vries, de, N.

    1996-01-01

    Most research on the impact of affect on attitudes and behavior emphasizes the effect of past and present affective reactions. In this article we focus on anticipated, postbehavioral, affective reactions. The influence of anticipated affective reactions on a number of behaviors was investigated in the context of Ajzen's theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1985, 1991). Results showed that anticipated affective reactions predicted behavioral intentions independent from general attitudes (evaluat...

  19. Anticipated affect and behavioral choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Richard; J. van der Pligt; N.K. de Vries

    1996-01-01

    Most research on the impact of affect on attitudes and behavior emphasizes the effect of past and present affective reactions. In this article we focus on anticipated, postbehavioral, affective reactions. The influence of anticipated affective reactions on a number of behaviors was investigated in t

  20. Anticipated affect and behavioral choice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Richard; J. van der Pligt; N.K. de Vries

    1996-01-01

    Most research on the impact of affect on attitudes and behavior emphasizes the effect of past and present affective reactions. In this article we focus on anticipated, postbehavioral, affective reactions. The influence of anticipated affective reactions on a number of behaviors was investigated in t

  1. Benefits and costs of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - a multi-centre randomised controlled equivalence trial

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Anne E; Mahal, Ajay; Hill, Catherine J; Lee, Annemarie L; Burge, Angela T; Moore, Rosemary; Nicolson, Caroline; O’Halloran, Paul; Cox, Narelle S.; Lahham, Aroub; Ndongo, Rebecca; Bell, Emily; McDonald, Christine F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary rehabilitation is widely advocated for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to improve exercise capacity, symptoms and quality of life, however only a minority of individuals with COPD are able to participate. Travel and transport are frequently cited as barriers to uptake of centre-based programs. Other models of pulmonary rehabilitation, including home-based programs, have been proposed in order to improve access to this important treatment. Previous...

  2. Palatable meal anticipation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia T Hsu

    Full Text Available The ability to sense time and anticipate events is a critical skill in nature. Most efforts to understand the neural and molecular mechanisms of anticipatory behavior in rodents rely on daily restricted food access, which induces a robust increase of locomotor activity in anticipation of daily meal time. Interestingly, rats also show increased activity in anticipation of a daily palatable meal even when they have an ample food supply, suggesting a role for brain reward systems in anticipatory behavior, and providing an alternate model by which to study the neurobiology of anticipation in species, such as mice, that are less well adapted to "stuff and starve" feeding schedules. To extend this model to mice, and exploit molecular genetic resources available for that species, we tested the ability of wild-type mice to anticipate a daily palatable meal. We observed that mice with free access to regular chow and limited access to highly palatable snacks of chocolate or "Fruit Crunchies" avidly consumed the snack but did not show anticipatory locomotor activity as measured by running wheels or video-based behavioral analysis. However, male mice receiving a snack of high fat chow did show increased food bin entry prior to access time and a modest increase in activity in the two hours preceding the scheduled meal. Interestingly, female mice did not show anticipation of a daily high fat meal but did show increased activity at scheduled mealtime when that meal was withdrawn. These results indicate that anticipation of a scheduled food reward in mice is behavior, diet, and gender specific.

  3. Introduction to the Natural Anticipator and the Artificial Anticipator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Daniel M.

    2010-11-01

    This short communication deals with the introduction of the concept of anticipator, which is one who anticipates, in the framework of computing anticipatory systems. The definition of anticipation deals with the concept of program. Indeed, the word program, comes from "pro-gram" meaning "to write before" by anticipation, and means a plan for the programming of a mechanism, or a sequence of coded instructions that can be inserted into a mechanism, or a sequence of coded instructions, as genes or behavioural responses, that is part of an organism. Any natural or artificial programs are thus related to anticipatory rewriting systems, as shown in this paper. All the cells in the body, and the neurons in the brain, are programmed by the anticipatory genetic code, DNA, in a low-level language with four signs. The programs in computers are also computing anticipatory systems. It will be shown, at one hand, that the genetic code DNA is a natural anticipator. As demonstrated by Nobel laureate McClintock [8], genomes are programmed. The fundamental program deals with the DNA genetic code. The properties of the DNA consist in self-replication and self-modification. The self-replicating process leads to reproduction of the species, while the self-modifying process leads to new species or evolution and adaptation in existing ones. The genetic code DNA keeps its instructions in memory in the DNA coding molecule. The genetic code DNA is a rewriting system, from DNA coding to DNA template molecule. The DNA template molecule is a rewriting system to the Messenger RNA molecule. The information is not destroyed during the execution of the rewriting program. On the other hand, it will be demonstrated that Turing machine is an artificial anticipator. The Turing machine is a rewriting system. The head reads and writes, modifying the content of the tape. The information is destroyed during the execution of the program. This is an irreversible process. The input data are lost.

  4. L'anticipation comme actualisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondeme, Chloé

    2017-01-01

    observation and analysis of ordinary interactions. The corpus is constituted of learning interactions, between dog educator and dogs in formation, in which anticipating an action, notably by assessing it before it happens, contributes in a large part to (re)configure it. This point leads us to develop...... a pragmatical conception of action, conceived as an emerging, collectively accomplished, and collaborative process....

  5. Anticipating and Resisting the Temptation to Behave Unethically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Oliver J; Fishbach, Ayelet

    2015-07-01

    Ethical dilemmas pose a self-control conflict between pursuing immediate benefits through behaving dishonestly and pursuing long-term benefits through acts of honesty. Therefore, factors that facilitate self-control for other types of goals (e.g., health and financial) should also promote ethical behavior. Across four studies, we find support for this possibility. Specifically, we find that only under conditions that facilitate conflict identification--including the consideration of several decisions simultaneously (i.e., a broad decision frame) and perceived high connectedness to the future self--does anticipating a temptation to behave dishonestly in advance promote honesty. We demonstrate these interaction patterns between conflict identification and temptation anticipation in negotiation situations (Study 1), lab tasks (Study 2), and ethical dilemmas in the workplace (Studies 3-4). We conclude that identifying a self-control conflict and anticipating a temptation are two necessary preconditions for ethical decision making. PMID:26001580

  6. Needs of anticipation for transport operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COGEMA LOGISTICS (formerly Transnucleaire) has designed and manufactured several thousands of casks, and owns fleet of more than 4000 casks. Benefiting from more than 40 years of experience in cask shipment COGEMA LOGISTICS has demonstrated an outstanding performance in transportation and has integrated all feed back from past successful operations in current ones. Early anticipation of needs, i.e. at preliminary design step, is of major importance from a technical point of view (capacity, interface, handling means, licensing), and also in terms of political and public acceptance issues from the design step. This paper will highlight for each step required for the implementation of an optimal transport and storage system: Decision to proceed (including political aspects)-Design of casks to be used (including operational interface)-Licensing process-Manufacturing process-Transport plan, Public Acceptance-Loading Operations-Transport-Maintenance operations. (authors)

  7. Anticipating flow assurance challenges through geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flannery, M. [Fluid Evaluation and Sampling Technologies (FEAST) Team, Shell International Exploration and Production (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The behaviour of reservoir fluids pose a challenge at all stages of petroleum production, from the reservoir to refinery. The challenges sometimes stem from sub-optimal operations or inappropriate system design, with assumptions of similar fluid properties across the field. Hydrocarbon fluid phase behaviour is the product of local PVT conditions and the geochemical identity of the fluids. An appropriate development scenario along with anticipation of production challenges, can benefit from early integration of engineering and geochemical understanding of hydrocarbon fluids. This paper presented field examples of how the kerogen type and maturity, and later post-generation alteration processes such as biodegradation, water washing, TSR can influence likely flow assurance challenges in the production stream. The confounding issues of multiple charges and overlaying signatures were also discussed.

  8. Anticipated regret and precautionary sexual behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Richard; N.K. de Vries; J. van der Pligt

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of anticipated regret on precautionary sexual behavior. 317 female and 134 male 18-48 yr old college students completed questionnaires assessing behavioral expectations regarding casual sexual behavior, anticipated regret, perceived behavioral control, attitudes, s

  9. Time discounting and pain anticipation. Experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brañas Garza, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with pain anticipation experienced before medical procedures. our experimental results show that individuals with lower time discount factors are more prone to suffer pain in advance. We provide a framework to rationalize the connection between pain anticipation and impatience. in this set up, more impatient subjects, who only value very near events, mainly take into account the present negative effects of medical procedures (the costs, whereas more patient individuals have a net positive valuation of medical events, given that they are able to value both the cost incurred now and all the benefits to be accrued in the future.

    Este artículo trata de la anticipación del dolor experimentada antes de los procedimientos médicos. nuestros resultados experimentales muestran que los individuos con factor de descuento temporal más bajo son más proclives a sufrir dolor por adelantado. el artículo proporciona un marco en el que racionalizar la relación existente entre impaciencia y anticipación del dolor. en este marco, los sujetos más impacientes, que evalúan sólo los eventos muy próximos en el tiempo, focalizan su atención principalmente en los efectos negativos de los procedimientos médicos (sólo los costes, mientras que los individuos más pacientes tienen una valoración neta positiva de los actos médicos puesto que valoran tanto el coste en el que se incurre en el presente como los beneficios que se obtendrán en el futuro.

  10. Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Help for an Eating Disorder: The Role of Stigma and Anticipated Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackler, Ashley H.; Vogel, David L.; Wade, Nathaniel G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between self-stigma, anticipated risks and benefits associated with seeking counseling, and attitudes toward seeking counseling among college students with disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. The results of hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that self-stigma and the anticipated risks and…

  11. Anticipated consumer reaction to irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction on first hearing of food irradiation is horror, revulsion, and disbelief that we could seriously anticipate such a thing. Ignorance coupled with fear of anything to do with the nuclear industry is the reason for such extreme reaction. Before anyone rushes into marketing irradiated foods, a lot of careful preparation must be done. A consumer education program is essential. The consumers must be told why it is proposed to irradiate food, what benefits it will bring to the public. Enough need will have to be demonstrated to overcome the supposed risk factor. Symbol on all irradiated foods must not be used to alert or alarm the consumer but rather as a piece of information. It will be necessary to be ever vigilant, to keep up the diligent training of food irradiators, food handlers and food inspectors. Irradiation is not a substitute for good manufacturing practice. So by using a different name or symbol, irradiated foods will soon be a part of our lives

  12. Anticipating urgent surgery in operating room departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lans, van der M.; Hans, E.W.; Hurink, J.L.; Wullink, G.; Houdenhoven, van M.; Kazemier, G.

    2005-01-01

    Operating Room (OR) departments need to create robust surgical schedules that anticipate urgent surgery, while minimizing urgent surgery waiting time and overtime, and maximizing utilization. We consider two levels of planning and control to anticipate urgent surgery. At the tactical level, we study

  13. Brain Responses during the Anticipation of Dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckel, M Cornelia; Esser, Roland W; Gamer, Matthias; Büchel, Christian; von Leupoldt, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is common in many cardiorespiratory diseases. Already the anticipation of this aversive symptom elicits fear in many patients resulting in unfavorable health behaviors such as activity avoidance and sedentary lifestyle. This study investigated brain mechanisms underlying these anticipatory processes. We induced dyspnea using resistive-load breathing in healthy subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Blocks of severe and mild dyspnea alternated, each preceded by anticipation periods. Severe dyspnea activated a network of sensorimotor, cerebellar, and limbic areas. The left insular, parietal opercular, and cerebellar cortices showed increased activation already during dyspnea anticipation. Left insular and parietal opercular cortex showed increased connectivity with right insular and anterior cingulate cortex when severe dyspnea was anticipated, while the cerebellum showed increased connectivity with the amygdala. Notably, insular activation during dyspnea perception was positively correlated with midbrain activation during anticipation. Moreover, anticipatory fear was positively correlated with anticipatory activation in right insular and anterior cingulate cortex. The results demonstrate that dyspnea anticipation activates brain areas involved in dyspnea perception. The involvement of emotion-related areas such as insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and amygdala during dyspnea anticipation most likely reflects anticipatory fear and might underlie the development of unfavorable health behaviors in patients suffering from dyspnea. PMID:27648309

  14. Brain Responses during the Anticipation of Dyspnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckel, M. Cornelia; Esser, Roland W.; Büchel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is common in many cardiorespiratory diseases. Already the anticipation of this aversive symptom elicits fear in many patients resulting in unfavorable health behaviors such as activity avoidance and sedentary lifestyle. This study investigated brain mechanisms underlying these anticipatory processes. We induced dyspnea using resistive-load breathing in healthy subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Blocks of severe and mild dyspnea alternated, each preceded by anticipation periods. Severe dyspnea activated a network of sensorimotor, cerebellar, and limbic areas. The left insular, parietal opercular, and cerebellar cortices showed increased activation already during dyspnea anticipation. Left insular and parietal opercular cortex showed increased connectivity with right insular and anterior cingulate cortex when severe dyspnea was anticipated, while the cerebellum showed increased connectivity with the amygdala. Notably, insular activation during dyspnea perception was positively correlated with midbrain activation during anticipation. Moreover, anticipatory fear was positively correlated with anticipatory activation in right insular and anterior cingulate cortex. The results demonstrate that dyspnea anticipation activates brain areas involved in dyspnea perception. The involvement of emotion-related areas such as insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and amygdala during dyspnea anticipation most likely reflects anticipatory fear and might underlie the development of unfavorable health behaviors in patients suffering from dyspnea.

  15. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge;

    2009-01-01

    . The effect remained when cancers diagnosed at surveillance were excluded, applied to maternal as well as paternal inheritance, and was independent of the MMR gene mutated. CONCLUSION: The effect from anticipation demonstrated in this large, population-based Lynch syndrome cohort underscores the need...... parent-child pairs in which age at the first cancer diagnosis was assessed. A paired t-test and a specifically developed bivariate model were used to assess a possible role of anticipation. RESULTS: Both methods revealed anticipation with children developing cancer mean 9.8 years (P ... parents using the paired t-test and 5.5 years (P

  16. Anticipation Behavior Upstream of a Bottleneck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duives, D.C.; Daamen, W.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Whether pedestrian movements do or do not follow similar patterns as vehicular traffic while experiencing congestion is not entirely understood. Using data gathered during bottleneck experiments under laboratory conditions, the phenomenon of anticipation before entering congestion is studied. This p

  17. [The primary healthcare centres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature. PMID:24770539

  18. Anticipating ethical issues in emerging IT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brey, P.A.E.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, a new approach to the ethics of emerging information technology will be presented, called anticipatory technology ethics (ATE). The ethics of emerging technology is the study of ethical issues at the R&D and introduction stage of technology development through anticipation of possible

  19. Why the Economic Crisis Was Not Anticipated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    An article in the October 11 "New York Times" attributed the almost universal failure to anticipate the current economic crisis to "insanity"--more precisely, to a psychological inability to give proper weight to past events, so that if there is prosperity today people assume that it will last forever, even though they know that in the past booms…

  20. Thailand NR Supply Better than Anticipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erin Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Learned from the media, though suffering from the attack of the rainstorm and flood, the Thailand NR is in better supply than anticipation this year. In the situation of the demand anxiety resulted from the European debt crisis and the sufficient inventory in China, the in- creasing supply makes the price under further pressure.

  1. Managing social impact in design: tools and methods for anticipating consequences of technology

    OpenAIRE

    Bouma, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    The use of email communication, mobile phones and cars has had wide-ranging social consequences. What is more, designers are plainly not always aware of all social consequences of technology, despite practicing user-centred design. Modern technology creates possibilities to influence social behaviour. Once a designer aims at defined social changes, the consequences of technology for practices become a responsibility, too. The present research is aimed at providing tools and methods to anticip...

  2. CMS Centre at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A new "CMS Centre" is being established on the CERN Meyrin site by the CMS collaboration. It will be a focal point for communications, where physicists will work together on data quality monitoring, detector calibration, offline analysis of physics events, and CMS computing operations. Construction of the CMS Centre begins in the historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room. The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room, Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. TThe LHC@FNAL Centre, in operation at Fermilab in the US, will work very closely with the CMS Centre, as well as the CERN Control Centre. (Photo Fermilab)The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room is about to start a new life. Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, the room will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. When finished, it will resemble the CERN Contro...

  3. Velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-yun; WENG Xu-dan; LI Qing-ding

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model (OVM) is investigated.The driver adjusts the velocity of his vehicle by the desired headway,which depends on both instantaneous headway and relative velocity.The effect of relative velocity is measured by a sensitivity function.A specific form of the sensitivity function is supposed and the involved parameters are determined by the both numerical simulation and empirical data.It is shown that inclusion of velocity anticipation enhances the stability of traffic flow.Numerical simulations show a good agreement with empirical data.This model provides a better description of real traffic,including the acceleration process from standing states and the deceleration process approaching a stopped car.

  4. Anticipation of physical causality guides eye movements

    OpenAIRE

    Wende, Kim; Theunissen, Laetitia; Missal, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Causality is a unique feature of human perception. We present here a behavioral investigation of the influence of physical causality during visual pursuit of object collisions. Pursuit and saccadic eye movements of human subjects were recorded during ocular pursuit of two concurrently launched targets, one that moved according to the laws of Newtonian mechanics (the causal target) and the other one that moved in a physically implausible direction (the non-causal target). We found that anticip...

  5. Five-Year-Old Preschoolers’ Sharing is Influenced by Anticipated Reciprocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Mingrui; Jiannong, Shi; Wu, Zhen;

    2016-01-01

    Whether children share in anticipation of future benefits returned by a partner is an interesting question. In this study, 5-year-old children and an adult partner played a sharing game, in which children donated first and the partner donated afterward. In Experiment 1, the partner’s resources were...

  6. Client Centred Desing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Nielsen, Janni; Levinsen, Karin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we argue for the use of Client Centred preparation phases when designing complex systems. Through Client Centred Design human computer interaction can extend the focus on end-users to alse encompass the client's needs, context and resources.......In this paper we argue for the use of Client Centred preparation phases when designing complex systems. Through Client Centred Design human computer interaction can extend the focus on end-users to alse encompass the client's needs, context and resources....

  7. Canadian Irradiation Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Irradiation Centre is a non-profit cooperative project between Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Radiochemical Company and Universite du Quebec, Institut Armand-Frappier, Centre for Applied Research in Food Science. The Centre's objectives are to develop, demonstrate and promote Canada's radiation processing technology and its applications by conducting applied research; training technical, professional and scientific personnel; educating industry and government; demonstrating operational and scientific procedures; developing processing procedures and standards, and performing product and market acceptance trials. This pamphlet outlines the history of radoation technology and the services offered by the Canadian Irradiation Centre

  8. Anticipated effects of climate change on estuarine and coastal fisheries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, V.S. (Univ. of Maryland, Cambridge (USA))

    Although the timing and magnitude of global climate change is in dispute, the possible effects of such charge merit consideration to allow for discussion of policy ramification and mitigative actions. Climate change may result in sea level rise; water temperature increase; and deviations from present patterns of precipitation, wind, and water circulation. Estuaries may experience loss of marsh habitat, intrusion of marine waters and associated organisms, changes in circulation patterns that affect retention of some indigenous species, and increased hypoxia and storm surges. Estuarine and coastal systems could experience poleward retreat of cold-tolerant species and range expansion of warm-tolerant species. Some fisheries and aquacultural enterprises and communities would benefit from the results of climate change and others would suffer losses, with economic and population dislocations probably inevitable in many parts of the world. Thus, flexibility in policy-making and planning will be vital if global climate is modified as rapidly as is anticipated by some scientists.

  9. Anticipating the organizational impacts of electric industry restructuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various aspects of restructuring in the electric industry, and what can be done to anticipate them, were reviewed, based on the California experience. Major issues that will affect the industry organizationally were discussed, with several examples of alternative structural models. Current issues and likely changes in competition at the wholesale level were described, along with the most probable changes in the way electricity will be marketed at the retail level. Potential benefits, and major concerns about retail access were defined. The structure of the industry in California was summarized (the Independent System Operator (ISO), and the Power Exchange (PX) being the principal features). The system's governance, present and future structure, the still evolving nature of regulation, problems with stranded costs and alternative methods for computing them, the transition process itself, the California approach to transition cost recovery, and what all this means to customers, were some of the topics that have received attention

  10. Postmodern Anticipations with E. A. Poe

    OpenAIRE

    Lucian-Vasile SZABO

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to serve as an introduction to a postmodern reading of Edgar Allan Poe’s short prose. Adventurous approach, as the author manifested himself as a writer in the first part of the 19th century, when romanticism revived and modern paradigm was founded. Based on the assessments expressed on postmodernism and using the tools proposed by various field researchers, we discover in Poe’s work anticipations of the narrative structure method specific for our present t...

  11. Postmodern Anticipations with E. A. Poe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian-Vasile SZABO

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to serve as an introduction to a postmodern reading of Edgar Allan Poe’s short prose. Adventurous approach, as the author manifested himself as a writer in the first part of the 19th century, when romanticism revived and modern paradigm was founded. Based on the assessments expressed on postmodernism and using the tools proposed by various field researchers, we discover in Poe’s work anticipations of the narrative structure method specific for our present times. His concern for the newspaper reader, the insertion of general press topics and articles in his prose, the use of the sensational side of events in his newspaper reports, the ironic approach of real and diegetic facts allow a fresh reading, revaluating this surprising writer. Remarkable are his projections which come close to the SF genre, his confidence in the progress of science and the permanent impairment of this confidence, generated by the fear of world destruction. The conclusion would be that Poe’s prose allows certain postmodern anticipative projections to be decoded and the research to be extended beyond the conventional boundaries of modernity.

  12. The Bionic Anticipation of Natural Disasters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helmut Tributsch

    2005-01-01

    After major natural disasters, such as the recent earthquake-tsunami event in South Asia, reports appear about the mysterious ability of animals to anticipate and to escape the impending danger. This is an opportunity to recall the long history of this phenomenon in the traditions of different civilizations, to evaluate Chinese efforts, 30 -40 years ago, to use this phenomenon for earthquake prediction, and to judge its state of acceptance in modern science. An effort is made to introduce this phenomenon as a research field of modern bionics. The timing is favorable since, increasingly, infrared thermal anomalies, monitored from satellite, suggesting litho-atmospheric processes, are found to precede earthquakes.They were unexpected by seismologists and are here suggested to essentially reflect the energy conversion patterns responsible for the signals monitored by animals. The aim is to learn from animals in the long term how natural disasters can better be anticipated, and how simple technical warning systems can be developed. Some challenges are analyzed. One is interpretation of the nature of energy release prior to the main earthquake disaster resulting in "macro-anomaly" precursors,another is better to understand the effect on animal senses. The role of non-linear cooperative phenomena including tsunamitype waves is emphasized.

  13. Anticipation learning from the past the Russian/Soviet contributions to the science of anticipation

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the work of leading scientists from Russia, Georgia, Estonia, Lithuania, Israel, and the USA, revealing major insights long unknown to the scientific community. Without any doubt their work will provide a springboard for further research in anticipation. Until recently, Robert Rosen (Anticipatory Systems) and Mihai Nadin (MIND – Anticipation and Chaos) were deemed forerunners in this still new knowledge domain. The distinguished neurobiologist, Steven Rose, pointed to the fact that Soviet neuropsychological theories have not on the whole been well received by Western science. These earlier insights as presented in this volume make an important contribution to the foundation of the science of anticipation. It is shown that the daring hypotheses and rich experimental evidence produced by Bernstein, Beritashvili, Ukhtomsky, Anokhin, and Uznadze, among others—extend foundational work to aspects of neuroscience, physiology, motorics, education.

  14. Anticipated Activities in Maritime Work, Process Control, and Business Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2004-01-01

    Most activities are anticipated before they are executed. The paper presents methods for describing this anticipated state and the processes that may lead to a new state where the activities are executed. The method builds on linguistic case-theory....

  15. Parallel Error Detection for Leading Zero Anticipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Zhang; Wei-Wu Hu; Zi-Chu Qi

    2006-01-01

    The algorithm and its implementation of the leading zero anticipation (LZA) are very vital for the performance of a high-speed floating-point adder in today's state of art microprocessor design. Unfortunately, in predicting "shift amount"by a conventional LZA design, the result could be off by one position. This paper presents a novel parallel error detection algorithm for a general-case LZA. The proposed approach enables parallel execution of conventional LZA and its error detection, so that the error-indication signal can be generated earlier in the stage of normalization, thus reducing the critical path and improving overall performance. The circuit implementation of this algorithm also shows its advantages of area and power compared with other previous work.

  16. Anticipated synchronization in neuronal network motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, F. S.; Gollo, L. L.; Carelli, P. V.; Copelli, M.; Mirasso, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Two identical dynamical systems coupled unidirectionally (in a so called master-slave configuration) exhibit anticipated synchronization (AS) if the one which receives the coupling (the slave) also receives a negative delayed self-feedback. In oscillatory neuronal systems AS is characterized by a phase-locking with negative time delay τ between the spikes of the master and of the slave (slave fires before the master), while in the usual delayed synchronization (DS) regime τ is positive (slave fires after the master). A 3-neuron motif in which the slave self-feedback is replaced by a feedback loop mediated by an interneuron can exhibits both AS and DS regimes. Here we show that AS is robust in the presence of noise in a 3 Hodgkin-Huxley type neuronal motif. We also show that AS is stable for large values of τ in a chain of connected slaves-interneurons.

  17. Intent, Future, Anticipation: A Semiotic, Transdisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeckenhoff, Hellmut

    2008-10-01

    Encouraged e.g. by chaos theory and (bio-)semiotics science is trying to attempt a deeper understanding of life. The paradigms of physics alone prove not sufficient to explain f. ex. evolution or phylogenesis and ontogenesis. In complement, research on life systems reassesses paradigmatic models not only for living systems and not only on the strict biological level. The ontological as well as the epistemological base of science in toto is to be reconsidered. Science itself proves a historical and cultural phenomenon and can be seen as shaped by evolution and semiosis. -Living systems are signified by purpose, intent and, necessarily, by the faculty to anticipate e.g. the cyclic changes of their environment. To understand the concepts behind a proposal is developed towards a model set constituting a transdisciplinary approach. It rests e.g. on concepts of systems, evolution, complexity and semiodynamics.

  18. Christians' Anticipations about Counselors in Response to Counselor Descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Alan M.; Fretz, Bruce R.

    1990-01-01

    College students and adults completed religiosity scale, read counselor description (Christian, secular, spiritual-empathic secular), and completed measure of five negative anticipations of Christian clients toward counselors. Subjects with higher religiosity scores had more negative anticipations; strongest negative anticipations were about…

  19. The IGU Knowledge Centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, Bernardus

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an innovative service for members of the International Gas Union - IGU. The IGU Knowledge Centre provides members with relevant information and data. In this article is described why, how and where.

  20. CENTRE FOR GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    The objective of this Annual Report is to give a general introduction to CGM as well as to give an account of the tasks carried out using the facilities of CGM's Instrument Centre during 1998 and 1999....

  1. Virtual particle therapy centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Particle therapy is an advanced technique of cancer radiation therapy, using protons or other ions to target the cancerous mass. This advanced technique requires a multi-disciplinary team working in a specialised centre. 3D animation: Nymus3D

  2. The Bruce Energy Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bruce Energy Centre Development Corporation is a joint venture of the Ontario Energy Corporation and 6 private companies formed to market surplus steam from the Bruce Nuclear Power Development. The corporation will also sell or lease land near Bruce NPD. The Bruce Energy Centre has an energy output of 900 BTU per day per dollar invested. Potential customers include greenhouse operators, aquaculturalists, food and beverage manufacturers, and traditional manufacturers

  3. Anticipation as a Strategy: A Design Paradigm for Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mary-Anne; Gärdenfors, Peter; Johnston, Benjamin; Wightwick, Glenn

    Anticipation plays a crucial role during any action, particularly in agents operating in open, complex and dynamic environments. In this paper we consider the role of anticipation as a strategy from a design perspective. Anticipation is a crucial skill in sporting games like soccer, tennis and cricket. We explore the role of anticipation in robot soccer matches in the context of reaching the RoboCup vision to develop a robot soccer team capable of defeating the FIFA World Champions in 2050. Anticipation in soccer can be planned or emergent but whether planned or emergent, anticipation can be designed. Two key obstacles stand in the way of developing more anticipatory robot systems; an impoverished understanding of the "anticipation" process/capability and a lack of know-how in the design of anticipatory systems. Several teams at RoboCup have developed remarkable preemptive behaviors. The CMU Dive and UTS Dodge are two compelling examples. In this paper we take steps towards designing robots that can adopt anticipatory behaviors by proposing an innovative model of anticipation as a strategy that specifies the key characteristics of anticipation behaviors to be developed. The model can drive the design of autonomous systems by providing a means to explore and to represent anticipation requirements. Our approach is to analyze anticipation as a strategy and then to use the insights obtained to design a reference model that can be used to specify a set of anticipatory requirements for guiding an autonomous robot soccer system.

  4. Anticipated soil selenium concentrations at Kesterson Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, S.M.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Zawislanski, P.

    1992-10-01

    Temporal trends from soil monitoring data collected at Kesterson Reservoir have been reviewed to shed light on anticipated concentrations of total and water-extractable selenium in surface and subsurface soils. Based on these data, a mass balance model for selenium has been developed and employed to evaluate the rate of leaching, remobilization and volatilization that has occurred since the Reservoir was dried out in 1987. Results from a series of calibration runs were then extrapolated 25 years in the future to forecast the evolution and redistribution of selenium within the soil profile. Projected water-extractable selenium concentrations within the 0.15 to 1 m depth interval were then used to drive a food-chain based risk-assessment model described in a separate report (CH2M Hill, 1992). Inventories of water-extractable selenium in the root zone increased in 4 of the 5 scenarios investigated. However, predicted values for the average concentration of water-extractable selenium in the root zone fall within the range of values observed at Kesterson today. Consequences of these projected increases on wildlife residing in and around Kesterson are addressed in CH2M Hill (1992).

  5. Cardiac fluid dynamics anticipates heart adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Martiniello, Alfonso R; Bianchi, Valter; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Caso, Pio; Tonti, Giovanni

    2015-01-21

    Hemodynamic forces represent an epigenetic factor during heart development and are supposed to influence the pathology of the grown heart. Cardiac blood motion is characterized by a vortical dynamics, and it is common belief that the cardiac vortex has a role in disease progressions or regression. Here we provide a preliminary demonstration about the relevance of maladaptive intra-cardiac vortex dynamics in the geometrical adaptation of the dysfunctional heart. We employed an in vivo model of patients who present a stable normal heart function in virtue of the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, bi-ventricular pace-maker) and who are expected to develop left ventricle remodeling if pace-maker was switched off. Intra-ventricular fluid dynamics is analyzed by echocardiography (Echo-PIV). Under normal conditions, the flow presents a longitudinal alignment of the intraventricular hemodynamic forces. When pacing is temporarily switched off, flow forces develop a misalignment hammering onto lateral walls, despite no other electro-mechanical change is noticed. Hemodynamic forces result to be the first event that evokes a physiological activity anticipating cardiac changes and could help in the prediction of longer term heart adaptations.

  6. The ideal Atomic Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents considerations which should prove to be of interest to all those who have to design, to construct and to operate a nuclear research centre. A large number of the ideas presented can also be applied to non-nuclear scientific research centres. In his report the author reviews: various problems with which the constructor is faced: ground-plan, infrastructure, buildings and the large units of scientific equipment in the centre, and those problems facing the director: maintenance, production, supplies, security. The author stresses the relationship which ought to exist between the research workers and the management. With this aim in view he proposes the creation of National School for Administration in Research which would train administrative executives for public or private organisations; they would be specialised in the fields of fundamental or applied research. (author)

  7. Lidar Calibration Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  8. ICT AND NIGERIAN BANKS REFORMS: ANALYSIS OF ANTICIPATED IMPACTS IN SELECTED BANKS

    OpenAIRE

    Osabuohien Evans S.C

    2008-01-01

    Banking has become highly Information Communication Technology (ICT) based and due to its intersectoral link, is reaping the benefits of technological revolution as evidenced by its application in most of its operations. This study empirical analyzes the anticipated role ICT has in enhancing the operations of selected Nigerian banks in the light of current reforms. Primary data was employed, which was analyzed using cross-tabulations and regression technique built on the framework of technica...

  9. International research centre launched

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The first scientific research and educational institution to be set up on a completely international basis was officially inaugurated in Trieste on 5 October 1964 by the Director General of IAEA, Dr. Sigvard Eklund, when he opened the first seminar of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics. As evidence of the international nature of the institution he noted that the scientists who would work and teach there during the first year represented sixteen different countries. By the end of 1964, the Centre building was nearing completion and three of the five floors were occupied. A successful symposium had been held on the subject of plasma physics, and a score of professors and fellows were at work, from Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Greece, India, Japan, Jordan, the Netherlands, Norway, Pakistan, Poland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. A dozen scientific papers had been issued as preprints. The main purpose of the Centre is to foster the advancement of theoretical physics through training and research; at first the chief subject will be high-energy and elementary particle physics. Plasma physics, low energy physics and solid-state physics will also be dealt with. Special attention is paid to the needs of the developing countries. Of the 25 fellows selected for the academic year 1964-65, more than half are from South America, Africa and Asia. In conjunction with the Research Centre, there is an Advanced School for theoretical Physics to provide graduate training for fellows who need such preparation before they embark upon research. The Centre works under the guidance of a Scientific Council comprising the president, Prof. M. Sandoval-Vallarta (Nuclear Energy Commission of Mexico); Prof. A. Abragam (Saclay, France); Prof. R. Oppenheimer (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, USA); Dr. V. Soloviev (Dubna, USSR); Prof V.F. Weiskopf (Director General, CERN) ; Prof Abdus Salam (Imperial College, London) ; Prof. P. Budini (University of Trieste

  10. Academic Drug Discovery Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Henriette Schultz; Valentin, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic...

  11. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  12. ATLAS Visitors Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS Visitors Centre has opened its shiny new doors to the public. Officially launched on Monday February 23rd, 2009, the permanent exhibition at Point 1 was conceived as a tour resource for ATLAS guides, and as a way to preserve the public’s opportunity to get a close-up look at the experiment in action when the cavern is sealed.

  13. Victims' use of professional services in a Dutch sexual assault centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Bicanic; H. Snetselaar; A. de Jongh; E. van de Putte

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prior research endorsed the establishment of sexual assault centres in the Netherlands because of the potential benefit for victims’ mental recovery. In 2012, the first Dutch sexual assault centre was founded at the University Medical Center Utrecht. The aim of the centre is to provide 2

  14. Howard Doris anticipates still-uncommitted work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-05-01

    Although more than $3.5 billion a year is being spent in the UK offshore sector it is believed that not all the spending promised has yet been committed. The Howard Doris Kishorn yard, one of the most successful in the UK, is likely to benefit from the long-promised upturn in business now under way. Kishorn has just finished work on the Buchan floater, and it won two module contracts for Total's North Alwyn field worth $17.6 million. The yard has a long list of major projects behind it, including Ninian Central's enormous concrete platform and the integrated deck used by Phillips on Maureen. New business coming to Kishorn from development off the Scottish west coast, where large quantities of frontier acreage are likely to be included with mature acreage in ninth round awards, is described.

  15. The non-anticipation of the asynchronous systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vlad, Serban E.

    2008-01-01

    The asynchronous systems are the models of the asynchronous circuits from the digital electrical engineering and non-anticipation is one of the most important properties in systems theory. Our present purpose is to introduce several concepts of non-anticipation of the asynchronous systems.

  16. Client Anticipations about Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Debra S.; Peterson, Gary W.; Sampson, James P., Jr.; Reardon, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    This study describes how 55 clients from a career center at a large, southeastern university anticipated using computer-assisted career guidance (CACG) systems to help in their career decision making and problem solving. Responses to a cued and a free response survey indicated that clients' most frequent anticipations included increased career…

  17. LINEAR ISOMETRIC NON-ANTICIPATIVE TRANSFORMATIONS OF WIENER PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The necessary and sufficient conditions are given so that a non-anticipative transformation in Hilbert space is isometric. In terms of second order Wiener process, these conditions assure that a non-anticipative transformation of Wiener process is a Wiener process, too.

  18. Age Differences in Risky Decisions: The Role of Anticipated Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiwei; Ma, Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of anticipated emotions in risky decisions of young and older adults. Young and older adults were asked to make a choice between an alternative that may have either a very positive or a very negative consequence and an alternative that was relatively safe. Meanwhile, they rated their anticipated emotions if…

  19. Elderly Care Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagiman, Aliani; Haja Bava Mohidin, Hazrina; Ismail, Alice Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The demand for elderly centre has increased tremendously abreast with the world demographic change as the number of senior citizens rose in the 21st century. This has become one of the most crucial problems of today's era. As the world progress into modernity, more and more people are occupied with daily work causing the senior citizens to lose the care that they actually need. This paper seeks to elucidate the best possible design of an elderly care centre with new approach in order to provide the best service for them by analysing their needs and suitable activities that could elevate their quality of life. All these findings will then be incorporated into design solutions so as to enhance the living environment for the elderly especially in Malaysian context.

  20. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  1. Tele-centres in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten

    2004-01-01

    Tele-centres offer a low cost opportunity for the many who cannot afford their own phone or Internet connection. This paper presents a field study of tele-centres in Ghana and analyses how they contribute to universal access.......Tele-centres offer a low cost opportunity for the many who cannot afford their own phone or Internet connection. This paper presents a field study of tele-centres in Ghana and analyses how they contribute to universal access....

  2. Medicaid Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medicaid Outreach Tools Medicaid State Plan Amendments Benefits States establish and administer their own Medicaid programs ... Medicare certified hospital, and critical access hospital (CAH). Benefits Content Autism Services Early Periodic Screening Diagnosis & Treatment ...

  3. Anticipating Human Activities Using Object Affordances for Reactive Robotic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppula, Hema S; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of human perception is anticipation, which we use extensively in our day-to-day activities when interacting with other humans as well as with our surroundings. Anticipating which activities will a human do next (and how) can enable an assistive robot to plan ahead for reactive responses. Furthermore, anticipation can even improve the detection accuracy of past activities. The challenge, however, is two-fold: We need to capture the rich context for modeling the activities and object affordances, and we need to anticipate the distribution over a large space of future human activities. In this work, we represent each possible future using an anticipatory temporal conditional random field (ATCRF) that models the rich spatial-temporal relations through object affordances. We then consider each ATCRF as a particle and represent the distribution over the potential futures using a set of particles. In extensive evaluation on CAD-120 human activity RGB-D dataset, we first show that anticipation improves the state-of-the-art detection results. We then show that for new subjects (not seen in the training set), we obtain an activity anticipation accuracy (defined as whether one of top three predictions actually happened) of 84.1, 74.4 and 62.2 percent for an anticipation time of 1, 3 and 10 seconds respectively. Finally, we also show a robot using our algorithm for performing a few reactive responses.

  4. A magnetoencephalography study of visual processing of pain anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Andre G; Gopalakrishnan, Raghavan; Plow, Ela B; Burgess, Richard C; Mosher, John C

    2014-07-15

    Anticipating pain is important for avoiding injury; however, in chronic pain patients, anticipatory behavior can become maladaptive, leading to sensitization and limiting function. Knowledge of networks involved in pain anticipation and conditioning over time could help devise novel, better-targeted therapies. With the use of magnetoencephalography, we evaluated in 10 healthy subjects the neural processing of pain anticipation. Anticipatory cortical activity elicited by consecutive visual cues that signified imminent painful stimulus was compared with cues signifying nonpainful and no stimulus. We found that the neural processing of visually evoked pain anticipation involves the primary visual cortex along with cingulate and frontal regions. Visual cortex could quickly and independently encode and discriminate between visual cues associated with pain anticipation and no pain during preconscious phases following object presentation. When evaluating the effect of task repetition on participating cortical areas, we found that activity of prefrontal and cingulate regions was mostly prominent early on when subjects were still naive to a cue's contextual meaning. Visual cortical activity was significant throughout later phases. Although visual cortex may precisely and time efficiently decode cues anticipating pain or no pain, prefrontal areas establish the context associated with each cue. These findings have important implications toward processes involved in pain anticipation and maladaptive pain conditioning.

  5. The experience of adolescent inpatient care and the anticipated transition to the community: Young people's perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Freya; Butler, Stephen; Pistrang, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    This study explored adolescents' perspectives of inpatient mental health care, focussing on aspects of the inpatient environment they anticipated would help or hinder their transition back home. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 adolescent inpatients; transcripts were analysed thematically. Participants experienced inpatient treatment as offering a mix of benefits (e.g., supportive relationships) and drawbacks (e.g., living in a "fake world"). They anticipated the transition home as providing opportunities for personal growth and consolidation of new coping skills, but also posing challenges concerning re-entering the "real world" after the experience of being "wrapped in cotton wool". Self-determination theory and attachment theory offer two potential frameworks for understanding these opportunities and challenges. Inpatient care has the potential to foster key mechanisms for adaptive development, creating a platform for developing positive future behaviours. Community teams should work closely with inpatient units to support the generalisation of the young person's newly acquired coping skills. PMID:26599528

  6. A closed-form analysis of anticipated monetary policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Tamegawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this short study, we use a simple new Keynesian model and carry out a closed-form analysis to observe the effects of anticipated monetary policy. For the assumed parameter space, we find that while an anticipated monetary easing always has inflationary effects, the effects on output depend on the parametric value of inflationary response to an interest-rate rule. If this parameter were low, an anticipated monetary easing would have a positive effect on output. However, if the parameter were sufficiently high, the policy would have a negative impact on output.

  7. DGNB certified Healthcare Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsgaard, Camilla; Larsen, Tine Steen

    2015-01-01

    for sustainability and wants a certification. This research investigates the decision‐making and design process (DMaDP) behind four DGNB certified Healthcare Centres (HCC) in Northern Jutland in Denmark. In general, knowledge about the DMaDP is important. However it is important to know what part DGNB plays...... a dialog about DGNB and energy concept is important even before anyone start sketching. Experiences with the different approaches will be further outlined in the paper.Future research has the intention to collect further knowledge about DGNB and DMaDP in practise. This project was limited to Healthcare...

  8. Centre liikekeskuksen digital signage

    OpenAIRE

    Bincl, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Opinnäytetyöni tarkastelee digital signagen suunnittelussa huomioitavia tekijöitä ja sen arvoa markkinointikanavana. Työ on toteutettu tilaustyönä Lappeenrantalaiselle mainostoimisto Mediakolmiolle. Työ sisältää teoriaosuuden lisäksi sisältösuunnitelman rakenteilla olevalle Centre liikekeskukselle. Tavoitteena oli luoda liikekeskukselle sen brändiä tukeva digital signage konsepti. Työ ei sisällä valmista tuotetta, vaan se toimii ehdotelmana myöhemmin alkavalle tuotanno...

  9. Town Centre Redevelopment Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagnby, Bo Hellisen

    urban planning and design strategieswhich have been practised in most of the larger Danish towns: pedestrian streets, shopping centres, preservation of historic features, waterfronts, concentration of offices, conference and sports facilities, improvement og traffic and transport conditions as well...... as slum clearence and urban renewal. To a certain extent parallels are drawn to international experiences, especially where these are of such a nature that they can be assumed transferred to Danish connctions. Conclusively, the strategies are discussed in the light of the turn of Danish urban planning...

  10. Visual Benefits in Apparent Motion Displays: Automatically Driven Spatial and Temporal Anticipation Are Partially Dissociated.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merle-Marie Ahrens

    Full Text Available Many behaviourally relevant sensory events such as motion stimuli and speech have an intrinsic spatio-temporal structure. This will engage intentional and most likely unintentional (automatic prediction mechanisms enhancing the perception of upcoming stimuli in the event stream. Here we sought to probe the anticipatory processes that are automatically driven by rhythmic input streams in terms of their spatial and temporal components. To this end, we employed an apparent visual motion paradigm testing the effects of pre-target motion on lateralized visual target discrimination. The motion stimuli either moved towards or away from peripheral target positions (valid vs. invalid spatial motion cueing at a rhythmic or arrhythmic pace (valid vs. invalid temporal motion cueing. Crucially, we emphasized automatic motion-induced anticipatory processes by rendering the motion stimuli non-predictive of upcoming target position (by design and task-irrelevant (by instruction, and by creating instead endogenous (orthogonal expectations using symbolic cueing. Our data revealed that the apparent motion cues automatically engaged both spatial and temporal anticipatory processes, but that these processes were dissociated. We further found evidence for lateralisation of anticipatory temporal but not spatial processes. This indicates that distinct mechanisms may drive automatic spatial and temporal extrapolation of upcoming events from rhythmic event streams. This contrasts with previous findings that instead suggest an interaction between spatial and temporal attention processes when endogenously driven. Our results further highlight the need for isolating intentional from unintentional processes for better understanding the various anticipatory mechanisms engaged in processing behaviourally relevant stimuli with predictable spatio-temporal structure such as motion and speech.

  11. Participation anticipating in elections using data mining methods

    OpenAIRE

    Sangar, Amin Babazadeh; Khaze, Seyyed Reza; Ebrahimi, Laya

    2013-01-01

    Anticipating the political behavior of people will be considerable help for election candidates to assess the possibility of their success and to be acknowledged about the public motivations to select them. In this paper, we provide a general schematic of the architecture of participation anticipating system in presidential election by using KNN, Classification Tree and Na\\"ive Bayes and tools orange based on crisp which had hopeful output. To test and assess the proposed model, we begin to u...

  12. The CERN Control Centre is up and running!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CERN Control Centre (CCC) that combines all the control rooms for the accelerators, the cryogenic system and the technical infrastructure came into operation on 1st February. This is not a mock-up but the real thing! The CERN Control Centre has been built and put into operation in only 15 months.On 1st February, at 2.00 p.m., Patrick Villeton Pachot started the first Technical Infrastructure shift at the brand new CERN Control Centre. From now on, when you dial 72201 to report a leak or an electrical fault, your call will ring out in the brand new CERN Control Centre. The much anticipated CCC came on line on 1st February, exactly as planned. The 2.00 p.m. shift by the operators of the former Technical Control Room (TCR), now renamed TI for Technical Infrastructure, marked the start of operations at the Centre. The PCR, MCR, TCR and QCR are no more, and all the individual control rooms have been merged into one. And what a control room it is! True to the streamlined image announced when the project was f...

  13. Nuclear Electric Visitor Centres - Innovation and inspiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This eight minute video demonstrates the approach taken by Nuclear Electric to exhibitions that are open to the public. The information is given both visually - with excerpts from some of the attractions on display at the centres - and in comments from interviews with visitors, the centre guides and the man responsible for many of the exhibits featured in the video. on one side are the schoolchildren who are visiting the exhibition and are seen both playing and learning as they press buttons, watch videos, 'meet' Michael Faraday, and learn about radiation - its disposal and its safe transportation. The headmaster of the school is interviewed and explains that the exhibition is helping his children understand the importance of electricity to their world. on the other side is Jackie Lucas, the visitor centre manager, explaining what the public make of the exhibition. We see her staff greeting the children and helping them to understand the show. The designer of the exhibition, Len Upton explains how you go about making an exhibition such as this both informative and fun. Also interviewed is the man behind many of the exhibitions featured at Nuclear Electric's visitor centres up and down the country, Nicholas Mullane. He explains the purpose of the exhibition and what messages it imparts. The video is presented in split-screen or composite format, whereby the interviewee and children are often presented together. Excerpts from the various videos on display are presented as both how they are seen from the floor, as well as the full screen effect of the various programmes. The video gives much of the feeling of fun to be gained at the exhibition, as well as showing the educational benefits to be gained from a couple of hours at one of Nuclear Electric's visitor centres. Copies of the video can be obtained from Bob Fenton at Nuclear Electric. (Fax: ++44 1 452 652 443). (author)

  14. Social Security's special minimum benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, K A; Hoffmeyer, D

    Social Security would modify and strengthen the current-law special minimum benefit. Interest in the special minimum benefit may also increase because of labor force participation and marital trends that suggest that enhancing workers' benefits may be a more effective means of reducing older women's poverty rates than enhancing spousal or widow's benefits. By understanding the Social Security program's experience with the special minimum benefit, policymakers will be able to better anticipate the effectiveness of other initiatives to enhance benefits for long-term low earners. This article presents the most recent and comprehensive information available about the special minimum benefit in order to help policymakers make informed decisions about the provision's future. Highlights of the current special minimum benefit include the following: Very few persons receive the special minimum benefit. As of December 2001, about 134,000 workers and their dependents and survivors were entitled to a benefit based on the special minimum. Of those, only about 79,000 received a higher total benefit because of the special minimum; the other 55,000 were dually entitled. (In effect, when persons are eligible for more than one type of benefit--that is, they are dually eligible--the highest benefit payable determines total benefits. If the special minimum benefit is not the highest benefit payable, it does not increase total benefits paid.) As of February 2000, retired workers who were special minimum beneficiaries with unreduced benefits and were not dually entitled were receiving, on average, a monthly benefit of $510 per month. That amount is approximately $2,000 less than the annual poverty threshold for an aged individual. Special minimum benefits provide small increases in total benefits. For special minimum beneficiaries who were not dually entitled as of December 2001, the average special minimum monthly PIA was just $39 higher than the regular PIA. Most special minimum

  15. Experiences of Telebased Information Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten

    1999-01-01

    Tele-based information community centres or just tele-centres have been seen as the killer application to empower local communities in developed and developing countries to meet the challenges of the information society. This paper will present a number of models for introducing such centres and ...... and discuss the different models and national strategies used for setting up tele-based information in relation to the Ghana experience.......Tele-based information community centres or just tele-centres have been seen as the killer application to empower local communities in developed and developing countries to meet the challenges of the information society. This paper will present a number of models for introducing such centres...

  16. Update on System Coordination Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stangl, W. [Power Pool of Alberta, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    The new System Coordination Centre at the Power Pool of Alberta was designed to meet the unique requirements of Alberta`s electric industry under the new regulatory regime. Development of the Centre, key provisions of the energy management system (EMS) are highlighted. The centre will provide an energy management system for the Pool`s system controller function and interface with the Power Pool Administrator`s market functions and the operations of the Transmission Administrator. System controllers are expected to be operating from the new location by the end of 1998. Unique EMS features of the centre include: (1) real-time management of energy market and network operations using diverse SCADA/EMS, (2) inter-control centre protocol used to accommodate the unique participant information requirements, and (3) special custom applications. The Centre is expected to be fully functioning by July 1999. 1 fig.

  17. Understanding the Reasons behind Anticipated Regret for Missing Regular Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Mistry, Chetan D

    2016-01-01

    Anticipated affective reactions to missing physical activity (PA), often labeled anticipated regret, has reliable evidence as a predictor of PA intention and behavior independent of other standard social cognitive constructs. Despite this evidence, the sources of regret are understudied and may come from many different reasons. The purpose of this study was to theme the reasons for why people responded to anticipated regret over missing regular PA for 2 weeks. Participants were a random sample of 120 university students who were primed on the public health definition of PA, completed measures of regret, and were asked to list their reasons for regret. Ninety-five percent of participants expressed that they would regret not being active and gave a total of 357 reasons. The dominant theme (n = 247; 69%) was a missed opportunity to obtain the benefits of PA, followed by shame/guilt for not being able to follow-through with one's goals or self-categorized role (n = 99; 28%) with a final theme of perceived pressure from others (n = 11; 3%). From a practical perspective, the diversity of these reasons suggest that more clarity on the source of regret should be present in assessment, while building from both attitude and identity theories may help understand how regret motivates PA in future intervention. PMID:27242613

  18. Leveraging management information in improving call centre productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manthisana Mosese

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The availability and efficient use of management information is one of the key strategic levers in driving growth and competitiveness for companies. Management information facilitates vital decision making that assists organisations in improving their competitiveness. For call centre operations, competitiveness entails improving productivity and customer service, and management information is essential in this endeavour.Objectives: This research explored the use of management information and its impact on two fundamental functions namely, improving productivity without compromising the quality of service, in the call centre of a well-known South African fashion retailer, Edcon. Following the implementation of the call centre technology project the research set out to determine how Edcon can transform their call centre to improve productivity and customer service through effective utilisation of their management information. Method: Internal documents and reports were analysed to provide the basis of evaluation between the measures of productivity prior to and post the implementation of a technology project at Edcon’s call centre. Semi-structured in-depth and group interviews were conducted to establish the importance and use of management information in improving productivity and customer service. Results: The results indicated that the availability of management information has indeed contributed to improved efficiency at the Edcon call centre. Although literature claims that there is a correlation between a call centre technology upgrade and improvement in performance, evident in the return on investment being realised within a year or two of implementation, it fell beyond the scope of this study to investigate the return on investment for Edcon’s call centre. Conclusion: Although Edcon has begun realising benefits in improved productivity in their call centre from their available management information, information will

  19. Anticipated Changes in Conducting Scientific Data-Analysis Research in the Big-Data Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Seablom, Michael; Clune, Thomas; Ramachandran, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    A Big-Data environment is one that is capable of orchestrating quick-turnaround analyses involving large volumes of data for numerous simultaneous users. Based on our experiences with a prototype Big-Data analysis environment, we anticipate some important changes in research behaviors and processes while conducting scientific data-analysis research in the near future as such Big-Data environments become the mainstream. The first anticipated change will be the reduced effort and difficulty in most parts of the data management process. A Big-Data analysis environment is likely to house most of the data required for a particular research discipline along with appropriate analysis capabilities. This will reduce the need for researchers to download local copies of data. In turn, this also reduces the need for compute and storage procurement by individual researchers or groups, as well as associated maintenance and management afterwards. It is almost certain that Big-Data environments will require a different "programming language" to fully exploit the latent potential. In addition, the process of extending the environment to provide new analysis capabilities will likely be more involved than, say, compiling a piece of new or revised code.We thus anticipate that researchers will require support from dedicated organizations associated with the environment that are composed of professional software engineers and data scientists. A major benefit will likely be that such extensions are of higherquality and broader applicability than ad hoc changes by physical scientists. Another anticipated significant change is improved collaboration among the researchers using the same environment. Since the environment is homogeneous within itself, many barriers to collaboration are minimized or eliminated. For example, data and analysis algorithms can be seamlessly shared, reused and re-purposed. In conclusion, we will be able to achieve a new level of scientific productivity in the Big

  20. Incapacity Benefits versus Benefit Transfers

    OpenAIRE

    Orszag, Jonathan Michael; Snower, Dennis J.

    1996-01-01

    The paper explores the employment implications of allowing people the opportunity of using a portion of their incapacity benefits to provide employment vouchers for employers that hire them. The analysis indicates that introducing this policy could increase employment, raise the incomes of incapacity benefit recipients, and reduce employers’ labour costs.

  1. Neural sensitivity to absolute and relative anticipated reward in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Jatin G; Knutson, Brian; O'Leary, Daniel S; Block, Robert I; Magnotta, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is associated with a dramatic increase in risky and impulsive behaviors that have been attributed to developmental differences in neural processing of rewards. In the present study, we sought to identify age differences in anticipation of absolute and relative rewards. To do so, we modified a commonly used monetary incentive delay (MID) task in order to examine brain activity to relative anticipated reward value (neural sensitivity to the value of a reward as a function of other available rewards). This design also made it possible to examine developmental differences in brain activation to absolute anticipated reward magnitude (the degree to which neural activity increases with increasing reward magnitude). While undergoing fMRI, 18 adolescents and 18 adult participants were presented with cues associated with different reward magnitudes. After the cue, participants responded to a target to win money on that trial. Presentation of cues was blocked such that two reward cues associated with $.20, $1.00, or $5.00 were in play on a given block. Thus, the relative value of the $1.00 reward varied depending on whether it was paired with a smaller or larger reward. Reflecting age differences in neural responses to relative anticipated reward (i.e., reference dependent processing), adults, but not adolescents, demonstrated greater activity to a $1 reward when it was the larger of the two available rewards. Adults also demonstrated a more linear increase in ventral striatal activity as a function of increasing absolute reward magnitude compared to adolescents. Additionally, reduced ventral striatal sensitivity to absolute anticipated reward (i.e., the difference in activity to medium versus small rewards) correlated with higher levels of trait Impulsivity. Thus, ventral striatal activity in anticipation of absolute and relative rewards develops with age. Absolute reward processing is also linked to individual differences in Impulsivity. PMID:23544046

  2. Neural sensitivity to absolute and relative anticipated reward in adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin G Vaidya

    Full Text Available Adolescence is associated with a dramatic increase in risky and impulsive behaviors that have been attributed to developmental differences in neural processing of rewards. In the present study, we sought to identify age differences in anticipation of absolute and relative rewards. To do so, we modified a commonly used monetary incentive delay (MID task in order to examine brain activity to relative anticipated reward value (neural sensitivity to the value of a reward as a function of other available rewards. This design also made it possible to examine developmental differences in brain activation to absolute anticipated reward magnitude (the degree to which neural activity increases with increasing reward magnitude. While undergoing fMRI, 18 adolescents and 18 adult participants were presented with cues associated with different reward magnitudes. After the cue, participants responded to a target to win money on that trial. Presentation of cues was blocked such that two reward cues associated with $.20, $1.00, or $5.00 were in play on a given block. Thus, the relative value of the $1.00 reward varied depending on whether it was paired with a smaller or larger reward. Reflecting age differences in neural responses to relative anticipated reward (i.e., reference dependent processing, adults, but not adolescents, demonstrated greater activity to a $1 reward when it was the larger of the two available rewards. Adults also demonstrated a more linear increase in ventral striatal activity as a function of increasing absolute reward magnitude compared to adolescents. Additionally, reduced ventral striatal sensitivity to absolute anticipated reward (i.e., the difference in activity to medium versus small rewards correlated with higher levels of trait Impulsivity. Thus, ventral striatal activity in anticipation of absolute and relative rewards develops with age. Absolute reward processing is also linked to individual differences in Impulsivity.

  3. Ultrasonic vocalizations in rats anticipating circadian feeding schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opiol, Hanna; Pavlovski, Ilya; Michalik, Mateusz; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2015-05-01

    Rats readily learn to anticipate a reward signaled by an external stimulus. Anticipatory behaviors evoked by conditioned stimuli include 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), a proposed behavioral correlate of positive affect and activation of midbrain dopamine pathways. Rats can also anticipate a reward, such as food, provided once daily, without external cueing. Anticipation of a daily reward exhibits formal properties of a circadian rhythm. The neural circuits that regulate the timing and amplitude of these rhythms remain an open question, but evidence suggests a role for dopamine. To gain further insight into the neural and affective correlates of circadian food anticipatory rhythms, we made 2h and 24h USV recordings in rats fed 2h/day in the light period, a procedure that induces robust anticipation 2-3h before mealtime. Potential interactions between internal and external time cues in USV production were evaluated by inclusion of a 3 kHz tone 15 min before mealtime. Prior to scheduled feeding, spontaneous 50 kHz USVs were rare during the light period. During scheduled feeding, flat and frequency modulated (FM) 50kHz USVs occurred prior to and during mealtime. FM USVs were more closely related to anticipation, while flat USVs were more dependent on food access. USVs also occurred during spontaneous waking at other times of day. The tone did not evoke USVs but did modulate activity. Behavioral anticipation of a daily meal is accompanied by USVs consistent with a positive affective state and elevated dopamine transmission. PMID:25677650

  4. Adaptive and Rational Anticipations in Risk Management Systems and Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Daniel M.; Holmberg, Stig C.

    2010-11-01

    The global financial crisis of year 2009 is explained as a result of uncoordinated risk management decisions in business firms and economic organisations. The underlying reason for this can be found in the current financial system. As the financial market has lost much of its direct coupling to the concrete economy it provides misleading information to economic decision makers at all levels. Hence, the financial system has moved from a state of moderate and slow cyclical fluctuations into a state of fast and chaotic ones. Those misleading decisions can further be described, but not explained, by help of adaptive and rational expectations from macroeconomic theory. In this context, AE, the Adaptive Expectations are related to weak passive Exo-anticipation, and RE, the Rational expectations can be related to a strong, active and design oriented anticipation. The shortcomings of conventional cures, which builds on a reactive paradigm, have already been demonstrated in economic literature and are here further underlined by help of Ashby's "Law of Requisite Variety", Weaver's distinction between systems of "Disorganized Complexity" and those of "Organized Complexity", and Klir's "Reconstructability Analysis". Anticipatory decision-making is hence here proposed as a replacement to current expectation based and passive risk management. An anticipatory model of the business cycle is presented for supporting that proposition. The model, which is an extension of the Kaldor-Kalecki model, includes both retardation and anticipation. While cybernetics with the feedback process in control system deals with an explicit goal or purpose given to a system, the anticipatory system discussed here deals with a behaviour for which the future state of the system is built by the system itself, without explicit goal. A system with weak anticipation is based on a predictive model of the system, while a system with strong anticipation builds its own future by itself. Numerical simulations on

  5. Council celebrates CERN Control Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the unveiling of its new sign, the CERN Control Centre was officially inaugurated on Thursday 16 March. To celebrate its startup, CERN Council members visited the sleek centre, a futuristic-looking room filled with a multitude of monitoring screens.

  6. Factors affecting anticipated emotions in association with aggressive behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína VASKOVÁ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Conflict situations and situations of guile are not rare in our everyday life. In context of broadly conceived study, inspired by Richetins and Richardson’s (2011 extension of Theory of Planned Behavior, the character of anticipated emotions in relation to situation of aggressive and non aggressive reaction is analyzed. Influence of behavioral desire and perceived behavioral control is examined. Results show anticipating different emotions in relation to situation and acknowledge significant role of behavioral desire. Unimportant role of perceived behavioral control is ascer tained. Closer explanations in relation to self-control and self-regulation is discussed.

  7. Source term research for ship reactor anticipated operational events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the basic hypothesis of anticipated operational events, grounding on the special characters of a ship reactor, the equilibrium vapor specific activity and the cabin activity were calculated using NSRC code for the main loop and the secondary loop. The calculation results show that the computational mode of NSRC code is correct, and the NSRC code can be used to calculate radioactive effect of a ship reactor in anticipated operational events of design basis accidents. The calculation results can provide support to the safe operation of a ship nuclear power device. (authors)

  8. Linear stochastic differential equations with anticipating initial conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalifa, Narjess; Kuo, Hui-Hsiung; Ouerdiane, Habib;

    In this paper we use the new stochastic integral introduced by Ayed and Kuo (2008) and the results obtained by Kuo et al. (2012b) to find a solution to a drift-free linear stochastic differential equation with anticipating initial condition. Our solution is based on well-known results from...... classical Itô theory and anticipative Itô formula results from Kue et al. (2012b). We also show that the solution obtained by our method is consistent with the solution obtained by the methods of Malliavin calculus, e.g. Buckdahn and Nualart (1994)....

  9. The Centres for Environment-friendly Energy Research (FME)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    public administration and various types of organisations. Uniting the strongest players within a specific area under the aegis of a single centre gives each centre a very high level of overall expertise. The FME centres do not comprise an institution in a single geographic location but rather represent a grouping of entities with unique competencies in relevant areas. Adequate funding is critical to the centres success and further development. The centres each receive NOK 8-20 million annually for a five-year period, with the potential for a three-year extension. The Research Council will evaluate each centre individually and determine whether to grant further funding beyond the initial five-year period. The FME centres are expected to keep on boosting Norwegian energy-related expertise well into the future, with the benefits of their activities extending far beyond the actual lifecycle of the centres themselves. Individually and together, the FME centres will help to provide a secure energy future for Norway and the world at large.(Author)

  10. New scheme of anticipating synchronization for arbitrary anticipation time and its application to long-term prediction of chaotic states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Zhong-Kui; Xu Wei; Yang Xiao-Li

    2007-01-01

    How to predict the dynamics of nonlinear chaotic systems is still a challenging subject with important real-life applications. The present paper deals with this important yet difficult problem via a new scheme of anticipating synchronization. A global, robust, analytical and delay-independent sufficient condition is obtained to guarantee the existence of anticipating synchronization manifold theoretically in the framework of the Krasovskii-Lyapunov theory.that the receiver system can synchronize with the future state of a transmitter system for an arbitrarily long anticipation time, which allows one to predict the dynamics of chaotic transmitter at any point of time if necessary. Also it is simple to implement in practice. A classical chaotic system is employed to demonstrate the application of the proposed scheme to the long-term prediction of chaotic states.

  11. Victims' use of professional services in a Dutch sexual assault centre

    OpenAIRE

    Bicanic, Iva; Snetselaar, Hanneke; de Jongh, Ad; van de Putte, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prior research endorsed the establishment of sexual assault centres in the Netherlands because of the potential benefit for victims’ mental recovery. In 2012, the first Dutch sexual assault centre was founded at the University Medical Center Utrecht. The aim of the centre is to provide 24/7 coordinated and integrated services (i.e., medical, forensic, and psychological) in one location.Objective: The purpose of the present study was to describe demographic, background, and assault...

  12. Probing the Neural Correlates of Anticipated Peer Evaluation in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, Amanda E.; McClure-Tone, Erin B.; Shiffrin, Nina D.; Pine, Daniel S.; Nelson, Eric E.

    2009-01-01

    Neural correlates of social-cognition were assessed in 9- to- 17-year-olds (N = 34) using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Participants appraised how unfamiliar peers they had previously identified as being of high or low interest would evaluate them for an anticipated online chat session. Differential age- and sex-related activation…

  13. Anticipation of vertebral pedicle breach through dynamic surgical guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Williams

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a pedicle probe to anticipate an impending breach and allow redirection during placement of a pilot pedicle hole. METHODS: Purposely four cortical wall sites were drilled: medial and lateral pedicle wall, and lateral and anterior wall of the vertebral body. The surgeon stopped probing when the sound changed, suggesting abutment against the cortical wall ("anticipation" of impending breach. A fluoroscopy image was then obtained. The surgeon then advanced the PediGuard through the cortex until the sound changed, indicating a breach. In the second part of the study three probes were used: 1 DSG (PediGuard with curved tip with electronics ON; 2 DSG with electronics OFF; 3 standard Lenke probe. After the images were taken, the operating surgeon (blinded to x-rays was instructed to redirect and continue drilling into the vertebral body. RESULTS: The surgeon accurately anticipated 60 of 75 (80% of the breaches, 17 of 19 (89% in the medial pedicle wall. In the second part of the study the DSG with electronics ON was superior to the DSG with electronics OFF as well as the standard Lenke probe (100% vs. 90% vs. 79%, p = 0.0191. CONCLUSION: Successful redirection by passing the pedicle probes into the vertebral body without a breach after anticipation of an impending pedicle wall breach occurred in 100% of the drillings when done with the DSG with the electronics ON vs only 84% when there was no electronic feedback.

  14. Anticipated identification costs: Improving assortment evaluation by diagnostic attributes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, van E.; Pieters, F.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Consumers often make quick assessments of product assortments, to determine if these are worthwhile for further investigation. They anticipate how difficult it will be to distinguish the various options in the assortment, which will influence their assortment evaluations. We reason that the

  15. Person x Context Effects on Anticipated Moral Emotions Following Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Sanna; Salmivalli, Christina; Hodges, Ernest V. E.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated person (sex, aggression level), context (witness type, victim reactions), and person x context effects on children's anticipated moral emotions following hypothetical acts of aggression against a peer. Children (N = 378, mean age = 11.3 years) were presented a series of hypothetical vignettes in which the presence of witnesses (no…

  16. The Aube centre; Le Centre de l`Aube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This educational booklet is devoted to a general presentation of the Aube radioactive wastes storage centre. After a short presentation of the Andra, the French national agency for the management of radioactive wastes, it gives some general information about radioactive wastes (origin, classification), containers (quality assurance and different types), wastes transportation (planning, safety), and about the Aube centre itself: description, treatment and conditioning of drums (compacting and injection), storage facilities, geological situation of the site, and environmental controls. (J.S.)

  17. Benefiting All

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new law promotes individual equality in social security benefits and forbids the misuse of funds The Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (NPC),China’s top legislature, voted to adopt a social insurance law on October 28 that prevents the

  18. Extending cost–benefit analysis for the sustainability impact of inter-urban Intelligent Transport Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports research involving three cost–benefit analyses performed on different ITS schemes (Active Traffic Management, Intelligent Speed Adaptation and the Automated Highway System) on one of the UK's busiest highways — the M42. The environmental scope of the assets involved is widened to take into account the possibility of new technology linked by ICT and located within multiple spatial regions. The areas focused on in the study were data centre energy emissions, the embedded emissions of the road-side infrastructure, vehicle tailpipe emissions, additional hardware required by the vehicles (if applicable) and safety, and all aspects of sustainability. Dual discounting is applied which aims to provide a separate discount rate for environmental elements. For ATM, despite the energy costs of the data centre, the initial implementation costs and mitigation costs of its embedded emissions, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved, although the scheme becomes less effective later on its lifecycle due to rising costs of energy. ISA and AHS generate a negative result, mainly due to the cost of getting the vehicle on the road. In order to negate these costs, the pricing of the vehicle should be scaled depending upon the technology that is outfitted. Retrofitting on vehicles without the technology should be paid for by the driver. ATM will offset greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO2 equivalency over a 25 year lifespan. This reduction has taken into account the expected improvement in vehicle technology. AHS is anticipated to save 280 kt of CO2 equivalency over 15 years of operational usage. However, this offset is largely dependent on assumptions such as the level of market penetration. - Highlights: • Three cost–benefit analyses are applied to inter-urban intelligent transport. • For ATM, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved. • ATM offsets greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO2 equivalency over 25 years. • ISA and AHS

  19. Extending cost–benefit analysis for the sustainability impact of inter-urban Intelligent Transport Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolosz, Ben, E-mail: kolosz27@gmail.com; Grant-Muller, Susan, E-mail: S.M.Grant-Muller@its.leeds.ac.uk

    2015-01-15

    The paper reports research involving three cost–benefit analyses performed on different ITS schemes (Active Traffic Management, Intelligent Speed Adaptation and the Automated Highway System) on one of the UK's busiest highways — the M42. The environmental scope of the assets involved is widened to take into account the possibility of new technology linked by ICT and located within multiple spatial regions. The areas focused on in the study were data centre energy emissions, the embedded emissions of the road-side infrastructure, vehicle tailpipe emissions, additional hardware required by the vehicles (if applicable) and safety, and all aspects of sustainability. Dual discounting is applied which aims to provide a separate discount rate for environmental elements. For ATM, despite the energy costs of the data centre, the initial implementation costs and mitigation costs of its embedded emissions, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved, although the scheme becomes less effective later on its lifecycle due to rising costs of energy. ISA and AHS generate a negative result, mainly due to the cost of getting the vehicle on the road. In order to negate these costs, the pricing of the vehicle should be scaled depending upon the technology that is outfitted. Retrofitting on vehicles without the technology should be paid for by the driver. ATM will offset greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over a 25 year lifespan. This reduction has taken into account the expected improvement in vehicle technology. AHS is anticipated to save 280 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 15 years of operational usage. However, this offset is largely dependent on assumptions such as the level of market penetration. - Highlights: • Three cost–benefit analyses are applied to inter-urban intelligent transport. • For ATM, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved. • ATM offsets greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 25 years

  20. Contemporary design for 'landmark' centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    As one of the UK's largest builders of healthcare facilities, construction company Morgan Ashurst is accustomed to delivering complex, challenging hospital projects. The construction of a new oncology centre at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton for Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust-- said to be the first new stand-alone radiotherapy centre to be built in the UK for almost 20 years--was no exception. Health Estate Journal reports. PMID:19711668

  1. The centre of the action

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Control Centre (CCC) has all the ingredients of an action movie control room: hundreds of screens, technicians buzzing in and out, huge floor-to-ceiling windows revealing the looming vista of a mountain range, flashing lights, microphones… This is the place where not just the LHC, but the whole of CERN’s accelerator complex and technical support is based - truly the centre of the action at CERN.

  2. Training centres - organization and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the lecture 'Training centres - organization and management' some principles and requirements which influence the organization, management and activity pattern of nuclear training centres, are briefly introduced. It is demonstrated, step by step, how these general principles are implemented in the development of the Czechoslovak nuclear power programme, it means, how the training of the NPP personnel proceeds in Czechoslovak nuclear training centres. General principles which are selected: a connection between the capacity of the training centre and the scope and needs of the nuclear power programme, a position of the training center within the institutional set-up, a structure and organization of the training system which complies with the system of NPP construction, reflect the pattern and the activity of the nuclear training centre and nuclear power technical level, a research group of workers in the nuclear training centre, main tasks and technical facilities, management of the training process and a transfer of knowledge and research results into the training process. The lecture is supplemented by pictures and slides. (orig.)

  3. Neural bases for anticipation skill in soccer: an FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Daniel T; Wright, Michael J; Jackson, Robin C; Abernethy, Bruce

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the neural bases for perceptual-cognitive superiority in a soccer anticipation task using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thirty-nine participants lay in an MRI scanner while performing a video-based task in which they predicted an oncoming opponent's movements. Video clips were occluded at four time points, and participants were grouped according to in-task performance. Early occlusion reduced prediction accuracy significantly for all participants, as did the opponent's execution of a deceptive maneuver; however, high-skill participants were significantly more accurate than their low-skill counterparts under deceptive conditions. This perceptual-cognitive superiority was associated with greater activation of cortical and subcortical structures involved in executive function and oculomotor control. The contributions of the present findings to an existing neural model of anticipation in sport are highlighted. PMID:23404883

  4. The role of anticipated regret in escalation of commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kin Fai Ellick; Kwong, Jessica Y Y

    2007-03-01

    This research tests the general proposition that people are motivated to reduce future regret under escalation situations. This is supported by the findings that (a) escalation of commitment is stronger when the possibility of future regret about withdrawal is high than when this possibility is low (Studies 1a and 1b) and (b) escalation of commitment increases as the net anticipated regret about withdrawal increases (Studies 2a and 2b). Furthermore, the regret effects in the 4 studies were above and beyond the personal responsibility effects on escalation. This research indicates that people in escalation situations are simultaneously influenced by the emotions they expect to experience in the future (e.g., anticipated regret) and by events that have happened in the past (e.g., responsibility for the initiating previous decision).

  5. Neural basis of reward anticipation and its genetic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tianye; Macare, Christine; Desrivières, Sylvane; Gonzalez, Dante A; Tao, Chenyang; Ji, Xiaoxi; Ruggeri, Barbara; Nees, Frauke; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia J; Dove, Rachel; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny A; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lemaitre, Hervé; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor; Smolka, Michael N; Müller, Christian P; Feng, Jianfeng; Rothenfluh, Adrian; Flor, Herta; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-04-01

    Dysfunctional reward processing is implicated in various mental disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and addictions. Such impairments might involve different components of the reward process, including brain activity during reward anticipation. We examined brain nodes engaged by reward anticipation in 1,544 adolescents and identified a network containing a core striatal node and cortical nodes facilitating outcome prediction and response preparation. Distinct nodes and functional connections were preferentially associated with either adolescent hyperactivity or alcohol consumption, thus conveying specificity of reward processing to clinically relevant behavior. We observed associations between the striatal node, hyperactivity, and the vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 4A (VPS4A) gene in humans, and the causal role of Vps4 for hyperactivity was validated in Drosophila Our data provide a neurobehavioral model explaining the heterogeneity of reward-related behaviors and generate a hypothesis accounting for their enduring nature. PMID:27001827

  6. Neural basis of reward anticipation and its genetic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tianye; Macare, Christine; Desrivières, Sylvane; Gonzalez, Dante A; Tao, Chenyang; Ji, Xiaoxi; Ruggeri, Barbara; Nees, Frauke; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia J; Dove, Rachel; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny A; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lemaitre, Hervé; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor; Smolka, Michael N; Müller, Christian P; Feng, Jianfeng; Rothenfluh, Adrian; Flor, Herta; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-04-01

    Dysfunctional reward processing is implicated in various mental disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and addictions. Such impairments might involve different components of the reward process, including brain activity during reward anticipation. We examined brain nodes engaged by reward anticipation in 1,544 adolescents and identified a network containing a core striatal node and cortical nodes facilitating outcome prediction and response preparation. Distinct nodes and functional connections were preferentially associated with either adolescent hyperactivity or alcohol consumption, thus conveying specificity of reward processing to clinically relevant behavior. We observed associations between the striatal node, hyperactivity, and the vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 4A (VPS4A) gene in humans, and the causal role of Vps4 for hyperactivity was validated in Drosophila Our data provide a neurobehavioral model explaining the heterogeneity of reward-related behaviors and generate a hypothesis accounting for their enduring nature.

  7. Acting on intentions: the role of anticipated regret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Charles; Sheeran, Paschal

    2003-12-01

    Three studies tested the hypothesis that anticipated regret (AR) increases consistency between exercise intentions and behaviour. Study 1 employed a longitudinal survey design (N = 384). Measures specified by the theory of planned behaviour, past behaviour, and AR were used to predict self-reported exercise behaviour 2 weeks later. AR moderated the intention-behaviour relationship such that participants were most likely to exercise if they both intended to exercise and anticipated regret if they failed to exercise. Study 2 used an experimental design to examine the effect of focusing on AR prior to reporting intentions (N = 229). Exercise was measured 2 weeks later and the AR-focus manipulation was found to moderate the intention-behaviour relationship in a similar manner to that observed in Study 1. In Study 3 (N = 97), moderation was replicated and was shown to be mediated by the temporal stability of intention. PMID:14715114

  8. Anticipated regret and organ donor registration: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    O'Carroll, Ronan; Shepherd, Lee; Hayes, Peter; Ferguson, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To test whether simply asking people to rate the extent to which they anticipate feeling regret for not registering as an organ donor after death increases subsequent verified organ donor registration. Methods: 14,509 members of the general public (both registered and non-registered donors) were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 arms, each receiving different questionnaires. The no-questionnaire control (NQC) arm received a survey measuring demographics and whether or not they were...

  9. Anticipation of Monetary Reward Can Attenuate the Vigilance Decrement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterman, Michael; Grosso, Mallory; Liu, Guanyu; Mitko, Alex; Morris, Rachael; DeGutis, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Motivation and reward can have differential effects on separate aspects of sustained attention. We previously demonstrated that continuous reward/punishment throughout a sustained attention task improves overall performance, but not vigilance decrements. One interpretation of these findings is that vigilance decrements are due to resource depletion, which is not overcome by increasing overall motivation. However, an alternative explanation is that as one performs a continuously rewarded task there are less potential gains/losses as the task progresses, which could decrease motivation over time, producing a vigilance decrement. This would predict that keeping future gains/losses consistent throughout the task would reduce the vigilance decrement. In the current study, we examined this possibility by comparing two versions (continuous-small loss vs. anticipate-large loss) of a 10-minute gradual onset continuous performance task (gradCPT), a challenging go/no-go sustained attention task. Participants began each task with the potential to keep $18. In the continuous-small-loss version, small monetary losses were accrued continuously throughout the task for each error. However, in the anticipate-large-loss version, participants lost all $18 if they erroneously responded to one target that always appeared toward the end of the vigil. Typical vigilance decrements were observed in the continuous-small-loss condition. In the anticipate-large-loss condition, vigilance decrements were reduced, particularly when the anticipate-large loss condition was completed second. This suggests that the looming possibility of a large loss can attenuate the vigilance decrement and that this attenuation may occur most consistently after sufficient task experience. We discuss these results in the context of current theories of sustained attention. PMID:27472785

  10. Nestle's dynamic forecasting process: Anticipating risks and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Ana Sofia Fidalgo

    2012-01-01

    Nestlé’s Dynamic Forecasting Process: Anticipating Risks and Opportunities This Work Project discusses the Nestlé’s Dynamic Forecasting Process, implemented within the organization as a way of reengineering its performance management concept and processes, so as to make it more flexible and capable to react to volatile business conditions. When stressing the importance of demand planning to reallocate resources and enhance performance, Nescafé Dolce Gusto comes as way of seeking improvemen...

  11. ANTICIPATING WPS PIN VULNERABILITY TO SECURE WIRELESS NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Dwi Rianto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available WiFi Protected Setup (WPS is a standardized function supported by numerous vendors of wireless routers and access point to help set up connection to a wireless local area network. It is designed to simplify the set up and generally enabled by default. Due to design flaw, the WPS or QSS PIN is susceptible to a brute force attack. In this paper, we test the security vulnerability occurred, evaluate the performance and give recommendations to anticipate the attack.

  12. Atypical emotional anticipation in high-functioning autism

    OpenAIRE

    Palumbo, Letizia; Burnett, Hollie G.; Jellema, Tjeerd

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding and anticipating others’ mental or emotional states relies on the processing of social cues, such as dynamic facial expressions. Individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA) may process these cues differently from individuals with typical development (TD) and purportedly use a ‘mechanistic’ rather than a ‘mentalistic’ approach, involving rule- and contingency-based interpretations of the stimuli. The study primarily aimed at examining whether the judgments of facial...

  13. Good rough path sequences and applications to anticipating stochastic calculus

    OpenAIRE

    Coutin, Laure; Friz, Peter; Victoir, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    We consider anticipative Stratonovich stochastic differential equations driven by some stochastic process lifted to a rough path. Neither adaptedness of initial point and vector fields nor commuting conditions between vector field is assumed. Under a simple condition on the stochastic process, we show that the unique solution of the above SDE understood in the rough path sense is actually a Stratonovich solution. We then show that this condition is satisfied by the Brownian motion. As applica...

  14. The role of anticipation in drug addiction and reward

    OpenAIRE

    Field, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Paweł Jędras, Andrew Jones, Matt FieldDepartment of Psychological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UKAbstract: Addiction is a chronically relapsing disorder, and substance users frequently relapse when they encounter opportunities to use drugs. In this paper, we review evidence regarding the psychological response to anticipation of imminent drug availability, its neural substrates, and its relationship to other phenomena implicated in addiction. Naturalistic and labor...

  15. The role of anticipation in drug addiction and reward

    OpenAIRE

    Jędras P; Jones A; Field M

    2013-01-01

    Paweł Jędras, Andrew Jones, Matt FieldDepartment of Psychological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UKAbstract: Addiction is a chronically relapsing disorder, and substance users frequently relapse when they encounter opportunities to use drugs. In this paper, we review evidence regarding the psychological response to anticipation of imminent drug availability, its neural substrates, and its relationship to other phenomena implicated in addiction. Naturalistic and laboratory ...

  16. Who benefits?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Frederik Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cross-border welfare rights for citizens of European Union member states are intensely contested, yet there is limited research into voter opposition to such rights, sometimes denoted ‘welfare chauvinism’. We highlight an overlooked aspect in scholarly work: the role of stereotypes about benefici...... recipient identity. These effects are strongest among respondents high in ethnic prejudice and economic conservatism. The findings imply that stereotypes about who benefits from cross-border welfare rights condition public support for those rights....

  17. Tax Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Hayhoe, Celia Ray; Hsu, Chungwen

    2009-01-01

    There are seven main categories on which the USDA bases its calculations for raising a child: housing, food, transportation, clothing, health care, childcare, education, and miscellaneous goods and services. This is an overview of tax benefits. This is one fact sheet in a series entitled Children and Family Finances. This fact sheet was revised from Planning for Baby ヨ Family Finances by Hayhoe, C., Jamison, S. Dillard, A. F., and Chase, M.

  18. Neural response to reward anticipation is modulated by Gray's impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Tim; Dresler, Thomas; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Plichta, Michael M; Heinzel, Sebastian; Polak, Thomas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Breuer, Felix; Jakob, Peter M; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2009-07-15

    According to the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST), Gray's dimension of impulsivity, reflecting human trait reward sensitivity, determines the extent to which stimuli activate the Behavioural Approach System (BAS). The potential neural underpinnings of the BAS, however, remain poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the association between Gray's impulsivity as defined by the RST and event-related fMRI BOLD-response to anticipation of reward in twenty healthy human subjects in brain regions previously associated with reward processing. Anticipation of reward during a Monetary Incentive Delay Task elicited activation in key components of the human reward circuitry such as the ventral striatum, the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex. Interindividual differences in Gray's impulsivity accounted for a significant amount of variance of the reward-related BOLD-response in the ventral striatum and the orbitofrontal cortex. Specifically, higher trait reward sensitivity was associated with increased activation in response to cues indicating potential reward. Extending previous evidence, here we show that variance in functional brain activation during anticipation of reward is attributed to interindividual differences regarding Gray's dimension of impulsivity. Thus, trait reward sensitivity contributes to the modulation of responsiveness in major components of the human reward system which thereby display a core property of the BAS. Generally, fostering our understanding of the neural underpinnings of the association of reward-related interindividual differences in affective traits might aid researchers in quest for custom-tailored treatments of psychiatric disorders, further disentangling the complex relationship between personality traits, emotion, and health. PMID:19328237

  19. Health, Anticipated Partner Infidelity, and Jealousy in Men and Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Arnocky

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Health has been identified as an important variable involved in mate choice. Unhealthy organisms are generally less able to provide reproductively important resources to partners and offspring and are more likely to pass on communicable disease. Research on human mate preferences has shown that both men and women prefer healthy mates. Yet to date, little research has examined how health relates to one’s own mating experiences. In the present study, 164 participants (87 women who were currently in heterosexual romantic relationships completed measures of frequency and severity of health problems, anticipated partner infidelity, and intensity of jealousy felt in their current relationship. Mediation analyses showed that health problems predicted greater anticipated partner infidelity and jealousy scores and that anticipated partner infidelity mediated the links between health and jealousy for both frequency and severity of health problems, controlling for both sex and relationship duration. These findings suggest that unhealthy people perceive themselves to be at a mating disadvantage, experiencing associated differences in perceptions and emotions surrounding their romantic partners’ fidelity.

  20. A parametric model for analyzing anticipation in genetically predisposed families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Klaus; Petersen, Janne; Bernstein, Inge;

    2009-01-01

    Anticipation, i.e. a decreasing age-at-onset in subsequent generations has been observed in a number of genetically triggered diseases. The impact of anticipation is generally studied in affected parent-child pairs. These analyses are restricted to pairs in which both individuals have been affect....... The suggested model corrects for incomplete observations and considers families rather than affected pairs and thereby allows for studies of large sample sets, facilitates subgroup analyses and provides generation effect estimates....... and are sensitive to right truncation of the data. We propose a normal random effects model that allows for right-censored observations and includes covariates, and draw statistical inference based on the likelihood function. We applied the model to the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC......)/Lynch syndrome family cohort from the national Danish HNPCC register. Age-at-onset was analyzed in 824 individuals from 2-4 generations in 125 families with proved disease-predisposing mutations. A significant effect from anticipation was identified with a mean of 3 years earlier age-at-onset per generation...

  1. Anticipating and Coordinating Voltage Control for Interconnected Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Moradzadeh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of an anticipating and coordinating feedback control scheme in order to mitigate the long-term voltage instability of multi-area power systems. Each local area is uniquely controlled by a control agent (CA selecting control values based on model predictive control (MPC and is possibly operated by an independent transmission system operator (TSO. Each MPC-based CA only knows a detailed local hybrid system model of its own area, employing reduced-order quasi steady-state (QSS hybrid models of its neighboring areas and even simpler PV models for remote areas, to anticipate (and then optimize the future behavior of its own area. Moreover, the neighboring CAs agree on communicating their planned future control input sequence in order to coordinate their own control actions. The feasibility of the proposed method for real-time applications is explained, and some practical implementation issues are also discussed. The performance of the method, using time-domain simulation of the Nordic32 test system, is compared with the uncoordinated decentralized MPC (no information exchange among CAs, demonstrating the improved behavior achieved by combining anticipation and coordination. The robustness of the control scheme against modeling uncertainties is also illustrated.

  2. Anticipated effects of alcohol stimulate craving and impair inhibitory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Paul; Jennings, Emily; Rose, Abigail K

    2016-05-01

    A considerable evidence base has demonstrated that priming doses of alcohol impair inhibitory control and activate motivation to consume alcohol. There is, however, a lack of studies investigating the effect of placebo-alcohol on these processes and their association with alcohol outcome expectancies (AOE). We investigated the effect of placebo-alcohol on craving and inhibitory control, and the extent to which placebo effects correlated with AOE in 32 nondependent drinkers. Participants completed questionnaires assessing typical alcohol use (fortnightly alcohol consumption, AUDIT) and AOE (measured using the Alcohol Outcome Expectancy Scale). On a within-subjects basis participants consumed a placebo-alcohol drink and control drink. Measures of craving were taken pre- and postdrink, and participants completed a go/no-go task following the drink. Craving was increased by the placebo-alcohol and, importantly, placebo-alcohol impaired inhibitory control. Furthermore expectancies of cognitive and behavioral impairment were correlated with go/no-go task performance following a placebo. Increases in craving were associated with a range of elevated outcome expectancies. This suggests that the anticipated effects of alcohol can impair inhibitory control and increase craving; therefore studies using placebo versus alcohol comparisons relative to studies using a pure no-alcohol control are underestimating the real-world effect of alcohol on these processes, which is a combination of pharmacological and anticipated effects of alcohol. Furthermore, individual differences in AOE may influence reactivity to the anticipated effects of alcohol. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27031087

  3. Public health measures during an anticipated influenza pandemic: Factors influencing willingness to comply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Taylor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanie Taylor1, Beverley Raphael1, Margo Barr2, Kingsley Agho1, Garry Stevens1, Louisa Jorm11School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 2Centre for Epidemiology and Research, New South Wales Department of Health, Sydney, AustraliaAbstract: This research assessed factors associated with willingness to comply with vaccination, isolation, and face mask wearing during an anticipated influenza pandemic. Data were collected from 2081 adults (16+ using a module of questions incorporated into the NSW Health Adult Population Health Survey. High levels of willingness to comply were reported with 73% either very or extremely willing to receive vaccination, 67% willing to isolate themselves, 58% willing to wear a face mask, and 48% willing to comply with all three behaviors. Further analysis indicated concern for self and family and higher levels of education were associated with high levels of willingness to comply. Younger people (16–24 were the least willing to comply; especially with wearing a face mask. Those with children reported higher levels of willingness to receive vaccination, and respondents who speak a language other than English at home were less willing to isolate themselves or comply with all behaviors. These findings provide a baseline measure of anticipated public compliance with key public health behaviors in the event of an influenza pandemic in the Australian population, and help to identify groups that may be more resistant to individual measures and may require additional attention in terms of risk communication strategies or health education.Keywords: risk perception, pandemic influenza, compliance, health behaviors

  4. Self-care and anticipated transition into retirement and later life in a Nordic welfare context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderhamn O

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Olle Söderhamn1–3, Anne Skisland1,2, Margaretha Herrman31Department of Health and Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad and Kristiansand, Norway; 2Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Grimstad, Norway; 3Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, SwedenAbstract: Few studies have appeared in the health care literature on the meaning of transition into retirement and later life. However, this predictable-involuntary transition may influence personal health and well-being, and studying it from a self-care perspective could be useful. The aim of this study was to illuminate aspects of self-care in a group of middle-aged individuals in relation to their anticipated transition into retirement in the Nordic welfare context. A total of 13 individuals, aged 55 to 65 years, were randomly chosen from the total number of inhabitants in three municipalities in mid-west Sweden. Conversational interviews took place, during which the informants shared important events in their lives that had occurred from early childhood until the present time, together with thoughts about their anticipated future developmental transition into later life. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. After content analyses and interpretation, a comprehensive picture of the phenomenon was revealed. The results showed that there were opportunities, expectations, wishes, concerns, and worries related to the transition into retirement and old age among informants from both rural and urban municipalities. Self-care, in connection with this, depended on motivating and demotivating factors. Autonomy and mature dependence seemed to be positive driving forces for reaching a successful transition into later life. Supporting autonomy should be a way of facilitating the transition into retirement and later life.Keywords: aging, autonomy, motivation, older people, successful aging

  5. Anticipating early fatality: friends', schoolmates' and individual perceptions of fatality on adolescent risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynie, Dana L; Soller, Brian; Williams, Kristi

    2014-02-01

    Past research indicates that anticipating adverse outcomes, such as early death (fatalism), is associated positively with adolescents' likelihood of engaging in risky behaviors. Health researchers and criminologists have argued that fatalism influences present risk taking in part by informing individuals' motivation for delaying gratification for the promise of future benefits. While past findings highlight the association between the anticipation of early death and a number of developmental outcomes, no known research has assessed the impact of location in a context characterized by high perceptions of fatality. Using data from Add Health and a sample of 9,584 adolescents (51% female and 71% white) nested in 113 schools, our study builds upon prior research by examining the association between friends', school mates', and individual perceptions of early fatality and adolescent risk behaviors. We test whether friends' anticipation of being killed prior to age 21 or location in a school where a high proportion of the student body subscribes to attitudes of high fatality, is associated with risky behaviors. Results indicate that friends' fatalism is positively associated with engaging in violent delinquency, non-violent delinquency, and drug use after controlling for individual covariates and prior individual risk-taking. Although friends' delinquency accounts for much of the effect of friends' fatalism on violence, none of the potential intervening variables fully explain the effect of friends' fatalism on youth involvement in non-violent delinquency and drug use. Our results underscore the importance of friendship contextual effects in shaping adolescent risk-taking behavior and the very serious consequences perceptions of fatality have for adolescents' involvement in delinquency and drug use.

  6. The ideal Atomic Centre; Le Centre Atomique ideal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The author presents considerations which should prove to be of interest to all those who have to design, to construct and to operate a nuclear research centre. A large number of the ideas presented can also be applied to non-nuclear scientific research centres. In his report the author reviews: various problems with which the constructor is faced: ground-plan, infrastructure, buildings and the large units of scientific equipment in the centre, and those problems facing the director: maintenance, production, supplies, security. The author stresses the relationship which ought to exist between the research workers and the management. With this aim in view he proposes the creation of National School for Administration in Research which would train administrative executives for public or private organisations; they would be specialised in the fields of fundamental or applied research. (author) [French] L'auteur propose une base de reflexions a tous ceux qui doivent concevoir, realiser et faire vivre un Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires. Un grand nombre des idees exprimees peut d'ailleurs s'appliquer a un Centre d'Etudes Scientifiques non nucleaires. Dans son ouvrage, l'auteur passe en revue les differents problemes qui se posent au constructeur: plan, masse, infrastructure, batiments et grands appareils du Centre, et ceux qu'a a resoudre le directeur: entretien, fabrication, approvisionnements, securite. L'auteur insiste sur l'aspect des rapports qui doivent exister entre les chercheurs et ceux qui les administrent. Il propose a cette fin la creation d'une Ecole Nationale d'Administration de la Recherche qui formerait des cadres administratifs pour les organismes publics ou prives, specialises dans la Recherche fondamentale ou appliquee. (auteur)

  7. Five-Year-Old Preschoolers' Sharing is Influenced by Anticipated Reciprocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mingrui; Shi, Jiannong; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Whether children share in anticipation of future benefits returned by a partner is an interesting question. In this study, 5-year-old children and an adult partner played a sharing game, in which children donated first and the partner donated afterward. In Experiment 1, the partner's resources were more attractive than the child's. In the reciprocal condition, the child was told that s/he would be a recipient when the partner played as a donor. In the non-reciprocal condition, however, the child was told that an anonymous child would be the recipient when the partner donated. Results showed that children shared more with the partner when they knew that they would be a recipient later. In Experiment 2, the child was always the recipient when the partner donated, but the partner's resources were more desirable than the child's in the high-value condition, and less desirable in the low-value condition. We found that children were more generous when the partner's resources were valued higher. These findings demonstrate that 5-year-old preschoolers' sharing choices take into account the anticipated reciprocity of the recipient, suggesting either self-interested tactical sharing or direct reciprocity in advance of receiving. Specifically, they adjust their sharing behavior depending on whether a partner has the potential to reciprocate, and whether it is worth sharing relative to the value of the payback. PMID:27064475

  8. The Galactic centre pulsar population

    CERN Document Server

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of a magnetar in the Galactic centre region has allowed Spitler et al. to characterize the interstellar scattering in that direction. They find that the temporal broadening of the pulse profile of the magnetar is substantially less than that predicted by models of the electron density of that region. This raises the question of what the plausible limits for the number of potentially observable pulsars - i.e., the number of pulsars beaming towards the Earth - in the Galactic centre region are. In this paper, using realistic assumptions, we show that the potentially observable population of pulsars in the inner parsec has a conservative upper limit of $\\sim$950, and that it is premature to conclude that the number of pulsars in this region is small. We also show that the observational results so far are consistent with this number and make predictions for future radio pulsar surveys of the Galactic centre.

  9. Will the Australian nuclear medicine technologist workforce meet anticipated health care demands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Edwina; Schofield, Deborah; Cox, Jennifer; Adamson, Barbara

    2008-05-01

    Determination of national nuclear medicine technologist workforce size was made from census data in 2001 and 1996 and from the professional body in 2004. A survey conducted by the authors in 2005 provided retention patterns in north-eastern Australia and suggested causes. Utilisation of nuclear medicine diagnostic services was established through the Medicare Benefits Schedule group statistics. More than half the nuclear medicine technologist workforce is under 35 years of age. Attrition commences from age 30, with very few workers over 55 years. In 2005 there was a 12% attrition of the survey workforce. In the past decade, service provision increased while workforce size decreased and the nuclear medicine technologist workforce is at risk of failing to meet the anticipated rise in health service needs. PMID:18447815

  10. Immune anticipation of mating in Drosophila: Turandot M promotes immunity against sexually transmitted fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weihao; McClure, Colin D; Evans, Cara R; Mlynski, David T; Immonen, Elina; Ritchie, Michael G; Priest, Nicholas K

    2013-12-22

    Although it is well known that mating increases the risk of infection, we do not know how females mitigate the fitness costs of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). It has recently been shown that female fruitflies, Drosophila melanogaster, specifically upregulate two members of the Turandot family of immune and stress response genes, Turandot M and Turandot C (TotM and TotC), when they hear male courtship song. Here, we use the Gal4/UAS RNAi gene knockdown system to test whether the expression of these genes provides fitness benefits for females infected with the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium robertsii under sexual transmission. As a control, we also examined the immunity conferred by Dorsal-related immunity factor (Dif), a central component of the Toll signalling pathway thought to provide immunity against fungal infections. We show that TotM, but not TotC or Dif, provides survival benefits to females following STIs, but not after direct topical infections. We also show that though the expression of TotM provides fecundity benefits for healthy females, it comes at a cost to their survival, which helps to explain why TotM is not constitutively expressed. Together, these results show that the anticipatory expression of TotM promotes specific immunity against fungal STIs and suggest that immune anticipation is more common than currently appreciated.

  11. Construction of the Wigner Data Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    A remote extension of the CERN data centre has recently been inaugurated. Hosted at the Wigner Research Centre for Physics in Hungary, it provides extra computing power required to cover CERN’s needs. This video presents the construction of the Wigner Data Centre from initial demolishing work through to its completion and details the major technical characteristics of the Data Centre.

  12. The CERN Data Centre readies for Run 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    While the world waits for Run 2 data with growing anticipation, the CERN Data Centre is battening down the hatches. Run 2 is set to see a significant increase in the amount of data produced by the LHC experiments, with more than one hundred additional petabytes expected over the next three years. How will CERN manage this flood of results? The Bulletin checks in with the IT Department to find out...   The CERN Data Centre: the heart of CERN's entire scientific, administrative, and computing infrastructure. With every second of run-time, gigabytes of data will come pouring into the CERN Data Centre to be stored, sorted and shared with physicists worldwide. To cope with this massive influx of Run 2 data, the CERN Data and Storage Services group focused on three areas: speed, capacity and reliability. First on the list, the group set out to increase the rate at which they could store data. "During Run 1, we were storing 1 gigabyte-per-second, with the occasional peak of 6 giga...

  13. Ventral Striatum Connectivity During Reward Anticipation in Adolescent Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jollans, Lee; Zhipeng, Cao; Icke, Ilknur; Greene, Ciara; Kelly, Clare; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Cattrell, Anna; Conrod, Patricia J; Desrivières, Sylvane; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Artiges, Eric; Nees, Frauke; Papadopoulos Orfanos, Dimitri; Paus, Tomáš; Smolka, Michael N; Walter, Henrik; Schumann, Gunter; Whelan, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Substance misusers, including adolescent smokers, often have reduced reward system activity during processing of non-drug rewards. Using a psychophysiological interaction approach, we examined functional connectivity with the ventral striatum during reward anticipation in a large (N = 206) sample of adolescent smokers. Increased smoking frequency was associated with (1) increased connectivity with regions involved in saliency and valuation, including the orbitofrontal cortex and (2) reduced connectivity between the ventral striatum and regions associated with inhibition and risk aversion, including the right inferior frontal gyrus. These results demonstrate that functional connectivity during reward processing is relevant to adolescent addiction. PMID:27074029

  14. Anticipation of periodic environmental changes in an amoeba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigusa, Tetsu; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2007-07-01

    The amoeboid organism of true slime mold, the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum, had capacity of memorizing a periodic event. The organism showed vigorous locomotion in the favorite conditions. When stimulation of the unfavorable conditions was given in a pulse-like regime and was repeated three times at interval of 60 minutes, the amoeba reduced the locomotion speed in response to each pulse. Even though the favorite conditions were kept to be constant after the periodic pulses, the amoeba spontaneously reduced the locomotion speed at the timing of next pulse (after 60 minutes). This means that the amoeba anticipated the next environmental change.

  15. tsk tsk tsk and Beyond: Anticipating Distributed Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Tofts

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers some important precursory events in the formative history of Australian media arts. These events have anticipated the post-object, serial conception of arts practice that Nicholas Bourriaud has called relational aesthetics. Relational aesthetics interpret both artwork and audience in differential, highly idiosyncratic ways; ways that have become important to our contemporary vocabulary of interactive, immersive and interfaced art. This paper will consider the ways in which the concept of the network was important to artists such as Philip Brophy & Tsk-tsk-tsk in the early 1980s. It will also explore related notions of “audience manipulation” in the work of Martine Corompt.

  16. Anticipating the use of future things: towards a framework for prospective use analysis in innovation design projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Julien; Buisine, Stéphanie; Aoussat, Améziane

    2013-11-01

    Anticipation of future product use is a persistent issue in User-Centered Design. In this paper, we argue that one obstacle to early integration of use analysis in innovation design is overreliance on retrospective use analysis, i.e. that which is based on clear references to existing products or activities. In contrast, innovation design projects are full of uncertainty, leading to a need for prospective analysis. After having described some limitations of prospective use analysis, we contend that creativity tools may be used to assist the anticipation of future product use, by allowing designers to approach the variability of situations of future use in a structured manner rather than by "muddling through". We illustrate the expected benefits of this approach with two case studies, and describe some prospects for future research and practice in ergonomics.

  17. Anticipated survival and health behaviours in older English adults: cross sectional and longitudinal analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Adams

    Full Text Available Individuals may make a rational decision not to engage in healthy behaviours based on their assessment of the benefits of such behaviours to them, compared to other uncontrollable threats to their health. Anticipated survival is one marker of perceived uncontrollable threats to health. We hypothesised that greater anticipated survival: a is cross-sectionally associated with healthier patterns of behaviours; b increases the probability that behaviours will be healthier at follow up than at baseline; and c decreases the probability that behaviours will be 'less healthy' at follow than at baseline.Data from waves 1 and 5 of the English Longitudinal Survey of Ageing provided 8 years of follow up. Perceptions of uncontrollable threats to health at baseline were measured using anticipated survival. Health behaviours considered were self-reported cigarette smoking, physical activity level, and frequency of alcohol consumption. A wide range of socio-economic, demographic, and health variables were adjusted for.Greater anticipated survival was cross-sectionally associated with lower likelihood of smoking, and higher physical activity levels, but was not associated with alcohol consumption. Lower anticipated survival was associated with decreased probability of adopting healthier patterns of physical activity, and increased probability of becoming a smoker at follow up. There were no associations between anticipated survival and change in alcohol consumption.Our hypotheses were partially confirmed, though associations were inconsistent across behaviours and absent for alcohol consumption. Individual assessments of uncontrollable threats to health may be an important determinant of smoking and physical activity.

  18. LDE centres: sprint or marathon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonger, S.; Van Rein, E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Strategic Leiden-Delft-Erasmus Alliance, established by the three universities in 2012, was to improve research and education and competitiveness. Projects are intended to develop from the ground up, which led to the establishment of eight joint centres in 2013. A quick look around re

  19. Market efficiency, anticipation and the formation of bubbles-crashes

    CERN Document Server

    Galam, Serge

    2011-01-01

    A dynamical model is introduced for the formation of a bullish or bearish trends driving an asset price in a given market. Initially, each agent decides to buy or sell according to its personal opinion, which results from the combination of its own private information, the public information and its own analysis. It then adjusts such opinion through the market as it observes sequentially the behavior of a group of random selection of other agents. Its choice is then determined by a local majority rule including itself. Whenever the selected group is at a tie, i.e., it is undecided on what to do, the choice is determined by the local group belief with respect to the anticipated trend at that time. These local adjustments create a dynamic that leads the market price formation. In case of balanced anticipations the market is found to be efficient in being successful to make the "right price" to emerge from the sequential aggregation of all the local individual informations which all together contain the fundamen...

  20. Coincidence-anticipation timing requirements are different in racket sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Selçuk; Devrilmez, Erhan; Kirazci, Sadettin

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coincidence-anticipation timing accuracy of athletes of different racket sports with various stimulus velocity requirements. Ninety players (15 girls, 15 boys for each sport) from tennis (M age = 12.4 yr., SD = 1.4), badminton (M age = 12.5 yr., SD = 1.4), and table tennis (M age = 12.4 yr., SD = 1.2) participated in this study. Three different stimulus velocities, low, moderate, and high, were used to simulate the velocity requirements of these racket sports. Tennis players had higher accuracy when they performed under the low stimulus velocity compared to badminton and table tennis players. Badminton players performed better under the moderate speed comparing to tennis and table tennis players. Table tennis players had better performance than tennis and badminton players under the high stimulus velocity. Therefore, visual and motor systems of players from different racket sports may adapt to a stimulus velocity in coincidence-anticipation timing, which is specific to each type of racket sports.

  1. The role of anticipation in drug addiction and reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jędras P

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Paweł Jędras, Andrew Jones, Matt FieldDepartment of Psychological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UKAbstract: Addiction is a chronically relapsing disorder, and substance users frequently relapse when they encounter opportunities to use drugs. In this paper, we review evidence regarding the psychological response to anticipation of imminent drug availability, its neural substrates, and its relationship to other phenomena implicated in addiction. Naturalistic and laboratory studies indicate that drug anticipation increases cue-provoked craving and attentional biases for drug-related cues. As predicted by existing theoretical models, these effects reflect hyper-valuation of drugs that are perceived as available for consumption, which is linked to activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex that, in turn, innervates subcortical regions associated with reward processing. Drug expectancy is necessary for the formation of conditioned responses to drug-related cues and it modulates the strength of conditioned responses. Furthermore, the role of impulsivity in addiction can be understood in terms of its interaction with the response to imminent drug availability. These results have a number of implications for the treatment of addiction, ranging from government policies that restrict the perceived availability of drugs to novel biological and psychological interventions that could blunt the response to signals of drug availability.Keywords: attentional bias, availability, conditioning, cue-reactivity, expectancy, substance use disorders

  2. Reduced anticipation of negative emotional events in alexithymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starita, Francesca; Làdavas, Elisabetta; di Pellegrino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Alexithymia is characterized by difficulties in different domains of emotion processing, especially in relation to negative emotions. Nevertheless, its causal mechanisms remain elusive. Reduced anticipation of negative emotional events might be one such mechanism because it enables the individual to prepare to respond effectively to coming events. To test this, changes in skin conductance response (SCR) were recorded during classical fear conditioning in sixty participants with high (HA), medium (MA) and low (LA) levels of alexithymia. Two coloured squares were presented, one was reinforced with a mild electrical stimulation (CS+) while the other was never reinforced (CS-). Critically, despite all groups showing higher SCR to CS+ compared to CS-, SCR to CS+ was lower and extinguished earlier in HA compared to MA and LA. These differences appeared to be attributable neither to differences in the intensity of stimulation received, nor to SCR to the stimulation itself. Groups showed comparable SCR to CS- as well. Therefore, HA exhibited decreased anticipation of the occurrence of a negative emotional event. Disruption of this mechanism may then compromise effective emotion recognition, emotional response and response regulation, which characterise HA, and represent a unifying causal mechanism underlying the difficulties in emotion processing of this group. PMID:27278856

  3. Investigating the effects of 6 months extended duration, in-centre nocturnal versus conventional haemodialysis treatment: a non-randomised, controlled feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Brown, Matthew P M; Preston, Robert; Pickering, Warren; McCann, Gerry P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In-centre nocturnal haemodialysis (INHD) is an underutilised dialysis regimen that can potentially provide patients with better clinical outcomes due to extended treatment times. We have established an INHD programme within our clinical network, fulfilling a previously unmet patient need. This feasibility study aims to gather sufficient data on numerous outcome measures to inform the design of a multicentre randomised controlled trial that will establish the potential benefits of INHD and increase the availability of this service nationally and internationally. Methods and analysis This will be a non-randomised controlled study. Prevalent patients on haemodialysis (HD) will electively change from a conventional in-centre HD regimen of 4 hours thrice weekly to a regimen of extended treatment times (5–8 hours) delivered in-centre overnight thrice weekly. After recruitment of the INHD cohort, a group of patients matched for age, gender and dialysis vintage will be selected from patients remaining on a conventional daytime dialysis programme. Outcome measures will include left ventricular mass as measured by MRI, physical performance measured by the short physical performance battery and physical activity measured by accelerometry. Additionally we will measure quality of life using validated questionnaires, nutritional status by bioimpedance spectroscopy and food diaries, and blood sampling for markers of cardiovascular disease, systemic inflammation. Suitable statistical tests shall be used to analyse the data. We will use omnibus tests to observe changes over the duration of the intervention and between groups. We will also look for associations between outcome measures that may warrant further investigation. These data will be used to inform the power calculation for future studies. Ethics and dissemination A favourable opinion was granted by Northampton Research Ethics Committee (15/EM/0268). It is anticipated that results of this study will be

  4. The Relationship of Personality, Values, and Race to Anticipation of the Supervisory Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kolk, Charles J.

    1974-01-01

    Graduate counseling students were placed in two groups according to whether they anticipated the supervisory relatonship to be more or less facilitative. Blacks differed from whites on how they anticipated the supervisory relationship. (Author)

  5. Anticipative Criminal Investigation : Theory and Counterterrorism Practice in the Netherlands and the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch Ballin, M.F.H.

    2012-01-01

    The book assesses the adoption of counterterrorism measures in the Netherlands and the United States, which facilitate criminal investigations with a preventive focus (anticipative criminal investigations), from the perspective of rule of law principles. Anticipative criminal investigation has emerg

  6. Modele a anticipations rationnelles de la conjoncture simulee : MARCOS.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquinot, P.; Mihoubi, F.

    2000-01-01

    MARCOS est un modèle étalonné de l'économie française en présence d'anticipations rationnelles. Son principal objectif est la réalisation d'exercices de simulation sur un horizon de moyen long terme. Il a été construit en adoptant l'hypothèse d'un petit pays où les marchés des biens et du travail sont dans un contexte de concurrence monopolistique, les salaires sont négociés suivant un modèle de droit à gérer l'emploi et la consommation des ménages non contraints par les liquidités résulte d'...

  7. Systems and models with anticipation in physics and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, A.

    2012-11-01

    Investigations of recent physics processes and real applications of models require the new more and more improved models which should involved new properties. One of such properties is anticipation (that is taking into accounting some advanced effects).It is considered the special kind of advanced systems - namely a strong anticipatory systems introduced by D. Dubois. Some definitions, examples and peculiarities of solutions are described. The main feature is presumable multivaluedness of the solutions. Presumable physical examples of such systems are proposed: self-organization problems; dynamical chaos; synchronization; advanced potentials; structures in micro-, meso- and macro- levels; cellular automata; computing; neural network theory. Also some applications for modeling social, economical, technical and natural systems are described.

  8. Revitalizing the United Nations. Anticipation and Prevention as Primary Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Novosseloff

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In tackling the on-going topic of UN reform, one should be honest with the analysis of the problems at stakes. It is necessary to first take into account the profound changes that have occurred since the end of the Cold War, as well as acknowledging the limits of an international organization and the shape of the UN system. It is only from that analysis that proposals can be made to rationalize and to make more efficient the functioning of the United Nations. What the Organization needs is not only a rationalization, it primarily needs a vision that gives it purpose and meaning. This article proposes that its primary goals should be anticipation and prevention – it should be the advanced guard and the conscience of the world. In this context, the United Nations is an indispensable and priceless instrument in international relations.

  9. A Complex Data Warehouse for Personalized, Anticipative Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Jérôme

    2008-01-01

    With the growing use of new technologies, healthcare is nowadays undergoing significant changes. Information-based medicine has to exploit medical decision-support systems and requires the analysis of various, heterogeneous data, such as patient records, medical images, biological analysis results, etc. In this paper, we present the design of the complex data warehouse relating to high-level athletes. It is original in two ways. First, it is aimed at storing complex medical data. Second, it is designed to allow innovative and quite different kinds of analyses to support: (1) personalized and anticipative medicine (in opposition to curative medicine) for well-identified patients; (2) broad-band statistical studies over a given population of patients. Furthermore, the system includes data relating to several medical fields. It is also designed to be evolutionary to take into account future advances in medical research.

  10. The Boxing Day Tsunami: Could the Disaster have been Anticipated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, P. R.; Burbdige, D.

    2005-05-01

    The occurrence of the 26 December, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake and the accompanying "Boxing Day" Tsunami, which killed over 280,00, has been described as one of the most lethal natural disasters in human history. Many lives could have been saved had a tsunami warning system, similar to that which exists for the Pacific Ocean, been in operation for the Indian Ocean. The former exists because great subduction zone earthquakes have generated destructive, Pacific-wide tsunami in the Pacific Ocean with some frequency. Prior to 26 December, 2004, all of the world's earthquakes with magnitude > 9 were widely thought to have occurred in the Pacific Ocean, where they caused destructive tsunami. Could the occurrence of similar earthquakes and tsunami in the Indian Ocean been predicted prior to the 2004 Box Day Tragedy? This presentation will argue that the answer is "Yes". Almost without exception (the exception being the 1952 Kamchatka earthquake) the massive subduction zone earthquakes and tsunami of the Pacific Ocean have been associated with the subduction of relatively young ocean lithosphere (literature and were the subject of recent research. In particular, research by Zachariasen et al. (1999 and 2000) had inferred that the magnitude of the 1833 event may have been as high as 9.2. Calculations for the tsunami that might have been associated with this event had shown, prior to 26 Dec, that it would affect the entire Indian Ocean basin, although due to the earthquake's location 1000 km southeast of the Boxing day event, the effects in the Bay of Bengal would not have been as severe. Thus, it seems to this author that the Boxing Day event could and should have been anticipated. This presentation will further consider why it was not, and what steps can be taken to anticipate and mitigate the effects of future events that may occur in the Indian Ocean and elsewhere.

  11. The INTEGRAL Science Data Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Beckmann, V.

    2002-01-01

    The INTEGRAL Science Data Centre (ISDC) processes, archives and distributes data from the INTEGRAL mission. At the ISDC incoming data from the satellite are processed and searched for transient sources and Gamma-Ray bursts. The data are archived and distributed to the guest observers. As soon as the data are public, any astronomer can access the data via the internet. ISDC also provides the tools which are necessary for the data analysis and offers user support concerning questions related to...

  12. Radwaste Treatment Centre Jaslovske Bohunice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this leaflet the Bohunice Radwaste Treatment Centre (BSC RAO) is presented. BSC RAO is designed to process and treat liquid and solid radwaste, arising from the NPP A-1 decommissioning, from NPPs V-1, V-2, and Mochovce operations, as well as institutional radwaste of diverse institutional (hospitals, research institutes) in the Slovak Republic. Transport, sorting, incineration, compacting, concentration and cementation of radwaste as well as monitoring of emission are described

  13. Psychological capital, work engagement and organisational commitment amongst call centre employees in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet C. Simons

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The development of psychological capital amongst call centre employees could have an impact on positive work-related attitudes and behaviour; such as work engagement and organisational commitment.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to determine the relationship between psychological capital, work engagement and organisational commitment amongst call centre employees; and further, to determine whether psychological capital and work engagement hold predictive value for the organisational commitment of call centre employees.Motivation for the study: There is a gap in research in understanding and enabling positive resource capacities in highly stressful work contexts such as call centres.Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional survey design was used. A sample of 106 call centre employees from a South African organisation participated in the research. The measuring instruments included a demographic questionnaire, the Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ, the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES and the Organisational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ.Main findings: Significant positive relationships were found between psychological capital, work engagement and organisational commitment. The results showed work engagement as being the only significant predictor of organisational commitment.Practical/managerial implications: Call centre employers need to develop and implement workplace interventions that would increase the psychological capital of call centre employees.Contribution/value-add: The research findings will benefit both call centre employees and management. The study highlighted the importance of the role of optimism as a subdimension of psychological capital in developing work engagement and organisational commitment amongst call centre employees.

  14. The Notting Dale Urban Studies Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Chris; Lynas, Sue

    1976-01-01

    Founded in 1974, the Centre is one of the most intensively used resource centres in the United Kingdom. Adults and students from elementary to college level use its facilities to learn about the urban environment. (BD)

  15. Anticipating the Future, Influencing the Present: Assessing the Societal Implications of Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Evan S.

    A growing challenge for the American policymaking system is to respond effectively to a wide range of interconnected, complex, long-term science and technology issues. Simultaneously, current approaches and institutions of governance are ill suited to address these multidimensional challenges. As the next generation of innovations in science and technology is arriving at an accelerating rate, the governance system is lagging behind. This realization leads to a vital overarching consideration that steers this study: What approaches are well suited to anticipate the longer-term societal implications of emerging technologies in the 21st Century? This study identifies and examines strategies for anticipating the longer-term societal implications of emerging technologies by way of a qualitative case study. It explores one area of technology (nanotechnology), in one particular governance system (the United States), and with a focus on one high profile non-governmental organization (NGO) involved in addressing a range of nanotechnology's societal and policy implications: the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (PEN). Based at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, PEN's goal was to ensure "that as nanotechnologies advance, possible risks are minimized, public and consumer engagement remains strong, and the potential benefits of these new technologies are realized." The conceptual framework of anticipatory governance guides the research, which offers a real-world example about how anticipatory governance applies in the nongovernmental sector and shows how this idea links to broader theoretical debates about the policymaking process. The study's main conclusion is that PEN utilized a set of interconnected strategies related to advancing foresight, operating in a boundary-spanning role, and promoting communications and public engagement in its attempt to influence, anticipate, and shape the societal implications of emerging technologies. The findings are

  16. INTRODUCTION: Anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Richard P.; Liepert, Beate G.

    2010-06-01

    The atmospheric branch of the water cycle, although containing just a tiny fraction of the Earth's total water reserves, presents a crucial interface between the physical climate (such as large-scale rainfall patterns) and the ecosystems upon which human societies ultimately depend. Because of the central importance of water in the Earth system, the question of how the water cycle is changing, and how it may alter in future as a result of anthropogenic changes, present one of the greatest challenges of this century. The recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Climate Change and Water (Bates et al 2008) highlighted the increasingly strong evidence of change in the global water cycle and associated environmental consequences. It is of critical importance to climate prediction and adaptation strategies that key processes in the atmospheric water cycle are precisely understood and determined, from evaporation at the surface of the ocean, transport by the atmosphere, condensation as cloud and eventual precipitation, and run-off through rivers following interaction with the land surface, sub-surface, ice, snow and vegetation. The purpose of this special focus issue of Environmental Research Letters on anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle is to consolidate the recent substantial advances in understanding past, present and future changes in the global water cycle through evidence built upon theoretical understanding, backed up by observations and borne out by climate model simulations. Thermodynamic rises in water vapour provide a central constraint, as discussed in a guest editorial by Bengtsson (2010). Theoretical implications of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation are presented by O'Gorman and Muller (2010) and with reference to a simple model (Sherwood 2010) while observed humidity changes confirm these anticipated responses at the land and ocean surface (Willett et al 2008). Rises in low-level moisture are thought to fuel an

  17. Mathematical Modeling and Analysis of Network Service Failure in DataCentre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FaizaAyub Syed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available World has become a global village. With the advent of technology, the concept of Cloud Computing has evolved a lot. Cloud computing offers various benefits in terms of storage, computation, cost and flexibility. It focuses on delivering combination of technological components such as applications, platforms, infrastructure, security and web hosted services over the internet. One of the major elements of Cloud Computing infrastructure is Data centre. Companies host there applications and services online through Data centres, whose probability of downtime is expected to be very low. Since, data centre consists of number of servers; the rate of service failure is usually high. In this paper we have analysed service failure rate of a conventional data centre. The Fault Trend of network failure by assuming there occurrence as a Poisson Process was made. The accurate prediction of fault rate helps in managing the up gradation, replacement and other administrative issues of data centre components.

  18. Anticipation - the underlying science of sport. Report on research in progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadin, Mihai

    2015-05-01

    Professional sport practitioners intuitively acknowledge anticipation. Sports researchers sometimes discuss it. Still, there is little data-based evidence to characterize the role anticipation plays in human performance. Even less documented is the distinction between reaction and anticipation. This text presents the real-time quantification environment developed as an AnticipationScope™. Based on a very large data harvest from this experimental set-up, hypotheses regarding the role of anticipation in sport are advanced. The conclusion is that while preparation and reaction play an important role in sports performance, in the final analysis anticipation distinguishes the professional from other sport practitioners. Work in progress is presented with the aim of engaging the community of researchers in the design of alternative methods for quantifying anticipation and for processing the data. Generalization from sport to human performance is one of the intended outcomes of this research.

  19. Overcoming the Educational Time Warp: Anticipating a Different Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Jacobs

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Education abridges the time required for individual and social progress by preserving and propagating the essence of human experience. It delivers to youth the accumulated knowledge of countless past generations in an organized and abridged form, so that future generations can start off with all the capacities acquired by their predecessors. However, today education confronts a serious dilemma. We are living in an educational time warp. There is a growing gap between contemporary human experience and what is taught in our educational system and that gap is widening rapidly with each passing year. Today humanity confronts challenges of unprecedented scope, magnitude and intensity. The incremental development of educational content and pedagogy in recent decades has not kept with the ever-accelerating pace of technological and social evolution. Education is also subject to a generational time warp resulting from the fact that many of today’s teachers were educated decades ago during very different times and based on different values and perspectives. The challenge of preparing youth for the future is exasperated by the fact that the future for which we are educating youth does not yet exist and to a large extent is unknown or unknowable. The resulting gap between the content of education and societal needs inhibits our capacity to anticipate and effectively respond to social problems. All these factors argue for a major reorientation of educational content and pedagogy from transmission of acquired knowledge based on past experience to development of the knowledge, skills and capacities of personality needed in a future we cannot clearly envision. We may not be able to anticipate the precise nature of the future, but we can provide an education based on the understanding that it will be very different from the present. In terms of content, the emphasis needs to shift from facts regarding the actual state of affairs in the past, present and

  20. Anticipated SWOT Observations of Human Impacts on the Water Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, E.; Andreadis, K.; Moller, D.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    The impoundment of water behind dams alters the timing and magnitude of the discharge of rivers to the ocean, and hence sea level, as well as evaporation from the global land areas, and, through irrigation, the storage of water on land in the soil column. The impact of these effects on the global hydrologic cycle globally is difficult to estimate given currently available (and shared) observations of temporally varying reservoir storage. The upcoming joint U.S.-France Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission* will measure terrestrial surface water storage dynamics with unprecedented global coverage for managed reservoirs, as well as natural lakes and rivers. Previous studies have investigated SWOT's potential ability to measure storage change for some lakes; however, because reservoirs are typically located in flooded river valleys, they tend to be more elongate than the high latitude lakes that have been studied, and have more complex shorelines (and hence a longer land-water boundary). Furthermore, for reservoirs in mountainous regions, SWOT observations will be prone to topographic layover effects. Finally, the temporal variability of water levels in reservoirs is determined by management goals (i.e., hydropower, flood control, irrigation, supply, recreation), rather than climate, as in the case of natural lakes. We report an investigation of the potential accuracy of SWOT observations of storage change over selected managed reservoirs in the United States. First, we developed a time series of water height maps over each reservoir by combining available bathymetry data with observations of reservoir storage. We then simulated realistic SWOT observations of water level over these water bodies, given the planned SWOT orbital parameters, anticipated noise, and topographic layover errors. We also simulated a realistic tropospheric delay, modeled from daily MERRA reanalysis data. From these synthetic observations, we estimate the number of overpasses needed

  1. Perceptions of an Anticipated Bilingual Education Program in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozfidan, Burhan; Burlbaw, Lynn; Kuo, Li-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Bilingual education is globally an important aspect within the educational community in recent years. The purpose of the study is to explore perceptions towards a bilingual education program and investigate factors that may affect the development of a bilingual education program in Turkey. This study also identifies the benefits of bilingualism in…

  2. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z > Exercise: Benefits of Exercise: Health Benefits In This Topic Health Benefits Benefits for Everyday Life Frequently ... Exercise: How to Stay Active The information in this topic was provided by the National Institute on ...

  3. Scheduling participants of Assessment Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jens; Løber, Janni

      Assessment Centres are used as a tool for psychologists and coaches to observe a number of dimensions in a person's behaviour and test his/her potential within a number of chosen focus areas. This is done in an intense course, with a number of different exercises which expose each participant......'s ability level in the chosen focus areas. The participants are observed by assessors with the purpose of gathering material for reaching a conclusion on each participant's personal profile. We consider the particular case that arises at the company Human Equity (www.humanequity.dk), where Assessment...

  4. Anticipating the Species Jump: Surveillance for Emerging Viral Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, M. L.; Parrish, C. R.; Cobey, S.; Glass, G. E.; Bush, R. M.; Leighton, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Zoonotic disease surveillance is typically triggered after animal pathogens have already infected humans. Are there ways to identify high-risk viruses before they emerge in humans? If so, then how and where can identifications be made and by what methods? These were the fundamental questions driving a workshop to examine the future of predictive surveillance for viruses that might jump from animals to infect humans. Virologists, ecologists and computational biologists from academia, federal government and non-governmental organizations discussed opportunities as well as obstacles to the prediction of species jumps using genetic and ecological data from viruses and their hosts, vectors and reservoirs. This workshop marked an important first step towards envisioning both scientific and organizational frameworks for this future capability. Canine parvoviruses as well as seasonal H3N2 and pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses are discussed as exemplars that suggest what to look for in anticipating species jumps. To answer the question of where to look, prospects for discovering emerging viruses among wildlife, bats, rodents, arthropod vectors and occupationally exposed humans are discussed. Finally, opportunities and obstacles are identified and accompanied by suggestions for how to look for species jumps. Taken together, these findings constitute the beginnings of a conceptual framework for achieving a virus surveillance capability that could predict future species jumps. PMID:21914152

  5. Current and anticipated uses of thermal hydraulic codes in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Doo; Chang, Won-Pyo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    In Korea, the current uses of thermal hydraulic codes are categorized into 3 areas. The first application is in designing both nuclear fuel and NSSS. The codes have usually been introduced based on the technology transfer programs agreed between KAERI and the foreign vendors. Another area is in the supporting of the plant operations and licensing by the utility. The third category is research purposes. In this area assessments and some applications to the safety issue resolutions are major activities using the best estimate thermal hydraulic codes such as RELAP5/MOD3 and CATHARE2. Recently KEPCO plans to couple thermal hydraulic codes with a neutronics code for the design of the evolutionary type reactor by 2004. KAERI also plans to develop its own best estimate thermal hydraulic code, however, application range is different from KEPCO developing code. Considering these activities, it is anticipated that use of the best estimate hydraulic analysis code developed in Korea may be possible in the area of safety evaluation within 10 years.

  6. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity in dysphoria during reward and punishment anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Jessica; Brinkmann, Kerstin

    2015-03-01

    Hyposensitivity to reward in depression and dysphoria has been found in behavioral and neuroimaging studies. For punishment responsiveness, some studies showed hyposensitivity to punishment while other studies demonstrated hypersensitivity. Only few studies have addressed the motivational question as to whether depressed individuals mobilize less effort in anticipation of a positive or a negative consequence. The present study aimed at investigating reward and punishment responsiveness in subclinical depression from an effort mobilization perspective. Working on a recognition memory task, one third of the participants could earn small amounts of money, one third could lose small amounts of money, and one third could neither earn nor lose money. Effort mobilization was operationalized as participants' cardiovascular reactivity during task performance. As expected, reactivity of cardiac pre-ejection period and heart rate was higher in both incentive conditions compared to the neutral condition for nondysphorics, while it was blunted across conditions for dysphorics. Moreover, the present study found that dysphorics show an altered behavioral response to punishment. These findings thus show that dysphorics present a reduced motivation to obtain a reward or to avoid a punishment in terms of reduced effort-related cardiac reactivity. PMID:25462217

  7. Early effects of reward anticipation are modulated by dopaminergic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thore Apitz

    Full Text Available The abilities to predict future rewards and assess the value of reward delivery are crucial aspects of adaptive behavior. While the mesolimbic system, including dopaminergic midbrain, ventral striatum and prefrontal cortex have long been associated with reward processing, recent studies also indicate a prominent role of early visual brain regions. However, the precise underlying neural mechanisms still remain unclear. To address this issue, we presented participants with visual cues predicting rewards of high and low magnitudes and probability (2 × 2 factorial design, while neural activity was scanned using magnetoencephalography. Importantly, one group of participants received 150 mg of the dopamine precursor levodopa prior to the experiment, while another group received a placebo. For the placebo group, neural signals of reward probability (but not magnitude emerged at ∼ 100 ms after cue presentation at occipital sensors in the event-related magnetic fields. Importantly, these probability signals were absent in the levodopa group indicating a close link. Moreover, levodopa administration reduced oscillatory power in the high (20-30 Hz and low (13-20 Hz beta band during both reward anticipation and delivery. Taken together, our findings indicate that visual brain regions are involved in coding prospective reward probability but not magnitude and that these effects are modulated by dopamine.

  8. A Bayesian belief network of threat anticipation and terrorist motivations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Davenport, Kristen M.; Schryver, Jack C.

    2010-04-01

    Recent events highlight the need for efficient tools for anticipating the threat posed by terrorists, whether individual or groups. Antiterrorism includes fostering awareness of potential threats, deterring aggressors, developing security measures, planning for future events, halting an event in process, and ultimately mitigating and managing the consequences of an event. To analyze such components, one must understand various aspects of threat elements like physical assets and their economic and social impacts. To this aim, we developed a three-layer Bayesian belief network (BBN) model that takes into consideration the relative threat of an attack against a particular asset (physical layer) as well as the individual psychology and motivations that would induce a person to either act alone or join a terrorist group and commit terrorist acts (social and economic layers). After researching the many possible motivations to become a terrorist, the main factors are compiled and sorted into categories such as initial and personal indicators, exclusion factors, and predictive behaviors. Assessing such threats requires combining information from disparate data sources most of which involve uncertainties. BBN combines these data in a coherent, analytically defensible, and understandable manner. The developed BBN model takes into consideration the likelihood and consequence of a threat in order to draw inferences about the risk of a terrorist attack so that mitigation efforts can be optimally deployed. The model is constructed using a network engineering process that treats the probability distributions of all the BBN nodes within the broader context of the system development process.

  9. Testing surgical gowns for the "anticipated level of exposure".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, N L

    2000-04-01

    Although the use of the surgeon's gown dates back to the turn of the century, the need for it to be made of a liquid-repellent material was disclosed only in 1952. Because of the relatively poor performance of the products that were introduced early on, the entire textile industry--makers of nonwoven disposable and woven reusable materials alike--was challenged to develop a test method to demonstrate a fabric's capability "under usual conditions of use." A cooperative attempt to do that was abandoned in 1983. With the emergence of HIV, the need to protect the wearer became the gown's priority. However, because there was no standard test method, the manufacturers used any of an array of tests to promote a product's suitability for use under what the Occupational Safety and Health Administration describes as the "level of exposure anticipated." Now, a standard test method has been adopted that describes the results on a pass/fail basis. However, the literature indicates that gowns made of materials that have passed this test have failed "under usual conditions of use." Nevertheless, the Food and Drug Administration is permitting manufacturers to mislead the surgical community by describing products as being "impervious" or "liquid proof." PMID:10794218

  10. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity in dysphoria during reward and punishment anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Jessica; Brinkmann, Kerstin

    2015-03-01

    Hyposensitivity to reward in depression and dysphoria has been found in behavioral and neuroimaging studies. For punishment responsiveness, some studies showed hyposensitivity to punishment while other studies demonstrated hypersensitivity. Only few studies have addressed the motivational question as to whether depressed individuals mobilize less effort in anticipation of a positive or a negative consequence. The present study aimed at investigating reward and punishment responsiveness in subclinical depression from an effort mobilization perspective. Working on a recognition memory task, one third of the participants could earn small amounts of money, one third could lose small amounts of money, and one third could neither earn nor lose money. Effort mobilization was operationalized as participants' cardiovascular reactivity during task performance. As expected, reactivity of cardiac pre-ejection period and heart rate was higher in both incentive conditions compared to the neutral condition for nondysphorics, while it was blunted across conditions for dysphorics. Moreover, the present study found that dysphorics show an altered behavioral response to punishment. These findings thus show that dysphorics present a reduced motivation to obtain a reward or to avoid a punishment in terms of reduced effort-related cardiac reactivity.

  11. In Wrong Anticipation - Miscalibrated Beliefs between Germans, Israelis, and Palestinians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerg, Sebastian J.; Hennig-Schmidt, Heike; Walkowitz, Gari; Winter, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    The reconcilability of actions and beliefs in inter-country relationships, either in business or politics, is of vital importance as incorrect beliefs on foreigners’ behavior can have serious implications. We study a typical inter-country interaction by means of a controlled laboratory investment game experiment in Germany, Israel and Palestine involving 400 student participants in total. An investor has to take a risky decision in a foreign country that involves transferring money to an investee/allocator. We found a notable constellation of calibrated and un-calibrated beliefs. Within each country, transfer standards exist, which investees correctly anticipate within their country. However, across countries these standards differ. By attributing the standard of their own environment to the other countries investees are remarkably bad in predicting foreign investors’ behavior. The tendency to ignore this potential difference can be a source of misinterpreting motives in cross-country interaction. Foreigners might perceive behavior as unfavorable or favorable differentiation, even though—unknown to them—investors actually treat fellow-country people and foreigners alike. PMID:27311066

  12. Neural correlates of anticipation risk reflect risk preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudorf, Sarah; Preuschoff, Kerstin; Weber, Bernd

    2012-11-21

    Individual risk preferences have a large influence on decisions, such as financial investments, career and health choices, or gambling. Decision making under risk has been studied both behaviorally and on a neural level. It remains unclear, however, how risk attitudes are encoded and integrated with choice. Here, we investigate how risk preferences are reflected in neural regions known to process risk. We collected functional magnetic resonance images of 56 human subjects during a gambling task (Preuschoff et al., 2006). Subjects were grouped into risk averters and risk seekers according to the risk preferences they revealed in a separate lottery task. We found that during the anticipation of high-risk gambles, risk averters show stronger responses in ventral striatum and anterior insula compared to risk seekers. In addition, risk prediction error signals in anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate indicate that risk averters do not dissociate properly between gambles that are more or less risky than expected. We suggest this may result in a general overestimation of prospective risk and lead to risk avoidance behavior. This is the first study to show that behavioral risk preferences are reflected in the passive evaluation of risky situations. The results have implications on public policies in the financial and health domain. PMID:23175822

  13. Current and anticipated uses of thermal hydraulic codes in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Korea, the current uses of thermal hydraulic codes are categorized into 3 areas. The first application is in designing both nuclear fuel and NSSS. The codes have usually been introduced based on the technology transfer programs agreed between KAERI and the foreign vendors. Another area is in the supporting of the plant operations and licensing by the utility. The third category is research purposes. In this area assessments and some applications to the safety issue resolutions are major activities using the best estimate thermal hydraulic codes such as RELAP5/MOD3 and CATHARE2. Recently KEPCO plans to couple thermal hydraulic codes with a neutronics code for the design of the evolutionary type reactor by 2004. KAERI also plans to develop its own best estimate thermal hydraulic code, however, application range is different from KEPCO developing code. Considering these activities, it is anticipated that use of the best estimate hydraulic analysis code developed in Korea may be possible in the area of safety evaluation within 10 years

  14. Mental practice promotes motor anticipation: evidence from skilled music performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Nicolò F; De Buglio, Matteo; Trimarchi, Pietro D; Chielli, Alfonso; Bricolo, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    Mental practice (MP) has been shown to improve movement accuracy and velocity, but it is not known whether MP can also optimize movement timing. We addressed this question by studying two groups of expert pianists who performed challenging music sequences after either MP or physical practice (PP). Performance and motion-capture data were collected along with responses to imagery questionnaires. The results showed that MP produced performance improvements, although to a lower degree than PP did. MP and PP induced changes in both movement velocity and movement timing, promoting the emergence of movement anticipatory patterns. Furthermore, motor imagery was associated with greater changes in movement velocity, while auditory imagery was associated with greater movement anticipation. Data from a control group that was not allowed to practice confirmed that the changes in accuracy and kinematics were not due to mere repetition of the sequence during testing. This study provides the first evidence of an anticipatory control following MP and extends the present knowledge on the effectiveness of MP to a task of unparalleled motor complexity. The practical implications of MP in the motor domain are discussed. PMID:23970859

  15. Mental practice promotes motor anticipation: evidence from skilled music performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolò Francesco Bernardi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mental practice (MP has been shown to improve movement accuracy and velocity, but it is not known whether MP can also optimize movement timing. We addressed this question by studying two groups of expert pianists who performed challenging music sequences after either MP or physical practice (PP. Performance and motion-capture data were collected along with responses to imagery questionnaires. The results showed that MP produced performance improvements, although to a lower degree than PP did. MP and PP induced changes in both movement velocity and movement timing, promoting the emergence of movement anticipatory patterns. Furthermore, motor imagery was associated with greater changes in movement velocity, while auditory imagery was associated with greater movement anticipation. Data from a control group that was not allowed to practice confirmed that the changes in accuracy and kinematics were not due to mere repetition of the sequence during testing. This study provides the first evidence of an anticipatory control following MP and extends the present knowledge on the effectiveness of mental practice to a task of unparalleled motor complexity. The practical implications of MP in the motor domain are discussed.

  16. Isolating neural correlates of the pacemaker for food anticipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian David Blum

    Full Text Available Mice fed a single daily meal at intervals within the circadian range exhibit food anticipatory activity. Previous investigations strongly suggest that this behaviour is regulated by a circadian pacemaker entrained to the timing of fasting/refeeding. The neural correlate(s of this pacemaker, the food entrainable oscillator (FEO, whether found in a neural network or a single locus, remain unknown. This study used a canonical property of circadian pacemakers, the ability to continue oscillating after removal of the entraining stimulus, to isolate activation within the neural correlates of food entrainable oscillator from all other mechanisms driving food anticipatory activity. It was hypothesized that continued anticipatory activation of central nuclei, after restricted feeding and a return to ad libitum feeding, would elucidate a neural representation of the signaling circuits responsible for the timekeeping component of the food entrainable oscillator. Animals were entrained to a temporally constrained meal then placed back on ad libitum feeding for several days until food anticipatory activity was abolished. Activation of nuclei throughout the brain was quantified using stereological analysis of c-FOS expressing cells and compared against both ad libitum fed and food entrained controls. Several hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei remained activated at the previous time of food anticipation, implicating them in the timekeeping mechanism necessary to track previous meal presentation. This study also provides a proof of concept for an experimental paradigm useful to further investigate the anatomical and molecular substrates of the FEO.

  17. In Wrong Anticipation - Miscalibrated Beliefs between Germans, Israelis, and Palestinians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian J Goerg

    Full Text Available The reconcilability of actions and beliefs in inter-country relationships, either in business or politics, is of vital importance as incorrect beliefs on foreigners' behavior can have serious implications. We study a typical inter-country interaction by means of a controlled laboratory investment game experiment in Germany, Israel and Palestine involving 400 student participants in total. An investor has to take a risky decision in a foreign country that involves transferring money to an investee/allocator. We found a notable constellation of calibrated and un-calibrated beliefs. Within each country, transfer standards exist, which investees correctly anticipate within their country. However, across countries these standards differ. By attributing the standard of their own environment to the other countries investees are remarkably bad in predicting foreign investors' behavior. The tendency to ignore this potential difference can be a source of misinterpreting motives in cross-country interaction. Foreigners might perceive behavior as unfavorable or favorable differentiation, even though-unknown to them-investors actually treat fellow-country people and foreigners alike.

  18. In Wrong Anticipation - Miscalibrated Beliefs between Germans, Israelis, and Palestinians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerg, Sebastian J; Hennig-Schmidt, Heike; Walkowitz, Gari; Winter, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    The reconcilability of actions and beliefs in inter-country relationships, either in business or politics, is of vital importance as incorrect beliefs on foreigners' behavior can have serious implications. We study a typical inter-country interaction by means of a controlled laboratory investment game experiment in Germany, Israel and Palestine involving 400 student participants in total. An investor has to take a risky decision in a foreign country that involves transferring money to an investee/allocator. We found a notable constellation of calibrated and un-calibrated beliefs. Within each country, transfer standards exist, which investees correctly anticipate within their country. However, across countries these standards differ. By attributing the standard of their own environment to the other countries investees are remarkably bad in predicting foreign investors' behavior. The tendency to ignore this potential difference can be a source of misinterpreting motives in cross-country interaction. Foreigners might perceive behavior as unfavorable or favorable differentiation, even though-unknown to them-investors actually treat fellow-country people and foreigners alike. PMID:27311066

  19. Core Competencies Of A Call Centre AgentCore Competencies Of A Call Centre Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Christine White; Vera Roos

    2005-01-01

    Call centre agents are becoming increasingly important in the call centre context. They act as a contact point between the customer and the company. Call centre agents should have certain competencies to perform their duties sufficiently. Identifying competencies, required to be effective agents, will ease the task of training and recruitment. Due to the interrelatedness of the call centre agent, the management of a call centre and customers, all relevant role players’ perceptions were taken ...

  20. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  1. The new AMS control centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    Construction work for the future AMS control room began in November 2010 and should be finished this June. The new building, which will have been completed in record time thanks to the professionalism of the project team, will soon be ready to receive the initial data from the AMS experiment.     Luigi Scibile and Michael Poehler, from the GS department, at the AMS control centre construction site.   The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is due to wing its way towards the International Space Station (ISS) on board the shuttle Discovery in April. Mainly intended for research on antimatter and dark matter, the data collected by AMS will be sent to Houston in the United States and then directly to CERN’s new Building 946. Construction work for the AMS control centre building on the Route Gentner at CERN’s Prévessin site started in November 2010 and must be completed in time to receive the first data from the spectrometer in June. “It normall...

  2. Regulating emotion in the context of interpersonal decisions: The role of anticipated pride and regret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Job eVan Der Schalk

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent theories about the relation between emotion and behavior hold that social behavior is influenced not only by the experience of emotion, but also by the anticipation of emotion. We argue that anticipating future emotional states is an emotion regulation strategy when it leads to a change in behavior. In the current studies we examined how construal of a fair or an unfair situation in terms of positive or negative anticipated emotions influences the fairness of subsequent behavior. We used the Ultimatum Bargaining Game--an experimental game in which participants divide a resource between themselves and another person--as a social situation that offers the opportunity to engage in fair and unfair behavior. In Study 1 we used an autobiographical recall task to manipulate anticipated emotions. Although the task did not influence anticipated emotions directly, results showed that anticipated pride about fair behavior increased levels of fairness, whereas anticipated pride about unfair behavior decreased levels of fairness. Similarly, anticipated regret about fair behavior decreased levels of fairness, whereas anticipated regret about unfair behavior increased levels of fairness. In Study 2 we replicated this pattern of findings, and found that participants who thought about their anticipated emotions (pride or regret in relation to unfair behavior behaved more fairly. We discuss these findings in relation to theories of emotion regulation and economic decision-making.

  3. THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE SPECIFIC TO THE STUDENT-CENTRED EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remus Dorel Rosca

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present socio-economic realities demand the necessity of a paradigm change in the Romanian academic education, in order to promote the student centred education at strategic and operational level. This could not be accomplished without promoting a specific organizational culture. This would change the role of the universities from the diploma providers to value competence and providers for the employee and/or entrepreneur status of the students and also for their status as responsible citizens. The conclusions of the paper will help the decision factors of the upper educational system in Romania to be aware of the importance of promoting the organizational culture specific to the student-centred education as a condition of increasing the satisfaction of all the stakeholders involved (employer, teacher, student with considerable benefits for the universities and the Romanian economy's competitiveness.

  4. The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Variable Selection and Anticipated Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J.; Myers, Adam D.; Eracleous, Michael; Kelly, Brandon; Badenes, Carlos; Bañados, Eduardo; Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Borissova, Jura; Nielsen Brandt, William; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth; Draper, Peter W.; Davenport, James R. A.; Flewelling, Heather; Garnavich, Peter; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Isler, Jedidah C.; Kaiser, Nick; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kudritzki, Rolf P.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Pâris, Isabelle; Parvizi, Mahmoud; Poleski, Radosław; Price, Paul A.; Salvato, Mara; Shanks, Tom; Schlafly, Eddie F.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shen, Yue; Stassun, Keivan; Tonry, John T.; Walter, Fabian; Waters, Chris Z.

    2015-06-01

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg2 selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  5. Centre for nuclear engineering University of Toronto annual report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report of the Centre for Nuclear Engineering, University of Toronto covers the following subjects: message from the Dean; Chairman's message; origins of the centre; formation of the centre; new nuclear appointments; and activities of the centre, 1984

  6. Identifying Centres of Plant Biodiversity in South Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg R Guerin

    not always congruent between metrics or datasets, notably for categorical endemism to South Australia versus georeferenced weighted endemism, justifying diverse approaches and cautious interpretation. The study could be extended to high resolution assessments of biodiversity centres and cost:benefit analysis for interventions.

  7. Identifying Centres of Plant Biodiversity in South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Greg R; Biffin, Ed; Baruch, Zdravko; Lowe, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    congruent between metrics or datasets, notably for categorical endemism to South Australia versus georeferenced weighted endemism, justifying diverse approaches and cautious interpretation. The study could be extended to high resolution assessments of biodiversity centres and cost:benefit analysis for interventions. PMID:26735131

  8. QUANTIFYING BENEFITS FOR COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Attila GYORGY; Nicoleta VINTILA; Florian GAMAN

    2014-01-01

    Cost Benefit Analysis is one of the most widely used financial tools to select future investment projects in public and private sector. This method is based on comparing costs and benefits in terms of constant prices. While costs are easier to predict and monetize, the benefits should be identified not only in direct relation with the investment, but also widening the sphere of analysis to indirect benefits experienced by the community from the neighbourhood or the whole society. During finan...

  9. School uniforms: tradition, benefit or predicament?

    OpenAIRE

    Van Aardt, Annette Marie; Wilken, Ilani

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the controversies surrounding school uniforms. Roleplayers in this debate in South Africa are parents, learners and educators, and arguments centre on aspects such as identity, economy and the equalising effect of school uniforms, which are considered in the literature to be benefits. Opposing viewpoints highlight the fact that compulsory uniforms infringe on learners’ constitutional rights to self-expression. The aim of this research was to determine the perspectives ...

  10. Understanding the Reasons behind Anticipated Regret for Missing Regular Physical Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Chetan D Mistry

    2016-01-01

    Anticipated affective reactions to missing physical activity (PA), often labeled anticipated regret, has reliable evidence as a predictor of PA intention and behavior independent of other standard social cognitive constructs. Despite this evidence, the sources of regret are understudied and may come from many different reasons. The purpose of this study was to theme the reasons for why people responded to anticipated regret over missing regular PA for 2 weeks. Participants were a random sampl...

  11. Measuring the Effects of Monetary Policy in the Euro Area: The Role of Anticipated Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Gottschalk, Jan; Höppner, Florian

    2001-01-01

    This paper investigates within a SVAR framework the effects of anticipated monetary policy in the euro area. Building on a procedure recently proposed by Cochrane yielding the response of output to an anticipated monetary policy impulse, we show that in the past twenty years anticipated monetary policy had a considerable influence on output. Moreover, we compute the output effects of the systematic monetary policy response to aggregate demand and supply shocks. We find that monetary policy pu...

  12. Powering the Future Data Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe

    2010-01-01

    The extended run Uninterruptible Power Supply system (UPSs) which powered by fuel cells and supercapcitors, is a promising solution for future data centre to obtain environmentfriendly energy efficient and cost effective. There are many challenges in power electronic interface circuits, because......: • Optimized design method for dual active bridge (DAB) converter and its derived circuits; • A novel hybrid dc-dc converter and its corresponding optimal design method are proposed; • An improved dual input current-fed DC-DC converter with bidirectional power conversion ability is investigated; • Extend...... the circuit level decoupling modulation scheme into 3LNPC inverter. As to the DAB converter, through the power factor and harmonics analysis, the dominated loss factor is found in variable input voltage range. Optimized parameter choosing method is used to decide the ac inductance and switching frequency...

  13. Resource utilisation and cost of ambulatory HIV care in a regional HIV centre in Ireland: a micro-costing study

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Aline; Jackson, Arthur; Horgan, Mary; Bergin, Colm J; Browne, John P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is anticipated that demands on ambulatory HIV services will increase in coming years as a consequence of the increased life expectancy of HIV patients on highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Accurate cost data are needed to enable evidence based policy decisions be made about new models of service delivery, new technologies and new medications. METHODS: A micro-costing study was carried out in an HIV outpatient clinic in a single regional centre in the south of Irelan...

  14. Crater Morphologies on Pluto and Charon: Anticipating New Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P.; Bray, V. J.; McKinnon, W. B.; White, O. L.; Moore, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Impact craters are among the few geologic features we have some confidence will be present in the Pluto/Charon system. Crater morphologies are important as tracers of thermal history (through the mechanism of viscous relaxation), and can be used to probe through icy crusts (in terms of excavating deeper layers as on Ganymede or penetrating through floating ice shells as on Europa). New Horizons will have the opportunity to examine crater morphologies on Pluto to resolutions Charon to ~250 meters over significant areas. Stereo-derived topography maps are anticipated over 20-35% of each body. The first task will be to place the observed craters (assuming they are not deeply eroded) into Solar System context. Crater morphology on icy satellites is controlled primarily by surface gravity. Charon has similar surface gravity to the icy Saturnian satellites and we expect craters on Charon to resemble those seen by Cassini, where the dominant landform will be prominent central peaks. Pluto surface gravity is midway between Ganymede and Rhea. Triton, with similar surface gravity and internal composition to Pluto, is of no help due to the paucity of resolved craters there. This opens the possibility of observing landforms seen on Ganymede, such as central dome craters, palimpsests and perhaps even a multiring basin or two, albeit at larger diameters than we would see on Ganymede. Several issues complicate our rosy picture. A key unresolved concern is that impact velocities in the Pluto system are only a few km/s, in the low end of the hypervelocity range. Numerical models imply possible differences during excavation, producing deeper simple craters than on the icy satellites. Impacts occurring at velocities well below the mean (topographic data sets is unclear. Any viscous relaxation (driven by internal or modest tidal heating) or mass wasting erosion (by volatile redistribution) will also work to reduce crater depths on Pluto in different ways, but cratering onto the likely

  15. Anticipating the uncertain: economic modeling and climate change policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Svenn

    2012-11-01

    With this thesis I wish to contribute to the understanding of how uncertainty and the anticipation of future events by economic actors affect climate policies. The thesis consists of four papers. Two papers are analytical models which explicitly consider that emissions are caused by extracting scarce fossil fuels which in the future must be replaced by clean technologies. The other two are so called numerical integrated assessment models. Such models represent the world economy, the climate system and the interactions between those two quantitatively, complementing more abstract theoretical work. Should policy makers discriminate between subsidizing renewable energy sources such as wind or solar power, and technologies such as carbon capture and storage (CCS)? Focusing only on the dynamic supply of fossil fuels and hence Co{sub 2}, we find here that cheaper future renewables cause extraction to speed up, lower costs of CCS may delay it. CCS hence may dampen the dynamic inefficiency caused by the absence of comprehensive climate policies today. Does it matter whether uncertainty about future damage assessment is due to scientific complexities or stems from the political process? In paper two, I find that political and scientific uncertainties have opposing effects on the incentives to investment in renewables and the extraction of fossil fuels: The prospect of scientific learning about the climate system increases investment incentives and, ceteris paribus, slows extraction down; uncertainty about future political constellations does the opposite. The optimal carbon tax under scientific uncertainty equals expected marginal damages, whereas political uncertainty demands a tax below marginal damages that decreases over time. Does uncertainty about economic growth impact optimal climate policy today? Here we are the first to consistently analyze how uncertainty about future economic growth affects optimal emission reductions and the optimal social cost of carbon. We

  16. Anticipating Interruptions. Security and risk in a liberalized electricity infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvast, A.

    2013-11-01

    During the past ten years, a number of social scientists have emphasized the importance of material infrastructures like electricity supply as a research topic for the social sciences. The developing of such new perspectives concerning infrastructures also includes uncertainties and risks. This research analyzes the management of uncertainties in the Finnish electricity infrastructure by posing the following research question: how are electricity interruptions, or blackouts, anticipated in Finland and how are these interruptions managed as risks? The main research methodology of the work is multi-sited field work. The empirical materials include interviews with experts and lay people (33 interviews); participant observation in two electricity control rooms; an electricity consumer survey (115 respondents); and also a number of infrastructure and security policy documents and observations from electricity security seminars. The materials were primarily gathered between 2004 and 2008. Social science research often links risks with major current social changes or socio-cultural risk perceptions. In recent international social science discussions, however, a new research topic has emerged - those styles of reasoning and techniques of governance that are deployed to manage risk as a practical matter. My study explores these themes empirically by focusing on the specific habitual practices of risk management in the Finnish electricity infrastructure. The work develops various also semi-ethnographic inquiries into infrastructure risk techniques like monitor screening of real-time risks in electricity control rooms; the management of risks in a liberalized electricity market; the emergence of Finnish reasoning about blackouts from a specific historical background; and the ways in which electricity consumers respond to blackouts in their homes. In addition, the work reflects upon the position of a risk researcher in those situations when the research subjects do not define

  17. Smart work centres in rural areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Anne Birte

    This paper discusses the establishment of telework centres as an element in local development strategies in rural areas, with a particular view to two new telework centres in region North Denmark. The paper argues that telework centres do not represent an easy solution to problems of local...... development and environmental sustainability, and further, that technology may not even be the most important feature needed to make them function as such....

  18. Activities of Radiation Protection Centre in 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Radiat. Prot. Cent. Vilnius

    2001-01-01

    Description of the activities of Radiation Protection Centre in 2000 is presented. Radiation Protection Centre is responsible for radiation protection issues. Currently there are six departments at Radiation Protection Centre: two in Vilnius - Department of Radiation Protection Supervision and Control and Department of Programs and Expertise, and four in the districts. Brief information on subject controlled by each departments is provided focusing on main achievements and events.

  19. Elm Farm Organic Research Centre December 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Richard; Whiltley, Andrew; Haigh, Zoe; Clarke, Sarah; Hitchings, Roger; O'Brien, Josie

    2006-01-01

    The Organic Research Centre. Elm Farm Research Centre Bulletin with Technical Updates from The Organic Advisory Service is a regular publication from The Organic Research Centre. The current issue covers: Report from 2006 Cirencester Conference; Quest for more home produced organic food; in a world where bread matters; Improving wheat with plenty of parents; Unlocking the secrets of the ancient (cereal varieties); Brain food- a good read; Not to late to protect the future: The organic...

  20. Business plan – Tennis centre modernization

    OpenAIRE

    Moravec, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this master's thesis "Business plan -- Tennis centre modernization" - is creating and writing the business plan for the reconstruction of the existing tennis centre. The theoretical part describes characteristics of small and medium sized enterprises, their meaning. Describes the necessary parts of the business plan, its possible structure. The paper involves the knowledge gained into the concrete case of the tennis centre. Describes its nowadays conditions and possible solutions....

  1. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In This Topic Health Benefits Benefits for Everyday Life Frequently Asked Questions Learn More Exercise: Benefits of ... and physical activity a regular part of your life can improve your health and help you maintain ...

  2. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can ... yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a ...

  3. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do ... Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a lot ...

  4. Anticipation or ascertainment bias in schizophrenia? Penrose`s familial mental illness sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, A.S. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)]|[Queen Street Mental health Centre, Toronto (Canada); Husted, J. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-03-01

    Several studies have observed anticipation (earlier age at onset [AAO] in successive generations) in familial schizophrenia. However, whether true anticipation or ascertainment bias is the principal originating mechanism remains unclear. In 1944 L.S. Penrose collected AAO data on a large, representative sample of familial mental illness, using a broad ascertainment strategy. These data allowed examination of anticipation and ascertainment biases in five two-generation samples of affected relative pairs. The median intergenerational difference (MID) in AAO was used to assess anticipation. Results showed significant anticipation in parent-offspring pairs with schizophrenia (n = 137 pairs; MID 15 years; P = .0001) and in a positive control sample with Huntington disease (n = 11; P = .01). Broadening the diagnosis of the schizophrenia sample suggested anticipation of severity of illness. However, other analyses provided evidence for ascertainment bias, especially in later-AAO parents, in parent-offspring pairs. Aunt/uncle-niece/nephew schizophrenia pairs showed anticipation (n = 111; P = .0001), but the MID was 8 years and aunts/uncles had earlier median AAO than parents. Anticipation effects were greatest in pairs with late-AAO parents but remained significant in a subgroup of schizophrenia pairs with early parental AAO (n = 31; P = .03). A small control sample of other diseases had MID of 5 years but no significant anticipation (n = 9; F = .38). These results suggest that, although ascertainment-bias effects were observed in parent-offspring pairs, true anticipation appears to be inherent in the transmission of familial schizophrenia. The findings support investigations of unstable mutations and other mechanisms that may contribute to true anticipation in schizophrenia. 37 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator (EEBC) was developed to assist organizations in estimating the environmental benefits of greening their purchase,...

  6. How stakeholders frame dam removal: The role of current and anticipated future ecosystem service use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Kate; Adamowski, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Many river restoration projects, including dam removal, are controversial and can trigger conflicts between stakeholders who are for and against the proposed project. The study of environmental conflicts suggests that differences in how stakeholders 'frame', or make sense of a situation based on their prior knowledge and experiences, can perpetuate conflicts. Understanding different stakeholders' frames, particularly how they converge, can form the basis of successful conflict resolution. In the case of dam removals, it is often assumed that emphasising increased provision of ecosystem services can be a point of convergence between those advocating for ecological restoration and those opposed to removal because of negative human impacts. However, how exactly stakeholders frame a contentious proposed dam removal and how those frames relate to ecosystem services has been little studied. Here we used the case of a potential dam removal in New Brunswick to investigate how people frame the issue and how that relates to their current and anticipated future use of ecosystem services. Based on in-depth interviews with 30 stakeholders in the area, including both people for and against dam removal, we found that both groups currently used ecosystem services and were in favour of ecosystem protection. However, they differed in how they framed the issue of the potential dam removal. The group against dam removal framed the issue as one of loss and risk - they thought that any potential benefits to the ecosystem would be outweighed by the high risk of negative social impacts caused by a loss of access to ecosystem services, such as recreation and aesthetic enjoyment. By contrast, the group in favour of the dam framed the issue as one of opportunity and justice. They thought that following a short transition period, all stakeholders would benefit from the restored river, particularly from a restored salmon fishery, improved aesthetic appeal and the long-term sustainability of an

  7. parkin mutation dosage and the phenomenon of anticipation: a molecular genetic study of familial parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellenberg Gerard D

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background parkin mutations are a common cause of parkinsonism. Possessing two parkin mutations leads to early-onset parkinsonism, while having one mutation may predispose to late-onset disease. This dosage pattern suggests that some parkin families should exhibit intergenerational variation in age at onset resembling anticipation. A subset of familial PD exhibits anticipation, the cause of which is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if anticipation was due to parkin mutation dosage. Methods We studied 19 kindreds that had early-onset parkinsonism in the offspring generation, late-onset parkinsonism in the parent generation, and ≥ 20 years of anticipation. We also studied 28 early-onset parkinsonism cases without anticipation. Patients were diagnosed by neurologists at a movement disorder clinic. parkin analysis included sequencing and dosage analysis of all 12 exons. Results Only one of 19 cases had compound parkin mutations, but contrary to our postulate, the affected relative with late-onset parkinsonism did not have a parkin mutation. In effect, none of the anticipation cases could be attributed to parkin. In contrast, 21% of early-onset parkinsonism patients without anticipation had parkin mutations. Conclusion Anticipation is not linked to parkin, and may signify a distinct disease entity.

  8. The relative importance of different perceptual-cognitive skills during anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Jamie S; Hope, Ed; Williams, A Mark

    2016-10-01

    We examined whether anticipation is underpinned by perceiving structured patterns or postural cues and whether the relative importance of these processes varied as a function of task constraints. Skilled and less-skilled soccer players completed anticipation paradigms in video-film and point light display (PLD) format. Skilled players anticipated more accurately regardless of display condition, indicating that both perception of structured patterns between players and postural cues contribute to anticipation. However, the Skill×Display interaction showed skilled players' advantage was enhanced in the video-film condition, suggesting that they make better use of postural cues when available during anticipation. We also examined anticipation as a function of proximity to the ball. When participants were near the ball, anticipation was more accurate for video-film than PLD clips, whereas when the ball was far away there was no difference between viewing conditions. Perceiving advance postural cues appears more important than structured patterns when the ball is closer to the observer, whereas the reverse is true when the ball is far away. Various perceptual-cognitive skills contribute to anticipation with the relative importance of perceiving structured patterns and advance postural cues being determined by task constraints and the availability of perceptual information.

  9. The European NEO Coordination Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perozzi, E.; Borgia, B.; Micheli, M.

    An operational approach to NEO (Near-Earth Object) hazard monitoring has been developed at European level within the framework of the Space Situational Awareness Program (SSA) of the European Space Agency (ESA). Through federating European assets and profiting of the expertise developed in European Universities and Research Centers, it has been possible to start the deployment of the so-called SSA NEO Segment. This initiative aims to provide a significant contribution to the worldwide effort to the discovery, follow-up and characterization of the near-Earth object population. A major achievement has been the inauguration in May 2013 of the ESA NEO Coordination Centre located at ESRIN (Frascati, Italy). The goal of the NEOCC Precursor Service operations is twofold: to make available updated information on the NEO population and the associated hazard and to contribute to optimize the NEO observational efforts. This is done by maintaining and improving a Web Portal publicly available at http://neo.ssa.esa.int and by performing follow-up observations through a network of collaborating telescopes and facilities. An overview of the SSA-NEO System and a summary of the first two years of NEOCC operations is presented.

  10. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy: Single centre experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Farrell, N J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is an attractive alternative to the traditional open approach in the surgical excision of an adrenal gland. It has replaced open adrenalectomy in our institution and we review our experience to date. METHODS: All cases of laparoscopic adrenalectomies in our hospital over eight years (from 2001 to May 2009) were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, diagnosis, length of hospital stay, histology and all operative and post-operative details were evaluated. RESULTS: Fifty-five laparoscopic adrenalectomies (LA) were performed on 51 patients over eight years. The mean age was 48 years (Range 16-86 years) with the male: female ratio 1:2. Twenty-three cases had a right adrenalectomy, 24 had a left adrenalectomy and the remaining four patients had bilateral adrenalectomies. 91% were successfully completed laparoscopically with five converted to an open approach. Adenomas (functional and non functional) were the leading indication for LA, followed by phaeochromocytomas. Other indications for LA included Cushing\\'s disease, adrenal malignancies and rarer pathologies. There was one mortality from necrotising pancreatitis following a left adrenalectomy for severe Cushing\\'s disease, with subsequent death 10 days later. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is effective for the treatment of adrenal tumours, fulfilling the criteria for the ideal minimally invasive procedure. It has replaced the traditional open approach in our centre and is a safe and effective alternative. However, in the case of severe Cushing\\'s disease, laparoscopic adrenalectomy has the potential for significant adverse outcomes and mortality.

  11. CLIMATE CHANGE – BETWEEN COSTS AND BENEFITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN VALENTINA RĂDULESCU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change – between costs and benefits. At global and regional levels the effects of climate change start to show up. While some of the countries make efforts to alleviate these effects and to find solutions, others are facing economic or political restrains that prevent them in applying the principle of common responsibility. The complex social, economic, and environmental implications of climate change’s effects focused a growing part of research on the analysis of costs and benefits. Although controversial, one of the methods used – the cost-benefit analysis – revealed that in most of the cases the prevention costs are lower than the costs of inaction. Prevention measures bring benefits by anticipating the impact and minimizing the risks for ecosystems and economy. The paper presents in its first part the controversies regarding the cost-benefit analysis, and continues, in the second part, with estimations on costs and benefits of certain policy instruments that target emission reduction.

  12. Oil Trading Centre to Reopen in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Chinese oil companies will likely resume activities at the oil trading centre in Shanghai this year, a move to further liberalize the once tightly controlled oil market. The centre will trade forward contracts for refined oil products,including gasoline, diesel oil, kerosene and fuel oil, industrial sources said.

  13. Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre - preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, L H; Roed-Petersen, J; Menné, T;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anaphylactoid reactions in anaesthesia are rare and should ideally be investigated in specialist centres. At Gentofte University Hospital, we established such a centre in 1998 as a joint venture between the Departments of Anaesthesiology and Dermatology. We present the methodology...

  14. Neighbourhood Centres – Organisation, Management and Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    From the late 1990s neighbourhood centres were brought to the fore of public urban regen-eration policy, because they were seen as a means to accelerate the formation of social capital in deprived urban neighbourhoods. A number of such local community centres were established with substantial pub...

  15. Anticipation Driving Behavior and Related Reduction of Energy Consumption in Traffic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Wei, Yan-Fang; Song, Tao; Dai, Shi-Qiang; Dong, Li-Yun

    In view that drivers would pay attention to the variation of headway on roads, an extended optimal velocity model is proposed by considering anticipation driving behavior. A stability criterion is given through linear stability analysis of traffic flows. The mKdV equation is derived with the reductive perturbation method for headway evolution which could be used to describe the stop-and-go traffic phenomenon. The results show a good effect of anticipation driving behavior on the stabilization of car flows and the anticipation driving behavior can improve the numerical stability of the model as well. In addition, the fluctuation of kinetic energy and the consumption of average energy in congested traffic flows are systematically analyzed. The results show that the reasonable level of anticipation driving behavior can save energy consumption in deceleration process effectively and lead to an associated relation like a "bow-tie" between the energy-saving and the value of anticipation factor.

  16. The role of the sexual assault centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Eogan, Maeve

    2013-02-01

    Sexual Assault Centres provide multidisciplinary care for men and women who have experienced sexual crime. These centres enable provision of medical, forensic, psychological support and follow-up care, even if patients chose not to report the incident to the police service. Sexual Support Centres need to provide a ring-fenced, forensically clean environment. They need to be appropriately staffed and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to allow prompt provision of medical and supportive care and collection of forensic evidence. Sexual Assault Centres work best within the context of a core agreed model of care, which includes defined multi-agency guidelines and care pathways, close links with forensic science and police services, and designated and sustainable funding arrangements. Additionally, Sexual Assault Centres also participate in patient, staff and community education and risk reduction. Furthermore, they contribute to the development, evaluation and implementation of national strategies on domestic, sexual and gender-based violence.

  17. Conserving critical sites for biodiversity provides disproportionate benefits to people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank W Larsen

    Full Text Available Protecting natural habitats in priority areas is essential to halt the loss of biodiversity. Yet whether these benefits for biodiversity also yield benefits for human well-being remains controversial. Here we assess the potential human well-being benefits of safeguarding a global network of sites identified as top priorities for the conservation of threatened species. Conserving these sites would yield benefits--in terms of a climate change mitigation through avoidance of CO(2 emissions from deforestation; b freshwater services to downstream human populations; c retention of option value; and d benefits to maintenance of human cultural diversity--significantly exceeding those anticipated from randomly selected sites within the same countries and ecoregions. Results suggest that safeguarding sites important for biodiversity conservation provides substantial benefits to human well-being.

  18. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  19. The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nicholas M.; Schade, D.; Astronomy Data Centre, Canadian

    2011-01-01

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) is the world's largest astronomical data center, holding over 0.5 Petabytes of information, and serving nearly 3000 astronomers worldwide. Its current data collections include BLAST, CFHT, CGPS, FUSE, Gemini, HST, JCMT, MACHO, MOST, and numerous other archives and services. It provides extensive data archiving, curation, and processing expertise, via projects such as MegaPipe, and enables substantial day-to-day collaboration between resident astronomers and computer specialists. It is a stable, powerful, persistent, and properly supported environment for the storage and processing of large volumes of data, a condition that is now absolutely vital for their science potential to be exploited by the community. Through initiatives such as the Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM), the Canadian Virtual Observatory (CVO), and the Canadian Advanced Network for Astronomical Research (CANFAR), the CADC is at the global forefront of advancing astronomical research through improved data services. The CAOM aims to provide homogeneous data access, and hence viable interoperability between a potentially unlimited number of different data collections, at many wavelengths. It is active in the definition of numerous emerging standards within the International Virtual Observatory, and several datasets are already available. The CANFAR project is an initiative to make cloud computing for storage and data-intensive processing available to the community. It does this via a Virtual Machine environment that is equivalent to managing a local desktop. Several groups are already processing science data. CADC is also at the forefront of advanced astronomical data analysis, driven by the science requirements of astronomers both locally and further afield. The emergence of 'Astroinformatics' promises to provide not only utility items like object classifications, but to directly enable new science by accessing previously undiscovered or intractable

  20. Anticipation-related brain connectivity in bipolar and unipolar depression: a graph theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manelis, Anna; Almeida, Jorge R C; Stiffler, Richelle; Lockovich, Jeanette C; Aslam, Haris A; Phillips, Mary L

    2016-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is often misdiagnosed as major depressive disorder, which leads to inadequate treatment. Depressed individuals versus healthy control subjects, show increased expectation of negative outcomes. Due to increased impulsivity and risk for mania, however, depressed individuals with bipolar disorder may differ from those with major depressive disorder in neural mechanisms underlying anticipation processes. Graph theory methods for neuroimaging data analysis allow the identification of connectivity between multiple brain regions without prior model specification, and may help to identify neurobiological markers differentiating these disorders, thereby facilitating development of better therapeutic interventions. This study aimed to compare brain connectivity among regions involved in win/loss anticipation in depressed individuals with bipolar disorder (BDD) versus depressed individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) versus healthy control subjects using graph theory methods. The study was conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and included 31 BDD, 39 MDD, and 36 healthy control subjects. Participants were scanned while performing a number guessing reward task that included the periods of win and loss anticipation. We first identified the anticipatory network across all 106 participants by contrasting brain activation during all anticipation periods (win anticipation + loss anticipation) versus baseline, and win anticipation versus loss anticipation. Brain connectivity within the identified network was determined using the Independent Multiple sample Greedy Equivalence Search (IMaGES) and Linear non-Gaussian Orientation, Fixed Structure (LOFS) algorithms. Density of connections (the number of connections in the network), path length, and the global connectivity direction ('top-down' versus 'bottom-up') were compared across groups (BDD/MDD/healthy control subjects) and conditions (win/loss anticipation). These analyses showed that

  1. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diarra, Moussa S; Malouin, François

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics (growth promoters) in feed need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily be spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2600 regulated chicken producers who have access to several antibiotics approved as feed additives for poultry. Feed recipes and mixtures vary greatly geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While some reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens) have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno-stimulatory activities. PMID:24987390

  2. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Sory Diarra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics in feed (growth promoters need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2,600 regulated chicken producers. There are several antibiotics approved as feed additives available for poultry farmers. Feed recipes and mixtures greatly vary geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While sporadic reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno

  3. Shale Gas Development and Brook Trout: Scaling Best Management Practices to Anticipate Cumulative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David; Snyder, Craig D.; Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Young, John A.; Faulkner, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Shale gas development may involve trade-offs between energy development and benefits provided by natural ecosystems. However, current best management practices (BMPs) focus on mitigating localized ecological degradation. We review evidence for cumulative effects of natural gas development on brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and conclude that BMPs should account for potential watershed-scale effects in addition to localized influences. The challenge is to develop BMPs in the face of uncertainty in the predicted response of brook trout to landscape-scale disturbance caused by gas extraction. We propose a decision-analysis approach to formulating BMPs in the specific case of relatively undisturbed watersheds where there is consensus to maintain brook trout populations during gas development. The decision analysis was informed by existing empirical models that describe brook trout occupancy responses to landscape disturbance and set bounds on the uncertainty in the predicted responses to shale gas development. The decision analysis showed that a high efficiency of gas development (e.g., 1 well pad per square mile and 7 acres per pad) was critical to achieving a win-win solution characterized by maintaining brook trout and maximizing extraction of available gas. This finding was invariant to uncertainty in predicted response of brook trout to watershed-level disturbance. However, as the efficiency of gas development decreased, the optimal BMP depended on the predicted response, and there was considerable potential value in discriminating among predictive models through adaptive management or research. The proposed decision-analysis framework provides an opportunity to anticipate the cumulative effects of shale gas development, account for uncertainty, and inform management decisions at the appropriate spatial scales.

  4. Regulatory Mode and Risk-Taking: The Mediating Role of Anticipated Regret.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Panno

    Full Text Available We propose that decision maker's regulatory mode affects risk-taking through anticipated regret. In the Study 1 either a locomotion or an assessment orientation were experimentally induced, and in the Studies 2 and 3 these different orientations were assessed as chronic individual differences. To assess risk-taking we used two behavioral measures of risk: BART and hot-CCT. The results show that experimentally induced assessment orientation--compared to locomotion--leads to decreased risk-taking through increased anticipated regret (Study 1. People chronically predisposed to be in the assessment state take less risk through increased anticipated regret (Study 2 and Study 3. Study 2 results also show a marginally non-significant indirect effect of chronic locomotion mode on BART through anticipated regret. Differently, Study 3 shows that people chronically predisposed to be in the locomotion state take greater risk through decreased anticipated regret, when play a dynamic risk task triggering stronger emotional arousal. Through all three studies, the average effect size for the relationship of assessment with anticipated regret was in the moderate-large range, whereas for risk-taking was in the moderate range. The average effect size for the relationship of locomotion with anticipated regret was in the moderate range, whereas for risk-taking was in the small-moderate range. These results increase our understanding of human behavior under conditions of risk obtaining novel insights into regulatory mode theory and decision science.

  5. The relationship between action anticipation and emotion recognition in athletes of open skill sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Ling; Lin, Chia-Yen

    2016-08-01

    Action anticipation plays an important role in the successful performance of open skill sports, such as ball and combat sports. Evidence has shown that elite athletes of open sports excel in action anticipation. Most studies have targeted ball sports and agreed that information on body mechanics is one of the key determinants for successful action anticipation in open sports. However, less is known about combat sports, and whether facial emotions have an influence on athletes' action anticipation skill. It has been suggested that the understanding of intention in combat sports relies heavily on emotional context. Based on this suggestion, the present study compared the action anticipation performances of taekwondo athletes, weightlifting athletes, and non-athletes and then correlated these with their performances of emotion recognition. This study primarily found that accurate action anticipation does not necessarily rely on the dynamic information of movement, and that action anticipation performance is correlated with that of emotion recognition in taekwondo athletes, but not in weightlifting athletes. Our results suggest that the recognition of facial emotions plays a role in the action prediction in such combat sports as taekwondo. PMID:27160338

  6. Improving the layout of recycling centres by use of lean production principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, Erik; Björkman, Mats; Eklund, Mats; Eklund, Jörgen; Engkvist, Inga-Lill

    2011-06-01

    There has been increased focus on recycling in Sweden during recent years. This focus can be attributed to external environmental factors such as tougher legislation, but also to the potential gains for raw materials suppliers. Recycling centres are important components in the Swedish total recycling system. Recycling centres are manned facilities for waste collection where visitors can bring, sort and discard worn products as well as large-sized, hazardous, and electrical waste. The aim of this paper was to identify and describe the main flows and layout types at Swedish recycling centres. The aim was also to adapt and apply production theory for designing and managing recycling centre operations. More specifically, this means using lean production principles to help develop guidelines for recycling centre design and efficient control. Empirical data for this research was primarily collected through interviews and questionnaires among both visitors and employees at 16 Swedish recycling centres. Furthermore, adapted observation protocols have been used in order to explore visitor activities. There was also close collaboration with a local recycling centre company, which shared their layout experiences with the researchers in this project. The recycling centres studied had a variety of problems such as queues of visitors, overloading of material and improper sorting. The study shows that in order to decrease the problems, the recycling centres should be designed and managed according to lean production principles, i.e. through choosing more suitable layout choices with visible and linear flows, providing better visitor information, and providing suitable technical equipment. Improvements can be achieved through proper planning of the layout and control of the flow of vehicles, with the result of increased efficiency and capacity, shorter visits, and cleaner waste fractions. The benefits of a lean production mindset include increased visitor capacity, waste

  7. Improving the layout of recycling centres by use of lean production principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, Erik; Björkman, Mats; Eklund, Mats; Eklund, Jörgen; Engkvist, Inga-Lill

    2011-06-01

    There has been increased focus on recycling in Sweden during recent years. This focus can be attributed to external environmental factors such as tougher legislation, but also to the potential gains for raw materials suppliers. Recycling centres are important components in the Swedish total recycling system. Recycling centres are manned facilities for waste collection where visitors can bring, sort and discard worn products as well as large-sized, hazardous, and electrical waste. The aim of this paper was to identify and describe the main flows and layout types at Swedish recycling centres. The aim was also to adapt and apply production theory for designing and managing recycling centre operations. More specifically, this means using lean production principles to help develop guidelines for recycling centre design and efficient control. Empirical data for this research was primarily collected through interviews and questionnaires among both visitors and employees at 16 Swedish recycling centres. Furthermore, adapted observation protocols have been used in order to explore visitor activities. There was also close collaboration with a local recycling centre company, which shared their layout experiences with the researchers in this project. The recycling centres studied had a variety of problems such as queues of visitors, overloading of material and improper sorting. The study shows that in order to decrease the problems, the recycling centres should be designed and managed according to lean production principles, i.e. through choosing more suitable layout choices with visible and linear flows, providing better visitor information, and providing suitable technical equipment. Improvements can be achieved through proper planning of the layout and control of the flow of vehicles, with the result of increased efficiency and capacity, shorter visits, and cleaner waste fractions. The benefits of a lean production mindset include increased visitor capacity, waste

  8. Scenario drafting to anticipate future developments in technology assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retèl Valesca P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health Technology Assessment (HTA information, and in particular cost-effectiveness data is needed to guide decisions, preferably already in early stages of technological development. However, at that moment there is usually a high degree of uncertainty, because evidence is limited and different development paths are still possible. We developed a multi-parameter framework to assess dynamic aspects of a technology -still in development-, by means of scenario drafting to determine the effects, costs and cost-effectiveness of possible future diffusion patterns. Secondly, we explored the value of this method on the case of the clinical implementation of the 70-gene signature for breast cancer, a gene expression profile for selecting patients who will benefit most from chemotherapy. Methods To incorporate process-uncertainty, ten possible scenarios regarding the introduction of the 70-gene signature were drafted with European experts. Out of 5 most likely scenarios, 3 drivers of diffusion (non-compliance, technical failure, and uptake were quantitatively integrated in a decision-analytical model. For these scenarios, the cost-effectiveness of the 70-gene signature expressed in Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs was compared to clinical guidelines, calculated from the past (2005 until the future (2020. Results In 2005 the ICER was €1,9 million/quality-adjusted-life-year (QALY, meaning that the 70-gene signature was not yet cost-effective compared to the current clinical guideline. The ICER for the 70-gene signature improved over time with a range of €1,9 million to €26,145 in 2010 and €1,9 million to €11,123/QALY in 2020 depending on the separate scenario used. From 2010, the 70-gene signature should be cost-effective, based on the combined scenario. The uptake-scenario had strongest influence on the cost-effectiveness. Conclusions When optimal diffusion of a technology is sought, incorporating process

  9. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, P; van Eldik, J; McCance, G; Panzer-Steindel, B; Coelho dos Santos, M; Traylen, S; Schwickerath, U

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project’s motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  10. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, P.; Bell, T.; van Eldik, J.; McCance, G.; Panzer-Steindel, B.; Coelho dos Santos, M.; Traylen and, S.; Schwickerath, U.

    2012-12-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project's motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  11. Density waves in a lattice hydrodynamic traffic flow model with the anticipation effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Min; Sun Di-Hua; Tian Chuan

    2012-01-01

    By introducing the traffic anticipation effect in the real world into the original lattice hydrodynamic model,we present a new anticipation effect lattice hydrodynamic (AELH) model,and obtain the linear stability condition of the model by applying the linear stability theory.Through nonlinear analysis,we derive the Burgers equation and Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation,to describe the propagating behaviour of traffic density waves in the stable and the metastable regions,respectively.The good agreement between simulation results and analytical results shows that the stability of traffic flow can be enhanced when the anticipation effect is considered.

  12. Anticipation in the synchronization of chaotic semiconductor lasers with optical feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoller, C

    2001-03-26

    The synchronization of chaotic semiconductor lasers with optical feedback is studied numerically in a one-way coupling configuration, in which a small amount of the intensity of one laser (master laser) is injected coherently into the other (slave laser). A regime of anticipated synchronization is found, in which the intensity of the slave laser is synchronized to the future chaotic intensity of the master laser. Anticipation is robust to small noise and parameter mismatches, but in this case the synchronization is not complete. It is also shown that anticipated synchronization occurs in coupled time-delay systems, when the coupling has a delay that is less than the delay of the systems.

  13. Towards Human-Centred Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Liam J.

    The field of HCI has evolved and expanded dramatically since its origin in the early 1980’s. The HCI community embraces a large community of researchers and practitioners around the world, from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds in the human and social sciences, engineering and informatics, and more recently, the arts and design disciplines. This kaleidoscope of cultures and disciplines as seen at INTERACT Conferences provides a rich pool of resources for examining our field. Applications are increasingly exploring our full range of sensory modalities, and merging the digital and physical worlds. WiFi has opened up a huge design space for mobile applications. A focus on usability of products and services has been complemented by an emphasis on engagement, enjoyment and experience. With the advent of ubiquitous computing, and the emergence of “The Internet of Things”, new kinds of more open infrastructures make possible radically new kinds of applications. The sources of innovation have also broadened, to include human and social actors outside of the computing and design organizations. The question is to what extent is our mainstream thinking in the HCI field ready for the challenges of this Brave New World? Do the technological and social innovations that we see emerging require us to re-shape, or even, re-create, our field, or is it a case of a more gradual evolution and development of that which we already know? In this closing Keynote, I will provide a perspective on the evolution and development of the HCI field, looking backwards as well as forwards, in order to determine what are some of the changes of significance in the field. This “broad-brush” approach to what I term “ human-centred design” will be complemented by the examination of specific projects and applications, to help anchor some of the discussion. Areas such as user-centred design, participatory design, computer-supported cooperative work and learning, and interaction design, in

  14. Benefits and challenges of outsourcing in electrical appliances industry: Case study of Videocon- India.

    OpenAIRE

    raheja, vaibhav

    2010-01-01

    Outsourcing as a practice is becoming common by every passing day as firms try to outsource in order to meet their corporate goals. Outsourcing provides several benefits such as lowering of costs, improved focus on core functions, access to latest innovations etc. But despite its potential benefits, many outsourcing firms fail to realise these anticipated benefits. Only the firms which are able to manage outsourcing functions and align it with the corporate strategy are able to realise the fu...

  15. Symmetric centres of braided monoidal categories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of‘symmetric centres' of braided monoidal categories. Let H be a Hopf algebra with bijective antipode over a field k. We address the symmetric centre of the Yetter-Drinfel'd module category HH(yD) and show that a left Yetter-Drinfel'd module M belongs to the symmetric centre of HH(yD) if and only if M is trivial. We also study the symmetric centres of categories of representations of quasitriangular Hopf algebras and give a sufficient and necessary condition for the braid of H(M) to induce the braid of (H(H)(A),(○)A,A,φ,l,r), or equivalently, the braid of (A#H(H),(○)A,A,φ,l,r), where A is a quantum commutative H-module algebra.

  16. The relativistic two-centre continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented to define unique continuum states for the two-centre Dirac Hamiltonian. In the spherical limit these states become the familiar angular momentum eigenstates of the radial Coulomb potential. The different states for a fixed total energy vertical strokeEvertical stroke > m may be distinguished by considering the asymptotic spin-angular distribution of states with unique scattering-phases. First numerical solutions of the two-centre Dirac equation for continuum states are presented. (orig.)

  17. INFOTERM – Information Disseminating Centre for Terminology

    OpenAIRE

    Albina Auksoriūtė

    2014-01-01

    International Information Centre for Terminology (INFOTERM) was founded in 1971 by contract with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the Austrian Standards Institute (ASI). In 1996, INFOTERM was reorganized and established as an independent non-profit organization. INFOTERM promotes and supports the cooperation of existing and the establishment of new terminology centres and networks with the general aim to improve domain communication, knowledge ...

  18. Two centre problems in relativistic atomic physics

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, Sean R.

    2012-01-01

    The work contained within this thesis is concerned with the explanation and usage of a set of theoretical procedures for the study of static and dynamic two–centre problems in the relativistic framework of Dirac’s equation. Two distinctly different theories for handling time–dependent atomic interactions are reviewed, namely semi–classical perturbation theory and a non–perturbative numerical technique based on the coupled channel equation to directly solve the time–dependent, two–centre Dirac...

  19. Joint Research Centre. Ispra establishment-Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive review of the work carried out during 1974 and 1975 in the Ispra establishment of the Joint Research Centre is presented. A description of the activity carried out within the context of the running programmes is given. Some of the most relevant scientific and technical achievement are described from the viewpoints of the Scientific Departments of the Centre. The technical and administrative support activities are also presented. A list of publications issued by the Ispra Scientific staff is given

  20. Social innovation for People-Centred Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars; P.K., Shajahan

    2013-01-01

    Social innovation is closely related to the people-centred development (PCD) framework of knowledge production. The discussion of PCD in this chapter particularly expands on the feature of empowerment and socio-political mobilization of people in social innovation......Social innovation is closely related to the people-centred development (PCD) framework of knowledge production. The discussion of PCD in this chapter particularly expands on the feature of empowerment and socio-political mobilization of people in social innovation...

  1. Medicare Hospice Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Medicare Hospice Benefits This official government booklet includes information about Medicare hospice benefits: Who’s eligible for hospice care What services are included in hospice care How ...

  2. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You ... activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging. Exercise or Physical Activity? Some people may wonder what ...

  3. Students' anticipated situational engagement: the roles of teacher behavior, personal engagement, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Jochem; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2009-09-01

    Among 9th-grade students (248 girls, 255 boys) from a large multiethnic school, the authors examined 2 aspects of anticipated situational engagement in relation to 3 types of hypothetical teacher behavior: authoritarian, authoritative, permissive. Furthermore, the authors investigated the moderating roles of students' personal (trait-like) engagement and gender. Multilevel analyses showed differential effects of teacher behavior type. Anticipated situational engagement was generally highest with the authoritative teacher and lowest with the authoritarian teacher. However, students' personal engagement and gender qualified these effects. The effects of the authoritative and authoritarian teachers versus the permissive teachers on anticipated situational engagement were more positive (or less negative) for students with high versus low personal engagement. Also, the positive effects of the authoritative and permissive teachers versus the authoritarian teacher were stronger for female students than for male students. Results show that anticipated situational engagement should be understood by examining the combined influences of contextual and individual characteristics.

  4. Neurobiological underpinnings of reward anticipation and outcome evaluation in gambling disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Gambling disorder is characterized by persistent and recurrent maladaptive gambling behavior, which leads to clinically significant impairment or distress. The disorder is associated with dysfunctions in the dopamine system. The dopamine system codes reward anticipation and outcome evaluation...

  5. Perturbation and Stability Analysis of the Multi-Anticipative Intelligent Driver Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi-Qun; Xie, Wei-Jun; Shi, Jing; Shi, Qi-Xin

    This paper discusses three kinds of IDM car-following models that consider both the multi-anticipative behaviors and the reaction delays of drivers. Here, the multi-anticipation comes from two ways: (1) the driver is capable of evaluating the dynamics of several preceding vehicles, and (2) the autonomous vehicles can obtain the velocity and distance information of several preceding vehicles via inter-vehicle communications. In this paper, we study the stability of homogeneous traffic flow. The linear stability analysis indicates that the stable region will generally be enlarged by the multi-anticipative behaviors and reduced by the reaction delays. The temporal amplification and the spatial divergence of velocities for local perturbation are also studied, where the results further prove this conclusion. Simulation results also show that the multi-anticipative behaviors near the bottleneck will lead to a quicker backwards propagation of oscillations.

  6. Preferences and Anticipations of Career Counseling: Comment of Galassi, Crace, Martin, James, and Wallace (1992).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Terence J.

    1992-01-01

    Criticizes previous article by Galassi, Crace, Martin, James, and Wallace on client anticipations and preferences regarding career counseling. Criticisms focus on theoretical grounding of the study, assessment format, data analysis, and data interpretation. (Author/NB)

  7. Predicting dynamic behavior via anticipating synchronization in coupled pendulum-like systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiyun; Yang, Ying

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, the regime of anticipating synchronization (sometimes called predicted synchronization) in a class of nonlinear dynamical systems is investigated by testing the global asymptotical stability of time-delayed error dynamics. Sufficient conditions in terms of linear matrix inequalities are established for anticipating synchronization between such systems with and without state time delay. These results allow one to predict the dynamic behavior of the systems by using a copy of the same system that performs as a slave. Moreover, the cascaded anticipating synchronization is concerned such that several slave systems could anticipate the same master system with different delays. Concrete applications to phase-locked loops demonstrate the applicability and validity of the proposed results.

  8. Protecting against natural hazards - Information seeking behaviour in anticipation of severe weather events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuring, Jelmer

    2011-01-01

    Protection against natural hazards - Information seeking behaviour in anticipation of severe weather events Severe weather events can have considerable impact on society, including tourism organisations and tourists. Providing accurate and timely information about possible risks due to environmental

  9. Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engkvist, I-L; Eklund, J; Krook, J; Björkman, M; Sundin, E

    2016-11-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to draw combined, all-embracing conclusions based on a long-term multidisciplinary research programme on recycling centres in Sweden, focussing on working conditions, environment and system performance. A second aim is to give recommendations for their development of new and existing recycling centres and to discuss implications for the future design and organisation. Several opportunities for improvement of recycling centres were identified, such as design, layout, ease with which users could sort their waste, the work environment, conflicting needs and goals within the industry, and industrialisation. Combining all results from the research, which consisted of different disciplinary aspects, made it possible to analyse and elucidate their interrelations. Waste sorting quality was recognized as the most prominent improvement field in the recycling centre system. The research identified the importance of involving stakeholders with different perspectives when planning a recycling centre in order to get functionality and high performance. Practical proposals of how to plan and build recycling centres are given in a detailed checklist. PMID:26826952

  10. Employee motivation and benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Březíková, Tereza

    2009-01-01

    The topic of my bachelor's thesis is the employee motivation and benefits. The thesis is divided in two parts, a theoretical one and a practical one. The theoretical part deals with the theory of motivation and individual employee benefits. The practical part describes employee benefits in ČSOB, where I did my research by questionnaires that were filled in by employees from different departments of ČSOB. These employees answered questions about their work motivation and benefits. The resultts...

  11. On the interactions between top-down anticipation and bottom-up regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Tani

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance of anticipation and regression in modeling cognitive behavior. The meanings of these cognitive functions are explained by describing our proposed neural network model which has been implemented on a set of cognitive robotics experiments. The reviews of these experiments suggest that the essences of embodied cognition may reside in the phenomena of the break-down between the top-down anticipation and the bottom-up regression and in its recovery process.

  12. Anticipation of monetary and social reward differently activates mesolimbic brain structures in men and women

    OpenAIRE

    Spreckelmeyer, Katja N.; Krach, Sören; Kohls, Gregor; Rademacher, Lena; Irmak, Arda; Konrad, Kerstin; Kircher, Tilo; Gründer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Motivation for goal-directed behaviour largely depends on the expected value of the anticipated reward. The aim of the present study was to examine how different levels of reward value are coded in the brain for two common forms of human reward: money and social approval. To account for gender differences 16 male and 16 female participants performed an incentive delay task expecting to win either money or positive social feedback. fMRI recording during the anticipation phase revealed proporti...

  13. Conceptual Approximations to Juvenile Politics: Demodernization, Moral Anticipation and Life Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eliécer Martínez Posada

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The central thesis of this essay is the understanding of juvenile collective dynamics as political forms of demodernization, moral anticipation and life politics, viewing its academic productions as zombie categories, unable to understand the dynamics of new times and the juvenile collective dynamics, interpreted as the moral anticipation and distanciation from forms of social proscription or deviation label. Emphasis is placed on the alternative political dimension of the juvenile collective dynamics, noted as political forms of life.

  14. Medication errors: pharmacovigilance centres in detection and prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Bencheikh, Rachida Soulaymani; Benabdallah, Ghita

    2009-01-01

    Detecting medication errors needs collaboration between various organizations, such as patient safety institutions, pharmacovigilance centres, and poison control centres. In order to evaluate the input of pharmacovigilance centres and poison control centres in detecting and evaluating medication errors a pilot project was initiated by the World Alliance for Patient Safety in collaboration with the Uppsala Monitoring Centre; the Moroccan pharmacovigilance centre acted as project coordinator. A...

  15. Analysis of benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Kováříková, Kamila

    2012-01-01

    This master thesis deals with employee benefits in the current labour market, especially from the perspective of young employees. The first part is focused on the theory of motivation and employee benefits also with their tax impact on employee's income. Employee benefits in the current labour market, employee's satisfaction and employer's attitude to this issue are analyzed in the second part of this thesis.

  16. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do ... Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a lot ...

  17. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You ... this page to learn more about the health benefits of exercise. To enlarge a video, click the brackets in ...

  18. Visualization in a Climate Computing Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Fleischer, Karin; Röber, Niklas; Böttinger, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Today, the extensive numerical simulations of climate models require elaborate visualization for understanding and communicating the results. Typical data sets of climate models are 3-dimensional, multivariate and time dependent, and can hence be very large. Interactive visual data analysis improves and accelerates the comprehension of these vast amounts of data. At DKRZ, the German Climate Computing Centre, a central high end visualization server, various domain specific visualization applications, and a remote 3D rendering solution enable users to interactively visualize their extensive model results right at their desktops. The DKRZ's visualization server is a heterogeneous Linux cluster, currently consisting of 10 state of the art visualization nodes equipped with 96 -256 GB RAM and high end NVidia GPUs. Since the parallel file system of the DKRZ's supercomputer is directly mounted over a powerful network, the model data can directly be analyzed and visualized. VirtualGL and TurboVNC are used for utilizing the server's GPUs for 3D rendering, while the TurboVNC client on the user's local computer continuously displays the resulting video stream. By using this central visualization server instead of a local computer, three main benefits are achieved: Time consuming transfers of large data sets from the supercomputer to the local computer are not needed. The hardware of the user's local workstation doesn't need to be powerful, no expensive GPU is required. Users don't have to install or buy visualization software. On the visualization server, a wide range of visualization software is installed. Avizo Green, a powerful commercial software customized for interactive 3D visualization of climate model data, is available, as well as SimVis and ParaView, which focus more on an exploratory visualization of data. SimVis and ParaView provide techniques like Linking & Brushing to emphasize or de-emphasize portions of the data. Furthermore, some domain specific 2D graphics

  19. Long Term Effects of Hazard Anticipation Training on Novice Drivers Measured on the Open Road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Thalia G G; Masserang, Kathleen M; Pradhan, Anuj K; Divekar, Gautam; Samuel, Siby; Muttart, Jeffrey W; Pollatsek, Alexander; Fisher, Donald L

    2011-01-01

    (a) The purpose of this study was to determine whether novice drivers that were trained to anticipate hazards did so better than novice drivers who were not so trained immediately after training and up to one year after training occurred. (b) Novice drivers who had held their restricted license for about one month were randomly assigned to a PC-based hazard anticipation training program (RAPT) or a placebo (control) training program. The programs took about one hour to complete. The effects of training were assessed in a field drive by using patterns of eye movements to assess whether drivers anticipated a potential unseen hazard. (c) The effects of training persisted over time. In the field test immediately after training, the RAPT group anticipated the hazards 65.8% of the time whereas; the control group anticipated them only 47.3% of the time. Six or more months later, the groups were brought back for a second field test and the effects of training did not diminish; the RAPT group anticipated the hazards 61.9% of the time compared to 37.7% for the control group.

  20. A magnetoencephalography study of multi-modal processing of pain anticipation in primary sensory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, R; Burgess, R C; Plow, E B; Floden, D P; Machado, A G

    2015-09-24

    Pain anticipation plays a critical role in pain chronification and results in disability due to pain avoidance. It is important to understand how different sensory modalities (auditory, visual or tactile) may influence pain anticipation as different strategies could be applied to mitigate anticipatory phenomena and chronification. In this study, using a countdown paradigm, we evaluated with magnetoencephalography the neural networks associated with pain anticipation elicited by different sensory modalities in normal volunteers. When encountered with well-established cues that signaled pain, visual and somatosensory cortices engaged the pain neuromatrix areas early during the countdown process, whereas the auditory cortex displayed delayed processing. In addition, during pain anticipation, the visual cortex displayed independent processing capabilities after learning the contextual meaning of cues from associative and limbic areas. Interestingly, cross-modal activation was also evident and strong when visual and tactile cues signaled upcoming pain. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and mid-cingulate cortex showed significant activity during pain anticipation regardless of modality. Our results show pain anticipation is processed with great time efficiency by a highly specialized and hierarchical network. The highest degree of higher-order processing is modulated by context (pain) rather than content (modality) and rests within the associative limbic regions, corroborating their intrinsic role in chronification.

  1. Is it worth the effort? Novel insights into obesity-associated alterations in cost-benefit decision-making

    OpenAIRE

    David eMathar; Annette eHorstmann; Burkhard ePleger; Arno eVillringer; Jane eNeumann

    2016-01-01

    Cost-benefit decision-making entails the process of evaluating potential actions according to the trade-off between the expected benefit (reward) and the anticipated costs (effort). Recent research revealed that dopaminergic transmission within the fronto-striatal circuitry strongly modulates cost-benefit decision-making. Alterations within the dopaminergic fronto-striatal system have been associated with obesity, but little is known about cost-benefit decision-making differences in obese com...

  2. Is it Worth the Effort? Novel Insights into Obesity-Associated Alterations in Cost-Benefit Decision-Making

    OpenAIRE

    Mathar, David; Horstmann, Annette; Pleger, Burkhard; Villringer, Arno; Neumann, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Cost-benefit decision-making entails the process of evaluating potential actions according to the trade-off between the expected reward (benefit) and the anticipated effort (costs). Recent research revealed that dopaminergic transmission within the fronto-striatal circuitry strongly modulates cost-benefit decision-making. Alterations within the dopaminergic fronto-striatal system have been associated with obesity, but little is known about cost-benefit decision-making differences in obese com...

  3. Multiparameter optimisation of dismantling activities and waste management at a research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) is a multi-disciplinary research centre for natural sciences and technology. The institute is active in solid-state physics, materials sciences, elementary particle physics, life sciences, nuclear and non-nuclear energy research, and energy-related ecology. PSI develops and operates complex research installations such as nuclear reactors and particle accelerators. These produce ionising radiation and major quantities of radioactive materials. The optimal handling of decommissioning and dismantling projects and radioactive waste treatment at PSI represents a complex management task, and is determined by many parameters that are only partially identical to those in the energy producing industry. Some of the major issues are addressed below. Management: The research community often requires rapid changes of experimental equipment. This necessitates that the four steps of decommissioning, removal, dismantling and conditioning of waste are spatially and temporally separated. The availability of a great scientific knowledge pool is instrumental for innovative solutions for the complex problems encountered. The accessibility of a modem hardware park (instruments, workshops etc.), sophisticated computer systems and modelling know how can facilitate the work considerably. The lack of a dedicated pool of decommissioning funds and the need for rapid response (see above) necessitate flexibility of the decommissioning crew and constant coordination and optimisation of the work packages with the institute's top management. The product of a research centre in general is not a tradable commodity and does not result in a direct return of money. Financial mechanisms such as the accumulation of funds for future liabilities are not an option. Since PSI - as probably most research institutes - is funded on a yearly basis, long term cost optimisations processes are in competition with legitimate short-term research needs. The benefits of

  4. Transmission of HIV in dialysis centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velandia, M; Fridkin, S K; Cárdenas, V; Boshell, J; Ramirez, G; Bland, L; Iglesias, A; Jarvis, W

    1995-06-01

    In August, 1993, 13 dialysis patients at one dialysis centre in Colombia, South America, were found to be HIV positive, and this prompted an epidemiological investigation. We carried out a cohort study of all dialysis centre patients during January, 1992 to December, 1993 (epidemic period) to determine risk factors for HIV seroconversion. Haemodialysis and medical records were reviewed, dialysis centre staff and surviving patients were interviewed, and dialysis practices were observed. Stored sera from all dialysis centre patients were tested for HIV antibody. 12 (52%) of 23 patients tested positive for HIV antibody by enzyme immunoassay and western blot during the epidemic period. Of the 23 tested, 9 (39%) converted from HIV antibody negative to positive (seroconverters) and 10 (44%) remained HIV negative (seronegatives). The HIV seroconversion rate was higher among patients dialysed at the centre while a new patient, who was HIV seropositive, was dialysed there (90% vs 0%; p dialysis centre reprocessed access needles, dialysers, and bloodlines (60% vs 0%). While 2 of 9 HIV seroconverters had had sex with prostitutes, none had received unscreened blood products or had other HIV risk factors. No surgical or dental procedures were associated with HIV seroconversion. Dialysers were reprocessed separately with 5% formaldehyde and were labelled for use on the same patient. Access needles were reprocessed by soaking them in a common container with a low-level disinfectant, benzalkonium chloride; 4 pairs of needles were placed in one pan creating the potential for cross-contamination or use of one patient's needles on another patient. HIV transmission at the dialysis centre was confirmed. Improperly reprocessed patient-care equipment, most probably access needles, is the likely mechanism of transmission. This outbreak was discovered by accident and similar transmission may be occurring in many other countries where low-level disinfectants are used to sterilise critical

  5. Analysis of the question-answer service of the Emma Children's Hospital information centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruisinga, Frea H; Heinen, Richard C; Heymans, Hugo S A

    2010-07-01

    The information centre of the Emma Children's Hospital AMC (EKZ AMC) is a specialised information centre where paediatric patients and persons involved with the patient can ask questions about all aspects of disease and its social implications. The aim of the study was to evaluate the question-answer service of this information centre in order to determine the role of a specialised information centre in an academic children's hospital, identify the appropriate resources for the service and potential positive effects. For this purpose, a case management system was developed in MS ACCESS. The characteristics of the requester and the question, the time it took to answer questions, the information sources used and the extent to which we were able to answer the questions were registered. The costs of the service were determined. We analysed all questions that were asked in the year 2007. Fourteen hundred thirty-four questions were asked. Most questions were asked by parents (23.3%), healthcare workers (other than nurses; 16.5%) and nurses (15.3%). The scope of the most frequently asked questions include disease (20.2%) and treatment (13.0%). Information on paper was the main information source used. Most questions could be solved within 15 min. Twelve percent to 28% of total working hours are used for the question-answer service. Total costs including staff salary are rather large. In conclusions, taking over the task of providing additional medical information and by providing readily available, good quality information that healthcare professionals can use to inform their patients will lead to less time investment of these more expensive staff members. A specialised information service can anticipate on the information need of parents and persons involved with the paediatric patient. It improves information by providing with relatively simple resources that has the potential to improve patient and parent satisfaction, coping and medical results. A specialised

  6. Benefits from Network "Parasitology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornudd, Elin

    1976-01-01

    Discussion of experience gained by the Finnish central library for technology in off-line use of computer-based services, both selective dissemination of information and retrospective searches offered by the Royal Institute of Technology Library and the Biomedical Documentation Centre in Stockholm, as well as the Technological Library of Denmark…

  7. Altered brain activity during reward anticipation in pathological gambling and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Seok Choi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathological gambling (PG and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD are conceptualized as a behavioral addiction, with a dependency on repetitive gambling behavior and rewarding effects following compulsive behavior, respectively. However, no neuroimaging studies to date have examined reward circuitry during the anticipation phase of reward in PG compared with in OCD while considering repetitive gambling and compulsion as addictive behaviors. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate the neural activities specific to the anticipation phase of reward, we performed event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in young adults with PG and compared them with those in patients with OCD and healthy controls. Fifteen male patients with PG, 13 patients with OCD, and 15 healthy controls, group-matched for age, gender, and IQ, participated in a monetary incentive delay task during fMRI scanning. Neural activation in the ventromedial caudate nucleus during anticipation of both gain and loss decreased in patients with PG compared with that in patients with OCD and healthy controls. Additionally, reduced activation in the anterior insula during anticipation of loss was observed in patients with PG compared with that in patients with OCD which was intermediate between that in OCD and healthy controls (healthy controls < PG < OCD, and a significant positive correlation between activity in the anterior insula and South Oaks Gambling Screen score was found in patients with PG. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased neural activity in the ventromedial caudate nucleus during anticipation may be a specific neurobiological feature for the pathophysiology of PG, distinguishing it from OCD and healthy controls. Correlation of anterior insular activity during loss anticipation with PG symptoms suggests that patients with PG fit the features of OCD associated with harm avoidance as PG symptoms deteriorate. Our findings have identified functional disparities and

  8. Scavenger hunt in the CERN Computing Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    Hidden among the racks of servers and disks in the CERN Computing Centre, you’ll find Hawaiian dancers, space aliens, gorillas… all LEGO® figurines! These characters were placed about the Centre for the arrival of Google’s Street View team for the world to discover.   PLEASE NOTE THAT THE COMPETITION IS OVER. ONLY FOR REFERENCE, HERE IS THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE. We’re pleased to announce our first global scavenger hunt! Spot three LEGO® figurines using Google’s Street View and you’ll be entered to win a gift of your choice from our CERN Gift Guide. A LEGO® figurine in the CERN Computing Centre, as seen on Google Street View. Here are the details: Find at least three LEGO® figurines hidden around the CERN Computing Centre using Google Street View.   Take screencaps of the figurines and e-mail the pictures to TreasureHunt-ComputingCentre@cern.ch. This email is no longer active.   The...

  9. Visits to Tier-1 Computing Centres

    CERN Multimedia

    Dario Barberis

    At the beginning of 2007 it became clear that an enhanced level of communication is needed between the ATLAS computing organisation and the Tier-1 centres. Most usual meetings are ATLAS-centric and cannot address the issues of each Tier-1; therefore we decided to organise a series of visits to the Tier-1 centres and focus on site issues. For us, ATLAS computing management, it is most useful to realize how each Tier-1 centre is organised, and its relation to the associated Tier-2s; indeed their presence at these visits is also very useful. We hope it is also useful for sites... at least, we are told so! The usual participation includes, from the ATLAS side: computing management, operations, data placement, resources, accounting and database deployment coordinators; and from the Tier-1 side: computer centre management, system managers, Grid infrastructure people, network, storage and database experts, local ATLAS liaison people and representatives of the associated Tier-2s. Visiting Tier-1 centres (1-4). ...

  10. The Aube centre. 1997 statement; Le centre de l`Aube. Bilan 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Since January 1992 the Aube centre ensures the storage of 90% of the short life radioactive wastes produced in France. This educational booklet describes the organization of the activities in the centre from the storage of wastes to the radioactivity surveillance of the environment (air, surface and ground waters, river sediments, plants and milk). (J.S.)

  11. Learning Styles of Independent Learning Centre Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Uzun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning style research has been a significant field within language teaching and learning. There have been very few attempts, however, to seek possible links between independent learning and learning style preferences. This paper aims to identify the learning styles of students who use the Independent Learning Centre (ILC on a regular basis at a state university in Turkey (n=102. The findings of the learning style analysis revealed that, contrary to expectations, most of the regular users of the centre were synoptic learners, which implies that these learners might not necessarily have conscious control over their own learning processes. An in-depth analysis of learning styles and recommendations to improve the services offered in the centre are also included in the paper.

  12. Occupational deprivation in an asylum centre:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morville, Anne-Le; Erlandsson, Lena-Karin

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a study of three asylum-seeking men from Iran and Afghanistan. It aimed to explore how and if they experienced occupations as occupations in a Danish asylum centre and how their life experience shaped their choice and value of current occupations. In-depth narrative interviews...... explored the participants’ occupational history and its influence on their occupations in the asylum centre. A thematic analysis showed that the participants had been subjected to occupational disruption and deprivation by politically oppressive systems even before their flight. Their occupations...... in Denmark were to a certain extent influenced by their earlier occupations and the current occupational deprivation they all experienced was due to limited possibilities in the centre. Although they tried their best to fill their days and create structure, there was a loss of valued occupations...

  13. A day in the CERN Control Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Control Centre (CCC) is the nerve centre of the CERN beam systems. From this room, the experts prepare, monitor, adjust, and control the particle beams that circulate throughout the accelerator complex while ensuring that the services and the technical infrastructure work flawlessly. Buttons, screens, telephones, lights (but no sound): in the CCC, everything is ready to make it possible for the LHC to reach the unprecedented energies expected at Run 2.   Seen from above, the CERN Control Centre resembles the shape of a quadrupole magnet. The consoles are distributed in four circles, called “islands”, dedicated to the LHC, the SPS, the PS Complex and the Technical Infrastructure (TI) respectively. Spread between TI and LHC are the Cryogenics consoles. Being in the same room allows the 24h-manned islands to be constantly in touch with one another, thus ensuring the best performance of the machines. At the LHC island, operators are currently busy training the magnet...

  14. Neural responsivity during soft drink intake, anticipation, and advertisement exposure in habitually consuming youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kyle S.; Stice, Eric

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although soft drinks are heavily advertised, widely consumed, and have been associated with obesity, little is understood regarding neural responsivity to soft drink intake, anticipated intake, and advertisements. METHODS Functional MRI was used to assess examine neural response to carbonated soft drink intake, anticipated intake and advertisement exposure as well as milkshake intake in 27 adolescents that varied on soft drink consumer status. RESULTS Intake and anticipated intake of carbonated Coke® activated regions implicated in gustatory, oral somatosensory, and reward processing, yet high-fat/sugar milkshake intake elicited greater activation in these regions versus Coke intake. Advertisements highlighting the Coke product vs. non-food control advertisements, but not the Coke logo, activated gustatory and visual brain regions. Habitual Coke consumers vs. non-consumers showed greater posterior cingulate responsivity to Coke logo ads, suggesting that the logo is a conditioned cue. Coke consumers exhibited less ventrolateral prefrontal cortex responsivity during anticipated Coke intake relative to non-consumers. CONCLUSIONS Results indicate that soft drinks activate reward and gustatory regions, but are less potent in activating these regions than high-fat/sugar beverages, and imply that habitual soft drink intake promotes hyper-responsivity of regions encoding salience/attention toward brand specific cues and hypo-responsivity of inhibitory regions while anticipating intake. PMID:23836764

  15. Neural signal during immediate reward anticipation in schizophrenia: Relationship to real-world motivation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Karuna; Hooker, Christine I; Biagianti, Bruno; Fisher, Melissa; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Vinogradov, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Amotivation in schizophrenia is a central predictor of poor functioning, and is thought to occur due to deficits in anticipating future rewards, suggesting that impairments in anticipating pleasure can contribute to functional disability in schizophrenia. In healthy comparison (HC) participants, reward anticipation is associated with activity in frontal-striatal networks. By contrast, schizophrenia (SZ) participants show hypoactivation within these frontal-striatal networks during this motivated anticipatory brain state. Here, we examined neural activation in SZ and HC participants during the anticipatory phase of stimuli that predicted immediate upcoming reward and punishment, and during the feedback/outcome phase, in relation to trait measures of hedonic pleasure and real-world functional capacity. SZ patients showed hypoactivation in ventral striatum during reward anticipation. Additionally, we found distinct differences between HC and SZ groups in their association between reward-related immediate anticipatory neural activity and their reported experience of pleasure. HC participants recruited reward-related regions in striatum that significantly correlated with subjective consummatory pleasure, while SZ patients revealed activation in attention-related regions, such as the IPL, which correlated with consummatory pleasure and functional capacity. These findings may suggest that SZ patients activate compensatory attention processes during anticipation of immediate upcoming rewards, which likely contribute to their functional capacity in daily life. PMID:26413478

  16. Neural signal during immediate reward anticipation in schizophrenia: Relationship to real-world motivation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuna Subramaniam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amotivation in schizophrenia is a central predictor of poor functioning, and is thought to occur due to deficits in anticipating future rewards, suggesting that impairments in anticipating pleasure can contribute to functional disability in schizophrenia. In healthy comparison (HC participants, reward anticipation is associated with activity in frontal–striatal networks. By contrast, schizophrenia (SZ participants show hypoactivation within these frontal–striatal networks during this motivated anticipatory brain state. Here, we examined neural activation in SZ and HC participants during the anticipatory phase of stimuli that predicted immediate upcoming reward and punishment, and during the feedback/outcome phase, in relation to trait measures of hedonic pleasure and real-world functional capacity. SZ patients showed hypoactivation in ventral striatum during reward anticipation. Additionally, we found distinct differences between HC and SZ groups in their association between reward-related immediate anticipatory neural activity and their reported experience of pleasure. HC participants recruited reward-related regions in striatum that significantly correlated with subjective consummatory pleasure, while SZ patients revealed activation in attention-related regions, such as the IPL, which correlated with consummatory pleasure and functional capacity. These findings may suggest that SZ patients activate compensatory attention processes during anticipation of immediate upcoming rewards, which likely contribute to their functional capacity in daily life.

  17. Neural Activation during Anticipation of Near Pain-Threshold Stimulation among the Pain-Fearful.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhou; Jackson, Todd; Huang, Chengzhi

    2016-01-01

    Fear of pain (FOP) can increase risk for chronic pain and disability but little is known about corresponding neural responses in anticipation of potential pain. In this study, more (10 women, 6 men) and less (7 women, 6 men) pain-fearful groups underwent whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during anticipation of near pain-threshold stimulation. Groups did not differ in the proportion of stimuli judged to be painful but pain-fearful participants reported significantly more state fear prior to stimulus exposure. Within the entire sample, stronger activation was found in several pain perception regions (e.g., bilateral insula, midcingulate cortex (MCC), thalamus, superior frontal gyrus) and visual areas linked to decoding stimulus valences (inferior orbital cortex) during anticipation of "painful" stimuli. Between groups and correlation analyses indicated pain-fearful participants experienced comparatively more activity in regions implicated in evaluating potential threats and processing negative emotions during anticipation (i.e., MCC, mid occipital cortex, superior temporal pole), though group differences were not apparent in most so-called "pain matrix" regions. In sum, trait- and task-based FOP is associated with enhanced responsiveness in regions involved in threat processing and negative affect during anticipation of potentially painful stimulation. PMID:27489536

  18. The effect of current and anticipated body pride and shame on dietary restraint and caloric intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troop, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Studies have established a link between body shame and eating disorder symptoms and behaviours. However, few have differentiated current feelings of body shame from those anticipated with weight change and none has examined the effects of these on subsequent eating behaviour. In this paper, a measure of body pride and shame was developed (Study 1) for the purposes of using it in a subsequent longitudinal study (Study 2). Two hundred and forty two women were recruited from a university and the general population and participated in Study 1, completing the Body Pride and Shame (BPS) scale either online or offline, as well as a number of validating measures. In Study 2, 40 female students completed the BPS, as well as a measure of dietary restraint, and subsequently recorded their dietary intake everyday for the next seven days. Study 1 identified and validated subscales of current body pride/shame as well as pride/shame that is anticipated were the individual to gain weight or lose weight. In Study 2, over and above levels of dietary restraint, current feelings of body shame predicted eating more calories over the next 7 days while the anticipation of shame with weight gain predicted eating fewer calories. Although previous research has only measured current feelings of body shame, the present studies showed that anticipated shame also impacts on subsequent behaviour. Interventions that regulate anticipated as well as current emotions, and that do not merely challenge cognitions, may be important in changing eating behaviour. PMID:26456412

  19. Benefits of Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Facts Fitness Fitness Find out more Categories Sports and Performance Training and Recovery Exercise Topics Fueling Your Workout Benefits of Physical Activity Exercise Nutrition Top Articles Man ...

  20. Enhancing person-centred communication in NICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Janne; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Egerod, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Aims of this article were (a) to explore how parents of premature infants experience guided family-centred care (GFCC), and (b) to compare how parents receiving GFCC versus standard care (SC) describe nurse-parent communication in the neonatal intensive care unit.......Aims of this article were (a) to explore how parents of premature infants experience guided family-centred care (GFCC), and (b) to compare how parents receiving GFCC versus standard care (SC) describe nurse-parent communication in the neonatal intensive care unit....

  1. Imperial College Reactor Centre annual report. 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following new equipment is noted; for atomic absorption spectrometry to supplement the neutron activation analysis, and an additional nuclear data analysis system to improve the quality and speed of the service to users of the Centre's facilities. Users include undergraduates from the University of London, outside bodies such as the British Musueum, as well as departments of Colleges of the University of London. The reactor lost only three days through failures or faults. Two replacement fuel elements were put into the reactor during the year. The report contains brief accounts of 34 research programmes at the Centre. (U.K.)

  2. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case Study in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G;

    2011-01-01

    Summary Genetic anticipation, described by earlier age of onset (AOO) and more aggressive symptoms in successive generations, is a phenomenon noted in certain hereditary diseases. Its extent may vary between families and/or between mutation subtypes known to be associated with the disease phenotype....... In this article, we posit a Bayesian approach to infer genetic anticipation under flexible random effects models for censored data that capture the effect of successive generations on AOO. Primary interest lies in the random effects. Misspecifying the distribution of random effects may result in......) genes known to cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome (LS). We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this article. Our model predicts family-level anticipation effects that are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high...

  3. Perceptual training effects on anticipation of direct and deceptive 7-m throws in handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharji, Khaled E; Wade, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of perceptual training on the performance of handball goalkeepers when anticipating the direction of both direct and deceptive 7-m throws. Skilled goalkeepers were assigned equally to three matched-ability groups based on their pre-test performance: a perceptual training group (n = 14) received video-based perceptual training, a placebo training group (n = 14) received video-based regular training and a control group received no training. Participants in the perceptual training group significantly improved their performance compared to both placebo and control groups; however, anticipation of deceptive throws improved less than for direct throws. The results confirm that although anticipating deception in handball is a challenging task for goalkeepers, task-specific perceptual training can minimise its effect and improve performance.

  4. Functional MRI reveals expert-novice differences during sport-related anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael J; Bishop, Daniel T; Jackson, Robin C; Abernethy, Bruce

    2010-01-27

    We examined the effect of expertise on cortical activation during sports anticipation using functional MRI. In experiment 1, recreational players predicted badminton stroke direction and the pattern of active clusters was consistent with a proposed perception-of-action network. This pattern was not replicated in a stimulus-matched, action-unrelated control task. In experiment 2, players of three different skill levels anticipated stroke direction from clips occluded either 160 ms before or 80 ms after racquet-shuttle contact. Early-occluded sequences produced more activation than late-occluded sequences overall, in most cortical regions of interest, but experts showed an additional enhancement in medial, dorsolateral and ventrolateral frontal cortex. Anticipation in open-skill sports engages cortical areas integral to observing and understanding others' actions; such activity is enhanced in experts.

  5. Anticipation of monetary and social reward differently activates mesolimbic brain structures in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreckelmeyer, Katja N; Krach, Sören; Kohls, Gregor; Rademacher, Lena; Irmak, Arda; Konrad, Kerstin; Kircher, Tilo; Gründer, Gerhard

    2009-06-01

    Motivation for goal-directed behaviour largely depends on the expected value of the anticipated reward. The aim of the present study was to examine how different levels of reward value are coded in the brain for two common forms of human reward: money and social approval. To account for gender differences 16 male and 16 female participants performed an incentive delay task expecting to win either money or positive social feedback. fMRI recording during the anticipation phase revealed proportional activation of neural structures constituting the human reward system for increasing levels of reward, independent of incentive type. However, in men activation in the prospect of monetary rewards encompassed a wide network of mesolimbic brain regions compared to only limited activation for social rewards. In contrast, in women, anticipation of either incentive type activated identical brain regions. Our findings represent an important step towards a better understanding of motivated behaviour by taking into account individual differences in reward valuation. PMID:19174537

  6. Coexistence of anticipated and layered chaotic synchronization in time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H J; Huang, H B; Qi, G X

    2005-09-01

    We study the dynamic stabilities of unidirectionally coupled linear arrays of chaotic oscillators with time-delay feedbacks in star configuration, and find that if all oscillators in the network are identical, then the oscillators in the linear arrays can anticipate the driving oscillators, and simultaneously the oscillators in the linear arrays with the same position with respect to the central one are in synchronous chaotic state. Compared with the anticipated synchronization, the layered synchronization is first generated and last destroyed as the coupling constant is increased. This coexistence of anticipated and layered chaotic synchronization is destroyed by long time feedback. If the driving and driven oscillators are different, then only layered chaotic synchronization is possible.

  7. Differences in anticipated interaction drive own group biases in face memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paul Wilson

    Full Text Available According to much research, the Own Group Bias (OGB in face memory occurs as a consequence of social categorization - ingroup members are more likely than outgroup members to be encoded as individuals and remembered well. The current work is an examination of the role of anticipated future interaction in the OGB. We conducted two studies showing that anticipated interaction influences group-based face memory. In Study 1, we provided correlational evidence that beliefs about the amount and importance of future interaction one will have with racial outgroup members is associated with the OGB, such that people expecting more interaction with outgroup members show a reduced OGB. In Study 2, we manipulated expectations about future interactions with lab-created groups and observed that high levels of anticipated future interaction with the outgroup eliminated the OGB. Thus, social group categorization drives face memory biases to the extent that group membership affords the expectation of interpersonal interaction.

  8. Best-estimate methodology for analysis of anticipated transients without scram in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Union Fenosa, a utility company in Spain, has performed research on pressurized water reactor (PWR) safety with respect to the development of a best-estimate methodology for the analysis of anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), i.e., those anticipated transients for which failure of the reactor protection system is postulated. A scientific and technical approach is adopted with respect to the ATWS phenomenon as it affects a PWR, specifically the Zorita nuclear power plant, a single-loop Westinghouse-designed PWR in Spain. In this respect, an ATWS sequence analysis methodology based on published codes that is generically applicable to any PWR is proposed, which covers all the anticipated phenomena and defines the applicable acceptance criteria. The areas contemplated are cell neutron analysis, core thermal hydraulics, and plant dynamics, which are developed, qualified, and plant dynamics, which are developed, qualified, and validated by comparison with reference calculations and measurements obtained from integral or separate-effects tests

  9. Best-estimate methodology for analysis of anticipated transients without scram in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo, L. (Union Fenosa, Madrid (Spain))

    1993-07-01

    Union Fenosa, a utility company in Spain, has performed research on pressurized water reactor (PWR) safety with respect to the development of a best-estimate methodology for the analysis of anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), i.e., those anticipated transients for which failure of the reactor protection system is postulated. A scientific and technical approach is adopted with respect to the ATWS phenomenon as it affects a PWR, specifically the Zorita nuclear power plant, a single-loop Westinghouse-designed PWR in Spain. In this respect, an ATWS sequence analysis methodology based on published codes that is generically applicable to any PWR is proposed, which covers all the anticipated phenomena and defines the applicable acceptance criteria. The areas contemplated are cell neutron analysis, core thermal hydraulics, and plant dynamics, which are developed, qualified, and plant dynamics, which are developed, qualified, and validated by comparison with reference calculations and measurements obtained from integral or separate-effects tests.

  10. Jail Inmates' Perceived and Anticipated Stigma: Implications for Post-release Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kelly; Stuewig, Jeffrey; Tangney, June

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that offenders perceive stigma, but the accuracy of these perceptions has not been assessed, nor their impact on successful reintegration. In a longitudinal study, jail inmates (N = 168) reported perceptions of stigma toward criminals and anticipated stigma just prior to release. A diverse college sample completed a parallel survey assessing stigmatizing attitudes toward criminals. Inmates' perceived stigma was significantly higher than students' stigmatizing attitudes. Perceived stigma positively predicted post-release employment for African-American inmates, but not for Caucasians. Anticipated stigma negatively predicted arrests for Caucasian inmates, but not for African Americans. Perceived and anticipated stigma may have different implications for reintegration, and these implications may vary across race. PMID:25045324

  11. Effects of Spike Anticipation on the Spiking Dynamics of Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel ede Santos-Sierra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Synchronization is one of the central phenomena involved in information processing in living systems. It is known that the nervous system requires the coordinated activity of both local and distant neural populations. Such an interplay allows to merge different information modalities in a whole processing supporting high-level mental skills as understanding, memory, abstraction, etc. Though the biological processes underlying synchronization in the brain are not fully understood there have been reported a variety of mechanisms supporting different types of synchronization both at theoretical and experimental level. One of the more intriguing of these phenomena is the anticipating synchronization, which has been recently reported in a pair of unidirectionally coupled artificial neurons under simple conditions cite{Pyragas}, where the slave neuron is able to anticipate in time the behaviour of the master one. In this paper we explore the effect of spike anticipation over the information processing performed by a neural network at functional and structural level. We show that the introduction of intermediary neurons in the network enhances spike anticipation and analyse how these variations in spike anticipation can significantly change the firing regime of the neural network according to its functional and structural properties. In addition we show that the interspike interval (ISI, one of the main features of the neural response associated to the information coding, can be closely related to spike anticipation by each spike, and how synaptic plasticity can be modulated through that relationship. This study has been performed through numerical simulation of a coupled system of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons.

  12. Moral Disengagement, Anticipated Social Outcomes and Adolescents' Alcohol Use: Parallel Latent Growth Curve Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Catherine A; Bussey, Kay

    2015-10-01

    Moral disengagement is a social cognitive process that has been extensively applied to transgressive behaviors, including delinquency, aggression and illicit substance use. However, there has been limited research on moral disengagement as it relates to underage drinking. The current study aimed to examine moral disengagement contextualized to underage drinking and its longitudinal relationship to alcohol use. Moreover, the social context in which adolescent alcohol use typically occurs was also considered, with a specific emphasis on the social sanctions, or social outcomes, that adolescents anticipate receiving from friends for their alcohol use. Adolescents were assessed across three time-points, 8 months apart. The longitudinal sample consisted of 382 (46% female) underage drinkers (12-16 years at T1). Parallel latent growth curve analysis was used to examine the bi-directional influence of initial moral disengagement, anticipated social outcomes, and alcohol use on subsequent growth in moral disengagement, anticipated social outcomes and alcohol use. The interrelation of initial scores and growth curves was also assessed. The findings revealed that, in the binary parallel analyses, initial moral disengagement and anticipated social outcomes both significantly predicted changes in alcohol use across time. Moreover, initial anticipated social outcomes predicted changes in moral disengagement. These findings were not consistently found when all three process analyses were included in a single model. The results emphasize the impact of social context on moral disengagement and suggest that by targeting adolescents' propensity to justify or excuse their drinking, as well as the social outcomes adolescents anticipate for being drunk, it may be possible to reduce their underage drinking. PMID:26318080

  13. Wellbeing or welfare benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Kristiansen, Maria; Nørredam, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    This debate article debunks the myth that migrants are driven primarily by the size of the welfare benefits in the host country, when they decide where to migrate to. We show that instead of welfare benefits, migrants are driven by a desire for safety, wellbeing, social networks and opportunities...

  14. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola;

    2009-01-01

    Optimal prevention of hereditary cancer is central and requires initiation of surveillance programmes and/or prophylactic measures at a safe age. Anticipation, expressed as an earlier age at onset in successive generations, has been demonstrated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC...... the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated...

  15. ANALYSIS OF CORRELATION BETWEENTHE EXPENSES OF SOCIAL PROTECTION AND THE ANTICIPATED OLD AGE PENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolae Daniel Militaru

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I have analysed two components of our social protection system in our country: the expenses of social protection and the anticipated old age pension. The main goal of the study is the analysis of the correlation that exists between the expenses with social protection and the anticipated old age pension, while the secondary goal of the study consists of the identification of the way in which the pension increases to an increase of the expenses with social protection by one uni...

  16. Liberalization of the Natural gas market. Combinations of options to anticipate for fruit-vegetable businesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical and economical possibilities for the greenhouse sector (section fruit-vegetables) to anticipate the liberalization process of the natural gas market in the Netherlands have been evaluated. As a result of the liberalization the structure of the tariffs for natural gas changes. The maximum gas consumption per hour will be a decisive factor for the cost of natural gas and is related to extreme cold conditions outdoors. The first anticipation option is to reduce the overcapacity. Several options to save costs are discussed

  17. RURAL HIGHWAY SERVICE CENTRES AND RURAL LIVELIHOODS DIVERSITY: A CASE OF NGUNDU HALT IN ZIMBABWE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Chazovachii

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to assess the impact of rural high way service centres on livelihood diversity. The establishment of Ngundu rural highway service centre was an approach to assist highway travelers and local residents in accessing essential services without going off-route. Since the establishment of these highway service centers, little has been realized in terms of their utility. Data was collected using questionnaires; participatory observation and interviews and presented in the form of graphs; pie charts and tables. The rural highway service centre benefited local residents in its sphere of influence through social welfare provision; employment creation; recreation and as agricultural inputs collection centres. However the opportunity on livelihoods diversity by locals and travelers to enjoy their need has been abused .Both locals and travelers have turned the centre into risk livelihood strategies arena, crime and deviant behavior proliferated turning it into life threatening zone. Therefore need is there to reinforce overnight surveillance through the neighborhood watch for security and welfare of genuine dealers and travelers for sustainable and investment confident and promotion climate.

  18. [The coordination of care in health centres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribardière, Olivia

    2016-06-01

    Health centres are structurally designed to facilitate the coordination of care. However, evolutions in society have resulted in forms of consumption of health care which are not necessarily compatible with efficient care coordination. On a local level, teams are nevertheless organising and structuring themselves to offer the right form of care, to the right patient and at the right time. PMID:27338687

  19. Renovation of the CERN Computer Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The Computer Centre at CERN is seen after half of the equipment is the large ground floor room has been removed. A large-scale spring-cleaning operation took place before renovation work for the new CERN Grid system began. Fifteen kilometres of cables that were no longer needed were removed from the cavity floor for recycling.

  20. The Australian Centre for Minesite Rehabilitation Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Centre for Minesite Rehabilitation Research (ACMRR) is a joint venture between the Australian mining industry through the Australian Mineral Industries Research Association Ltd. (AMIRA) and three of the organizations working most actively in this area in Australia: CSIRO Minesite Rehabilitation Research Program; University of Queensland Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation; and Curtin University Mulga Research Centre. The ACMRR was established in July 1993 to provide a national framework to conduct Strategic Research into minesite rehabilitation. It is an industry led and funded initiative. The Goals of the Centre include: to conduct strategic research into minesite rehabilitation to provide sustainable environmental solutions which are acceptable to industry, government and the community; to be recognized as a center of excellence undertaking commissioned research on minesite rehabilitation in an independent and thorough manner; to provide scientific and technological foundations to facilitate industry and government in setting acceptable standards; to act as networking and communications focus; and to enhance education and training in minesite rehabilitation. Strategic Research Programs in: Water Systems--downstream surface and groundwater quality; Land--the long-term behavior and stability of constructed landforms; Ecosystems--the long-term sustainability of constructed landforms; Waste--the long-term treatment and disposal of waste products; will allow the ACMRR to achieve these goals through specific research projects in these areas, developed with industry sponsors. This paper will discuss their progress to date, research projects underway, and plans for the future

  1. Interorganisatorisk styring i Shared Service Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harritz, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    I den offentlige sektor er der en stigende udbredelse af Shared Service Centre (SSC). Men der er endnu meget lidt viden om de interorganisatoriske styringsproblemstillinger, der opstår når et SSC oprettes. I denne artikel præsenteres, ud fra et interorganisatorisk perspektiv, en styringsramme der...

  2. [The coordination of care in health centres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribardière, Olivia

    2016-06-01

    Health centres are structurally designed to facilitate the coordination of care. However, evolutions in society have resulted in forms of consumption of health care which are not necessarily compatible with efficient care coordination. On a local level, teams are nevertheless organising and structuring themselves to offer the right form of care, to the right patient and at the right time.

  3. In the Field: The Canadian Ecology Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Clare

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Ecology Centre (Ontario) offers year-round residential and day programs in outdoor and environmental education for secondary students, field placement and internship opportunities for college students, and ecotourism programs, while providing employment and tax revenues to the local community. Dubbed consensus environmentalism, the…

  4. Centring the Subject in Order to Educate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R. Scott

    2007-01-01

    It is important for educators to recognise that the various calls to decentre the subject--or self--should not be interpreted as necessarily requiring the removal of the subject altogether. Through the individualism of the Enlightenment the self was centred. This highly individualistic notion of the sovereign self has now been decentred especially…

  5. The fragility of human-centred design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M.G.D.

    2008-01-01

    In human-centred design (HCD), researchers and designers develop products in cooperation with the potential users of these products. They attempt to give users a voice or a role in their projects, with the intention of developing products that match users' needs and preferences. This approach is esp

  6. Student-Centred Learning: A Humanist Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangney, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The notion of student-centred learning is often not defined; within the pedagogic literature it is generally associated with constructivism or principles associated with a constructivist environment such as building on prior knowledge, purposeful active learning and sense-making. An informal enquiry into conceptions of university staff prior to…

  7. The young centre of the Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uggerhøj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Mikkelsen, Rune E.; Faye, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We treat, as an illustrative example of gravitational time dilation in relativity, the observation that the centre of the Earth is younger than the surface by an appreciable amount. Richard Feynman first made this insightful point and presented an estimate of the size of the effect in a talk...

  8. Single implant and crown versus fixed partial denture: A cost-benefit, patient-centred analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodacre, Charles J; Naylor, W Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Single implants and their crowns have high survival rates that exceed the survival rates for fixed partial dentures on teeth and most but not all publications have determined single implants are more cost-effective than 3-unit fixed partial dentures. Both initial root canal treatment and retreatment are more cost-effective than tooth extraction and rehabilitation with a single implant and crown. PMID:27314112

  9. What should we do with Jack-in-the-box? Anticipating surprises in mobile learning

    OpenAIRE

    Kukulska-Hulme, Agnes

    2008-01-01

    Today's learners are the owners of multifunctional phones and other lightweight portable devices that many of them carry around wherever they go. Equipped with connected digital devices that make learning readily accessible 'anytime, anywhere', learners appear to be moving to a position of power with regard to their ability to influence how and where learning happens and even its content and form. The technologies are precipitating a shift from teacher-centred towards learner-centred educatio...

  10. A Social-Centred Gamification Approach to Improve Household Water Use Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Wang; Capiluppi, A

    2015-01-01

    The research community is showing a growing interest in gamification and there are works showing the usefulness of gamification in different problem domains. Recently, a special interest has been given to the gamification design on systems addressing natural resource consumption issues such as to encourage efficient household water consumption. Despite the potential benefits, the gamification design method for such system is not conclusive. In this paper, we proposed a social-centred gamifica...

  11. A multi-dimensional framework to assist in the design of successful shared services centres

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Borman

    2012-01-01

    Organisations are increasingly looking to realise the benefits of shared services yet there is little guidance available as to the best way to proceed. A multi-dimensional framework is presented that considers the service provided, the design of the shared services centre and the organisational context it sits within. Case studies are then used to determine what specific attributes from each dimension are associated with success and how they should be aligned. It is concluded that there appe...

  12. Benefits of multiple sites for asteroseismic detections

    CERN Document Server

    Arentoft, T; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Kjeldsen, H; White, T R; Grundahl, F

    2013-01-01

    While Kepler has pushed the science of asteroseismology to limits unimaginable a decade ago, the need for asteroseismic studies of individual objects remains. This is primarily due to the limitations of single-colour intensity variations, which are much less sensitive to certain asteroseismic signals. The best way to obtain the necessary data is via very high resolution ground-based spectrography. Such observations measure the perceived radial-velocity shifts that arise due to stellar oscillations, which exhibit a much better signal-to-noise ratio than those for intensity observations. SONG, a proposed network of 1m telescopes with spectrographs that can reach R=110,000, was designed with this need in mind. With one node under commissioning in Tenerife and another under construction in China, an analysis of the scientific benefits of constructing additional nodes for the network is warranted. By convolving models of asteroseismic observables (mean densities, small separations) with the anticipated window func...

  13. Person-centred care in nursing documentation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Broderick, Margaret C

    2012-12-07

    BACKGROUND: Documentation is an essential part of nursing. It provides evidence that care has been carried out and contains important information to enhance the quality and continuity of care. Person-centred care (PCC) is an approach to care that is underpinned by mutual respect and the development of a therapeutic relationship between the patient and nurse. It is a core principle in standards for residential care settings for older people and is beneficial for both patients and staff (International Practice Development in Nursing and Healthcare, Chichester, Blackwell, 2008 and The Implementation of a Model of Person-Centred Practice in Older Person Settings, Dublin, Health Service Executive, 2010a). However, the literature suggests a lack of person-centredness within nursing documentation (International Journal of Older People Nursing 2, 2007, 263 and The Implementation of a Model of Person-Centred Practice in Older Person Settings, Dublin, Health Service Executive, 2010a). AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore nursing documentation in long-term care, to determine whether it reflected a person-centred approach to care and to describe aspects of PCC as they appeared in nursing records. METHOD: A qualitative descriptive study using the PCN framework (Person-centred Nursing; Theory and Practice, Oxford, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010) as the context through which nursing assessments and care plans were explored. RESULTS: Findings indicated that many nursing records were incomplete, and information regarding psychosocial aspects of care was infrequent. There was evidence that nurses engaged with residents and worked with their beliefs and values. However, nursing documentation was not completed in consultation with the patient, and there was little to suggest that patients were involved in decisions relating to their care. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The structure of nursing documentation can be a major obstacle to the recording of PCC and appropriate care planning. Documentation

  14. Women’s Work and Divorce : A Matter of Anticipation? A Research Note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortman, Anne-Rigt

    2005-01-01

    The most common hypothesis on the positive association between wives’ work and divorce is that the wife’s work increases the risk of divorce. Critics argue that the causal direction is the other way around and that women adjust their working hours in anticipation of divorce. These competing hypothes

  15. Awake fiberoptic or awake video laryngoscopic tracheal intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Thøgersen, Bente; Afshari, Arash;

    2012-01-01

    Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation (FFI) is the gold standard for management of anticipated difficult tracheal intubation. The purpose of this study was to compare awake FFI to awake McGrath® video laryngoscope, (MVL), (Aircraft Medical, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom) intubation in patients...

  16. Under stochastic dominance choquet-expected utility and anticipated utility are identical

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Wakker

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to convince the reader that Choquet-expected utility, as initiated by Schmeidler (1982) for decision making under uncertainty, when formulated for decision making under risk naturally leads to Yaari (1987)'s anticipated utility. Thus the two generalizations of expected utili

  17. Under stochastic dominance Choquet-expected utility and anticipated utility are identical

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Wakker (Peter)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this paper is to convince the reader that Choquet-expected utility, as initiated by Schmeidler (1982, 1989) for decision making under uncertainty, when formulated for decision making under risk naturally leads to anticipated utility, as initiated by Quiggin/Yaari. Thus the two

  18. Will Marriage Matter? Effects of Marriage Anticipated by Same-Sex Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Julie L.; Gotta, Gabrielle; Green, Robert-Jay

    2012-01-01

    The current study used an online survey to explore the anticipated impact of legalized marriage on partners in same-sex couples living in California. These data were gathered prior to the California Supreme Court decision in May 2008 legalizing same-sex marriage, which held sway for 5 months before California Proposition 8 eliminating same-sex…

  19. Students’ anticipated situational engagement : the roles of teacher behaviour, personal engagement, and gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, J.T.; Verkuyten, M.J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Among 9th-grade students (248 girls, 255 boys) from a large multiethnic school, the authors examined 2 aspects of anticipated situational engagement in relation to 3 types of hypothetical teacher behavior: authoritarian, authoritative, permissive. Furthermore, the authors investigated the moderating

  20. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case Study in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G;

    2011-01-01

    Summary Genetic anticipation, described by earlier age of onset (AOO) and more aggressive symptoms in successive generations, is a phenomenon noted in certain hereditary diseases. Its extent may vary between families and/or between mutation subtypes known to be associated with the disease phenoty...

  1. Age associations with neural processing of reward anticipation in adolescents with bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana Urošević

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reward/behavioral approach system hypersensitivity is implicated in bipolar disorders (BD and in normative development during adolescence. Pediatric onset of BD is associated with a more severe illness course. However, little is known about neural processing of rewards in adolescents with BD or developmental (i.e., age associations with activation of these neural systems. The present study aims to address this knowledge gap. The present sample included 21 adolescents with BD and 26 healthy adolescents, ages 13 to 19. Participants completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI protocol using the Monetary Incentive Delay (MID task. Behavioral performance was similar between groups. Group differences in BOLD activation during target anticipation and feedback anticipation periods of the task were examined using whole-brain analyses, as were group differences in age effects. During both target anticipation and feedback anticipation, adolescents with BD, compared to adolescents without psychopathology, exhibited decreased engagement of frontal regions involved in cognitive control (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Healthy adolescents exhibited age-related decreases, while adolescents with BD exhibited age-related increases, in activity of other cognitive control frontal areas (i.e., right inferior frontal gyrus, suggesting altered development in the BD group. Longitudinal research is needed to examine potentially abnormal development of cognitive control during reward pursuit in adolescent BD and whether early therapeutic interventions can prevent these potential deviations from normative development.

  2. The effects of anticipated regret on risk preferences of social and problem gamblers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Tochkov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Anticipated regret is an important determinant in risky decision making, however only a few studies have explored its role in problem gambling. This study tested for differences in the anticipation of regret among social and problem gamblers and examined how these differences affect risk preferences in a gambling task. The extent of problem gambling was assessed using the South Oaks Gambling Screen and participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. In the risky feedback condition, the feeling of regret was avoided by choosing the risky gamble, whereas in the safe feedback condition the safe gamble was the regret-minimizing option. Problem gambling was associated with the choice of the risky gamble in both conditions indicating less sensitivity to anticipated regret. It was also associated with risk seeking across feedback conditions when the stakes of winning and loosing were higher. These findings suggest that less regret or the poor anticipation of regret might contribute to excessive gambling and thus need to be addressed in cognitive treatments of problem gambling.

  3. Perception of Kinematic Characteristics of Tennis Strokes for Anticipating Stroke Type and Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jaeho; Carlton, Les G.; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the sources of visual information used by highly skilled tennis players in anticipating their opponent's shots. In Experiment 1, motion analysis of the strokes showed that the relative motion between the racquet and forearm was different between the ground strokes and lobs, but there were no reliable…

  4. A genetic polymorphism of the endogenous opioid dynorphin modulates monetary reward anticipation in the corticostriatal loop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Votinov

    Full Text Available The dynorphin/κ-opioid receptor (KOP-R system has been shown to play a role in different types of behavior regulation, including reward-related behavior and drug craving. It has been shown that alleles with 3 or 4 repeats (HH genotype of the variable nucleotide tandem repeat (68-bp VNTR functional polymorphism of the prodynorphin (PDYN gene are associated with higher levels of dynorphin peptides than alleles with 1 or 2 repeats (LL genotype. We used fMRI on N = 71 prescreened healthy participants to investigate the effect of this polymorphism on cerebral activation in the limbic-corticostriatal loop during reward anticipation. Individuals with the HH genotype showed higher activation than those with the LL genotype in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC when anticipating a possible monetary reward. In addition, the HH genotype showed stronger functional coupling (as assessed by effective connectivity analyses of mOFC with VMPFC, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, and ventral striatum during reward anticipation. This hints at a larger sensitivity for upcoming rewards in individuals with the HH genotype, resulting in a higher motivation to attain these rewards. These findings provide first evidence in humans that the PDYN polymorphism modulates neural processes associated with the anticipation of rewards, which ultimately may help to explain differences between genotypes with respect to addiction and drug abuse.

  5. Top-down-directed synchrony from medial frontal cortex to nucleus accumbens during reward anticipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, Michael X.; Bour, Lo; Mantione, Mariska; Figee, Martijn; Vink, Matthijs; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Schuurman, P. Richard; Denys, Damiaan

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens and medial frontal cortex (MFC) are part of a loop involved in modulating behavior according to anticipated rewards. However, the precise temporal landscape of their electrophysiological interactions in humans remains unknown because it is not possible to record neural activity

  6. Correspondence of Children's Anticipated Vocations, Perceived Competencies, and Interests: Results from an Italian Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prime, Dominic R.; Nota, Laura; Ferrari, Lea; Schultheiss, Donna E. Palladino; Soresi, Salvatore; Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Relations among anticipated vocations, self-assessments of competence, and interests in sample of 190 Italian children were examined. Children were asked what activities they liked, those they thought they were good at, and what job they expected when they grew up. The responses were coded into RIASEC Holland codes and agreement across the three…

  7. Anticipation is the key to understanding music and the effects of music on emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Vuust, Peter; Frith, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    There is certainly a need for a framework to guide the study of the physiological mechanisms underlying the experience of music and the emotions that music evokes. However, this framework should be organised hierarchically, with musical anticipation as its fundamental mechanism.

  8. Measurement of Eccentricity of the Centre of Mass from the Geometric Centre of a Sphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭俊起; 胡忠坤; 顾邦明; 罗俊

    2004-01-01

    The eccentricity of the centre of mass from the geometric centre of a spherical attracting mass in determining the Newtonian gravitational constant G is tested by means of an electronic balance. The experimental result shows that the eccentricity of the sample is about 0.31 μm with uncertainty of 0.05 μm. Two density distribution models are discussed to estimate the uncertainty to G by the eccentricities of the attracting masses.

  9. Benefits of Breastfeeding

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on Women's Health Skip Navigation Skip top navigation Home A-Z Health Topics ePublications News About Us ... Only Natural email updates. Enter email address Submit Home > It's Only Natural > Planning ahead The benefits of ...

  10. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Asked Questions Learn More Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Videos quiz yourself MedlinePlus for More Information National Institute ... accompany aging. Playing Volleyball Helps Me Stay Active Video length: 2 min 51 sec Click to watch ...

  11. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the healthiest things you can do for yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits ... join a gym or have special equipment. Yet, studies show that "taking it easy" is risky. For ...

  12. Benefits of Breastfeeding

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... size | Print | Skip left navigation It's Only Natural Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work ... Enter email address Submit Home > It's Only Natural > Planning ahead The benefits of breastfeeding Learn the unique ...

  13. Decreased frontal regulation during pain anticipation in unmedicated subjects with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strigo, I A; Matthews, S C; Simmons, A N

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by impaired processing of negative information, possibly due to dysfunction in both, the bottom-up emotional network and top-down modulatory network. By acquiring functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on a pain-anticipation task, we tested the hypothesis that individuals with MDD would show increased negative biasing that may be associated with reduced frontal connectivity. Thirty-one (15 females) unmedicated young adults with current MDD and 22 (11 females) healthy subjects with no history of MDD were recruited. Groups did not differ significantly in age, race, level of education, marital status or gender distribution. fMRI data were collected during an event-related pain-anticipation paradigm, during which subjects were cued to anticipate painful heat stimuli of high or low intensity. All temperature stimuli were applied to each subject's left forearm. We found that relative to healthy comparison subjects, participants with MDD showed significantly stronger responses to high versus low pain anticipation within right ventral anterior insula (AI), but overlapping response within right dorsal AI, which correlated positively with the depression symptoms severity in the MDD group. Functional connectivity analyses showed increased functional connectivity between dorsal insula and posterior thalamus and decreased functional connectivity between dorsal insula and the right inferior frontal gyrus in the MDD compared with the non-MDD group. Our results demonstrate that unmedicated individuals with current MDD compared with healthy never-depressed subjects show both differential and overlapping response within AI during anticipation of pain. Furthermore, the overlapping insular response is less regulated by frontal brain systems and is more subservient to affective processing regions in the posterior thalamus in MDD. These results support and provide functional validation of the co-occurring enhanced 'bottom-up' and

  14. Increasing organ donation via anticipated regret (INORDAR: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Carroll Ronan E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout the world there is an insufficient supply of donor organs to meet the demand for organ transplantations. This paper presents a protocol for a randomised controlled trial, testing whether a simple, theory-based anticipated regret manipulation leads to a significant increase in posthumous organ donor registrations. Methods We will use a between-groups, prospective randomised controlled design. A random sample of 14,520 members of the adult Scottish general public will be contacted via post. These participants will be randomly allocated into 1 of the 4 conditions. The no questionnaire control (NQC group will simply receive a letter and donor registration form. The questionnaire control (QC arm will receive a questionnaire measuring their emotions and non-cognitive affective attitudes towards organ donation. The theory of planned behavior (TPB group will complete the emotions and affective attitudes questionnaire plus additional items assessing their cognitive attitudes towards organ donation, perceived control over registration and how they think significant others view this action. Finally, the anticipated regret (AR group will complete the same indices as the TPB group, plus two additional anticipated regret items. These items will assess the extent to which the participant anticipates regret for not registering as an organ donor in the near future. The outcome variable will be NHS Blood and Transplant verified registrations as an organ donor within 6 months of receiving our postal intervention. Discussion This study will assess whether simply asking people to reflect on the extent to which they may anticipate regret for not registering as an organ donor increases organ donor registration 6 months later. If successful, this simple and easy to administer theory-based intervention has the potential to save lives and money for the NHS by reducing the number of people receiving treatments such as dialysis. This

  15. Unemployment benefits and unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Moffitt, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    All developed economies have unemployment benefit programs to protect workers against major income losses during spells of unemployment. By enabling unemployed workers to meet basic consumption needs, the programs protect workers from having to sell their assets or accept jobs below their qualifications. The programs also help stabilize the economy during recessions. If benefits are too generous, however, the programs can lengthen unemployment and raise the unemployment rate. The policy chall...

  16. Early Retirement Pension Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Jeremy I. Bulow

    1981-01-01

    Early retirement options alter the accrual of pension benefits, increasing the fraction of total benefits accrued in the early years of work. This is true regardless of whether de facto no worker exercises the early retirement option. No currently used actuarial method correctly calculates the cost of an early retirement option. Early retirement options must be considered in calculating age/compensation profiles. Furthermore, the early retirement option can effectively be used to encourage le...

  17. Real Estate Diversification Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk P.M. De Wit

    1997-01-01

    Diversification benefits are shown to vary inversely with the correlation between asset returns. The present study estimates average correlation coefficients between real-estate returns from property-specific data of an internationally diversified real estate and in the Netherlands. It is found that diversification benefits within the United States are much larger than on the European Continent. The low correlation found between U.S. real estate returns implies that portfolios of small number...

  18. Benefits for handicapped children

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of long-term care benefits within the CERN Health Insurance Scheme requires the coordination of the benefits foreseen for handicapped children. Measures were adopted by the Management following the recommendation made by the Standing Concertation Committee on 26 March 2003. A document clarifying these measures is available on the Web at the following address: http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/soc/Social_affairs/social_affairs.asp Social Affairs Service 74201

  19. Effects of unstratified and centre-stratified randomization in multi-centre clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Vladimir V

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of randomization effects in multi-centre clinical trials. The two randomization schemes most often used in clinical trials are considered: unstratified and centre-stratified block-permuted randomization. The prediction of the number of patients randomized to different treatment arms in different regions during the recruitment period accounting for the stochastic nature of the recruitment and effects of multiple centres is investigated. A new analytic approach using a Poisson-gamma patient recruitment model (patients arrive at different centres according to Poisson processes with rates sampled from a gamma distributed population) and its further extensions is proposed. Closed-form expressions for corresponding distributions of the predicted number of the patients randomized in different regions are derived. In the case of two treatments, the properties of the total imbalance in the number of patients on treatment arms caused by using centre-stratified randomization are investigated and for a large number of centres a normal approximation of imbalance is proved. The impact of imbalance on the power of the study is considered. It is shown that the loss of statistical power is practically negligible and can be compensated by a minor increase in sample size. The influence of patient dropout is also investigated. The impact of randomization on predicted drug supply overage is discussed.

  20. Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction and Anticipated Turnover among Nurses in Sidama Zone Public Health Facilities, South Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agezegn Asegid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Workplace turnover is destructive to nursing and patient outcomes as it leads to losing competent and qualified nurses. However, developments of coping strategies demand a clear understanding of workplace variables that either motivate nurses to remain employed or lead them to leave their current jobs. Objective. This study was designed toassess factors influencing job satisfaction and intention to turnover among nurses in Sidama zone public health facilities, in Southern Ethiopia. Method. Cross-sectional study design was carried out on 278 nurses using both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods from May 12 to June 05, 2010. Result. A total of 242 nurses were interviewed giving a response rate of 87%. Nearly two-third (68.6% of the participants were female, and the mean age was 28 (±6.27 years for both sexes. All job satisfaction subscale except benefit and salary subscale were significant predictors of overall job satisfaction. Satisfactions with work environment and group cohesion (AOR: 0.25 [95% CI: 0.12, 0.51], single cohesion (AOR: 2.56 [95% CI: 1.27, 5.13], and working in hospital (AOR: 2.19 [95% CI: 1.12, 4.30] were the final significant predictors of anticipated turnover of Sidama zone nurses. Conclusions. More than any factors managers should consider the modification of working environment and group cohesions rather than trying to modify nurses to retain and maintain more experienced nurses for the organizations.

  1. International centres of excellence based on research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of high flux research reactors were, or will be constructed. Each of these high flux facilities has the potential to be an important regional or International Centre of Excellence based on Research Reactors (ICERR) and scientific hub for research and materials investigations. Some are so organized currently, but for many there is a strongly national focus and scope for a significant expansion of their international role. There are manifold benefits of an expanded international role both for the ICERR's themselves and for the institutes that affiliate with them. These benefits include increased utilization and financial stability, increased international prestige, and enhanced scientific resources and capabilities. There are significant hurdles to obtaining the benefits from an expanded international role. For example, to achieve its full potential an ICERR must accommodate scientists from other nations, and include the plans and aspirations of the international community in the ICERR governance. The ICERR must also fully meet the national responsibilities for safety and security. Balancing these potentially conflicting requirements and finding a path through the organisational and legal issues is a significant challenge for any institute. The existing ICERR's therefore provide important case studies and examples of best practice that could inform the actions of other potential ICERR's. This paper describes an IAEA initiative to encourage and support the formation of new ICERR's, strengthen existing ones, and increase training resources available to Member States. The initiative will seek to share best practice and facilitate meetings and technical exchanges between the existing and potential ICERRs, and between the potential ICERR's and potential subscribing or affiliating institutes. (orig.)

  2. It's all change at the Computer Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    The IT and EN Departments are modernising the infrastructure of the Computer Centre to improve the conditions in which the equipment has to operate and to increase capacity. The construction work has already begun and is due to be completed in October 2012.   Every year CERN experiences around ten power cuts lasting from less than a second to several hours. In most cases the two protection systems - the UPS* and the diesel generators – are able to ensure that the operation of the Computer Centre is not affected. As Vincent Doré, the project leader for the IT Department, and Paul Pepinster, the EN Department's technical coordinator in charge of modernising the infrastructure, explains: "Building 513 has two types of computing facilities – the "non-critical" ones, such as the servers for "off-line" computing, which have UPS systems ensuring that they can operate for 10 minutes after a power cut, and the "critical&...

  3. JOB CENTRE FOR DOMESTIC STAFF IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service; http://www.cern.ch/relations/

    2001-01-01

    The Permanent mission of Switzerland to the International Organisations in Geneva has informed CERN that the Geneva Welcome Centre has set up an employment registration desk for the domestic staff of international civil servants. The aim of this pilot project is, on the one hand, to help international civil servants find domestic staff and, on the other hand, to help domestic staff holding an 'F'-type carte de légitimation find employment within 30 days after the expiry of a contract. For more information, please contact the Geneva Welcome Centre, La Pastorale, 106, route de Ferney, Case postale 103, 1211 Genève 20, tel. (+41.22) 918 02 70, fax (+41.22) 918 02 79), http://geneva-international.org/Welcome.E.html.

  4. Frequency selectivity at very low centre frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Carlos Andrés Jurado; Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Marquardt, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    A significant factor in the decrease of sensitivity to low-frequency sound is the helicotrema shunt effect. In humans, it causes a slope increase of the middle-ear transfer function (METF) from 6 dB/oct to 12 dB/oct below approximately 50 Hz [Marquardt et al., J.Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 3628...... measurements based on OAE suppression techniques and notched-noise masking data psychophysically measured for centre frequencies in the range 50-125 Hz, this study examines how individual differences in frequency selectivity, as well as in masking, may occur at very low CFs due to individual differences......-3638 (2007)]. Recent experiments showed that the exact frequency varies from individual to individual. Besides, the helicotrema region in the METF has been found to highly influence frequency selectivity for centre frequencies (CFs) below 80 Hz (Jurado and Moore in prep). By using individual METF...

  5. Patient-centred Prevention among PAD Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pii, Kathrine Hoffmann

    2014-01-01

    that will improve their health condition. The patient-centred approach (and related concepts: patient participation, involvement, and empowerment) is being promoted both in healthcare politics and by healthcare professionals as a way to achieve more active self-managing and self-caring patients. Patient......-centredness is thus promoted as a way to organize health more effectively (in terms of cost and treatment outcomes) and as a way to ensure patients’ autonomy and fundamental right to make their own decisions regarding their treatment. Critical voices within social and nursing theory have however argued...... that the patient-centred approach does not ensure patient autonomy, but continues to be organized according to biomedical regimes and thereby carry on a paternalistic approach. In this paper, I present findings from a PhD project, which investigates how the ideal of patient-centredness is practiced in the case...

  6. Danish Polymer Centre annual report 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, O.; Hvilsted, S.; Mortensen, Kell

    The centre is a collaboration between the Risø National Laboratory and the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). At the DTU the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management participate in the centre.From 2001 the Polymer Department at Risø...... coordinates the activities at Risø From the outset it was considered important with common laboratories to obtain the full effect of the collaboration between the two departments at the DTU and Risø NationalLaboratory. In 2001 new laboratories for polymer research and education were established at the DTU...... campus in Lyngby as shown in the pictures on this page. In addition to well equipped laboratories at Risø which will be expanded in 2002 and 2003, thesefacilities provide a common ground for polymer chemists, polymer physicists, chemical engineers and mechanical engineers from the two institutions...

  7. Anticipating and Managing Future Trade-offs and Complementarities between Ecosystem Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Reed

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how, with the aid of computer models developed in close collaboration with decision makers and other stakeholders, it is possible to quantify and map how policy decisions are likely to affect multiple ecosystem services in future. In this way, potential trade-offs and complementarities between different ecosystem services can be identified, so that policies can be designed to avoid the worst trade-offs, and where possible, enhance multiple services. The paper brings together evidence from across the Rural Economy and Land Use Programme's Sustainable Uplands project for the first time, with previously unpublished model outputs relating to runoff, agricultural suitability, biomass, heather cover, age, and utility for Red Grouse (Lagopus scotica, grass cover, and accompanying scenario narratives and video. Two contrasting scenarios, based on policies to extensify or intensify land management up to 2030, were developed through a combination of interviews and discussions during site visits with stakeholders, literature review, conceptual modeling, and process-based computer models, using the Dark Peak of the Peak District National Park in the UK as a case study. Where extensification leads to a significant reduction in managed burning and grazing or land abandonment, changes in vegetation type and structure could compromise a range of species that are important for conservation, while compromising provisioning services, amenity value, and increasing wildfire risk. However, where extensification leads to the restoration of peatlands damaged by former intensive management, there would be an increase in carbon sequestration and storage, with a number of cobenefits, which could counter the loss of habitats and species elsewhere in the landscape. In the second scenario, land use and management was significantly intensified to boost UK self-sufficiency in food. This would benefit certain provisioning services but would have negative

  8. Display-centred applications in ubiquitous computing

    OpenAIRE

    José, Rui; Pinto, Helder

    2006-01-01

    Public displays can play an important enabling role in ubiquitous computing environments. This paper describes an on-going work for a multipurpose, multi-display infrastructure, designed to address the requirements of display-centred applications in ubiquitous computing environments. The system provides an infrastructure in which situated displays can act as portals to the physical space, allowing ubicomp applications to support their association with the physical world by providing them with...

  9. The Researcher : The Refugee Documentation Centre Newsletter

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Elisabeth; Goggins, David

    2014-01-01

    Contents: Subsidiary Protection – a distinct and autonomous form of complementary protection / Enda O’Neill, Jennifer Higgins, UNHCR Ireland; Recent Changes at the Refugee Appeals Tribunal / Barry Magee, Refugee Appeals Tribunal; The Use of Decision Templates for Refugee Status Determination / Seán O’Connell, Refugee Appeals Tribunal; Forced Marriage in Afghanistan / David Goggins, Refugee Documentation Centre; Houses of the Holy: Iraq and the last days of the Mandeans / Patrick Dowling, R...

  10. Structure and Responsibilities of Radiation Protection Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constitution of Radiation Protection Centre (RPC) in Lithuania is presented. RPC was established in 1997, in 1999 the Government granted the status of the regulatory authority of Lithuania on radiation protection issues. Currently there are two departments at RPC: two in Vilnius - Department of Radiation Protection Supervision and Control and Department of Programs and Expertise, and four in the districts. Main tasks of RPC are listed

  11. Imperial College Reactor Centre annual report. 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reported that the reactor operated reliably during the year with less than half a day of operating time lost by faults or failures. Brief accounts of the 34 research projects at the Centre are given, and a list of teaching experiments or visits is included. These include undergraduate and post-graduate teaching. Commercial requests for irradiations and neutron activation analysis are reported as increasing. (U.K.)

  12. CMS Centres Worldwide - a New Collaborative Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Lucas

    2011-01-01

    Webcasts, and generic Web tools such as CMS-TV for broadcasting live monitoring and outreach information. Being Web-based and experiment-independent, these systems could easily be extended to other organizations. We describe the experiences of using CMS Centres Worldwide in the CMS data-taking operations as well as for major media events with several hundred TV channels, radio stations, and many more press journalists simultaneously around the world.

  13. Learning Styles of Independent Learning Centre Users

    OpenAIRE

    Tarik Uzun

    2014-01-01

    Learning style research has been a significant field within language teaching and learning. There have been very few attempts, however, to seek possible links between independent learning and learning style preferences. This paper aims to identify the learning styles of students who use the Independent Learning Centre (ILC) on a regular basis at a state university in Turkey (n=102). The findings of the learning style analysis revealed that, contrary to expectations, most of the regular users ...

  14. LSE centre for economic performance: bankers’ bonuses

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A new series of Election Analyses is now available from the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (CEP). The series will discuss the research evidence on some of the key policy battlegrounds of the 2010 General Election, including macroeconomic policy, immigration, health, education, crime, poverty and inequality, labour market policy, regional policy, energy and the environment, financial regulation and bankers’ bonuses, and foreign aid. The latest CEP Election Analysis, by Brian Bell, g...

  15. Enhancing Safety at Airline Operations Control Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Řasa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a new term of Safety Management System (SMS has been introduced into aviation legislation. This system is being adopted by airline operators. One of the groundbased actors of everyday operations is Operations Control Centre (OCC. The goal of this article has been to identify and assess risks and dangers which occur at OCC and create a template for OCC implementation into SMS.

  16. The LifeWatch Service Centre Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Parr, Terry; Spinelli, Oliviero; Mauri, Maria Paola; Billisari, Livia; Hardisty, Alex; Ludlow, David; Khan, Zaheer; Roberts, Dave; Sleep, Chris; Sier, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This report summarises the construction plan for the Lifewatch Service Centre. The main purpose of LifeWatch is to serve the biodiversity and ecosystem research community in its work on the understanding and rational management of our ecosystems for use by policy makers, resource managers, the private sector and the general public. To do this the LifeWatch infrastructure will provide capabilities to analyse, model and simulate with integrated biodiversity and ecosystem data from many dive...

  17. User-Centred Design Using Gamestorming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    User-centered design (UX) is becoming a standard in software engineering and has tremendous potential in healthcare. The purpose of this tutorial will be to demonstrate and provide participants with practice in user-centred design methods that involve 'Gamestorming', a form of brainstorming where 'the rules of life are temporarily suspended'. Participants will learn and apply gamestorming methods including persona development via empathy mapping and methods to translate artefacts derived from participatory design sessions into functional and design requirements.

  18. Training science centre Explainers. The Techniquest experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Johnson

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Techniquest was established in 1986, and in 1995 moved to its current premises at Cardiff Bay, South Wales. This was the first purpose-built science centre in the UK. It receives around 200,000 visitors every year to its exhibition, and to its programmes for schools and public audiences in the theatre, laboratory, discovery room and planetarium. The author joined the Techniquest project in 1985, became a staff member in 1990 and was the Chief Executive from 1997 until his retirement in 2004. Techniquest has three “out-stations” in Wales, and is responsible for the supply and maintenance of exhibits to the Look Out Discovery Centre in Bracknell, England. There is a Techniquest gallery at the Lisbon Pavilhão do Conhecimento - Ciência Viva, and a traveling exhibition, SciQuest, in South Africa which was also supplied by Techniquest. All these centres rely on the effective intervention of “Explainers” (at Techniquest we call them “Helpers” to provide the best possible experience for visitors. At its most demanding, the tasks of an Explainer are varied and intensive, yet there may be times when the duties are mundane or even dull. When you rely on people to act as both hosts and housekeepers, to provide both support and stimulus, and to be both welcoming and watchful, you are asking a great deal. This article raises some of the issues concerned with the recruitment and retention of Explainers, their training and management, and the way in which their role is recognized and valued by the science centre as a whole.

  19. INFOTERM – Information Disseminating Centre for Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albina Auksoriūtė

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available International Information Centre for Terminology (INFOTERM was founded in 1971 by contract with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO and the Austrian Standards Institute (ASI. In 1996, INFOTERM was reorganized and established as an independent non-profit organization. INFOTERM promotes and supports the cooperation of existing and the establishment of new terminology centres and networks with the general aim to improve domain communication, knowledge transfer and provision of content with view to facilitating the participation of all in the global multilingual knowledge society. The article presents not only a history of the foundation of INFOTERM, the tasks and activities of INFOTERM and its members, which are international, regional or national terminology institutions, organizations and networks, as well as specialized public or semi-public or other non-profit institutions engaged in terminological activities, but also analyses “Guidelines for terminology policies”, preparied by INFOTERM, and cooperation between INFOTERM and the Institute of the Lithuanian Language.In conclusion, the experience and sharing expertise of INFOTERM regarding harmonized methods and guidelines for terminology management and policies, the management of terminology centres, terminology standardization, the use of terminological data, methods and tools in all applications etc are very important for all countries and language communities especially for countries and language communities with less mature terminologies. The Institute of the Lithuanian Language as a member of INFOTERM has a possibility to get information on terminology research and training, terminology publications, terminological events and activities all over the world.

  20. Upcoming opening of CERN's new Mobility Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    On 29 February, CERN’s brand new Mobility Centre opened in the Globe car park. The Centre has been created to cater to the transport needs of everyone at CERN, to simplify procedures and to centralise all the transport services on offer: the rental of CERN bikes and cars, the CERN car-sharing scheme and SIXT car rental.   From 29 February onwards, the Mobility Centre in the Globe car park will be the place to go for all your duty travel needs: rental of CERN cars (with or without the CERN logo), SIXT car rental, CERN bike rental, distribution of cards allowing the use of CERN’s self-service bike- and car-sharing schemes. That same day, the premises currently housing the Car Pool in Building 130 will become the CERN garage, responsible for: upkeep and repairs on CERN bikes, minor maintenance work on CERN vehicles (e.g. replacing windscreen wipers, bulbs and fuses, refilling windscreen washer fluid, pumping up tyres, etc.), arranging and following up the repair and maintenan...

  1. A new visitor centre for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    At the inauguration of the new CMS visitor centre. The CMS experiment inaugurated a new visitor centre at its Cessy site on 14 June. This will allow the thousands of people who come to CERN each year to follow the construction of one the Laboratory's flagship experiments first-hand. CERN receives over 20,000 visitors each year. Until recently, many of them were taken on a guided tour of one of the LEP experiments. With the closure of LEP, however, trips underground are no longer possible, and the Visits' Service has put in place a number of other itineraries (Bulletin 46/2000). Since the CMS detector will be almost entirely constructed in a surface hall, it is now taking a big share of the limelight. The CMS visitor centre has been built on a platform overlooking CMS construction. It contains a set of clear descriptive posters describing the experiment, along with a video projection showing animations and movies about CMS construction. In the coming weeks, a display of CMS detector elements will be added, as...

  2. Gamma Rays frim the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Erlykin, A D

    2007-01-01

    Recent results from the HESS gamma ray telescope have shown the presence of both a diffuse, extended, flux of gamma rays above ~0.4 TeV and discrete sources in and near the Galactic Centre. Here, we put forward a possible explanation in terms of the diffusion of cosmic ray protons from a succession of supernova remnants (SNR) in the SgrA* region of the Galaxy plus a contribution from SNR in the rest of the Galactic Centre Region, to be called the Galactic Centre Ridge (GCR). Protons are favoured over electrons because the mG magnetic fields in the Region will attenuate energetic electrons severely. Prominent features are the need for 'anomalous diffusion' of the protons in the whole region and the adoption of low efficiency for SNR acceleration in the high density regions. The latter is related by us to the well-known low 'cosmic ray gradient' in the Galaxy. A corroborating feature is the close correlation of inferred cosmic ray intensity with the smoothed intensity of 5 GHZ radio radiation. We attribute this...

  3. Addressing the challenges of patient-centred design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen LaBat

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Patient-centred design is a relatively new term, but a longstanding concept in clinical practice. This discussion looks at patient-centred design and explores the relationships of patient-centred design to universal design, user-centred design and the newer human-centred design. It also explores why interdisciplinary approaches are needed for patient-centred design and how interdisciplinary collaboration works to address the challenges of patient centred design. Successful patient-centred solutions can grow from collaborations which include shared visions, understanding of both the nature and degree of variation in the patient,materials, and the designed solution, clear regular communication among all parties with careful definition of terms, and respect for the inherent cultures of all disciplines involved.

  4. Wider benefits of education: skills, higher education and civic engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Bynner, John; Schuller, Thomas; Feinstein, Leon

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we do the following: First we describe the remit and programme of the University of London’s Wider Benefits of Learning Research Centre, which studies the noneconomic effects of learning, at individual but also collective level. We set out a theoretical framework for our programme, organised around three ‘capitals’: human capital, social capital, and identity capital. After that we report results drawn from two large-scale longitudinal datasets. We use the data collected in the ...

  5. Preface [to] "Authenticity in biology education : benefits and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Yarden, Anat; Carvalho, Graça Simões

    2011-01-01

    This volume consists of 31 original papers presented at the 8th Conference of European Researchers in Didactics of Biology (ERIDOB) held in July 2010 and hosted by the Research Centre CIEC of the Institute of Education, University of Minho, Portugal. The theme of the conference was Authenticity in Biology Education: Benefits and Challenges. This theme emerged from discussions that took place at the ERIDOB 2008 meeting in Utrecht. During those discussions it became apparent that various ERI...

  6. Overview of direct air free cooling and thermal energy storage potential energy savings in data centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last years the total energy demand of data centres has experienced a dramatic increase which is expected to continue. This is why data centres industry and researchers are working on implementing energy efficiency measures and integrating renewable energy to overcome energy dependence and to reduce operational costs and CO2 emissions. The cooling system of these unique infrastructures can account for 40% of the total energy consumption. To reduce the energy consumption, free cooling strategies are used more and more, but so far there has been little research about the potential of thermal energy storage (TES) solutions to match energy demand and energy availability. Hence, this work intends to provide an overview of the potential of the integration of direct air free cooling strategy and TES systems into data centres located at different European locations. For each location, the benefit of using direct air free cooling is evaluated energetically and economically for a data centre of 1250 kW. The use of direct air free cooling is shown to be feasible. This does not apply the TES systems by itself. But when using TES in combination with an off-peak electricity tariff the operational cooling cost can be drastically reduced. - Highlights: • The total annual hours for direct air free cooling in data centres are calculated. • The potential of TES integration in data centres is evaluated. • The implementation of TES to store the ambient air cold is not recommended. • TES is feasible if combined with redundant chillers and off-peak electricity price. • The cooling electricity cost is being reduced up to 51%, depending on the location

  7. Tele-centres as a way of achieving universal access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Anyimadu, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The success of tele-centres in Ghana is discussed. The tele-centres offer a low cost opportunity to empower local communities in developed and developing countries to meet the challenges of the information society. The tele-centres can also contribute more directly to the supply of non-commercial...

  8. Canadian Educational Development Centre Websites: More Ebb than Flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines information portrayed on Canadian educational development (ED) centre websites and, in particular, whether information that corresponds to questions compiled from a literature search of ED centre practices is readily available from centre websites. This study phase is part of a larger national study of Canadian educational…

  9. Crime and benefit sanctions

    OpenAIRE

    Machin, Stephen; Marie, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we look at the relationship between crime and economic incentives in a different way to other work in this area. We look at changes in unemployment benefits and the imposition of benefit sanctions as a means of studying the way that people on the margins of crime may react to economic incentives. The paper relies on a quasiexperimental setting induced by the introduction of the Jobseekers Allowance (JSA) in the UK in October 1996. We look at crime rates in areas more and less af...

  10. Anticipated transients without scram for light water reactors: implications for liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the design of light water reactors (LWRs), protection against anticipated transients (e.g., loss of normal electric power and control rod withdrawal) is provided by a highly reliable scram, or shutdown system. If this system should become inoperable, however, the transient could lead to a core meltdown. The Nuclar Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed, in NUREG-0460 [1], new requirements (or acceptance criteria) for anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) events and the manner in which they could be considered in the design and safety evaluation of LWRs. This note assesses the potential impact of the proposed LWR-ATWS criteria on the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) safety program as represented by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

  11. Perceived social loafing and anticipated effort reduction among young football (soccer) players: an achievement goal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høigaard, Rune; Ommundsen, Yngvar

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated the relationship between motivational climates, personal achievement goals, and three different aspects of social loafing in football (soccer). 170 male competitive football players completed questionnaires assessing perceived motivational climate, achievement goal, and measures of perceived social loafing (anticipation of lower effort amongst their teammates and themselves). The results indicated a marginal but significant positive relationship between an ego-oriented achievement goal and perceived social loafing. In addition, a mastery climate was negatively associated with perceived social loafing and anticipation of lower effort of team members, particularly for athletes who also strongly endorsed a task-oriented achievement goal. A performance climate, in contrast, related positively with these two aspects of social loafing. A mastery climate also related negatively to the third aspect of social loafing, i.e., players' readiness to reduce their own effort in response to their perception of social loafing among their teammates. PMID:17688105

  12. [Living a good live with e-health: anticipating ethical consequences and monitoring them].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Klasien

    2014-01-01

    E-health incorporates a range of digital techniques that are interlinked because they promise to improve people's health and quality of life. The question of how these techniques actually contribute to "living a good live" is not so easy to answer, because scientific, commercial and patients' perspectives all come into play. Research on the unintended consequences of e-health applications clearly shows that it is necessary to anticipate social consequences as early as in the design phase. However, because it is not possible to predict some outcomes, it is also necessary to properly monitor how these techniques affect daily life. It is crucial to pay attention to how these techniques affect people with different educational backgrounds.. Digital techniques have a great capacity to democratise healthcare, but may also unintentionally increase health inequalities. The ethical consequences of e-health applications need to be anticipated and monitored in order to prevent this happening as much as possible.

  13. Evolving protected-area impacts in Panama: impact shifts show that plans require anticipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protected areas (PAs) are the leading forest conservation policy, so accurate evaluation of future PA impact is critical in conservation planning. Yet by necessity impact evaluations use past data. Here we argue that forward-looking plans should blend such evaluations with anticipation of shifts in threats. Applying improved methods to evaluate past impact, we provide rigorous support for that conceptual approach by showing that PAs’ impacts on deforestation shifted with land use. We study the Republic of Panama, where species-dense tropical forest faces real pressure. Facing variation in deforestation pressure, the PAs’ impacts varied across space and time. Thus, if shifts in pressure levels and patterns could be anticipated, that could raise impact. (paper)

  14. Evolving protected-area impacts in Panama: impact shifts show that plans require anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruna, Akiko; Pfaff, Alexander; van den Ende, Sander; Joppa, Lucas

    2014-03-01

    Protected areas (PAs) are the leading forest conservation policy, so accurate evaluation of future PA impact is critical in conservation planning. Yet by necessity impact evaluations use past data. Here we argue that forward-looking plans should blend such evaluations with anticipation of shifts in threats. Applying improved methods to evaluate past impact, we provide rigorous support for that conceptual approach by showing that PAs’ impacts on deforestation shifted with land use. We study the Republic of Panama, where species-dense tropical forest faces real pressure. Facing variation in deforestation pressure, the PAs’ impacts varied across space and time. Thus, if shifts in pressure levels and patterns could be anticipated, that could raise impact.

  15. Autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy and speech dyspraxia: a new syndrome with anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, I E; Jones, L; Pozzebon, M; Howell, R A; Saling, M M; Berkovic, S F

    1995-10-01

    We describe a family of 9 affected individuals in three generations with nocturnal oro-facio-brachial partial seizures, secondarily generalized partial seizures, and centro-temporal epileptiform discharges, associated with oral and speech dyspraxia and cognitive impairment. The speech disorder was prominent, but differed from that of Landau-Kleffner syndrome and of epilepsy with continuous spike and wave during slow-wave sleep. The electroclinical features of this new syndrome of autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy resemble those of benign rolandic epilepsy, a common inherited epilepsy of childhood. This family shows clinical anticipation of the seizure disorder, the oral and speech dyspraxia, and cognitive dysfunction, suggesting that the genetic mechanism could be expansion of an unstable triplet repeat. Molecular studies on this syndrome, where the inheritance pattern is clear, could also be relevant to identifying a gene for benign rolandic epilepsy where anticipation does not occur and the mode of inheritance is uncertain. PMID:7574460

  16. Enhanced interoceptive awareness during anticipation of public speaking is associated with fear of negative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durlik, Caroline; Brown, Gary; Tsakiris, Manos

    2014-04-01

    Interoceptive awareness (IA)--the ability to detect internal body signals--has been linked to various aspects of emotional processing. However, it has been examined mostly as a trait variable, with few studies also investigating state dependent fluctuations in IA. Based on the known positive correlation between IA and emotional reactivity, negative affectivity, and trait anxiety, the current study examined whether IA, as indexed by heartbeat detection accuracy, would change during an anxiety-provoking situation. Participants in the experimental condition, in which they anticipated giving a speech in front of a small audience, displayed significant IA increases from baseline to anticipation. Enhancement in IA was positively correlated with fear of negative evaluation. Implications of the results are discussed in relation to the role of trait and state IA in emotional experience. PMID:24044552

  17. The anticipation of converging industries a concept applied to nutraceuticals and functional foods

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, Clive-Steven

    2013-01-01

    The blurring of boundaries between hitherto distinct scientific disciplines, technologies or markets is a common and powerful phenomenon. Subjects of this convergence often change consumer behaviours, favouring products and platforms with multiple functions. The Anticipation of Converging Industries provides a detailed focus on the triggers, drivers and consequences of convergence to create a more concise definition of convergence.   This detailed analysis includes a specifically developed toolbox for ‘convergence foresight’, creating a forecasting method for convergence trends. With the focus on the chemical, biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries, several indicators of convergence in the areas of Nutraceuticals/Functional Foods, Cosmeceuticals and ICT are derived from samples including over 1million patents and scientific publications.   By supporting this methodical approach with real world data, The Anticipation of Converging Industries is perfect for industry practitioners looking for a com...

  18. Anticipation and the Non-linear Dynamics of Meaning-Processing in Social Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2009-01-01

    Social order does not exist as a stable phenomenon, but can be considered as "an order of reproduced expectations." When anticipations operate upon one another, they can generate a non-linear dynamics which processes meaning. Although specific meanings can be stabilized, for example in social institutions, all meaning arises from a global horizon of possible meanings. Using Luhmann's (1984) social systems theory and Rosen's (1985) theory of anticipatory systems, I submit algorithms for modeling the non-linear dynamics of meaning in social systems. First, a self-referential system can use a model of itself for the anticipation. Under the condition of functional differentiation, the social system can be expected to entertain a set of models; each model can also contain a model of the other models. Two anticipatory mechanisms are then possible: a transversal one between the models, and a longitudinal one providing the system with a variety of meanings. A system containing two anticipatory mechanisms can become h...

  19. Location of test bundle instrumentation and anticipated experimental values for the CFTL AG-1 bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The placement of instrumentation within the Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) AG-1 test section to meet the following objectives is described. The objectives are threefold: (1) to provide values for the evaluation of the performance of the test section, (2) to compare the experimental data with value determined by pretest calulations to indicate the approach to conditions that can lead to a bundle failure, and (3) to acquire data during testing that will form a data base for subsequent use in the verification of computational procedures used in the licensing of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Anticipated values for the various instruments have been determined using the computational procedure SAGAPO modified for the AG-1 geometry. These results are used as the basis for the specification of differential pressure cells and the range of readings anticipated from the thermocouples. Part of the results for the full-flow, full-power case is presented

  20. A review of statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation: looking for an answer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Gruber, Stephen B; Raymond, Victoria M;

    2010-01-01

    to a recently proposed random effects model which includes extended pedigree data and unaffected family members [Larsen et al., 2009]. A naive use of the paired t-test is biased for the simple reason that age of onset has to be less than the age at ascertainment (interview) for both affected parent and child......Anticipation, manifested through decreasing age of onset or increased severity in successive generations, has been noted in several genetic diseases. Statistical methods for genetic anticipation range from a simple use of the paired t-test for age of onset restricted to affected parent-child pairs...... to incorporate recently proposed statistical methods that consider family instead of affected pairs as the sampling unit. These prospective censored regression models offer additional flexibility to incorporate unaffected family members, familial correlation and other covariates into the analysis. An expanded...

  1. An anticipating It\\^o formula for L\\'evy processes

    OpenAIRE

    Alòs, Elisa; León, Jorge A.; Vives, Josep

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we use the Malliavin calculus techniques to obtain an anticipative version of the change of variable formula for L\\'evy processes. Here the coefficients are in the domain of the anihilation (gradient) operator in the "future sense", which includes the family of all adapted and square-integrable processes. This domain was introduced on the Wiener space by Al\\`os and Nualart.

  2. Dynamic Analytical Capability to Better Understand and Anticipate Extremist Shifts Within Populations under Authoritarian Regimes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Michael Lewis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to create a generalizable data- and theory-supported capability to better understand and anticipate (with quantifiable uncertainty): 1) how the dynamics of allegiance formations between various groups and society are impacted by active conflict and by third-party interventions and 2) how/why extremist allegiances co-evolve over time due to changing geopolitical, sociocultural, and military conditions.

  3. Current and anticipated uses of thermal-hydraulic codes in NFI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, K. [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Takayasu, M. [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Sennann-gun (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents the thermal-hydraulic codes currently used in NFI for the LWR fuel development and licensing application including transient and design basis accident analyses of LWR plants. The current status of the codes are described in the context of code capability, modeling feature, and experience of code application related to the fuel development and licensing. Finally, the anticipated use of the future thermal-hydraulic code in NFI is briefly given.

  4. Pain, distress, and anticipated recovery for older versus younger emergency department patients after motor vehicle collision

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Gregory F; McLean, Samuel A.; Tkacik, Thomas J; Swor, Robert A; Jones, Jeffrey S.; Lee, David C; Peak, David A.; Domeier, Robert M.; Rathlev, Niels K.; Hendry, Phyllis L.; Platts-Mills, Timothy F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) are the second most common injury mechanism resulting in emergency department (ED) visits by older adults. MVCs result in substantial pain and psychological distress among younger individuals, but little is known about the occurrence of these symptoms in older individuals. We describe the frequency of and characteristics associated with pain, distress, and anticipated time for physical and emotional recovery for older adults presenting to the ED afte...

  5. Role of affective attitudes and anticipated affective reactions in predicting health behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Conner, M; McEachan, R.; Taylor, N; O'Hara, J.; Lawton, R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Two measures of affect-affective attitude (AA) and anticipated affective reaction (AAR)- have frequently been used individually, but rarely simultaneously, in correlational studies predicting health behaviors. This research assessed their individual and combined impact in predicting intention and action for a range of health behaviors, controlling for theory of planned behavior (TPB) variables. Method: Self-reported intentions and performance of health behaviors were the main outco...

  6. Contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) to core melt at United States nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report looks at WASH-1400 and several other Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) and Probabilistic Safety Studies (PSSs) to determine the contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) events to the total core melt probability at eight nuclear power plants in the United States. After considering each plant individually, the results are compared from plant to plant to see if any generic conclusions regarding ATWS, or core melt in general, can be made. 8 refs., 34 tabs

  7. The anticipation and interpretation of UK company announcements: The incentives to acquire information

    OpenAIRE

    Foreman, Denise Ann Wren

    1996-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The objective of this thesis is to explain the behaviour of stock returns around the disclosure of different types of information release by UK companies. Previous literature has documented the existence of both market anticipation and the lagged impounding of value relevant information. The main objective of this research is, therefore, to identify the conditions under which inve...

  8. International transmission of anticipated inflation under alternative exchange-rate regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Jill A. Holman; Felix K. Rioja

    1998-01-01

    This paper studies the international transmission of anticipated inflation. A two-country, two-good, two-currency, cash-in-advance model is used to examine analytically and numerically the consequences of changes in a country's inflation rate. Domestic monetary policy influences real activity at home through an inflation-tax channel. These real effects are transmitted to the foreign country via fluctuations in the real exchange rate. Under a flexible nominal exchange rate, inflation is a begg...

  9. Anticipated Inflation, Real Disturbances and Money Demand: The Case of Chinese Hyperinflation, 1946-49

    OpenAIRE

    Tallman, Ellis W; De-piao Tang; Ping Wang

    2001-01-01

    This paper re-examines the dynamics of hyperinflation extending the standard Cagan framework. In our theoretical model, we allow the relative price of capital goods in units of consumption goods to vary in order to examine interactions between the real and monetary sectors. The theory generates empirically testable implications that suggest expanding the standard Caganian money demand function to include both anticipated inflation and relative price effects in a nonlinear fashion. Employing d...

  10. How Stakeholder Sensing and Anticipations Shape the Firm’s Strategic Response Capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Carina Antonia; Andersen, Torben Juul; Ooi, Can-Seng

    We outline a strategic response capability framework drawing on cognitive neuroscience to explain stakeholder sensing and anticipations as essential input to environmental analysis. Stakeholders receive stimuli from ongoing interactions with the firm and thereby sense current environmental change...... with associated propositions. We discuss the implications of the proposed framework and suggest future research venues to further uncover the microfoundations of the firm’s strategic response capability....

  11. Anticipated utility and rational expectations as approximations of Bayesian decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Cogley, Timothy W.; Sargent, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    For a Markov decision problem in which unknown transition probabilities serve as hidden state variables, we study the quality of two approximations to the decision rule of a Bayesian who each period updates his subjective distribu- tion over the transition probabilities by Bayes’ law. The first is the usual ratio- nal expectations approximation that assumes that the decision maker knows the transition probabilities. The second approximation is a version of Kreps’ (1998) anticipated utility mo...

  12. When Math Hurts: Math Anxiety Predicts Pain Network Activation in Anticipation of Doing Math

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Ian M.; Beilock, Sian L.

    2012-01-01

    Math can be difficult, and for those with high levels of mathematics-anxiety (HMAs), math is associated with tension, apprehension, and fear. But what underlies the feelings of dread effected by math anxiety? Are HMAs' feelings about math merely psychological epiphenomena, or is their anxiety grounded in simulation of a concrete, visceral sensation - such as pain - about which they have every right to feel anxious? We show that, when anticipating an upcoming math-task, the higher one's math a...

  13. For an Olive Wreath? Olympic Games and Anticipation Effects in Macroeconomics

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Bruckner; Evi Pappa

    2011-01-01

    We examine the effects that hosting and bidding for the Olympic Games has on macroeconomic outcomes in a panel of 184 countries spanning the period 1950-2006. Actual hosting of the Games generates positive investment, consumption, and output responses before, during, and after hosting. We detect anticipation effects: (i) bidding for the Olympic Games generates positive investment, consumption, and output responses at the time of the bidding; (ii) bidding for the Games has a transitory level e...

  14. The Effects of High- and Low-Anxiety Training on the Anticipation Judgments of Elite Performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, David; Ford, Paul R; Causer, Joe; Williams, A Mark

    2016-02-01

    We examined the effects of high- versus low-anxiety conditions during video-based training of anticipation judgments using international-level badminton players facing serves and the transfer to high-anxiety and field-based conditions. Players were assigned to a high-anxiety training (HA), low-anxiety training (LA) or control group (CON) in a pretraining-posttest design. In the pre- and posttest, players anticipated serves from video and on court under high- and low-anxiety conditions. In the video-based high-anxiety pretest, anticipation response accuracy was lower and final fixations shorter when compared with the low-anxiety pretest. In the low-anxiety posttest, HA and LA demonstrated greater accuracy of judgments and longer final fixations compared with pretest and CON. In the high-anxiety posttest, HA maintained accuracy when compared with the low-anxiety posttest, whereas LA had lower accuracy. In the on-court posttest, the training groups demonstrated greater accuracy of judgments compared with the pretest and CON. PMID:27018561

  15. Instruction in learning a temporal pattern on an anticipation-coincidence task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albinet, C; Fezzani, K

    2003-08-01

    Using a computer-simulated anticipation-coincidence task, the main aim of the study was to examine the effect of the type of instruction on learning a temporal pattern. For this task, participants must learn to anticipate the appropriate time to launch a projectile to hit a moving target. The experiment involved three instructional conditions. In the Explicit-rule Discover Instruction Condition participants were informed that target speed could change from trial to trial and that change is controlled by a regular pattern. Their task was then to search, to identify, and to use such pattern to enhance their anticipation. In the Explicit-Informative Instruction Condition, participants were, however, allowed before practice to examine attentively the regular pattern. Participants were also explicitly urged to use the pattern they observed to ensure a better interception of the target. Finally, in the Implicit Instruction Condition, participants were only informed that their task was to hit, or at least, to place the projectile as near as possible to the target. No additional information was provied about the target's behaviour. Analysis indicated that learning the temporal pattern was more important in Implicit than in Explicit-rule Discover Instruction Condion. However, the Explicit-Informative Instruction Condition produced unambiguouslly the highest learning. Overall, the study highlights the role of information over guidance in the understanding of the effect of the instructions on learning. Finally, we discussed the implications of these results on the comprehension of the variability of the effects of the instruction on learning.

  16. Reduced reward anticipation in youth at high-risk for unipolar depression: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Olino

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Offspring of depressed parents are at risk for depression and recent evidence suggests that reduced positive affect (PA may be a marker of risk. We investigated whether self-reports of PA and fMRI-measured striatal response to reward, a neural correlate of PA, are reduced in adolescent youth at high familial risk for depression (HR relative to youth at low familial risk for depression (LR. Functional magnetic resonance imaging assessments were conducted with 14 HR and 12 LR youth. All youth completed an ecological momentary assessment protocol to measure PA in natural settings and a self-report measure of depression symptomatology. Analyses found that HR youth demonstrated lower striatal response than LR youth during both reward anticipation and outcome. However, after controlling for youth self-reports of depression, HR youth demonstrated lower striatal response than LR youth only during reward anticipation. No significant differences were found between HR and LR youth on subjective ratings of PA or depressive symptoms. Results are consistent with previous findings that reduced reward response is a marker of risk for depression, particularly during reward anticipation, even in the absence of (or accounting for disrupted subjective mood. Further examinations of prospective associations between reward response and depression onset are needed.

  17. LARYNGEAL CHONDROSARCOMA: SUCCESSFUL USE OF VIDEO LARYNGOSCOPE IN ANTICIPATED DIFFICULT AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinaj, Vladimir; Milošev, Sanja; Janjević, Dušanka

    2016-03-01

    Laryngeal chondrosarcoma is a rare mesenchymal tumor, most frequently affecting cricoid cartilage. The objective of this report is to present successful video laryngoscope usage in a patient with anticipated difficult airway who refused awake fiberoptic endotracheal intubation (AFOI). A 59-year-old male patient was admitted in our hospital due to difficulty breathing and swallowing. On clinical examination performed by ENT surgeon, preoperative endoscopic airway examination (PEAE) could not be performed properly due to the patient's uncooperativeness. Computed tomography revealed a spherical tumor that obstructed the subglottic area almost entirely. Due to the narrowed airway, the first choice for the anticipated difficult airway management was AFOI, which the patient refused. Consequently, we decided to perform endotracheal intubation with indirect laryngoscope using a C-MAC video laryngoscope (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). Reinforced endotracheal tube (6.0 mm internal diameter) was placed gently between the tumor mass and the posterior wall of the trachea in the first attempt. Confirmation of endotracheal intubation was done by capnography. In a patient with subglottic area chondrosarcoma refusing PEAE and AFOI, video laryngoscope is a particularly helpful device for difficult airway management when difficult airway is anticipated. PMID:27276783

  18. Anxiety, anticipation and contextual information: A test of attentional control theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Adam J; Jackson, Robin C; Bishop, Daniel T; Williams, A Mark

    2016-09-01

    We tested the assumptions of Attentional Control Theory (ACT) by examining the impact of anxiety on anticipation using a dynamic, time-constrained task. Moreover, we examined the involvement of high- and low-level cognitive processes in anticipation and how their importance may interact with anxiety. Skilled and less-skilled tennis players anticipated the shots of opponents under low- and high-anxiety conditions. Participants viewed three types of video stimuli, each depicting different levels of contextual information. Performance effectiveness (response accuracy) and processing efficiency (response accuracy divided by corresponding mental effort) were measured. Skilled players recorded higher levels of response accuracy and processing efficiency compared to less-skilled counterparts. Processing efficiency significantly decreased under high- compared to low-anxiety conditions. No difference in response accuracy was observed. When reviewing directional errors, anxiety was most detrimental to performance in the condition conveying only contextual information, suggesting that anxiety may have a greater impact on high-level (top-down) cognitive processes, potentially due to a shift in attentional control. Our findings provide partial support for ACT; anxiety elicited greater decrements in processing efficiency than performance effectiveness, possibly due to predominance of the stimulus-driven attentional system. PMID:26211944

  19. When math hurts: math anxiety predicts pain network activation in anticipation of doing math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ian M; Beilock, Sian L

    2012-01-01

    Math can be difficult, and for those with high levels of mathematics-anxiety (HMAs), math is associated with tension, apprehension, and fear. But what underlies the feelings of dread effected by math anxiety? Are HMAs' feelings about math merely psychological epiphenomena, or is their anxiety grounded in simulation of a concrete, visceral sensation - such as pain - about which they have every right to feel anxious? We show that, when anticipating an upcoming math-task, the higher one's math anxiety, the more one increases activity in regions associated with visceral threat detection, and often the experience of pain itself (bilateral dorso-posterior insula). Interestingly, this relation was not seen during math performance, suggesting that it is not that math itself hurts; rather, the anticipation of math is painful. Our data suggest that pain network activation underlies the intuition that simply anticipating a dreaded event can feel painful. These results may also provide a potential neural mechanism to explain why HMAs tend to avoid math and math-related situations, which in turn can bias HMAs away from taking math classes or even entire math-related career paths. PMID:23118929

  20. Insular activation during reward anticipation reflects duration of illness in abstinent pathological gamblers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke eTsurumi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pathological gambling (PG is a chronic mental disorder characterized by a difficulty restraining gambling behavior despite negative consequences. Although brain abnormalities in patients with substance use disorders are caused by repetitive drug use and recover partly with drug abstinence, the relationship between brain activity and duration of illness or abstinence of gambling behavior in PG patients remains unclear. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared the brain activity of 23 PG patients recruited from a treatment facility with 27 demographically-matched healthy control subjects during reward anticipation, and examined the correlations between brain activity and duration of illness or abstinence in PG patients. During reward anticipation, PG patients showed decreased activity compared to healthy controls in a broad range of the reward system regions, including the insula cortex. In PG patients, activation in the left insula showed a significant negative correlation with illness duration. Our findings suggest that insular activation during reward anticipation may serve as a marker of progression of pathological gambling.

  1. Integrated mechanisms of anticipation and rate-of-change computations in cortical circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel D Puccini

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Local neocortical circuits are characterized by stereotypical physiological and structural features that subserve generic computational operations. These basic computations of the cortical microcircuit emerge through the interplay of neuronal connectivity, cellular intrinsic properties, and synaptic plasticity dynamics. How these interacting mechanisms generate specific computational operations in the cortical circuit remains largely unknown. Here, we identify the neurophysiological basis of both the rate of change and anticipation computations on synaptic inputs in a cortical circuit. Through biophysically realistic computer simulations and neuronal recordings, we show that the rate-of-change computation is operated robustly in cortical networks through the combination of two ubiquitous brain mechanisms: short-term synaptic depression and spike-frequency adaptation. We then show how this rate-of-change circuit can be embedded in a convergently connected network to anticipate temporally incoming synaptic inputs, in quantitative agreement with experimental findings on anticipatory responses to moving stimuli in the primary visual cortex. Given the robustness of the mechanism and the widespread nature of the physiological machinery involved, we suggest that rate-of-change computation and temporal anticipation are principal, hard-wired functions of neural information processing in the cortical microcircuit.

  2. Analyses of the Anticipated Operational Occurrences for the HANARO Fuel Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. K.; Sim, B. S.; Chi, D. Y.; Lee, C. Y.; Ahn, S. H

    2007-12-15

    The analyses of anticipated operational occurrences of the HANARO fuel test loop have been carried out by using the MARS/FTL{sub A} code, which is a modified version of the MARS code. A critical heat flux correlation on the three rods with triangular array was implemented in the MARS/FTL{sub A} code. The correlation was obtained from the critical heat fluxes measured at a test section, which is the same geometry of the in-pile test section of the HANARO fuel test loop. The anticipated operational occurrences of the HANARO fuel test loop are the inadvertent closure of the isolation valves, the over-power transient of the HANARO, the stuck open of the safety valves, and the loss of HANARO class IV power. A minimum DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) was predicted in the inadvertent closure of the isolation valves. It is indicated that the minimum DNBR of 1.85 is greater than the design limit DNBR of 1.39. The maximum coolant pressure calculated in the anticipated operational occurrences is also less than the 110 percents of the design pressure.

  3. When math hurts: math anxiety predicts pain network activation in anticipation of doing math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ian M; Beilock, Sian L

    2012-01-01

    Math can be difficult, and for those with high levels of mathematics-anxiety (HMAs), math is associated with tension, apprehension, and fear. But what underlies the feelings of dread effected by math anxiety? Are HMAs' feelings about math merely psychological epiphenomena, or is their anxiety grounded in simulation of a concrete, visceral sensation - such as pain - about which they have every right to feel anxious? We show that, when anticipating an upcoming math-task, the higher one's math anxiety, the more one increases activity in regions associated with visceral threat detection, and often the experience of pain itself (bilateral dorso-posterior insula). Interestingly, this relation was not seen during math performance, suggesting that it is not that math itself hurts; rather, the anticipation of math is painful. Our data suggest that pain network activation underlies the intuition that simply anticipating a dreaded event can feel painful. These results may also provide a potential neural mechanism to explain why HMAs tend to avoid math and math-related situations, which in turn can bias HMAs away from taking math classes or even entire math-related career paths.

  4. When math hurts: math anxiety predicts pain network activation in anticipation of doing math.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Lyons

    Full Text Available Math can be difficult, and for those with high levels of mathematics-anxiety (HMAs, math is associated with tension, apprehension, and fear. But what underlies the feelings of dread effected by math anxiety? Are HMAs' feelings about math merely psychological epiphenomena, or is their anxiety grounded in simulation of a concrete, visceral sensation - such as pain - about which they have every right to feel anxious? We show that, when anticipating an upcoming math-task, the higher one's math anxiety, the more one increases activity in regions associated with visceral threat detection, and often the experience of pain itself (bilateral dorso-posterior insula. Interestingly, this relation was not seen during math performance, suggesting that it is not that math itself hurts; rather, the anticipation of math is painful. Our data suggest that pain network activation underlies the intuition that simply anticipating a dreaded event can feel painful. These results may also provide a potential neural mechanism to explain why HMAs tend to avoid math and math-related situations, which in turn can bias HMAs away from taking math classes or even entire math-related career paths.

  5. Social Security and Medicare Benefits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Annual cash benefits and rehabilitation benefits paid in each year from the Old-Age and Survivors Insurance, and Disability Insurance Trust Funds, and benefits paid...

  6. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manley, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.manley@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au; Last, Andrew; Fu, Kenneth; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P [North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients.

  7. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients

  8. Improving the Quality of the Supply-Demand-Match in Vocational Education and Training by Anticipation and "Matching Policy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassnigg, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the implications of a framework to improve matching supply and demand in VET by a policy to improve quality by using anticipation and foresight approaches. Analysis of the Austrian anticipation system identified some basic aspects such as policy. The analysis focused on two issues: the observation and measurement of…

  9. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. Exercise also helps people ... watch this video To learn about exercise and diabetes, see "Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes" from Go4Life®, ...

  10. The Benefits of Latin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Lisa R.

    2012-01-01

    Classicists have long claimed that the study of Latin has benefits that exceed knowledge of the language itself, and in the current economic times, these claims are made with urgency. Indeed, many contend that Latin improves English grammar and writing skills, cognitive abilities, and develops transferable skills necessary for success in the…

  11. Benefits at risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jesper; Sandøe, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Herbicide resistant GM plants have been promoted as a tool in the development of more environment-friendly agriculture. The environmental benefits here, however, depend not only on farmer's acceptance of GM crops as such, but also on their willingness to use herbicides in accordance with altered...

  12. PENSION FUND BENEFITS SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Benefits Service

    2002-01-01

    Please note that from now on, our offices (5-1-030) will be opened to members and beneficiaries on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 10 to 12 a.m. and from 3 to 5 p.m. We are otherwise available but by appointment only. Benefits Service (tel. 79194 / 72738)

  13. PENSION FUND BENEFITS SERVICE

    CERN Document Server

    Benefits Service

    2002-01-01

    Please note that from now on, our offices will be opened to members and beneficiaries on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 10 to 12 a.m. and from 3 to 5 p.m. We are otherwise available but by appointment only. Benefits Service 5-1-030 tel. 79194 / 72738

  14. Benefits of quitting tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Every week, month, and year without tobacco further improves your health. Within 20 minutes of quitting: Your blood pressure ... that of a person who still smokes. Other health benefits of quitting ... may travel to the lungs Lower risk of erectile dysfunction ...

  15. Developing benefits management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Markus

    An old quote goes “Rome wasn’t built in a day” which is similar to the practices comprehended by benefits management (BM) in today’s organizations; they mature as organizations improve practices (Ward & Daniel, 2012). The implication is that many organizations are still not realizing or are unsure...

  16. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. Exercise also helps people ... or difficulty walking. To learn about exercise and diabetes, see "Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes" from Go4Life®, ...

  17. Public services, personal benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bob Kuhry; Evert Pommer; Jedid-Jah Jonker; John Stevens

    2006-01-01

    Original title: Publieke productie & persoonlijk profijt. This report looks in detail at the costs of public services (such as care, education, public administration and safety) and the benefits that citizens derive from the government expenditure involved in delivering those services. In 2003,

  18. The "Magic" of Tutorial Centres in Hong Kong: An Analysis of Media Marketing and Pedagogy in a Tutorial Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask…

  19. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre: annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development (R and D) work carried out in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay during 1988 is summarised and presented in the sections entitled Physical Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Materials and Materials Science, Radioisotopes, Reactors, Fuel cycle, Radiological Safety and Protection, Electronics and Instrumentation, Engineering Services, Life Sciences and General. At the end of each section a list of publications is also given. The R and D work of the outstation units of BARC, namely, Nuclear Research Laboratory, Srinagar; High Altitute Research Laboratory, Gulmarg and Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta are also described in this report. Some of the highlights of the work during the year are: (1) Medium Energy Heavy Ion Accelerator (MEHIA) facility set up jointly by BARC and the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) at TIFR premises became fully operational in September 1988. A number of new compositions of high temperature supconducting materials were synthesized. The highest transition temperature achieved was 125 K. Research work to improve the quality of sintered uranium oxide pellets achieved the purpose. Nuclear fuels were fabricated by using sol-gel process. R and D work for 235 MWe and 500 MWe PHWR type reactors is continuing. Conceptual design of the fuel handling system for the prototype fast breeder reactor was finalised. 233U+Al alloy fuel for Kamini reactor was fabricated. Progress has been made in industrial applications of enzymes. Various applications of radioisotopes are being continued. Certain technologies and processes developed in the Centre were transferred to commercial agencies for large scale exploitation. (M.G.B.)

  20. Human-centred approaches in slipperiness measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönqvist, Raoul; Abeysekera, John; Gard, Gunvor; Hsiang, Simon M.; Leamon, Tom B.; Newman, Dava J.; Gielo-Perczak, Krystyna; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Pai, Clive Y.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A number of human-centred methodologies—subjective, objective, and combined—are used for slipperiness measurement. They comprise a variety of approaches from biomechanically-oriented experiments to psychophysical tests and subjective evaluations. The objective of this paper is to review some of the research done in the field, including such topics as awareness and perception of slipperiness, postural and balance control, rating scales for balance, adaptation to slippery conditions, measurement of unexpected movements, kinematics of slipping, and protective movements during falling. The role of human factors in slips and falls will be discussed. Strengths and weaknesses of human-centred approaches in relation to mechanical slip test methodologies are considered. Current friction-based criteria and thresholds for walking without slipping are reviewed for a number of work tasks. These include activities such as walking on a level or an inclined surface, running, stopping and jumping, as well as stair ascent and descent, manual exertion (pushing and pulling, load carrying, lifting) and particular concerns of the elderly and mobility disabled persons. Some future directions for slipperiness measurement and research in the field of slips and falls are outlined. Human-centred approaches for slipperiness measurement do have many applications. First, they are utilized to develop research hypotheses and models to predict workplace risks caused by slipping. Second, they are important alternatives to apparatus-based friction measurements and are used to validate such methodologies. Third, they are used as practical tools for evaluating and monitoring slip resistance properties of foot wear, anti-skid devices and floor surfaces. PMID:11794763

  1. Biological Inspiration in Human Centred Robotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUHuo-sheng; LIUJin-dong; CalderonCarlosA

    2004-01-01

    Human centred robotics (HCR) concerns with the development of various kinds of intelligent systems and robots that will be used in environments coexisting with humans. These systems and robots will be interactive and useful assistants/companions for people in different ages, situations, activities and environments in order to improve the quality of life. This paper presents the autors' current research work toward the development of advanced theory and technologies for HCR applications, based on inspiration from biological systems. More specifically, both bio-mimetic system modelling and robot learning by imitation are discussed respectively, and some preliminary results are demonstrated.

  2. The INTEGRAL science data centre (ISDC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courvoisier, T.J.L.; Walter, Rasmus; Beckmann, V.;

    2003-01-01

    The INTEGRAL Science Data Centre (ISDC) provides the INTEGRAL data and means to analyse them to the scientific community. The ISDC runs a gamma ray burst alert system that provides the position of gamma ray bursts on the sky within seconds to the community. It operates a quick-look analysis...... of the data within few hours that detects new and unexpected sources as well as it monitors the instruments. The ISDC processes the data through a standard analysis the results of which are provided to the observers together with their data....

  3. Hunting for hardware changes in data centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With many servers and server parts the environment of warehouse sized data centres is increasingly complex. Server life-cycle management and hardware failures are responsible for frequent changes that need to be managed. To manage these changes better a project codenamed “hardware hound” focusing on hardware failure trending and hardware inventory has been started at CERN. By creating and using a hardware oriented data set - the inventory - with detailed information on servers and their parts as well as tracking changes to this inventory, the project aims at, for example, being able to discover trends in hardware failure rates.

  4. WHEAT GRASS HEALTH BENEFITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nutraceutical is a food or food product that provides health and medical benefits, including the preventionand treatment of disease. Nutraceuticals are the products typically claim to prevent chronic diseases, improve health,delay the aging process, and increase life expectancy.Let us know something about one such nutraceutical.Wheatgrass is a commonly found herb in India contains enzymes like protease, cytrochrome, amylase, lipase,transhydrogenase and SOD (super oxide dismutase. Besides these enzymes, it also contains all the essential aminoacids especially alanine, asparatic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and serine, which are helpful in providing good amountof protein in body which builds and repair tissues. Wheatgrass contains chlorophyll and flavonoids in good amount.It also contains vitamins like vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin E and minerals like iron, calcium and magnesium.Chlorophyll has been shown to build red blood cells quickly,cures anemia, normalise blood pressure by dilating theblood vessels. Chlorophyll has been shown to produce an unfavourable environment for bacterial growth in the bodyand therefore effective in increasing the body's resistance to illness. Probably the most important benefit ofwheatgrass is, it is a cancer fighting agent. Many people strongly believe that the benefits of wheatgrass on cancerare real and that consuming wheat grass can help in the treatment and even in the prevention of cancer. Wheatgrassproduces an immunization effect against many dietary carcinogens..Additional benefits of wheatgrass are bettercomplexion and a healthy glow. The slowing of graying hair is also a benefit believed to come from wheatgrass. Wecan grow wheat grass in small cups, pots and trays very conveniently in our homes, so that we will have fresh juiceand powder with minimum cost.

  5. Managing social impact in design: tools and methods for anticipating consequences of technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    The use of email communication, mobile phones and cars has had wide-ranging social consequences. What is more, designers are plainly not always aware of all social consequences of technology, despite practicing user-centred design. Modern technology creates possibilities to influence social behaviou

  6. International energy technology collaboration: benefits and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IEA Energy Technology Collaboration Programme facilitates international collaboration on energy technology research, development and deployment. More than 30 countries are involved in Europe, America, Asia, Australasia and Africa. The aim is to accelerate the development and deployment of new energy technologies to meet energy security, environmental and economic development goals. Costs and resources are shared among participating governments, utilities, corporations and universities. By co-operating, they avoid unproductive duplication and maximize the benefits from research budgets. The IEA Programme results every year in hundreds of publications which disseminate information about the latest energy technology developments and their commercial utilisation. The IEA Energy Technology Collaboration Programme operates through a series of agreements among governments. This report details the activities and achievements of all 41 agreements, covering energy technology information centres and Research and Development projects in fossil fuels, renewable energy efficient end-use, and nuclear fusion technologies. (authors). 58 refs., 9 tabs

  7. "I just feel like I am at home" : person-centred support at the Monika- Multicultural Women's House

    OpenAIRE

    Järvinen, Anna-Maria; Lehto, Anni; Le Baron, Maare

    2013-01-01

    Järvinen, Anna-Maria; Le Baron, Maare and Lehto, Anni. “I just feel like I am at home”: Person-centred support at the Monika- Multicultural Women’s House. 78 pages. 1 appendix. Language: English. Autumn 2013. Diaconia University of Applied Sciences. Degree Programme in Social Services. Degree: Bachelor of Social Services. The research question is how the person-centred support at the Monika- Multicultural Women’s House benefits its clients. The aim of the research was to study how the cli...

  8. Demand for DNA probe testing in three genetic centres in Britain (August 1986 to July 1987).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, R J; Swan, A V; Beech, R; Prentice, L; Reynolds, A; Wilson, O; Mole, G; Vadera, P

    1989-04-01

    published guidelines for clinicians in general on the uses of DNA probes, the type of families that could benefit, and the centres to which referrals should be sent would be very useful in increasing coverage and maximising the effectiveness of the services. Since this may increase demand, this educative tool should be coordinated and agreed by the Departments of Health with all the genetic departments and centres in the country. PMID:2716033

  9. A Building as a Catalyst for Change: the New British Library Centre for Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Shenton

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The new Centre for Conservation at the British Library (BLCC opened in London this year. This 2600 square metre, purpose-built Centre is connected to the main British Library by a new public terrace and is adjacent to the new St Pancras Eurostar station opening in November 2007. The Centre houses state-of-the-art book conservation studios and sound preservation studios, together with facilities for an extensive training and public outreach programme. The public programme includes a permanent, free exhibition and education suite at the entrance to the new Centre, linked to the rotation of iconic collection items within the BL’s Treasures Gallery. There are to be free, behind-the-scenes tours of the conservation studios for the public as well as demonstrations, workshops and talks. The professional outreach includes partnering with the University of the Arts on setting up a new two-year Foundation Degree in Book Conservation, setting up funded internships for book and sound preservation, and steps to furthering the BL in conservation research. From the beginning, there were three main, intertwined elements at the core of the Centre for Conservation project, namely construction, fund-raising and a ‘change programme’. The paper describes the construction project and highlights features such as the ‘floating’ sound studios, the natural north light that bathes the majority of the conservation studios and describes how the needs of visitors and circulation were anticipated. Secondly it describes the nature of the fund-raising for the €19.65 (£13.25 million project, which was the first such capital fund-raising project undertaken by the BL. The money has been raised from a combination of public and private sources. The mixture of conservation, professional training and public access has been key to the success in raising the funds. Thirdly, the paper describes how the impetus for providing appropriate accommodation for those areas not

  10. The Australian centre for RF bioeffects research (ACRBR) - an NHMRC centre of research excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Australian Centre for Radiofrequency Bioeffects Research (ACRBR) is a newly established multi-institutional research centre which seeks to research questions pertaining to possible health effects of exposure to radiofrequency devices, such as mobile phones and which is funded under the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centres of Research Excellence funding program. The Centre of Research Excellence in Electromagnetic Energy is combining the efforts of engineers, epidemiologists, physicists, psychophysiologists and veterinary pathologists from RMIT University, the Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science in South Australia (IMVS), Monash University, Swinburne University of Technology and Telstra Research Laboratories (TRL). The centre is funded at $2.5 M over five years and will undertake a program of research to address the issue of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) devices and health. It will also train new scientists, keep the community informed of ongoing developments and help the development of government policies in this area of considerable public concern. The 5-year program has the following components: Neurobiology: One important area where there is a perceived research gap is in the area of potential neurological effects, which will hence be a major focus of this Centre. The proposed studies range from in vitro and in vivo research studies of RF effects on neuron and neural system functioning in rodents, to that of RF effects on simple neural function, cognition and subjective report in humans. The latter series of studies have been developed to account for the consensus view that more emphasis needs to be placed on possible differences in RF population sensitivity (e.g. youth versus aged, and ' electromagnetic hypersensitives'). Epidemiological studies are an important tool in studying the impact on public health from exposure of whole populations to modern radio technologies. Cancer outcomes in this area of

  11. University Benefits Survey. Part I (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of a 1984 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: questions on general benefits, such as insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, and maternity leave policy;…

  12. Information validation tool for technical support centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The French National Emergency Organisation relies on the expert advice given by the different Technical Support Centres (EDF/SEPTEN, CEA/IPSN, Framatome). For several years a great effort has been made to improve tools. The first generation was mainly concerned with computational aids such as real-time plant data acquisition and visualisation, break size calculations, containment release estimations... These tools were presented at the OECD NEA Specialist Meeting in 1993. Currently work is performed in the field of validation of information available to the Technical Support Centres. The three partners (EDF, CEA and Framatome) have developed a prototype implementing the diagnosis and the quality of the information pertaining to the 3D/3P method. The philosophy of this tool is to present to the expert a set of essential information (e.g. state of the fuel barrier, primary water inventory...) for the diagnosis with a confidence level associated to each information and the adequate explications. In fact the expert has not only to know the diagnosis but also how reliable the information is and why. Subsequently, the algorithms used to elaborate the diagnoses and the confidence factor have to be simple enough so that the user is able to consult the explanations in a fast and easy way. The paper details the three-step process to elaborate the diagnosis and the confidence factor

  13. ALICE opens its new nerve centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-nine fully equipped and ergonomic workstations, one meeting area and 11 large format screens in a completely refurbished room: the ALICE Run Control Centre (ARC) implements the best and newest solutions for its shift workers and expert operators, including access for persons with reduced mobility and very soon a magic window for Point 2 visitors.   The ALICE Run Control Centre. “Our initial intention was just to optimise the old layout,” says Federico Ronchetti from Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy), a CERN scientific associate currently appointed as ALICE Run Coordinator and person in charge of the ALICE Consolidation Task Force. “However, during the review process, we carried out a study of all the existing control rooms at CERN and became aware we needed a radical change. Hence we started planning a complete redesign of the workspace.” Designed and equipped over many years, the old ALICE control room did not have enough space to fit al...

  14. KNMI Data Centre: Easy access for all

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vegte, John; Som de Cerff, Wim; Plieger, Maarten; de Vreede, Ernst; Sluiter, Raymond; Willem Noteboom, Jan; van der Neut, Ian; Verhoef, Hans; van Versendaal, Robert; van Binnendijk, Martin; Kalle, Henk; Knopper, Arthur; Spit, Jasper; Mastop, Joeri; Klos, Olaf; Calis, Gijs; Ha, Siu-Siu; van Moosel, Wim; Klein Ikkink, Henk-Jan; Tosun, Tuncay

    2013-04-01

    KNMI is the Dutch institute for weather, climate research and seismology. It disseminates weather information to the public at large, the government, aviation and the shipping industry in the interest of safety, the economy and a sustainable environment. To gain insight into long-term developments KNMI conducts research on climate change. Making the knowledge, data and information on hand at KNMI accessible is one core activity. A huge part of the KNMI information is from numerical models, insitu sensor networks and remote sensing satellites. This digital collection is mostly internal only available and is a collection of non searchable , non standardized file formats, lacking documentation and has no references to scientific publications. With the KNMI Data Centre (KDC) project these issues are tackled. In the project a user driven development approach with SCRUM was chosen to get maximum user involvement in a relative short development timeframe. Building on open standards and proven open source technology (which includes in-house developed software like ADAGUC WMS and Portal) resulted in a first release in December 2012 This presentation will focus on the aspects of KDC relating to its technical challenges, the development strategy and the initial usage results of the data centre.

  15. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre annual report : 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main thrust of the various research and development (R and D) activities of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay, is towards the implementation of India's nuclear power programme. To that end, its R and D activities cover the entire nuclear fuel cycle, reactor technology; applications of radioisotopes and radiations in agriculture, medicine and industries; and radiation protection in nuclear installations. The report presents in summarised form the R and D activities carried out during 1989 in the chapters entitled: Physical Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Materials and Materials Sciences, Radioisotopes, Reactors, Fuel Cycle, Radiological Safety and Protection, Electronics and Instrumentation, Engineering Services, Life Sciences and General. At the end of each chapter, a list of publications by the staff scientists in the corresponding subject field is given. The list includes published journal articles and technical reports, and papers presented at conferences, symposia etc. The report also covers the R and D activities of the outstation units of BARC, namely, Nuclear Research Laboratory, Srinagar; High Altitude Research Laboratory, Gulmarg; and Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. BARC is also engaged in basic an applied research in frontier areas of science such as plasma and fusion physics, accelerators and lasers, high temperature superconductivity, condensed matter physics, high pressure physics, high resolution spectroscopy, chemical reaction dynamics and laser induced chemistry, electronics and robotics: radiation biology, and genetic engineering. Report is illustrated with a number of figures, graphs, and coloured pictures. (M.G.B.) figs., refs

  16. CMS tracker slides into centre stage

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As preparations for the magnet test and cosmic challenge get underway, a prototype tracker has been carefully inserted into the centre of CMS. The tracker, in its special platform, is slowly inserted into the centre of CMS. The CMS prototype tracker to be used for the magnet test and cosmic challenge coming up this summer has the same dimensions -2.5 m in diameter and 6 m in length- as the real one and tooling exactly like it. However, the support tube is only about 1% equipped, with 2 m2 of silicon detectors installed out of the total 200 m2. This is already more than any LEP experiment ever used and indicates the great care needed to be taken by engineers and technicians as these fragile detectors were installed and transported to Point 5. Sixteen thousand silicon detectors with a total of about 10 million strips will make up the full tracker. So far, 140 modules with about 100 000 strips have been implanted into the prototype tracker. These silicon strips will provide precision tracking for cosmic muon...

  17. Pharmacist involvement in a diabetic education centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitz, J; Birken, B; Ward, V

    1982-01-01

    During the past two years, a multi-discipline health team has been meeting with selected diabetic "problem" patients on a regular basis at the North York General Hospital (NYGH). The patients are referred to the programme by their physicians when they appear to be having difficulty handling or coping with their diabetes. The participants in the programme attend the Diabetic Education Centre (DEC) for one week as day patients in the hospital and are exposed to various types of counselling from members of the Diabetic Education Centre Team (DECT), one of which is the pharmacist. Follow-up from this week of intensive education is made at annual intervals. The main purpose of the pharmacist in the clinic is to provide information for the patients regarding their prescriptions and over the counter (OTC) medication. This is achieved by means of individual patient interviews and informal group discussions, as well as rounds with other team members and contact with patients' families. This programme provides a forum for the patient and the patient's family to obtain valid information about diabetes, as well as problems associated with the disease, and aids in coping with these problems. The team concept enables the patient to be analyzed by all disciplines in order to assess his teaching needs and fulfill them. The pharmacist is continually involved in this information system and plays a valuable role on the team. PMID:10257341

  18. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia.

  19. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. PMID:27284024

  20. Streamlined Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) application to CANDU 6 stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past five years, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) has been working with CANDU utilities on Plant Life Management (PLiM) programs that will see existing CANDU plants through their design life and beyond. As part of this initiative, AECL and New Brunswick Power have partnered to develop a Systematic Approach to Maintenance program applied to selected critical plant systems. This paper will describe how streamlined Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) techniques have been applied on systems at the Point Lepreau Generating Station to provide a sound documented basis for maintenance strategies. These strategies have emphasised a hierarchy of condition based maintenance, time based maintenance and, where appropriate, corrective maintenance. The major steps in the process are described. The clear benefits of focusing maintenance in areas where it is needed and effective from the context of impact on system function requirements are described. The basis of the maintenance program is fully documented at the individual task level. The results of the program are also used to define maintenance strategies for future CANDU power plants. (author)

  1. User-Centred Design and Agile Development: Rebuilding the Swedish National Union Catalogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Lindström

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available With a new generation of OPACs emerging that attempt to address longstanding shortcomings, how do we make sure that we do not lose ground again in the future? This article suggests a combination of iterative development and user-centred design as a way to develop systems that will meet the constantly changing expectations of users by providing both functionality and usability. It gives a short introduction to iterative software development and user-centred design. A case study of the development of the new version of LIBRIS (http://libris.kb.se, the Swedish National Union Catalogue, is used as an example of how these methodologies can benefit from each other in practice.

  2. A process for developing a principle-centred district nursing service philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Quinten

    2011-11-01

    While it is well known that team vision and values statements in nursing can promote person-centred care, practitioner role clarity and empowerment, and service effectiveness, especially during times of change, their use in district nursing is limited. Accepted practice is to formulate vision and values statements 'from the top', and then seek buy-in from other staff groups, however, this inhibits practitioner engagement. This paper describes the use of group facilitation, based on principle-centred leadership practices, to engage practitioners in all the creative aspects of developing a values statement. Increasing practitioner engagement would be expected to provide the above benefits by improving communication with service-users and other key stakeholders and by motivating performance evaluation and improvement.

  3. A multi-dimensional framework to assist in the design of successful shared services centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Borman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Organisations are increasingly looking to realise the benefits of shared services yet there is little guidance available as to the best way to proceed. A multi-dimensional framework is presented that considers the service provided, the design of the shared services centre and the organisational context it sits within. Case studies are then used to determine what specific attributes from each dimension are associated with success and how they should be aligned. It is concluded that there appears to be a single, broadly standard pattern of attributes for successful Shared Services Centres (SSCs across the proposed dimensions of Activity, Environment, History, Resources, Strategy, Structure, Management, Technology and Individual Skills. It should also be noted though that some deviation from the identified standard along some dimensions is possible without adverse effect – ie that the alignment identified appears to be relatively soft.

  4. Bond centred functions in relativistic and non-relativistic calculations for diatomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we discuss the performance of molecular basis sets consisting of atomic centred (AC) functions augmented with bond centred (BC) functions in relativistic and non-relativistic calculations carried out at the Hartree-Fock and several correlated levels of approximation. While usually non-correlated calculations employing BC functions can be performed at a lower computational cost as compared with those making use of energy optimized AC basis sets, the correlated calculations are always more accurate and less expensive with the latter. It is demonstrated that both correlated or non-correlated calculations always benefit from the addition of a few BC functions with a moderate increase of computational effort. The performance of basis sets containing even-tempered BC functions is also studied and their usage is advocated in case of relativistic calculations

  5. Software Preservation Benefits Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Chue Hong, Neil; Crouch, Steve; Hettrick, Simon; Parkinson, Tim; Shreeve, Matt

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of software preservation has been carried out by Curtis+Cartwright Consulting Limited, in partnership with the Software Sustainability Institute (SSI), on behalf of the JISC. The aim of the study was to raise awareness and build capacity throughout the Further and Higher Education (FE/HE) sector to engage with preservation issues as part of the process of software development. Part of this involved examining the purpose and benefits of employing preservation measures in relat...

  6. THE BENEFITS OF NEUROECONOMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Krawczyk

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper serves as a brief introduction into the methods, results and problems of the new interdisciplinary field of neuroecomics (and its relatives. The focus is on the practical benefits that may result from it for the economic profession. These primarily involve the possibility of setting new promising research directions and providing novel tools raising hopes of enabling direct observation of human preference. The author also discusses methodological and ethical challenges that neuroeconomics is or will soon be facing

  7. Anticipated and current preventive behaviors in response to an anticipated human-to-human H5N1 epidemic in the Hong Kong Chinese general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffiths Sian

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of self-reported preventive behaviors in response to an anticipated local human-to-human H5N1 transmission outbreak and factors associated with such behaviors have not been examined. Methods A random, anonymous, cross-sectional telephone survey of 503 Hong Kong Chinese adults. Results The public in Hong Kong is likely to adopt self-protective behaviors (e.g., wearing face mask in public venues (73.8%, increasing the frequency of handwashing (86.7% and behaviors that protect others (e.g., wearing face masks when experiencing influenza-like illness (ILI, 92.4%, immediately seeking medical consultation (94.2%, making declarations when crossing the border with ILI (87.1%, complying to quarantine policies (88.3%. Multivariate analyses indicated that factors related to age, full-time employment, perceived susceptibility, perceived efficacy of preventive measures, perceived higher fatality as compared to SARS, perceived chance of a major local outbreak, and being worried about self/family members contracting the virus were significantly associated with the inclination to adopt self-protective measures. Similar analyses showed that education level, variables related to perceived efficacy, perceived major local outbreak and such were significantly associated with various behaviors directed towards protecting others. Conclusion In the event of a human-to-human H5N1 outbreak, the public in Hong Kong is likely to adopt preventive measures that may help contain the spread of the virus in the community.

  8. Ketamine Suppresses the Ventral Striatal Response to Reward Anticipation: A Cross-Species Translational Neuroimaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Jennifer; Grimm, Oliver; Schwarz, Adam J; Schweiger, Janina; Haller, Leila; Risterucci, Celine; Böhringer, Andreas; Zang, Zhenxiang; Tost, Heike; Gilmour, Gary; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Convergent evidence implicates regional neural responses to reward anticipation in the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, where blunted ventral striatal responses to positive reward are observed in patients and at-risk populations. In vivo oxygen amperometry measurements in the ventral striatum in awake, behaving rats reveal reward-related tissue oxygen changes that closely parallel blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes observed in human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), suggesting that a cross-species approach targeting this mechanism might be feasible in psychopharmacology. The present study explored modulatory effects of acute, subanaesthetic doses of ketamine-a pharmacological model widely used in psychopharmacological research, both preclinically and clinically-on ventral striatum activity during performance of a reward anticipation task in both species, using fMRI in humans and in vivo oxygen amperometry in rats. In a region-of-interest analysis conducted following a cross-over placebo and ketamine study in human subjects, an attenuated ventral striatal response during reward anticipation was observed following ketamine relative to placebo during performance of a monetary incentive delay task. In rats, a comparable attenuation of ventral striatal signal was found after ketamine challenge, relative to vehicle, in response to a conditioned stimulus that predicted delivery of reward. This study provides the first data in both species demonstrating an attenuating effect of acute ketamine on reward-related ventral striatal (O2) and fMRI signals. These findings may help elucidate a deeper mechanistic understanding of the potential role of ketamine as a model for psychosis, show that cross-species pharmacological experiments targeting reward signaling are feasible, and suggest this phenotype as a promising translational biomarker for the development of novel compounds, assessment of disease status, and

  9. Beyond face value: does involuntary emotional anticipation shape the perception of dynamic facial expressions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia Palumbo

    Full Text Available Emotional facial expressions are immediate indicators of the affective dispositions of others. Recently it has been shown that early stages of social perception can already be influenced by (implicit attributions made by the observer about the agent's mental state and intentions. In the current study possible mechanisms underpinning distortions in the perception of dynamic, ecologically-valid, facial expressions were explored. In four experiments we examined to what extent basic perceptual processes such as contrast/context effects, adaptation and representational momentum underpinned the perceptual distortions, and to what extent 'emotional anticipation', i.e. the involuntary anticipation of the other's emotional state of mind on the basis of the immediate perceptual history, might have played a role. Neutral facial expressions displayed at the end of short video-clips, in which an initial facial expression of joy or anger gradually morphed into a neutral expression, were misjudged as being slightly angry or slightly happy, respectively (Experiment 1. This response bias disappeared when the actor's identity changed in the final neutral expression (Experiment 2. Videos depicting neutral-to-joy-to-neutral and neutral-to-anger-to-neutral sequences again produced biases but in opposite direction (Experiment 3. The bias survived insertion of a 400 ms blank (Experiment 4. These results suggested that the perceptual distortions were not caused by any of the low-level perceptual mechanisms (adaptation, representational momentum and contrast effects. We speculate that especially when presented with dynamic, facial expressions, perceptual distortions occur that reflect 'emotional anticipation' (a low-level mindreading mechanism, which overrules low-level visual mechanisms. Underpinning neural mechanisms are discussed in relation to the current debate on action and emotion understanding.

  10. Victims’ use of professional services in a Dutch sexual assault centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Bicanic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prior research endorsed the establishment of sexual assault centres in the Netherlands because of the potential benefit for victims’ mental recovery. In 2012, the first Dutch sexual assault centre was founded at the University Medical Center Utrecht. The aim of the centre is to provide 24/7 coordinated and integrated services (i.e., medical, forensic, and psychological in one location. Objective: The purpose of the present study was to describe demographic, background, and assault characteristics of victims seen at the centre within one week post-assault, and their use of post-assault services in order to improve current services. Method: From January 2012 to September 2013, prospective data of 108 patients were collected. To describe the population included, frequency counts and proportions were generated for categorical variables. Results: The mean age was 21.3 years (SD=9.8. Most victims were female (91.7%. A large proportion of victims reported background characteristics known to increase the risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and revictimisation such as prior sexual abuse (32.4%, pre-existing use of mental health services (45.4%, and not living with both biological parents (61.7%. Most patients (88.9% consulted the centre within 72 hours post-assault. The uptake of services was high: 82.4% received emergency medical care, 61.7% underwent a forensic–medical exam, 34% reported to the police, and 82.4% utilised psychological services. Conclusion: To prevent revictimisation and PTSD, current psychological services could be improved with immediate trauma-focused treatments. Current forensic services may be improved with the use of standard top to toe forensic–medical examinations for both children and adults.

  11. Organisational and Infrastructure Prerequisites of Creation of an International Logistic Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarnavska Nataliya P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article lies in the study of organisational and infrastructure prerequisites of creation and functioning of integration structures capable, on the basis of logistics, of assisting subjects of economy in structuring and optimisation of material flows and also accompanying financial and information flows. In the result of the study the article identifies irregularities of the transition of national economies to new models of development and prospects of development of logistic provision of the innovation economy connected with them, transformation possibilities and prospects of international integration of the logistic market of Ukraine; it analyses prerequisites and substantiates expediency and shows benefits of formation of an international logistic centre in the city of Ternopil. The mission of the planned international logistic centre is ensuring a qualitatively new level of logistic provision of market participants, which would correspond with the existing world standards. The logistic centre performs realisation of its tasks and conduct of functions in the process of interaction with partners – participants of the logistic chain. The logistic centre should become an operator of flows of transit and export-import cargoes and it would perform important logistic functions connected not only with organisation of shipping operations but also with sorting, storing, packing and some other functions at the level of the best world representatives of the logistic servicing. In order to ensure successful activity of such a centre, it is required to adapt tariff policy of the state to international standards, to expand a list of relevant services, to reduce terms of cargo handling and to introduce modern technologies of information processing intensively.

  12. Stable anticipation synchronization in mutually coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Two vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers(VCSELs) are mutually coupled through a partially transparent mirror (PTM) placed in the pathway. The PTM plays the role of external mirror,which controls the feedback strength and coupling strength.We numerically simulate this system by establishing a visible SIMULINK model.The results demonstrate that the anticipation synchronization is achieved and it can tolerate some extent frequency detuning.Moreover,the system shows similar chaos-pass filtering effect on unidirectionally coupled system even both VCSELs are modulated.This system allows simultaneously bidirectional secure message transmission on public channels.

  13. The effect of a new communication template on anticipated willingness to initiate or resume allergen immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderon, Moises A; Cox, Linda; Casale, Thomas B;

    2015-01-01

    of prescription and (ii) a new communication template viewed some months later, we performed an Internet-based survey of patient panels in France, Germany, Spain, the USA and Russia. The survey participants were either recent "early abandoners" (having discontinued allergen immunotherapy before the end...... to validate the new communication template and to assess its impact on anticipated willingness to initiate or resume allergen immunotherapy. RESULTS: We surveyed a total of 261 patients (France: 57; Germany: 51; Spain: 52; USA: 51; Russia: 50), comprising 127 "early abandoners" and 134 "non...

  14. Contributions from eye movement potentials to stimulus preceding negativity during anticipation of auditory stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engdahl, Lis; Bjerre, Vicky K; Christoffersen, Gert R J

    2007-01-01

    distraction of attention and during attention with fixed gaze. ERP maxima found near the eyes required examination of eye movement interference, wherefore six monopolar EOG electrodes were included. Similarities between ERPs and potentials evoked by voluntary eye movements with respect to spatial distribution...... and polarities of amplitudes around the eyes and over the frontal cortex suggested that, in the closed-eyes condition, small involuntary downward eye movements occurred during attentive anticipation of sounds. Analyses of single trials corroborated this interpretation. On this basis it is suggested that the SPN...... was caused by such eye movements....

  15. Modelling Of Water Resources in Bakaru Hydropower Plant in Anticipating Load Increment in Sulselbar Power System

    OpenAIRE

    Said, Sri Mawar

    2015-01-01

    Bakaru hydro power plan water resources model will describe a model in anticipating load growth in Sulselbar Power System until year 2030. Bakaru hydro power plan is supplied by Mamasa, Sumarorong, and Lembang watershed, water supply is influenced with rain fall volume, topography condition (steep slope, type of soil, and land use) of a water catchment area. A model is constructed using Fuzzy logic in water water inflow is Y = 0,0687X2 ??? 4,279X + 82,917 and erosion inflow is Y = - 0.0001X2 ...

  16. Modelling of Water Resources in Bakaru Hydropower Plant in Anticipating Load Increment in Sulselbar Power System

    OpenAIRE

    Said, Sri Mawar; Manjang, Salama; Tjaronge, Wihardi; Thaha, Arsyad

    2014-01-01

    Bakaru hydro power plan water resources model will describe a model in anticipating load growth in Sulselbar Power System until year 2030. Bakaru hydro power plan is supplied by Mamasa, Sumarorong, and Lembang watershed, water supply is influenced with rain fall volume, topography condition (steep slope, type of soil, and land use) of a water catchment area. A model is constructed using Fuzzy logic in water water inflow is Y = 0,0687X2 ??? 4,279X + 82,917 and erosion inflow is Y = - 0.0001X2 ...

  17. Anticipated outcomes from introduction of 5-HTTLPR genotyping for depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Svetlana; Møldrup, C

    2010-01-01

    depression patients. Methods: Using an internet survey system, authors of clinical studies addressing the topic of association of 5-HTTLPR genotyping with antidepressant response were contacted to participate in a Delphi study. Results: Responses from 12 experts were used for the final analysis. According to...... remission rates with genotyping at first sight do not appear to be superior to existing practice, i.e. without genotyping. It is anticipated that a combination of 5-HTTLPR testing with other genomic variables, which have yet to be determined, and compliance measurements can improve clinical outcomes in the...

  18. Oocyte banking for anticipated gamete exhaustion (AGE) is a preventive intervention, neither social nor nonmedical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Dominic; van der Veen, Fulco; Deneyer, Michel; Nekkebroeck, Julie; Tournaye, Herman

    2014-05-01

    The scope of female fertility preservation through cryopreservation of oocytes or ovarian cortex has widened from mainly oncological indications to a variety of fertility-threatening conditions. So far, no specific universally accepted denomination name has been given to cryopreservation of oocytes or ovarian cortex for the prevention of age-related fertility decline. We argue that the commonly used phrases 'social' and 'nonmedical freezing' to denote the indication for cryopreservation are not entirely correct. We suggest 'AGE banking', as this has not only the advantage of being catchy but also depicts the exact indication for the strategy, anticipated gamete exhaustion.

  19. Children's Centre "3 in 1 - together"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancheva, Hristina

    2013-04-01

    "There are only two ways to life your live. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle." Albert Einstein Children's Centre "3 in 1" is an extracurricular unit linked to the High School of Zlatartitsa, St. Cyril and St. Methodius, accomplished with the help of the municipality and many volunteers from the local community. With its activity it forms in children patriotic spirit, love for nature, active citizenship, and an impulse for a healthy life through communication with nature, saving the traditions and history, insurance of equality of the kids of the local five ethnicities and participation in activities in the sphere of science, art, sport and tourism. The educational work is mainly directed towards kids with difficulties with communication, hyperactivity, aggression, problems in their families, or those deprived of parental care. For a few years in the Children's Centre there have been clubs of interests: "Gardeners" - kids cultivate a garden. They plow, dig, plant, put in, irrigate and weed under the watch of Ms Stafka Nikolova, parents, and volunteers of the local community. The ecologically clean products - vegetables and fruits, kids use to cook delicious meals, sell, or give away. Weeds are also utilized; they are making herbarium out of them. "Cooks" - "What to have for lunch, when mom is out?". One can learn a lot of wonderful recipes from the club "Cooks". Products are own made, raised with love. In 2010, on the on the annual traditional holiday of the garden soup in Zlataritsa, the little cooks won third prize for making a delicious vegetable soup. On the same day, the 26 years old Nadezhda Savova, Cultural and Social Anthropology PhD in Princeton, founded the second community bakery in Bulgaria in Children's Centre "3 in1". Nadezhda Savova was declared traveler of 2012 by National Geographic. After the baking house in Gabrovo and Zlataritsa, Nadezhda also founded such projects in Sofia, Varna and Ruse

  20. Project for a renewable energy research centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Giachetta

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In Liguria, where sustainable approaches to the design, construction and management of buildings enjoy scant currency, the idea of a company from Milan (FERA s.r.l. setting up a research centre for studies into renewable energy resources, could well open up very interesting development opportunities.The project includes: environmental rehabilitation (restoration projects; strategies for the protection of water resources and waste management systems; passive and active solar systems (solar thermal and experiments with thermodynamic solar energy; hyperinsulation systems, passive cooling of buildings; use of natural materials; bio-climatic use of vegetation. The author describes the project content within the context of the multidisciplinary work that has gone into it.

  1. Annual report 1992 - Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a non-technical progress report (in English) of the activities of the Research Centre Seibersdorf in the fields of energy and safety, materials research, isotope and radiation techniques, environment protection, health and food and industrial consulting. Within other non nuclear related highlights the newly built radio-pharmaceutical laboratory is described, which will guarantee the reliable supply of products and develop new diagnostic and therapeutic preparations. A newly developed whole-body counter for measuring internal radiation is in use in the Vienna General Hospital to obtain better information of the patient's metabolism and can thus assess the efficiency of pharmaceuticals. The research in the field of toxicology and carcinogenicity was intensified. Geological dating was performed for the 'Continental Deep-Drilling Programme' on behalf of the Max Planck Institute. Environmental data acquisition was mainly conducted in the field of ozone, water quality, air pollution and electro-smog (quittner, rieger)

  2. Stimulated emission from NV centres in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Jeske, Jan; McGuinness, Liam P; Reineck, Philip; Johnson, Brett C; McCallum, Jeffrey C; Jelezko, Fedor; Volz, Thomas; Cole, Jared H; Gibson, Brant C; Greentree, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated emission is the process fundamental to laser operation, thereby producing coherent photon output. Despite negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV$^-$) centres being discussed as a potential laser medium since the 1980's, there have been no definitive observations of stimulated emission from ensembles of NV$^-$ to date. Reasons for this lack of demonstration include the short excited state lifetime and the occurrence of photo-ionisation to the neutral charge state by light around the zero-phonon line. Here we show both theoretical and experimental evidence for stimulated emission from NV$^-$ states using light in the phonon-sidebands. Our system uses a continuous wave pump laser at 532 nm and a pulsed stimulating laser that is swept across the phononic sidebands of the NV$^-$. Optimal stimulated emission is demonstrated in the vicinity of the three-phonon line at 700 nm. Furthermore, we show the transition from stimulated emission to photoionisation as the stimulating laser wavelength is reduced fro...

  3. MATERNAL MORTALITY IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Maternal Mortality in A Tertiary Care Centre. OBJECTIVE: To study maternal mortality and the complications leading to maternal death. METHODS: A retrospective study of hospital record to study maternal mortality and its causes over 3 years from January 2010 to December 2012. RESULTS: There were a total of 58 maternal deaths out of 2823 live births giving a maternal mortality ratio of 2054.55 per one lakh live births. Unbooked and late referrals account for 77.58% of maternal deaths. The majority of deaths around 75.86% were in 20-30 years age group. Haemorrhage was the commonest causes of death (24.12% followed by sepsis (18.96% and pregnancy induced hypertension 15.51% Anemia contributed to the most common indirect cause of maternal morality. CONCLUSION: Haemorrhage, sepsis and pregnancy induced hypertension including eclampsia were the direct major causes of death. Anaemia and cardiac diseases were other indirect causes of death.

  4. Data communication at the CERN computer centre

    CERN Document Server

    Bruins, T; Pieters, R; Slettenhaar, Hendrik J; Van de Kerk, P

    1972-01-01

    The growing interest for on-line computer service and process control at CERN decentralises certain computer activities. Small process computers, remote batch stations and user terminals are to be backed by a powerful central computer. The present data network is principally star shaped. At the centre of it is a CDC 6600-6500 computer combination. It has a front end CDC 3100 computer with a Hewlett Packard 2116 as multiplexer. Some details about the fast parallel connections between the CDC 3100 and the HP 2116B are given in the paper, as well as descriptions of some computer simulation techniques used to test the present systems. Finally some plans on a future network are given. (12 refs).

  5. Surviving stroke in an Ebola Treatment Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Paul; McCarthy, Sinead; Gibbs, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A middle aged woman presented to an Ebola Treatment Centre in West Africa with a 4-day history of fever, fatigue, joint pain and vomiting. She tested positive for Ebola virus disease (EVD) and a standard treatment platform of care was started. On day 3 of her admission, she was found to have suffered a left-sided CVA of unknown aetiology. Treatment was largely supportive within a resource-constrained environment and the added layer of providing care with extensive personal protective equipment, and human resource and safety constraints. The patient was able to clear the EVD and did regain some functional use of her arm and leg. She was discharged on day 15 of her stay, as a survivor of both stroke and Ebola. PMID:26516244

  6. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre : annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development (R and D) activities of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) carried out during 1990 are reported. The main thrust of the R and D activities of BARC is on : (1)providing support to the nuclear power programme, (2)designing, building and utilising research reactors, (3)working in related frontline technologies, and also (4)basic research in frontier areas of science. These activities are described in brief under the chapters entitled : (1)Physical Sciences (2)Chemical Sciences (3)Materials and Material Science (4)Radioisotopes (5)Reactions (6)Fuel Cycle (7)Radiological Safety and Protection (8)Electronics and Instrumentation (9)Engineering Services (10)Life Sciences and (11)General. At the end of each chapter a list of papers and reports published in the subject field indicated by the title of the chapter is given. (N.B.). figs., tabs

  7. Supporting the Development of Autonomous Learning Skills in Reading and Writing in an Independent Language Learning Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel L. W. Chiu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article draws on observations, examples and findings from previous action research and teaching experiences gathered in an independent language learning centre in a university in Hong Kong to explore strategies for supporting independent learning. The learning centre offers one-to-one and small-group learning sessions to support the development of independent learning skills in various areas. This discussion will explore particularly the focuses of reading and writing skills development. These learner-centred support sessions aim to develop awareness of different types of learning strategies to suit individual learning needs, and cultivate interest and ability for continuous self-learning. The benefits of a semi-structured scaffolding format with attention to individual learning differences and supported by technology will be highlighted.

  8. Beef quality assessed at European research centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dransfield, E; Nute, G R; Roberts, T A; Boccard, R; Touraille, C; Buchter, L; Casteels, M; Cosentino, E; Hood, D E; Joseph, R L; Schon, I; Paardekooper, E J

    1984-01-01

    Loin steaks and cubes of M. semimembranosus from eight (12 month old) Galloway steers and eight (16-18 month old) Charolais cross steers raised in England and from which the meat was conditioned for 2 or 10 days, were assessed in research centres in Belgium, Denmark, England, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, Italy and the Netherlands. Laboratory panels assessed meat by grilling the steaks and cooking the cubes in casseroles according to local custom using scales developed locally and by scales used frequently at other research centres. The meat was mostly of good quality but with sufficient variation to obtain meaningful comparisons. Tenderness and juiciness were assessed most, and flavour least, consistently. Over the 32 meats, acceptability of steaks and casseroles was in general compounded from tenderness, juiciness and flavour. However, when the meat was tough, it dominated the overall judgement; but when tender, flavour played an important rôle. Irish and English panels tended to weight more on flavour and Italian panels on tenderness and juiciness. Juciness and tenderness were well correlated among all panels except in Italy and Germany. With flavour, however, Belgian, Irish, German and Dutch panels ranked the meats similarly and formed a group distinct from the others which did not. The panels showed a similar grouping for judgements of acceptability. French and Belgian panels judged the steaks from the older Charolais cross steers to have more flavour and be more juicy than average and tended to prefer them. Casseroles from younger steers were invariably preferred although the French and Belgian panels judged aged meat from older animals equally acceptable. These regional biases were thought to be derived mainly from differences in cooking, but variations in experience and perception of assessors also contributed. PMID:22055992

  9. Analyses of Observed and Anticipated Changes in Extreme Climate Events in the Northwest Himalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmaveer Singh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, past (1970-2005 as well as future long term (2011-2099 trends in various extreme events of temperature and precipitation have been investigated over selected hydro-meteorological stations in the Sutlej river basin. The ensembles of two Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3 models: third generation Canadian Coupled Global Climate Model and Hadley Centre Coupled Model have been used for simulation of future daily time series of temperature (maximum and minimum and precipitation under A2 emission scenario. Large scale atmospheric variables of both models and National Centre for Environmental Prediction/National Centre for Atmospheric Research reanalysis data sets have been downscaled using statistical downscaling technique at individual stations. A total number of 25 extreme indices of temperature (14 and precipitation (11 as specified by the Expert Team of the World Meteorological Organization and Climate Variability and Predictability are derived for the past and future periods. Trends in extreme indices are detected over time using the modified Mann-Kendall test method. The stations which have shown either decrease or no change in hot extreme events (i.e., maximum TMax, warm days, warm nights, maximum TMin, tropical nights, summer days and warm spell duration indicators for 1970–2005 and increase in cold extreme events (cool days, cool nights, frost days and cold spell duration indicators are predicted to increase and decrease respectively in the future. In addition, an increase in frequency and intensity of extreme precipitation events is also predicted.

  10. Collaborating at a distance: operations centres, tools, and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, Erik E.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Successful operation of the LHC and its experiments is crucial to the future of the worldwide high-energy physics program. Remote operations and monitoring centres have been established for the CMS experiment in several locations around the world. The development of remote centres began with the LHC{at}FNAL ROC and has evolved into a unified approach with distributed centres that are collectively referred to as 'CMS Centres Worldwide'. An overview of the development of remote centres for CMS will be presented, along with a synopsis of collaborative tools that are used in these centres today and trends in the development of remote operations capabilities for high-energy physics.

  11. Attitude Formation of Benefits Satisfaction: Knowledge and Fit of Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gery Markova, Foard Jones

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the theoretical framework of the Theory of Reasoned Action [6], we examine benefits satisfactionas an attitude formed by the beliefs about benefits (i.e., benefits knowledge and the perceived value ofthese benefits (i.e., fit of benefits to individual needs. We use questionnaires to gather data from arandom sample of 591 employees in a large county agency in the South-eastern United States. The datasupport that knowledge of benefits is associated with enhanced benefits satisfaction and mediates theeffect of explanations about benefits on satisfaction. The results provide strong evidence that benefitsperceived to suit employee needs generate highest benefits satisfaction. Employees satisfied with theirbenefits are less likely to consider leaving the organization. The tested model is a starting point for futurestudies to apply the extended Theory of Reasoned Action [1] and incorporate perceived behaviouralcontrol and subjective norms (i.e., co-workers’ attitudes in forming benefits satisfaction. Understandingemployees’ affective and cognitive reactions to compensation, including benefits, can render betterpractices. Companies should use information campaigns to improve employee beliefs about benefits.Better attentiveness to individual needs and preferences can maximize the utility of a benefits plan andimprove its acceptance. We replicate and extend past research in a parsimonious model of benefitssatisfaction with a random sample of public sector employees.

  12. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste Scientific activities in 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains three parts. Part 1 is a general review of the scientific activities of the Centre in 1991, including a statistical digest. Part II presents the scientific programme of the Centre in the following fields: Fundamental Physics, Condensed Matter Physics, Mathematics, Physics and Energy, Physics and Environment, Applied Physics, Adriatico Research Conferences, as well as other aspects of the Centre activities in 1991. Part III lists the publications issued in 1991. Tabs

  13. Routing algorithms for recursively-defined data centre networks.

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, A.; Kiasari, A.; Navaridas, J.; Stewart, I.A.

    2015-01-01

    The server-centric data centre network architecture can accommodate a wide variety of network topologies. Newly proposed topologies in this arena often require several rounds of analysis and experimentation in order that they might achieve their full potential as data centre networks. We propose a family of novel routing algorithms on two well-known data centre networks of this type, (Generalized) DCell and FiConn, using techniques that can be applied more generally to the class of networks w...

  14. Complex Modelling Scheme Of An Additive Manufacturing Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Liliana Georgeta

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a modelling scheme sustaining the development of an additive manufacturing research centre model and its processes. This modelling is performed using IDEF0, the resulting model process representing the basic processes required in developing such a centre in any university. While the activities presented in this study are those recommended in general, changes may occur in specific existing situations in a research centre.

  15. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste. Scientific activities in 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains three parts: Part I is a general review of the scientific activities of the Centre in 1990, including a statistical digest. Part II describes the scientific programme of the Centre in the following fields: Fundamental physics, condensed nuclear physics, mathematics, physics and energy, physics and environment, physics of the living state, applied physics Adriatico research conferences and other aspects of the Centre activities. Part III lists the publications issued in 1990

  16. Identifying the processes underpinning anticipation and decision-making in a dynamic time-constrained task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, André; Ford, Paul R; McRobert, Allistair P; Mark Williams, A

    2011-08-01

    A novel, representative task was used to examine skill-based differences in the perceptual and cognitive processes underlying performance on a dynamic, externally paced task. Skilled and less skilled soccer players were required to move and interact with life-size, action sequences involving 11 versus 11 soccer situations filmed from the perspective of a central defender in soccer. The ability of participants to anticipate the intentions of their opponents and to make decisions about how they should respond was measured across two separate experiments. In Experiment 1, visual search behaviors were examined using an eye-movement registration system. In Experiment 2, retrospective verbal reports of thinking were gathered from a new sample of skilled and less skilled participants. Skilled participants were more accurate than less skilled participants at anticipating the intentions of opponents and in deciding on an appropriate course of action. The skilled players employed a search strategy involving more fixations of shorter duration in a different sequential order and toward more disparate and informative locations in the display when compared with the less skilled counterparts. The skilled players generated a greater number of verbal report statements with a higher proportion of evaluation, prediction, and planning statements than the less skilled players, suggesting they employed more complex domain-specific memory representations to solve the task. Theoretical, methodological, and practical implications are discussed. PMID:21305386

  17. The Empowerment Strategy for The Food Crop Farmers in Anticipating The Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efriyani Sumastuti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia, the climate change and the global warming like changes in the pattern and distribution of the rainfall give impacts on agricultural production at large, especially in the food crops. These also cause droughts, floods, landslides, forest fires, rising temperatures in urban areas, and rising sea levels. The above impacts are felt by the farmers because those can lead to a decrease in production even the crop failure. This research aims to develop an empowerment strategy of the food crop farmers in anticipating the climate change in Central Java. The data used is the primary data obtained through in-depth interviews with key-person and the Focus Group Discussion (FGD. The Analysis Hierarchy Process (AHP is conducted to determine the program priorities and strate gies. The result of research shows that anticipating the climate change should be synergistically conducted in four aspects: human resources, technology, institutional and production, by involving various groups in the society. Various groups can be grouped into academics, businessmen / private sectors, government and community of food crop farmers / society.

  18. Systems in a Retardation and Anticipation Relation: Mathematical Developments, Interpretations, Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlacan, Eufrosina

    2008-10-01

    The starting point of the paper is the system of differential equations proposed by D. M. Dubois to express conjugate retardation and anticipation variables. The research proposes to find the relation between time shift, the constant parameters of the equations and the solutions of these equations. The 2nd and 3rd parts of the paper present mathematical calculus to solve the case when the current state of the slave system is an exponential function, then this state is presumed to be a linear function. There are demonstrated four theorems, especially by means of classical methods to solve ordinary differential equations. Conclusions are presented about each hypothesis which was considered. It is also studied the case when the time shift for the anticipation is different from the time shift of the retardation. The 4th part deals with the problem of systems which have an oscillating movement. The last part of the paper introduces man and his environment as advanced—retarded conjugate systems and makes links with the results of the mathematical calculus.

  19. Learning to Anticipate Flexible Choices in Multiple Criteria Decision-Making Under Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Carlos R B; Von Zuben, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    In several applications, a solution must be selected from a set of tradeoff alternatives for operating in dynamic and noisy environments. In this paper, such multicriteria decision process is handled by anticipating flexible options predicted to improve the decision maker future freedom of action. A methodology is then proposed for predicting tradeoff sets of maximal hypervolume, where a multiobjective metaheuristic was augmented with a Kalman filter and a dynamical Dirichlet model for tracking and predicting flexible solutions. The method identified decisions that were shown to improve the future hypervolume of tradeoff investment portfolio sets for out-of-sample stock data, when compared to a myopic strategy. Anticipating flexible portfolios was a superior strategy for smoother changing artificial and real-world scenarios, when compared to always implementing the decision of median risk and to randomly selecting a portfolio from the evolved anticipatory stochastic Pareto frontier, whereas the median choice strategy performed better for abruptly changing markets. Correlations between the portfolio compositions and future hypervolume were also observed. PMID:25838537

  20. Anticipated Degradation Modes of Metallic Engineered Barriers for High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Martín A.

    2014-03-01

    Metallic engineered barriers must provide a period of absolute containment to high-level radioactive waste in geological repositories. Candidate materials include copper alloys, carbon steels, stainless steels, nickel alloys, and titanium alloys. The national programs of nuclear waste management have to identify and assess the anticipated degradation modes of the selected materials in the corresponding repository environment, which evolves in time. Commonly assessed degradation modes include general corrosion, localized corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, hydrogen-assisted cracking, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. Laboratory testing and modeling in metallurgical and environmental conditions of similar and higher aggressiveness than those expected in service conditions are used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the materials. This review focuses on the anticipated degradation modes of the selected or reference materials as corrosion-resistant barriers in nuclear repositories. These degradation modes depend not only on the selected alloy but also on the near-field environment. The evolution of the near-field environment varies for saturated and unsaturated repositories considering backfilled and unbackfilled conditions. In saturated repositories, localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking may occur in the initial aerobic stage, while general corrosion and hydrogen-assisted cracking are the main degradation modes in the anaerobic stage. Unsaturated repositories would provide an oxidizing environment during the entire repository lifetime. Microbiologically influenced corrosion may be avoided or minimized by selecting an appropriate backfill material. Radiation effects are negligible provided that a thick-walled container or an inner shielding container is used.