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Sample records for central venous saturation

  1. Femoral venous oxygen saturation is no surrogate for central venous oxygen saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; van der Schors, Alice; Liefers, Henriëtte; Coenen, Ludo G. J.; Braam, Richard L.; Habib, Najib; Braber, Annemarije; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Kuiper, Michaël A.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to determine if central venous oxygen saturation and femoral venous oxygen saturation can be used interchangeably during surgery and in critically ill patients. Design: Prospective observational controlled study. Setting: Nonacademic university-affiliated

  2. Femoral venous oxygen saturation is no surrogate for central venous oxygen saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; van der Schors, Alice; Liefers, Henriette; Coenen, Ludo G. J.; Braam, Richard L.; Habib, Najib; Braber, Annemarije; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective:  The purpose of our study was to determine if central venous oxygen saturation and femoral venous oxygen saturation can be used interchangeably during surgery and in critically ill patients. Design:  Prospective observational controlled study. Setting:  Nonacademic university-affiliated

  3. Central venous oxygen saturation during hypovolaemic shock in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P; Iversen, H; Secher, N H

    1993-01-01

    We compared central venous oxygen saturation and central venous pressure (CVP) as indices of the effective blood volume during 50 degrees head-up tilt (anti-Trendelenburg's position) induced hypovolaemic shock in eight healthy subjects. Head-up tilt increased thoracic electrical impedance from 31...

  4. No agreement of mixed venous and central venous saturation in sepsis, independent of sepsis origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; van Ingen, Jan; Boerma, E. Christiaan; Holman, Nicole D.; Groen, Henk; Koopmans, Matty; Spronk, Peter E.; Kuiper, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Controversy remains regarding the relationship between central venous saturation (ScvO(2)) and mixed venous saturation (SvO(2)) and their use and interchangeability in patients with sepsis or septic shock. We tested the hypothesis that ScvO(2) does not reliably predict SvO(2) in sepsis. Additionally

  5. Central venous oxygen saturation does not correlate with the venous oxygen saturation at the surgical site during abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Malte; Scheingraber, Stefan; Stephan, Bernhard; Weiss, Christel; Kayser, Anna; Kopp, Berit; Schilling, Martin K

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of central venous oxygen saturation has become a surrogate parameter for fluid administration, blood transfusions and treatment with catecholamines in (early) goal directed therapy in the treatment of acute septic patients. These strategies are not easily transferred to the postoperative management of abdominal surgery due to the different conditions in surgical patients. A study population of 15 patients (8 females/7 males) underwent elective major abdominal surgery: 6 gastrectomies, 5 major liver resections and 4 lower anterior rectum resections. Surgery was performed for primary or secondary malignancy. The patients' age was 65.4+/-12.7 (mean+/-standard deviation, range 44-84, median 62) years. Blood samples were taken intraoperatively from indwelling central venous lines as well as from draining veins at the surgical site. Blood gas analyses to determine the oxygen saturations were performed immediately. All patients were operated in standardized general anesthesia including epidural analgesia and in a balanced volume status. Central venous oxygen saturations and oxygen saturations in blood from the draining veins of the surgical site showed a wide range with high intra- and interindividual differences intraoperatively. Overall, at most time points no correlation between the two oxygen saturations could be detected in three operation types. A significant correlation was only observed at one time point during liver resections. Our results show a lack of correlation between central venous oxygen saturations and oxygen saturations in the draining veins of the surgical site during major abdominal surgery. Measurement of central venous oxygen saturations does not seem to be a good surrogate for the local oxygen supply in the field of interest in major abdominal surgery even under standardized conditions.

  6. Central venous oxygen saturation for the diagnosis of low cardiac output in septic shock patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Haase, N; Wiis, J

    2010-01-01

    Simple diagnostic tests are needed to screen septic patients for low cardiac output because intervention is recommended in these patients. We assessed the diagnostic value of central venous oxygen saturation in the superior vena cava (ScvO(2)) for detecting low cardiac output in patients with sep...... with septic shock.......Simple diagnostic tests are needed to screen septic patients for low cardiac output because intervention is recommended in these patients. We assessed the diagnostic value of central venous oxygen saturation in the superior vena cava (ScvO(2)) for detecting low cardiac output in patients...

  7. Central venous oxygen saturation for the diagnosis of low cardiac output in septic shock patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Haase, N; Wiis, J

    2010-01-01

    Simple diagnostic tests are needed to screen septic patients for low cardiac output because intervention is recommended in these patients. We assessed the diagnostic value of central venous oxygen saturation in the superior vena cava (ScvO(2)) for detecting low cardiac output in patients with sep......Simple diagnostic tests are needed to screen septic patients for low cardiac output because intervention is recommended in these patients. We assessed the diagnostic value of central venous oxygen saturation in the superior vena cava (ScvO(2)) for detecting low cardiac output in patients...

  8. Central venous oxygen saturation and thoracic admittance during dialysis: new approaches to hemodynamic monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, J.; Olde, B.; Solem, K.

    2008-01-01

    events are reflected in the central venous oxygen saturation (ScO(2)) and thoracic admittance (TA) during dialysis. Twenty ambulatory HD patients, 11 hypotension prone (HP) and 9 hypotension resistant, with central vascular access, were monitored during 3 HD sessions each. ScO(2), TA, finger blood...... in ScO(2) and TA correlated much closer than did changes in ScO(2) and DeltaBV (r=0.43 and 0.18, respectively). Our results suggest that an intradialytic decrease in cardiac output, as reflected by a fall in ScO(2), is a common feature to HD patients prone to IDH. In patients using a central vascular...... access, ScO(2) and TA measurements may be more specific to the pathophysiologic events preceding IDH than DeltaBV-the current standard monitoring method Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  9. Central venous oxygen saturation in septic shock - a marker of cardiac output, microvascular shunting and/or dysoxia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Nicolai; Perner, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Shock therapy aims at increasing central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2), which is a marker of inadequate oxygen delivery. In this issue of Critical Care, Textoris and colleagues challenge this notion by reporting that high levels of ScvO2 are associated with mortality in patients with septic...

  10. End expiratory oxygen concentrations to predict central venous oxygen saturation: an observational pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steuerwald Michael

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A non-invasive surrogate measurement for central venous oxygen saturation (ScVO2 would be useful in the ED for assessing therapeutic interventions in critically ill patients. We hypothesized that either linear or nonlinear mathematical manipulation of the partial pressure of oxygen in breath at end expiration (EtO2 would accurately predict ScVO2. Methods Prospective observational study of a convenience sample of hemodialysis patients age > 17 years with existing upper extremity central venous catheters were enrolled. Using a portable respiratory device, we collected both tidal breathing and end expiratory oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations, volume and flow on each patient. Simultaneous ScVO2 measurements were obtained via blood samples collected from the hemodialysis catheter. Two models were used to predict ScVO2: 1 Best-fit multivariate linear regression equation incorporating all respiratory variables; 2 MathCAD to model the decay curve of EtO2 versus expiratory volume using the least squares method to estimate the pO2 that would occur at Results From 21 patients, the correlation between EtO2 and measured ScVO2 yielded R2 = 0.11. The best fit multivariate equation included EtCO2 and EtO2 and when solved for ScVO2, the equation yielded a mean absolute difference from the measured ScVO2 of 8 ± 6% (range -18 to +17%. The predicted ScVO2 value was within 10% of the actual value for 57% of the patients. Modeling of the EtO2 curve did not accurately predict ScVO2 at any lung volume. Conclusion We found no significant correlation between EtO2 and ScVO2. A linear equation incorporating EtCO2 and EtO2 had at best modest predictive accuracy for ScVO2.

  11. Central venous oxygen saturation in septic shock - a marker of cardiac output, microvascular shunting and/or dysoxia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Nicolai; Perner, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Shock therapy aims at increasing central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2), which is a marker of inadequate oxygen delivery. In this issue of Critical Care, Textoris and colleagues challenge this notion by reporting that high levels of ScvO2 are associated with mortality in patients with septic...... shock. This is of obvious interest, but as their retrospective design has inherent limitations, the association should be confirmed in a prospective, multicenter study with protocolized ScvO2 measurements and detailed registration of potentially confounding factors....

  12. Effects of blood transfusion on oxygen extraction ratio and central venous saturation in children after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Bana; Tageldein, Mohmad; AlMesned, Abdulrahman; Kabbani, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is common in critically ill children after cardiac surgery. Since the threshold for hemoglobin (Hb) transfusion need is not well defined, the threshold Hb level at which dependent critical oxygen uptake-to-delivery (VO2-DO2) status compensation is uncertain. To assess the effects of blood transfusion on the oxygen extraction ratio (O2ER) and central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) to identify a critical O2ER value that could help us determine the critical need for blood transfusion. Prospective, observational cohort study. Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit at Prince Sultan Cardiac Center in Qassim, Saudi Arabia. Between January 2013 and December 2015, we included all children with cardiac disease who underwent surgery and needed a blood transfusion. Demographic and laboratory data with physiological parameters before and 1 and 6 hours after transfusion were recorded and O2ER before and 6 hours after transfusion was computed. Cases were divided into two groups based on O2ER: Patients with increased O2ER (O2ER > 40%) and normal patients without increased O2ER (O2ER transfusion. Changes in O2ER and ScvO2 following blood transfusion. Of 103 patients who had blood transfusion, 75 cases had normal O2ER before transfusion while 28 cases had increased O2ER before transfusion. Following blood transfusion, O2ER and ScvO2 improved in the group that had increased O2ER before transfusion, but not in the group that had normal O2ER before transfusion. The clinical and hemodynamic indicators O2ER and ScvO2 may be considered as markers that can indicate a need for blood transfusion. The limitation of this study is the small number of patients that had increased O2ER before transfusion. There were few available variables to assess oxygen consumption.

  13. Lactate, endothelin, and central venous oxygen saturation as predictors of mortality in patients with Tetralogy of Fallot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Malhotra Kapoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lactate and central venous oxygen saturation (ScVO2 are well known biomarkers for adequacy of tissue oxygenation. Endothelin, an inflammatory marker has been associated with patient′s nutritional status and degree of cyanosis. The aim of this study was to explore the hypothesis that lactate, ScVO2 and endothelin before induction may be predictive of mortality in pediatric cardiac surgery. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study of 150 pediatric (6 months to 12 years patients who were posted for intracardiac repair for tetralogy of fallot and measured lactate, ScVO2 and endothelin before induction (T1, 20 minutes after protamine administration (T2 and 24 hours after admission to ICU (T3. Results: Preinduction lactate and endothelin levels were found to predict mortality in patients of tetralogy of fallot with an odds ratio of 6.020 (95% CI 2.111-17.168 and 1.292(95% CI 1.091-1.531 respectively. In the ROC curve analysis for lactate at T1, the AUC was 0.713 (95% CI 0.526-0.899 P = 0.019. At the cutoff value of 1.750mmol/lt, the sensitivity and specificity for the prediction of mortality was 63.6% and 65.5%, respectively. For endothelin at T1, the AUC was 0.699 (95% CI 0.516-0.883, P = 0.028 and the cutoff value was ≤2.50 (sensitivity, 63.6%; specificity, 58.3 %. ScVO2 (odds ratio 0.85 at all three time intervals, suggested that improving ScVO2 can lead to 15% reduction in mortality. Conclusions: Lactate, ScVO2 and endothelin all showed association with mortality with lactate having the maximum prediction. Lactate was found to be an independent, reliable and cost-effective measure of prediction of mortality in patients with tetralogy of fallot.

  14. Regional venous oxygen saturation versus mixed venous saturation after paediatric cardiac surgery.

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    Moreno, G E; Pilán, M L; Manara, C; Magliola, R; Vassallo, J C; Balestrini, M; Lenz, A M; Krynski, M; Althabe, M; Landry, L

    2013-03-01

    Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) remains the gold standard surrogate for tissue oxygen extraction in paediatric cardiac surgery. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been developed as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for regional oxygen saturation. The aim was to compare regional oxygen saturation measured by NIRS with ScvO2 in postoperative paediatric cardiac patients. In this prospective study, we included newborns and infants younger than 45 days undergoing heart surgery. We recorded continuous ScvO2 and NIRS regional saturation placed on the forehead (B) and right flank (S) for 48 h postoperatively. A Bland-Altman's analysis was used to assess the agreement between these measurements. A total of 23 patients were included with a median age of 12 days (2-46) and median weight of 3.1 kg (2.3-4.47). The mean difference (MD) ScvO2- B NIRS was 10.45% with limits of agreement (LOA) -17.23 to 38.13% and ScvO2- S NIRS MD 7.16% with LOA: -25.51 to 39.84%. The single ventricle ScvO2- S NIRS subgroup had MD within ± 5%; however, wide LOA was observed. The remaining subgroups showed MD nearly above ± 5%, with wide LOA. The regional oxygen saturation of brain and kidney did not match ScvO2 as estimation of global tissue perfusion. Nevertheless, NIRS may still provide information regarding regional circulation that may help in the management of neonatal cardiac surgery patients. © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  15. Comprehensive Interpretation of Central Venous Oxygen Saturation and Blood Lactate Levels During Resuscitation of Patients With Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Tae Gun; Jo, Ik Joon; Hwang, Sung Yeon; Jeon, Kyeongman; Suh, Gee Young; Choe, Euna; Lee, Young Kun; Lee, Tae Rim; Cha, Won Chul; Sim, Min Seob

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated central venous oxygen saturation (Scvo2) and lactate levels as a combination measure to predict mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. We included patients older than 18 years of age who presented to a single tertiary emergency center with septic shock or severe sepsis and received early goal-directed therapy. We classified the sample into four groups according to lactate (cut-off: 4 mmol/L) and Scvo2 (cut-off: 70%) levels at the time of initial resuscitation: Group 1, high-Scvo2, and low-lactate; Group 2, low-Scvo2, and low-lactate; Group 3, high-Scvo2, and high-lactate; Group 4, low-Scvo2, and high-lactate. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality determined by multivariable Cox-regression analysis. A total of 880 patients were included in this study. The 28-day mortality was 6.7% in Group 1, 15.7% in Group 2, 26.7% in Group 3, and 25.5% in Group 4 (P septic shock. Associations between Scvo2 ≥70% and 28-day survival were observed only in patients without severe lactic acidosis.

  16. Association of haemodynamic changes measured by serial central venous saturation during ultrafiltration for acutely decompensated heart failure with diuretic resistance and change in renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazir, Ali; Simpkin, Victoria L; Marino, Philip; Ludman, Andrew; Banya, Winston; Tavazzi, Guido; Bastin, Anthony J; Trenfield, Sarah; Ghori, Arshad; Alexander, Peter D; Griffiths, Mark; Price, Susanna; Sharma, Rakesh; Cowie, Martin R

    2016-10-01

    Patients with acute decompensated heart failure with diuretic resistance (ADHF-DR) have a poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to assess in patients with ADHF-DR, whether haemodynamic changes during ultrafiltration (UF) are associated with changes in renal function (Δcreatinine) and whether Δcreatinine post UF is associated with mortality. Seventeen patients with ADHF-DR underwent 20 treatments with UF. Serial bloods (4-6 hourly) from the onset of UF treatment were measured for renal function, electrolytes and central venous saturation (CVO2). Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to assess the relationship between changes in markers of haemodynamics [heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), packed cell volume (PCV) and CVO2] and Δcreatinine. Patients were followed up and mortality recorded. Cox-regression survival analysis was performed to determine covariates associated with mortality. Renal function worsened after UF in 17 of the 20 UF treatments (baseline vs. post UF creatinine: 164±58 vs. 185±69μmol/l, Pchanges in SBP, HR and PCV [Pchanges during UF as measured by the surrogate of cardiac output was associated with Δcreatinine. Worsening renal function at end of UF treatment occurred in the majority of patients and was associated with mortality. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. The association between lactate, mean arterial pressure, central venous oxygen saturation and peripheral temperature and mortality in severe sepsis: a retrospective cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwink, Aletta P I; Rijkenberg, Saskia; Bosman, Rob J; van der Voort, Peter H J

    2016-03-12

    During resuscitation in severe sepsis and septic shock, several goals are set. However, usually not all goals are equally met. The aim of this study is to determine the relative importance of the different goals, such as mean arterial pressure (MAP), lactate, central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) and central to forefoot temperature (delta-T), and how they relate to intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital mortality. In a retrospective cohort study in a 20-bed mixed medical and surgical ICU of a teaching hospital we studied consecutive critically ill patients who were admitted for confirmed infection and severe sepsis or septic shock between 2008 and 2014. All validated MAP, lactate levels, ScvO2 and delta-T for the first 24 hours of ICU treatment were extracted from a clinical database. Logistic regression analyses were performed on validated measurements in the first hour after admission and on mean values over 24 hours. Patients were categorized by MAP (24-hour mean below or above 65 mmHg) and lactate (24-hour mean below or above 2 mmol/l) for Cox regression analysis. From 837 patients, 821 were eligible for analysis. All had MAP and lactate measurements. The delta-T was available in 812 (99%) and ScvO2 was available for 193 out of these patients (23.5%). Admission lactate (p < 0.001) and admission MAP (p < 0.001) were independent predictors of ICU and hospital mortality. The 24-hour mean values for lactate, MAP and delta-T were all independent predictors of ICU mortality. Hospital mortality was independently predicted by the 24-hour mean lactate (odds ratio (OR) 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-1.40, p = 0.001) mean MAP (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.95-0.97, p = 0.001) and mean delta-T (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.06-1.12, p = 0.001). Patients with a 24-hour mean lactate below 2 mmol/l and a 24-hour mean MAP above 65 mmHg had the best survival, followed by patients with a low lactate and a low MAP. Admission MAP and lactate independently predicted ICU and hospital mortality

  18. An unusual Complication of Central Venous Cannulation

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    Ashvini Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheter (CVC hub fracture is a rare complication of central venous cannulation. We report a case where catheter hub fracture was detected immediately after CVC insertion. Causes of catheter hub fracture and its complications are discussed.

  19. Central venous catheters: the role of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, P.L.; Gibson, M.

    2006-01-01

    The insertion and management of long-term venous catheters have long been the province of anaesthetists, intensive care physicians and surgeons. Radiologists are taking an increasing role in the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) because of their familiarity with the imaging equipment and their ability to manipulate catheters and guide-wires. The radiological management of the complications of CVCs has also expanded as a result. This article reviews the role of radiology in central venous access, covering the detection and management of their complications

  20. Central venous obstruction in the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collin, G.; Jones, R.G.; Willis, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Central venous stenosis and occlusion can occur secondary to a spectrum of conditions ranging from aggressive malignancy to benign extrinsic anatomical compression in otherwise healthy individuals. Irrespective of aetiology, significant morbidity in the acute setting and long term can occur unless prompt accurate diagnosis and appropriate management is initiated, the radiologist being central to both. The present review will provide radiologists with a thorough illustration and explanation of the range of central venous conditions in the thorax (including deep vein thrombosis, thoracic outlet syndrome, haemodialysis, and malignancy related causes), the salient imaging findings and interventional management using case examples from the authors' practice. - Highlights: • We show a range of causes of central venous disease in the thorax. • We provide information about different imaging and management strategies. • We show several cases with successes and complications of endovascular management

  1. Complications of central venous stenosis due to permanent central venous catheters in children on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinat, Choni; Ben-Shalom, Efrat; Becker-Cohen, Rachel; Feinstein, Sofia; Frishberg, Yaacov

    2014-11-01

    Central venous catheters are frequently used as access for hemodialysis (HD) in children. One of the known complications is central venous stenosis. Although this complication is not rare, it is often asymptomatic and therefore unacknowledged. Superior vena cava (SVC) stenosis is obviously suspected in the presence of upper body edema, but several other signs and symptoms are often unrecognized as being part of this syndrome. We describe four patients with various manifestations of central venous stenosis and SVC syndrome. These sometimes life- or organ-threatening conditions include obstructive sleep apnea, unresolving stridor, increased intracranial pressure, increased intraocular pressure, right-sided pleural effusion, protein-losing enteropathy and lymphadenopathy. The temporal relationship of these complications associated with the use of central venous catheters and documentation of venous stenosis, together with their resolution after alleviation of high venous pressure, points to a causal role. We suggest pathophysiological mechanisms for the formation of each of these complications. In patients with occlusion of the SVC, various unexpected clinical entities can be caused by high central venous pressure. As often the etiology is not obvious, a high index of suspicion is needed as in some cases prompt alleviation of the high pressure is mandatory.

  2. Central venous oxygenation: when physiology explains apparent discrepancies.

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    Squara, Pierre

    2014-11-10

    Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) >70% or mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) >65% is recommended for both septic and non-septic patients. Although it is the task of experts to suggest clear and simple guidelines, there is a risk of reducing critical care to these simple recommendations. This article reviews the basic physiological and pathological features as well as the metrological issues that provide clear evidence that SvO2 and ScvO2 are adaptative variables with large inter-patient variability. This variability is exemplified in a modeled population of 1,000 standard ICU patients and in a real population of 100 patients including 15,860 measurements. In these populations, it can be seen how optimizing one to three of the four S(c)vO2 components homogenized the patients and yields a clear dependency with the fourth one. This explains the discordant results observed in large studies where cardiac output was increased up to predetermined S(c)vO2 thresholds following arterial oxygen hemoglobin saturation, total body oxygen consumption needs and hemoglobin optimization. Although a systematic S(c)vO2 goal-oriented protocol can be statistically profitable before ICU admission, appropriate intensive care mandates determination of the best compromise between S(c)vO2 and its four components, taking into account the specific constraints of each individual patient.

  3. Effects of Hypothermic Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Internal Jugular Bulb Venous Oxygen Saturation, Cerebral Oxygen Saturation, and Bispectral Index in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Study

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    Hu, Zhiyong; Xu, Lili; Zhu, Zhirui; Seal, Robert; McQuillan, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2), internal jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), and bispectral index (BIS) used to monitor cerebral oxygen balance in pediatric patients. Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists Class II-III patients aged 1 to 4 years old with congenital heart disease scheduled for elective cardiac surgery were included in this study. Temperature, BIS, rSO2, mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and hematocrit were recorded. Internal jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation and SvO2 were obtained from blood gas analysis at the time points: after induction of anesthesia (T0), beginning of CPB (T1), ascending aortic occlusion (T2), 20 minutes after initiating CPB (T3), coronary reperfusion (T4), separation from CPB (T5), and at the end of operation (T6). The effect of hypothermia or changes in CPP on rSO2, SjvO2, SvO2, and BIS were analyzed. Compared with postinduction baseline values, rSO2 significantly decreased at all-time points: onset of extracorporeal circulation, ascending aortic occlusion, 20 minutes after CPB initiation, coronary reperfusion, and separation from CPB (P  0.05). Correlation analysis demonstrated that rSO2 was positively related to CPP (r = 0.687, P = 0.000), with a low linear correlation to temperature (r = 0.453, P = 0.000). Internal jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation was negatively related to temperature (r = −0.689, P = 0.000). Bispectral index was positively related to both temperature (r = 0.824, P = 0.000) and CPP (r = 0.782, P = 0.000). Cerebral oxygen saturation had a positive linear correlation with CPP and a low linear correlation to temperature. Internal jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation had a negative linear correlation to temperature. Pre-and and early

  4. Massive hydrothorax with malpositioned central venous catheter – Ultrasound detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Hasija

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Radioimaging is the gold standard for confirmation of the position of central venous catheter as well as its related complications. Use of ultrasound has been proven in guiding central venous cannulations, and it can also be used in detecting related complications. We report a case of a 2 year old child with hydrothorax causing desaturation due to malpositioned central venous catheter diagnosed by ultrasound in the delay for getting a radiograph.

  5. Saturação venosa central e mista de oxigênio no choque séptico: existe diferença clinicamente relevante? Central and mixed venous oxygen saturation in septic shock: is there a clinically relevant difference?

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    Flavia Ribeiro Machado

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A medida da saturação venosa central de oxigênio (SvcO2 tem sido proposta como alternativa a saturação venosa mista (SvO2, com grau de concordância variável nos dados atualmente disponíveis. Esse estudo objetivou avaliar as possíveis diferenças entre a SvO2 e a SvcO2 ou saturação venosa atrial de oxigênio (SvaO2, com ênfase na interferência do débito cardíaco, e o impacto delas no manejo clínico do paciente séptico. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo observacional em pacientes com choque séptico monitorizados com cateter de artéria pulmonar. Foi obtido sangue simultaneamente para determinação da SvcO2, SvO2 e SvaO2. Realizado testes de correlação linear (significativos se pINTRODUCTION: Central venous oxygen saturation (SvcO2 has been proposed as an alternative for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2, with a variable level of acceptance according to available data. This study aimed to evaluate possible differences between SvO2 and SvcO2 or atrial venous saturation (SvaO2, with emphasis on the role of cardiac output and their impact on clinical management of the septic patient. METHODS: This is an observational, prospective study of patients with septic shock monitored by pulmonary artery catheter. Blood was obtained simultaneously for SvcO2, SvO2 and SvaO2 determination. Linear correlation (significant if p<0.05 and agreement analysis (Bland-Altman were performed with samples and subgroups according to cardiac output. Moreover, agreement about clinical management based on these samples was evaluated. RESULTS: Sixty one measurements from 23 patients were obtained, median age of 65.0 (49.0-75.0 years and mean APACHE II of 27.7±6.3. Mean values of SvO2, SvcO2 and SvaO2 were 72.20±8.26%, 74.61±7.60% and 74.64±8.47%. Linear correlation test showed a weak correlation between SvO2 and SvcO2 (r=0.61, p<0.0001 and also between SvO2 and SvaO2 (r=0.70, p<0.0001. Agreements between SvcO2/SvO2 and SvaO2/SvO2 were -2.40

  6. Central venous catheters and catheter locks in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Schrøder, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC).......To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC)....

  7. The incidence of low venous oxygen saturation on admission to the intensive care unit : a multi-center observational study in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, P. A.; Hofstra, J. J.; Schultz, M. J.; Boerma, E. C.; Spronk, P. E.; Kuiper, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Low mixed or central venous saturation (S(c)vO(2)) can reveal global tissue hypoxia and therefore can predict poor prognosis in critically ill patients. Early goal directed therapy (EGDT), aiming at an ScvO(2) >= 70%, has been shown to be a valuable strategy in patients with sepsis or

  8. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amerasekera, S.S.H.; Jones, C.M.; Patel, R.; Cleasby, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  9. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amerasekera, S.S.H. [Department of Radiology, Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steve.amerasekera@nhs.net; Jones, C.M.; Patel, R.; Cleasby, M.J. [Department of Radiology, Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  10. Fiberoptic monitoring of central venous oxygen saturation (PediaSat in small children undergoing cardiac surgery: continuous is not continuous [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3qt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca G. Iodice

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monitoring of superior vena cava saturation (ScvO2 has become routine in the management of pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The objective of our study was to evaluate the correlation between continuous ScvO2 by the application of a fiber-optic oximetry catheter (PediaSat and intermittent ScvO2 by using standard blood gas measurements. These results were compared to those obtained by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (cNIRS. Setting: Tertiary pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU. Methods and main results: A retrospective study was conducted in consecutive patients who were monitored with a 4.5 or 5.5 F PediaSat catheter into the right internal jugular vein. An in vivo calibration was performed once the patient was transferred to the PCICU and re-calibration took place every 24 hours thereafter. Each patient had a NIRS placed on the forehead. Saturations were collected every 4 hours until extubation. Ten patients with a median age of 2.2 (0.13-8.5 years and a weight of 12.4 (3.9-24 kg were enrolled. Median sampling time was 32 (19-44 hours: 64 pairs of PediaSat and ScVO2 saturations showed a poor correlation (r=0.62, 95% CI 44-75; p<0.0001 and Bland Altman analysis for repeated measures showed an average difference of 0.34 with a standard deviation of 7,9 and 95% limits of agreement from -15 to 16. Thirty-six pairs of cNIRS and ScVO2 saturations showed a fair correlation (r=0.79, 95% CI 0.60-0.89; p<0.0001 an average difference of -1.4 with a standard deviation of 6 and 95% limits of agreement from -13 to 10. Analysis of median percentage differences between PediaSat and ScvO2 saturation over time revealed that, although not statistically significant, the change in percentage saturation differences was clinically relevant after the 8th hour from calibration (from -100 to +100%. Conclusion: PediaSat catheters showed unreliable performance in our cohort. It should be further investigated whether repeating

  11. Central venous line associated osteomyelitis in children with intestinal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Children with intestinal failure often require long-term central venous access for parenteral nutrition. Line-related complications often include liver dysfunction, sepsis, and loss of venous access. Osteomyelitis is a rare complication that has been reported in adults with intestinal failure. There has been little focus, however, on the development of osteomyelitis in the pediatric population. In this study we present 2 case studies of patients with intestinal failure requiring parenteral nutrition who subsequently developed acute osteomyelitis.

  12. Ultrasound-guided central venous cannulation in bariatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusasco, Claudia; Corradi, Francesco; Zattoni, Pier Luigi; Launo, Claudio; Leykin, Yigal; Palermo, Salvatore

    2009-10-01

    Central venous catheterization may be difficult in morbidly obese patients because anatomic landmarks are often obscured. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided central venous cannulation in 55 patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The usefulness of ultrasonic examination combined with intraatrial electrocardiogram as a diagnostic tool for catheter misplacement was studied. Preliminary ultrasound examination of the neck vessels demonstrated anatomical variations in the position of internal jugular vein in 19 cases and four unrecognized asymptomatic thromboses of the right internal jugular vein. Central venous catheterization was successful in all 55 patients, in 51 with single skin puncture, and in 42 with single vein puncture. In three cases in whom the catheter was misplaced, this was detected by bedside ultrasonic examination during the procedure and immediately corrected by real-time echographic visualization. No arterial puncture, no hematoma, and no pneumothorax occurred in any patient. Successful catheter placement was also confirmed in all patients by post-operative chest X-ray. No evidence of infection or thrombosis subsequently was noted. The use of ultrasound guidance may increase the success rate and decrease the incidence of complications associated with central venous cannulation. The advantages of this approach is visualization of the anatomical structures at puncture site prior to skin puncture and the ability to track needle and guide-wire placement during the procedure. With its high accuracy in detecting catheter misplacement, bedside ultrasonic examination combined with intraatrial electrocardiogram may further decrease morbidity associated with misplaced central venous catheters.

  13. Placement of an implantable central venous access device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Young Suk [Dan Kook Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Hospital

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of placement of a central venous catheter with infusion port into the superior vena cava. Central venous catheters with a infusion port were implanted in 21 patients (M:F=4:17, age range:15-63, mean age: 41) diagnosed as suffering from breast cancer (n=9), lymphoma (n=7), thymoma (n=2) rhabdomyosarcoma(n=2) and rectal cancer (n=1). The per(n=9), lymphoma(n=7), thymoma (n=2) rhabdomyosarcoma (n=2) and rectal cancer (n=1). The peripheral portion of the subclavian vein was punctured under fluoroscopic guidance during injection of contrast media at the site of the ipsilateral peripheral vein (20 cases) and under ultrasonographic guidance (1 case). 9.6F central venous catheters placed in the superior vena cava via the subclavian vein and the connected infusion ports were implanted in the subcutaneous pocket near the puncture site of the right anterosuperior chest wall. Radiologic placement under fluoroscopic guidance of a central venous catheter with a infusion port is easy, safe and useful for patients requiring long-term venous access. (author). 21 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Reduction mammoplasty as a treatment for symptomatic central venous stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Seok Fun Fok

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Central venous stenosis is a rare cause of unilateral breast edema occurring in hemodialysis patients that needs to be differentiated from other differential diagnoses, including, but not limited to, inflammatory breast carcinoma, mastitis, lymphedema, and congestive heart failure. All reports of similar cases in the available literature have described improvement or resolution of the edema after treatment. Herein, we report and discuss the pathophysiology of breast edema formation in a patient who presented with massive left-sided breast edema 7 years after being diagnosed with central venous stenosis. Medical and minimally invasive therapy had not been successful, so she underwent reduction mammoplasty to relieve the symptoms.

  15. Guide Wire Entrapment during Central Venous Catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Woo Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We experienced a case of venous vessel wall entrapment between the introducer needle and the guide wire during an attempt to perform right internal jugular vein (IJV catheterization. The guide wire was introduced with no resistance but could not be withdrawn. We performed ultrasonography and C-arm fluoroscopy to confirm the entrapment location. We assumed the introducer needle penetrated the posterior vessel wall during the puncture and that only the guide wire entered the vein; an attempt to retract the wire pinched the vein wall between the needle tip and the guide wire. Careful examination with various diagnostic tools to determine the exact cause of entrapment is crucial for reducing catastrophic complications and achieving better outcomes during catheterization procedures.

  16. The where, what and how of paediatric central venous access

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-04-17

    Apr 17, 2012 ... to use and insertion technique, as well as prolonged catheter ... decisions about the site, insertion technique, type of catheter to use, and care of the CVC. ..... Circulation. 2006,113(2):e12-16. 4. Jacobs BR. Central venous catheter occlusion and thrombosis. Critical Care. Clinics. 2003;19(3):489-514. 5.

  17. Confirmation of the safety of central venous catheterisation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To evaluate, in critically ill children, the safety and effectiveness of routine central venous catheterisatians (CVCs) performed by residents from all disciplines. Design. Prospective audit of all eves over a 24-month period. Setting. Multidisciplinary intensive care unit at. Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto. Patients.

  18. Retained Fractured Fragment of A Central Venous Catheter: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Complication following fracture of a central venous catheter can be catastrophic to both the patient and the attending doctor. Catheter fracture has been attributed to several factors namely prolong mechanical force acting on the catheter, and forceful removal or insertion of the catheter. CASE DETAILS: In ...

  19. Percutaneous central venous catheterization in children, is it efficient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To evaluate the frequent use of percutaneous central venous catheters (CVCs) in pediatric agegroup. Methods Retrospectively we reviewed the records of all children that had percutaneous CVCs in the pediatric surgical ward and pediatric intensive care unit at King Hussein Medical Center between January

  20. Supraventricular tachycardia following insertion of a central venous catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavascan Onder

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Placement of central venous catheters (CVCs in patients is associated with several risks including endocardial injury and dysrhythmias. In addition, CVC extending into intracardiac chambers can provoke premature atrial and ventricular complexes, which have been reported to initiate supraventricular tachycardia (SVT. A 15-year-old boy with end-stage renal failure developed SVT after insertion of a CVC.

  1. Reduction in central venous pressure enhances erythropoietin synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montero, D.; Rauber, S.; Gøtze, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Erythropoiesis is a tightly controlled biological event, but its regulation under non-hypoxic conditions, however, remains unresolved. We examined whether acute changes in central venous blood pressure (CVP) elicited by whole-body tilting affect erythropoietin (EPO) concentration according...

  2. Retained Fractured Fragment of A Central Venous Catheter

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2016-01-01

    Jan 1, 2016 ... acts as a hemodialysis access point pending creation of a more ... access for hemodialysis pending maturation of a more permanent ... parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy agents, and monitoring of central venous pressure. They have become ubiquitous in the intensive care unit and are available as single.

  3. CT in cerebral air embolism from central venous catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, N.; Umek, H.; Kristoferitsch, W.

    1988-01-01

    A case of air embolism to the brain occurred via a disconnected central venous catheter. Computed tomography disclosed a number of small air bubbles in the right hemisphere. If the clinician suspects air embolism a CT scan should be obtained immediately to verify the presence of intracerebral air. On later CT scans only secondary effects like in any embolism will be seen. (orig.) [de

  4. Ultrasonic Guided Insertion of Central Venous Catheter in Infants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Purpose: ultrasound is licensed for application of regional blocks and insertion of vascular access. We aimed to compare ultrasonic guided (USG) and anatomical landmark technique (ALT) for insertion of central venous catheter (CVC) as regard success rate and rate of complications in infants and children.

  5. Complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The objective of this study was to assess the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) in neonates admitted to neonatal surgical intensive care unit (NSICU). Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 237 neonates admitted to NSICU from January 2010 to December 2011 ...

  6. Managing Inadvertent Arterial Catheterization During Central Venous Access Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, Tony; Ettles, Duncan; Robinson, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 200,000 central venous catheterizations are carried out annually in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. Inadvertent arterial puncture occurs in up to 3.7%. Significant morbidity and death has been reported. We report on our experience in the endovascular treatment of this iatrogenic complication. Methods: Retrospective analysis was carried out of 9 cases referred for endovascular treatment of inadvertent arterial puncture during central venous catheterization over a 5 year period. Results: It was not possible to obtain accurate figures on the numbers of central venous catheterizations carried out during the time period. Five patients were referred with carotid or subclavian pseudoaneurysms and hemothorax following inadvertent arterial catheter insertion and subsequent removal. These patients all underwent percutaneous balloon tamponade and/or stent-graft insertion. More recently 4 patients were referred with the catheter still in situ and were successfully treated with a percutaneous closure device. Conclusion: If inadvertent arterial catheterization during central venous access procedures is recognized and catheters removed, sequelae can be treated percutaneously. However, once the complication is recognized it is better to leave the catheter in situ and seal the artery percutaneously with a closure device

  7. Rising Central venous pressure: Impending right-sided failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monish S Raut

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous pressure generally indicates right sided cardiac filling pressure. Although it is a static hemodynamic parameter, however trend of CVP gives important information regarding the patient's management. Patient with left ventricular assist device is prone to develop right ventricular dysfunction which can easily be suspected by trend of CVP. However rising CVP does not always imply right heart dysfunction.

  8. Risk factors for venous thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted central venous catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Longfang; Zhao, Qianru; Yang, Xiangmei

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the risk factors associated with an increased risk of symptomatic peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC)-related venous thrombosis. Retrospective analyses identified 2313 patients who received PICCs from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2013. All 11 patients with symptomatic PICC-related venous thrombosis (thrombosis group) and 148 who did not have thromboses (non-thrombosis group) were selected randomly. The medical information of 159 patients (age, body mass index (BMI), diagnosis, smoking history, nutritional risk score, platelet count, leucocyte count as well as levels of D-dimer, fibrinogen, and degradation products of fibrin) were collected. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to determine the risk factors for thrombosis. Of 2313 patients, 11 (0.47%) were found to have symptomatic PICC-related venous thrombosis by color Doppler ultrasound. Being bedridden for a long time (odds ratio [(OR]), 17.774; P=0.0017), D-dimer >5 mg/L (36.651; 0.0025) and suffering from one comorbidity (8.39; 0.0265) or more comorbidities (13.705; 0.0083) were the major risk factors for PICC-catheter related venous thrombosis by stepwise logistic regression analysis. Among 159 patients, the prevalence of PICC-associated venous thrombosis in those with ≥1 risk factor was 10.34% (12/116), in those with ≥2 risk factors was 20.41% (10/49), and in those with >3 risk factors was 26.67% (4/15). Being bedridden >72 h, having increased levels of D-dimer (>5 mg/L) and suffering from comorbidities were independent risk factors of PICC-related venous thrombosis. PMID:25664112

  9. Implementation of a children's hospital-wide central venous catheter insertion and maintenance bundle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Helder MScN (Onno); R.F. Kornelisse (René); C. van der Starre (Cynthia); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); R.M.H. Wijnen (René); M.J. Poley (Marten); E. Ista (Erwin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections in children are an increasingly recognized serious safety problem worldwide, but are often preventable. Central venous catheter bundles have proved effective to prevent such infections. Successful implementation

  10. Central venous catheter placement in coagulopathic patients: risk factors and incidence of bleeding complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Weerdt, Emma K.; Biemond, Bart J.; Baake, Bart; Vermin, Ben; Binnekade, Jan M.; van Lienden, Krijn P.; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Central venous catheters are frequently inserted into patients with coagulation disorders. It is unclear whether preprocedural correction of hemostasis is beneficial. We determined the incidence of bleeding complications after central venous catheter placement in patients who had severe coagulopathy

  11. Comparison of complication rates between umbilical and peripherally inserted central venous catheters in newborns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnts, I.J.J.; Bullens, L.M.; Groenewoud, H.; Liem, K.D.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the complication rates between umbilical central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central venous catheters in newborns and to investigate whether other variables might increase complication rates. DESIGN: A retrospective observational study. SETTING: A Level III

  12. Comparison of complications in midlines versus central venous catheters: Are midlines safer than central venous lines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Ammara; Navalkele, Bhagyashri; Kaur, Maninder; Krishna, Amar; Saleem, Aleena; Rana, Natasha; Gera, Sonia; Chandramohan, Suganya; Surapaneni, Malini; Chopra, Teena

    2018-03-07

    With the rising use of midline catheters (MCs), validation of their safety is essential. Our study aimed to evaluate the incidence of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and other complications related to the use of MCs and central venous catheters (CVCs). A retrospective cohort study was performed at a tertiary care hospital in Detroit, Michigan, from March-September 2016. Adult patients with either MC or CVC were included. Outcomes assessed were catheter-related BSI (CRBSI), mechanical complications, hospital length of stay, readmission within 90 days of discharge (RA), and mortality. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS software. A total of 411 patients with MC and 282 patients with CVC were analyzed. More CRBSIs were seen in patients with CVC (10/282) than MC (1/411) (3.5% vs 0.2%, respectively; P = .0008). More mechanical complications were seen in patients with MC (2.6%) than CVC (0.3%; P = .03). Patients with CVC had a higher crude mortality (17.3% vs 5.3%; P < .0001), RA (58% vs 35%; P ≤ .0001), line-related RA (2.8% vs 0.2%; P = .0041), and transfer to intensive care unit after line placement (9% vs 5%; P = .01). CVC was a significant exposure for a composite of mortality, CRBSI, mechanical issues, thrombosis, and readmission because of a line-related complication (odds ratio, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-5.8). Our findings show use of MC is safer than CVC, but larger studies are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Improvement in retinal venous oxygen saturation after panretinal photocoagulation is predictive of progression of proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp, Thomas Lee; Kawasaki, Ryo; Wong, Tien Yin

    blood pressure was 152/84mmHg. Retinal arterial and venous saturation was 96.7% and 67.4%, respectively. Patients in Group 1 and 2 did not differ in baseline retinal arterial and venous oxygen saturation, number of laser spots delivered, total laser energy delivered, or change in retinal arterial oxygen...... saturation after PRP (-1.2% vs. -0.4%, p=0.92). In contrast, as compared to baseline, the improvement in retinal vein oxygen saturation was significantly different between the groups (+2.7% for Group 1 vs. -3.5% for Group 2, p=0.02). In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, adjusted for the mentioned...... variables, the change in retinal vein oxygen saturation between baseline and follow-up independently predicted PDR-progression (OR 1.31 per 1% increment in retinal venous oxygen saturation between baseline and follow-up, 95% CI 1.03-1.61, p=0.03). Lack of reduction in retinal venous oxygen saturation after...

  14. Central venous catheterization for acute trauma resuscitation: Tip position analysis using routine emergency computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Manuel F; Ewens, Sebastian; Schummer, Wolfram; Busch, Thilo; Bernhard, Michael; Fakler, Johannes K M; Stumpp, Patrick; Stehr, Sebastian N; Josten, Christoph; Wrigge, Hermann

    2018-03-01

    Central venous catheter insertion for acute trauma resuscitation may be associated with mechanical complications, but studies on the exact central venous catheter tip positions are not available. The goal of the study was to analyze central venous catheter tip positions using routine emergency computed tomography. Consecutive acute multiple trauma patients requiring large-bore thoracocervical central venous catheters in the resuscitation room of a university hospital were enrolled retrospectively from 2010 to 2015. Patients who received a routine emergency chest computed tomography were analyzed regarding central venous catheter tip position. The central venous catheter tip position was defined as correct if the catheter tip was placed less than 1 cm inside the right atrium relative to the cavoatrial junction, and the simultaneous angle of the central venous catheter tip compared with the lateral border of the superior vena cava was below 40°. During the 6-year study period, 97 patients were analyzed for the central venous catheter tip position in computed tomography. Malpositions were observed in 29 patients (29.9%). Patients with malpositioned central venous catheters presented with a higher rate of shock (systolic blood pressure central venous catheter tips. Logistic regression revealed injury severity score as a significant predictor for central venous catheter malposition (odds ratio = 1.039, 95% confidence interval = 1.005-1.074, p = 0.024). Multiple trauma patients who underwent emergency central venous catheter placement by experienced anesthetists presented with considerable tip malposition in computed tomography, which was significantly associated with a higher injury severity.

  15. High central venous-to-arterial CO2 difference/arterial-central venous O2 difference ratio is associated with poor lactate clearance in septic patients after resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huai-wu; Liu, Da-wei; Long, Yun; Wang, Xiao-ting

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the central venoarterial carbon dioxide difference/arterial-central venous oxygen difference (P(v-a)CO2/C(a-v)O2) ratio has been suggested as an additional indicator of anaerobic metabolism. We investigated the relationship between the P(v-a)CO2/C(a-v)O2 ratio and 8-hour lactate clearance (LC) in septic patients after resuscitation. We prospectively obtained 168 sets of measurements from 84 septic patients. The arterial and central venous blood gases were measured simultaneously at enrollment and 8 hours after resuscitation. The P(v-a)CO2/C(a-v)O2 (r = -0.24, P = .028) at T8 was negatively correlated with 8-hour LC after resuscitation in all patients. The patients with 8-hour LC ≥ 10% exhibited significantly lower P(v-a)CO2/C(a-v)O2 ratios and intensive care unit mortality after resuscitation than the patients with 8-hour LC CO2/C(a-v)O2 ratio for the detection of LC ≥ 10% was the greatest and was significantly better than that of the central venous oxygen saturation and similar to that of the P(v-a)CO2. Moreover, a P(v-a)CO2/C(a-v)O2 CO2/C(a-v)O2 ratio is associated with poor LC after resuscitation. The P(v-a)CO2/C(a-v)O2 ratio may provide useful information for assessing the LC potential and optimizing the LC rate. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictors of Venous Thromboembolic Events Associated with Central Venous Port Insertion in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Hohl Moinat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Insertion of central venous port (CVP catheter in the cancer population is associated with increased incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTE. However, trials have shown limited benefit of antithrombotic treatment to prevent catheter-related venous thrombosis. This prospective observational cohort study was designed to assess the incidence of VTE closely related to CVP implantation in patients with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy, and to identify a high risk subgroup of patients. Between February 2006 and December 2011, 1097 consecutive cancer patients with first CVP implantation were included. Catheter-related VTE were defined as deep venous thrombosis in the arm, with or without pulmonary embolism (PE, or isolated PE. The incidence of CVP-associated VTE was 5.9% (IC95 4.4–7.3% at 3 months, and 11.3% (IC95 9.4–13.2% at 12 months. The incidence of any VTE was 7.6% (IC95 6.0–9.3% at 3 months, and 15.3% (IC95 13.1–17.6% at 12 months. High Khorana risk score and lung cancer were significant predictors of 3 month VTE. In conclusion, this large cohort study of patients with first CVP catheter implantation confirms the high incidence of VTE associated with the CVP implantation and allow identifying high risk patients who may benefit from thromboprophylaxis.

  17. Assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhsan, Mohammad; Tan, Kok Kiong; Putra, Andi Sudjana

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the existing technology used to improve the safety and ease of ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. Electronic database searches were conducted in Scopus, IEEE, Google Patents, and relevant conference databases (SPIE, MICCAI, and IEEE conferences) for related articles on assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. A total of 89 articles were examined and pointed to several fields that are currently the focus of improvements to ultrasound-guided procedures. These include improving needle visualization, needle guides and localization technology, image processing algorithms to enhance and segment important features within the ultrasound image, robotic assistance using probe-mounted manipulators, and improving procedure ergonomics through in situ projections of important information. Probe-mounted robotic manipulators provide a promising avenue for assistive technology developed for freehand ultrasound-guided percutaneous procedures. However, there is currently a lack of clinical trials to validate the effectiveness of these devices.

  18. Nonfatal cardiac perforation after central venous catheter insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Vedran Premuzic; Lea Katalinic; Marijan Pasalic; Hrvoje Jurin

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade caused by perforation of the cardiac wall is a rare complication related to central venous catheter (CVC) placement. A 71-year-old female with a previous history of moderate aortic stenosis and kidney transplantation was admitted to hospital due to global heart failure and worsening of allograft function. Intensified hemodialysis was commenced through a CVC placed in the right subclavian vein. Chest radiography revealed catheter tip in the right atrium and no signs of pneumo...

  19. Central Venous Catheter (CVC) related infections: a local retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Manuela Fresu; Agostina Ronca; Carla Pruzzo; Simona Roveta

    2008-01-01

    Background. Central venous catheter (CVC) related infection is associated with significant increases in morbidity, mortality, and health care cost.This local surveillance study was carry out to monitor the frequency of occurrence of CVC-related blood stream infections. Materials and methods. During the period January – December 2005, 226 CVC specimens were analyzed (quantitative method) and microrganism identification from positive samples was performed by Vitek II. In 53 patients it was poss...

  20. Noninvasive measurement of internal jugular venous oxygen saturation by photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Erpelding, Todd N.; Ke, Haixin; Reddy, Kavya; Sharma, Anshuman; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The metabolic rate and oxygen consumption of the brain is reflected in jugular venous oxygen saturation. In many clinical conditions, such as head trauma, stroke, and low cardiac output states, the brain is at risk for hypoxic-ischemic injury. The current gold standard for monitoring brain oxygenation is invasive and requires jugular vein catheterization under fluoroscopic guidance; and therefore it is rarely used. Photo-acoustic tomography in combination with ultrasound can be used to estimate oxygen saturation of the internal jugular vein in real-time. This noninvasive method will enable earlier detection and prevention of impending hypoxic brain injury. A wavelength-tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser delivers light through an optical fiber bundle, and a modified commercial ultrasound imaging system (Philips iU22) detects both the pulse-echo ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) signals. A custom-built multichannel data acquisition system renders co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic images at 5 frames per second. After the jugular vein was localized in healthy volunteers, dualwavelength PA images were used to calculate the blood hemoglobin oxygen saturation from the internal jugular vein in vivo. The preliminary results raise confidence that this emerging technology can be used clinically as an accurate, noninvasive indicator of cerebral oxygenation.

  1. Correlation of central venous pressure with venous blood gas analysis parameters; a diagnostic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Rahim-Taleghani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to assess the correlation between central venous pressure (CVP and venous blood gas (VBG analysis parameters, to facilitate management of severe sepsis and septic shock in emergency department. Material and methods: This diagnostic study was conducted from January 2014 until June 2015 in three major educational medical centers, Tehran, Iran. For patients selected with diagnosis of septic shock, peripheral blood sample was taken for testing the VBG parameters and the anion gap (AG was calculated. All the mentioned parameters were measured again after infusion of 500 cc of normal saline 0.9% in about 1 h. Results: Totally, 93 patients with septic shock were enrolled, 63 male and 30 female. The mean age was 72.53 ± 13.03 and the mean Shock Index (SI before fluid therapy was 0.79 ± 0.30. AG and pH showed significant negative correlations with CVP, While HCO3 showed a significant positive correlation with CVP. These relations can be affected by the treatment modalities used in shock management such as fluid therapy, mechanical ventilation and vasopressor treatment. Conclusion: It is likely that there is a significant statistical correlation between VBG parameters and AG with CVP, but further research is needed before implementation of the results of this study. Keywords: Shock, Septic, Central venous pressure, Blood gas analysis, Emergency department, Emergency medicine

  2. Radiologic Placement of Tunneled Central Venous Catheters in Pediatric Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Yong Ho [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    We evaluated the technical success and complication rates associated with the radiological placement of tunneled central venous catheters in pediatric patients. Between May 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008, a total of 46 tunneled central venous catheters were placed in 34 children (M:F = 22:12; mean age, 9.9 years [9 months to 16.8 years]). All procedures were performed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Follow-up data were obtained through the retrospective review of the medical records. We used the Kaplan-Meier survival method for the evaluation of survival rate of the catheters. All procedures were technically successful. The observed periprocedural complications included hematoma formation in three patients. The mean catheter life was 189.3 days (total, 8710 days; range, 7-810). Catheters were removed due to death (n=9), the end of treatment (n=8), catheter sepsis (n=4), malfunction (n=8), and accidental removal (n=4). The rate of catheter sepsis and malfunction was 0.459 and 0.919 for every 1000 catheter days, respectively. The expected mean catheter life was 479.6 days as per the Kaplan- Meier analysis. The results suggest that the radiologic placement of a tunneled central venous catheter is an effective technique with a high technical success rate and low complication rate.

  3. Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, T.; Afzal, R.K.; Ahmad, R.N.; Hussain, I.; Anwar, M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) in cancer patients and the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the isolates. Subjects and Methods: Cancer patients requiring short or long-term central venous catheterization at the time of admission or thereafter were included. Catheter tips on removal were cultured quantitatively; specimens of blood and pus were cultured qualitatively. Isolates were identified and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by standard techniques. Results: Eighty-nine patients were included in the study. The frequency of CR-BSI was 17%. Out of the 19 organisms isolated, 10 (53%) were Gram-positive cocci, 8 (42%) were Gram-negative rods and 1 (5%) was a fungus. Coagulase negative staphylococci (27%) were the predominant pathogens. Among the staphylococci, 46% of the isolates were methicillin-resistant. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptive to glycopeptides. Gram-negative rods were resistant to most of the commonly used antimicrobial groups. Conclusion: Central venous catheter is an important source of bloodstream infections in cancer patients. Most of the infections are caused by Gram-positive cocci. Rigorous infection control measures and continuous surveillance is required to curb the frequency of these infections. (author)

  4. Development of Needle Insertion Manipulator for Central Venous Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yo; Hong, Jaesung; Hamano, Ryutaro; Hashizume, Makoto; Okada, Kaoru; Fujie, Masakatsu G.

    Central venous catheterization is a procedure, which a doctor insert a catheter into the patient’s vein for transfusion. Since there are risks of bleeding from arterial puncture or pneumothorax from pleural puncture. Physicians are strictly required to make needle reach up into the vein and to stop the needle in the middle of vein. We proposed a robot system for assisting the venous puncture, which can relieve the difficulties in conventional procedure, and the risks of complication. This paper reports the design structuring and experimental results of needle insertion manipulator. First, we investigated the relationship between insertion force and angle into the vein. The results indicated that the judgment of perforation using the reaction force is possible in case where the needling angle is from 10 to 20 degree. The experiment to evaluate accuracy of the robot also revealed that it has beyond 0.5 mm accuracy. We also evaluated the positioning accuracy in the ultrasound images. The results displays that the accuracy is beyond 1.0 mm and it has enough for venous puncture. We also carried out the venous puncture experiment to the phantom and confirm our manipulator realized to make needle reach up into the vein.

  5. Oxygen uptake and mixed venous oxygen saturation during aortic surgery and the first three postoperative hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, J P; Annat, G J; Ravat, F M; Pommier, C M; Brudon, J R; Desuzinges, C J; Bertrand, O M; Motin, J P

    1991-11-01

    This study was designed to determine the significance of changes in mixed venous oxygen saturation (SVO2) associated with aortic surgery. In 12 patients undergoing aortic aneurysm repair, SVO2 was monitored using a fiberoptic pulmonary arterial catheter, and oxygen uptake (VO2) was measured at 2-min intervals by a mass-spectrometer system. Excluding the phase of aortic clamping, VO2, hemoglobin, and arterial oxygen saturation were moderately stable during anesthesia, and changes in SVO2 were correlated with changes in cardiac output (CO). SVO2 remained stable during infrarenal aortic clamping, but increased during supraceliac aortic clamping. During the first three postoperative hours, changes in SVO2 were opposite to changes in VO2 and CO. They were especially marked in the patients whose preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction was less than 50%. We conclude that SVO2 changes are an indicator of same-direction changes in CO during general anesthesia except during periods of aortic clamping. The interpretation of SVO2 changes is more complex during aortic clamping and during the immediate postoperative period, two critical periods during which simultaneous changes in VO2 and CO occur.

  6. Pain and efficacy of local anesthetics for central venous access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C Culp Jr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available William C Culp Jr1, Mohammed Yousaf2, Benjamin Lowry1, Timothy C McCowan3, William C Culp21Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology, Scott and White Hospital, The Texas A&M University College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USA; 2Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 3Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USAPurpose: To compare pain during injection and efficacy of analgesia of local anesthetics during central venous line placement.Methods: Sixty-two patients were studied in a randomized, double-blinded prospective fashion. Patients received 1% lidocaine (L, buffered 1% lidocaine (LB, or 2% chloroprocaine (CP injected around the internal jugular vein for procedural analgesia for central venous access. Patients reported pain via a standard linear visual analog scale, with 0 representing no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable.Results: Overall patient perception of pain was better with CP and L than LB with mean scores of CP 2.4, L 2.6, LB 4.2. Pain with injection mean scores were CP 2.1, L 2.5, LB 3.2. Pain with catheter placement scores were CP 2.5, L 1.7, LB 3.4. Operator assessment of overall pain values were CP 1.9, L 2.2, LB 3.4. LB consistently scored the worst, though compared with CP, this only reached statistical significance in overall patient pain and pain at catheter insertion compared with L.Conclusion: Though chloroprocaine scored better than lidocaine in 3 of 4 parameters, this trend did not achieve statistical significance. Adding sodium bicarbonate to lidocaine isn’t justified in routine practice, nor is routine replacement of lidocaine with chloroprocaine.Keywords: local anesthesia, analgesia, central venous access, lidocaine, chloroprocaine

  7. Spontaneous migration of central venous catheter tip following extubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Prabaharan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Migration of the tip of central venous catheters is not an uncommon event and the mechanism for this is not clear. Increased intrathoracic pressure due to coughing, sneezing or weight lifting, changing the body position or physical movements such as abduction or adduction of the arms is thought to be the cause of such migration. We present here a case of a patient with a port catheter tip that migrated from the left subclavian to the superior vene cava following extubation.

  8. Central Venous Pressure Monitoring; Introduction of a New Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Ghafoori Yazdi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemodynamic monitoring is needed in up to 58% of patients presented to the emergency department. Central venous pressure (CVP monitoring is generally useful to assess general volume status. There are several methods of CVP measurement, which can be categorized as invasive and non-invasive. CVP manometer and electronic transducer are among the invasive methods and direct observation, ultrasonography and plethysmography are examples of non-invasive ones. All the mentioned methods have some negative points and shortcomings. Here we introduce a new device that can facilitate CVP measurement and provide physicians with further data that can be helpful regarding decision making and patient management.

  9. Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava and Left Brachiocephalic Vein with Preserving the Central Venous Catheter in Situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isfort, Peter; Penzkofer, Tobias; Goerg, Fabian; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2011-01-01

    Stenting of the central veins is well established for treating localized venous stenosis. The techniques regarding catheter preservation for central venous catheters in the superior vena cava have been described. We describe here a method for stent implantation in the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein, and principally via a single jugular venous puncture, while saving a left sided jugular central venous catheter in a patient suffering from central venous stenosis of the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein.

  10. Central Venous Catheter-Associated Deep Venous Thrombosis in Critically Ill Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, Edward Vincent S

    2018-02-01

    The presence of a central venous catheter and admission to the intensive care unit are the most important risk factors for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in children. At least 18% of critically ill children with a catheter develop radiologically confirmed catheter-associated thrombosis. Clinically apparent thrombosis occurs in 3% of critically ill children with a catheter and is associated with 8 additional days of mechanical ventilation. Even when the thrombus is initially asymptomatic, 8 to 18% of critically ill children with catheter-associated thrombosis develop postthrombotic syndrome. Thrombosis is uncommon within 24 hours after insertion of a nontunneled catheter in critically ill children, but nearly all thrombi have developed by 4 days after insertion. Hypercoagulability during or immediately after insertion of the catheter plays an essential role in the development of thrombosis. Pharmacologic prophylaxis, including local anticoagulation with heparin-bonded catheter, has not been shown to reduce the risk of catheter-related thrombosis in children. Systemic anticoagulation in critically ill children started soon after the insertion of the catheter, however, may be beneficial. A multicenter clinical trial that is testing this hypothesis is currently underway. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. [Concordance between central venous and arterial blood gases in post-surgical myocardial revascularization patients in stable condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Guevara-Carrasco, Marlene; Naranjo-Ricoy, Guillermo; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Moreno-Ruíz, Luis Antonio; Herrera-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Magaña-Serrano, José Antonio; Valencia-Sánchez, Jesús Salvador; Calderón-Abbo, Moisés Cutiel

    2014-01-01

    The concordance between the parameters of arterial and central venous blood gases has not been defined yet. We studied the concordance between both parameters in post-surgical myocardial revascularization patients in stable condition. Consecutive subjects were studied in a cross-sectional design. The position of the central venous catheter was performed and simultaneously we obtained arterial and central venous blood samples prior to discharge from the intensive care unit. Data are expressed according to Bland-Altman statistical method and the intraclass correlation coefficient. Statistical result was accepted at P<.05. Two hundred and six samples were studied of 103 post-surgical patients, pH and lactate had a mean difference (limits of agreement) 0.029±0.048 (-0018, 0.077) and -0.12±0.22 (-0.57, 0.33) respectively. The magnitude of the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.904 and 0.943 respectively. The values related to oxygen pressure were 27.86±6.08 (15.9, 39.8) and oxygen saturation 33.02±6.13 (21, 45), with magnitude of 0.258 and 0.418 respectively. The best matching parameters between arterial and central venous blood samples were pH and lactate. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. [The influence of joining central venous catheter and pressure transducer with T-junctions on central venous pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiuling; Yang, Wanjie; An, Youzhong; Teng, Hongyun; Zhang, Rumei; Wang, Yumei; Gao, Hailing; Hua, Ning; Song, Yan

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the influence of the number of T-junctions between central venous catheter and pressure transducer on measurement of central venous pressure ( CVP ) in patients. A prospective controlled study was conducted. The patients with CVP monitoring in Department of Critical Care Medicine of the Fifth Center Hospital in Tianjin from February to October in 2014 were enrolled. The patients were divided into three groups according to the number of T-junction between central venous catheter and pressure transducer: without T-junction control group and 1, 2, 3 T-junctions groups. In each patient, corresponding CVP values with different number of T-junctions placed between the central venous catheter and pressure sensors were determined within a certain period, and a square-wave graphic was obtained and preserved on the monitor. The own frequency ( fn ) and the attenuation coefficient ( D ) of the system of pressure measurement were calculated after measurement of the shock wave following a square-wave to obtain the distance between two vibrations and the amplitude of the shock wave. The difference in CVP, fn and D were compared among the groups. A total of 20 cases were enrolled, and 150 groups of data were collected. (1) With the increase in the number of T-junction, CVP showed a tendency of gradual reduction. The CVP of the groups of control and 1, 2, 3 T-junctions was ( 7.00±1.60 ), ( 7.00±3.00 ), ( 5.00±2.00 ), and ( 4.00±1.00 ) mmHg ( 1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa ), respectively. The CVP of 3 T-junctions group was significantly lower than that of the control group ( F = 9.333, P = 0.015 ). (2) With an increase in the number of T-junction, fn showed a tendency of gradual increase. The fn of groups control and 1, 2, 3 T-junctions was ( 12.30±0.79 ), ( 16.00±0.91 ), ( 18.10±1.75 ), ( 20.90±2.69 ) Hz, respectively. The fn of 1, 2, 3 T-junctions group was significantly higher than that of the control group ( F1 = 45.962, F2 = 45.414, F3 = 46.830, all P = 0

  13. Radiologic placement of hemodialysis central venous catheters: a practical guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schemmer, D.; Sadler, D.J.; Gray, R.R.; Saliken, J.C.; So, C.B. [Foothills Hospital, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2001-04-01

    Typical indications for central venous catheters (CVCs) are hemodialysis (HD), apheresis, total parenteral nutrition, analgesia, chemotherapy, long-term antibiotic therapy and cases of difficult or absent peripheral venous access. One of the largest medical services requesting CVC insertion is nephrology for HD patients. Demographics dictate that the demand for CVCs will continue to grow over the next few decades, placing striking demands on interventional radiology departments. In our centre, interventional radiologists now place nearly all percutaneously inserted HD CVCs. Radiologists provide rapid access to CVC services with significantly fewer complications than CVCs placed by other clinicians. With the demand for CVC management increasing and available operating room time decreasing, many clinicians now refer CVC insertions to radiologists. As well, clinicians who ordinarily place their own lines often refer high-risk patients, such as those who are obese or uncooperative and those with burns or coagulopathy. Our experience, derived from over 7000 CVC insertions, manipulations and removals, has allowed us to continually progress and improve our techniques, many of which are summarized here. (author)

  14. Radiologic placement of hemodialysis central venous catheters: a practical guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schemmer, D.; Sadler, D.J.; Gray, R.R.; Saliken, J.C.; So, C.B.

    2001-01-01

    Typical indications for central venous catheters (CVCs) are hemodialysis (HD), apheresis, total parenteral nutrition, analgesia, chemotherapy, long-term antibiotic therapy and cases of difficult or absent peripheral venous access. One of the largest medical services requesting CVC insertion is nephrology for HD patients. Demographics dictate that the demand for CVCs will continue to grow over the next few decades, placing striking demands on interventional radiology departments. In our centre, interventional radiologists now place nearly all percutaneously inserted HD CVCs. Radiologists provide rapid access to CVC services with significantly fewer complications than CVCs placed by other clinicians. With the demand for CVC management increasing and available operating room time decreasing, many clinicians now refer CVC insertions to radiologists. As well, clinicians who ordinarily place their own lines often refer high-risk patients, such as those who are obese or uncooperative and those with burns or coagulopathy. Our experience, derived from over 7000 CVC insertions, manipulations and removals, has allowed us to continually progress and improve our techniques, many of which are summarized here. (author)

  15. Nonfatal cardiac perforation after central venous catheter insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premuzic, Vedran; Katalinic, Lea; Pasalic, Marijan; Jurin, Hrvoje

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade caused by perforation of the cardiac wall is a rare complication related to central venous catheter (CVC) placement. A 71-year-old female with a previous history of moderate aortic stenosis and kidney transplantation was admitted to hospital due to global heart failure and worsening of allograft function. Intensified hemodialysis was commenced through a CVC placed in the right subclavian vein. Chest radiography revealed catheter tip in the right atrium and no signs of pneumothorax. Thorough diagnostics outruled immediate life-threatening conditions, such as myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. However, not previously seen, 2 cm thick pericardial effusion without repercussion on the blood flow was visualized during echocardiography, predominantly reclining the free surface of the right atrium, with fibrin scar tissue covering the epicardium - it was the spot of spontaneously recovered cardiac wall perforation. Follow-up echocardiogram performed before the discharge showed regression of the previously found pericardial effusion.

  16. Hematologic patients' clinical and psychosocial experiences with implanted long-term central venous catheter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Adamsen, Lis

    2010-01-01

    A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients.......A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients....

  17. Central venous catheter use in severe malaria: time to reconsider the World Health Organization guidelines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, J.; Lam, S.W.K.; Mohanty, S.; Alam, S.; Hasan, M.M.U.; Lee, S.J.; Schultz, M.J.; Charunwatthana, P.; Cohen, S.; Kabir, A.; Mishra, S.; Day, N.P.J.; White, N.J.; Dondorp, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To optimize the fluid status of adult patients with severe malaria, World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines recommend the insertion of a central venous catheter (CVC) and a target central venous pressure (CVP) of 0-5 cmH2O. However there are few data from clinical trials to

  18. Central venous catheter use in severe malaria: time to reconsider the World Health Organization guidelines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, Josh; Lam, Sophia Wk; Mohanty, Sanjib; Alam, Shamshul; Hasan, Md Mahtab Uddin; Lee, Sue J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; Cohen, Sophie; Kabir, Ashraf; Mishra, Saroj; Day, Nicholas Pj; White, Nicholas J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2011-01-01

    To optimize the fluid status of adult patients with severe malaria, World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines recommend the insertion of a central venous catheter (CVC) and a target central venous pressure (CVP) of 0-5 cmH2O. However there are few data from clinical trials to support this

  19. Central venous catheter associated thrombosis of major veins: thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenhuis, S.; van't Hek, L. G.; Vlasveld, L. T.; Kröger, R.; Dubbelman, R.; van Tol, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Major thromboses can occur in the venous system in association with central venous catheters. This usually necessitates removal of the catheter. The effectiveness of low dose recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in combination with heparin was assessed in patients with central

  20. Evaluation of 6 years use of sodium hydroxide solution to clear partially occluded central venous catheters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, Suzanne G.; Balke, Petra; Jonkers-Schuitema, Cora F.; Tas, Tirzah A. J.; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Central venous catheter occlusion is a frequently occurring complication during home parenteral nutrition (HPN). The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) administration to clear an occluded central venous catheter especially in HPN.

  1. In-vivo continuous monitoring of mixed venous oxygen saturation by photoacoustic transesophageal echocardiography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Subramaniam, Balachundhar; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Andrawes, Michael N.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-02-01

    Mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), measured from pulmonary arteries, is a gold-standard measure of the dynamic balance between the oxygen supply and demand in the body. In critical care, continuous monitoring of SvO2 plays a vital role in early detection of circulatory shock and guiding goal-oriented resuscitation. In current clinical practice, SvO2 is measured by invasive pulmonary artery catheters (PAC), which are associated with a 10% risk of severe complications. To address the unmet clinical need for a non-invasive SvO2 monitor, we are developing a new technology termed photoacoustic transesophageal echocardiography (PA-TEE). PA-TEE integrates transesophageal echocardiography with photoacoustic oximetry, and enables continuous assessment of SvO2 through an esophageal probe that can be inserted into the body in a minimally invasive manner. We have constructed a clinically translatable PA-TEE prototype, which features a mobile OPO laser, a modified ultrasonography console and a dual-modality esophageal probe. Comprised of a rotatable acoustic array detector, a flexible optical fiber bundle and a light-integrating acoustic lens, the oximetric probe has an outer diameter smaller than 15 mm and will be tolerable for most patients. Through custom-made C++/Qt software, our device acquires and displays ultrasonic and photoacoustic images in real time to guide the deployment of the probe. SvO2 is calculated on-line and updated every second. PA-TEE has now been used to evaluate SvO2 in living swine. Our findings show that changing the fraction of oxygen in the inspired gas modulates SvO2 measured by PA-TEE. Statistic comparison between SvO2 measurements from PA-TEE in vivo the gold-standard laboratorial analysis on blood samples drawn from PACs will be presented.

  2. Relationship between oxygen uptake and mixed venous oxygen saturation in the immediate postoperative period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, J P; Annat, G; Lehot, J J; Quard, S; Quintin, L; Parlow, J; Durand, P G; Zabot, J M; Villard, J; Estanove, S

    1994-02-01

    During muscular exercise, a negative correlation has been demonstrated between the value of mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) and the level of muscular work, expressed at each level as the ratio of oxygen uptake (VO2) to each subject's maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Because the immediate postoperative period is associated with an increase in whole body oxygen demand, and in this regard resembles the effects of muscular exercise, a similar correlation may exist during this period. VO2max was determined in 11 patients 3-5 days before coronary artery bypass surgery. During the first 2 postoperative h, VO2 and SvO2 were monitored. VO2 was measured by indirect calorimetry and SvO2 by a fiberoptic pulmonary arterial catheter. The highest postoperative value of VO2 was most often associated with visible shivering and ranged among patients from 19% to 53% of preoperatively measured VO2max. There was a highly significant negative correlation between SvO2 and the ratio VO2/VO2max. This correlation was observed when data were examined collectively (136 simultaneous determinations of the two variables) and at the individual level (10-18 determinations for each patient). The slopes and the y intercepts of individual lines of correlation were within a narrow range. During the first 2 postoperative h after coronary artery bypass surgery, VO2 rarely exceeds 50% of preoperative VO2max. Assuming a stable state of myocardial function, SvO2 measurement may provide an indirect means of assessment of the "exercise test" imposed on patients recovering from general anesthesia.

  3. The vanishing veins: difficult venous access in a patient requiring translumbar, transhepatic, and transcollateral central catheter insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaacob, Yazmin; Zakaria, Rozman; Mohammad, Zahiah; Ralib, Ahmad Razali Md; Muda, Ahmad Sobri

    2011-10-01

    Central venous catheter placement is indicated in patients requiring long-term therapy. With repeated venous catheterisations, conventional venous access sites can be exhausted. This case illustrates the expanding role of radiology in managing difficult venous access. We present a case of translumbar, transhepatic, and transcollateral placement of central catheter in a woman with a difficult venous access problem who required lifelong parenteral nutrition secondary to short bowel syndrome. This case highlights the technical aspects of interventional radiology in vascular access management.

  4. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    Internal jugular veins are the major cerebral venous outflow pathway in supine humans. In upright humans the positioning of these veins above heart level causes them to collapse. An alternative cerebral outflow pathway is the vertebral venous plexus. We set out to determine the effect of posture...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  5. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, Bernhard; Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency, a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5F angiographic catheters (pigtail, Sos Omni), goose-neck snare, or combinations thereof. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients, port catheter malposition correction was not possible because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. In migrated catheter tips, radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis, port catheter correction is often more challenging

  6. Ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization in prone position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofi Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheterization (CVC is a commonly performed intraoperative procedure. Traditionally, CVC placement is performed blindly using anatomic landmarks as a guide to vessel position. Real-time ultrasound provides the operator the benefit of visualizing the target vein and the surrounding anatomic structures prior to and during the catheter insertion, thereby minimizing complications and increasing speed of placement. A 22-year-old male underwent open reduction and internal fixation of acetabulum fracture in prone position. Excessive continuous bleeding intraoperatively warranted placement of CVC in right internal jugular vein (IJV, which was not possible in prone position without the help of ultrasound. Best view of right IJV was obtained and CVC was placed using real-time ultrasound without complications. Ultrasound-guided CVC placement can be done in atypical patient positions where traditional anatomic landmark technique has no role. Use of ultrasound not only increases the speed of placement but also reduces complications known with the traditional blind technique.

  7. Central Venous Catheter (CVC related infections: a local retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Fresu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Central venous catheter (CVC related infection is associated with significant increases in morbidity, mortality, and health care cost.This local surveillance study was carry out to monitor the frequency of occurrence of CVC-related blood stream infections. Materials and methods. During the period January – December 2005, 226 CVC specimens were analyzed (quantitative method and microrganism identification from positive samples was performed by Vitek II. In 53 patients it was possible to compare quantitative results with those obtained from blood cultures. Results. Positive CVC samples were 125 (55% and 130 microrganisms were isolated: 109 Gram-positives (84%, 4 Gram-negatives (3%, and 17 mycetes (13%. Among pathogens collected simultaneously from CVC and blood samples, the most frequently isolated were Staphylococcus spp. (30% coagulase-negative staphylococci and 20%. S. aureus and Candida spp. (45%. In the group of patients that presented positive CVC and negative blood samples the most frequently recovered microrganisms were staphylococci. Many isolates (33% were polymicrobial. Conclusions. Catheter-related infections occurred in those patients who presented the same pathogen in both CVC and blood cultures. These infections were principally caused by staphylococci and Candida spp. On the contrary, a possible CVC contamination could be suspected when positive CVC and negative blood cultures were found.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers indicate a central venous hypertension syndrome in patients with symptomatic pineal cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Pripp, Are Hugo; Ringstad, Geir A

    2016-04-15

    While most pineal cysts (PCs) are asymptomatic, some PCs are accompanied with symptoms of variable severity. We suggested that symptom severity in symptomatic patients with non-hydrocephalic PCs relates to venous compression causing central venous hypertension. This study explored whether possible magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers of central venous hypertension could differentiate the severity of symptoms in individuals with non-hydrocephalic PCs. The study included all individuals with PCs and MRI available for analysis followed conservatively within the department from 2003 to 2014. Severity of symptoms at follow-up were assessed from a questionnaire. Suggested MRI biomarkers indicative of central venous hypertension were explored, in addition to MRI measures of cyst size, aqueduct stenosis, and tectal compression. The study included 66 patients. As compared to the 27/66 patients (41%) with "None-Moderate" symptoms at follow-up, the 39/66 patients (59%) with "Much-Severe" symptoms presented with significantly altered indices of central venous hypertension (tectum-splenium-cyst ratio and indices of thalamic and periventricular edema). PC grading based on MRI biomarkers of central venous hypertension differentiated the severity of symptoms. The results indicate an association between severity of symptoms and MRI biomarkers of central venous hypertension in symptomatic individuals with non-hydrocephalic PCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Advantages and disadvantages of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) compared to other central venous lines: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Eva; Hammarskjöld, Fredrik; Lundberg, Dag; Arnlind, Marianne Heibert

    2013-06-01

    The use of central venous lines carries a significant risk for serious complications and high economic costs. Lately, the peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) has gained in popularity due to presumed advantages over other central venous lines. The aim of this systematic literature review was to identify scientific evidence justifying the use of PICC. The literature review was performed according to the principles of Cochrane Collaboration. The electronic literature search included common databases up to March 2011. Only those studies rated as high or moderate quality were used for grading of evidence and conclusions. The search resulted in 827 abstracts, 48 articles were read in full text, and 11 met the inclusion criteria. None of the articles was classified as high quality and two had moderate quality. The results of these two studies indicate that PICC increases the risk for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), but decreases the risk for catheter occlusion. The quality of scientific evidence behind these conclusions, however, was limited. Due to the lack of studies with sufficiently high quality, questions such as early complications, patient satisfaction and costs could not be answered. We conclude that although PICCs are frequently used in oncology, scientific evidence supporting any advantage or disadvantage of PICC when comparing PICC with traditional central venous lines is limited, apart from a tendency towards increased risk for DVT and a decreased risk for catheter occlusion with PICC.

  10. The where, what and how of paediatric central venous access | Gray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) in paediatric patients to make informed decisions about the site, insertion technique, type of catheter to use, and care of the CVC. Keywords: central venous catheter, children, acute complications, infection, thrombosis, subclavian vein, ...

  11. Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing early central venous catheter Gram positive infections in oncology patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wetering, M. D.; van Woensel, J. B. M.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term tunnelled central venous catheters (TCVC) are increasingly used in oncology patients. Despite guidelines on insertion, maintenance and use, infections remain an important complication. Most infections are caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Therefore antimicrobial prevention

  12. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-01-01

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  13. Tricuspid valve endocarditis with pulmonary infarction caused by central venous catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabbe, E.; Guthoff, A.

    1981-02-01

    Knowledge of common complications of central venous catheters is completed by a case of bacterial tricuspid endocarditis with recurrent pulmonary infarction. This rare, life threatening complication should be considered in differential diagnosis, when in case of central venous catheter sepsis, changing pulmonary infiltrations with pleural effusion as well as different auscultatory findings above the tricuspid valve do occur. The diagnosis can be supported by echocardiographic demonstration of tricuspid vegetations.

  14. Tricuspid valve endocarditis with pulmonary infarction caused by central venous catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabbe, E.; Guthoff, A.; Hamburg Univ.

    1981-01-01

    Knowledge of common complications of central venous catheters is completed by a case of bacterial tricuspid endocarditis with recurrent pulmonary infarction. This rare, life threatening complication should be considered in differential diagnosis, when in case of central venous catheter sepsis, changing pulmonary infiltrations with pleural effusion as well as different auscultatory findings above the tricuspid valve do occur. The diagnosis can be supported by echocardiographic demonstration of tricuspid vegetations. (orig.) [de

  15. Central Venous Catheter-Related Tachycardia in the Newborn: Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Amer, Aya; Broadbent, Roland S.; Edmonds, Liza; Wheeler, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Central venous access is an important aspect of neonatal intensive care management. Malpositioned central catheters have been reported to induce cardiac tachyarrhythmia in adult populations and there are case reports within the neonatal population. We present a case of a preterm neonate with a preexisting umbilical venous catheter (UVC), who then developed a supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). This was initially treated with intravenous adenosine with transient reversion. Catheter migration w...

  16. Laser Recanalization of Central Venous Occlusion to Salvage a Threated Arteriovenous Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhia, Sagar; Janko, Matthew; Hacker, Robert I

    2018-02-15

    Central venous occlusion is conventionally managed with balloon angioplasty, stent extension or sharp recanalization. Here we describe recanalization of a chronically occluded innominate vein using excimer laser after conventional techniques were unsuccessful. Patient clinical improvement and fistula patency have been sustained two years post-intervention. This technique may provide new hemodialysis access options for patients who would not otherwise be candidates for hemodialysis access on the ipsilateral side of a central venous occlusion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER AS A VASCULAR APPROACH TO HEMODIALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verica Djordjevic

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of the central venous catheter (CVC as a temporary orpermanent vascular approach to hemodialysis has been practiced in our Center since1994. So far 30 (12,6% patients have been thus treated. The primary application hasbeen done in 25 patients, namely: the first making of the A V fistula has been done in16, the ABT in 6, while the vascular approach correction in 3 patients. The secondaryapplication has been done in 5 patients. The infection episode incidence concerningthe CVC application is 20 infections per 1.000 patients. This is the upper limitaccording to the data given in the literature (5, rang 3-20. The average duration of thecatheter is 21 + - 13 days (rang 1-47. Two-volume catheters have been used for ajugular approach though less often for a femoral one. The unsuccessful placing due tothe catheter thrombosis has occurred in 4 patients, the catheter drop-out and itsreplacing have been done in 2 patients, while no replacement has happened in onečaše. The treatment has been stopped in one patient. Tn four patients the cerebrovascularinsult has happened after placing the CVC. The mortality rate is 26,6%,that is, K patients, namely: 4 due to cerebrovascular insult, one due to lung emboly,one due to heart weakness and one due to the sepsis from the V fistula. One patientdied at home for unknown reason. A high infection episode incidence rate is related toinadequate patients' placing so that their location in the rooms for intensive care is away of reducing it. It is necessary to provide for general aseptic procedure at work aswell as for betterment of the accompanying procedures (hemoculture, antibiograms,sterilization in order to maintain a safe catheter function.

  18. A Rare Case of Massive Hemothorax due to Central Venous Catheterization Treated with Angiographic Stent Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Min Bae

    Full Text Available In critically ill patients, centeral venous catheterization is a widely used procedure for fluid resuscitation, massive transfusion, total parenteral nutrition, central venous pressure monitoring and hemodialysis. However, many complications are associated with central venous catheterization. Among these complications, hemothorax is rare but fatal. We recently experienced a 32-year-old female diagnosed with hemothorax due to subclavian catheterization who was successfully treated with angiographic intervention. There are no absolute indications of surgery or interventional treatment in such cases. Multicenter studies and consensus are necessary to determine the proper treatment for hemothorax due to central venous catheterization. Angiographic treatment is rarely used for this uncommon complication of subclavian catheterization. We describe a rare case with a review of the literature.

  19. Electrocardiography-controlled central venous catheter tip positioning in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhagen, Folkert; Kanthak, Maximilian; Kukuk, Guido; Bode, Christian; Hoeft, Andreas; Weber, Stefan; Kim, Se-Chan

    2018-02-01

    A significant increase of the p-wave of a real-time intracavitary electrocardiography is a reliable and safe method to confirm the central venous catheter tip position close to the atrium. However, conflicting data about the feasibility of electrocardiography exist in patients with atrial fibrillation. An observational prospective case-control cohort study was set up to study the feasibility and accuracy of the electrocardiography-controlled central venous catheter tip placement in 13 patients with atrial fibrillation versus 10 patients with sinus rhythm scheduled for elective surgery. Each intervention was crosschecked with ultrasound-guided positioning via right supraclavicular fossa view and chest radiography. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular venipuncture of the right subclavian vein and guidewire advancement were performed. A B-mode view of the superior vena cava and the right pulmonary artery was obtained to visualize the J-tip of the guidewire. The central venous catheter was advanced over the guidewire and the electrocardiography was derived from the J-tip of the guidewire protruding from the central venous catheter tip. Electrocardiography was read for increased p- and atrial fibrillation waves, respectively, and insertion depth was compared with the ultrasound method. Electrocardiography indicated significantly increasing fibrillation and p-waves, respectively, in all patients and ultrasound-guided central venous catheter positioning confirmed a tip position within the lower third of the superior vena cava. Electrocardiography-guided central venous catheter tip positioning is a feasible real-time method for patients with atrial fibrillation. Combined with ultrasound, the electrocardiography-controlled central venous catheter placement may eliminate the need for postinterventional radiation exposure.

  20. Central Venous Catheter-Related Tachycardia in the Newborn: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Amer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous access is an important aspect of neonatal intensive care management. Malpositioned central catheters have been reported to induce cardiac tachyarrhythmia in adult populations and there are case reports within the neonatal population. We present a case of a preterm neonate with a preexisting umbilical venous catheter (UVC, who then developed a supraventricular tachycardia (SVT. This was initially treated with intravenous adenosine with transient reversion. Catheter migration was subsequently detected, with the UVC tip located within the heart. Upon withdrawal of the UVC and a final dose of adenosine, the arrhythmia permanently resolved. Our literature review confirms that tachyarrhythmia is a rare but recognised neonatal complication of malpositioned central venous catheters. We recommend the immediate investigation of central catheter position when managing neonatal tachyarrhythmia, as catheter repositioning is an essential aspect of management.

  1. Transposition of cephalic vein to rescue hemodialysis access arteriovenous fistula and treat symptomatic central venous obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Jose Skupien

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that stenosis or central venous obstruction affects 20 to 50% of patients who undergo placement of catheters in central veins. For patients who are given hemodialysis via upper limbs, this problem causes debilitating symptoms and increases the risk of loss of hemodialysis access. We report an atypical case of treatment of a dialysis patient with multiple comorbidities, severe swelling and pain in the right upper limb (RUL, few alternative sites for hemodialysis vascular access, a functioning brachiobasilic fistula in the RUL and severe venous hypertension in the same limb, secondary to central vein occlusion of the internal jugular vein and right brachiocephalic trunk. The alternative surgical treatment chosen was to transpose the RUL cephalic vein, forming a venous necklace at the anterior cervical region, bypassing the site of venous occlusion. In order to achieve this, we dissected the cephalic vein in the right arm to its junction with the axillary vein, devalved the cephalic vein and anastomosed it to the contralateral external jugular vein, providing venous drainage to the RUL, alleviating symptoms of venous hypertension and preserving function of the brachiobasilic fistula.

  2. Interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters : results and complications in 557 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Kyo; Do, Young Soo; Paik, Chul H. [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    1999-05-01

    To evaluate prospectively the results of interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters, and subsequent complications. Between April 1997 and April 1998, a total of 557 tunneled central venous catheters were percutaneously placed in 517 consecutive patients in an interventional radiology suite. The indications were chemotherapy in 533 cases, total parenteral nutrition in 23 and transfusion in one. Complications were evaluated prospectively by means of a chart review, chest radiography, central vein angiography and blood/catheter culture. The technical success rate for tunneled central venous catheter placement was 100% (557/557 cases). The duration of catheter placement ranged from 4 to 356 (mean, 112{+-}4.6) days; Hickman catheters were removed in 252 cases during follow-up. Early complications included 3 cases of pneumothorax(0.5%), 4 cases of local bleeding/hematoma(0.7%), 2 cases of primary malposition(0.4%), and 1 case of catheter leakage(0.2%). Late complications included 42 cases of catheter-related infection(7.5%), 40 cases of venous thrombosis (7.2%), 18 cases of migration (3.2%), 5 cases of catheter / pericatheter of occlusion(0.8%), and 1 case of pseudoaneurysm(0.2%). The infection rate and thrombosis rate per 1000 days were 1.57 and 1.50, respectively. The technical success rate of interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters was high. In comparison to conventional surgical placement, it is a more reliable method and leads to fewer complications.

  3. Insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsikoris, Ioannis; Zygomalas, Apollon; Papas, Theofanis; Maras, Dimitris; Pavlidis, Polyvios; Andrikopoulou, Maria; Tsanis, Antonis; Alivizatos, Vasileios; Bessias, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Central venous catheter placement is an effective alternative vascular access for dialysis in patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations in terms of efficacy of the procedure and early complications. Materials and methods: Between 2008 and 2010, the vascular access team of our hospital placed 409 central venous catheters in patients with chronic renal failure. The procedure was performed using the Seldinger blind technique. In 18 (4.4%) cases it was impossible to advance the guidewire, and so the patients were transported to the angiography suite. Results: Using the angiographic technique, the guidewire was advanced in order to position the central venous catheter. The latter was inserted into the subclavian vein in 12 (66.6%) cases, into the internal jugular vein in 4 (22.2%) and into the femoral vein in 2 (11.1%) cases. There was only one complicated case with severe arrhythmia in 1 (5.5%) patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that insertion of central venous catheters using angiographic techniques in hemodialysis patients with previous multiple catheterizations is a safe and effective procedure with few complications and high success rates

  4. Insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsikoris, Ioannis, E-mail: gkotsikoris@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Zygomalas, Apollon, E-mail: azygomalas@upatras.gr [Department of General Surgery, University Hospital of Patras (Greece); Papas, Theofanis, E-mail: pfanis@otenet.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Maras, Dimitris, E-mail: dimmaras@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Pavlidis, Polyvios, E-mail: polpavlidis@yahoo.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Andrikopoulou, Maria, E-mail: madric@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Tsanis, Antonis, E-mail: atsanis@gmail.com [Department of Interventional Radiology, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Alivizatos, Vasileios, E-mail: valiviz@hol.gr [Department of General Surgery and Artificial Nutrition Unit, “Agios Andreas” General Hospital of Patras (Greece); Bessias, Nikolaos, E-mail: bessias@otenet.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece)

    2012-09-15

    Introduction: Central venous catheter placement is an effective alternative vascular access for dialysis in patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations in terms of efficacy of the procedure and early complications. Materials and methods: Between 2008 and 2010, the vascular access team of our hospital placed 409 central venous catheters in patients with chronic renal failure. The procedure was performed using the Seldinger blind technique. In 18 (4.4%) cases it was impossible to advance the guidewire, and so the patients were transported to the angiography suite. Results: Using the angiographic technique, the guidewire was advanced in order to position the central venous catheter. The latter was inserted into the subclavian vein in 12 (66.6%) cases, into the internal jugular vein in 4 (22.2%) and into the femoral vein in 2 (11.1%) cases. There was only one complicated case with severe arrhythmia in 1 (5.5%) patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that insertion of central venous catheters using angiographic techniques in hemodialysis patients with previous multiple catheterizations is a safe and effective procedure with few complications and high success rates.

  5. Incidence and risk factors for central venous access port-related infection in Chinese cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Yao Wang

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: Infection remains to be a challenging issue for totally implantable central venous ports. Implementation of an insertion bundle for the prevention of central line-associated bloodstream infections is warranted, especially for those patients with hematological and head and neck cancers, as well as for patients receiving chemotherapy in the metastatic settings.

  6. Subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm: a rare and serious complication of central venous catheterization in an infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koklu, Esad; Poyrazoglu, Hakan; Yikilmaz, Ali; Canpolat, Mehmet; Konuskan, Bahadir

    2008-01-01

    Serious complications of central venous access occur in 0.4-9.9% of patients undergoing attempted central venepuncture. We report an unusual case of an 18-month-old infant in whom a right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm developed rapidly after attempted subclavian vein catheterization without US guidance failed. (orig.)

  7. Subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm: a rare and serious complication of central venous catheterization in an infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koklu, Esad; Poyrazoglu, Hakan [Erciyes University School Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, Division of Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Kayseri (Turkey); Yikilmaz, Ali [Erciyes University, Department of Radiology, Kayseri (Turkey); Canpolat, Mehmet; Konuskan, Bahadir [Erciyes University, Department of Paediatrics, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2008-02-15

    Serious complications of central venous access occur in 0.4-9.9% of patients undergoing attempted central venepuncture. We report an unusual case of an 18-month-old infant in whom a right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm developed rapidly after attempted subclavian vein catheterization without US guidance failed. (orig.)

  8. Simultaneous estimation of arterial and venous oxygen saturation using a camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gastel, Mark; Liang, Hangbing; Stuijk, Sander; de Haan, Gerard

    2018-02-01

    Optical monitoring of arterial blood oxygenation, SpO2, using cameras has recently been shown feasible by measuring the relative amplitudes of the remotely sensed PPG waveforms captured at different wavelengths. SvO2 measures the venous blood oxygenation which together with SpO2 provides an indication of tissue oxygen consumption. In contrast to SpO2 it usually still requires a blood sample from a pulmonary artery catheter. In this work we present a method which suggests simultaneous estimation of SpO2 and SvO2 with a camera. Contrary to earlier work, our method does not require external cuffs leading to better usability and improved comfort. Since the arterial blood varies synchronously with the heart rate, all frequencies outside the heart rate band are typically filtered out for SpO2 measurements. For SvO2 estimation, we include intensity variations in the respiratory frequency range since respiration modulates venous blood due to intrathoracic pressure variations in the chest and abdomen. Consequently, under static conditions, the two dominant components in the PPG signals are respiration and pulse. By measuring the amplitude ratios of these components, it seems possible to monitor both SpO2 and SvO2 continuously. We asked healthy subjects to follow an auditory breathing pattern while recording the face and hand. Results show a difference in estimated SpO2 and SvO2 values in the range 5-30 percent for both anatomical locations, which is normal for healthy people. This continuous, non-contact, method shows promise to alert the clinician to a change in patient condition sooner than SpO2 alone.

  9. Efficacy and safety of peripherally inserted central venous catheters in acute cardiac care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Fabrizio; Coccino, Claudio; Monolo, Davide; Crespi, Paolo; Ciccioli, Giorgio; Cordio, Giuseppe; Seveso, Giovanni; De Servi, Stefano

    2018-03-01

    Patients admitted to cardiac intensive care unit need administration of drugs intravenously often in concomitance of therapeutic techniques such as non-invasive ventilation, continuous renal replacement therapy and intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation. Therefore, the insertion of central venous catheters provides a reliable access for delivering medications, laboratory testing and hemodynamic monitoring, but it is associated with the risk of important complications. In our study, we tested the efficacy and safety of peripherally inserted central catheters to manage cardiac intensive care. All patients admitted to cardiac intensive care unit with indication for elective central venous access were checked by venous arm ultrasound for peripherally inserted central catheter's implantation. Peripherally inserted central catheters were inserted by ultrasound-guided puncture. After 7 days from the catheter's placement and at the removal, vascular ultrasound examination was performed searching signs of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. In case of sepsis, blood cultures peripherally from the catheter and direct culture of the tip of the catheter were done to establish a catheter-related blood stream infection. In our cardiac intensive care unit, 137 peripherally inserted central catheters were placed: 80.3% of patients eligible for a peripherally inserted central catheter were implanted. The rate of symptomatic catheter-related peripheral venous thrombosis was 1.4%. Catheter-related blood stream infection was diagnosed in one patient (0.7%; 5.7 × 1000 peripherally inserted central catheter days). All peripherally inserted central catheters were inserted successfully without other major complications. In patients admitted to cardiac intensive care unit, peripherally inserted central catheters' insertion was feasible in a high percentage of patients and was associated with low infective complications and clinical thrombosis rate.

  10. Durability of central venous catheters. A randomized trial in children with malignant diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S W; Jungersen, D; Hole, P

    1996-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study the durability of tunnelled and non-tunnelled central venous catheters was investigated in children with malignant diseases. Twenty children were included in the study but four (two in each group) had to be excluded; three because the entry criteria turned out......, respectively. In conclusion cuffed, tunnelled central venous catheters are less prone to displacement than traditional percutaneous central venous catheters when used in children with malignant diseases....... not to be fulfilled and one because of lack of data. The median duration of the tunnelled catheters was 224 days with a range of 25-846 days which was significantly longer than that of conventional catheters (39.5 days, range 9-228 days). In addition six of eight conventional catheters were accidentally removed...

  11. Management Of Fever And Suspected Infection In Pediatric Patients With Central Venous Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Courtney; Wang, Vincent J

    2015-12-01

    The use of indwelling central venous catheters is essential for pediatric patients who require hemodialysis, parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy, or other medications. Fever is a common chief complaint in the emergency department, and fever in a patient with a central venous catheter may be related to a common cause of fever, or it may be due to a catheter-associated bloodstream infection. Catheter-associated bloodstream infections may also lead to additional complications such as sepsis, septic shock, or septic complications including suppurative thrombophlebitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic emboli, and abscesses. Early resuscitation as well as timely and appropriate antibiotic therapy have been shown to improve outcomes. This issue focuses on the approach to fever in pediatric patients with central venous catheters and the management and disposition of patients with possible catheter-associated bloodstream infections.

  12. A novel technique of axillary vein puncture involving peripherally inserted central venous catheters for a small basilic vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Fumito; Odaka, Yoshinobu; Mutoh, Mitsuhisa; Katayose, Yu; Tokumura, Hiromi

    2018-03-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters are some of the most useful devices for vascular access used globally. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters have a low rate of fatal mechanical complications when compared to non-tunnel central venous catheters. However, as peripherally inserted central venous catheter access requires a smaller vein, there is a high risk of thrombosis. The axillary vein (confluence of the basilic and brachial veins) can serve as an access for cannulation. Moreover, as this vein is larger than the basilic or brachial vein, it might be a superior option for preventing thrombosis. The risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection should be considered when the puncture site is at the axillary fossa. The aim of this study was to present our new protocol involving peripherally inserted central venous catheters (non-tunneled/tunneled) and a tunneling technique and assess its feasibility and safety for improving cannulation and preventing thrombosis and infection. The study included 20 patients. The axillary vein in the upper arm was used for peripherally inserted central venous catheters in patients with a small-diameter basilic vein (venous catheter. The observed catheter duration was 645 days (median ± standard deviation, 26 ± 22.22 days). Catheterization was successful in all cases, however, two accidental dislodgements were identified. No fatal or serious complications were observed after catheterization. Our new protocol for axillary peripherally inserted central venous catheters/tunneled axillary peripherally inserted central venous catheters use for a small-diameter basilic vein is safe and feasible.

  13. Evaluation of a central venous catheter tip placement for superior vena cava-subclavian central venous catheterization using a premeasured length: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Jeong, Young-Il; Jun, In-Gu; Moon, Young-Jin; Lee, Yu-Mi

    2018-01-01

    Subclavian central venous catheterization is a common procedure for which misplacement of the central venous catheter (CVC) is a frequent complication that can potentially be fatal. The carina is located in the mid-zone of the superior vena cava (SVC) and is considered a reliable landmark for CVC placement in chest radiographs. The C-length, defined as the distance from the edge of the right transverse process of the first thoracic spine to the carina, can be measured in posteroanterior chest radiographs using a picture archiving and communication system. To evaluate the placement of the tip of the CVC in subclavian central venous catheterizations using the C-length, we reviewed the medical records and chest radiographs of 122 adult patients in whom CVC catheterization was performed (from January 2012 to December 2014) via the right subclavian vein using the C-length. The tips of all subclavian CVCs were placed in the SVC using the C-length. No subclavian CVC entered the right atrium. Tip placement was not affected by demographic characteristics such as age, sex, height, weight, and body mass index. The evidence indicates that the C-length on chest radiographs can be used to determine the available insertion length and place the right subclavian CVC tip into the SVC. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Improved Cerebral Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography at 7 Tesla – Feasibility Study and Preliminary Results Using Optimized Venous Saturation Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Karsten H.; Johst, Sören; Dammann, Philipp; Özkan, Neriman; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Kraemer, Markus; Maderwald, Stefan; Ladd, Mark E.; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale; Schlamann, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Conventional saturation pulses cannot be used for 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF MRA) due to specific absorption rate (SAR) limitations. We overcome these limitations by utilizing low flip angle, variable rate selective excitation (VERSE) algorithm saturation pulses. Material and Methods Twenty-five neurosurgical patients (male n = 8, female n = 17; average age 49.64 years; range 26–70 years) with different intracranial vascular pathologies were enrolled in this trial. All patients were examined with a 7 Tesla (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens) whole body scanner system utilizing a dedicated 32-channel head coil. For venous saturation pulses a 35° flip angle was applied. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the delineation of arterial vessels in the Circle of Willis, delineation of vascular pathologies, presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue contrast and overall image quality of TOF MRA scans in consensus on a five-point scale. Normalized signal intensities in the confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter were measured and vessel-tissue contrasts were calculated. Results Ratings for the majority of patients ranged between good and excellent for most of the evaluated features. Venous saturation was sufficient for all cases with minor artifacts in arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas. Quantitative signal intensity measurements showed high vessel-tissue contrast for confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter. Conclusion The use of novel low flip angle VERSE algorithm pulses for saturation of venous vessels can overcome SAR limitations in 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution TOF MRA. Our protocol is suitable for clinical application with excellent image quality for delineation of various intracranial vascular pathologies. PMID:25232868

  15. Safety and effectiveness of central venous catheters usage in newborns intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    І. А. Anikin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To date, ensuring long-term venous access in newborns is an actual problem of intensive therapy. Central venous catheters, which implantable peripherally (PICC-line, are widely used as a medium-term vascular access in newborns in the department of intensive care. Objective - To study the incidence of complications associated with the use of central venous access in newborns intensive care department. Materials and methods. Characteristics and safety of various central venous access in newborns were studied. The study is retrospective, with a quantitative analysis of the results. The safe practice PICC-line and CVCSI accesses groups were compared, revealed complications in 361 newborns, who received complex intensive therapy in connection with diseases of the perinatal period, were analyzed. Results. Due to the fact that some babies accessed re-established catheters, the total number of observations was 395. We took the complications of catheter-related infection, taking into account the instructions of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (theUSA. We searched the number of mechanical and infectious complications, which were associated with venous catheters. The number of catheter occlusion, against the background of infusion therapy was not significantly different in the groups, and the obstruction of the catheter by thrombus was the most frequent complication in the PICC-line group. CVCSIs revealed fairly large number of system thrombosis of the superior vena cava, and a great number of infectious complications. KAI Number of cases in the group of newborns with PICC-line was almost 4 times less than in infants with CVCSI venous access. Cases of death in patients did not associate with venous access, despite the fact that the total amount of complications in CVCSI group were significantly higher. Conclusion. The received results have showen that peripherally implanted catheters have a higher level of security and ease of installation

  16. Prevention of neonatal late-onset sepsis associated with the removal of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemels, Marieke A. C.; van den Hoogen, Agnes; Verboon-Maciolek, Malgorzata A.; Fleer, Andre; Krediet, Tannette G.

    Objectives: Indwelling central venous catheters are the most important risk factors for the development of sepsis attributable to coagulase-negative staphylococci among preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units. In addition, removal of a central venous catheter also may cause

  17. Endovascular repair of inadvertent arterial injury induced by central venous catheterization using a vascular closure device: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Hee; Jang, Woo Jin; Oh, Ju Heyon; Song, Yun Gyu [Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Central venous catheterization can cause various complications. Inadvertent subclavian artery catheterization was performed during insertion of a central venous catheter in a 73-year-old man suffering from panperitonitis due to small-bowel perforation. Endovascular treatment was conducted to treat the injured subclavian artery with a FemoSeal vascular closure device.

  18. Percutaneous central venous catheters versus peripheral cannulae for delivery of parenteral nutrition in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, S B; Clerihew, L; McGuire, W

    2007-07-18

    Parenteral nutrition for neonates may be delivered via a short peripheral cannula or a central venous catheter. The latter may either be inserted via the umbilicus or percutaneously. Because of the complications associated with umbilical venous catheter use, many neonatal units prefer to use percutaneously inserted catheters following the initial stabilisation period. The method of parenteral nutrition delivery may affect nutrient input and consequently growth and development. Although potentially more difficult to place, percutaneous central venous catheters may be more stable than peripheral cannulae, and need less frequent replacement. These delivery methods may also be associated with different risks of adverse events, including acquired systemic infection and extravasation injury. To determine the effect of infusion via a percutaneous central venous catheter versus a peripheral cannula on nutrient input, growth and development, and complications including systemic infection, or extravasation injuries in newborn infants who require parenteral nutrition. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2007), MEDLINE (1966 - February 2007), EMBASE (1980 - February 2007), conference proceedings, and previous reviews. Randomised controlled trials that compared the effect of delivering parenteral nutrition via a percutaneous central venous catheter versus a peripheral cannulae in neonates. Data were extracted the data using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group, with separate evaluation of trial quality and data extraction by each author, and synthesis of data using relative risk, risk difference and mean difference. Four trials eligible for inclusion were found. These trials recruited a total of 368 infants and reported a number of different outcomes. One study showed that the use of a percutaneous

  19. Ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement : a structured review and recommendations for clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saugel, Bernd; Scheeren, Thomas W L; Teboul, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    The use of ultrasound (US) has been proposed to reduce the number of complications and to increase the safety and quality of central venous catheter (CVC) placement. In this review, we describe the rationale for the use of US during CVC placement, the basic principles of this technique, and the

  20. Ultrasound-guided or landmark techniques for central venous catheter placement in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulego-Erroz, Ignacio; González-Cortes, Rafael; García-Soler, Patricia; Balaguer-Gargallo, Mónica; Frías-Pérez, Manuel; Mayordomo-Colunga, Juan; Llorente-de-la-Fuente, Ana; Santos-Herraiz, Paula; Menéndez-Suso, Juan José; Sánchez-Porras, María; Palanca-Arias, Daniel; Clavero-Rubio, Carmen; Holanda-Peña, Mª Soledad; Renter-Valdovinos, Luis; Fernández-De-Miguel, Sira; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    To assess whether ultrasound guidance improves central venous catheter placement outcomes compared to the landmark technique in critically ill children. A prospective multicentre observational study was carried out in 26 paediatric intensive care units over 6 months. Children 0-18 years old who received a temporary central venous catheter, inserted using either ultrasound or landmark techniques, were eligible. The primary outcome was the first-attempt success rate. Secondary outcomes included overall placement success, number of puncture attempts, number of procedures requiring multiple punctures (> 3 punctures), number of procedures requiring punctures at more than one vein site and immediate mechanical complications. To account for potential confounding factors, we used propensity scores. Our primary analysis was based on 1:1 propensity score matching. The association between cannulation technique and outcomes in the matched cohort was estimated using generalized estimating equations and mixed-effects models to account for patient-level and hospital-level confounders. Five hundred central venous catheter-placement procedures involving 354 patients were included. Ultrasound was used for 323 procedures, and the landmark technique was used for 177. Two hundred and sixty-six procedures were matched (133 in the ultrasound group and 133 in the landmark group). Ultrasound was associated with an increase in the first-attempt success rate [46.6 vs. 30%, odds ratio 2.09 (1.26-3.46); p central venous catheter placement in critically ill children.

  1. An unknown complication of peripherally inserted central venous catheter in a patient with ventricular assist device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unknown complication of peripherally inserted central venous catheter in a patient with Ventricular Assist Device. This rare complication led to the failure of the right ventricular assist device, which could be detrimental in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

  2. Thrombosis prophylaxis in patient populations with a central venous catheter - A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, Clara P. W.; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; Büller, Harry R.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Central venous catheters (CVCs) are used in a wide variety of patients. Associated complications are thrombosis and infection. It is a matter of debate whether thromboprophylaxis is beneficial. Methods: We performed a systematic review of 3 different patient populations to render the

  3. Additional Analgesia for Central Venous Catheter Insertion: A Placebo Controlled Randomized Trial of Dexmedetomidine and Fentanyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloka Samantaray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to show that a single preprocedural dose of either dexmedetomidine or fentanyl reduces procedural pain and discomfort and provides clinically acceptable sedation. In this prospective, double-blind study, sixty patients scheduled for elective surgery and requiring planned central venous catheter insertion were randomized to receive dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg, fentanyl (1 μg/kg, or 0.9% normal saline intravenously over ten minutes followed by local anesthetic field infiltration before attempting central venous catheterization. The primary outcome measures are assessment and analysis of pain, discomfort, and sedation level before, during, and after the central venous catheter insertion at five time points. The median (IQR pain score is worst for normal saline group at local anaesthetic injection [6 (4–6.7] which was significantly attenuated by addition of fentanyl [3 (2–4] and dexmedetomidine [4 (3–5] in the immediate postprocedural period (P=0.001. However, the procedure related discomfort was significantly lower in dexmedetomidine group compared to fentanyl group in the first 10 min of procedure after local anaesthetic Injection (P=0.001. Fentanyl is more analgesically efficient for central venous catheter insertion along with local anaesthetic injection. However, dexmedetomidine has the potential to be superior to fentanyl and placebo in terms of providing comfort to the patients during the procedure.

  4. Preventing central venous catheter-related infection in a surgical intensive-care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijma, R; Girbes, AR; Kleijer, DJ; Zwaveling, JH

    The cumulative effect of five measures (introduction of hand disinfection with alcohol, a new type of dressing, a one-bag system for parenteral nutrition, a new intravenous connection device, and surveillance by an infection control practitioner) on central venous catheter colonization and

  5. Placing of tunneled central venous catheters prior to induction chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Frydenberg, Morten

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) are inevitable in children with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of CVC-related complications in children with ALL in relation to timing of catheter placement and type of catheter. PROCEDURE: All...

  6. Central venous access device associated infections: recommendations for best practice in home infusion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Lisa A

    2010-04-01

    Central venous access devices (CVADs) are commonly used for patients who require home infusion therapy. CVAD-associated infections are preventable with attention to hand hygiene, site assessment and care, use of aseptic technique with all infusion therapy-related procedures, and thorough patient education.

  7. In-line filters in central venous catheters in a neonatal intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogen, A; Krediet, TG; Uiterwaal, CSPM; Bolenius, JFGA; Gerards, LJ; Fleer, A

    Nosocomial sepsis remains an important cause of morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Central venous catheters (CVCs) and parenteral nutrition (TPN) are major risk factors. In-line filters in the intravenous (IV) administration sets prevent the infusion of particles, which may reduce

  8. Use of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter as a Conduit for Central Venous Access Across Thrombosed Great Veins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guntur Ramkumar, Prasad; Chakraverty, Sam; Zealley, Ian

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a technique of inserting an implantable venous access port (portacath) through a thrombosed and occluded vein employing a pre-existing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) as the route of access. The PICC was used as a conduit for venous access in a way that has not been described previously in the literature. This procedure was performed in a young patient with cystic fibrosis in an effort to prevent the use of his virgin contralateral veins, which might be used in the future.

  9. Unnecessary Removal of Central Venous Catheters in Cancer Patients with Bloodstream Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaftari, Anne Marie; Hachem, Ray; Raad, Sammy; Jiang, Ying; Natividad, Elizabeth; Chaftari, Patrick; Raad, Issam

    2018-02-01

    We evaluated the rate of central venous catheter (CVC) removal in 283 cancer patients with bloodstream infections (BSIs). Removal of CVCs occurred unnecessarily in 57% of patients with non-central-line-associated BSI (non-CLABSI), which was equivalent to the rate of CVC removal in patients with CLABSIs. Physician education and safe interventions to salvage the vascular access are warranted. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:222-225.

  10. [Application of ultrasonography in central venous catheterization; access sites and procedure techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzewska, Dorota; Ustymowicz, Andrzej; Klukowski, Mark

    2016-08-05

    Central venous catheterization is commonly performed in clinical practice. Traditional procedural technique is based on anatomical landmarks, but is associated with a high risk of failure and complications. To decrease their incidence European and American societies recommend application of ultrasonography. Preliminary ultrasonographic examination allows for assessment of local anatomical relations as well as vessel morphology (diameter, patency), while real-time ultrasonography increases chances of successful needle insertion. This paper presents the most common venous access sites and procedure techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of body temperature on peripheral venous pressure measurements and its agreement with central venous pressure in neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Altan; Salman, M Alper; Salman, A Ebru; Aypar, Ulka

    2005-04-01

    Previous studies suggest a correlation of central venous pressure (CVP) with peripheral venous pressure (PVP) in different clinical settings. The effect of body temperature on PVP and its agreement with CVP in patients under general anesthesia are investigated in this study. Fifteen American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients undergoing elective craniotomy were included in the study. CVP, PVP, and core (Tc) and peripheral (Tp) temperatures were monitored throughout the study. A total of 950 simultaneous measurements of CVP, PVP, Tc, and Tp from 15 subjects were recorded at 5-minute intervals. The measurements were divided into low- and high-Tc and -Tp groups by medians as cutoff points. Bland-Altman assessment for agreement was used for CVP and PVP in all groups. PVP measurements were within range of +/-2 mm Hg of CVP values in 94% of the measurements. Considering all measurements, mean bias was 0.064 mm Hg (95% confidence interval -0.018-0.146). Corrected bias for repeated measurements was 0.173 +/- 3.567 mm Hg (mean +/- SD(corrected)). All of the measurements were within mean +/- 2 SD of bias, which means that PVP and CVP are interchangeable in our setting. As all the measurements were within 1 SD of bias when Tc was > or = 35.8 degrees C, even a better agreement of PVP and CVP was evident. The effect of peripheral hypothermia was not as prominent as core hypothermia. PVP measurement may be a noninvasive alternative for estimating CVP. Body temperature affects the agreement of CVP and PVP, which deteriorates at lower temperatures.

  12. Central venous pressure monitoring via peripherally or centrally inserted central catheters: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Filippo; Noto, Alberto; Martucci, Gennaro; Farbo, Marco; Burgio, Gaetano; Biasucci, Daniele G

    2017-07-14

    The central venous pressure (CVP) is the most commonly used static marker of preload for guiding fluid therapy in critically ill patients, though its usefulness remains controversial. Centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs) are the gold-standard devices for CVP monitoring but peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) may represent a valid alternative. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis with the aim to investigate whether the difference between PICC- and CICC-measured CVP is not significant. We searched for clinical studies published in PubMed and EMBASE databases from inception until December 21st 2016. We included studies providing data on paired and simultaneous CVP measurement from PICCs and CICCs. We conducted two analyses on the values of CVP, the first one according to the total number of CVP assessments, the second one considering the number of patients recruited. Four studies matched the inclusion criteria, but only three of them provided data for the meta-analyses. Both analyses showed non-significant differences between PICC-measured and CICC-measured CVP: 1489 paired simultaneous CVP assessments (MD 0.16, 95%CI -0.14, 0.45, p = 0.30) on a total of 57 patients (MD 0.22, 95%CI -1.46, 1.91, p = 0.80). Both analyses showed no heterogeneity (I2 = 0%). Available evidence supports that CVP monitoring with PICCs is accurate and reproduces similar values to those obtained from CICCs. The possibility to monitor CVP should not be used among clinical criteria for preferring a CICC over a PICC line.

  13. Incidence of thrombosis in children with tunneled central venous access devices versus peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanin, Maralee; Young, Guy

    2013-11-01

    The recent proliferation of deep vein thrombosis in children has been attributed to the increased use of central venous catheters, specifically tunneled lines and peripherally inserted central catheters. A formal comparison of the incidence rate for deep vein thrombosis between tunneled lines and peripherally inserted central catheters has not been undertaken. Children inclusion. Data were extracted from the hospital discharge database which includes data on all procedures and up to 20 diagnoses per admission. Diagnoses and procedures were identified by International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision coding. Patients were excluded if they received more than one central line. Data collected included type of central line, deep vein thrombosis event, and underlying medical illnesses classified according to chronic complex conditions. Over the seven year study period there was an overall rate of 73 deep vein thromboses per 10,000 hospital discharges. Of the 6915 eligible subjects, 181 had a deep vein thrombosis for an overall incidence rate of 2.6%. There were 152 thrombi (2.6%) in subjects with peripherally inserted central catheters and 29 thrombi (3.1%) in subjects with tunneled lines [OR=.83 (0.55, 1.29), p=0.38]. Despite the relative ease and simplicity of use of peripherally inserted central catheters leading to a substantial rise in their use, this study demonstrates that such lines pose a substantial risk for venous thrombosis and no difference in incidence was detected between such lines and tunneled lines. © 2013.

  14. Radiographic inguinal curl may indicate paraspinal misplacement of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters: report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chedid, Faris; Abbas, Adil; Morris, Lloyd

    2005-01-01

    Misplacement of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters (PCVCs) into the paraspinal venous plexus can result in devastating outcomes. Several cases have been reported in the literature together with an explanation of the mechanism. To describe three premature babies with their PCVCs inserted through the left saphenous vein that ended up in the lumbar spinal dural venous plexus. Plain radiographs obtained to check positions showed an unusual 360 curl of the PCVC in the left inguinal area. We believe that misplacement of the catheter into the paraspinal venous plexus could be diagnosed with great accuracy if such a curl is seen. (orig.)

  15. Radiographic inguinal curl may indicate paraspinal misplacement of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters: report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chedid, Faris [Al Tawam Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Abbas, Adil [Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Clinical Haematology/Oncology, Brisbane (Australia); Morris, Lloyd [Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Adelaide (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    Misplacement of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters (PCVCs) into the paraspinal venous plexus can result in devastating outcomes. Several cases have been reported in the literature together with an explanation of the mechanism. To describe three premature babies with their PCVCs inserted through the left saphenous vein that ended up in the lumbar spinal dural venous plexus. Plain radiographs obtained to check positions showed an unusual 360 curl of the PCVC in the left inguinal area. We believe that misplacement of the catheter into the paraspinal venous plexus could be diagnosed with great accuracy if such a curl is seen. (orig.)

  16. Intercostal artery damage and massive hemothorax after thoracocentesis by central venous catheter: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai-Qiang Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheters (CVCs are widely used in various puncture and drainage operations in intensive care units (ICUs in recent years. Compared to conventional operating devices, CVC was welcomed by clinicians because of the advantages of easy use, less damage to the body and convenient fixation process. We came across a patient with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP who developed cardiac arrest due to thoracic cavity massive bleeding 24 h after thoracocentesis with CVC. Thoracotomy surgery was carried out immediately, which confirmed an intercostal artery injury. The patient was discharged from hospital without any neurological complications two months later. Here we report this case to remind all the emergency department and ICU physicians to pay more attention to the complication of thoracic cavity bleeding following thoracocentesis conducted by CVC. Keywords: Central venous catheters, Thoracentesis, Hemothorax

  17. Risk factors for central venous catheter-related infections in a neonatal population - systematic review,

    OpenAIRE

    Rosado, Viviane; Camargos, Paulo A.M.; Anchieta, Lêni M.; Bouzada, Maria C.F.; Oliveira, Gabriela M. de; Clemente, Wanessa T.; Romanelli, Roberta M. de C.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This was a systematic review of the incidence density and risk factors for central venous catheter-related infections in a neonatal population. Data source: The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, BDENF, SciELO, and LILACS databases were used without date or language restriction. Studies that analyzed risk factors for bloodstream infections in newborns were identified. Data synthesis: A total of 134 articles were found that met the eligibility criteria. Of these articles, 14 wer...

  18. Central Venous Catheter-directed Tissue Plasminogen Activator in Massive Pulmonary Embolism

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Gulati

    2018-01-01

    We present the case of an 88-year-old female who presented to the emergency department (ED) with suspected massive pulmonary embolism (PE) causing respiratory failure, right heart strain, and shock, who despite early and aggressive resuscitation with vasopressors and continuous peripheral infusion of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), suffered a cardiac arrest in the ED. We describe the approach of a tPA bolus directed through a central venous catheter, resulting in return of spontaneous cir...

  19. A Rare Central Venous Catheter Malposition in a 10-Year-Old Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movafegh, Ali; Saliminia, Alireza; Atef-Yekta, Reza; Azimaraghi, Omid

    2018-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed in operating rooms worldwide via different approaches. Like any other medical procedure, CVC placement can cause a variety of complications. We report the case of an unexpected malposition of a catheter in the right internal jugular vein, where it looped back on itself during placement and went upward into the right internal jugular vein. CVC line placement should always be viewed as a procedure that could become complicated, even in the hands of the most experienced operators.

  20. Risk factors for central venous catheter‐related infections in a neonatal population – systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Viviane Rosado; Paulo A.M. Camargos; Lêni M. Anchieta; Maria C.F. Bouzada; Gabriela M. de Oliveira; Wanessa T. Clemente; Roberta M. de C. Romanelli

    2018-01-01

    Objective: This was a systematic review of the incidence density and risk factors for central venous catheter‐related infections in a neonatal population. Data source: The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, BDENF, SciELO, and LILACS databases were used without date or language restriction. Studies that analyzed risk factors for bloodstream infections in newborns were identified. Data synthesis: A total of 134 articles were found that met the eligibility criteria. Of these articles, 14 were sele...

  1. A Rare Central Venous Catheter Malposition in a 10-Year-Old Girl

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Movafegh; Alireza Saliminia; Reza Atef-Yekta; Omid Azimaraghi

    2018-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed in operating rooms worldwide via different approaches. Like any other medical procedure, CVC placement can cause a variety of complications. We report the case of an unexpected malposition of a catheter in the right internal jugular vein, where it looped back on itself during placement and went upward into the right internal jugular vein. CVC line placement should always be viewed as a procedure that could become complicated, even in the hands of the...

  2. [Doctor-nurse delegation of the insertion of central venous lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellupica, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The Léon Bérard Cancer Centre treats the disease in all its complexity with numerous disciplines such as surgery, medicine, radiotherapy, palliative care, home care, etc. The insertion of a central venous line is an essential part of cancer care and the nursing profession. It enables patients to have their treatment administered in the best possible conditions and without risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Sharp Central Venous Recanalization in Hemodialysis Patients: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arabi, Mohammad, E-mail: marabi2004@hotmail.com; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz [Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Division of Endovascular Interventional Radiology, Department of Medical Imaging (Saudi Arabia); Ahmed, Dildar; Aslam, Naveed [Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Department of Nephrology (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeWe report our institutional experience with sharp central venous recanalization in chronic hemodialysis patients who failed standard techniques.Materials and MethodsSince January 2014, a series of seven consecutive patients (four males and three females), mean age 35 years (18–65 years), underwent sharp central venous recanalization. Indications included obtaining hemodialysis access (n = 6) and restoration of superior vena cava (SVC) patency to alleviate occlusion symptoms and restore fistula function (n = 1). The transseptal needle was used for sharp recanalization in six patients, while it could not be introduced in one patient due to total occlusion of the inferior vena cava. Instead, transmediastinal SVC access using Chiba needle was obtained.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all cases. SVC recanalization achieved symptoms’ relief and restored fistula function in the symptomatic patient. One patient underwent arteriovenous fistula creation on the recanalized side 3 months after the procedure. The remaining catheters were functional at median follow-up time of 9 months (1–14 months). Two major complications occurred including a right hemothorax and a small hemopericardium, which were managed by covered stent placement across the perforated SVC.ConclusionSharp central venous recanalization using the transseptal needle is feasible technique in patients who failed standard recanalization procedures. The potential high risk of complications necessitates thorough awareness of anatomy and proper technical preparedness.

  4. Optoacoustic monitoring of central and peripheral venous oxygenation during simulated hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Andrey; Kinsky, Michael; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Henkel, S. Nan; Seeton, Roger; Salter, Michael G.; Khan, Muzna N.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Circulatory shock may be fatal unless promptly recognized and treated. The most commonly used indicators of shock (hypotension and tachycardia) lack sensitivity and specificity. In the initial stages of shock, the body compensates by reducing blood flow to the peripheral (skin, muscle, etc.) circulation in order to preserve vital organ (brain, heart, liver) perfusion. Characteristically, this can be observed by a greater reduction in peripheral venous oxygenation (for instance, the axillary vein) compared to central venous oxygenation (the internal jugular vein). While invasive measurements of oxygenation are accurate, they lack practicality and are not without complications. We have developed a novel optoacoustic system that noninvasively determines oxygenation in specific veins. In order to test this application, we used lower body negative pressure (LBNP) system, which simulates hemorrhage by exerting a variable amount of suction on the lower body, thereby reducing the volume of blood available for central circulation. Restoration of normal blood flow occurs promptly upon cessation of LBNP. Using two optoacoustic probes, guided by ultrasound imaging, we simultaneously monitored oxygenation in the axillary and internal jugular veins (IJV). LBNP began at -20 mmHg, thereafter was reduced in a step-wise fashion (up to 30 min). The optoacoustically measured axillary oxygenation decreased with LBNP, whereas IJV oxygenation remained relatively constant. These results indicate that our optoacoustic system may provide safe and rapid measurement of peripheral and central venous oxygenation and diagnosis of shock with high specificity and sensitivity.

  5. Central venous catheter infections in outpatients with pulmonary hypertension treated with continuous iloprost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keusch, Stephan; Speich, Rudolf; Treder, Ulla; Ulrich Somaini, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous prostanoid therapy is one cornerstone of therapy for patients with pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension (PH). Long-term central venous catheters expose patients to infectious complications. We report the incidence of catheter-related infection (CRI) and the spectrum of bacteria for ambulatory PH patients treated with iloprost via non-tunnelled central venous catheters from our Swiss referral centre in Zurich. Data from 15 PH patients treated with intravenous iloprost between May 2000 and June 2012 were reviewed. We found 11 CRI in 4 cases by two different organisms. Pathogens found were Brevibacterium (55%), Micrococcus luteus (18%), coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (9%) and Staphylococcus aureus (9%), as well as unusual organisms such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens or Delftia tsuruhatensis. The overall CRI rate was 1.28 per 1,000 catheter days, or 0.47 per year. The incidence of CRI using long-term, non-tunnelled central venous catheters in PH patients treated with iloprost is low. Uncommon, rare pathogens causing CRI were found in a substantial number of patients. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Chlorhexidine and gauze and tape dressings for central venous catheters: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivane Pedrolo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess the effectiveness of the chlorhexidine antimicrobial dressing in comparison to the gauze and tape dressing in the use of central venous catheters.METHOD: a randomized clinical trial was conducted in the intensive care and adult semi intensive care units of a university hospital in the south of Brazil. The subjects were patients using short-term central venous catheters, randomly assigned to the intervention (chlorhexidine antimicrobial dressing or control (gauze and micro porous tape groups.RESULTS: a total of 85 patients were included: 43 in the intervention group and 42 in the control group. No statistically significant differences were found between dressings in regard to the occurrence of: primary bloodstream infections (p-value = 0.5170; local reactions to the dressing (p-value = 0.3774; and dressing fixation (p-value = 0.2739.CONCLUSION: both technologies are effective in covering central venous catheters in regard to the investigated variables and can be used for this purpose. Registry ECR: RBR-7b5ycz.

  7. Instructional design affects the efficacy of simulation-based training in central venous catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Christopher; Feldon, David F; Brown, Eric A

    2014-05-01

    Simulation-based learning is a common educational tool in health care training and frequently involves instructional designs based on Experiential Learning Theory (ELT). However, little research explores the effectiveness and efficiency of different instructional design methodologies appropriate for simulations. The aim of this study was to compare 2 instructional design models, ELT and Guided Experiential Learning (GEL), to determine which is more effective for training the central venous catheterization procedure. Using a quasi-experimental randomized block design, nurse anesthetists completed training under 1 of the 2 instructional design models. Performance was assessed using a checklist of central venous catheterization performance, pass rates, and critical action errors. Participants in the GEL condition performed significantly better than those in the ELT condition on the overall checklist score after controlling for individual practice time (F[1, 29] = 4.021, P = .027, Cohen's d = .71), had higher pass rates (P = .006, Cohen's d = 1.15), and had lower rates of failure due to critical action errors (P = .038, Cohen's d = .81). The GEL model of instructional design is significantly more effective than ELT for simulation-based learning of the central venous catheterization procedure, yielding large differences in effect size. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasound-guided central venous access using Google Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teresa S; Dameff, Christian J; Tully, Jeffrey L

    2014-12-01

    The use of ultrasound during invasive bedside procedures is quickly becoming the standard of care. Ultrasound machine placement during procedures often requires the practitioner to turn their head during the procedure to view the screen. Such turning has been implicated in unintentional hand movements in novices. Google Glass is a head-mounted computer with a specialized screen capable of projecting images and video into the view of the wearer. Such technology may help decrease unintentional hand movements. Our aim was to evaluate whether or not medical practitioners at various levels of training could use Google Glass to perform an ultrasound-guided procedure, and to explore potential advantages of this technology. Forty participants of varying training levels were randomized into two groups. One group used Google Glass to perform an ultrasound-guided central line. The other group used traditional ultrasound during the procedure. Video recordings of eye and hand movements were analyzed. All participants from both groups were able to complete the procedure without difficulty. Google Glass wearers took longer to perform the procedure at all training levels (medical student year 1 [MS1]: 193 s vs. 77 s, p > 0.5; MS4: 197s vs. 91s, p ≤ 0.05; postgraduate year 1 [PGY1]: 288s vs. 125 s, p > 0.5; PGY3: 151 s vs. 52 s, p ≤ 0.05), and required more needle redirections (MS1: 4.4 vs. 2.0, p > 0.5; MS4: 4.8 vs. 2.8, p > 0.5; PGY1: 4.4 vs. 2.8, p > 0.5; PGY3: 2.0 vs. 1.0, p > 0.5). In this study, it was possible to perform ultrasound-guided procedures with Google Glass. Google Glass wearers, on average, took longer to gain access, and had more needle redirections, but less head movements were noted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Central venous device-related thrombosis as imaged with MDCT in oncologic patients: prevalence and findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalano, Orlando; Castelguidone, Elisabetta de Lutio di; Granata, Vincenza; D'Errico, Adolfo Gallipoli; Sandomenico, Claudia; Petrillo, Mario; Aprea, Pasquale

    2011-01-01

    Background: Venous thrombosis is a common occurrence in cancer patients, developing spontaneously or in combination with indwelling central venous devices (CVD). Purpose: To analyze the multidetector CT (MDCT) prevalence, appearance, and significance of catheter related thoracic venous thrombosis in oncologic patients and to determine the percentage of thrombi identified in the original reports. Material and Methods: Five hundred consecutive patients were considered. Inclusion criteria were: presence of a CVD; availability of a contrast-enhanced MDCT; and cancer history. Exclusion criteria were: direct tumor compression/infiltration of the veins; poor image quality; device tip not in the scanned volume; and missing clinical data. Seventeen (3.5%) out of the final 481 patients had a diagnosis of venous thrombosis. Results: Factors showing the highest correlation with thrombosis included peripherally-inserted CVD, right brachiocephalic vein tip location, patient performance status 3, metastatic stage disease, ongoing chemotherapy, and longstanding CVD. The highest prevalence was in patients with lymphoma, lung carcinoma, melanoma, and gynecologic malignancies. Eleven out of 17 cases had not been identified in the original report. Conclusion: CVD-related thrombosis is not uncommon in cancer patients and can also be observed in outpatients with a good performance status and a non-metastatic disease. Thrombi can be very tiny. Radiologists should be aware of the possibility to identify (or overlook) small thrombi

  10. Extravasation of parenteral alimentation fluid into the renal pelvis--a complication of central venous catheter in a neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadroo, A M; al-Sowailem, A M

    2001-01-01

    Many complications of central venous catheters, which include perforation of the vessel walls and extravasation of the infusate into pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities, have been reported. We report an infant with a central venous catheter in inferior vena cava who experienced extravasation of parenteral alimentation fluid into the right renal pelvis secondary to perforation of the renal vein. To our knowledge, this rare complication has not been reported earlier.

  11. Vascular access in neonatology: peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Lienemann

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to present aspects of peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter, highlighting important points in choosing the type of access. For the passage of peripherally inserted central catheter is previously performing specific course necessary, while the primary indication occurs when it is necessary to access the patient's stay for a long period of time. Whereas peripheral venipuncture is the most appropriate in cases of needing an IV line quickly and safely, for the administration of fluids, blood collection, blood transfusion and other.

  12. Chlorhexidine 2% and choice of transparent dressing increase skin reactions at central venous catheter insertion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenthal, Mark; Dobson, Pauline; Boyle, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Infection at central venous catheter (CVC) sites remains a common problem, particularly with long-term use. This report discusses the influence of choice of transparent dressing type and chlorhexidine concentration on skin reactions at CVC insertion sites. A concentration of 2% chlorhexidine is associated with a higher rate of skin reactions than either 0.5% or 1% chlorhexidine. Higher chlorhexidine concentrations may not decrease the number of central line-associated bloodstream infections. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of central venous pressure and determination of hormones in blood serum during weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, K.

    1981-01-01

    A Spacelab experiment is described which proposes to obtain data on the degree of engorgement of the cephalad circulation during weightlessness by recording central venous pressure. Of practical importance is the question of how close the astronauts are to pulmonary edema and whether the pressure falls toward normal during the time of the mission. Another experiment to investigate deviations from normal fluid and mineral metabolism, possibly initiated by the central engorgement of the low pressure system, is discussed. Hormones responsible for the control of water and mineral balance (vasopressin, catecholamines, renin, aldosterone, corticosteroids, and prostaglandin E1) will be analyzed from blood samples.

  14. Central venous access related adverse events after trabectedin infusions in soft tissue sarcoma patients; experience and management in a nationwide multi-center study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verboom, M.C.; Ouwerkerk, J.; Steeghs, N.; Lutjeboer, J.; Kerst, J.M.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Reyners, A.K.; Sleijfer, S.; Gelderblom, H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trabectedin has shown efficacy against soft tissue sarcomas (STS) and has manageable toxicity. Trabectedin is administered through central venous access devices (VAD), such as subcutaneous ports with tunneled catheters, Hickman catheters and PICC lines. Venous access related adverse

  15. Central venous catheter insertion problem solving using intravenous catheter: technical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemohammad M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Insertion of central venous catheter is an accepted method for hemodynamic monitor-ring, drug and fluid administration, intravenous access, hemodialysis and applying cardiac pace-maker in hospitalized patients. This procedure can be associated with severe complications. The aim of this article is to provide a practical approach to prevent catheter malposition in states that the guide wire will not pass freely.During central venous insertion in internal jugular vein using modified seldinger technique, when after venous insertion, the passage of the guide wire shows difficulties and don’t pass freely, insertion of an intravenous cannula over the wire and re-insertion of the wire can help to prevent malposition of the wire and the catheter. Use of an intravenous cannula over the guide, in situations that the guide wire cannot pass freely among the needle inserted in internal jugular vein, and re-insertion of the guide can probably prevent or reduce the tissue or vascular trauma and the associated complica-tions. This simple maneuver can be helpful in difficult cases especially in cardiac surgery patients who receive high dose heparin and it is necessary to avoid traumatize-tion of carotid artery.

  16. Central venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients without a previous history of catheter placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri; Yildirim, Sedat; Torun, Dilek

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dialysis history, imaging findings and outcome of endovascular treatment in six patients with central venous stenosis without a history of previous catheter placement. Material and methods: Between April 2000 and June 2004, six (10%) of 57 haemodialysis patients had stenosis of a central vein without a previous central catheter placement. Venography findings and outcome of endovascular treatment in these six patients were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were three women (50%) and three men aged 32-60 years (mean age: 45 years) and all had massive arm swelling as the main complaint. The vascular accesses were located at the elbow in five patients and at the wrist in one patient. Results: Three patients had stenosis of the left subclavian vein and three patients had stenosis of the left brachiocephalic vein. The mean duration of the vascular accesses from the time of creation was 25.1 months. Flow volumes of the vascular access were very high in four patients who had flow volume measurement. The mean flow volume was 2347 ml/min. One of three patients with brachiocephalic vein stenosis had compression of the vein by the brachiocephalic artery. All the lesions were first treated with balloon angioplasty and two patients required stent placement on long term. Number of interventions ranged from 1 to 4 (mean: 2.1). Symptoms resolved in five patients and improved in one patient who had a stent placed in the left BCV. Conclusion: Central venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients without a history of central venous catheterization tends to occur or be manifested in patients with a proximal permanent vascular access with high flow rates. Balloon angioplasty with or without stent placement offers good secondary patency rates in mid-term

  17. Central venous access through the external jugular vein in children submitted to bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz de Godoy

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of long-term central venous access is a sine qua non step for bone marrow transplantation in children. Most frequently, long-term central venous access has been obtained via blind percutaneous cannulation of subclavian and internal jugular veins or via internal jugular vein cutdown. In order to avoid some potential minor and major complications associated with the subclavian or internal jugular approaches, the authors describe an easy, simple and safe method for central venous access through an external jugular vein cutdown that should be of interest to readers involved in the field of bone marrow transplantation. It should be also considered for children as well as adults needing central venous access via an external catheter - or totally implantable port - for reasons other than bone marrow transplantation, such as total parenteral nutrition and administration of chemotherapeutic agents.O estabelecimento de um acesso venoso central de longa duração é uma condição sine qua non para realizar o transplante de medula óssea em crianças. Com frequência, este acesso tem sido obtido através da punção percutânea das veias subclávia e jugular interna ou via dissecção da jugular interna. Com o objetivo de evitar algumas complicações maiores e menores associadas com a subclávia e a jugular interna, os autores descrevem um método simples, fácil e seguro para o acesso venoso central através de dissecção da veia jugular externa. Este método deveria ser de interesse dos leitores envolvidos com o transplante de medula óssea e ser considerado também para crianças e/ou adultos que necessitem de cateter venoso central de longa permanência (externo ou totalmente implantável devido a outras razões, como a nutrição parenteral ou a administração de agentes quimioterápicos.

  18. STUDY OF CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER RELATED BLOOD STREAM INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS ON HAEMODIALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjal Pankaj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Temporary and permanent central venous catheters are used in majority of patients of CKD when initiated on hemodialysis and mostly these catheters act as bridge before permanent AV fistula assess could be obtained. Blood stream infections related to these central venous catheters are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Appropriate antiseptic precautions while inserting central venous catheter and early identification of catheter related blood stream infections (CRBSI are of utmost importance for reducing hospital stay, cost of therapy and mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 50 patients of CKD were included in the study who had central venous catheter in situ (internal jugular or subclavian and developed symptoms related to blood stream infections. Blood cultures were obtained from the catheter lumen and a separate venous site 1 hour apart. All the culture sensitivity reports were obtained from department of microbiology of our institute. Inclusion Criteria- Known case of CKD patients aged more than 18yrs on hemodialysis with symptoms and signs of catheter related blood stream infections were included in the study. Exclusion Criteria- Patients with other associated comorbid infections like Koch’s, urinary tract infection or others mimicking symptoms of CRBSI. RESULTS The cultures were found positive in 38 patients (76% while in rest 24% cases positive cultures could not be obtained. Out of culture positive patients 52.63% cases were found to have gram positive infections while 44.74% had gram negative infections. In 2.63% patients, fungus was isolated to be the causative organism. Among the gram positive organisms 50% had CoNS, 30% had MSSA and 20% had MRSA infections. Among the gram negative group, 47.06% had klebsiella, 23.53% had acinetobacter, 17.65% had E.coli and 11.76% had pseudomonas as the causative organisms. Mortality was observed in 14% patients out of which 28.57% were culture

  19. Multicenter study in monitoring central venous catheters complications in hematologic patiennts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen García Gabás

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Most hematological patients suffer a significant venous damage related to different administrated intravenous therapy, being necessary to place central venous catheters (CVC. CVC is associated with various complications. The most common catheter-related complications are occlusion and infection. To avoid such of them, the development of protocols for insertion and care are needed, as well as recording and following up complications. To this end, we propose a cross-sectional carried out during 13 months whose main goal is to know the incidence of CVC- related complications (mainly occlusion and infection in hematological patients.Population included all the =14 ages patients admitted to different hematological units at Ramon y Cajal and Gregorio Marañón hospitals in Madrid and who signed informed consent. Socio-demographic, clinical characteristics and complications were entered into a log which included a pursuit of care protocol.

  20. Comparative study of peripherally inserted central venous catheter and traditional central catheter assisted with X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jianchun; Wang Xiurong; Jiang Zhuming

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility, complications, mid- and long-term advantages of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) compared with central venous access assisted with X-ray. Methods: From Jan 1997 to Dec 1998, the authors conducted a study in 60 patients with placed PICC lines and 60 patients with central lines. Study variables included tip placement and complication rates. Results: Tere were on significant differences between PICC and CVC in the successful placement 95.0% and 88.3%, t = 1.745, P 0.19; the mean duration 13(6-98) days and 14 (7-104) days, F = 0.049, P = 0.83; the total occlusion rate 6.7% (4/60) and 5.0%(3/60), t = 0.152, P = 0.70. In PICC patients, the occlusion rate was slightly higher in 3 Fr (20-gauge) catheter (3/20, 15.0%) than in 4 Fr(18-gauge) catheters (1/20, 5.0%), t = 1.111, P=0.29. Phlebitis occurred in 5.0% of patients (3/60) and one catheter fracture was happened on the catheter hub junction (1.7%). In 3 catheter tips dislocation cases, the catheter tips were moved to the optional position assisted with X-ray image. In CVC group, pneumothorax happened in 1 case (1.7%). In 4 catheter dislocation cases, the catheters were with drawn. No catheter-related sepsis and hemo-pneumothorax happened in both group patients. Conclusions: Both PICC and CVC can be acceptable in clinical use. PICC assisted with X-ray possesses the advantages of less trauma, accurate localization preventing some possible severe complications of central venous access such as pneumothorax. The new method provides a reliable, effective venous access for mid-and long-term usage in patients receiving a variety of solutions, primarily parenteral alimentation, chemotherapy or antibiotic infusion

  1. Comparison of three types of central venous catheters in patients with malignant tumor receiving chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Shirong Fang,1 Jinhong Yang,2 Lei Song,3 Yan Jiang,1 Yuxiu Liu4 1Department of Anesthesiology, 2Department of Oncology, Weifang People’s Hospital, Weifang, 3Intensive Care Unit, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, 4Nursing College, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, People’s Republic of China Background: Central venous catheters (CVCs have been an effective access for chemotherapy instead of peripherally intravenous catheters. There were limited studies on the choices and effects of different types of CVCs for chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to compare the complications, cost, and patients’ quality of life and satisfaction of three commonly used CVCs for chemotherapy, such as implanted venous port, peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs, and external non-tunneled central venous catheters (NTCs.Methods: A double-center prospective cohort study was carried out from March 2014 to December 2016. Catheterization situation, complications, catheter maintenance, cost, and patients’ quality of life and satisfaction were recorded, investigated, and analyzed. Forty-five ports, 60 PICCs and 40 NTCs were included. All the CVCs were followed up to catheter removal.Results: There was no statistical difference in catheterization success rates between port and PICC. NTC had less success rate by one puncture compared with port. Ports had fewer complications compared with PICCs and NTCs. The complication rates of ports, PICCs and NTCs were 2.2%, 40%, and 27.5%, respectively. If the chemotherapy process was <12 months, NTCs cost least, and the cost of port was much higher than PICC and NTC. When the duration time was longer than 12 months, the cost of port had no difference with the cost of PICC. Quality of life and patients’ satisfaction of port group were significantly higher than the other two groups. Conclusion: Although port catheterization costs more and needs professional medical staff and strict operational

  2. An Evaluation of Complications in Ultrasound-Guided Central Venous Catheter Insertion in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin OZAKIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: In emergency departments, emergency physicians frequently have to perform central venous access. In cases where peripheral venous access is not possible, central venous access is required for dialysis, fulfillment of urgent fluid need, or central venous pressure measurement. This study was carried out to evaluate the emergence of complications in the process of and in the 15 days following the insertion of central venous catheter under ultrasound guidance in the emergency department. Methods: For this study, patients who presented to the emergency department over a period of eight months with an urgent need for central catheter were examined prospectively. Age, gender, and accompanying diseases of patients as well as the type, time, duration, and indication of the venous access were recorded. Furthermore, the amount of experience of the physician was taken into consideration. Results: In the emergency department, physicians performed ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion for 74 patients (40 men and 34 women. For access, internal jugular vein was used in 65 (87.8% patients, and femoral vein was used in 9 (12.2% patients. The reason for access was urgent dialysis need in 55 (74.3%, CVP measurement in 3 (4.1%, fluid support due to severe hypovolemia in 6 (8.1%, and difficulty of peripheral venous access in 10 (13.5% patients. None of the patients developed complications in the process of or after the insertion. Patients did not have infections related to the catheter in 15 days following the insertion. Conclusions: Central venous access is frequently required in emergency departments. The risk of complication is little if any in ultrasonographyguided access carried out under appropriate conditions. ÖZET: Amaç: Acil servislerde acil tıp hekimlerince santral damar yolu işlemi sık uygulanır. Periferik damar yolu açılamadığı hallerde, diyaliz, acil sıvı ihtiyacı veya santral venöz basınç

  3. Retrospective analysis of intravertebral collateral enhancement in patients with central venous obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, F.J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Bennett, Debbie L. [Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-02-15

    To compare prevalence and patterns of intravertebral collateral enhancement in patients with and without central venous obstruction (CVO). Chest CTs performed between 1/1/2000 and 12/15/2012 with reports containing terms indicating CVO were identified. All contrast enhanced CTs were examined for the presence of CVO and collateral venous pathways. If intravertebral collateral enhancement was present, the pattern was recorded as nodular, linear, or both. In 209 suspected cases of CVO, 53 (25 %) were confirmed with obstruction and 156 (75 %) were without obstruction. In patients with CVO, 47 % (25/53) demonstrated collateral venous flow through an intravertebral marrow pathway compared to 5 % (8/156) of patients without CVO (P < 0.0001). The most common level of enhancement was the upper thoracic spine, involving only the vertebral body. Nodular, linear, and combined nodular-linear enhancement patterns were seen with similar frequency. Nodular intravertebral collateral enhancement was mistaken for sclerotic metastases in 33 % (3/9) of cases. Intravertebral collateral enhancement was seen in almost half the patients with CVO and when nodular enhancement is present, it is important to differentiate between metastatic lesions and enhancement related to CVO. (orig.)

  4. Primary thromboprophylaxis for cancer patients with central venous catheters--a reappraisal of the evidence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cunningham, M S

    2006-01-30

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is responsible for an estimated 25 000 deaths per annum in UK hospital practice. It is well established that many of these deaths could be prevented through the use of appropriate thromboprophylaxis. This issue is of particular relevance in oncology practice, where the risks of VTE and bleeding are both significantly higher than those observed in general medical patients. Cancer patients with in-dwelling central venous catheters (CVCs) are at particularly high risk of developing thrombotic complications. However, the literature has produced conflicting conclusions regarding the efficacy of using routine primary thromboprophylaxis in these patients. Indeed such is the level of confusion around this topic, that the most recent version of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines published in 2004 actually reversed their previous recommendation (published in 2001). Nevertheless, minidose warfarin continues to be routinely used in many oncology centres in the UK. In this article, we have performed a systematic review of the published literature regarding the efficacy and the risks, associated with using thromboprophylaxis (either minidose warfarin or low-dose LMWH) in cancer patients with CVC. On the basis of this evidence, we conclude that there is no proven role for using such thromboprophylaxis. However, asymptomatic CVC-related venous thrombosis remains common, and further more highly powered studies of better design are needed in order to define whether specific subgroups of cancer patients might benefit from receiving thromboprophylaxis.

  5. To clot or not to clot? That is the question in central venous catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadman, A.; Lawrance, J.A.L.; Fitzsimmons, L.; Spencer-Shaw, A.; Swindell, R.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To establish the relationship between the tip position of tunnelled central venous catheters (CVC) and the incidence of venous thrombosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A randomly sampled, retrospective review of 428 CVC inserted into 334 patients was performed. The chest radiograph obtained post-catheter insertion, as well as follow-up radiographs, linograms, venograms and Doppler ultrasounds (US), were reviewed. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 72 days (range 1-720 days), with a total follow-up of 23,040 line days. Venous thrombosis occurred in five out of 191 (2.6%) CVC in a distal position (distal third of the superior vena cava (SVC) or right atrium (RA)), five of 95 (5.3%) in an intermediate position (middle third of the SVC) and 20 of 48 (41.7%) in a proximal position (proximal third SVC or thoracic inlet veins). There was a significant difference in thrombosis rate between lines sited with the tip in a distal compared with a proximal position (p<0.0005). CVC with tips in a proximal position were 16 times more likely to thrombose than those in a distal position. None of the 58 CVC with the tip located in the RA thrombosed or caused complications. CONCLUSION: Distal placement of tunnelled CVC, either in the distal third of the SVC or proximal RA is optimal

  6. Retrospective analysis of intravertebral collateral enhancement in patients with central venous obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeone, F.J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Torriani, Martin; Bennett, Debbie L.

    2016-01-01

    To compare prevalence and patterns of intravertebral collateral enhancement in patients with and without central venous obstruction (CVO). Chest CTs performed between 1/1/2000 and 12/15/2012 with reports containing terms indicating CVO were identified. All contrast enhanced CTs were examined for the presence of CVO and collateral venous pathways. If intravertebral collateral enhancement was present, the pattern was recorded as nodular, linear, or both. In 209 suspected cases of CVO, 53 (25 %) were confirmed with obstruction and 156 (75 %) were without obstruction. In patients with CVO, 47 % (25/53) demonstrated collateral venous flow through an intravertebral marrow pathway compared to 5 % (8/156) of patients without CVO (P < 0.0001). The most common level of enhancement was the upper thoracic spine, involving only the vertebral body. Nodular, linear, and combined nodular-linear enhancement patterns were seen with similar frequency. Nodular intravertebral collateral enhancement was mistaken for sclerotic metastases in 33 % (3/9) of cases. Intravertebral collateral enhancement was seen in almost half the patients with CVO and when nodular enhancement is present, it is important to differentiate between metastatic lesions and enhancement related to CVO. (orig.)

  7. Central and peripheral venous lines-associated blood stream infections in the critically ill surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugas, Mohamed Ali; Cho, Hyongyu; Trilling, Gregory M; Tahir, Zainab; Raja, Humaera Farrukh; Ramadan, Sami; Jerjes, Waseem; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2012-09-04

    Critically ill surgical patients are always at increased risk of actual or potentially life-threatening health complications. Central/peripheral venous lines form a key part of their care. We review the current evidence on incidence of central and peripheral venous catheter-related bloodstream infections in critically ill surgical patients, and outline pathways for prevention and intervention. An extensive systematic electronic search was carried out on the relevant databases. Articles were considered suitable for inclusion if they investigated catheter colonisation and catheter-related bloodstream infection. Two independent reviewers engaged in selecting the appropriate articles in line with our protocol retrieved 8 articles published from 1999 to 2011. Outcomes on CVC colonisation and infections were investigated in six studies; four of which were prospective cohort studies, one prospective longitudinal study and one retrospective cohort study. Outcomes relating only to PICCs were reported in one prospective randomised trial. We identified only one study that compared CVC- and PICC-related complications in surgical intensive care units. Although our search protocol may not have yielded an exhaustive list we have identified a key deficiency in the literature, namely a paucity of studies investigating the incidence of CVC- and PICC-related bloodstream infection in exclusively critically ill surgical populations. In summary, the diverse definitions for the diagnosis of central and peripheral venous catheter-related bloodstream infections along with the vastly different sample size and extremely small PICC population size has, predictably, yielded inconsistent findings. Our current understanding is still limited; the studies we have identified do point us towards some tentative understanding that the CVC/PICC performance remains inconclusive.

  8. Surgical retrieval of a guide wire lost during central venous catheterization in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jade M; Lansdowne, Jennifer L; Himsel, Carol A; Freer, Sean R

    2017-05-01

    To report a case of successful surgical removal of a guide wire lost during central venous catheterization. A 28 kg, 4-year-old female neutered mixed breed dog presented to the primary care veterinarian with diabetic ketosis. During the process of central venous catheterization, the guide wire was accidently released and the entire length of the guide wire slipped into the jugular vein. Due to the absence of nearby interventional radiology facilities, surgical intervention was proposed. An ultrasound was used to determine that the guide wire was located in the caudal vena cava extending caudally into the right internal iliac vein. Rommel tourniquets were placed around the iliac vein cranial to the bifurcation of the common iliac vein into the external and internal iliac veins. A venotomy was performed in the right common iliac vein and the guide wire was grasped with hemostats and gently removed while alternately relaxing the cranial then caudal tourniquets. During anesthesia, ventricular premature contractions were noted that varied in frequency with the dog's positioning. Postoperative color flow Doppler ultrasound evaluation of the caudal vena cava, right common, internal and external iliac veins, and right femoral vein was normal with no evidence of thrombosis. Several days postoperative the dog's diabetic ketosis and ventricular premature contractions had resolved and color flow Doppler ultrasound evaluation was normal with no evidence of thrombosis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported veterinary case of loss and subsequent surgical retrieval of a central venous catheter guide wire. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  9. Adult 'PICC' Device May be Used as a Tunnelled Central Venous Catheter in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Brooke T; Zealley, Ian A

    2018-04-01

    Central venous access in children, in particular small children and infants, is challenging. We have developed a technique employing adult peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) as tunnelled central venous catheters (TCVCs) in children. The principal advantage of this novel technique is that the removal technique is less complex than that of conventional cuffed TCVCs. The catheter can be removed simply by being pulled out and does not require general anaesthesia. The purpose of this study is to determine the success, safety and utility of this technique and to identify the rate of late complications. We describe the 6-year experience in our unit. Electronic and paper medical records were reviewed for consecutive paediatric patients who had a PICC device inserted as a TCVC over a 6-year period (September 2009 through July 2015). The following data were recorded-patient demographics, setting for PICC as TCVC insertion, use of ultrasound and fluoroscopy, PICC device type, early or late complications and date of and reason for removal. Twenty-one PICCs were inserted as TCVCs in 19 children, all aged less than 10 years. Mean patient age at the time of placement was 3.7 years. Average patient weight was 15.7 kg. All insertions were successful with no significant immediate complications recorded. The most common indication for insertion in our patient sample was pseudo-obstruction secondary to gastrointestinal dysmotility disorder (24%), with cystic fibrosis infective exacerbation being the second most frequent diagnosis (14%). Suspected catheter-related infection led to early device removal in one case (4.8%). Inadvertent dislodgement occurred in one case (4.8%). Nineteen of the 21 devices (90.4%) lasted for the total intended duration of use. Using a PICC device as a TCVC in small children appears to be a safe technique, with an acceptable complication profile.

  10. Comparison of three types of central venous catheters in patients with malignant tumor receiving chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shirong; Yang, Jinhong; Song, Lei; Jiang, Yan; Liu, Yuxiu

    2017-01-01

    Background Central venous catheters (CVCs) have been an effective access for chemotherapy instead of peripherally intravenous catheters. There were limited studies on the choices and effects of different types of CVCs for chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to compare the complications, cost, and patients’ quality of life and satisfaction of three commonly used CVCs for chemotherapy, such as implanted venous port, peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), and external non-tunneled central venous catheters (NTCs). Methods A double-center prospective cohort study was carried out from March 2014 to December 2016. Catheterization situation, complications, catheter maintenance, cost, and patients’ quality of life and satisfaction were recorded, investigated, and analyzed. Forty-five ports, 60 PICCs and 40 NTCs were included. All the CVCs were followed up to catheter removal. Results There was no statistical difference in catheterization success rates between port and PICC. NTC had less success rate by one puncture compared with port. Ports had fewer complications compared with PICCs and NTCs. The complication rates of ports, PICCs and NTCs were 2.2%, 40%, and 27.5%, respectively. If the chemotherapy process was PICC and NTC. When the duration time was longer than 12 months, the cost of port had no difference with the cost of PICC. Quality of life and patients’ satisfaction of port group were significantly higher than the other two groups. Conclusion Although port catheterization costs more and needs professional medical staff and strict operational conditions, ports have fewer complications and higher quality of life and patients’ satisfaction than PICCs and NTCs. Therefore, not following consideration of the economic factor, we recommend port as a safe and an effective chemotherapy access for cancer patients, especially for whom needing long chemotherapy process. PMID:28744109

  11. Central venous access in the home parenteral nutrition population-you PICC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLegge, Mark H; Borak, Gregory; Moore, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Central venous access is imperative for the delivery of home parenteral nutrition (HPN). Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are being used more frequently for the delivery of HPN. There is an abundance of short-term information on the use of PICC in the hospitalized patient. However, there are no data comparing the use of PICC to other central venous access devices (OCVAD; Hickman, port) for the delivery of HPN. Catheter-related infections (CRI) are the most common cause of hospital readmission for the HPN patients. A retrospective analysis was performed from the Digestive Disease Center HPN database at the Medical University of South Carolina and the open architecture clinical information system (OACIS) hospital and clinic reporting system. All CRI were analyzed and compared between patients with PICC and OCVAD. The PICC group and the OCVAD group were further broken down into diabetic patients and nondiabetic patients, and the incidence of CRI was compared within those groups. HPN patients with PICC had a statistically significant increase (p PICC for HPN may be associated with an increase in CRI. A prospective, randomized trial in the HPN population between PICC and OCVAD must be performed.

  12. Arterial and venous revascularization with bifurcation of a single central artery: a reliable strategy for Tamai Zone I replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chung-Chen; Lin, Yu-Te; Moran, Steven L; Lin, Cheng-Hung; Wei, Fu-Chan; Lin, Chih-Hung

    2010-12-01

    Replantation of the distal phalanx and pulp can be performed to improve finger function and finger aesthetics; however, establishing adequate venous drainage is a challenge. Slattery et al. reported microsurgical reattachment of a partial distal phalanx with the use of a bifurcated terminal digital artery. The bifurcation was divided into two pedicles, one of which was used for venous drainage. In this article, the authors report their experience with a similar technique and propose a new algorithm for distal finger replantation. From January of 2008 to February of 2009, five replantations were performed using a single central artery. The replanted levels were pulp, avulsed fingertip of the thumb, and distal phalanges. There was no volar vein, dorsal vein, or second artery available in the amputated part for standard venous drainage. Venous drainage in all cases was established by creating an anastomosis from a branch of the solitary terminal artery to a recipient vein. All digits were replanted successfully without evidence of arterial insufficiency or venous congestion. Partial necrosis was not identified postoperatively in any of the five fingers. There were no cases of wound infection. A branch of the central solitary artery may be used successfully to reestablish venous outflow in cases of distal finger tip replantation. This technique allowed for the salvage of all fingers in this study without the use of leeches or other techniques used in cases of venous insufficiency.

  13. Shower and no-dressing technique for tunneled central venous hemodialysis catheters: a quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Julie Ann; Seiler, Suzanne; Wilson, Barbara; Harwood, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Self-care practices and quality-of-life nuances juxtaposed our tunneled hemodialysis central venous catheter (CVC) protocols. Despite our advice, individuals with CVCs were showering. As a quality improvement initiative, we compared the standard CVC dressing practices to the "shower and no-dressing" technique. After 1380 catheter months (n = 119) infection rates were 0.31 events per 1000 catheter days. The "shower and no-dressing" technique appears to be a safe CVC dressing option with improved quality of life, no increase in infection rates, and cost-effectiveness.

  14. Central venous catheters and bloodstream infection during induction therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Kristin; Hasle, Henrik; Asdahl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the risk of firsttime bloodstream infection (BSI) according to type of central venous catheter (CVC) during induction therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients eligible for our analysis were all newly diagnosed children with ALL...... treated at 3 pediatric centers in Denmark between 2008 and 2014. A total of 136 patients were followed from initial CVC placement until first BSI, CVC removal, death, or day 28, whichever occurred first. Thirty-nine BSIs were detected, of which 67% were gram-positive infections, and 59% met the criteria...

  15. Simulation training for pediatric residents on central venous catheter placement: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Scott M; Burch, Wesley; Kuehnle, Sarah E; Flood, Robert G; Scalzo, Anthony J; Gerard, James M

    2013-11-01

    To assess the effect of simulation training on pediatric residents' acquisition and retention of central venous catheter insertion skills. A secondary objective was to assess the effect of simulation training on self-confidence to perform the procedure. Prospective observational pilot study. Single university clinical simulation center. Pediatric residents, postgraduate years 1-3. Residents participated in a 60- to 90-minute ultrasound-guided central venous catheter simulation training session. Video recordings of residents performing simulated femoral central venous catheter insertions were made before (baseline), after, and at 3-month following training. Three blinded expert raters independently scored the performances using a 24-item checklist and 100-mm global rating scale. At each time point, residents rated their confidence to perform the procedure on a 100-mm scale. Twenty-six residents completed the study. Compared with baseline, immediately following training, median checklist score (54.2% [interquartile range, 40.8-68.8%] vs 83.3% [interquartile range, 70.0-91.7%]), global rating score (8.0 mm [interquartile range, 0.0-64.3 mm] vs 79.5 mm [interquartile range, 16.3-91.7 mm]), success rate (38.5% vs 80.8%), and self-confidence (8.0 mm [interquartile range, 3.8-19.0 mm] vs 52.0 mm [interquartile range, 43.5-66.5 mm]) all improved (p interquartile range, 40.8-68.8%] vs 54.2% [interquartile range, 45.8-80.4%], p = 0.47), global rating score (8.0 mm [interquartile range, 0.0-64.3 mm] vs 35.5 mm [interquartile range, 5.3-77.0], p = 0.62), and success rate (38.5% vs 65.4%, p = 0.35) were similar at 3-month follow-up. Self-confidence, however, remained above baseline at 3-month follow-up (8.0 mm [interquartile range, 3.8-19.0 mm] vs 61.0 mm [interquartile range, 31.5-71.8 mm], p < 0.01). Simulation training improved pediatric residents' central venous catheter insertion procedural skills. Decay in skills was found at 3-month follow-up. This suggests that

  16. Microstructural evaluation by confocal and electron microscopy in thrombi developed in central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Thabata Coaglio; Silva, Eliata Ester da; Souza, Danilo Olzon Dionysio; Santos, Amanda Rodrigues Dos; Lara, Maristela Oliveira

    2017-08-28

    Evaluating thrombi microstructure developed in central venous catheters using confocal and electron microscopy. An experimental, descriptive study carrying out a microstructural evaluation of venous thrombi developed in central venous catheters using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. A total of 78 venous catheters were collected over a period of three months. Different fibrin structures were distinguished: fibrin plates, fibrin network, and fibrin fibers. It was observed that the thrombus had thick fibrin plates adhered to the catheter wall openings in both a catheter with three days of permanence as well as in a catheter with 20 days of insertion in the patient. However, a greater amount of erythrocytes and fibrin fibers were found in the central region of the thrombus. This study contributes to improving health care and can have a positive impact on clinical practice, as easy adherence of platelets and fibrins to the catheter wall demonstrated in this study makes it possible to adopt thrombus prevention strategies such as therapy discontinuation for an extended period, blood reflux by a catheter, slow infusion rate and hypercoagulo pathyclinical conditions. Avaliar a microestrutura por microscopia confocal e eletrônica em trombos desenvolvidos em cateteres venosos centrais. Pesquisa experimental, descritiva, em que foi feita uma avaliação microestrutural de trombos venosos desenvolvidos em cateteres venosos centrais por Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura e Microscopia Confocal de Varredura a Laser. Foram coletados 78 cateteres venosos centrais num período de três meses. Distinguiram-se diferentes estruturas de fibrina: a placa de fibrina, a rede de fibrina e as fibras de fibrina. Observou-se que tanto em um cateter com três dias de permanência quanto em um cateter com 20 dias inserido no paciente o trombo apresentou placas de fibrina espessas aderidas às paredes dos orifícios dos cateteres. Na região central do

  17. Improving Patient Safety with a Mobile Application for Patients with Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters (PICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüssli, Stephan; Schnyder, Florian; Zenhäusern, Raphael; Bosshart, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are of growing interest because they allow intravenous therapies up to several months. The appropriate management of the PICCs is crucial to minimize complications and largely depends on the right information for everyone who cares for the patient. To reach this goal we develop the mobile application "PICC App" to provide the necessary information for all involved persons in the outpatient setting. We expect to be able to report about the PICC App and the results of the usability evaluation with pilot users.

  18. Improving safety and efficiency during emergent central venous catheter placement with a needleless securing clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silich, Bert; Chrobak, Paul; Siu, Jeffrey; Schlichting, Adam; Patel, Samir; Yang, James

    2013-08-01

    To compare the needleless securing clamp to the traditional suture-secured clamp for central venous catheters. Compare the holding strength of each type of clamps by measuring the amount of kinetic energy absorbed, ask 20 physicians to evaluate the clamp placement using sutures or staples, and summarise the clamps effectiveness and complications in 10 patients. Compared to sutured clamp, the needleless clamp was more secure. The needleless clamp was also significantly better with regard to ease of use, safety, perceived strength (p value clamps. Without incurring complications or increasing risk to patients, the needleless clamp is secure and improves safety and efficiency for physicians.

  19. Cardiac tamponade in an infant during contrast infusion through central venous catheter for chest computed tomography; Tamponamento cardiaco durante infusao de contraste em acesso venoso central para realizacao de tomografia computadorizada do torax em lactente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daud, Danilo Felix; Campos, Marcos Menezes Freitas de; Fleury Neto, Augusto de Padua [Hospital Geral de Palmas, TO (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    Complications from central venous catheterization include infectious conditions, pneumothorax, hemothorax and venous thrombosis. Pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade hardly occurs, and in infants is generally caused by umbilical catheterization. The authors describe the case of cardiac tamponade occurred in an infant during chest computed tomography with contrast infusion through a central venous catheter inserted into the right internal jugular vein. (author)

  20. Central venous infusion port inserted via high versus low jugular venous approaches: Retrospective comparison of outcome and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hong Suk [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu 1-dong, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 411-764 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hpark@dreamwiz.com; Kim, Young Il; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jung Im; Seo, Hyobin; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Youkyung; Lim, Min Kyung [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu 1-dong, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 411-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Suk [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare immediate and long-term outcome of central venous infusion port inserted via right high versus low jugular vein approaches. Materials and methods: The study included 163 patients (125 women patients, 38 men patients; age range, 18-79 years; mean age, 53 years); 142 patients underwent port insertion with low jugular vein approach and 21 patients with high jugular vein approach. The causes of high jugular vein puncture were metastatic lymphadenopathy (n = 7), operation scar (n = 6), radiation scar (n = 5), failure of low jugular vein puncture (n = 2), and abnormal course of right subclavian artery (n = 1). Medical records and radiologic studies were reviewed retrospectively to determine and compare the outcome and the occurrence of complication related to port. Results: The procedure-related complications were all minor (n = 14, 8.6%) in both groups; hematoma (n = 4, 2.8% in low jugular puncture group and n = 1, 4.8% in high jugular puncture group, p = 0.6295), air embolism (n = 2, 1.4% in low jugular puncture group and n = 0 in high jugular puncture group, p = 0.5842) and minor bleeding (n = 5, 3.5% in low jugular vein puncture group and n = 2, 9.5% in high jugular vein puncture group, p = 0.2054). The average length of follow-up was 431 days for low jugular vein puncture group and 284 days for high jugular vein puncture group. The difference between two groups was significant (p = 0.0349). The reasons for catheter removal were patients' death (59 in low jugular puncture group and 14 in high jugular puncture group, p = 0.0465), suspected infection (11 in low jugular vein puncture group and 2 in high jugular vein puncture group, p = 0.8242), catheter occlusion (four in low jugular vein puncture group and one in high jugular vein puncture group, p = 0.6583). The catheter tip migrated upward an average of 1.86 cm (range, -0.5 to 5.0 cm) in low jugular vein puncture group and 1.56 cm (range, 0-3.6 cm) in high jugular vein

  1. Anticoagulation results in increased line salvage for children with intestinal failure and central venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Cory M; Bennett, Monica; Channabasappa, Nandini; Journeycake, Janna; Piper, Hannah G

    2018-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether anticoagulation (AC) results in thrombus resolution and increased line longevity in children with intestinal failure (IF) and catheter-associated central venous thrombosis (CVT). A retrospective, single institution review was performed of children with IF who were dependent on parenteral nutrition with known CVT between 2006 and 2017. Frequency of catheter-related complications including infection, occlusion, and breakage were compared 18months prior to and after starting AC. Thrombus resolution during anticoagulation was also determined. Data were analyzed using Poisson regression. p-Values catheter days during AC (p=0.01), and the number of infections requiring catheter replacement decreased from 3.0 to 1.0 per 1000 catheter days (p=0.01). There were no significant differences in line occlusions or breakages. Anticoagulation for children with intestinal failure and central venous thrombosis may prevent thrombus propagation, and decrease blood stream infections and line replacements. Further research is needed to determine optimal dosing and duration of therapy. III; Retrospective Comparative Study. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Central venous catheter placement by an interventional radiology unit: an australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M. K. S.; Mossop, P. J.; Vrazas, J. I.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the outcomes of central venous catheter (CVC) placement carried out by an interventional radiology unit. A review of our hospital records identified 331 consecutive patients who underwent insertion of a tunnelled or non-tunnelled CVC between January 2000 and December 2004. Key outcome measures included the technical success rate of CVC insertion and the percentage of immediate ( 30 days) complications. A total of 462 CVCs were placed under radiological guidance, with an overall success rate of 98.9%. Immediate complications included one pneumothorax, which was diagnosed 7 days after subclavian CVC insertion, and eight episodes of significant haematoma or bleeding within 24 h of CVC insertion. No cases were complicated by arterial puncture or air embolus. Catheter-related sepsis occurred in 2% of non-tunnelled CVC and 8.9% of tunnelled CVC. The overall incidence of catheter-related sepsis was 0.17 per 100 catheter days. As the demand for chemotherapy and haemodialysis grows with our ageing population, interventional radiology suites are well placed to provide a safe and reliable service for the placement of central venous access devices

  3. Managing dysfunctional central venous access devices: a practical approach to urokinase thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumwenda, Mick; Dougherty, Lisa; Spooner, Helen; Jackson, Victoria; Mitra, Sandip; Inston, Nicholas

    2018-01-25

    Tunnelled central venous access devices (CVADs) are defined as any intravenous multipurpose catheters placed within the central veins for use in haemodialysis and administration of blood products or chemotherapy in oncology and haematological conditions. Frequent complications include thrombosis and catheter-related infection, which may lead to significant adverse patient outcomes. Once thrombosis is suspected correction should be attempted empirically with thrombolytic agents. Commonly available thrombolytic agents in the UK include urokinase (Syner-Kinase) and alteplase (Cathflo). It is well recognised that urokinase usage differs widely and concerns were raised by clinicians about the variation of dose regimens nationally. The objective of the CVAD Focus Group was to address this issue and offer guidance in the management of suspected thrombosis of CVAD with urokinase using two algorithms for renal and non-renal dysfunctional CVAD and to audit prospectively the outcomes of intervention.

  4. Detection of an embolized central venous catheter fragment with endobronchial ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Samjot Singh; Harris, Kassem; Alraiyes, Abdul H; Picone, Anthony L

    2018-01-01

    An 84-year-old woman underwent Convex-probe Endobronchial Ultrasound (CP-EBUS) for 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose avid subcarinal lymphadenopathy on Positron Emission Tomogram (PET) scan. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of the subcarinal lymph node revealed squamous cell lung carcinoma. A small hyperechoic rounded density was noted inside the lumen of the azygous vein. Based on chest computed tomography findings and her clinical history, this was felt to be a broken fragment of a peripherally inserted central catheter, which was placed for intravenous antibiotics, a few months prior to this presentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever CP-EBUS description of a broken fragment of central venous catheter. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Central Venous Catheter-Associated Pericardial Tamponade in a 6-Day Old: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati O. Arya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pericardial effusion (PCE and tamponade can cause significant morbidity and mortality in neonates. Such cases have been reported in the literature in various contexts. Case Presentation. A 6-day old neonate with meconium aspiration syndrome and persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn on high frequency oscillator ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide was referred to our hospital with a large pericardial effusion causing hemodynamic compromise. Prompt pericardiocentesis led to significant improvement in the cardio-respiratory status and removal of the central line prevented the fluid from reaccumulating. Cellular and biochemical analysis aided in the diagnosis of catheter related etiology with possibility of infusate diffusion into the pericardial space. Conclusion. We present this paper to emphasize the importance of recognizing this uncommon but serious complication of central venous catheters in intensive care units. We also discuss the proposed hypothesis for the mechanism of production of PCE.

  6. [Subcutaneous implantation type central venous port management in patients with malignant tumors effect of different antiseptic agents on central venous port-related infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junya; Kumagai, Masumi; Kato, Kenichi; Akahane, Akio; Suzuki, Michiko; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Sone, Miyuki; Kudo, Kenzo

    2014-08-01

    Subcutaneous implantation type central venous ports(CV ports)are used in chemotherapy. Here, we prospectively examined the frequency of CV port-related infections when the disinfectant was changed from 10% povidone iodine to 1% chlorhexidine ethanol or 70% ethanol. The subjects were patients with malignant tumors, who had newly been implanted with CV ports. We examined CV port-related infections at 1 week after CV port implantation and every 2 weeks thereafter, following sterilization upon insertion of a Huber needle to the CV port. CV port evulsion due to CV port-related infection was noted in 3 patients(4.8%)in whom 15%chlorhexidine ethanol was used(n=62)and in 2 patients(3.3%)in whom 70% ethanol was used(n=60). Infection rates per 1,000 days of CV port use were 1.48% and 1.01%, respectively. Thus, the outcomes of sterilization using 1% chlorhexidine ethanol and 70% ethanol did not differ significantly from those on using 10% povidone iodine for sterilization, based on preliminary results at our institution(3 of 59 patients[5.1%]had port evulsion due to CV port-related infection and the infection rate per 1,000 days of CV port use was 1.47%, Akahane et al, 2012). Chlorhexidine ethanol and ethanol are very convenient to use because they dry quickly and do not need discoloration. Accordingly, chlorhexidine ethanol and ethanol might be useful in CV port management.

  7. Elevated Mean Airway Pressure and Central Venous Pressure in the First Day of Mechanical Ventilation Indicated Poor Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yun; Su, Longxiang; Zhang, Qing; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Hao; Cui, Na; Chai, Wenzhao; Wang, Xiaoting; Rui, Xi; Liu, Dawei

    2017-05-01

    The relationship between respiratory mechanical parameters and hemodynamic variables remains unclear. This study was performed to determine whether mean airway pressure and central venous pressure in the first day of mechanical ventilation are associated with patient outcomes. Retrospective first 24-hour comparison during ICU stay. The Department of Critical Care Medicine of Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Patients with mechanical ventilation. None. The clinical data of patients who received mechanical ventilation, especially respiratory and hemodynamic data, were collected and analyzed. In terms of the hemodynamic and perfusion data, the nonsurvivors group (177/2,208) had higher heart rate, respiratory rate, central venous pressure, and lactates and a lower perfusion index and P(v-a)CO2 (p mechanical ventilation, patients with elevated mean airway pressure and elevated central venous pressure had worse outcomes.

  8. Performance and safety of femoral central venous catheters in pediatric autologous peripheral blood stem cell collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, Laura; Hoffmann, Sandra; Webb, Dawn; Yamada, Chisa; Davenport, Robertson; Choi, Sung Won

    2017-12-01

    Autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cell collection (A-HPCC) in children typically requires placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) for venous access. There is scant published data regarding the performance and safety of femoral CVCs in pediatric A-HPCC. Seven-year, retrospective study of A-HPCC in pediatric patients collected between 2009 and January 2017. Inclusion criteria were an age ≤ 21 years and A-HPCC using a femoral CVC for venous access. Femoral CVC performance was examined by CD34 collection rate, inlet rate, collection efficiency (MNC-FE, CD34-FE), bleeding, flow-related adverse events (AE), CVC removal, and product sterility testing. Statistical analysis and graphing were performed with commercial software. A total of 75/119 (63%) pediatric patients (median age 3 years) met study criteria. Only 16% of children required a CVC for ≥ 3 days. The CD34 collect rate and CD34-FE was stable over time whereas MNC-FE decreased after day 4 in 80% of patients. CD34-FE and MNC-FE showed inter- and intra-patient variability over time and appeared sensitive to plerixafor administration. Femoral CVC showed fewer flow-related AE compared to thoracic CVC, especially in pediatric patients (6.7% vs. 37%, P = 0.0005; OR = 0.12 (95%CI: 0.03-0.45). CVC removal was uneventful in 73/75 (97%) patients with hemostasis achieved after 20-30 min of pressure. In a 10-year period, there were no instances of product contamination associated with femoral CVC colonization. Femoral CVC are safe and effective for A-HPCC in young pediatric patients. Femoral CVC performance was maintained over several days with few flow-related alarms when compared to thoracic CVCs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Femoral arterial and central venous catheters in the trauma resuscitation room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, S R; Fromentin, M; Ronot, M; Gauss, T; Harrois, A; Duranteau, J; Paugam-Burtz, C

    2018-03-23

    Arterial and central venous femoral catheters (fAC-CVC) use during the initial management of severe trauma patients is not a standard technique in most trauma centers. Arguments in favor of their use are: continuous monitoring of blood pressure, safe drug administration, easy blood sampling and potentially large bore venous access. The lack of evidence makes the practice heterogeneous. The aim of the present study was to describe the use and complications of fAC-CVC in the trauma bay in two centers where they are routinely used. This was a retrospective analysis of routine fAC-CVC use from two French trauma centers. All patients admitted directly to the trauma resuscitation room were included. Demographic, clinical and biological data were collected from the scene to discharge to describe the use of catheters during initial trauma management including infectious, mechanical and thrombotic complications. 243 pairs of femoral catheters were inserted among 692 patients admitted in both trauma centers. Femoral AC-CVC use was more frequent in critically ill patients with higher ISS 26 [17; 41] vs 13 [8; 24], p catheter days. An incidence of 12% of mechanical complications and of 42% deep venous thromboses were observed. Of the latter none was associated with confirmed pulmonary embolism. Femoral AC-CVC appeared to be deployed more often in critically ill patients, presenting with shock and/or traumatic brain injury in particular. The observed rate of complications in this sample seems to be low compared to reported rates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Importance of Blood Cultures from Peripheral Veins in Pediatric Patients with Cancer and a Central Venous Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Rutkjær, Cecilie

    2015-01-01

    When an infection is suspected in a child with cancer and a central venous line (CVL), cultures are often only obtained from the CVL and not from a peripheral vein (PV). This study was undertaken to evaluate the importance of concomitant blood cultures from the CVL and a PV.......When an infection is suspected in a child with cancer and a central venous line (CVL), cultures are often only obtained from the CVL and not from a peripheral vein (PV). This study was undertaken to evaluate the importance of concomitant blood cultures from the CVL and a PV....

  11. Central venous pressure and impaired renal function in patients with acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthoff, Heiko; Breidthardt, Tobias; Klima, Theresia; Aschwanden, Markus; Arenja, Nisha; Socrates, Thenral; Heinisch, Corinna; Noveanu, Markus; Frischknecht, Barbara; Baumann, Ulrich; Jaeger, Kurt A; Mueller, Christian

    2011-04-01

    To determine the relationship between central venous pressure (CVP) and renal function in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) presenting to the emergency department. Central venous pressure was determined non-invasively using compression sonography in 140 patients with AHF at presentation. Worsening renal function (WRF) was defined as an increase in serum creatinine ≥ 0.3 mg/dL during hospitalization. In the study cohort [age 77 ± 12 years, B-type natriuretic peptide 1862 ± 1564 pg/mL, left ventricular ejection fraction 40 ± 15%, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 58 ± 28 mL/min, and CVP 13.2 ± 6.9 cmH(2)O], 51 patients (36%) developed WRF. No significant association between CVP at presentation or discharge and concomitant eGFR (r = 0.005, P = 0.419 and r = 0.013, P = 0.313, respectively) was observed. However, in patients with systolic blood pressure (SBP) 15 cmH(2)O), eGFR was significantly lower at presentation and discharge (29 ± 17 vs. 47 ± 19 mL/min/1.73 m(2), P = 0.039 and 26 ± 10 vs. 53 ± 26 mL/min/1.73 m(2), P = 0.013, respectively). Central venous pressure at presentation and at discharge did not differ between patients with or without in-hospital WRF (12.6 ± 7.2 vs. 13.5 ± 6.7 cmH(2)O, P = 0.503 and 7.4 ± 6.5 vs. 7.7 ± 5.7 cmH(2)O, P = 0.799, respectively) (receiver-operating characteristic analysis 0.543, P = 0.401 and 0.531, P = 0.625, respectively). However, patients with CVP in the lowest tertile (cmH(2)O) at presentation were more likely to develop WRF within the first 24 h than patients with CVP in the highest tertile (>15 cmH(2)O) (18 vs. 4%, P = 0.046). In AHF, combined low SBP and high CVP predispose to lower eGFR. However, lower CVP may also be associated with short-term WRF. The pathophysiology of WRF and the role of CVP seem to be more complex than previously thought.

  12. Infection related to implantable central venous access devices in cancer patients: epidemiology and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Maristela P; Pierrotti, Ligia C; Zerati, Antônio E; Araújo, Pedro H X N; Motta-Leal-Filho, J M; Duarte, Laiane P G; Ibrahim, Karim Y; Souza, Antonia A L; Diz, Maria P E; Pereira, Juliana; Hoff, Paulo M; Abdala, Edson

    2013-07-01

    To describe the epidemiology of infections related to the use of implantable central venous access devices (CVADs) in cancer patients and to evaluate measures aimed at reducing the rates of such infections. Prospective cohort study. Referral hospital for cancer in São Paulo, Brazil. We prospectively evaluated all implantable CVADs employed between January 2009 and December 2011. Inpatients and outpatients were followed until catheter removal, transfer to another facility, or death. Outcome measures were bloodstream infection and pocket infection. We also evaluated the effects that the creation of a multidisciplinary team for CVAD care, avoiding in-hospital implantation of CVADs, and limiting CVAD insertion in neutropenic patients have on the rates of such infections. During the study period, 966 CVADs (mostly venous ports) were implanted in 933 patients, for a combined total of 243,792 catheter-days. We identified 184 episodes of infection: 154 (84%) were bloodstream infections, 21 (11%) were pocket infections, and 9 (5%) were surgical site infections. During the study period, the rate of CVAD-related infection dropped from 2.2 to 0.24 per 1,000 catheter-days ([Formula: see text]). Multivariate analysis revealed that relevant risk factors for such infection include surgical reintervention, implantation in a neutropenic patient, in-hospital implantation, use of a cuffed catheter, and nonchemotherapy indication for catheter use. Establishing a multidisciplinary team specifically focused on CVAD care, together with systematic reporting of infections, appears to reduce the rates of infection related to the use of these devices.

  13. Radiologists need to be aware of secondary central venous stenosis in patients with SAPHO syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mizuho; Kanazawa, Hidenori; Shinozaki, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hideharu [Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shimotsuke, Tochigi (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    We aimed to define central venous stenosis (CVS) caused by sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis as a feature of synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome on routine contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. The relationship between SAPHO syndrome and CVS without venous thrombosis caused by anterior chest wall compression has not been investigated. Therefore, the present study evaluated CVS in patients with SAPHO syndrome at our hospital. We retrospectively reviewed contrast-enhanced CT images of ten patients with suspected or diagnosed SAPHO syndrome between January 2007 and November 2015. The patients were assessed by contrast-enhanced CT using 16-, 64- or 128-detector row scanners. Two radiologists independently assessed the presence of CVS or obstruction and SAPHO syndrome in a retrospective review of CT images. Six of the ten patients had findings of CVS with SAPHO syndrome. The mean diameter and patency rate at the site of CVS were 1.88 mm and 27.2%, respectively. Stenosis was more significant in terms of the mean diameter of CVS sites than of stenotic sites that crossed the anteroposterior vein (p < 0.05). Radiologists who routinely assess contrast-enhanced CT images should be aware that sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis with SAPHO syndrome could cause secondary CVS. (orig.)

  14. Biofilm formation in long-term central venous catheters in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Fuursted, Kurt; Funch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Taurolidine has demonstrated inhibition of biofilm formation in vitro. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of catheter locking with taurolidine vs heparin in biofilm formation in central venous catheters. Forty-eight children with cancer were randomized to catheter locking by heparin (n...... = 22) or taurolidine (n = 26), respectively. After removal, catheters were examined by standardized scanning electron microscopy to assess quantitative biofilm formation. Biofilm was present if morphologically typical structures and bacterial cells were identified. Quantitative and semi......-quantitative cultures were also performed. Biofilm was identified in 23 of 26 catheters from the taurolidine group and 21 of 22 catheters from the heparin group. A positive culture was made of six of the catheters locked with taurolidine and heparin, respectively (p = 0.78). The rate of catheter-related bloodstream...

  15. Tricuspid valve endocarditis following central venous cannulation: The increasing problem of catheter related infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Babu Kale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A central venous catheter (CVC is inserted for measurement of haemodynamic variables, delivery of nutritional supplements and drugs and access for haemodialysis and haemofiltration. Catheterization and maintenance are common practices and there is more to the technique than routine placement as evident when a procedure-related complication occurs. More than 15% of the patients who receive CVC placement have some complications and infectious endocarditis involving the tricuspid valve is a rare and serious complication with high morbidity and mortality. Overenthusiastic and deep insertion of the guide wire and forceful injection through the CVC may lead to injury of the tricuspid valve and predispose to bacterial deposition and endocarditis. We report a case of tricuspid valve endocarditis, probably secondary to injury of the anterior tricuspid leaflet by the guide wire or the CVC that required open heart surgery with vegetectomy and repair of the tricuspid valve.

  16. Radiologic interventional retrieval of retained central venous catheter fragment in prematurity: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee Won; Jo, Jung Hyun; Park, Byeong Ho [College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    The fracture of a central venous catheter is a rare but potentially serious complication. Moreover, removal of the broken catheter pieces is considerably challenging, especially for premature infants. We report 3 case studies of the percutaneous transcatheter retrieval of broken catheter parts in 3 premature infants. We confirmed the location of the catheter fragments via a DSA venogram with diluted contrast media. Using the minimum amount of contrast, and extreme caution, we made certain no contrast-induced nephrotoxicity of air embolism occurred during catheter manipulation. In addition, when the broken fragment was curled or attached to the cardiac wall, we used a hook-shaped catheter to facilitate the capturing of the catheter with a loopsnare. This report demonstrates the feasibility of removing a retained catheter fragment in a premature infant using a percutaneous transcatheter approach.

  17. Central Venous Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection withKocuria kristinaein a Patient with Propionic Acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masato; Kawai, Eichiro; Yaoita, Hisao; Ichinoi, Natsuko; Sakamoto, Osamu; Kure, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    Kocuria kristinae is a catalase-positive, coagulase-negative, Gram-positive coccus found in the environment and in normal skin and mucosa in humans; however, it is rarely isolated from clinical specimens and is considered a nonpathogenic bacterium. We describe a case of catheter-related bacteremia due to K. kristinae in a young adult with propionic acidemia undergoing periodic hemodialysis. The patient had a central venous catheter implanted for total parenteral nutrition approximately 6 months prior to the onset of symptoms because of repeated acute pancreatitis. K. kristinae was isolated from two sets of blood cultures collected from the catheter. Vancomycin followed by cefazolin for 16 days and 5-day ethanol lock therapy successfully eradicated the K. kristinae bacteremia. Although human infections with this organism appear to be rare and are sometimes considered to result from contamination, physicians should not underestimate its significance when it is isolated in clinical specimens.

  18. Central Venous Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection with Kocuria kristinae in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Kimura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kocuria kristinae is a catalase-positive, coagulase-negative, Gram-positive coccus found in the environment and in normal skin and mucosa in humans; however, it is rarely isolated from clinical specimens and is considered a nonpathogenic bacterium. We describe a case of catheter-related bacteremia due to K. kristinae in a young adult with propionic acidemia undergoing periodic hemodialysis. The patient had a central venous catheter implanted for total parenteral nutrition approximately 6 months prior to the onset of symptoms because of repeated acute pancreatitis. K. kristinae was isolated from two sets of blood cultures collected from the catheter. Vancomycin followed by cefazolin for 16 days and 5-day ethanol lock therapy successfully eradicated the K. kristinae bacteremia. Although human infections with this organism appear to be rare and are sometimes considered to result from contamination, physicians should not underestimate its significance when it is isolated in clinical specimens.

  19. Body surface infrared thermometry in patients with central venous cateter-related infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvah, José Henrique; Lima, Cristiane Maria Mártires de; Unamuno, Maria do Rosário Del Lama de; Schetino, Marco Antônio Alves; Schetino, Luana Pereira Leite; Fassini, Priscila Giácomo; Brandão, Camila Fernanda Costa e Cunha Moraes; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Cunha, Selma Freire Carvalho da; Marchini, Julio Sergio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate if body surface temperature close to the central venous catheter insertion area is different when patients develop catheter-related bloodstream infections. Observational cross-sectional study. Using a non-contact infrared thermometer, 3 consecutive measurements of body surface temperature were collected from 39 patients with central venous catheter on the following sites: nearby the catheter insertion area or totally implantable catheter reservoir, the equivalent contralateral region (without catheter), and forehead of the same subject. A total of 323 observations were collected. Respectively, both in male and female patients, disregarding the occurrence of infection, the mean temperature on the catheter area minus that on the contralateral region (mean ± standard deviation: -0.3±0.6°C versus-0.2±0.5ºC; p=0.36), and the mean temperature on the catheter area minus that on the forehead (mean ± standard deviation: -0.2±0.5°C versus-0.1±0.5ºC; p=0.3) resulted in negative values. Moreover, in infected patients, higher values were obtained on the catheter area (95%CI: 36.6-37.5ºC versus 36.3-36.5ºC; p<0.01) and by temperature subtractions: catheter area minus contralateral region (95%CI: -0.17 - +0.33ºC versus -0.33 - -0.20ºC; p=0.02) and catheter area minus forehead (95%CI: -0.02 - +0.55ºC versus-0.22 - -0.10ºC; p<0.01). Using a non-contact infrared thermometer, patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections had higher temperature values both around catheter insertion area and in the subtraction of the temperatures on the contralateral and forehead regions from those on the catheter area.

  20. Central venous catheter use in severe malaria: time to reconsider the World Health Organization guidelines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanson Josh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To optimize the fluid status of adult patients with severe malaria, World Health Organization (WHO guidelines recommend the insertion of a central venous catheter (CVC and a target central venous pressure (CVP of 0-5 cmH2O. However there are few data from clinical trials to support this recommendation. Methods Twenty-eight adult Indian and Bangladeshi patients admitted to the intensive care unit with severe falciparum malaria were enrolled in the study. All patients had a CVC inserted and had regular CVP measurements recorded. The CVP measurements were compared with markers of disease severity, clinical endpoints and volumetric measures derived from transpulmonary thermodilution. Results There was no correlation between the admission CVP and patient outcome (p = 0.67 or disease severity (p = 0.33. There was no correlation between the baseline CVP and the concomitant extravascular lung water (p = 0.62, global end diastolic volume (p = 0.88 or cardiac index (p = 0.44. There was no correlation between the baseline CVP and the likelihood of a patient being fluid responsive (p = 0.37. On the occasions when the CVP was in the WHO target range patients were usually hypovolaemic and often had pulmonary oedema by volumetric measures. Seven of 28 patients suffered a complication of the CVC insertion, although none were fatal. Conclusion The WHO recommendation for the routine insertion of a CVC, and the maintenance of a CVP of 0-5 cmH2O in adults with severe malaria, should be reconsidered.

  1. Central Venous Catheter Retention and Mortality in Children With Candidemia: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Brian T; Vendetti, Neika; Bryan, Matthew; Prasad, Priya A; Russell Localio, A; Damianos, Andreas; Coffin, Susan E; Bell, Louis M; Walsh, Thomas J; Gross, Robert; Zaoutis, Theoklis E

    2016-12-01

    Candidemia causes significant morbidity and mortality among children. Removal of a central venous catheter (CVC) is often recommended for adults with candidemia to reduce persistent and metastatic infection. Pediatric-specific data on the impact of CVC retention are limited. A retrospective cohort study of inpatients candidemia at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between 2000 and 2012 was performed. The final cohort included patients that had a CVC in place at time of blood culture and retained their CVC at least 1 day beyond the blood culture being positive. A structured data collection instrument was used to retrieve patient data. A discrete time failure model, adjusting for age and the complexity of clinical care before onset of candidemia, was used to assess the association of CVC retention and 30-day all-cause mortality. Two hundred eighty-five patients with candidemia and a CVC in place at the time of blood culture were identified. Among these 285 patients, 30 (10%) died within 30 days. Central venous catheter retention was associated with a significant increased risk of death on a given day (odds ratio, 2.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-5.91). Retention of a CVC was associated with an increased risk of death after adjusting for age and complexity of care at candidemia onset. Although there is likely persistence of unmeasured confounding, given the strong association between catheter retention and death, our data suggest that early CVC removal should be strongly considered. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Predictors of Unattempted Central Venous Catheterization in Septic Patients Eligible for Early Goal-directed Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Vinson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central venous catheterization (CVC can be an important component of the management of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. CVC, however, is a time- and resource-intensive procedure associated with serious complications. The effects of the absence of shock or the presence of relative contraindications on undertaking central line placement in septic emergency department (ED patients eligible for early goal-directed therapy (EGDT have not been well described. We sought to determine the association of relative normotension (sustained systolic blood pressure >90 mmHg independent of or in response to an initial crystalloid resuscitation of 20 mL/kg, obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥30, moderate thrombocytopenia (platelet count <50,000 per μL, and coagulopathy (international normalized ratio ≥2.0 with unattempted CVC in EGDT-eligible patients. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of 421 adults who met EGDT criteria in 5 community EDs over a period of 13 months. We compared patients with attempted thoracic (internal jugular or subclavian CVC with those who did not undergo an attempted thoracic line. We also compared patients with any attempted CVC (either thoracic or femoral with those who did not undergo any attempted central line. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to calculate adjusted odd ratios (AORs. Results: In our study, 364 (86.5% patients underwent attempted thoracic CVC and 57 (13.5% did not. Relative normotension was significantly associated with unattempted thoracic CVC (AOR 2.6 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-4.3, as were moderate thrombocytopenia (AOR 3.9; 95% CI, 1.5-10.1 and coagulopathy (AOR 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3-5.6. When assessing for attempted catheterization of any central venous site (thoracic or femoral, 382 (90.7% patients underwent attempted catheterization and 39 (9.3% patients did not. Relative normotension (AOR 2.3; 95% CI, 1.2-4.5 and moderate thrombocytopenia (AOR 3.9; 95

  3. Transitioning from anatomic landmarks to ultrasound guided central venous catheterizations: guidelines applied to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oom, Rodrigo; Casaca, Rui; Barroca, Rita; Carvalhal, Sara; Santos, Catarina; Abecasis, Nuno

    2017-07-14

    Centrally inserted central catheter (CICC) insertion is a commonly performed procedure that may give rise to different complications. Despite the suggestion of guidelines to use ultrasound guidance (USG) for vascular access, not all centers use it systematically. The aim of this study is to illustrate the experience with ultrasound in CICC placement at a high-volume oncological center, in a country where the landmark technique is standard. Retrospective analysis of a prospective database was performed on CICC placement under USG in the Central Venous Catheter Unit of Instituto Português de Oncologia de Lisboa Francisco Gentil, from 2012 to 2015. Three thousand five hundred and seventy-two procedures were recorded. From 2728 CICC placements, 1187 (43.5%) were done using USG. The majority of CICC placements were successful without immediate complications (96.1%). In 55 cases (4.6%), more than three attempts were necessary to puncture the vein. Pneumothorax occurred in 5 cases (0.4%) and arterial puncture was registered in 41 cases (3.5%). An increasing use of USG for placing CICCs was planned and observed over the years and, in the last year of the study, 67.3% of the CICC placements were with USG. CICC placement with USG is a safe and effective technique. Despite some resistance that is observed, these results support that it is worth following the guidelines that advocate the use of the USG in the placement of CICC.

  4. Ventilator-induced central venous pressure variation can predict fluid responsiveness in post-operative cardiac surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherpanath, T. G. V.; Geerts, B. F.; Maas, J. J.; de Wilde, R. B. P.; Groeneveld, A. B.; Jansen, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-induced dynamic hemodynamic parameters such as stroke volume variation (SVV) and pulse pressure variation (PPV) have been shown to predict fluid responsiveness in contrast to static hemodynamic parameters such as central venous pressure (CVP). We hypothesized that the ventilator-induced

  5. Emission of Nitrous Oxide in Temperate Forests with Different Stages of Nitrogen Saturation in Central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaoyan, F.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term nitrogen deposition has caused a problem called nitrogen saturation in forest ecosystems globally. Aber et al. (1989) suggested that nitrogen saturation activate soil nitrification in forest systems, which is the main process of N2O production in aerobic condition. Thus, nitrogen saturation may affect significantly the N2O emission from forests, while the impact on flux has not been quantitatively evaluated yet. In the present study, 3-year monitoring of N2O emission was performed in an N-saturated forests (Tama Hill, Tokyo): the emission rate of N2O was measured monthly by a closed chamber method at 12 plots along a slope, and the net nitrification rate of surface soil (0-10 cm) was measured 4 times in situ. In addition, a comparative research was conducted in summer in eight temperate forests with different stages of nitrogen saturation in central Japan; the N2O flux, soil moisture, nitrogen availability and stream water NO3- concentration were measured at each site. In an N-saturated forests, the annual N2O emission was estimated to be 0.88 kg N ha-1year-1 , showing a typical seasonal variation . The seasonal patterns of N2O emission were significantly related to soil moisture and ambient temperature. We also found high spatial variation of N2O flux among 12 plots along the slope, which was generally higher at the bottom. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between the rate of N2O emission and the net nitrification rate with WFPS60% , probably due to the effect of denitrification. In comparison sites, the N2O emission rate ranged nearly 16-fold from 0.13-2.11 g N ha-1day-1 was linearly related to the stream water NO3- concentration ranged 10-fold from 0.14 to 1.4 mg N/L. Our results revealed N enrichment in forest obviously stimulate soil N2O emission. Keywords: Nitrous oxide, nitrogen saturation, nitrification, temperate forest

  6. The clinical application of head-ring type posture pad used for prone position in performing the placement of central venous catheter in patients with tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Meiqian; Wang Chunmei; Chen Feiyin; Zhang Lubing

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to observe the effectiveness of head-ring type posture pad used for prone position in performing the procedure of peripheral insertion of central catheter (PICC) via the dorsal forearm vein in patients with neoplasm. Methods: A total of 80 consecutive tumor patients were randomly divided into two groups. PICC was carried out in all patients in prone position. In control group (n=38) PICC was performed with patient's head inclining to one side, while in study group (n=42) PICC was performed with the help of head-ring type pad to keep the patient in comfortable posture. The comfortableness, breathing rhythm, transcutaneous oxygen saturation and the change of heart rate during the procedure were observed. The results were analyzed and compared between the two groups. Results: The results is study group were much better than those in control group. Statistically significant difference in the comfortableness, breathing rhythm, transcutaneous oxygen saturation and heart rate existed between the two groups. Conclusion: The head-ring type posture pad used for prone position can make the patients more comfortable in performing peripheral insertion of central venous catheter via the dorsal forearm vein. (authors)

  7. Evidence-based consensus on the insertion of central venous access devices: definition of minimal requirements for training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureau, N; Lamperti, M; Kelly, L J; Dawson, R; Elbarbary, M; van Boxtel, A J H; Pittiruti, M

    2013-03-01

    There is a lack of standard minimal requirements for the training of insertion techniques and maintenance of central venous access devices (CVADs). An international evidence-based consensus task force was established through the World Congress of Vascular Access (WoCoVA) to provide definitions and recommendations for training and insertion of CVADs. Medical literature published from February 1971 to April 2012 regarding 'central vascular access', 'training', 'competency', 'simulation', and 'ultrasound' was reviewed on Pubmed, BioMed Central, ScienceDirect, and Scopus databases. The GRADE and the GRADE-RAND methods were utilized to develop recommendations. Out of 156 papers initially identified, 83 papers described training for central vascular access placement. Sixteen recommendations are proposed by this task force, each with an evidence level, degree of consensus, and recommendation grade. These recommendations suggest central venous access education include didactic or web-based teaching with insertion procedure, infection prevention, complications, care, and maintenance of devices, along with laboratory models and tools for simulation practice incorporating ultrasound. Clinical competence should be determined by observation during clinical practice using a global rating scale rather than by the number of procedures performed. Ensuring safe insertion and management of central venous devices requires standardized education, simulation practice, and supervised insertions.

  8. Polyurethane versus silicone catheters for central venous port devices implanted at the forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Lueg, Claudia; Borgmeyer, Sebastian; Karimov, Ilham; Braun, Ulrike; Kiechle, Marion; Meier, Reinhard; Koehler, Michael; Ettl, Johannes; Berger, Hermann

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to analyse short and long-term complications of polyurethane (PU) versus silicone catheters used in totally implantable venous-access ports (TIVAPs) implanted at the forearm. Retrospective analysis of 698 consecutively implanted TIVAPs was performed. Primary end-points were defined as rates of major complications associated with either type of central venous port catheter. Technical success rate, device service interval as well as minor complications not requiring port explantation were defined as secondary end-points. A total of 698 port devices were implanted in 681 patients, 396 equipped with a PU catheter, 302 with a silicone catheter. The technical success rate was 99.9% with no major periprocedural complications. During follow-up a total of 211 complications in 146 patients were observed (1.0/1000 catheter days), 183 occurred associated with PU catheters (1.8/100 catheter days), 28 (0.3/1000 catheter days) with silicone catheters (log rank test p < 0.0001). Catheter-related bloodstream infections as well as thrombotic complications occurred significantly more frequently with PU catheters, while silicone catheters exhibited a trend towards a higher rate of mechanical failure such as disconnection or catheter rupture. Major complications requiring explantation of the device occurred more frequently with PU-based catheters (10.6%) compared to silicone catheter carrying ports (4.6%, log rank test p < 0.001). PU catheters are more susceptible to catheter-related infections and exhibit a higher thrombogenicity, compared to silicone catheters. Silicone catheters instead exhibit a trend towards decreased mechanical stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of a "VTE-rich" population in pediatrics - Critically ill children with central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Minh; Shein, Steven L; Ji, Xinge; Ahuja, Sanjay P

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is rising among inpatients in US hospitals, especially among kids with central venous catheters (CVCs) in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). To identify a sub-group of "VTE-rich" population among PICU children, and to assess the effect of VTE on morbidity and mortality. Data was extracted from a multicenter Virtual PICU Database, or VPS, for children with a CVC and presence of a VTE. The primary outcome variable was all cause mortality and secondary outcome measure was prolonged mechanical ventilation. Primary diagnoses and Pediatric risk of mortality 2 (PIM 2) score were also recorded. The database identified 158,299 PICU patients who had a CVC. A total of 1602 patients had VTE (103 per 10,000 PICU patients). Multivariate analysis showed increased risk of VTE in patients who were <1year old (OR 1.48; 1.30-1.68), mechanically ventilated (OR 2.48; 2.07-2.98), had either a diagnostic (OR 2.32; 1.94-2.78) or therapeutic cardiac catheterization (OR 2.06; 1.66-2.55), PICC (OR 3.91; 3.50-4.37), and percutaneous CVC (OR 3.99; 3.48-4.61). Primary diagnoses associated with VTE were endocrinologic, immunologic, and gastrointestinal disorders. PICU patients with CVC and VTE had increased odds of mortality (OR 1.71; 1.47-2.00) after adjusting for factors associated with mortality, and fewer Ventilator Free Days (VFD) than patients without VTE. Critically ill children with CVC have a significant risk of developing VTE. Identification of the above "VTE-rich" population may aid in design of clinical trials aimed at prevention of VTE among hospitalized PICU children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An Endovascular Approach to the Entrapped Central Venous Catheter After Cardiac Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Shamit S., E-mail: shamit.desai@northwestern.edu [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Konanur, Meghana [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (United States); Foltz, Gretchen [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at Washington University, Interventional Radiology (United States); Malaisrie, S. Chris [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (United States); Resnick, Scott, E-mail: sresnick@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology, Northwestern Memorial Hospital (United States)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeEntrapment of central venous catheters (CVC) at the superior vena cava (SVC) cardiopulmonary bypass cannulation site by closing purse-string sutures is a rare complication of cardiac surgery. Historically, resternotomy has been required for suture release. An endovascular catheter release approach was developed.Materials and MethodsFour cases of CVC tethering against the SVC wall and associated resistance to removal, suggestive of entrapment, were encountered. In each case, catheter removal was achieved using a reverse catheter fluoroscopically guided over the suture fixation point between catheter and SVC wall, followed by the placement of a guidewire through the catheter. The guidewire was snared and externalized to create a through-and-through access with the apex of the loop around the suture. A snare placed from the femoral venous access provided concurrent downward traction on the distal CVC during suture release maneuvers.ResultsIn the initial attempt, gentle traction freed the CVC, which fractured and was removed in two sections. In the subsequent three cases, traction alone did not release the CVC. Therefore, a cutting balloon was introduced over the guidewire and inflated. Gentle back-and-forth motion of the cutting balloon atherotomes successfully incised the suture in all three attempts. No significant postprocedural complications were encountered. During all cases, a cardiovascular surgeon was present in the interventional suite and prepared for emergent resternotomy, if necessary.ConclusionAn endovascular algorithm to the “entrapped CVC” is proposed, which likely reduces risks posed by resternotomy to cardiac surgery patients in the post-operative period.

  11. Risk Factors for Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Complications in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumani, Ketan; Advani, Sonali; Reich, Nicholas G.; Gosey, Leslie; Milstone, Aaron M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) To characterize the epidemiology and identify risk factors for complications necessitating removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) in children. Design Cohort study Setting The Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, Baltimore, Maryland. Participants Hospitalized children who had a PICC inserted outside of the neonatal ICU between January 1, 2003 and December 1, 2009. Main Exposures Age, PICC dwell time, PICC insertion site, PICC tip location, pediatric ICU exposure, indication for PICC insertion Outcome Measures Complications necessitating PICC removal as recorded by the PICC Team. Results During the study period, 2574 PICCs were placed in 1807 children. Complications necessitating catheter removal occurred in 20.8% of PICCs during 46,021 catheter days (11.6 complications per 1,000 catheter days). These included accidental dislodgement (4.6%), infection (4.3%), occlusion (3.6%), local infiltration (3.0%), leakage (1.5%), breaks (1.4%), phlebitis (1.2%) and thrombosis (0.5%). From 2003 to 2009 complications decreased by 15% per year (IRR 0.85; 95%CI 0.81-0.89). In adjusted analysis, all non-central PICC tip locations - midline (IRR 4.59, 95% CI 3.69-5.69), mid-clavicular (IRR 2.15, 95% CI 1.54-2.98), and other (IRR 3.26 95% CI 1.72-6.15) - compared to central tip location were associated with an increased risk of complications. Pediatric ICU exposure and age less than one year old were independently associated with complications necessitating PICC removal. Conclusion(s) Non-central PICC tip locations, younger age, and pediatric ICU exposure were independent risk factors for complications necessitating PICC removal. Despite reductions in PICC complications, further efforts are needed to prevent PICC-associated complications in children. PMID:23549677

  12. Medically Attended Catheter Complications Are Common in Patients With Outpatient Central Venous Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spires, Steven S; Rebeiro, Peter F; Miller, Mickie; Koss, Katie; Wright, Patty W; Talbot, Thomas R

    2018-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Outpatient central venous catheters (CVCs) are being used more frequently; however, data describing mechanical complications and central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) in the outpatient setting are limited. We performed a retrospective observational cohort study to understand the burden of these complications to elucidate their impact on the healthcare system. METHODS Data were retrospectively collected on patients discharged from Vanderbilt University Medical Center with a CVC in place and admitted into the care of Vanderbilt Home Care Services. Risk factors for medically attended catheter-associated complications (CACs) and outpatient CLABSIs were analyzed. RESULTS A CAC developed in 143 patients (21.9%), for a total of 165 discrete CAC events. Among these, 76 (46%) required at least 1 visit to the emergency department or an inpatient admission, while the remaining 89 (54%) required an outpatient clinic visit. The risk for developing a CAC was significantly increased in female patients, patients with a CVC with >1 lumen, and patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. The absolute number of CLABSIs identified in the study population was small at 16, or 2.4% of the total cohort. CONCLUSIONS Medically attended catheter complications were common among outpatients discharged with a CVC, and reduction of these events should be the focus of outpatient quality improvement programs. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:439-444.

  13. Serious Gaming to Improve the Safety of Central Venous Catheter Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Katz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 5 million central venous catheters (CVCs are placed by physicians annually in the United States, with a complication rate of 15%.1 Guidelines and recommendations are continually being established and updated regarding CVC placement.2 While much has been done regarding training the technical skills of CVC placement using part-task trainers (i.e., mannequins, successfully finding and cannulating a central vein is but one part of the process. In fact, many steps designed to prevent untoward complications involve non-technical skills which are perhaps more important in training practitioners to safely place CVCs. First in aviation and now in healthcare, practitioners are being trained in realistic and highly interactive simulated environments so they can learn not just technical skills , but the key management and non-technical steps which make their task safer.3 One modality being used to improve performance is video gaming simulation, or "serious gaming." Gaming as a learning tool is being increasingly utilized in health care fields and can lead to better skill-based outcomes.4 As such, we have developed a game based around the placement of CVCs that will be used as a new teaching modality in a pilot program for instructing residents in safe CVC placement.

  14. A survey of central venous catheter practices in Australian and New Zealand tertiary neonatal units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jacqueline E; McDonald, Susan J; Tan, Kenneth

    2014-02-01

    Infection is the most common problem with central venous catheters (CVCs) in neonates. There are two published guidelines, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infection that describes evidence-based practice to reduce nosocomial infection. Our aims were to survey current medical and nursing management of central venous catheters in tertiary neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand and to compare with the CDC evidence-based practice guideline. A cross sectional survey was performed across 27 Australian and New Zealand neonatal units in September 2012. Two web-based questionnaires were distributed, one to medical directors related to the insertion of CVCs while CVC "maintenance" surveys were sent to nurse unit managers. Seventy percent (19/27) medical management and 59% (16/27) on nursing management surveys were completed. In all neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) there were guidelines for CVC maintenance and for 18 out of 19 there were guidelines for insertion. In the seven units using femoral lines, three had a guideline on insertion and four for maintenance. CVC insertion was restricted to credentialed staff in 57.9% of neonatal units. Only 26.5% used full maximal sterile barriers for insertion. Skin disinfection practices widely varied. Dressing use and dressing change regimens were standardised; all using a semi-permeable dressing. Duration of cleaning time of the access point varied significantly; however, the majority used a chlorhexidine with alcohol solution (68.8%). Line and fluid changes varied from daily to 96 h. The majority used sterile gloves and a sterile dressing pack to access the CVC (68.8%). In the majority of NICUs stopcocks were used (62.5%) with a needle-less access point attached (87.5%). In less than 50% of NICUs education was provided on insertion and maintenance. There is diversity of current practices and some aspects vary from the CDC

  15. Evaluation of mupirocin ointment in control of central venous catheter related infections: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaei J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Central venous catheter (CVC related infections are important complications of cathter application. This study assessed the usefulness of mupirocin in prevention and control of these infections."n"nMethods: In this randomized clinical trial, consecutive surgical patients requiring central venous catheter (for more than 2 days in Amir-Alam Hospital from 2006-2008 were enrolled. Patients were divided in two groups; in "case group" patients received topical mupirocin 2% every 48 hours at the time of insertion of catheter and dressing change and for "control group" mupirocin was not used. All of the patients received chlorhexidine and enoxoparin as complementary treatments. Two groups were comparable in regard of age, sex and risk factors."n"nResults: One hundred eighteen patients enrolled in the study (57 in case and 61 in control group completed the study. 84 catheters in case group and 88 catheters in control group were inserted. The catheters in 90% of patients were inserted in jugular vein. At the end of study 29(16.8% patients (16 in control versus 13 in case group had catheter colonization (p=NS. Catheter related bloodstream infection was observed in 16(9.3% patients (6 in

  16. Does the preference of peripheral versus central venous access in peripheral blood stem cell collection/yield change stem cell kinetics in autologous stem cell transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogu, Mehmet Hilmi; Kaya, Ali Hakan; Berber, Ilhami; Sari, İsmail; Tekgündüz, Emre; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Iskender, Dicle; Kayıkçı, Ömur; Kuku, Irfan; Kaya, Emin; Keskin, Ali; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2016-02-01

    Central venous access is often used during apheresis procedure in stem cell collection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether central or peripheral venous access has an effect on stem cell yield and the kinetics of the procedure and the product in patients undergoing ASCT after high dose therapy. A total of 327 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The use of peripheral venous access for stem cell yield was significantly more frequent in males compared to females (p = 0.005). Total volume of the product was significantly lower in central venous access group (p = 0.046). As being a less invasive procedure, peripheral venous access can be used for stem cell yield in eligible selected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Single-centre experience with tunnelled central venous catheters in 150 cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, D. A.; van Laarhoven, H. W. M.; Wobbes, Th; Punt, C. J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Tunnelled venous catheters improve venous access in cancer patients, but are associated with complications. We retrospectively analysed the outcome of Hickman catheter and Port-A-Cath (PAC) insertion in cancer patients from a department of medical oncology and compared these results with the

  18. Central venous pulse pressure analysis using an R-synchronized pressure measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yoshihisa; Hayashi, Daisuke; Wada, Shinya; Yoshioka, Naoki; Yasukawa, Takeshi; Pestel, Gunther

    2006-12-01

    The information derived from central venous catheters is underused. We developed an EKG-R synchronization and averaging system to obtained distinct CVP waveforms and analyzed components of these. Twenty-five paralyzed surgical patients undergoing CVP monitoring under mechanical ventilation were studied. CVP and EKG signals were analyzed employing our system, the mean CVP and CVP at end-diastole during expiration were compared, and CVP waveform components were measured using this system. CVP waveforms were clearly visualized in all patients. They showed the a peak to be 1.8+/- 0.7 mmHg, which was the highest of three peaks, and the x trough to be lower than the y trough (-1.6+/- 0.7 mmHg and -0.9+/- 0.5 mmHg, respectively), with a mean pulse pressure of 3.4 mmHg. The difference between the mean CVP and CVP at end-diastole during expiration was 0.58+/- 0.81 mmHg. The mean CVP can be used as an index of right ventricular preload in patients under mechanical ventilation with regular sinus rhythm. Our newly developed system is useful for clinical monitoring and for education in circulatory physiology.

  19. Concentrated parenteral nutrition solutions and central venous catheter complications in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, T; McGowan, P; Turner, M A; Morgan, C

    2015-05-01

    Standardised, concentrated neonatal parenteral nutrition (PN) regimens can overcome early nutritional deficits in very preterm infants. A PN regimen with increased macronutrient content (standardised, concentrated, added macronutrients parenteral (SCAMP)) has been shown to improve early head growth in a randomised controlled trial. Line complications including late onset sepsis were secondary outcomes of this study. Infants were started on standardised, concentrated PN at birth and randomised at 2-5 days to either switch to SCAMP or remain on control PN. Central venous catheter (CVC), blood culture (BC) and inflammatory marker data were collected for the 28-day intervention period. 150 infants were randomised with mean (SD) birth weight (g) of 900 (158) versus 884 (183) in SCAMP (n=74) and control (n=76) groups, respectively. There were no differences in CVC use/type or duration or in positive/negative BC with/without associated C reactive protein rise in SCAMP versus control groups. Increasing the macronutrient content of a standardised, concentrated neonatal PN regimen does not increase CVC complication rates. ISRCTN 76597892. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Inserting central venous catheter in emergency conditions in coagulopathic patients in comparison to noncoagulopathic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasr-Esfahani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The current study was designed to compare the complications and adverse effects of central venous catheter (CVC insertion under ultrasound guidance in patients with and without coagulopathy. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 59 patients who needed CVC for various reasons were enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups of those with and without coagulopathy based on complete blood count, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, and international normalized ratio test results, and then, CVC was inserted with ultrasound guidance in both groups. The CVC inserting site was examined for hematoma and hemorrhage in four stages at different times. Results: There was no significant difference in the terms of demographic features, catheter lumen size (P = 0.43, and number of attempting for CVC placement (odds ratio [OR] =2.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.36–15.3, P = 0.39 between two groups. Seven out of 59 patients suffered from complications (11.9% that the complications in coagulopathic patients were oozing (5.7% and superficial hematoma (8.6% while in noncoagulopathic patients were 4.2% for both complications (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.09–3.07, P = 0.767. Conclusion: According to our results, it can be concluded that inserting CVC with ultrasound guidance under emergency conditions causes no serious and life-threatening complications in coagulopathic patients.

  1. Central venous catheters for chronic hemodialysis: Is "last choice" never the "right choice"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumaine, Chance S; Brown, Robert S; MacRae, Jennifer M; Oliver, Matthew J; Ravani, Pietro; Quinn, Robert R

    2018-01-01

    Since the publication of the first vascular access clinical practice guidelines in 1997, the global nephrology community has dedicated significant time and resources toward increasing the prevalence of arteriovenous fistulas and decreasing the prevalence of central venous catheters for hemodialysis. These efforts have been bolstered by observational studies showing an association between catheter use and increased patient morbidity and mortality. To date, however, no randomized comparisons of the outcomes of different forms of vascular access have been conducted. There is mounting evidence that much of the difference in patient outcomes may be explained by patient factors, rather than choice of vascular access. Some have called into question the appropriateness of fistula creation for certain patient populations, such as those with limited life expectancy and those at high risk of fistula-related complications. In this review, we explore the extent to which catheters and fistulas exhibit the characteristics of the "ideal" vascular access and highlight the significant knowledge gaps that exist in the current literature. Further studies, ideally randomized comparisons of different forms of vascular access, are required to better inform shared decision making. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. ABO blood group related venous thrombosis risk in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Chung Mo; Vissapragada, Ravi; Sharp, Rebecca; Nguyen, Phi; Ung, Thomas; Solanki, Chrismin; Esterman, Adrian

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the association between ABO blood group and upper limb venous thrombosis (VT) risk in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC). Single centre retrospective cohort study. A cohort of patients who underwent PICC insertion from September 2010 to August 2014 were followed up for symptomatic VT presentations diagnosed by ultrasound. Blood group status was identified from hospital information systems. 2270 participants had 3020 PICCs inserted. There were 124 cases of symptomatic VT, an incident rate of 4% [95% confidence interval, CI (3-5%)]. Univariate analysis adjusting for the clustered sample showed that having chemotherapy, two or more previous PICCs, a larger catheter size, a diagnosis of cancer and having a blood group B were all associated with an increased risk of a VT. In the multivariate analysis, PICC diameter, cancer diagnosis and blood group B were all independently associated with increased risk of VT. Patients undergoing PICC insertion with a blood group B appear to have a higher risk of VT, independent of risks attached to the PICC procedure and cancer diagnosis. Without any existing guidelines for PICC-related VT, this investigation creates a platform for further research to be conducted in order to establish guidelines. Advances in knowledge: Previous studies investigating VT risk associated with blood group status related to large heterogeneous populations. In this article, we look at patients specifically with PICC, which reduces the heterogeneity in the cohort. In addition, due to the substantial number of patients enrolled, we had a chance to perform multivariate analyses with statistical significance.

  3. The pericardial reflection and the tip of the central venous catheter - topographical analysis in stillborn babies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eifinger, Frank; Vierzig, Anne; Roth, Bernhard [University Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine and Neonatology, Cologne (Germany); Scaal, Martin [University of Cologne, Institute of Anatomy II, Cologne (Germany); Koerber, Friederike [University of Cologne, Department of Radiology, Cologne (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Central venous cannulation is widely used in neonatal critical care. Pericardial tamponade caused by vessel wall perforation can occur if the catheter tip induces extravasation at the level of the pericardium. To investigate the level of the superior pericardial reflection in stillborn babies. We dissected 20 bodies (11 female, mean gestational age 33 6/7 weeks, range 25-43 weeks), with careful opening of the thoracic area. After injecting contrast medium into the pericardial sac, we introduced a catheter through the right internal jugular vein. We then took radiographs to analyse the relationship between visual osseous landmarks and the pericardium. Mean distance between the pericardial reflection at its upper end and the first thoracic vertebra was 1.3 cm (standard deviation [SD]: 0.3 cm) and did not extend over the 3rd intercostal space. The mean distance from the entry of the superior vena cava into the pericardial sac and the 1st thoracic vertebra was 2.3 cm (SD: 0.5). The upper end of the pericardial reflection in neonates at autopsy lies below the middle of the 3rd thoracic vertebra. The tip of an upper inserted catheter should not extend below the level of the 3rd intercostal space. (orig.)

  4. A preliminary study of paraoxonase-1 in infected patients with an indwelling central venous catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftimie, Simona; García-Heredia, Anabel; Pujol, Isabel; Ballester, Frederic; Fort-Gallifa, Isabel; Simó, Josep M; Joven, Jorge; Castro, Antoni; Camps, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Identification of biochemical markers to diagnose bloodstream infections in patients with a central venous catheter (CVC) inserted is an active research pursuit. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is an enzyme participating in the innate immune system protecting against toxic substances and infectious agents. We investigated the relationships between serum PON1 alterations and the characteristics of infection in a group of patients with a CVC implant. Patients (n=114) who had had an inserted CVC removed because of infection or because the usefulness was at an end, and 407 healthy volunteers were recruited. In all participants we measured serum PON1 lactonase and paraoxonase activities, PON1 concentration and genetic polymorphisms, together with levels of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), procalcitonin and C-reactive protein (CRP). Patients with an acute concomitant infection (ACI) had higher CCL2, CRP and procalcitonin concentrations than the control group, together with lower paraoxonase and lactonase activities and specific activities. The areas under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic plots for paraoxonase and lactonase specific activities in the discrimination between patients with or without and ACI were 0.81 (0.73-0.89) and 0.81 (0.71-0.89), respectively, indicating the high diagnostic accuracy of these parameters. This preliminary study suggests that the measurement of PON1 may be useful as a tool for the diagnosis of ACI in patients with an indwelling CVC. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Antibiotic-Impregnated Central Venous Catheters Do Not Change Antibiotic Resistance Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Isaiah R; Buckman, Sara A; Horn, Christopher B; Bochicchio, Grant V; Mazuski, John E

    2018-01-01

    Antibiotic-impregnated central venous catheters (CVCs) decrease the incidence of infection in high-risk patients. However, use of these catheters carries the hypothetical risk of inducing antibiotic resistance. We hypothesized that routine use of minocycline and rifampin-impregnated catheters (MR-CVC) in a single intensive care unit (ICU) would change the resistance profile for Staphylococcus aureus. We reviewed antibiotic susceptibilities of S. aureus isolates obtained from blood cultures in a large urban teaching hospital from 2002-2015. Resistance patterns were compared before and after implementation of MR-CVC use in the surgical ICU (SICU) in August 2006. We also compared resistance patterns of S. aureus obtained in other ICUs and in non-ICU patients, in whom MR-CVCs were not used. Data for rifampin, oxacillin, and clindamycin were available for 9,703 cultures; tetracycline resistance data were available for 4,627 cultures. After implementation of MR-CVC use in the SICU, rifampin resistance remained unchanged, with rates the same as in other ICU and non-ICU populations (3%). After six years of use of MR-CVCs in the SICU, the rate of tetracycline resistance was unchanged in all facilities (1%-3%). The use of MR-CVCs was not associated with any change in S. aureus oxacillin-resistance rates in the SICU (66% vs. 60%). However, there was a significant decrease in S. aureus clindamycin resistance (59% vs. 34%; p resistance of S. aureus isolates to rifampin or tetracyclines.

  6. Cost of installing and turning off hemodialysis on patients with central venous catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillene Santos Ferreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to identify the average total cost (ATC for installing and turning off hemodialysis on patients with central venous catheters. This quantitative, exploratory, and descriptive research, in the mode of a single-case study, was conducted in a public university hospital. The non-probabilistic sample corresponded to the observation of 100 installations and 100 terminations of hemodialysis on 42 patients during 23 days of collection. The ATC was calculated by multiplying the time spent by nurses by the unit cost of direct labor, and adding the cost of materials, solutions, and medications. The Brazilian currency (R$ was used for the calculations. The ATC for installation was R$ 80.10 and for shutting off was R$ 13.04, totaling R$ 93.14 per hemodialysis session. The results obtained will facilitate a better planning of the allocation of human, material, and financial resources enabling the increase of managerial strategies aimed at economic efficiency. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i4.23044.

  7. Bloodstream infection, venous thrombosis, and peripherally inserted central catheters: reappraising the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; Anand, Sarah; Krein, Sarah L; Chenoweth, Carol; Saint, Sanjay

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) has transformed the care of medical and surgical patients. Whereas intravenous antibiotics, parenteral nutrition, and administration of chemotherapy once necessitated prolonged hospitalization, PICCs have eliminated the need for such practice. However, PICCs may not be as innocuous as once thought; a growing body of evidence suggests that these devices also have important risks. This review discusses the origin of PICCs and highlights reasons behind their rapid adoption in medical practice. We evaluate the evidence behind 2 important PICC-related complications--venous thrombosis and bloodstream infections--and describe how initial studies may have led to a false sense of security with respect to these outcomes. In this context, we introduce a conceptual model to understand the risk of PICC-related complications and guide the use of these devices. Through this model, we outline recommendations that clinicians may use to prevent PICC-related adverse events. We conclude by highlighting important knowledge gaps and identifying avenues for future research in this area. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Usefulness of Totally Implantable Central Venous Access Devices in Elderly Patients: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Yuki; Kuranishi, Fumito; Ogawa, Yoshiteru

    2018-01-01

    The need for totally implantable central venous access devices (TICVADs) has increased with increased opportunities in the use of chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of TICVAD implantation and use in patients aged ≥85 years. Between January 2010 and August 2016, 117 patients underwent TICVAD implantation and their records were retrospectively reviewed. Participants were divided into 2 groups (plus-85 and sub-85 groups). Fifty-five patients (47.0%) had solid organ cancer alone; 35 patients (29.9%) had cerebrovascular or cranial nerve disease. The average follow-up period was 201 (2-1,620) days. Major complications were identified in 6 (14.6%) plus-85 patients and 11 (14.5%) sub-85 patients (p = 0.9813). Catheter-related infections developed in 3 plus-85 (7.3%) and 4 sub-85 patients (5.3%; p = 0.6549). There were no significant group differences in hematoma, pneumothorax, occlusion, and removal rates. In plus-85 patients examined just before surgery and a month after surgery, increased rates of serum albumin and Onodera's prognostic nutritional index were observed in 48% (14/39) and 41% (12/39), respectively. The use of TICVADs in the plus-85 group resulted in effective outcomes. The results of this retrospective study support the wider use of TICVADs in patients aged ≥85 years. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Injection of gadolinium contrast through pediatric central venous catheters: a safety study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriarty, John M.; Ramos, Yanerys; Finn, J.P.; Kung, Geoffrey L.; Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Ennis, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    Catheter rupture during CT angiography has prompted policies prohibiting the use of electronic injectors with peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) not only for CT but also for MRI. Consequently, many institutions mandate hand injection for MR angiography, limiting precision of infusion rates and durations of delivery. To determine whether electronic injection of gadolinium-based contrast media through a range of small-caliber, single-lumen PICCs would be safe without risk of catheter rupture over the range of clinical protocols and determine whether programmed flow rates and volumes were realized when using PICCs for contrast delivery. Experiments were performed and recorded using the Medrad Spectris Solaris EP MR Injection System. PICC sizes, contrast media and flow rates were based on common institutional protocols. No catheters were damaged during any experiments. Mean difference between programmed and delivered volume was 0.07 ± 0.10 mL for all experiments. Reduced flow rates and prolonged injection durations were observed when the injector's pressure-limiting algorithm was triggered, only in protocols outside the clinical range. PICCs commonly used in children can withstand in vitro power injection of gadolinium-based contrast media at protocols significantly above clinical levels. (orig.)

  10. Plan to Reduce Improper Care of Peripherally-inserted Central Venous Catheters in Outpatient Chemotherapy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Mei Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This project aims at improving peripherally-inserted central venous catheter (PICC care in chemotherapy outpatients. From February to March 2011, 16.8% of PICCs were not cared for properly. The main problems encountered were dermatitis, catheter obstruction and catheter slippage. These problems were caused by lack of wound care guidelines for the PICC, the nursing staff's lack of knowledge and skills for PICC nursing care, and patients and their families’ lack of knowledge regarding PICC home care. Improvement plans included: 1. To establish norms for care of normal and abnormal PICC wounds and produce instructional videos; 2. To design correct flushing and butterfly fixation methods of the PICC. 3. To develop the transparent waterproof protective jacket and to produce a home nursing care manual and instructional video. After implementation of this project, the rate of improper PICC care decreased to 6.1% in September to November 2011, thus achieving the goals of this project. This PICC care project not only enhanced the professional knowledge and skills of nurses, but also the knowledge of patients regarding self-care.

  11. Injection of gadolinium contrast through pediatric central venous catheters: a safety study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, John M.; Ramos, Yanerys; Finn, J.P. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kung, Geoffrey L. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Moghaddam, Abbas N. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ennis, Daniel B. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Catheter rupture during CT angiography has prompted policies prohibiting the use of electronic injectors with peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) not only for CT but also for MRI. Consequently, many institutions mandate hand injection for MR angiography, limiting precision of infusion rates and durations of delivery. To determine whether electronic injection of gadolinium-based contrast media through a range of small-caliber, single-lumen PICCs would be safe without risk of catheter rupture over the range of clinical protocols and determine whether programmed flow rates and volumes were realized when using PICCs for contrast delivery. Experiments were performed and recorded using the Medrad Spectris Solaris EP MR Injection System. PICC sizes, contrast media and flow rates were based on common institutional protocols. No catheters were damaged during any experiments. Mean difference between programmed and delivered volume was 0.07 {+-} 0.10 mL for all experiments. Reduced flow rates and prolonged injection durations were observed when the injector's pressure-limiting algorithm was triggered, only in protocols outside the clinical range. PICCs commonly used in children can withstand in vitro power injection of gadolinium-based contrast media at protocols significantly above clinical levels. (orig.)

  12. Computer Identification of Symptomatic Deep Venous Thrombosis Associated with Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R. Scott; Linford, Lorraine H.; Sharp, Jamie H.; White, Gayle; Lloyd, James F.; Weaver, Lindell K.

    2007-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are considered a safe method to provide long-term antibiotic therapy, chemotherapy and nutrition support. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a complication that requires early PICC removal, may extend hospitalization and can result in pulmonary embolism. PICC insertion teams strive to understand risk factors and develop methods to prevent DVTs. However, they can only manage what they can measure. At LDS Hospital, identification of PICC associated DVTs was dependent on verbal notification or manual surveillance of more than a thousand free-text vascular reports. Accurate DVT rates were not known which hindered prevention. We describe the development of a computer application (PICC-DVT monitor) to identify PICC associated DVTs each day. A one-year evaluation of the monitor by the PICC team and a review of 445 random vascular reports found a positive predictive value of 98%, sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 100% and a PICC team associated DVT rate of 2.8%. PMID:18693831

  13. Challenges in the Management of Pediatric Central Venous Access Devices in the Community.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wallace, Elaine

    2012-05-25

    Central venous access devices (CVADs) play an essential role in the care of critically ill children. Significant challenges exist for teams in managing CVADs particularly in a community setting. The authors aimed to assess the experience of general practitioners (GPs) caring for children with CVADs. From 200 CVADs inserted in a pediatric hospital in 2009, 50 patients were randomly selected and 44 GPs were forwarded a questionnaire. Twenty (46%) GPs responded. The main reasons (n = 22) for using CVADs were medication administration (n = 11), nutrition (n = 6), and blood sampling (n = 5). Thirteen (65%) GPs had no education in CVAD management and 14 (70%) were unaware of existing guidelines. Those identified by GPs as having primary responsibility for care of CVADs in the community included hospital\\/pediatric teams (n = 9), parents (n = 3), GPs (n = 2), public health nurses (n = 1), and palliative care ("home care") teams (n = 1). The main challenges (n = 15) identified by GPs were lack of education (n = 4), line management difficulties (n = 3), infection risk (n = 3), infrequent exposure to CVADs (n = 3), and poor communication (n = 1). GPs felt that these challenges could be addressed through: education (n = 8), increased manpower and community support (n = 1), and improved communication (n = 1). This study highlights the inconsistency and challenges for GPs surrounding CVAD use in children. Further education and support is necessary to assist GPs in their use particularly when providing end-of-life care for children in the community.

  14. PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER SAFETYIN BURN CARE: A SINGLE CENTRE RETROSPECTIVE COHORT REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan E.; Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Bolourani, Siavash; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective PICC line use for central venous access in thermally injured patients has increased in recent years despite a lack of evidence regarding safety in this patient population. A recent survey of invasive catheter practices among 44 burn centers in the United States found that 37% of burn units use PICC lines as part of their treatment protocol. The goal of this study was to compare PICC associated complication rates to existing literature in both the critical care and burn settings. Methods A single institution retrospective cohort review of patients who received a PICC line during admission to a regional burn unit between 2008–2013. Fifty-three patients were identified with a total of seventy-three PICC lines. The primary outcome measurement for this study was indication for PICC line discontinuation. Results The most common reason for PICC line discontinuation was that the line was no longer indicated (45.2%). Four cases of symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (5.5%) and 3 cases of central line associated bloodstream infection (4.3%, 2.72 infections per 1000 line days) were identified. PICC lines were in situ an average of 15 days [range 1–49 days]. Conclusions We suggest that PICC line associated complication rates are similar to those published in the critical care literature. Though these rates are higher than those published in the burn literature, they are similar to CVC associated complication rates. While PICC lines can be a useful resource in the treatment of the thermally injured patient, they are associated with significant, and potentially fatal risks. PMID:25501778

  15. Comparing the Effect of 3 Kinds of Different Materials on the Hemostasis of the Central Venous Catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ming; Liang, Zhen-Zhen; Song, Chun-Lei

    2016-05-01

    To compare the effect of 3 kinds of different materials on the hemostasis of puncture site after central venous catheterization. Method: A selection of 120 patients with peripheral central venous catheter chemotherapy in the Affiliated Hospital of our university from January 2014 to April 2015, Randomly divided into 3 groups, using the same specification (3.5cm × 2cm) alginate gelatin sponge and gauze dressing, 3 kinds of material compression puncture point, 3 groups of patients after puncture 24 h within the puncture point of local blood and the catheter after the catheter 72 h within the catheter maintenance costs. Result: (1) The local infiltration of the puncture point in the 24 h tube: The use of alginate dressing and gelatin sponge hemostatic effect is better than that of compression gauze. The difference was statistically significant (P PICC implantation, using gelatin sponge and gauze dressing is more effective and economic.

  16. Correlation of brain tissue oxygen tension with cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy and mixed venous oxygen saturation during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyree, Kreangkai; Tyree, Melissa; DiGeronimo, Robert

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this prospective, animal study was to compare brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) with cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SVO(2)) during venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) in a porcine model. This was accomplished using twelve immature piglets with surgically implanted catheters placed in the superficial cerebral cortex to measure brain PbtO(2) and microdialysis metabolites. The NIRS sensor was placed overlying the forehead to measure cerebral regional saturation index (rSO(2)i) while SVO(2) was measured directly from the ECMO circuit. Animals were placed on VA ECMO followed by an initial period of stabilization, after which they were subjected to graded hypoxia and recovery. Our results revealed that rSO(2)i and SVO(2) correlated only marginally with PbtO(2) (R(2)=0.32 and R(2)=0.26, respectively) while the correlation between rSO(2)i and SVO( 2) was significantly stronger (R(2)=0.59). Cerebral metabolites and rSO(2)i were significantly altered during attenuation of PbtO( 2), p<0.05). A subset of animals, following exposure to hypoxia, experienced markedly delayed recovery of both rSO(2)i and PbtO( 2) despite rapid normalization of SVO(2). Upon further analysis, these animals had significantly lower blood pressure (p=0.001), lower serum pH (p=0.01), and higher serum lactate (p=0.02). Additionally, in this subgroup, rSO(2)i correlated better with PbtO(2) (R(2)=0.76). These findings suggest that, in our ECMO model, rSO(2)i and SVO( 2) correlate reasonably well with each other, but not necessarily with brain PbtO(2) and that NIRS-derived rSO(2)i may more accurately reflect cerebral tissue hypoxia in sicker animals.

  17. Frequency of change of chlorhexidine-impregnated gel dressings for central venous catheters in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dolci, Mariana Ehmke; Margatho, Amanda Salles; Silveira, Renata Cristina de Campos Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To identify the frequency of change of chlorhexidine-impregnated gel dressings applied in central venous catheter insertion sites, describe reasons for dressing changes, and identify the amount of dressings used per adult patients admitted to an intensive care unit. Methods: Descriptive study consisting of daily record of occurrence evaluation, reason for dressing change and quantity used per patient, between April and December 2014. Descriptive statistical analysis was...

  18. Risk factors and current recommendations for prevention of infections associated with central venous catheters: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle de Mendonça Henrique

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Infections related to central venous catheter (CVC use constitute an important a problem. It is estimated that approximately 90% of bloodstream infections (BSI are caused by CVC use. This study aims at reviewing the risk factors and current recommendations for prevention of infections associated with central venous catheter use. Methods: A total of 12 articles published in the last 5 years and indexed in the databases of the Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS, Nursing Database (BDENF, International Literature on Health Sciences (Medline/Pubmed were selected, as well as publications related to the recommendations for BSI prevention, such as: Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC and the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA. Results: Two categories were identified: prevention and control measures and risk factors for BSI associated with central venous catheter use. Conclusions: Some recommendations that were well-defined over the years have been questioned by some authors and continuing training and education of the multidisciplinary team are the most important factors for the prevention of bloodstream infections associated with CVC use.

  19. The Use of a Low-Concentration Heparin Solution to Extend the Life of Central Venous Catheters in the African Green Monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gamble, Christopher S; Jacobsen, Kenneth O; Leffel, Elizabeth K; Pitt, M. L

    2006-01-01

    ...), physical restraint, and capture stress. The dual-lumen central venous catheter, jacket, and tether combination described allows intravenous fluid administration and repeated blood sampling without using restraint or anesthesia...

  20. Pressão venosa central em bezerros neonatos hígidos Central venous pressure in healthy newborn calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.R. Leal

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Com o propósito de estabelecer valores-padrão da pressão venosa central (PVC, utilizaram-se 24 bezerros sadios, da raça Holandesa, com idade entre oito e 30 dias, e peso entre 37 e 50kg. A PVC foi medida, no átrio direito, com uso de cateter intravenoso e equipo próprio usando-se como via de acesso a veia jugular esquerda. O átrio direito foi considerado o ponto zero de referência para as leituras, estando topograficamente em correspondência externa à articulação escapuloumeral no animal em estação e à região do esterno, quando em decúbito lateral direito. Estabeleceram-se os valores médios da PVC, em centímetros de água, de 0,81±1,40 e 0,88±1,76, respectivamente, nos animais em estação e em decúbito lateral, e não houve diferença estatística entre os valores. A metodologia empregada para mensurar a PVC de bezerros revelou-se segura e exeqüível, não necessitando de aparelhagem sofisticada para a sua determinação.With the aim of determining the central venous pressure (CVP standard values, twenty-four healthy Holstein calves, aging 8-to-30 days and weighing from 37 to 50kg, were studied. To measure CVP, a specific intravenous catheter was inserted in the right atrium through the left jugular vein. The right atrium was the reference mark (zero for the measurements, topographically in external correspondence to the scapulohumeral joint, when the animal was standing; and to the sternum region, when the animal was in right lateral recumbency. It was measured a mean CVP, in centimetres of H2O - 0.81±1.40 for animals in standing position, and 0.88±1.76 for animals in lateral recumbency - with no statistical difference between those values. The technique used for measuring CVP in calves was determined to be feasible and do not require sophisticated devices.

  1. Development and Evaluation of a Simulation-based Curriculum for Ultrasound-guided Central Venous Catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Robert; Chaplin, Tim; McKaigney, Conor; Rang, Louise; Jaeger, Melanie; Redfearn, Damian; Davison, Colleen; Ungi, Tamas; Holden, Matthew; Yeo, Caitlin; Keri, Zsuzsanna; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2016-11-01

    To develop a simulation-based curriculum for residents to learn ultrasound-guided (USG) central venous catheter (CVC) insertion, and to study the volume and type of practice that leads to technical proficiency. Ten post-graduate year two residents from the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Anesthesiology completed four training sessions of two hours each, at two week intervals, where they engaged in a structured program of deliberate practice of the fundamental skills of USG CVC insertion on a simulator. Progress during training was monitored using regular hand motion analysis (HMA) and performance benchmarks were determined by HMA of local experts. Blinded assessment of video recordings was done at the end of training to assess technical competence using a global rating scale. None of the residents met any of the expert benchmarks at baseline. Over the course of training, the HMA metrics of the residents revealed steady and significant improvement in technical proficiency. By the end of the fourth session six of 10 residents had faster procedure times than the mean expert benchmark, and nine of 10 residents had more efficient left and right hand motions than the mean expert benchmarks. Nine residents achieved mean GRS scores rating them competent to perform independently. We successfully developed a simulation-based curriculum for residents learning the skills of USG CVC insertion. Our results suggest that engaging residents in three to four distributed sessions of deliberate practice of the fundamental skills of USG CVC insertion leads to steady and marked improvement in technical proficiency with individuals approaching or exceeding expert level benchmarks.

  2. Barriers and Facilitators to Central Venous Catheter Insertion: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kenzie A; Cohen, Elaine R; Hertz, Joelle R; Wayne, Diane B; Mitra, Debi; Barsuk, Jeffrey H

    2018-03-14

    The aims of the study were to identify perceived barriers and facilitators to central venous catheter (CVC) insertion among healthcare providers and to understand the extent to which an existing Simulation-Based Mastery Learning (SBML) program may address barriers and leverage facilitators. Providers participating in a CVC insertion SBML train-the-trainer program, in addition to intensive care unit nurse managers, were purposively sampled from Veterans Administration Medical Centers located in geographically diverse areas. We conducted semistructured interviews to assess perceptions of barriers and facilitators to CVC insertion. Deidentified transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach and the constant comparative method. We subsequently mapped identified barriers and facilitators to our SBML curriculum to determine whether or not the curriculum addresses these factors. We interviewed 28 providers at six Veterans Administration Medical Centers, identifying the following five overarching factors of perceived barriers to CVC insertion: (1) equipment, (2) personnel/staff, (3) setting or organizational context, (4) patient or provider, and (5) time-related barriers. Three overarching factors of facilitators emerged: (1) equipment, (2) personnel, and (3) setting or organizational context facilitators. The SBML curriculum seems to address most identified barriers, while leveraging many facilitators; building on the commonly identified facilitator of nursing staff contribution by expanding the curriculum to explicitly include nurse involvement could improve team efficiency and organizational culture of safety. Many identified facilitators (e.g., ability to use ultrasound, personnel confidence/competence) were also identified as barriers. Evidence-based SBML programs have the potential to amplify these facilitators while addressing the barriers by providing an opportunity to practice and master CVC insertion skills.

  3. Comparative study on fixation of central venous catheter by suture versus adhesive device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Mazón, C S; Martín-Cerezo, X; Domene-Nieves de la Vega, G; Asensio-Flores, S; Adamuz-Tomás, J

    2018-03-27

    To assess the efficacy of a central venous catheter adhesive fixation device (CVC) to prevent associated complications. To establish the need for dressing changes, number of days' catheterization and reasons for catheter removal in both study groups. To assess the degree of satisfaction of personnel with the adhesive system. A, randomized, prospective and open pilot study, of parallel groups, with comparative evaluation between CVC fixation with suture and with an adhesive safety system. The study was performed in the Coronary Unit of the Universitari de Bellvitge Hospital, between April and November 2016. The population studied were patients with a CVC. The results were analyzed using SPSS Statistics software. The study was approved by the Clinical Research Ethics Committee. 100 patients (47 adhesive system and 53 suture) were analyzed. Both groups were homogeneous in terms of demographic variables, anticoagulation and days of catheterization. The frequency of complications in the adhesive system group was 21.3%, while in the suture group it was 47.2% (P=.01). The suture group had a higher frequency of local signs of infection (p=.006), catheter displacement (p=.005), and catheter-associated bacteraemia (P=.05). The use of adhesive fixation was associated with a lower requirement for dressing changes due to bleeding (P=.006). Ninety-six point seven percent of the staff recommended using the adhesive safety system. The catheters fixed with adhesive systems had fewer infectious complications and less displacement. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Central venous access devices site care practices: an international survey of 34 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, Daphne; Moureau, Nancy; Ullman, Amanda J

    2016-01-01

    Effective postinsertion management of central venous access devices (CVADs) is important to prevent CVAD-associated complications, including catheter-associated bloodstream infections. Although there is a wealth of evidence-based guidelines available to guide the care of CVADs, applying their recommendations to the clinical setting across variable patient groups, CVAD types and international healthcare settings is challenging. This may result in patients receiving suboptimal care. A cross-sectional descriptive study using an online survey was performed with an aim to determine current CVAD site care practices internationally. The CVAD site care domains included skin antisepsis, dressing selection, frequency of dressing change and device securement practices across impaired and unimpaired CVAD sites. Clinicians (n = 1044) residing in 34 countries reported diversity in their practice, with the majority of respondents practicing as nurses (89%) from North America (81%) as vascular access specialists (52%). The respondents' reported practice was variant, with differing inconsistency to guidelines throughout each of the domains. There was wide variance in the management of CVAD sites with impaired skin integrity, such as rash, skin stripping/adhesive-related injuries and drainage. Vascular access clinicians reported high levels of confidence in managing CVAD sites, including those with impaired skin. These inconsistencies are reflective of the complex and heterogeneous populations requiring CVADs, the evidence available to support practice in this area, the skills and knowledge of the clinicians caring for them and the resources of the healthcare setting. Further research and education is necessary to ensure that CVAD site care is undertaken effectively to minimise preventable complications.

  5. Investigating the Effect of Simulator Functional Fidelity and Personalized Feedback on Central Venous Catheterization Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovanoff, Mary A; Chen, Hong-En; Pepley, David F; Mirkin, Katelin A; Han, David C; Moore, Jason Z; Miller, Scarlett R

    2018-03-21

    To compare the effect of simulator functional fidelity (manikin vs a Dynamic Haptic Robotic Trainer [DHRT]) and personalized feedback on surgical resident self-efficacy and self-ratings of performance during ultrasound-guided internal jugular central venous catheterization (IJ CVC) training. In addition, we seek to explore how self-ratings of performance compare to objective performance scores generated by the DHRT system. Participants were randomly assigned to either manikin or DHRT IJ CVC training over a 6-month period. Self-efficacy surveys were distributed before and following training. Training consisted of a pretest, 22 practice IJ CVC needle insertion attempts, 2 full-line practice attempts, and a posttest. Participants provided self-ratings of performance for each needle insertion and were presented with feedback from either an upper level resident (manikin) or a personalized learning system (DHRT). A study was conducted from July 2016 to February 2017 through a surgical skills training program at Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pennsylvania. Twenty-six first-year surgical residents were recruited for the study. Individuals were informed that IJ CVC training procedures would be consistent regardless of participation in the study and that participation was optional. All recruited residents opted to participate in the study. Residents in both groups significantly improved their self-efficacy scores from pretest to posttest (p training with the DHRT system and the personalized learning feedback can improve resident self-efficacy with IJ CVC procedures and provide sufficient feedback to allow residents to accurately assess their own performance. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Septic transfusion reactions during blood transfusion via indwelling central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Kristin S; Martinez, Fernando; Lichtiger, Benjamin; Han, Xiang Y

    2014-10-01

    Transfusion of blood products requires a vascular port. Use of an indwelling central venous catheter (CVC) provides this port readily and safely in general; however, potential risks require assessment. The objective was to examine septic reactions to blood transfusions performed via CVCs owing to subclinical microbial catheter colonization. All transfusion reactions that occurred from 2007 to 2011 at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center were analyzed and correlated with microbiology culture results. Data on the reactions, including vascular access via a catheter or peripheral venipuncture, were collected prospectively. A total of 999 reactions were reported, with an incidence of two per 1000 transfusion events. A total of 738 reactions occurred in 642 patients during transfusion through a CVC. Among them, 606 reactions occurred in patients that had cultures of blood samples drawn within 7 days before or after reaction. Sixty of these (9.9%) had at least one significant microorganism isolated from their catheters and/or peripheral blood. The blood culture results and timing suggested that these patients likely had catheter-related bloodstream infections caused by transfusion through a CVC with subclinical microbial colonization. Fever and chills occurred in 35 of these patients (58%), which resembled febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions. Culture results of the transfused blood products, although not performed in all cases, were mostly negative in these CVC-related reactions. Blood transfusion through an indwelling CVC may lead to septic reaction owing to subclinical microbial colonization. This risk should be considered before transfusion and during investigation of transfusion reactions. © 2014 AABB.

  7. The safety of ultrasound guided central venous cannulation in patients with liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta A Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Central venous cannulation (CVC is frequently required during the management of patients with liver disease with deranged conventional coagulation parameters (CCP. Since CVC is known to be associated with vascular complications, it is standard practice to transfuse Fresh-Frozen Plasma or platelets to correct CCP. These CCP may not reflect true coagulopathy in liver disease. Additionally CVC when performed under ultrasound guidance (USG-CVC in itself reduces the incidence of complications. Aim: To assess the safety of USG-CVC and to evaluate the incidence of complications among liver disease patients with coagulopathy. Setting and Design: An audit of all USG-CVCs was performed among adult patients with liver disease in a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Data was collected for all the adult patients (18-60 years of either gender suffering from liver disease who had required USG-CVC. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was done to identify possible risk factors for complications. Results: The mean age of the patients was 42.1 ± 11.6 years. Mean international normalized ratio was 2.17 ± 1.16 whereas median platelet count was 149.5 (range, 12-683 × 10 9 /L. No major vascular or non-vascular complications were recorded in our patients. Overall incidence of minor vascular complications was 18.6%, of which 13% had significant ooze, 10.3% had hematoma formation and 4.7% had both hematoma and ooze. Arterial puncture and multiple attempts were independent risk factors for superficial hematoma formation whereas low platelet count and presence of ascites were independent risk factors for significant oozing. Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance -CVC in liver disease patients with deranged coagulation is a safe and highly successful modality.

  8. Central venous catheter tip migration due to tracheal extubation: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Manuel F; Jünemann, Theresa; Reinhart, Konrad; Schummer, Wolfram

    2017-10-01

    Considerable numbers of patients undergo central venous catheterization (CVC) under mechanical ventilation. We hypothesized that the return of spontaneous breathing and tracheal extubation could be associated with distal CVC tip migration towards intracardiac positions due to decreasing intrathoracic pressures and subsequent readjustment of mediastinal organs. Patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomized for right or left internal jugular vein (IJV) CVC placement under general anesthesia and mechanical ventilation. CVC tips were positioned at the cavoatrial junction and measured at the time of placement, postoperatively under mechanical ventilation, and after tracheal extubation until 48 h after surgery. Measurement methods included intravascular electrocardiography (ECG) P-wave amplitude, transesophageal echocardiography, and chest radiography (CXR). Out of 70 patients, 60 were eligible for final statistical analysis (31 right and 29 left IJV CVC). According to ECG interpretation, CVC tip positions remained below the pericardiac reflection point in the distal superior vena cava over the course of the three measurement intervals. The ECG revealed significant proximal migration of CVC tips from the time of placement to the time of tracheal extubation (1.19 ± 0.55 vs. 0.62 ± 0.31 mV; P migrations in the time between postoperative assessment and following tracheal extubation (5.1 ± 1.7 vs. 5.3 ± 1.5 cm; P = 0.196). In patients with CVCs positioned at the cavoatrial junction, tracheal extubation was not associated with significant postoperative CVC tip malposition, but tended to undergo proximal migration. This trend should be considered particularly in left-sided thoracocervical puncture approaches to avoid unfavorable CVC tip positions.

  9. Are central venous catheter tip cultures reliable after 6-day refrigeration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza, Emilio; Guembe, Maria; Gómez, Haydee; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Rivera, Marisa; Alcalá, Luis

    2009-07-01

    Present guidelines recommend culturing only central venous catheter (CVC) tips from patients with suspected catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI). However, a high proportion of these suspicions are not confirmed. Moreover, CVC tip culture increases laboratory workload, and reports of colonization may be meaningless or misleading for the clinician. Our working hypothesis was that CVC tips should be refrigerated and cultured only in patients with positive blood cultures. We evaluated the effect of 6-day refrigeration of 215 CVC tips. We selected all the catheters with a significant count according to the Maki's roll-plate technique and randomly assigned them to 2 groups. In group A, the catheters were recultured after 24 h of refrigeration, and in group B, the catheters were recultured after 6 days more of refrigeration, so that the refrigeration time evaluated would be of 6 days. The yield of refrigerated CVC tips that grow significant colony counts of primary culture in group B was compared with the yield of refrigerated catheter tips in group A. The difference showed that 6-day refrigeration reduced the number of significant CVCs by 15.2%. Only 61 CVCs were obtained from patients with CR-BSI, and in most of them, blood cultures were already positive before CVC culture, so only 0.91% of the CR-BSI episodes would have been misdiagnosed as culture negative after refrigeration. Refrigeration of CVC tips sent for culture and culturing only those from patients with positive blood cultures reduce the workload in the microbiology laboratory without misdiagnosing CR-BSI.

  10. Central venous catheter repair is not associated with an increased risk of central line infection or colonization in intestinal failure pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiven, Claire; Switzer, Noah; Wood, Melisssa; Persad, Rabin; Hancock, Marie; Forgie, Sarah; Dicken, Bryan J

    2016-03-01

    The intestinal failure (IF) population is dependent upon central venous catheters (CVC) to maintain minimal energy requirements for growth. Central venous catheter infections (CVCI) are frequent and an independent predictor of intestinal failure associated liver disease. A common complication in children with long-term CVC is the risk of line breakage. Given the often-limited usable vascular access sites in this population, it has been the standard of practice to perform repair of the broken line. Although widely practiced, it is unknown if this practice is associated with increased line colonization rates and subsequent line loss. A retrospective review of our institutional IF population over the past 8years (2006-2014) was performed. Utilizing a prospectively constructed database, all pediatric patients (n=13, ages 0-17 years) with CVC dependency enrolled in the Children's Intestinal Rehabilitation Program with IF were included who underwent a repair and/or replacement procedure of their line. The control replacement group was CVCs that were replaced without being repaired (36), the experimental repair group was CVCs that were repaired (8). The primary outcome of interest was the mean number of days in each group from the intervention (replacement or repair) to line infection/colonization. Mann-Whitney tests for significance were performed with p-values <0.05 being the threshold value for significance. There were no catheter repair associated CVCI. The mean number of days from the replacement or repair of a CVC to its removal owing to infection/colonization was 210.0 and 162.8days respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between these groups in time to removal owing to line infection (p=0.55). Repair of central venous catheters in the pediatric population with intestinal failure does not lead to an increased rate of central venous catheter infection and should be performed when possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Superior Vena Cava (SVC) Endovascular Reconstruction with Implanted Central Venous Catheter Repositioning for Treatment of Malignant SVC Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Stephanie; Doenz, Francesco; Qanadli, Salah D

    2018-01-01

    Superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome is a group of clinical signs caused by the obstruction or compression of SVC and characterized by edema of the head, neck, and upper extremities, shortness of breath, and headaches. The syndrome may be caused by benign causes but most of the cases are caused by lung or mediastinal malignant tumors. Stenting of SVC has become widely accepted as the palliative treatment for this condition in malignant diseases, as it offers rapid relief of symptoms and improves the quality of life. Preserving previously placed central venous catheters (CVCs) is a major issue in this population. We report the case of a patient with SVC syndrome caused by tumoral obstruction due to central small-cell lung cancer who had right subclavian implanted CVC and a preferential head and neck venous drainage through the left internal jugular and brachiocephalic vein (BCV). We describe a complex procedure of SVC reconstruction with two different objectives: left recanalization and stent placement to ensure head and neck venous drainage and right BCV stenting for CVC repositioning and subsequent replacement. We also review published cases of SVC obstructions stenting with catheter repositioning. The patient experienced quick relief of symptoms after treatment. Chemotherapy was rapidly delivered through the preserved implanted CVC access. A 3-month follow-up computed tomography showed stents patency.

  12. [The ISP (Safe Insertion of PICCs) protocol: a bundle of 8 recommendations to minimize the complications related to the peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoli, Alessandro; Cappuccio, Serena; Marche, Bruno; Musarò, Andrea; Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The ISP (Safe Insertion of PICCs) protocol: a bundle of 8 recommendations to minimize the complications related to the peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC). The insertion of a peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) is not without risks. The Italian Group for the Study of Long-Term Central Venous Access Devices (GAVeCeLT) has developed a protocol (SIP: Safe Implantation of PICCs) with the aim of minimizing the risks which may be associated with the placement of PICCs. The protocol is based on recommendations available in the literature and on the main clinical practice guidelines. The SIP protocol, a bundle of evidence-based recommendations, it is is easy to use, inexpensive, and cost-effective. If routinely used and carefully inplemented, it greatly reduces complications such as failure of venipuncture, accidental arterial puncture, damage of median nerve, infection and catheter related venous thrombosis.

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Central Venous Catheter Confirmation by Bedside Ultrasound Versus Chest Radiography in Critically Ill Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablordeppey, Enyo A; Drewry, Anne M; Beyer, Alexander B; Theodoro, Daniel L; Fowler, Susan A; Fuller, Brian M; Carpenter, Christopher R

    2017-04-01

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the accuracy of bedside ultrasound for confirmation of central venous catheter position and exclusion of pneumothorax compared with chest radiography. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, reference lists, conference proceedings and ClinicalTrials.gov. Articles and abstracts describing the diagnostic accuracy of bedside ultrasound compared with chest radiography for confirmation of central venous catheters in sufficient detail to reconstruct 2 × 2 contingency tables were reviewed. Primary outcomes included the accuracy of confirming catheter positioning and detecting a pneumothorax. Secondary outcomes included feasibility, interrater reliability, and efficiency to complete bedside ultrasound confirmation of central venous catheter position. Investigators abstracted study details including research design and sonographic imaging technique to detect catheter malposition and procedure-related pneumothorax. Diagnostic accuracy measures included pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio. Fifteen studies with 1,553 central venous catheter placements were identified with a pooled sensitivity and specificity of catheter malposition by ultrasound of 0.82 (0.77-0.86) and 0.98 (0.97-0.99), respectively. The pooled positive and negative likelihood ratios of catheter malposition by ultrasound were 31.12 (14.72-65.78) and 0.25 (0.13-0.47). The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for pneumothorax detection was nearly 100% in the participating studies. Bedside ultrasound reduced mean central venous catheter confirmation time by 58.3 minutes. Risk of bias and clinical heterogeneity in the studies were high. Bedside ultrasound is faster than radiography at identifying pneumothorax after central venous catheter insertion. When a central venous catheter malposition exists, bedside ultrasound will identify four out of every five earlier than

  14. Complications of central venous catheter in patients transplanted with hematopoietic stem cells in a specialized service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barretta, Lidiane Miotto; Beccaria, Lúcia Marinilza; Cesarino, Cláudia Bernardi; Pinto, Maria Helena

    2016-06-07

    to identify the model, average length of stay on site and complications of central venous catheter in patients undergoing transplant of hematopoietic stem cells and verify the corresponding relationship between the variables: age, gender, medical diagnosis, type of transplant, implanted catheter and insertion site. a retrospective and quantitative study with a sample of 188 patients transplanted records between 2007 and 2011. the majority of patients used Hickman catheter with an average length of stay on site of 47.6 days. The complication fever/bacteremia was significant in young males with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma undergoing autologous transplant, which remained with the device for a long period in the subclavian vein. nurses should plan with their team the minimum waiting time, recommended between the catheter insertion and start of the conditioning regimen, as well as not to extend the length of time that catheter should be on site and undertake their continuing education, focusing on the prevention of complications. identificar o modelo, tempo médio de permanência e complicações de cateter venoso central em pacientes submetidos ao transplante de células-tronco hematopoiéticas e verificar a relação de correspondência entre as variáveis: idade, sexo, diagnóstico médico, tipo de transplante, cateter implantado e local de inserção. retrospectivo, quantitativo, com amostra de prontuários de 188 pacientes transplantados, entre 2007 e 2011. a maioria dos pacientes utilizou o cateter de Hickman com permanência média de 47,6 dias. A complicação febre/bacteremia foi significante em jovens do sexo masculino, com linfoma não Hodgkin, submetidos ao transplante autólogo, que permaneceram com o dispositivo por longo período, em veia subclávia. os enfermeiros devem planejar com a equipe o aguardo do tempo mínimo preconizado entre o implante do cateter e início do regime de condicionamento, assim como não estender o período de permanência e realizar

  15. Reverse Trendelenburg position is a safer technique for lowering central venous pressure without decreasing blood pressure than clamping of the inferior vena cava below the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Godai; Katagiri, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2015-06-01

    Bleeding remains an important intraoperative complication in patients who undergo hepatectomy. It is generally believed that a reduction in central venous pressure will decrease bleeding from the hepatic venous system. To our knowledge, however, no study has compared the effectiveness of these techniques for controlling bleeding. So we compared the effectiveness of central venous pressure control techniques, such as infrahepatic inferior vena cava clamping, changes in surgical position of the patient, and hypoventilation anesthesia, for lowering central venous pressure. The study group comprised 50 patients who underwent hepatectomy in our department from 2012 through 2013. A central venous catheter was inserted into the right internal jugular vein, and the tip was placed in the superior vena cava. A transducer was placed along the mid-axillary line of the left side of the chest. After opening the abdomen, changes in central venous pressure were measured during inferior vena cava clamping, the reverse Trendelenburg position, the Trendelenburg position, and hypoventilation anesthesia. The inclination relative to the transducer, as measured with an inclinometer, was -10 degrees for the Trendelenburg position and +10 degrees for the reverse Trendelenburg position. The tidal volume was set at 10 mL/kg during conventional anesthesia and 5 mL/kg during hypoventilation anesthesia. The mean central venous pressure was 8.0 cm H(2)O in the supine position during conventional anesthesia, 5.0 cm H(2)O during inferior vena cava clamping, 5.6 cm H(2)O during reverse Trendelenburg position, 10.6 cm H(2)O during Trendelenburg position, and 7.6 cm H(2)O during hypoventilation anesthesia. The mean central venous pressure during inferior vena cava clamping and reverse Trendelenburg position was significantly lower than that during supine position (P = 0.0017 and P = 0.0231, respectively). The mean central venous pressure during hypoventilation

  16. Use of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) in children receiving autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, Stefano; Ceresoli, Rosanna; Boroni, Giovanni; Parolini, Filippo; Porta, Fulvio; Alberti, Daniele

    2018-03-01

    The aim of our study was to present our experience with the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in pediatric patients receiving autologous or allogenic blood stem-cell transplantation. The insertion of the device in older children does not require general anesthesia and does not require a surgical procedure. From January 2014 to January 2017, 13 PICCs were inserted as a central venous device in 11 pediatric patients submitted to 14 autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantation, at the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit of the Children's Hospital of Brescia. The mean age of patients at the time of the procedure was 11.3 years (range 3-18 years). PICCs remained in place for an overall period of 4104 days. All PICCs were positioned by the same specifically trained physician and utilized by nurses of our stem-cell transplant unit. No insertion-related complications were observed. Late complications were catheter ruptures and line occlusions (1.2 per 1000 PICC days). No rupture or occlusion required removal of the device. No catheter-related venous thrombosis, catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), accidental removal or permanent lumen occlusion were observed. Indications for catheter removal were completion of therapy (8 patients) and death (2 patients). Three PICCs are currently being used for blood sampling in follow-up patients after transplantation. Our data suggest that PICCs are a safe and effective alternative to conventional central venous catheters even in pediatric patients with high risk of infectious and hemorrhagic complications such as patients receiving stem-cell transplantation.

  17. Venous Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Venous sampling Venous sampling is a diagnostic procedure that uses ... the limitations of venous sampling? What is venous sampling? Venous sampling is a diagnostic procedure that involves ...

  18. Optoacoustic measurement of central venous oxygenation for assessment of circulatory shock: clinical study in cardiac surgery patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Kinsky, Michael; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Andrey; Henkel, S. Nan; Seeton, Roger; Salter, Michael G.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Circulatory shock is a dangerous medical condition, in which blood flow cannot provide the necessary amount of oxygen to organs and tissues. Currently, its diagnosis and therapy decisions are based on hemodynamic parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, blood gases) and mental status of a patient, which all have low specificity. Measurement of mixed or central venous blood oxygenation via catheters is more reliable, but highly invasive and associated with complications. Our previous studies in healthy volunteers demonstrated that optoacoustic systems provide non-invasive measurement of blood oxygenation in specific vessels, including central veins. Here we report our first results of a clinical study in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery patients. We used a medical-grade OPO-based optoacoustic system developed in our laboratory to measure in real time blood oxygenation in the internal jugular vein (IJV) of these patients. A clinical ultrasound imaging system (GE Vivid e) was used for IJV localization. Catheters were placed in the IJV as part of routine care and blood samples taken via the catheters were processed with a CO-oximeter. The optoacoustic oxygenation data were compared to the CO-oximeter readings. Good correlation between the noninvasive and invasive measurements was obtained. The results of these studies suggest that the optoacoustic system can provide accurate, noninvasive measurements of central venous oxygenation that can be used for patients with circulatory shock.

  19. Stuck long-term indwelling central venous catheters in adolescents: three cases and a short topical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, A; Afshari, A; Henneberg, S W

    2010-01-01

    in the vessel wall and impossible to remove. In the other two cases, catheters were removed with great difficulty by the interventional radiologists. These cases raise important questions concerning the maximum indwelling time and the choice of catheter material when implanting permanent central venous......We present three cases of fixated vascular injection ports. Two patients had cystic fibrosis and one had an immunological defect. All catheters were made from polyurethane and implanted in adolescent patients. Indwelling time were 6-8 years. One patient's catheter was entirely integrated...... catheters (CVCs) in adolescents. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of not breaking a CVC in the attempt to remove it....

  20. A community collaborative to develop consensus guidelines to standardize out-of-hospital maintenance care of central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nailon, Regina; Rupp, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) maintenance is integral to preventing complications and improving outcomes. This process is made more challenging when patients transition from hospital to home care or to an outpatient infusion setting, because different CVC maintenance practices and care parameters confuse patients and care providers alike. Through collaboration and consensus building, a group of metropolitan home health and home infusion agencies developed a standardized approach to CVC maintenance care. This article discusses the multiagency collaborative and resulting guideline and other educational materials that better enable providers, patients, and families to maintain CVC integrity and achieve optimal outcomes.

  1. An establishment of vascular access through superior vena cava for a patient with multiple central venous stenosis or occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yong Shu; Feng, Yan Huan; Liu, Chun Cheng; Cui, Tian Lei; Fu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    The patency of vascular access is of vital importance to dialysis patients. Access dysfunction is largely caused by vessel stenosis and thrombosis. Nephrologists usually find themselves helpless when all treatments fail and the vascular access seems to have exhausted. Here we report a successful establishment of vascular access through superior vena cava for a critical patient with multiple central venous stenosis or occlusion. To our knowledge, it is the first case ever reported on the successful establishment of vascular access through superior vena cava under such a complicated condition of vascular exhaustion.

  2. Repositioning and Leaving In Situ the Central Venous Catheter During Percutaneous Treatment of Associated Superior Vena Cava Syndrome: A Report of Eight Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockx, Luc; Raat, Henricus; Donck, Jan; Wilms, Guy; Marchal, Guy

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a combined procedure of repositioning and leaving in situ a central venous catheter followed by immediate percutaneous treatment of associated superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS). Methods: Eight patients are presented who have central venous catheter-associated SVCS (n = 6 Hickman catheters, n = 2 Port-a-cath) caused by central vein stenosis (n = 4) or concomitant thrombosis (n = 4). With the use of a vascular snare introduced via the transcubital or transjugular approach, the tip of the central venous catheter could be engaged, and repositioned after deployment of a stent in the innominate or superior vena cava. Results: In all patients it was technically feasible to reposition the central venous catheter and treat the SVCS at the same time. In one patient flipping of the Hickman catheter in its original position provoked dislocation of the released Palmaz stent, which could be positioned in the right common iliac vein. Conclusion: Repositioning of a central venous catheter just before and after stent deployment in SVCS is technically feasible and a better alternative than preprocedural removal of the vascular access

  3. Second-Generation central venous catheter in the prevention of bloodstream infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Janislei Gislei Dorociaki; Hoers, Hellen; Pott, Franciele Soares; Crozeta, Karla; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida; Meier, Marineli Joaquim

    2016-08-08

    to evaluate the effectiveness and safety in the use of second-generation central venous catheters impregnated in clorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine when compared with other catheters, being them impregnated or not, in order to prevent the bloodstream infection prevention. systematic review with meta-analysis. Databases searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS/SciELO, Cochrane CENTRAL; search in Congress Proceedings and records from Clinical Trials. 1.235 studies were identified, 97 were pre-selected and 4 were included. In catheter-related bloodstream infection, there was no statistical significance between second-generation impregnated catheter compared with the non-impregnated ones, absolute relative risk 1,5% confidence interval 95% (3%-1%), relative risk 0,68 (confidence interval 95%, 0,40-1,15) and number needed to treat 66. In the sensitivity analysis, there was less bloodstream infection in impregnated catheters (relative risk 0,50, confidence interval 95%, 0,26-0,96). Lower colonization, absolute relative risk 9,6% (confidence interval 95%, 10% to 4%), relative risk 0,51 (confidence interval 95% from 0,38-0,85) and number needed to treat 5. the use of second-generation catheters was effective in reducing the catheter colonization and infection when a sensitivity analysis is performed. Future clinical trials are suggested to evaluate sepsis rates, mortality and adverse effects. evaluar la efectividad y seguridad del uso de catéteres venosos centrales de segunda generación, impregnados en clorhexidina y sulfadiazina de plata, comparados con otros catéteres impregnados o no impregnados, para prevención de infección de la corriente sanguínea. revisión sistemática con metaanálisis. La búsqueda fue realizada en las bases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS/SciELO, Cochrane CENTRAL; fueron consultados anales de congresos y registros de ensayos clínicos. fueron identificados 1.235 estudios, 97 preseleccionados y cuatro incluidos. En la infección de la

  4. Risk of venous thromboembolism associated with peripherally inserted central catheters: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; Anand, Sarah; Hickner, Andy; Buist, Michael; Rogers, Mary Am; Saint, Sanjay; Flanders, Scott A

    2013-07-27

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. However, the size of this risk relative to that associated with other central venous catheters (CVCs) is unknown. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the risk of venous thromboembolism associated with PICCs versus that associated with other CVCs. We searched several databases, including Medline, Embase, Biosis, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Conference Papers Index, and Scopus. Additional studies were identified through hand searches of bibliographies and internet searches, and we contacted study authors to obtain unpublished data. All human studies published in full text, abstract, or poster form were eligible for inclusion. All studies were of adult patients aged at least 18 years who underwent insertion of a PICC. Studies were assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa risk of bias scale. In studies without a comparison group, the pooled frequency of venous thromboembolism was calculated for patients receiving PICCs. In studies comparing PICCs with other CVCs, summary odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with a random effects meta-analysis. Of the 533 citations identified, 64 studies (12 with a comparison group and 52 without) including 29 503 patients met the eligibility criteria. In the non-comparison studies, the weighted frequency of PICC-related deep vein thrombosis was highest in patients who were critically ill (13·91%, 95% CI 7·68-20·14) and those with cancer (6·67%, 4·69-8·64). Our meta-analysis of 11 studies comparing the risk of deep vein thrombosis related to PICCs with that related to CVCs showed that PICCs were associated with an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (OR 2·55, 1·54-4·23, p<0·0001) but not pulmonary embolism (no events). With the baseline PICC-related deep vein thrombosis rate of 2·7% and pooled OR of 2·55, the number needed to harm relative to CVCs was 26 (95% CI 13-71). PICCs are

  5. Peripheral and Central Venous Blood Glucose Concentrations in Dogs and Cats with Acute Arterial Thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Klainbart, S.; Kelmer, E.; Vidmayer, B.; Bdolah?Abram, T.; Segev, G.; Aroch, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute limb paralysis because of arterial thromboembolism (ATE) occurs in cats and less commonly in dogs. ATE is diagnosed based on physical examination findings and, occasionally, advanced imaging. Hypothesis/Objectives Peripheral, affected limb venous glucose concentration is decreased in ATE, whereas its systemic concentration is within or above reference interval. Animals Client?owned cats and dogs were divided into 3 respective groups: acute limb paralysis because of ATE (22 ca...

  6. Heparin Versus Normal Saline: Flushing Effectiveness in Managing Central Venous Catheters in Patients Undergoing Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, John; Jepsen, Amelia; Patterson, Amy; Reich, Richard R; Mason, Tina M

    2018-04-01

    Patients undergoing blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) use a central venous catheter (CVC); heparin is often employed to maintain patency but may increase the risk of complications. Research has not provided conclusive differences in efficacy and safety regarding heparin flushing versus normal saline flushing in CVC maintenance. Minimal research is specific to this patient population. This study aimed to determine if differences exist in CVC patency, tissue plasminogen activator usage, and the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections when flushing with normal saline only versus heparin and normal saline among patients undergoing BMT. A convenience sample of 30 patients undergoing allogeneic or autologous transplantation with a new non-port/non-peripherally inserted CVC were evaluated. Elimination of routine heparin use could positively affect outcomes in this patient population.

  7. Use of cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques to assess contamination of central venous catheters: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.K.; Thomsen, T.R.; Moser, C.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Catheters are the most common cause of nosocomial infections and are associated with increased risk of mortality, length of hospital stay and cost. Prevention of infections and fast and correct diagnosis is highly important. METHODS: In this study traditional semiquantitative...... culture-dependent methods for diagnosis of bacteria involved in central venous catheter-related infections as described by Maki were compared with the following culture-independent molecular biological methods: Clone libraries, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis, phylogeny and fluorescence in situ...... observed on most of the catheters and were much more common than the cultivation-dependent methods indicated. CONCLUSION: The results show that diagnosis based on molecular methods improves the detection of microorganisms involved in central catheter-related infections. The importance...

  8. Use of cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques to assess contamination of central venous catheters: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.K.; Thomsen, T.R.; Moser, C.

    2008-01-01

    hybridization. RESULTS: In accordance with previous studies, the cultivation of central venous catheters from 18 patients revealed that S. epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci were most abundant and that a few other microorganisms such as P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae occasionally were found...... observed on most of the catheters and were much more common than the cultivation-dependent methods indicated. CONCLUSION: The results show that diagnosis based on molecular methods improves the detection of microorganisms involved in central catheter-related infections. The importance...... on the catheters. The molecular analysis using clone libraries and sequencing, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing provided several important results. The species found by cultivation were confirmed by molecular methods. However, many other bacteria belonging to the phyla Proteobacteria...

  9. Use of cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques to assess contamination of central venous catheters: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Høiby Niels

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catheters are the most common cause of nosocomial infections and are associated with increased risk of mortality, length of hospital stay and cost. Prevention of infections and fast and correct diagnosis is highly important. Methods In this study traditional semiquantitative culture-dependent methods for diagnosis of bacteria involved in central venous catheter-related infections as described by Maki were compared with the following culture-independent molecular biological methods: Clone libraries, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis, phylogeny and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results In accordance with previous studies, the cultivation of central venous catheters from 18 patients revealed that S. epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci were most abundant and that a few other microorganisms such as P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae occasionally were found on the catheters. The molecular analysis using clone libraries and sequencing, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing provided several important results. The species found by cultivation were confirmed by molecular methods. However, many other bacteria belonging to the phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were also found, stressing that only a minor portion of the species present were found by cultivation. Some of these bacteria are known to be pathogens, some have not before been described in relation to human health, and some were not closely related to known pathogens and may represent new pathogenic species. Furthermore, there was a clear difference between the bacterial species found in biofilm on the external (exluminal and internal (luminal side of the central venous catheter, which can not be detected by Maki's method. Polymicrobial biofilms were observed on most of the catheters and were much more common than the cultivation-dependent methods indicated. Conclusion The results show that diagnosis

  10. Effect of a patency bundle on central venous catheter complications among hospitalized adult patients: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Vivian

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this project was to improve continuity of care by decreasing central catheter occlusions in adults in two acute care units with high use of central venous catheters. Specific objectives were to introduce a patency bundle and train nurses on thrombolytic administration for timely resolution of catheter occlusions. Central venous catheters are a vital component of medical care of acutely ill hospitalized patients. Occluded catheters delay treatment and can increase infection risk. There are bundles of best practices on catheter insertion, dressing and removal. However, a gap exists in nursing guidance for maintaining and restoring catheter patency. The project used the Joanna Briggs Institute's tools for promoting practice change. Getting Research into Practice (GRiP) and Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System (PACES) assisted with strategy formation and data analysis. Direct observation and medical record review were used for baseline and follow-up audits. Several teaching strategies were employed to educate direct care nurses. Occlusion rates fluctuated greatly above and below baseline rates. Infection rates did not increase with thrombolytic administration. Nurses' compliance with catheter access and flushing techniques doubled. Timeliness of thrombolytic administration increased to 100% compliance. However, patency documentation did not improve. Multi-modal education reached all nurses and contributed to significantly improved compliance with patency best practice. Nurses were empowered to expediently troubleshoot occlusions by using thrombolytics. However, three months of post-implementation data was not enough to demonstrate a continued downward trend in occlusion rates. Thrombolytic administration by nurses on the other adult units and improved patency documentation are in the planning stages.

  11. The dwell time and survival rates of PICC placement after balloon angioplasty in patient with unexpected central venous obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Park, Sang Woo; Chang, Il Soo; Yim, Younghee

    2016-09-21

    To evaluate the dwell time and actual survival rates of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) placements after balloon angioplasty in patients with unexpected central venous obstructions. Data were obtained on all PICC insertions performed in a tertiary care hospital from August 2008 to December 2013. Thirty-five PICCs attempted after balloon angioplasty in 25 patients (15 male and 10 female patients; mean age, 63 years). Fisher's exact test was used to test for differences in reasons for catheter removal between the groups of patients with stenosis or obstructions. Survival curves for PICC dwell time of all patients, stenosis group, and obstruction group were generated separately using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and compared with log-rank tests. There were a total 21 obstructions and 14 stenoses. The overall technical success rate of PICC placement after balloon angioplasty was 94% (33 of 35 procedures). The PICC dwell time was determined for 27 PICCs and ranged from 4 to 165 days (mean, 39.6 days). Among all PICCs, 16 were removed early, resulting in an actual survival rate of 40.7% (11 of 27 PICCs). There were no significant differences in reasons for catheter removal between the stenosis and obstruction groups (p = 0.24). The dwell times for both groups were not significantly different by Kaplan-Meier analysis (p = 0.54). PICC placement after balloon angioplasty is a good treatment option for patients with unexpected central venous lesions, and offers high technical success rates. The actual survival rate was relatively lower (40.7%) than that from previous studies.

  12. An estimation of right- and left-sided central venous catheter insertion depth using measurement of surface landmarks along the course of central veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Chun; Kim, Keon-Sik; Choi, Young-Kyoo; Kim, Dong-Soo; Kwon, Moo-Il; Sung, Joon-Kyung; Moon, Jee-Youn; Kang, Jong-Man

    2011-06-01

    In this study we sought to determine whether the topographical measurement along the course of the central veins can estimate the approximate insertion depths of central venous catheters (CVC). Two hundred central venous catheterizations were performed via the right and left internal jugular vein (IJV) or subclavian vein (SCV). The anterior approach, using the sternocleidomastoid muscle as a landmark, was used for IJV catheterization and the infraclavicular approach for SCV. Topographical measurement was performed by placing the catheter with its own curvature over the draped skin starting from the insertion point of the needle through the ipsilateral clavicular notch, and to the insertion point of the second right costal cartilage to the manubriosternal joint. The CVC was inserted and secured to a depth determined topographically. The distance between the CVC tip and the carina and the angle of the left-sided CVC tip to the vertical were measured on the postoperative chest radiograph. The mean (SD) tip position of 50 CVCs placed via the right IJV was 0.1 (1.1) cm above the carina; right SCV, 0.0 (0.9) cm; left IJV, 0.3 (1.0) cm above the carina, and left SCV, 0.2 (0.9) cm below the carina. CVC locations could be predicted with a margin of error between 2.2 cm below the carina and 2.3 cm above the carina in 95% of patients. There were steeper (≥ 40°) angles to the vertical in the left-sided CVCs whose tips were above the carina (17 out of 54) than below the carina (2 out of 46). The approximate insertion depth of a CVC can be estimated using measurement of surface landmarks along the pathway of central veins.

  13. Colonization of a Central Venous Catheter by the Hyaline Fungus Fusarium solani Species Complex: A Case Report and SEM Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Colombo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of opportunistic infections by filamentous fungi is increasing partly due to the widespread use of central venous catheters (CVC, indwelling medical devices, and antineoplastic/immunosuppressive drugs. The case of a 13-year-old boy under treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia is presented. The boy was readmitted to the Pediatric Ward for intermittent fever of unknown origin. Results of blood cultures drawn from peripheral venous sites or through the CVC were compared. CVC-derived bottles (but not those from peripheral veins yielded hyaline fungi that, based on morphology, were identified as belonging to the Fusarium solani species complex. Gene amplification and direct sequencing of the fungal ITS1 rRNA region and the EF-1alpha gene confirmed the isolate as belonging to the Fusarium solani species complex. Portions of the CVC were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Fungi mycelia with long protruding hyphae were seen into the lumen. The firm adhesion of the fungal formation to the inner surface of the catheter was evident. In the absence of systemic infection, catheter removal and prophylactic voriconazole therapy were followed by disappearance of febrile events and recovery. Thus, indwelling catheters are prone to contamination by environmental fungi.

  14. Concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters for percutaneous retrieval of dislodged central venous port catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tsung Chuang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to report our experience of percutaneous retrieval of dislodged port catheters with concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters. During a 5-year period at our institute (June 2005 to July 2010, a total of 23 dislodged port catheters were retrieved. The interval between port catheter implantation and dislodged catheter retrieval ranged from 43 days to 1,414 days (mean 586.7 days. The time of delayed retrieval ranged from 1 day to 45 days (mean 4.6 days. All dislodged catheters were retrieved with the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters via femoral venous route. The prevalence of port catheter dislodgement at our institute was 3.4%. All dislodged port catheters were removed successfully with pigtail and loop snare catheters together. No procedure-related complications were encountered, except for transient arrhythmia in two patients, which required no medication. In conclusion, the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters is a feasible and easy way for percutaneous retrieval of a dislodged central venous port catheter.

  15. Acesso venoso central guiado por ultrassom: qual a evidência? Ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization: what is the evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felippe Leopoldo Dexheimer Neto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recentemente, órgãos internacionais de qualidade em saúde passaram a recomendar o uso de orientação ultrassonográfica para punções venosas centrais. O objetivo deste artigo foi revisar as evidências fundamentando tais recomendações. Foi revisada a literatura no MEDLINE, PubMed e SCIELO com os seguintes termos (MeSH: acesso venoso central, ultrassom e adultos. A pesquisa realizada em 24/09/2010, com seleção de metanálises, ensaios clínicos randomizados e revisões, encontrou 291 artigos. Os 21 artigos mais importantes foram utilizados para a confecção desta revisão. A veia jugular interna é o local mais estudado para punções guiadas por ultrassonografia, com metanálises demonstrando menor risco relativo de falha e de complicações. Além disso, o maior ensaio clínico randomizado disponível também demonstrou redução na incidência de infecções de corrente sanguínea associadas aos cateteres venosos centrais. Poucos estudos existem com relação à punção da veia subclávia, porém o uso do ultrassom mostrou-se benéfico em duas metanálises (mas com um número pouco expressivo de pacientes. Quanto ao sítio venoso femoral, há apenas um ensaio clínico randomizado (20 pacientes, o qual obteve resultados positivos. Em uma avaliação britânica de custo-efetividade, houve economia de recursos com o auxílio do ultrassom na realização das punções venosas nos diferentes sítios. Fortes evidências demonstram benefício com o auxílio ultrassonográfico para punção jugular interna. Embora o método pareça atraente para os demais sítios, ainda não há estudos suficientes que sustentem alguma recomendação.In recent years, international health quality assurance organizations have been recommending ultrasound guidance for central venous punctures. This article reviews the evidence behind these recommendations. The MEDLINE, PubMed and SCIELO databases were searched for the following MeSH terms: central venous

  16. Personalized Learning in Medical Education: Designing a User Interface for a Dynamic Haptic Robotic Trainer for Central Venous Catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovanoff, Mary; Pepley, David; Mirkin, Katelin; Moore, Jason; Han, David; Miller, Scarlett

    2017-09-01

    While Virtual Reality (VR) has emerged as a viable method for training new medical residents, it has not yet reached all areas of training. One area lacking such development is surgical residency programs where there are large learning curves associated with skill development. In order to address this gap, a Dynamic Haptic Robotic Trainer (DHRT) was developed to help train surgical residents in the placement of ultrasound guided Internal Jugular Central Venous Catheters and to incorporate personalized learning. In order to accomplish this, a 2-part study was conducted to: (1) systematically analyze the feedback given to 18 third year medical students by trained professionals to identify the items necessary for a personalized learning system and (2) develop and experimentally test the usability of the personalized learning interface within the DHRT system. The results can be used to inform the design of VR and personalized learning systems within the medical community.

  17. [Management of a massive cervical hematoma after insertion of a central venous catheter under tirofiban].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, R; Michels, G

    2018-03-27

    An 81-year-old woman with infarct-related cardiogenic shock was admitted to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Coronary angiography revealed an occlusion of the ramus interventricularis anterior. Due to incomplete flow after the percutaneous coronary intervention with implantation of three coronary stents and high thrombus burden, tirofiban was given as a bail out therapy. A central venous catheter (CVC) aimed at the internal jugular vein was incidentally inserted in the common carotid artery, resulting in acute dyspnea and a hemorrhagic shock due to a massive cervical hematoma. Although the CVC is a frequently used intervention in critical care, the procedure still carries some risks of iatrogenic injury. Knowledge about the emergency management of CVC-associated complications is therefore essential.

  18. Stuck long-term indwelling central venous catheters in adolescents: three cases and a short topical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anette; Afshari, A; Henneberg, S W

    2010-01-01

    We present three cases of fixated vascular injection ports. Two patients had cystic fibrosis and one had an immunological defect. All catheters were made from polyurethane and implanted in adolescent patients. Indwelling time were 6-8 years. One patient's catheter was entirely integrated in the v......We present three cases of fixated vascular injection ports. Two patients had cystic fibrosis and one had an immunological defect. All catheters were made from polyurethane and implanted in adolescent patients. Indwelling time were 6-8 years. One patient's catheter was entirely integrated...... in the vessel wall and impossible to remove. In the other two cases, catheters were removed with great difficulty by the interventional radiologists. These cases raise important questions concerning the maximum indwelling time and the choice of catheter material when implanting permanent central venous...

  19. Randomised controlled trial of central venous catheterisation through external jugular vein: A comparison of success with or without body manoeuvres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Magoon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The external jugular vein (EJV, often used for resuscitation, has been underutilised for central venous catheterisation (CVC in view of an unpredictable success rate. There is an encouraging literature on the improved success rate of CVC through EJV with the inclusion of certain body manoeuvres. This prospective randomised controlled study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the efficacy of body manoeuvres in improving the success rate of CVC through EJV. Methods: One hundred patients aged 18–50 years, scheduled for elective surgery requiring CVC, were randomly assigned to either undergo CVC using Seldinger technique with body manoeuvres or a control group undergoing CVC without body manoeuvres. The primary outcome was the success rate of CVC, as observed in the post-procedure chest radiograph. Secondary outcomes included quality of central venous pressure waveform, catheterisation attempts, total time for CVC, complications. Results: CVC was achieved in 98% (49/50 of patients in study group and 80% (40/50 of patients in control group (P = 0.008. Mean catheterisation time was significantly lower in the study group (151.06 ± 40.50 s compared to control group (173.50 ± 50.66 s (P = 0.023. The incidence of catheter misplacement and failure to cannulate were lower in the study group (0%, 2% vs. 20%, 12.5%, respectively. Groups did not differ in a number of catheterisation attempts and incidence of haematoma. Conclusion: Inclusion of various body manoeuvres to Seldinger technique significantly improves the success rate of CVC through EJV.

  20. Increased risk of symptomatic upper-extremity venous thrombosis with multiple peripherally inserted central catheter insertions in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Waespe, Nicolas; Temple, Michael; Amirabadi, Afsaneh; Liu, Kuan; Brandão, Leonardo R; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2018-02-27

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are associated with superficial and deep venous thrombosis of the arm. The purpose of this study was to analyze the sequelae of repeated upper limb PICC insertions in children, in terms of the frequency of upper limb thrombosis in this patient group. The study population included all children who underwent their first successful arm PICC insertion between January 2010 and December 2015. We included subsequent ipsilateral arm PICCs in the analysis. Patients were followed until March 2016 or until any alternative central venous line insertion. For each PICC insertion, we collected demographic variables and line characteristics. We correlated all symptomatic deep and superficial thromboses of the arm with the PICC database. Applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 2,180 PICCs remained for analysis. We identified first, second, third and fourth PICC insertions in the same arm in 1,955, 181, 38 and 6 patients, respectively. In total there were 57 upper body deep symptomatic thrombotic events. An increasing odds ratio was seen with higher numbers of PICC insertions, which was significant when comparing the first with the third and fourth PICC insertions in the same arm (odds ratio [OR] 6.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.25-16.04, P=0.0004). Double-lumen PICCs were associated with a significantly higher risk of thrombosis than single lumen (OR 2.77, 95% CI 1.72-4.47, P=0.0003). Repetitive PICC insertions in the same arm are associated with an increased risk of symptomatic thrombosis. Double-lumen PICCs are associated with a higher risk of thrombosis compared to single-lumen lines.

  1. Prophylactic platelet transfusion prior to central venous catheter placement in patients with thrombocytopenia: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weerdt, Emma K; Biemond, Bart J; Zeerleder, Sacha S; van Lienden, Krijn P; Binnekade, Jan M; Vlaar, Alexander P J

    2018-02-20

    Severe thrombocytopenia should be corrected by prophylactic platelet transfusion prior to central venous catheter (CVC) insertion, according to national and international guidelines. Even though correction is thought to prevent bleeding complications, evidence supporting the routine administration of prophylactic platelets is absent. Furthermore, platelet transfusion bears inherent risk. Since the introduction of ultrasound-guided CVC placement, bleeding complication rates have decreased. The objective of the current trial is, therefore, to demonstrate that omitting prophylactic platelet transfusion prior to CVC placement in severely thrombocytopenic patients is non-inferior compared to prophylactic platelet transfusion. The PACER trial is an investigator-initiated, national, multicentre, single-blinded, randomised controlled, non-inferior, two-arm trial in haematologic and/or intensive care patients with a platelet count of between 10 and 50 × 10 9 /L and an indication for CVC placement. Consecutive patients are randomly assigned to either receive 1 unit of platelet concentrate, or receive no prophylactic platelet transfusion prior to CVC insertion. The primary endpoint is WHO grades 2-4 bleeding. Secondary endpoints are any bleeding complication, costs, length of intensive care and hospital stay and transfusion requirements. This is the first prospective, randomised controlled trial powered to test the hypothesis of whether omitting forgoing platelet transfusion prior to central venous cannulation leads to an equal occurrence of clinical relevant bleeding complications in critically ill and haematologic patients with thrombocytopenia. Nederlands Trial Registry, ID: NTR5653 ( http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/index.asp ). Registered on 27 January 2016. Currently recruiting. Randomisation commenced on 23 February 2016.

  2. An in vitro study comparing a peripherally inserted central catheter to a conventional central venous catheter: no difference in static and dynamic pressure transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregg Bethene L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early goal directed therapy improves survival in patients with septic shock. Central venous pressure (CVP monitoring is essential to guide adequate resuscitation. Use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC is increasing, but little data exists comparing a PICC to a conventional CVP catheter. We studied the accuracy of a novel PICC to transmit static and dynamic pressures in vitro. Methods We designed a device to generate controlled pressures via a column of water allowing simultaneous measurements from a PICC and a standard triple lumen catheter. Digital transducers were used to obtain all pressure readings. Measurements of static pressures over a physiologic range were recorded using 5Fr and 6Fr dual lumen PICCs. Additionally, random repetitive pressure pulses were applied to the column of water to simulate physiologic intravascular pressure variations. The resultant PICC and control waveforms were recorded simultaneously. Results Six-hundred thirty measurements were made using the 5 Fr and 6 Fr PICCs. The average bias determined by Bland-Altman plot was 0.043 mmHg for 5 Fr PICC and 0.023 mmHg for 6 Fr PICC with a difference range of 1.0 to -1.0. The correlation coefficient for both catheters was 1.0 (p-value Conclusion In vitro, no static or dynamic pressure differences were found between the PICC and a conventional CVP catheter. Clinical studies are required to assess whether the novel PICC has bedside equivalence to conventional catheters when measuring central venous pressures.

  3. A comparison between two types of central venous catheters in the prevention of catheter-related infections: the importance of performing all the relevant cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, J.; Leusink, J.A.; de Jongh, B.M.; de Boer, A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: to determine the efficacy of double-lumen central venous catheters coated with chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine in reducing the incidence of catheter-related infections. Design: a randomized controlled trial. Setting: medical-surgical intensive care unit of a 600-bed teaching

  4. The effectiveness of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine impregnated central venous catheters in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaskant, J. M.; de Boer, J. P.; Dalesio, O.; Holtkamp, M. J.; Lucas, C.

    2009-01-01

    Immuno-compromised patients are at high risk for all kind of infections. Unfortunately, they need central venous catheters (CVCs), which are associated with infectious complications. In this study we examined the effectiveness of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine impregnated CVCs to prevent

  5. Surgical insertion of central venous catheters in low-birth-weight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: Neonatal central vascular access (CVA) represents a daily practice in neonatal intensive care unit. Low birth weight (LBW) neonates pose a challenge to anesthetists who try the landmark technique to cannulate central veins. We reported our experience of open surgical cutdown (OSC) to insert catheters through right ...

  6. Venous plethysmography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.W.; Middleton, J.; Turley, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    Venous plethysmography provides an objective, versatile, and accurate method of defining those alterations that may result from acute or chronic venous disease, namely venous outflow obstruction and venous reflux through incompetent venous valves. Impedance or strain-gauge plethysmography provides the most accurate means of quantifying abnormal venous outflow in acute deep venous thrombosis. Venous volume plethysmography, using the phleborheograph, provides very sensitive determination of altered venous hemodynamics in acute deep venous thrombosis; it also serves to assess some patients with chronic venous insufficiency. Combinations of strain-gauge and photoplethysmography lead to useful measures of venous reflux in deep, perforating, and superficial veins. This information, along with measurements of maximum venous outflow, may provide the most versatile means of establishing altered hemodynamics in patients with chronic venous insufficiency

  7. Reduction of central venous catheter associated blood stream infections following implementation of a resident oversight and credentialing policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    West Cheri E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assesses the impact that a resident oversight and credentialing policy for central venous catheter (CVC placement had on institution-wide central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI. We therefore investigated the rate of CLABSI per 1,000 line days during the 12 months before and after implementation of the policy. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data at an academic medical center with four adult ICUs and a pediatric ICU. All patients undergoing non-tunneled CVC placement were included in the study. Data was collected on CLABSI, line days, and serious adverse events in the year prior to and following policy implementation on 9/01/08. Results A total of 813 supervised central lines were self-reported by residents in four departments. Statistical analysis was performed using paired Wilcoxon signed rank tests. There were reductions in median CLABSI rate (3.52 vs. 2.26; p = 0.015, number of CLBSI per month (16.0 to 10.0; p = 0.012, and line days (4495 vs. 4193; p = 0.019. No serious adverse events reported to the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority. Conclusions Implementation of a new CVC resident oversight and credentialing policy has been significantly associated with an institution-wide reduction in the rate of CLABSI per 1,000 central line days and total central line days. No serious adverse events were reported. Similar resident oversight policies may benefit other teaching institutions, and support concurrent organizational efforts to reduce hospital acquired infections.

  8. [Regional cerebral oxygen saturation as a marker of hemodynamic state following cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, J A; Aldemira-Liz, A; Martínez-López, A I; Cayuela, A; Charlo-Molina, M T; Cano-Franco, J; Loscertales-Abril, M

    2013-10-01

    Regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO₂) is a measure of the general state of perfusion and oxygenation. We aim to analyze the relationship between this and various hemodynamic and respiratory parameters. Forty-three patients, operated on between October 2011 and July 2012, were included in this prospective observational descriptive study. The following parameters were measured: mean arterial pressure, both arterial and central venous oxygen saturation and partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and lactate levels. From these parameters, the oxygenation index and the oxygen extraction ratio were calculated. These measurements were studied to evaluate whether rSO₂ correlated significantly with the other parameters. The average age and weight of the patients were 27.3 months and 9.2 kg, respectively. The rSO₂ correlated positively with both central venous oxygen saturation (r=0.73, P 0.4) between the rSO₂ and central venous oxygen saturation, and between the rSO₂ and oxygen extraction ratio. Regional cerebral oxygen saturation correlates well with hemodynamic parameters - mean arterial pressure, venous saturation, and the tissue oxygen extraction. However, it does not correlate with respiratory parameters. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Placement of central venous port catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters in the routine clinical setting of a radiology department: analysis of costs and intervention duration learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotzinger, Roman; Gebauer, Bernhard; Schnapauff, Dirk; Streitparth, Florian; Wieners, Gero; Grieser, Christian; Freyhardt, Patrick; Hamm, Bernd; Maurer, Martin H

    2017-12-01

    Background Placement of central venous port catheters (CVPS) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) is an integral component of state-of-the-art patient care. In the era of increasing cost awareness, it is desirable to have more information to comprehensively assess both procedures. Purpose To perform a retrospective analysis of interventional radiologic implantation of CVPS and PICC lines in a large patient population including a cost analysis of both methods as well as an investigation the learning curve in terms of the interventions' durations. Material and Methods All CVPS and PICC line related interventions performed in an interventional radiology department during a three-year period from January 2011 to December 2013 were examined. Documented patient data included sex, venous access site, and indication for CVPS or PICC placement. A cost analysis including intervention times was performed based on the prorated costs of equipment use, staff costs, and expenditures for disposables. The decrease in intervention duration in the course of time conformed to the learning curve. Results In total, 2987 interventions were performed by 16 radiologists: 1777 CVPS and 791 PICC lines. An average implantation took 22.5 ± 0.6 min (CVPS) and 10.1 ± 0.9 min (PICC lines). For CVPS, this average time was achieved by seven radiologists newly learning the procedures after performing 20 CVPS implantations. Total costs per implantation were €242 (CVPS) and €201 (PICC lines). Conclusion Interventional radiologic implantations of CVPS and PICC lines are well-established procedures, easy to learn by residents, and can be implanted at low costs.

  10. Peripheral and central venous blood glucose concentrations in dogs and cats with acute arterial thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klainbart, S; Kelmer, E; Vidmayer, B; Bdolah-Abram, T; Segev, G; Aroch, I

    2014-01-01

    Acute limb paralysis because of arterial thromboembolism (ATE) occurs in cats and less commonly in dogs. ATE is diagnosed based on physical examination findings and, occasionally, advanced imaging. Peripheral, affected limb venous glucose concentration is decreased in ATE, whereas its systemic concentration is within or above reference interval. Client-owned cats and dogs were divided into 3 respective groups: acute limb paralysis because of ATE (22 cats and 9 dogs); acute limb paralysis secondary to orthopedic or neurologic conditions (nonambulatory controls; 10 cats and 11 dogs); ambulatory animals presented because of various diseases (ambulatory controls; 10 cats and 9 dogs). Prospective observational, clinical study. Systemic and local (affected limb) blood glucose concentrations were measured. Their absolute and relative differences (ΔGlu and %ΔGlu, respectively) were compared among groups. ΔGlu and %ΔGlu were significantly higher in the ATE cats and dogs groups, compared to both of their respective controls (P cats, respectively, and 1.00 and 1.00, in dogs, respectively. ΔGlu cutoffs of 30 mg/dL and 16 mg/dL, in cats and dogs, respectively, corresponded to sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 90% in cats, respectively, and 100% in dogs. ΔGlu and %ΔGlu are accurate, readily available, diagnostic markers of acute ATE in paralyzed cats and dogs. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. Right atrial ball-valve thrombus: a complication of central venous alimentation in an infant. Diagnosis and successful surgical management of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliam, M B; McGough, E C; Nixon, G W; Ruttenberg, H D

    1979-10-01

    The following is a case report of a 6-week-old premature infant in whom a ball-valve thrombus developed after prolonged central venous alimentation. Clinical presentation included facial edema, cyanotic episodes, and apnea. No murmur was present, but the diagnosis was suspected when a calcified right atrial mass became apparent on the plain chest film. The diagnosis was confirmed by echocardiography and then venous and cardiac angiography. The calcified thrombus was removed successfully from the right atrium by use of profound hypothermia with ether anesthesia and total circulatory arrest. Subsequently, the patient made an uneventful recovery and is healthy 3 years postoperatively.

  12. Real-time ultrasound-guided placement of peripherally inserted central venous catheter without fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamuta, Soshi; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Matsuhashi, Shiori; Shimizu, Arata; Uraoka, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masato

    2018-03-01

    Malposition of peripherally inserted central catheters placed at the bedside is a well-recognized phenomenon. We report the success rate of the placement of peripherally inserted central catheters with ultrasound guidance for tip positioning and describe the knacks and pitfalls. We retrospectively reviewed the medical case charts of 954 patients who received peripherally inserted central catheter procedure. Patient clinical data included success rate of puncture, detection rate of tip malposition with ultrasonography, adjustment rate after X-ray, and success rate of peripherally inserted central catheter placement. The success rate of puncture was 100% (954/954). Detection rate of tip malposition with ultrasonography was 82.1% (78/95). The success rate of ultrasound-guided tip navigation was 98.2% (937/954). The success rate of ultrasound-guided tip location was 98.0% (935/954). Adjustment rate after X-ray was 1.79% (17/952). The final success rate of peripherally inserted central catheter placement was 99.8% (952/954). Ultrasound guidance for puncturing and tip positioning is a promising option for the placement of peripherally inserted central catheters. Ultrasound guidance could dispense with radiation exposure and the transfer of patients to the X-ray department.

  13. Risk of Venous Thromboembolism Following Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Exchange: An Analysis of 23,000 Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; Kaatz, Scott; Grant, Paul; Swaminathan, Lakshmi; Boldenow, Tanya; Conlon, Anna; Bernstein, Steven J; Flanders, Scott A

    2018-02-01

    Catheter exchange over a guidewire is frequently performed for malfunctioning peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Whether such exchanges are associated with venous thromboembolism is not known. We performed a retrospective cohort study to assess the association between PICC exchange and risk of thromboembolism. Adult hospitalized patients that received a PICC during clinical care at one of 51 hospitals participating in the Michigan Hospital Medicine Safety consortium were included. The primary outcome was hazard of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (radiographically confirmed upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) in those that underwent PICC exchange vs those that did not. Of 23,010 patients that underwent PICC insertion in the study, 589 patients (2.6%) experienced a PICC exchange. Almost half of all exchanges were performed for catheter dislodgement or occlusion. A total of 480 patients (2.1%) experienced PICC-associated deep vein thrombosis. The incidence of deep vein thrombosis was greater in those that underwent PICC exchange vs those that did not (3.6% vs 2.0%, P < .001). Median time to thrombosis was shorter among those that underwent exchange vs those that did not (5 vs 11 days, P = .02). Following adjustment, PICC exchange was independently associated with twofold greater risk of thrombosis (hazard ratio [HR] 1.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37-2.85) vs no exchange. The effect size of PICC exchange on thrombosis was second in magnitude to device lumens (HR 2.06; 95% CI, 1.59-2.66 and HR 2.31; 95% CI, 1.6-3.33 for double- and triple-lumen devices, respectively). Guidewire exchange of PICCs may be associated with increased risk of thrombosis. As some exchanges may be preventable, consideration of risks and benefits of exchanges in clinical practice is needed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. A prospective study of Rivaroxaban for central venous catheter associated upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in cancer patients (Catheter 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G A; Lazo-Langner, A; Gandara, E; Rodger, M; Tagalakis, V; Louzada, M; Corpuz, R; Kovacs, M J

    2018-02-01

    Patients with cancer are at increased risk of thrombosis, particularly those with central venous catheter (CVC) placement, which may predispose to the development of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT). Standard treatment includes low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or LMWH bridged to warfarin. The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have become standard of care for uncomplicated venous thromboembolism (VTE), but research in patients with cancer is ongoing. To assess rivaroxaban monotherapy in patients with cancer who develop UEDVT due to CVC for preservation of line function, and safety outcomes of VTE recurrence, bleeding risk and death. Patients ≥18years of age with active malignancy and symptomatic proximal UEDVT with or without pulmonary embolism (PE), associated with a CVC, were eligible. Treatment included rivaroxaban 15mg oral twice daily for 3weeks, followed by 20mg oral daily for 9weeks. Patients were followed clinically for 12weeks to assess for line function, recurrent VTE and bleeding. Seventy patients (47 women) were included, with mean age 54.1years. The most common malignancy was breast cancer (41%). Preservation of line function was 100% at 12weeks. The risk of recurrent VTE at 12weeks was 1.43%, with one episode of fatal PE. 9 patients (12.9%) experienced 11 total bleeding episodes. Rivaroxaban showed promise in treating CVC-UEDVT in cancer patients, resulting in preserved line function. However, bleeding rates and a fatal pulmonary embolism on treatment are concerning safety outcomes necessitating further study before rivaroxaban can be recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Need for tissue plasminogen activator for central venous catheter dysfunction is significantly associated with thrombosis in pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Jessica; MacDonald, Tamara; Digout, Carol; Smith, Nadine; Rigby, Krista; Kulkarni, Ketan

    2018-03-14

    Central venous catheter (CVC) dysfunction is a common complication among pediatric cancer patients. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is administered to resolve CVC dysfunction. The present study was designed to determine risk factors associated with requirement of tPA for CVC dysfunction and to assess the clinical impact of CVC dysfunction in terms of CVC loss and venous thrombotic events (VTE). Case records of all pediatric patients with cancer from the Maritimes, Canada were reviewed following ethics approval. Data regarding demographics, clinical diagnosis, CVC dysfunction, characteristics of CVCs, and VTE were pooled from multiple data sources. Seven hundred and forty-one patients required ≥1 CVC. 26.3% of patients required tPA for ≥1 episodes of CVC dysfunction. Requirement of one or more doses of tPA for episodes of CVC dysfunction increased the odds of VTE by two times (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.6). Patients that required ≥1 doses of tPA required significantly more CVCs (2.05 ± 1.29 per individual patient, 55% of the patients needed >1 CVCs) as compared to the remainder (1.52 ± 0.95 per individual patient, 32% needed >1 CVCs) (P = 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed age > 10 years, diagnosis of sarcoma, and tunneled line were independently associated with tPA requirement. We determined independent risk factors associated with requirement of tPA for CVC dysfunction. Requirement of tPA for CVC dysfunction was associated with significantly increased risk of VTE and requirement of more CVCs. These observations can assist in identification of patients at increased risk of CVC dysfunction and inform approaches to reduce CVC loss and VTE. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A Review of Central Venous Pressure and Its Reliability as a Hemodynamic Monitoring Tool in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Kristen M; Shaw, Scott P

    2016-09-01

    To review the current literature regarding central venous pressure (CVP) in veterinary patients pertaining to placement (of central line), measurement, interpretation, use in veterinary medicine, limitations, and controversies in human medicine. CVP use in human medicine is a widely debated topic, as numerous sources have shown poor correlation of CVP measurements to the volume status of a patient. Owing to the ease of placement and monitoring in veterinary medicine, CVP remains a widely used modality for evaluating the hemodynamic status of a patient. A thorough evaluation of the veterinary and human literature should be performed to evaluate the role of CVP measurements in assessing volume status in veterinary patients. Veterinary patients that benefit from accurate CVP readings include those suffering from hypovolemic or septic shock, heart disease, or renal disease or all of these. Other patients that may benefit from CVP monitoring include high-risk anesthetic patients undergoing major surgery, trending of fluid volume status in critically ill patients, patients with continued shock, and patients that require rapid or large amounts of fluids. The goal of CVP use is to better understand a patient's intravascular volume status, which would allow early goal-directed therapy. CVP would most likely continue to play an important role in the hemodynamic monitoring of the critically ill veterinary patient; however, when available, cardiac output methods should be considered the first choice for hemodynamic monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of Postplacement Adjustment of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters on the Risk of Bloodstream Infection and Venous Thrombus Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxi, Sanjiv M.; Shuman, Emily K.; Scipione, Christy A.; Chen, Benrong; Sharma, Aditi; Rasanathan, Jennifer J. K.; Chenoweth, Carol E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) tip malposition is potentially associated with complications, and postplacement adjustment of PICCs is widely performed. We sought to characterize the association between central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) or venous thrombus (VT) and PICC adjustment. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING University of Michigan Health System, a large referral hospital. PATIENTS Patients who had PICCs placed between February 2007 and August 2007. METHODS The primary outcomes were development of CLABSI within 14 days or VT within 60 days of postplacement PICC adjustment, identified by review of patient electronic medical records. RESULTS There were 57 CLABSIs (2.69/1,000 PICC-days) and 47 VTs (1.23/1,000 PICC-days); 609 individuals had 1, 134 had 2, and 33 had 3 or more adjustments. One adjustment was protective against CLABSI (P = .04), whereas 2 or 3 or more adjustments had no association with CLABSI (P = .58 and .47, respectively). One, 2, and 3 or more adjustments had no association with VT formation (P = .59, .85, and .78, respectively). Immunosuppression (P PICCs (P = .05), and 3 PICC lumens compared with 1 lumen (P = .02) were associated with CLABSI. Power-injectable PICCs were also associated with increased VT formation (P = .03). CONCLUSIONS Immunosuppression and 3 PICC lumens were associated with increased risk of CLABSI. Power-injectable PICCs were associated with increased risk of CLABSI and VT formation. Postplacement adjustment of PICCs was not associated with increased risk of CLABSI or VT. PMID:23838218

  18. Complications of Central Venous Totally Implantable Access Port: Internal Jugular Versus Subclavian Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pil Young Jung

    Full Text Available Background: Totally implantable access port (TIAP provides reliable, long term vascular access with minimal risk of infection and allows patients normal physical activity. With wide use of ports, new complications have been encountered. We analyzed TIAP related complications and evaluated the outcomes of two different percutaneous routes of access to superior vena cava. Methods: All 172 patients who underwent port insertion with internal jugular approach (Group 1, n = 92 and subclavian approach (Group 2, n = 79 between August 2011 and May 2013 in a single center were analyzed, retrospectively. Medical records were analyzed to compare the outcomes and the occurrence of port related complications between two different percutaneous routes of access to superior vena cava. Results: Median follow-up for TIAP was 278 days (range, 1-1868. Twenty four complications were occurred (14.0%, including pneumothorax (n = 1, 0.6%, migration/malposition (n = 4, 2.3%, pinch-off syndrome (n = 4, 2.3%, malfunction (n = 2, 1.1%, infection (n = 8, 4.7%, and venous thrombosis (n = 5, 2.9%. The overall incidence was 8.7% and 20.3% in each group (p = 0.030. Mechanical complications except infectious and thrombotic complications were more often occurred in group 2 (p = 0.033. The mechanical complication free probability is significantly higher in group 1 (p = 0.040. Conclusions: We suggest that the jugular access should be chosen in patients who need long term catheterization because of high incidence of mechanical complication, such as pinch-off syndrome.

  19. Remifentanil for the insertion and removal of long-term central venous access during monitored anesthesia care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burlacu, Crina L

    2012-02-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine the analgesic efficacy of three different rates of remifentanil infusion in patients undergoing insertion or removal of long-term central venous access devices during monitored anesthesia care and local anesthetic field infiltration. DESIGN: Double-blinded, randomized, controlled study. SETTING: Operating theatre of an University hospital. PATIENTS: 44 unpremedicated, ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients, aged 18-65 years, undergoing insertion or removal of a Port-a-Cath or Hickman catheter. INTERVENTIONS: Patients sedated with a propofol target-controlled infusion were randomly allocated to three groups: Group R25 (n = 14), Group R50 (n = 15), and Group R75 (n = 15), to receive remifentanil 0.025, 0.05, and 0.075 mug\\/kg\\/min, respectively. Rescue remifentanil 0.5 mug\\/kg was administered for pain scores > 3. The remifentanil infusion rate was maintained constant unless respiratory and\\/or cardiovascular unwanted events occurred, whereupon the rate was adjusted in 0.01 mug\\/kg\\/min decrements as necessary. MEASUREMENTS: Pain scores (primary outcome), sedation, and movement scores (secondary outcomes) were assessed during local anesthetic infiltration of the anterior chest wall and 5 other procedural steps. MAIN RESULTS: All infusion rates had equal analgesic efficacy, as shown by comparable pain scores, number of rescue boluses, and number of patients requiring rescue analgesia. Excessive sedation was associated with the highest remifentanil rate such that Group R75 patients were significantly more sedated than Groups R25 or R50 at selective procedural steps (P < 0.05). More Group R75 patients (6\\/15) required remifentanil rate reduction than did patients from Group R50 (1\\/15) or Group R25 (0\\/14), P < 0.01, most commonly because of respiratory depression. CONCLUSIONS: For the insertion or removal of long-term central venous access devices, all three remifentanil infusion rates proved to be equally analgesic

  20. Massive pleural effusion on the contralateral side of a venous peripherally inserted central catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancak, Selim; Tuten, Abdulhamit; Yildirim, Tulin Gokmen; Karatekin, Guner

    2018-02-01

    A preterm newborn infant, delivered at 30 weeks of gestation and 965 g birth weight, developed respiratory distress with resistant hypoxia after a central catheter line was inserted via the right venae brachialis on postnatal day 21. Left-sided massive pleural effusion, collapsed left lung with air bronchograms, and bidirectional shunting through reopened ductus arteriosus were detected by targeted neonatal echocardiography. Hydrothorax was drained under sonographic guidance, producing a milky-white fluid biochemically compatible with parenteral nutrition. We report this case of hydrothorax secondary to a misplaced central catheter on the contralateral side of its peripheral insertion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 46:140-144, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Inpatient Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Complications: Should Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Lines Be Placed in the Intensive Care Unit Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyak, Michael; Kabir, Ishraq; Britt, Rebecca

    2017-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are now commonly used for central access in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting; however, there is a paucity of data evaluating the complication rates associated with these lines. We performed a retrospective review of all PICCs placed in the inpatient setting at our institution during a 1-year period from January 2013 to December 2013. These were divided into two groups: those placed at the bedside in the ICU and those placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients. Data regarding infectious and thrombotic complications were collected and evaluated. During the study period, 1209 PICC line placements met inclusion criteria and were evaluated; 1038 were placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients, and 171 were placed at the bedside in ICU patients. The combined thrombotic and central line associated blood stream infection rate was 6.17 per cent in the non-ICU group and 10.53 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.035). The thrombotic complication rate was 5.88 per cent in the non-ICU group and 7.60 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.38), whereas the central line associated blood stream infection rate was 0.29 per cent in the non-ICU group and 2.92 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.002). This study seems to suggest that PICC lines placed at the bedside in the ICU setting are associated with higher complication rates, in particular infectious complications, than those placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients. The routine placement of PICC lines in the ICU settings needs to be reevaluated given these findings.

  2. Antibiotics at the time of removal of central venous catheter to reduce morbidity and mortality in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, Rowena L; Gordon, Adrienne

    2018-03-07

    Late-onset sepsis is associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity in newborn infants, in addition to poorer long-term developmental outcomes and increased length of stay and hospital costs. Central line-associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) is the most common cause of late-onset sepsis in hospitalised infants, and prevention of CLABSI is a key objective in neonatal care. Increased frequency of CLABSI around the time of removal of central venous catheters (CVCs) has been reported, and use of antibiotics at the time of removal may reduce the incidence and impact of late-onset sepsis in vulnerable newborn infants. To determine the efficacy and safety of giving antibiotics at the time of removal of a central venous catheter (CVC) for reduction of morbidity and mortality in newborn infants, in particular effects on late-onset sepsis. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group without language restriction to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 3), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 6 April 2017), Embase (1980 to 6 April 2017), and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1982 to 6 April 2017). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. Randomised, quasi-randomised, and cluster-randomised trials considering use of any antibiotic or combination of antibiotics at the time of CVC removal in newborn infants compared with placebo, no antibiotics, or another antibiotic or combination of antibiotics. We extracted data using standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. Two review authors independently selected, assessed the quality of, and extracted data from the included study. Only one randomised controlled trial was eligible for inclusion in this analysis. Forty-four of a total of 88 infants received two doses of cephazolin

  3. Mechanic and surface properties of central-venous port catheters after removal: A comparison of polyurethane and silicon rubber materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Ulrike; Lorenz, Edelgard; Weimann, Christiane; Sturm, Heinz; Karimov, Ilham; Ettl, Johannes; Meier, Reinhard; Wohlgemuth, Walter A; Berger, Hermann; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2016-12-01

    Central venous port devices made of two different polymeric materials, thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and silicone rubber (SiR), were compared due their material properties. Both naïve catheters as well as catheters after removal from patients were investigated. In lab experiments the influence of various chemo-therapeutic solutions on material properties was investigated, whereas the samples after removal were compared according to the implanted time in patient. The macroscopic, mechanical performance was assessed with dynamic, specially adapted tests for elasticity. The degradation status of the materials was determined with common tools of polymer characterisation, such as infrared spectroscopy, molecular weight measurements and various methods of thermal analysis. The surface morphology was analysed using scanning electron microscopy. A correlation between material properties and clinical performance was proposed. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the polyurethane catheter materials can potentially result in increased susceptibility of the catheter to bloodstream infections and thrombotic complications. The higher mechanic failure, especially with increasing implantation time of the silicone catheters is related to the lower mechanical performance compared to the polyurethane material as well as loss of barium sulphate filler particles near the surface of the catheter. This results in preformed microscopic notches, which act as predetermined sites of fracture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Totally Implantable Central Venous Port Catheters: Radiation Exposure as a Function of Puncture Site and Operator Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonczyk, Martin; Gebauer, Bernhard; Rotzinger, Roman; Schnapauff, Dirk; Hamm, Bernd; Collettini, Federico

    2018-01-01

    Totally implantable central venous port systems provide a safe and effective, long-term means of access for administration of hyperosmolar, local irritant medication, such as chemotherapy, antibiotics and parenteral nutrition. To evaluate the combination of access site and level of experience on fluoroscopy times (FT) and dose area products (DAP) during implantation of port catheters in a large patient population. A total of 1,870 patients (992 women, 878 men; age: 61±13.14 years) were reviewed investigating two groups of junior (≤50 implantations) and senior (>50) radiologists. Senior radiologists required less FT/DAP (0.24 s/57.3 μGy m 2 versus 0.43 s/68.2 μGy m 2 , respectively; p<0.001). Right jugular vein access required the least FT/DAP (0.25 s/56.15 μGy m 2 ) and right-sided implantation lower FT/DAP (right: 0.26 s/56.4 μGy m 2 , left: 0.40 s/85.10 μGy m 2 , p<0.001). Due to DAP/FT reductions, the right jugular vein seems to be the most favorable implantation side for port systems. For further dose reduction, residents should be well-trained. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  5. Transient bacteremia induced by dental cleaning is not associated with infection of central venous catheters in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Saad; Choquette, Linda; Bona, Robert; Feinn, Richard; Shahid, Zainab; Lalla, Rajesh V

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of bacteremia resulting from dental cleaning and of subsequent established bloodstream infection (BSI) caused by oral microorganisms in patients with cancer with central venous catheters (CVCs). Twenty-six patients with cancer with CVCs and absolute neutrophil count over 1000 cells/µL received dental cleaning without antibiotic prophylaxis. Periodontal status was assessed at baseline by using the Periodontal Screening and Recording (PSR) score. Blood cultures were drawn via the CVCs at baseline, 20 minutes into cleaning, and 30 minutes and 24 hours after cleaning. Medical records were monitored for 6 months. Baseline blood culture results were negative in 25 patients. Nine of 25 patients (36%) had positive blood culture 20 minutes into cleaning, all associated with at least 1 microorganism typically found in the mouth. These 9 patients had significantly higher mean PSR score (3.22) compared with the other 16 (2.56; P = .035). These expected bacteremias did not persist, with blood culture results (0/25) at 30 minutes and 24 hours after cleaning showing no positivity (P = .001). There were no cases of CVC-related infection or BSI attributable to dental cleaning. Bacteremia resulting from dental cleaning is transient and unlikely to cause CVC-related infection or BSI in patients with absolute neutrophil count greater than 1000 cells/µL. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence and correlates of central venous catheter use among haemodialysis patients in the Irish health system - a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Wael F; Mohammed, Husham; Browne, Leonard; Plant, Liam; Stack, Austin G

    2018-04-02

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality among patients undergoing haemodialysis (HD), yet they are frequently used as the primary vascular access for many patients on HD. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence and variation in CVC use across centres in the Irish health system. Data from the National Kidney Disease Clinical Patient Management System (KDCPMS) was used to determine CVC use and patterns across centres. Data on demographic characteristics, primary cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), comorbid conditions, laboratory values and centre affiliation were extracted for adult HD patients (n = 1, 196) who were on dialysis for at least three months up to end of December 2016. Correlates of CVC use were explored using multivariable logistic regression. Overall prevalence of CVC use was 54% and varied significantly across clinical sites from 43% to 73%, P catheter use was greater for women than men, OR 1.77 (1.34-2.34) and for 2 out of 10 regional dialysis centres, OR 1.98 (1.02-3.84) and OR 2.86 (1.67-4.90) respectively compared to referent group). Catheters are the predominant type of vascular access in patients undergoing HD in the Irish health system. Substantial centre variation exists which is not explained by patient-level characteristics.

  7. Flow confirmation study for central venous port in oncologic outpatient undergoing chemotherapy: Evaluation of suspected system-related mechanical complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofue, Keitaro, E-mail: ksofue@ncc.go.jp [Divisions of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kobe University, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Arai, Yasuaki; Takeuchi, Yoshito [Divisions of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and outcome of a flow confirmation study (FCS) in oncologic outpatients undergoing chemotherapy suspected of a central venous port (CVP) system-related mechanical complication. Materials and methods: A total of 66 patients (27 men, 39 women; mean age, 60 years) received FCS for the following reasons: prolonged infusion time during chemotherapy (n = 32), inability to inject saline fluid (n = 15), lateral neck and/or back pain (n = 6), subcutaneous extravasation of anticancer drug (n = 5), arm swelling (n = 4), and inability to puncture the port (n = 4). FCS consisted of examining the position of CVP, potential secondary shifts or fractures, and integrity of the system using contrast material through the port. Results: Of the 66 patients, 43 had an abnormal finding uncovered by FCS. The most frequent abnormal findings was catheter kinking (n = 22). Explantation and reimplantation of the CVP system was required in 21 of the 66 patients. Remaining 45 patients were able continue using the CVP system after the FCS without any system malfunction. Conclusion: FCS was effective for evaluating CVP system-related mechanical complications and was useful for deciding whether CVP system explantation and reimplantation was required.

  8. Serum PON1 arylesterase activity in relation to hyperhomocysteinaemia and oxidative stress in young adult central retinal venous occlusion patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angayarkanni, N; Barathi, S; Seethalakshmi, T; Punitham, R; Sivaramakrishna, R; Suganeswari, G; Tarun, S

    2008-07-01

    To estimate the arylesterase activity of serum paraoxonase-1 (PON1-ARE), which is reported to have an antioxidant and antiatherogenic potential and to correlate with plasma homocysteine (Hcys) and plasma TBARS in young adult central retinal venous occlusion (CRVO) patients. A case-control prospective study carried out in 10 CRVO patients (mean age 27+/-5 years; 7 males, 3 females) and 20 healthy controls (mean age 29+/-5 years; 15 males, 5 females). The CRVO patients showed a significantly lowered serum PON1-ARE activity (P=0.009) along with a significant increase in the levels of plasma Hcys (P=0.018) when compared to the control subjects. There was a negative correlation between serum PON1-ARE and plasma Hcys levels (P=0.058) as well as between PON1-ARE and plasma TBARS levels (P=0.001) in the CRVO patients. This is the first report of lowered serum PON1-ARE level as a risk factor for CRVO (OR= 1.108, CI=0.914, 1.314; P=0.296), which is found to correlate with oxidative stress.

  9. Convective Leakage Makes Heparin Locking of Central Venous Catheters Ineffective Within Seconds: Experimental Measurements in a Model Superior Vena Cava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Michael C; McGah, Patrick M; Ng, Chin H; Clark, Alicia M; Gow, Kenneth W; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs), placed in the superior vena cava (SVC) for hemodialysis or chemotherapy, are routinely filled while not in use with heparin, an anticoagulant, to maintain patency and prevent thrombus formation at the catheter tip. The heparin-locking procedure, however, places the patient at risk for systemic bleeding, as heparin is known to leak from the catheter into the blood stream. We provide evidence from detailed in vitro experiments that shows the driving mechanism behind heparin leakage to be convective-diffusive transport due to the pulsatile flow surrounding the catheter. This novel mechanism is supported by experimental planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow velocity and heparin transport from a CVC placed inside a model SVC inside a pulsatile flow loop. The results predict an initial, fast (<10 s), convection-dominated phase that rapidly depletes the concentration of heparin in the near-tip region, the region of the catheter with side holes. This is followed by a slow, diffusion-limited phase inside the catheter lumen, where the concentration is still high, that is insufficient at replenishing the lost heparin concentration in the near-tip region. The results presented here, which are consistent with previous in vivo estimates of 24 hour leakage rates, predict that the concentration of heparin in the near-tip region is essentially zero for the majority of the interdialytic phase, rendering the heparin locking procedure ineffective.

  10. Correlation of inferior vena cava (ivc) diameter and central venous pressure (cvp) for fluid monitoring in icu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, A.; Hayat, A.

    2015-01-01

    To determine intravascular fluid status in critically ill patients using inferior vena cava diameter and correlating it with central venous pressure. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Intensive care department, Military Hospital Rawalpindi from Jan 2013 to Aug 2013. Material and Methods: We included 115 adult patients of both genders in age range of 18 to 87 years by consecutive sampling admitted in intensive care unit. Ultrasound guided IVC diameter was assessed in supine patients. Data was simultaneously collected from the CVP catheter. Variables included in study were age, gender, CVP, IVC diameter. Results: CVP ranged from -4 to 26 cm H/sub 2/O with mean of 8 cm H/sub 2/O (SD = 6.24). Mean IVC diameters increased with increase in CVP. Correlation between CVP and max IVC diameter was moderate and significant (r = 0.53, p < 0.001). Correlation between CVP and min IVC diameter was also moderate and significant (r = 0.58, p < 0.001). Conclusion: A simple bedside sonography of inferior vena cava diameter correlates well with extremes of CVP values and can be helpful in assessing intravascular fluid status in these patients. (author)

  11. [Assessment of central venous-to-arterial CO(2) difference during early goal-directed therapy in patients with septic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling; Zhao, Hong-jie; Huang, Ying-zi; Liu, Song-qiao; Yang, Cong-shan; Guo, Feng-mei; Qiu, Hai-bo; Yang, Yi

    2012-10-01

    To detect the changes of central venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide difference (P(cv-a)CO(2)) during early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) in patients with septic shock and evaluate its' value in predicting adequate resuscitation and prognosis. From April 2009 to October 2010, 26 septic shock patients were enrolled in the study. EGDT was performed in all the patients immediately after enrollment. According to the whether they achieved early goal with in the 6 hour or not, patients were separated to EGDT achievement and un-achievement groups. At the onset and after the 6 hours EGDT, mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac index (CI), central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO(2)), oxygen delivery (DO(2)), oxygen consumption (VO(2)), oxygen extraction ratio (O(2) ext), lactate, P(cv-a)CO(2) were recorded. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score and 28 day mortality were compared between 2 groups. There were no significant difference of age and sex between the 15 patients who achieved early goals and 11 patients who did not. EGDT un-achievement patients had higher APACHE II score (21 ± 5) and 28 day mortality (9/11) when compared with EGDT achievement patients (t = 2.985, χ(2) = 4.547, P un-achievement group, MAP, CI, DO(2), VO(2), O(2)ext, ScvO(2), Lac, P(cv-a)CO(2) were comparable between the onset and 6 hours after EGDT. However, in EGDT achievement group, MAP ((90 ± 9) mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa)), CI ((4.0 ± 1.8) L×min(-1)×m(-2)), DO(2) ((596 ± 274) ml×min(-1)×m(-2)), ScvO(2) (76.9% ± 4.1%) increased, and P(cv-a)CO(2) ((4.2 ± 2.7) mmHg) decreased significantly after 6 hours of EGDT (t values were -3.393, -2.985, -2.103 and -3.195 respectively, all P < 0.05). The changes of P(cv-a)CO(2) between the onset and 6 hours after EGDT, demonstrated high value for predictability of outcome, according to the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.839 (P = 0.004). As a predictor for death, increasing of P(cv-a)CO(2) after 6 hours of EGDT has a

  12. INCIDENCE OF INFECTION ASSOCIATED TO CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETERS IN A NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Teixeira Reis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um estudo transversal e retrospectivo que objetivou  identificar o tipo de cateter venoso central (CVC mais utilizado na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal (UTIN de um hospital público universitário do estado do Rio de Janeiro, estratificado por peso de nascimento e apresentar as densidades de incidência de infecção associadas aos dispositivos.  Os dados foram coletados através de análise documental nos meses de junho e julho de 2008, referentes ao período de julho a dezembro de 2007, totalizando um registro de 712 cateteres-dia. Foi verificado o cateter central de inserção periférica (CCIP/PICC como o dispositivo mais utilizado na unidade, seguido do cateter venoso umbilical e da dissecção venosa. A densidade de incidência das infecções primárias da corrente sanguínea foi cerca de oito vezes maior nos recém-nascidos com peso ≤ 1.500g, sendo o cateter umbilical o dispositivo mais associado a essas infecções.

  13. Eliminating guidewire retention during ultrasound guided central venous catheter insertion via an educational program, a modified CVC set, and a drape with reminder stickers

    OpenAIRE

    Peh, Wee Ming; Loh, Wann Jia; phua, ghee chee; Loo, Chian Min

    2016-01-01

    Guidewire retention is a severe but preventable complication from central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. There were three cases of guidewire retention during CVC insertion in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) in Singapore General Hospital, in the period between December 2011 and February 2012. The primary objective of this quality improvement project was to eliminate future incidences of guidewire retention during CVC insertion in the MICU and medical intermediate care area (MICA) via ...

  14. Implantable central venous chemoport: camparision of results according to approach routes and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Byung Suck; Ahn, Moon Sang

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the results and complications of placement of implantable port according to approach routes and methods. Between April 2001 and October 2002, a total of 103 implantable chemoport was placed in 95 patients for chemotherapy using preconnected type (n=39) and attachable type (n=64). Puncture sites were left subclavian vein (n=35), right subclavian vein (n=5), left internal jugular vein (n=9), right internal jugular vein (n=54). We evaluated duration of catheterization days, complications according to approach routes and methods. Implantable chemoport was placed successfully in all cases. Duration of catheterization ranged from 8 to 554 days(mean 159, total 17,872 catheter days). Procedure related complications occurred transient pulmonary air embolism (n=1), small hematoma (n=1) and malposition in using preconnected type (n=2). Late complications occurred catheter migration (n=5), catheter malfunction (n=3), occlusion (n=1) and infection (n=11). Among them 15 chemoport was removed (14.5%). Catheter migration was occured via subclavian vein in all cases (13%, p=.008). Infection developed in 10.7% of patients(0.61 per 1000 catheter days). There were no catheter-related central vein thrombosis. Implantation of chemoport is a safe procedure. Choice of right internal jugular vein than subclavian vain vein for puncture site has less complications. And selection of attachable type of chemoport is convenient than preconnected type. Adequate care of chemoport is essential for long patency

  15. Heparin for clearance of peripherally inserted central venous catheter in newborns: an in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaminut, Talita; Venturini, Danielle; da Silva, Valéria Costa Evangelista; Rossetto, Edilaine Giovanini; Zani, Adriana Valongo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of two concentrations of heparin to clear the lumen of in vitro clotted neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Methods: This is an in vitro, experimental quantitative study of 76 neonatal 2.0-Fr PICCs coagulated in vitro. The catheters were divided into two groups of 38 PICCs each. In both groups an infusion of low molecular weight heparin was administered with a dose of 25IU/mL for Group 1 and 50IU/mL for Group 2. The negative pressure technique was applied to the catheters of both groups at 5, 15 and 30min and at 4h to test their permeability. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to verify the outcome of the groups according to time intervals. Results: The comparison between both groups in the first 5min showed that more catheters from Group 2 were cleared compared to Group 1 (57.9 vs. 21.1%, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that less time was needed to clear catheters treated with 50IU/mL of heparin (p<0.001). Conclusions: The use of low molecular weight heparin at a concentration of 50IU/mL was more effective in restoring the permeability of neonatal PICCs occluded in vitro by a clot, and the use of this concentration is within the safety margin indicated by scientific literature. PMID:26116325

  16. Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection in Hospitalized Children with Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters: Extending Risk Analyses Outside the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, Sonali; Reich, Nicholas G.; Sengupta, Arnab; Gosey, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Background. Increasingly, peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are placed for prolonged intravenous access. Few data exist regarding risk factors for central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) complicating PICCs in hospitalized children, especially children hospitalized outside the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods. We identified all children with a PICC inserted at The Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, MD) from 1 January 2003 through 31 December 2009 and used Poisson regression models to identify risk factors for PICC-associated CLABSIs. Results. A total of 2592 PICCs were placed in 1819 children. One hundred sixteen CLABSIs occurred over 44,972 catheter-days (incidence rate [IR], 2.58 cases per 1000 catheter-days; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.07–3.00 cases per 1000 catheter-days). Independent predictors of CLABSI in the entire cohort included PICC dwell time of ≥21 days (IR ratio [IRR], 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05–2.26), parenteral nutrition as indication for insertion (IRR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.31–3.84), prior PICC-associated CLABSI (IRR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.18–5.25), underlying metabolic condition (IRR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.14–3.74), and pediatric ICU exposure during hospitalization (IRR, 1.80; 95% CI, 1.18–2.75). Risk factors for CLABSI in children without PICU exposure included younger age, underlying malignancy and metabolic conditions, PICCs inserted in the lower extremity, and a prior PICC-associated CLABSI. Conclusions. Prolonged catheter dwell time, pediatric ICU exposure, and administration of parenteral nutrition as the indication for PICC insertion are important predictors of PICC-associated CLABSI in hospitalized children. A careful assessment of these risk factors may be important for future success in preventing CLABSIs in hospitalized children with PICCs. PMID:21454298

  17. Therapeutic drug monitoring of methotrexate on the pediatric oncology ward: can blood sampling from central venous accesses substitute for capillary finger punctures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzmo, Carina; Albertioni, Freidoun; Cosic, Karin; Söderhäll, Stefan; Eksborg, Staffan

    2007-08-01

    Intravenous methotrexate therapy with subsequent calcium folinate rescue is widely used for treatment of various neoplastic diseases, both in adults and in children. The optimization of the methotrexate dose and/or the calcium folinate rescue is based on pharmacokinetic data calculated from plasma concentrations collected after cessation of the methotrexate infusion. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possibility of substituting capillary blood samples with blood samples drawn from central venous catheters (PORT-A-CATH) for therapeutic drug monitoring of methotrexate on the pediatric oncology ward. Nine cancer patients (4 females and 5 males; median age: 15 years; range: 5-20 years) were included. The quantitative analysis of methotrexate was carried out by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA). The concentrations of methotrexate in venous and capillary samples were closely correlated (rs = 0.98; P plasma concentration ratio was 1.00 [median value; interquartile range (IQR): 0.882-1.094]; for 85% of the data points the ratio was 0.8 to 1.2, independent of drug concentration. The observed plasma concentration differences in blood samples drawn from central venous accesses and obtained from capillary blood samples in this study could have altered the calcium folinate rescue at 1 treatment occasion only. Plotting all measured methotrexate concentration time data for the individual patients during the elimination phase, on a chart including a normal elimination curve, is mandatory to enable proper handling of the subsequent rescue after high-dose methotrexate therapy. Blood sampling from the central venous access can be used only under certain circumstances for therapeutic drug monitoring of methotrexate. Carefully evaluated standardized instructions regarding rinsing, flushing, and discarding waste volumes, as well as precautions to minimize the required blood volume, are needed.

  18. The risk of bloodstream infection associated with peripherally inserted central catheters compared with central venous catheters in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; O'Horo, John C; Rogers, Mary A M; Maki, Dennis G; Safdar, Nasia

    2013-09-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are associated with central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). The magnitude of this risk relative to central venous catheters (CVCs) is unknown. To compare risk of CLABSI between PICCs and CVCs. MEDLINE, CinAHL, Scopus, EmBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL were searched. Full-text studies comparing the risk of CLABSI between PICCs and CVCs were included. Studies involving adults 18 years of age or older who underwent insertion of a PICC or a CVC and reported CLABSI were included in our analysis. Studies were evaluated using the Downs and Black scale for risk of bias. Random effects meta-analyses were used to generate summary estimates of CLABSI risk in patients with PICCs versus CVCs. Of 1,185 studies identified, 23 studies involving 57,250 patients met eligibility criteria. Twenty of 23 eligible studies reported the total number of CLABSI episodes in patients with PICCs and CVCs. Pooled meta-analyses of these studies revealed that PICCs were associated with a lower risk of CLABSI than were CVCs (relative risk [RR], 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.94). Statistical heterogeneity prompted subgroup analysis, which demonstrated that CLABSI reduction was greatest in outpatients (RR [95% CI], 0.22 [0.18-0.27]) compared with hospitalized patients who received PICCs (RR [95% CI], 0.73 [0.54-0.98]). Thirteen of the included 23 studies reported CLABSI per catheter-day. Within these studies, PICC-related CLABSI occurred as frequently as CLABSI from CVCs (incidence rate ratio [95% CI], 0.91 [0.46-1.79]). Only 1 randomized trial met inclusion criteria. CLABSI definition and infection prevention strategies were variably reported. Few studies reported infections by catheter-days. Although PICCs are associated with a lower risk of CLABSI than CVCs in outpatients, hospitalized patients may be just as likely to experience CLABSI with PICCs as with CVCs. Consideration of risks and benefits before PICC use in inpatient

  19. Thromboelastometry versus standard coagulation tests versus restrictive protocol to guide blood transfusion prior to central venous catheterization in cirrhosis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Neto, Ary Serpa; do Prado, Rogerio Ruscitto; Silva, Eliezer; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Correa, Thiago Domingos

    2017-02-27

    Liver failure patients have traditionally been empirically transfused prior to invasive procedures. Blood transfusion is associated with immunologic and nonimmunologic reactions, increased risk of adverse outcomes and high costs. Scientific evidence supporting empirical transfusion is lacking, and the best approach for blood transfusion prior to invasive procedures in cirrhotic patients has not been established so far. The aim of this study is to compare three transfusion strategies (routine coagulation test-guided - ordinary or restrictive, or thromboelastometry-guided) prior to central venous catheterization in critically ill patients with cirrhosis. Design and setting: a double-blinded, parallel-group, single-center, randomized controlled clinical trial in a tertiary private hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. adults (aged 18 years or older) admitted to the intensive care unit with cirrhosis and an indication for central venous line insertion. Patients will be randomly assigned to three groups for blood transfusion strategy prior to central venous catheterization: standard coagulation tests-based, thromboelastometry-based, or restrictive. The primary efficacy endpoint will be the proportion of patients transfused with any blood product prior to central venous catheterization. The primary safety endpoint will be the incidence of major bleeding. Secondary endpoints will be the proportion of transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, platelets and cryoprecipitate; infused volume of blood products; hemoglobin and hematocrit before and after the procedure; intensive care unit and hospital length of stay; 28-day and hospital mortality; incidence of minor bleeding; transfusion-related adverse reactions; and cost analysis. This study will evaluate three strategies to guide blood transfusion prior to central venous line placement in severely ill patients with cirrhosis. We hypothesized that thromboelastometry-based and/or restrictive protocols are safe and would significantly

  20. Clinical impact of delayed catheter removal for patients with central-venous-catheter-related Gram-negative bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y-M; Moon, C; Kim, Y J; Lee, H J; Lee, M S; Park, K-H

    2018-01-10

    Gram-negative bacteria are increasingly the cause of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), and the prevalence of multi-drug-resistant strains is rising rapidly. This study evaluated the impact of delayed central venous catheter (CVC) removal on clinical outcomes in patients with Gram-negative CRBSI. Between January 2007 and December 2016, patients with Gram-negative bacteraemia and CVC placement, from two tertiary care hospitals, were included retrospectively. Cases with CVC removal more than three days after onset of bacteraemia or without CVC removal were classified as having delayed CVC removal. In total, 112 patients were included. Of these, 78 had CRBSI (43 definite and 35 probable) and 34 had Gram-negative bacteraemia from another source (non-CRBSI). Enterobacteriaceae were less common pathogens in patients with CRBSI than in patients with non-CRBSI (11.5% vs 41.3%; P0.99). Delayed CVC removal [odds ratio (OR) 6.8], multi-drug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteraemia (OR 6.3) and chronic renal failure (OR 11.1) were associated with 30-day mortality in patients with CRBSI. The protective effect of early CVC removal on mortality was evident in the MDR group (48.3% vs 18.2%; P=0.03), but not in the non-MDR group (11.1% vs 0%; P=0.43). CVCs should be removed early to improve clinical outcomes in patients with Gram-negative CRBSI, especially in settings where MDR isolates are prevalent. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of hydrochloric acid instillation on salvage of infected central venous catheters in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Mette; Rosthøj, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Bacteraemia associated with indwelling central venous catheters (CVC) causes significant morbidity in children with cancer. Hydrochloric acid (HCl) instillations have been reported to salvage CVCs with antibiotic-refractory infection. We implemented this treatment in 2002. The impact on the survival of CVCs has been evaluated in a retrospective cohort study of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Children with newly diagnosed ALL during 1999-2005 having their first CVC inserted before (n = 16) and after (n = 24) the introduction of the procedure were studied. All bacteraemic episodes were reviewed, recording bacteriological findings and treatment, and the time to premature or planned removal of the CVC was determined. In the comparison cohort, 31.0% (9/29) of bacteraemic episodes led to removal of the CVC, compared to 5.5% (2/36) in the intervention cohort (p = 0.01). Thus, the rate of catheter loss due to infection fell from 56.3% (9/16) to 8.3% (2/24) after introducing HCl treatment (p = 0.0025). Overall, the premature catheter removal rate fell from 75.0% (12/16) to 45.8% (11/24) (p = 0.10). Analysed in a CUSUM plot the reduced frequency of premature CVC removal evidently coincided with the introduction of the procedure. In a subgroup analysis of 21 monobacterial infections with coagulase-negative staphylococci, a decrease in systemic and lock antibiotic therapy was found. No adverse events were noted. HCl instillations significantly reduced the need to remove and replace CVCs. The procedure is practical, appears to be safe, and may reduce the consumption of antibiotics.

  2. Comparison of Two Central Venous Pressure Control Strategies to Prevent Atrial Fibrillation After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

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    Mario Augusto Cray da Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF takes place in 10-40% of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG, and increases cardiovascular mortality. Enlargement of atrial chambers is associated with increased AF incidence, so patients with higher central venous pressure (CVP are expected to have larger atrial distension, which increases AF incidence. Objective: To compare post-CABG AF incidence, following two CVP control strategies. Methods: Interventional, randomized, controlled clinical study. The sample comprised 140 patients undergoing CABG between 2011 and 2015. They were randomized into two groups, G15 and G20, with CVP maintained ≤ 15 cmH2O and ≤ 20 cmH2O, respectively. Results: 70 patients were included in each group. The AF incidence in G15 was 8.57%, and in G20, 22.86%, with absolute risk reduction of 14.28%, and number needed to treat (NNT of 7 (p = 0.03. Mortality (G15 = 5.71%; G20 = 11.42%; p = 0.07, hospital length of stay (G15 = 7.14 days; G20 = 8.21 days; p = 0.36, number of grafts (median: G15 = 3, G2 = 2; p = 0.22 and cardiopulmonary bypass use (G15 = 67.10%; G20 = 55.70%; p = 0.22 were statistically similar. Age (p = 0.04 and hospital length of stay (p = 0.001 were significantly higher in patients who developed AF in both groups. Conclusion: Keeping CVP low in the first 72 post-CABG hours reduces the relative risk of AF, and may be useful to prevent AF after CABG.

  3. Ethanol-lock therapy for the prevention of central venous access device infections in pediatric patients with intestinal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cober, M Petrea; Kovacevich, Debra S; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    Central venous access device (CVAD) infections are a major complication in pediatric patients receiving long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) and are particularly prevalent in patients with intestinal failure. This study evaluated the outcomes of outpatient ethanol-lock therapy (ELT) for the prevention of CVAD infections in children with intestinal failure. In this retrospective analysis, the primary outcome measure was the rate of bloodstream infection (BSI) due to CVAD infections per 1,000 catheter days, and secondary measures included type of organisms cultured and complications of ELT. Over the course of 2 years, 15 patients received outpatient ELT. Sixty-seven percent were male; patients had a mean ± standard deviation age at enrollment of 5.6 ± 6.9 years and body weight of 19.9 ± 15.4 kg. Mean duration of ELT was 263 ± 190 days. Mean BSI rate per 1,000 catheter days significantly decreased from 8.0 before ELT to 1.3 after ELT (P ELT included thrombosis (n = 1), difficulty withdrawing blood from the CVAD, requiring thrombolytic administration (n = 3), and repair of the CVAD for leakage/tear (n = 20). The rate of CVAD repair for leakage/tear with ELT was compared to prior rates per 1,000 catheter days and was found to be elevated after initiation of ELT (6.4 ± 10.0 vs 3.1 ± 5.2; P = .20). No signs and symptoms of ethanol intoxication were observed. ELT for the prevention of CVAD infections in pediatric intestinal failure patients significantly decreased BSI rates and may be used for extended periods of time in an outpatient setting.

  4. Epidemiology and mortality of candidemia both related and unrelated to the central venous catheter: a retrospective cohort study.

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    Arias, S; Denis, O; Montesinos, I; Cherifi, S; Miendje Deyi, V Y; Zech, F

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to compare mortality, epidemiology, and morbidity in hospitalized patients with candidemia which was both related and unrelated to the central venous catheter (CVC). This was a monocentric, retrospective cohort study of candidemia. The sample consisted of 103 patients with laboratory-confirmed nosocomial candidemia hospitalized between 2006 and 2013 in a tertiary care public hospital. We included 65 (63.1 %) patients (24 in the CVC-positive group, 41 in the CVC-negative group). Demographic data and risk factors were recorded using a structured case report form. In the group of candidemia associated to the CVC, survival at day 50 was 58.6 ± 11.9 %, compared to 26.5 ± 8.9 % for the CVC-negative group (p-value = 0.012); the hazard ratio of death was 0.38 (95 % confidence interval 0.17-0.85, p-value = 0.019). Compared with the CVC-positive patients, CVC-negative patients were often colonized with yeast (41.5 % vs. 16.7 %, p-value = 0.041), had a shorter previous in-hospital stay (20 days vs. 34 days, p-value = 0.023), and were more severely ill (severe sepsis 85.4 % vs. 58.3 %, p-value = 0.016). In this study, when the origin of candidemia was not the CVC, patients were more seriously ill, had a higher mortality rate, and the removal of the catheter seemed to lead to disappointing results. It would be useful to explore the impact of retention of the CVC on survival in the CVC-negative patients, where the CVCs are essential to treating these patients.

  5. Measurement of Anterior–Posterior Diameter of Ivc By Ultrasonography: a Non Invasive Method for Estimation of Central Venous Pressure.

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    N Nouri-Majalan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The assessment of intravascular volume in severely traumatized patients or patients admitted in ICU is very essential. At present the accurate method for estimating the intravascular volume requirement is by measuring the CVP which is an invasive method. The measurement of IVC diameter by ultrasound has been suggested as an easily available and simple method for measuring the intravascular volume status. The purpose of this study was to compare the results of IVC diameter measurement by ultrasonography and CVP measurement for calculating the intravascular volume in ICU admitted patients. Methods: This was a descriptive and prospective study including 50 patients admitted in ICU with a central venous catheter placed for any reason whatsoever and no signs of increased right atrial pressure. CVP was measured in supine position by CVP manometer. The anterior- posterior IVC diameter was assessed by ultrasonography during inspiration and expiration. Data analysis was performed by SPSS and evaluated statistically with Pearsons regression and linear correlation test. Results: The mean CVP at inspiration and during expiration was 11.35+ 5.53, 12.20 + 5.65 cmH2O, respectively. The mean of inspiratory and expiratory IVC diameter was 7.71 + 3.5 , 11.37 + 3.28 mm, respectively. There was significant correlation between CVP and IVC diameter both during inspiration (r= 0.64 , p-value= 0.001 and expiration (r=0.495 , p-value=0.001 Conclusion: The result of this study suggests that IVC diameter measurement by ultrasound can be used as a reliable and non- invasive method for estimating the intravascular volume.

  6. The Effect of Model Fidelity on Learning Outcomes of a Simulation-Based Education Program for Central Venous Catheter Insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Emily; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Rigler, Sally K; Williamson, Timothy L; Tarver, Stephen; Sharpe, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    Simulation-based education for central venous catheter (CVC) insertion has been repeatedly documented to improve performance, but the impact of simulation model fidelity has not been described. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of the physical fidelity of the simulation model on learning outcomes for a simulation-based education program for CVC insertion. Forty consecutive residents rotating through the medical intensive care unit of an academic medical center completed a simulation-based education program for CVC insertion. The curriculum was designed in accordance with the principles of deliberate practice and mastery learning. Each resident underwent baseline skills testing and was then randomized to training on a commercially available CVC model with high physical fidelity (High-Fi group) or a simply constructed model with low physical fidelity (Low-Fi group) in a noninferiority trial. Upon completion of their medical intensive care unit rotation 4 weeks later, residents returned for repeat skills testing on the high-fidelity model using a 26-item checklist. The mean (SD) posttraining score on the 26-item checklist for the Low-Fi group was 23.8 (2.2) (91.5%) and was not inferior to the mean (SD) score for the High-Fi group of 22.5 (2.6) (86.5%) (P Simulation-based education using equipment with low physical fidelity can achieve learning outcomes comparable with those with high-fidelity equipment, as long as other aspects of fidelity are maintained and robust educational principles are applied during the design of the curriculum.

  7. Use of simulation-based education to improve outcomes of central venous catheterization: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene W Y; Brindle, Mary E; Ronksley, Paul E; Lorenzetti, Diane L; Sauve, Reg S; Ghali, William A

    2011-09-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC) is increasingly taught by simulation. The authors reviewed the literature on the effects of simulation training in CVC on learner and clinical outcomes. The authors searched computerized databases (1950 to May 2010), reference lists, and considered studies with a control group (without simulation education intervention). Two independent assessors reviewed the retrieved citations. Independent data abstraction was performed on study design, study quality score, learner characteristics, sample size, components of interventional curriculum, outcomes assessed, and method of assessment. Learner outcomes included performance measures on simulators, knowledge, and confidence. Patient outcomes included number of needle passes, arterial puncture, pneumothorax, and catheter-related infections. Twenty studies were identified. Simulation-based education was associated with significant improvements in learner outcomes: performance on simulators (standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.60 [95% CI 0.45 to 0.76]), knowledge (SMD 0.60 [95% CI 0.35 to 0.84]), and confidence (SMD 0.41 [95% CI 0.30 to 0.53] for studies with single-group pretest and posttest design; SMD 0.52 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.81) for studies with nonrandomized, two-group design). Furthermore, simulation-based education was associated with improved patient outcomes, including fewer needle passes (SMD -0.58 [95% CI -0.95 to -0.20]), and pneumothorax (relative risk 0.62 [95% CI 0.40 to 0.97]), for studies with nonrandomized, two-group design. However, simulation-based training was not associated with a significant reduction in risk of either arterial puncture or catheter-related infections. Despite some limitations in the literature reviewed, evidence suggests that simulation-based education for CVC provides benefits in learner and select clinical outcomes.

  8. Skin antisepsis with 0.05% sodium hypochlorite before central venous catheter insertion in neonates: A 2-year single-center experience.

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    Ciccia, Matilde; Chakrokh, Roksana; Molinazzi, Dario; Zanni, Angela; Farruggia, Patrizia; Sandri, Fabrizio

    2018-02-01

    The study reports a 2-year single-center experience of the practice of skin antisepsis using a 0.05% sodium hypochlorite solution before central venous catheter placement in neonates. Eligible subjects included any hospitalized neonate who needed a central line for at least 48 hours. Infants were excluded if they had a generalized or localized skin disorder. An ad hoc Excel (Microsoft Corp, Redmond, WA) file was used to record the data from each patient. The catheter sites were monitored daily for the presence of contact dermatitis. Central line-associated bloodstream infection was diagnosed according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition. One hundred five infants underwent central venous catheter placement and were enrolled. A total of 198 central lines were inserted. The median gestational age was 31 weeks (range, 23-41 weeks) and median birth weight was 1,420 g (range, 500-5,170 g). There were no signs of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite-related skin toxicity in any infant. Of 198 catheters (1,652 catheter-days) prospectively studied, 9 were associated with bloodstream infections (5.4 per 1,000 catheter-days). During the observation period, no local adverse effects were observed suggesting that 0.05% sodium hypochlorite may be a safe choice in this context. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bedside ultrasound to detect central venous catheter misplacement and associated iatrogenic complications: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Jasper M; Raadsen, Reinder; Blans, Michiel J; Petjak, Manfred; Van de Ven, Peter M; Tuinman, Pieter R

    2018-03-13

    Insertion of a central venous catheter (CVC) is common practice in critical care medicine. Complications arising from CVC placement are mostly due to a pneumothorax or malposition. Correct position is currently confirmed by chest x-ray, while ultrasonography might be a more suitable option. We performed a meta-analysis of the available studies with the primary aim of synthesizing information regarding detection of CVC-related complications and misplacement using ultrasound (US). This is a systematic review and meta-analysis registered at PROSPERO (CRD42016050698). PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched. Articles which reported the diagnostic accuracy of US in detecting the position of CVCs and the mechanical complications associated with insertion were included. Primary outcomes were specificity and sensitivity of US. Secondary outcomes included prevalence of malposition and pneumothorax, feasibility of US examination, and time to perform and interpret both US and chest x-ray. A qualitative assessment was performed using the QUADAS-2 tool. We included 25 studies with a total of 2548 patients and 2602 CVC placements. Analysis yielded a pooled specificity of 98.9 (95% confidence interval (CI): 97.8-99.5) and sensitivity of 68.2 (95% CI: 54.4-79.4). US examination was feasible in 96.8% of the cases. The prevalence of CVC malposition and pneumothorax was 6.8% and 1.1%, respectively. The mean time for US performance was 2.83 min (95% CI: 2.77-2.89 min) min, while chest x-ray performance took 34.7 min (95% CI: 32.6-36.7 min). US was feasible in 97%. Further analyses were performed by defining subgroups based on the different utilized US protocols and on intra-atrial and extra-atrial misplacement. Vascular US combined with transthoracic echocardiography was most accurate. US is an accurate and feasible diagnostic modality to detect CVC malposition and iatrogenic pneumothorax

  10. Central Venous Catheter (Central Line)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... day) without being “stuck” many times. ■ ■ To deliver nutrition directly into the blood when food or liquids cannot be given through the mouth, stomach, or intestine. ■ ■ To connect a person with kidney failure to a hemodialysis machine that clears the body of wastes and ...

  11. Percutaneous retrieval of centrally embolized fragments of central venous access devices or knotted Swan-Ganz catheters. Clinical report of 14 retrievals with detailed angiographic analysis and review of procedural aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Kalińczuk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Totally implantable venous access systems (TIVAS, Swan-Ganz (SG and central venous catheters (CVC allow easy and repetitive entry to the central cardiovascular system. Fragments of them may be released inadvertently into the cardiovascular system during their insertion or as a result of mechanical complications encountered during long-term utilization. Aim : To present results of percutaneous retrieval of embolized fragments of central venous devices or knotted SG and review the procedural aspects with a series of detailed angiographies. Material and methods : Between January 2003 and December 2012 there were 14 (~0.025% successful retrievals in 13 patients (44 ±16 years, 15% females of embolized fragments of TIVAS (n = 10 or CVC (n = 1 or of dislodged guide-wires (n = 2 or knotted SG (n = 1. Results : Foreign bodies with the forward end located in the right ventricle (RV, as well as those found in the pulmonary artery (PA, often required repositioning with a pigtail catheter as compared to those catheter fragments which were located in the right atrium (RA and/or great vein and possessed an accessible free end allowing their direct ensnarement with the loop snare (57.0% (4/7 vs. 66.7% (2/3 vs. 0.0% (0/3; p = 0.074 respectively. Procedure duration was 2–3 times longer among catheters retrieved from the PA than among those with the forward edge located in the RV or RA (30 (18–68 vs. 13.5 (11–37 vs. 8 min (8–13; p = 0.054 respectively. The SG catheter knotted in the vena cava superior (VCS was encircled with the loop snare introduced transfemorally, subsequently cut at its skin entrance and then pulled down inside the 14 Fr vascular sheath. Conclusions : By using the pigtail catheter and the loop snare, it is feasible to retrieve centrally embolized fragments or knotted central venous access devices.

  12. Central venous catheter - flushing

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    ... Martin BC, Aebersold M, Gonzalez L, eds. Clinical Nursing Skills: Basic to Advanced Skills . 9th ed. New York, NY: Pearson; 2016:chap 29. Read More Bone marrow transplant Patient Instructions After chemotherapy - discharge Bleeding during cancer treatment Bone marrow transplant - ...

  13. Interaction of central and peripheral factors during repeated sprints at different levels of arterial O2 saturation.

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    François Billaut

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the interaction between the development of peripheral locomotor muscle fatigue, muscle recruitment and performance during repeated-sprint exercise (RSE. METHOD: In a single-blind, randomised and cross-over design, ten male team-sport athletes performed two RSE (fifteen 5-s cycling sprints interspersed with 25 s of rest; power self-selected in normoxia and in acute moderate hypoxia (FIO2 0.138. Mechanical work, total electromyographic intensity (summed quadriceps electromyograms, RMSsum and muscle (vastus lateralis and pre-fontal cortex near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS parameters were calculated for every sprint. Blood lactate concentration ([Lac(-] was measured throughout the protocol. Peripheral quadriceps fatigue was assessed via changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force (ΔQtw,pot pre- versus post-exercise in response to supra-maximal magnetic femoral nerve stimulation. The central activation ratio (QCAR was used to quantify completeness of quadriceps activation. RESULTS: Compared with normoxia, hypoxia reduced arterial oxygen saturation (-13.7%, P=0.001, quadriceps RMSsum (-13.7%, P=0.022, QCAR (-3.3%, P=0.041 and total mechanical work (-8.3%, P=0.019. However, the magnitude of quadriceps fatigue induced by RSE was similar in the two conditions (ΔQtw,pot: -53.5% and -55.1%, P=0.71. The lower cycling performance in hypoxia occurred despite similar metabolic (muscle NIRS parameters and blood [Lac(-] and functional (twitch and M-wave muscle states. CONCLUSION: Results suggest that the central nervous system regulates quadriceps muscle recruitment and, thereby, performance to limit the development of muscle fatigue during intermittent, short sprints. This finding highlights the complex interaction between muscular perturbations and neural adjustments during sprint exercise, and further supports the presence of pacing during intermittent sprint exercise.

  14. Probing gluon saturation with next-to-leading order photon production at central rapidities in proton-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benić, Sanjin [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb,Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo,7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Fukushima, Kenji [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo,7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Garcia-Montero, Oscar [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg,Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Venugopalan, Raju [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory,Bldg. 510A, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2017-01-26

    We compute the cross section for photons emitted from sea quarks in proton-nucleus collisions at collider energies. The computation is performed within the dilute-dense kinematics of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) effective field theory. Albeit the result obtained is formally at next-to-leading order in the CGC power counting, it provides the dominant contribution for central rapidities. We observe that the inclusive photon cross section is proportional to all-twist Wilson line correlators in the nucleus. These correlators also appear in quark-pair production; unlike the latter, photon production is insensitive to hadronization uncertainties and therefore more sensitive to multi-parton correlations in the gluon saturation regime of QCD. We demonstrate that k{sub ⊥} and collinear factorized expressions for inclusive photon production are obtained as leading twist approximations to our result. In particular, the collinearly factorized expression is directly sensitive to the nuclear gluon distribution at small x. Other results of interest include the realization of the Low-Burnett-Kroll soft photon theorem in the CGC framework and a comparative study of how the photon amplitude is obtained in Lorenz and light-cone gauges.

  15. Evaluation of adjusted central venous blood gases versus arterial blood gases of patients in post-operative paediatric cardiac surgical intensive care unit

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    Naveen G Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Central venous catheters are in situ in most of the intensive care unit (ICU patients, which may be an alternative for determining acid-base status and can reduce complications from prolonged arterial cannulation. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability between adjusted central venous blood gas (aVBG and arterial blood gas (ABG samples for pH, partial pressure of carbon-di-oxide (pCO2, bicarbonate (HCO3−, base excess (BE and lactates in paediatric cardiac surgical ICU. Methods: We applied blood gas adjustment rule, that is aVBG pH = venous blood gas (VBG pH +0.05, aVBG CO2 = VBG pCO2 - 5 mm Hg from the prior studies. In this study, we validated this relationship with simultaneous arterial and central venous blood obtained from 30 patients with four blood sample pairs each in paediatric cardiac surgical ICU patients. Results: There was a strong correlation (R i.e., Pearson's correlation between ABG and aVBG for pH = 0.9544, pCO2 = 0.8738, lactate = 0.9741, HCO3− = 0.9650 and BE = 0.9778. Intraclass correlation co-efficients (ICCs for agreement improved after applying the adjustment rule to venous pH (0.7505 to 0.9454 and pCO2 (0.4354 to 0.741. Bland Altman showed bias (and limits of agreement for pH: 0.008 (−0.04 to + 0.057, pCO2: −3.52 (–9.68 to +2.65, lactate: −0.10 (−0.51 to +0.30, HCO3−: −2.3 (–5.11 to +0.50 and BE: −0.80 (−3.09 to +1.49. Conclusion: ABG and aVBG samples showed strong correlation, acceptable mean differences and improved agreement (high ICC after adjusting the VBG. Hence, it can be promising to use trend values of VBG instead of ABG in conjunction with a correction factor under stable haemodynamic conditions.

  16. Incidence of catheter-related complications in patients with central venous or hemodialysis catheters: a health care claims database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napalkov, Pavel; Felici, Diana M; Chu, Laura K; Jacobs, Joan R; Begelman, Susan M

    2013-10-16

    Central venous catheter (CVC) and hemodialysis (HD) catheter usage are associated with complications that occur during catheter insertion, dwell period, and removal. This study aims to identify and describe the incidence rates of catheter-related complications in a large patient population in a United States-based health care claims database after CVC or HD catheter placement. Patients in the i3 InVision DataMart® health care claims database with at least 1 CVC or HD catheter insertion claim were categorized into CVC or HD cohorts using diagnostic and procedural codes from the US Renal Data System, American College of Surgeons, and American Medical Association's Physician Performance Measures. Catheter-related complications were identified using published diagnostic and procedural codes. Incidence rates (IRs)/1000 catheter-days were calculated for complications including catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), thrombosis, embolism, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), major bleeding (MB), and mechanical catheter-related complications (MCRCs). Thirty percent of the CVC cohort and 54% of the HD cohort had catheter placements lasting <90 days. Catheter-related complications occurred most often during the first 90 days of catheter placement. IRs were highest for CRBSIs in both cohorts (4.0 [95% CI, 3.7-4.3] and 5.1 [95% CI, 4.7-5.6], respectively). Other IRs in CVC and HD cohorts, respectively, were thrombosis, 1.3 and 0.8; MCRCs, 0.6 and 0.7; embolism, 0.4 and 0.5; MB, 0.1 and 0.3; and ICH, 0.1 in both cohorts. Patients with cancer at baseline had significantly higher IRs for CRBSIs and thrombosis than non-cancer patients. CVC or HD catheter-related complications were most frequently seen in patients 16 years or younger. The risk of catheter-related complications is highest during the first 90 days of catheter placement in patients with CVCs and HD catheters and in younger patients (≤16 years of age) with HD catheters. Data provided in this study can be applied

  17. A comparative study of two techniques (electrocardiogram- and landmark-guided for correct depth of the central venous catheter placement in paediatric patients undergoing elective cardiovascular surgery

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    Neeraj Kumar Barnwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The complications of central venous catheterisation can be minimized by ensuring catheter tip placement just above the superior vena cava-right atrium junction. We aimed to compare two methods, using an electrocardiogram (ECG or landmark as guides, for assessing correct depth of central venous catheter (CVC placement. Methods: In a prospective randomised study of sixty patients of <12 years of age, thirty patients each were allotted randomly to two groups (ECG and landmark. After induction, central venous catheterisation was performed by either of the two techniques and position of CVC tip was compared in post-operative chest X-ray with respect to carina. Unpaired t-test was used for quantitative data and Chi-square test was used for qualitative data. Results: In ECG group, positions of CVC tip were above carina in 12, at carina in 9 and below carina in 9 patients. In landmark group, the positions of CVC tips were above carina in 10, at carina in 4 and below carina in 16 patients. Mean distance of CVC tip in ECG group was 0.34 ± 0.23 cm and 0.66 ± 0.35 cm in landmark group (P = 0.0001. Complications occurred in one patient in ECG group and in nine patients in landmark group (P = 0.0056. Conclusion: Overall, landmark-guided technique was comparable with ECG technique. ECG-guided technique was more precise for CVC tip placement closer to carina. The incidence of complications was more in the landmark group.

  18. A systematic review of extravasation and local tissue injury from administration of vasopressors through peripheral intravenous catheters and central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubani, Osama M; Green, Robert S

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to collect and describe all published reports of local tissue injury or extravasation from vasopressor administration via either peripheral intravenous (IV) or central venous catheter. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases was performed from inception through January 2014 for reports of adults who received vasopressor intravenously via peripheral IV or central venous catheter for a therapeutic purpose. We included primary studies or case reports of vasopressor administration that resulted in local tissue injury or extravasation of vasopressor solution. Eighty-five articles with 270 patients met all inclusion criteria. A total of 325 separate local tissue injury and extravasation events were identified, with 318 events resulting from peripheral vasopressor administration and 7 events resulting from central administration. There were 204 local tissue injury events from peripheral administration of vasopressors, with an average duration of infusion of 55.9 hours (±68.1), median time of 24 hours, and range of 0.08 to 528 hours. In most of these events (174/204, 85.3%), the infusion site was located distal to the antecubital or popliteal fossae. Published data on tissue injury or extravasation from vasopressor administration via peripheral IVs are derived mainly from case reports. Further study is warranted to clarify the safety of vasopressor administration via peripheral IVs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of Two Central Venous Pressure Control Strategies to Prevent Atrial Fibrillation After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Mario Augusto Cray da; Lirani, Wesley; Wippich, Ana Caroline; Lopes, Luana; Tolentino, Eduardo de Souza; Zampar, Beatriz; Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli

    2017-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) takes place in 10-40% of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and increases cardiovascular mortality. Enlargement of atrial chambers is associated with increased AF incidence, so patients with higher central venous pressure (CVP) are expected to have larger atrial distension, which increases AF incidence. To compare post-CABG AF incidence, following two CVP control strategies. Interventional, randomized, controlled clinical study. The sample comprised 140 patients undergoing CABG between 2011 and 2015. They were randomized into two groups, G15 and G20, with CVP maintained ≤ 15 cmH2O and ≤ 20 cmH2O, respectively. 70 patients were included in each group. The AF incidence in G15 was 8.57%, and in G20, 22.86%, with absolute risk reduction of 14.28%, and number needed to treat (NNT) of 7 (p = 0.03). Mortality (G15 = 5.71%; G20 = 11.42%; p = 0.07), hospital length of stay (G15 = 7.14 days; G20 = 8.21 days; p = 0.36), number of grafts (median: G15 = 3, G2 = 2; p = 0.22) and cardiopulmonary bypass use (G15 = 67.10%; G20 = 55.70%; p = 0.22) were statistically similar. Age (p = 0.04) and hospital length of stay (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in patients who developed AF in both groups. Keeping CVP low in the first 72 post-CABG hours reduces the relative risk of AF, and may be useful to prevent AF after CABG. A fibrilação atrial (FA) ocorre em 10-40% dos pacientes submetidos a cirurgia de revascularização miocárdica (RM), e eleva a mortalidade cardiovascular. Como o aumento dos átrios está associado ao aumento da incidência de FA, espera-se que pacientes com pressão venosa central (PVC) mais alta tenham maior distensão atrial, o que eleva a incidência dessa arritmia. Comparar a incidência de FA em pós-operatório de RM, seguindo duas estratégias de controle de PVC. Estudo clínico randomizado controlado intervencionista. A amostra foi composta por 140 pacientes submetidos a RM entre 2011 e 2015. Os

  20. A new central venous catheter cap: decreased microbial growth and risk for catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, A L; Spapperi, J; Leopold, P

    2009-01-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and is a source of significant healthcare expenditures in patients that require central venous catheters for intravenous nutrition, chemotherapy, and other products. The source of many catheter-related infections is contamination of the catheter hub. Herein an antimicrobial catheter cap, the AB Cap is described. The AB Cap device is a catheter cleaning device designed to keep needleless luer valves clean by encapsulating them in a cleaning solution. This device was evaluated using an in vitro model of hub contamination with Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), Klebsiella pneumonia (K. pneumonia), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans (C. albicans). Following hub contamination on days 1, 3, 5 and 7, saline was infused through the AB Cap and effluent collected from the efferent end. The effluent fluid was cultured for the index organisms, and allowed to incubate in culture for up to 7 days. Negative control caps were not contaminated and positive controls lacked cleaning solution and were contaminated. Microbial growth developed for all index organisms, and generally within 1 day of culture growth following the first day of contamination (day 1) in effluent from all positive controls, while no growth occurred in effluent from negative controls. No growth of any organism occurred in any of the test items after the first day of contamination. Growth of three organisms was detected in two of the three test AB Caps following contamination day 3, after 1-4 days of incubation. All organisms could be cultured in the effluent from two of the three test items at contamination day 5, generally by the second day of incubation. One test item remained free of growth for the entire test period except for one organism. By day 7, this particular test item grew an additional organism and the testing was concluded. All positive growth test

  1. Tamponamento cardíaco em dois recém-nascidos causado por cateter umbilical Cardiac tamponade caused by central venous catheter in two newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey José Monteiro

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Tamponamento cardíaco secundário ao uso de cateter venoso central é uma complicação rara, porém potencialmente tratável, quando identificada a tempo. Nós relatamos dois casos de tamponamento cardíaco, diagnosticados por ecocardiograma transtorácico, seguido de pericardiocentese de urgência e drenagem pericárdica cirúrgica como complicação de cateterização venosa umbilical. Em um caso, a ponta do cateter estava adequadamente localizada e, no outro caso, não. Em ambos os casos, solução hiperosmolar estava sendo infundida. Apesar de situação incomum, esta deve ser sempre considerada em neonato, evoluindo com choque cardiogênico sem causa aparente.Cardiac tamponade secondary to the use of central venous catheter is a rare complication; however, it is potentially reversible when it is caught in time. We report two cases of cardiac tamponade that was diagnosed using a transthoracic echocardiography, followed by urgent pericardiocentesis and surgical pericardial drainage as a complication from umbilical venous catheterization. In one case, the tip of the catheter was properly placed, and in the other case, it was not. In both cases, a hyperosmolar solution was being injected. Although it may be an uncommon situation, it should be always considered as a possibility in a newborn who develops cardiogenic shock without an apparent cause.

  2. CT-Guided Superior Vena Cava Puncture: A Solution to Re-Establishing Access in Haemodialysis-Related Central Venous Occlusion Refractory to Conventional Endovascular Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, Mohamed, E-mail: mkhalifa@nhs.net; Patel, Neeral R., E-mail: neeral.patel06@gmail.com; Moser, Steven, E-mail: steven.moser@imperial.nhs.uk [Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Radiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this technical note is to demonstrate the novel use of CT-guided superior vena cava (SVC) puncture and subsequent tunnelled haemodialysis (HD) line placement in end-stage renal failure (ESRF) patients with central venous obstruction refractory to conventional percutaneous venoplasty (PTV) and wire transgression, thereby allowing resumption of HD.MethodsThree successive ESRF patients underwent CT-guided SVC puncture with subsequent tract recanalisation. Ultrasound-guided puncture of the right internal jugular vein was performed, the needle advanced to the patent SVC under CT guidance, with subsequent insertion of a stabilisation guidewire. Following appropriate tract angioplasty, twin-tunnelled HD catheters were inserted and HD resumed.ResultsNo immediate complications were identified. There was resumption of HD in all three patients with a 100 % success rate. One patient’s HD catheter remained in use for 2 years post-procedure, and another remains functional 1 year to the present day. One patient died 2 weeks after the procedure due to pancreatitis-related abdominal sepsis unrelated to the Tesio lines.ConclusionCT-guided SVC puncture and tunnelled HD line insertion in HD-related central venous occlusion (CVO) refractory to conventional recanalisation options can be performed safely, requires no extra equipment and lies within the skill set and resources of most interventional radiology departments involved in the management of HD patients.

  3. Comparison of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) versus subcutaneously implanted port-chamber catheters by complication and cost for patients receiving chemotherapy for non-haematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, G S; Jain, K; Kumar, R; Strickland, A H; Pellegrini, L; Slavotinek, J; Eaton, M; McLeay, W; Price, T; Ly, M; Ullah, S; Koczwara, B; Kichenadasse, G; Karapetis, C S

    2014-01-01

    Indwelling central venous catheters (CVCs) have been increasingly used to enable delivery of intravenous chemotherapy. We aimed to compare the safety and cost of two commonly used CVCs, peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICCs) and ports, in the delivery of chemotherapy in patients with non-haematological malignancies. Seventy patients were randomly assigned to receive either a PICC or a port. The primary endpoint was occurrence of major complications, which required removal of the CVC and secondary endpoints included occurrence of any complications. Port devices were associated with fewer complications compared with PICC lines (hazard ratio of 0.25, CI, 0.09-0.86, P = 0.038). Major complication rate was lower in the port arm compared to the PICC arm (0.047 versus 0.193 major complications/100 catheter days, P = 0.034) with 6 versus 20 % of patients experiencing major complications, respectively. Thrombosis, the most common complication, was significantly higher in the PICC arm compared to the port arm (25 versus 0 %, P = 0.013). Quality of life and cost estimates did not differ significantly between the two arms. Port devices are associated with a lower risk of complications, with no difference in cost, compared to PICC lines in patients with non-haematological malignancies receiving intravenous chemotherapy.

  4. [Venous ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms.

  5. The intracavitary ECG method for positioning the tip of central venous access devices in pediatric patients: results of an Italian multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Francesca; Pittiruti, Mauro; Lamperti, Massimo; Graziano, Ugo; Celentano, Davide; Capozzoli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The Italian Group for Venous Access Devices (GAVeCeLT) has carried out a multicenter study investigating the safety and accuracy of intracavitary electrocardiography (IC-ECG) in pediatric patients. We enrolled 309 patients (age 1 month-18 years) candidate to different central venous access devices (VAD) - 56 peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC), 178 short term centrally inserted central catheters (CICC), 65 long term VADs, 10 VADs for dialysis - in five Italian Hospitals. Three age groups were considered: A (ECG was applicable in 307 cases. The increase of the P wave on IC-ECG was detected in all cases but two. The tip of the catheter was positioned at the cavo-atrial junction (CAJ) (i.e., at the maximal height of the P wave on IC-ECG) and the position was checked during the procedure by fluoroscopy or chest x-ray, considering the CAJ at 1-2 cm (group A), 1.5-3 cm (group B), or 2-4 cm (group C) below the carina. There were no complications related to IC-ECG. The overall match between IC-ECG and x-ray was 95.8% (96.2% in group A, 95% in group B, and 96.8% in group C). In 95 cases, the IC-ECG was performed with a dedicated ECG monitor, specifically designed for IC-ECG (Nautilus, Romedex): in this group, the match between IC-ECG and x-ray was 98.8%. We conclude that the IC-ECG method is safe and accurate in the pediatric patients. The applicability of the method is 99.4% and its feasibility is 99.4%. The accuracy is 95.8% and even higher (98.8%) when using a dedicated ECG monitor.

  6. Imaging of cerebral venous complications in patients with infections

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    Xudong Shen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic and local infections can cause cerebrovascular complications in the central nervous system. The involvement of cerebral venous system would result in venous or dural venous sinus thrombophlebitis. Images can help evaluate the venous complications in patients with central nervous system infection and provide information in guiding treatment and prognosis. The main focus of this review is to emphasize the proper utilization of imaging modalities in assessment the complications of cerebral venous system in patients with infection.

  7. A randomized controlled trial and cost-effectiveness analysis of early cannulation arteriovenous grafts versus tunneled central venous catheters in patients requiring urgent vascular access for hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Emma; Thomson, Peter; Bainbridge, Leigh; Kasthuri, Ram; Mohr, Belinda; Kingsmore, David

    2017-03-01

    Early cannulation arteriovenous grafts (ecAVGs) are proposed as an alternative to tunneled central venous catheters (TCVCs) in patients requiring immediate vascular access for hemodialysis (HD). We compared bacteremia rates in patients treated with ecAVG and TCVC. The study randomized 121 adult patients requiring urgent vascular access for HD in a 1:1 fashion to receive an ecAVG with or without (+/-) an arteriovenous fistula (AVF; n = 60) or TCVC+/-AVF (n = 61). Patients were excluded if they had active systemic sepsis, no anatomically suitable vessels, or an anticipated life expectancy vascular access for HD. The strategy also proved to be cost-neutral. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Biofilm formation in long-term central venous catheters in children with cancer: a randomized controlled open-labelled trial of taurolidine versus heparin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Fuursted, Kurt; Funch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Taurolidine has demonstrated inhibition of biofilm formation in vitro. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of catheter locking with taurolidine vs heparin in biofilm formation in central venous catheters. Forty-eight children with cancer were randomized to catheter locking by heparin (n......-quantitative cultures were also performed. Biofilm was identified in 23 of 26 catheters from the taurolidine group and 21 of 22 catheters from the heparin group. A positive culture was made of six of the catheters locked with taurolidine and heparin, respectively (p = 0.78). The rate of catheter-related bloodstream...... infections (CRBSI) was 0.1 per 1000 catheter-days using taurolidine and 0.9 per 1000 catheter-days using heparin (p = 0.03). This randomized trial confirmed that the use of taurolidine as catheter-lock compared with heparin reduced the rate of CRBSIs; this reduction was not related to a reduction...

  9. Systematic review including re-analyses of 1148 individual data sets of central venous pressure as a predictor of fluid responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskesen, T G; Wetterslev, M; Perner, A

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Central venous pressure (CVP) has been shown to have poor predictive value for fluid responsiveness in critically ill patients. We aimed to re-evaluate this in a larger sample subgrouped by baseline CVP values. METHODS: In April 2015, we systematically searched and included all clinical...... studies evaluating the value of CVP in predicting fluid responsiveness. We contacted investigators for patient data sets. We subgrouped data as lower (12 mmHg) baseline CVP. RESULTS: We included 51 studies; in the majority, mean/median CVP values were...... the lower 95% CI crossed 0.50. We identified some positive and negative predictive value for fluid responsiveness for specific low and high values of CVP, respectively, but none of the predictive values were above 66% for any CVPs from 0 to 20 mmHg. There were less data on higher CVPs, in particular >15 mm...

  10. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia due to Tsukamurella species in the immunocompromised host: a case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, M A; Tabet, S R; Collier, A C; Wallis, C K; Carlson, L C; Nguyen, T T; Kattar, M M; Coyle, M B

    2002-10-01

    We report 6 cases of bacteremia due to Tsukamurella species, all of which were in immunosuppressed patients with indwelling central venous catheters (CVCs). Fewer than 20 cases of serious illness due to these gram-positive bacilli have been reported in the medical literature; these cases have mostly been ascribed to the species Tsukamurella paurometabola. Tsukamurella species are frequently misidentified as Rhodococcus or Corynebacterium species. We used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify these organisms to the genus level and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and DNA-DNA dot blots for species identification. Three of our isolates were identified as Tsukamurella pulmonis, 1 was identified as Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvans, and 1 was identified as a unique species. One isolate was not maintained long enough for species identification. All patients were successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy and CVC removal. Infection with this organism should be considered in the immunosuppressed patient with an indwelling CVC and gram-positive bacilli in the blood.

  11. Transcatheter treatment of tricuspid regurgitation by caval valve implantation--experimental evaluation of decellularized tissue valves in central venous position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauten, Alexander; Laube, Adrian; Schubert, Harald; Bischoff, Sabine; Nietzsche, Sandor; Horstkötter, Kim; Poudel-Bochmann, Bhawana; Franz, Marcus; Lichtenberg, Artur; Figulla, Hans R; Akhyari, Payam

    2015-01-01

    Caval valve implantation has been suggested for transcatheter treatment of severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR). Combining the interventional technique with the promising surgical experience with decellularized valves, we sought to evaluate the functional and structural outcome of decellularized pericardial tissue valves (dTVs) in the low-pressure venous circulation in a chronic model of TR. Sixteen pericardial tissue valves were heterotopically implanted in the inferior and superior vena cava in a sheep model (54-98 kg; median 74.5 kg, n = 8) of severe TR. The devices were assembled using self-expanding nitinol stents and bovine pericardia decellularized by a detergent-based protocol (group dTV; n = 8). Glutaraldehyde-fixed pericardial tissue valves served as control (GaTV, n = 8). After 6 months, device function and structural maturation were analyzed using echocardiographic, histologic, immunohistologic, and electron microscopic approaches. After implantation, cardiac output increased significantly from 3.7 ± 1.1 l/min to 4.8 ± 1.1 l/min (P < 0.05) and competent valve function was verified by angiography. At 6 months, angiographic and echocardiographic evaluation revealed moderate to severe regurgitation in all GaTV. In contrast, five of the eight dTVs functioned well with only minor regurgitation. In these animals, autopsy revealed preserved valve structure with tender leaflets without signs of thrombosis or calcification. Conversely, GaTV showed severe degeneration with large calcification areas. Microscopic and histologic analysis confirmed endothelial repopulation in both valve types. However, additional interstitial reseeding was observed in decellularized valves. In the venous circulation in severe TR, decellularized valves show superior functional performance compared to Ga-fixed tissue valves. Macroscopic and microscopic analyses suggest preserved structural integrity and advanced endothelial and interstitial repopulation with

  12. Misplaced left internal jugular venous catheter with an exceptional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Large numbers of central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed each year in the intensive care units and misplacement occurs frequently. Many critically ill patients require central venous catheterization for multiple and varied reasons. Internal jugular vein (IJV) catheter is one of the most frequent central venous catheters in ...

  13. Venous insufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a large vein in the leg called the superficial saphenous vein. Outlook (Prognosis) Chronic venous insufficiency tends ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  14. Venous Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  15. Venous thromboses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebauer, A.; Tosch, U.; Rath, M.

    1985-02-01

    The suspicion of the presence of venous thrombosis is supported by Doppler-sonography. The crucial diagnostic procedure, however, is the conventional x-ray-phlebography. The digital subtraction phlebography adds to the conventional technique in the pelvic and thoracic area if parts of the skeleton or soft tissue are overlapping. The radionuclid-phlebography will be applied in contrast medium incompatibility or in suspicion of pulmonary embolism. Factors of increased prevalence of venous thrombosis can be confirmed by CT or sonography.

  16. Fístula broncovascular: complicação de cateter venoso central percutâneo em neonato Bronchovascular fistula: complication of percutaneous central venous catheter in a neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio D'Elia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: relatar um caso em que ocorreu falso trajeto de cateter venoso central, com fístula vásculo-pulmonar e graves conseqüências respiratórias correlatas em recém-nascido. Revisar a literatura sobre as complicações respiratórias e não respiratórias relacionadas à introdução de cateteres venosos centrais percutâneos em crianças. Descrição: dados clínicos evolutivos e diagnósticos foram obtidos após revisão do prontuário. O recém-nascido prematuro permaneceu em UTI neonatal após o parto para tratamento de doença da membrana hialina leve e de infecção manifestada posteriormente. No dia seguinte à introdução percutânea do cateter central, para a administração de nutrição parenteral, iniciou desconforto respiratório que progrediu rapidamente. Necessitou de ventilação mecânica para estabelecer troca gasosa adequada. A verificação da trajetória do cateter com o auxílio de contraste radiológico revelou a presença da complicação. Comentários: não são raras as complicações decorrentes da inserção de cateteres centrais, sendo a infecção a mais comum. É importante que os profissionais responsáveis pelos cuidados desses pacientes conheçam as várias outras complicações menos freqüentes, como a trombose vascular e a migração do cateter, com lesões de órgãos e coleções extravasculares de líquidos. Em recém-nascidos, existe apenas um único relato de complicação semelhante à verificada em nosso paciente. Sua raridade pode ter determinado dificuldades para o diagnóstico imediato. São enfatizados os aspectos relacionados aos cuidados, após a introdução destes cateteres, que poderiam facilitar o reconhecimento precoce destas complicações.Objectives: to present a case of central venous line misplacement with vasculo-pulmonary fistula and severe respiratory consequences in a newborn. To review the literature concerning respiratory and non-respiratory complications related to the

  17. A peripherally inserted central catheter line, inserted the day before surgery, decreases the time from induction to incision for spinal deformity surgery and safely provides central venous access during surgery: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuedemann, Anne E; Schwend, Richard M; Thomas, Valorie K; Leamon, Julia M; Lightner, Tammy S

    2018-03-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity may benefit from central venous access to provide intraoperative monitoring and fluid resuscitation. For pediatric surgical patients requiring central access, we hypothesized that placing a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line preoperatively should decrease time from induction of anesthesia to incision and result in improved patient safety and decreased operating room charges. This was a retrospective, nonrandomized, and case comparison study. Clinical records of all children with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis or neuromuscular scoliosis treated surgically by the senior author between December 2007 and April 2012 were reviewed. Control group patients had a central venous catheter (CVC) placed by the anesthesiologist after induction of anesthesia. The trial group had a PICC placed under local anesthesia the day before surgery by an experienced vascular access team. The time from induction of anesthesia to the time for the surgical incision was determined for each study group. The CVC line placement charges were determined by the operating room time charges at $214/min. Charges saved were the mean time difference multiplied by the operating room time charge, less the charge for PICC line insertion ($1282). There were 29 neuromuscular patients, the mean age was 13 years (SD: 4 years). The mean time from induction to incision for the PICC group was 91 min [95% confidence interval (CI): 67-115 min] and for the CVC group 113 min (95% CI: 99-127 min, P=0.083). For this mean time difference of 22 min, the estimated cost savings would be $3426 per patient. There were 59 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, the mean age was 14 years (SD: 2 years). The mean time from induction to incision for the PICC group was 78 min (95% CI: 74-82 min) and for the CVC group 106 min (95% CI: 96-116  min, P≤0.001). For this mean time difference of 28 min, the estimated cost savings would

  18. Effects of starting hemodialysis with an arteriovenous fistula or central venous catheter compared with peritoneal dialysis: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coentrão Luis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although several studies have demonstrated early survival advantages with peritoneal dialysis (PD over hemodialysis (HD, the reason for the excess mortality observed among incident HD patients remains to be established, to our knowledge. This study explores the relationship between mortality and dialysis modality, focusing on the role of HD vascular access type at the time of dialysis initiation. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed among local adult chronic kidney disease patients who consecutively initiated PD and HD with a tunneled cuffed venous catheter (HD-TCC or a functional arteriovenous fistula (HD-AVF in our institution in the year 2008. A total of 152 patients were included in the final analysis (HD-AVF, n = 59; HD-TCC, n = 51; PD, n = 42. All cause and dialysis access-related morbidity/mortality were evaluated at one year. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to compare the survival of PD patients with those who initiated HD with an AVF or with a TCC. Results Compared with PD patients, both HD-AVF and HD-TCC patients were more likely to be older (pp = 0.017 and cardiovascular disease (p = 0.020. Overall, HD-TCC patients were more likely to have clinical visits (p = 0.069, emergency room visits (ppvs. 0.93 vs. 0.64, per patient-year; pvs. 0.07 vs. 0.14, per patient-year; p = 0.034 than HD-AVF and PD patients, respectively. The survival rates at one year were 96.6%, 74.5% and 97.6% for HD-AVF, HD-TCC and PD groups, respectively (pp = 0.024. Conclusion Our results suggest that HD vascular access type at the time of renal replacement therapy initiation is an important modifier of the relationship between dialysis modality and survival among incident dialysis patients.

  19. Central venous catheter infections in home parenteral nutrition patients: Outcomes from Sustain: American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition's National Patient Registry for Nutrition Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Vicki M; Guenter, Peggi; Corrigan, Mandy L; Kovacevich, Debra; Winkler, Marion F; Resnick, Helaine E; Norris, Tina L; Robinson, Lawrence; Steiger, Ezra

    2016-12-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is a high-cost, complex nutrition support therapy that requires the use of central venous catheters. Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are among the most serious risks of this therapy. Sustain: American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition's National Patient Registry for Nutrition Care (Sustain registry) provides the most current and comprehensive data for studying CLABSI among a national cohort of HPN patients in the United States. This is the first Sustain registry report detailing longitudinal data on CLABSI among HPN patients. To describe CLABSI rates for HPN patients followed in the Sustain registry from 2011-2014. Descriptive, χ 2 , and t tests were used to analyze data from the Sustain registry. Of the 1,046 HPN patients from 29 sites across the United States, 112 (10.7%) experienced 194 CLABSI events during 223,493 days of HPN exposure, for an overall CLABSI rate of 0.87 episodes/1,000 parenteral nutrition-days. Although the majority of patients were female (59%), adult (87%), white (75%), and with private insurance or Medicare (69%), CLABSI episodes per 1,000 parenteral nutrition-days were higher for men (0.69 vs 0.38), children (1.17 vs 0.35), blacks (0.91 vs 0.41), and Medicaid recipients (1.0 vs 0.38 or 0.39). Patients with implanted ports or double-lumen catheters also had more CLABSIs than those with peripherally inserted or central catheters or single-lumen catheters. Staphylococci were the most commonly reported pathogens. These data support findings of smaller studies about CLABSI risk for children and by catheter type and identify new potential risk factors, including gender, race, and insurance type. Additional studies are needed to determine effective interventions that will reduce HPN-associated CLABSI. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Project work: formation of health-care personnel for self-care of tunnelled central venous catheters in hemodialysis patients of the territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morale, Walter; Patanè, D; Incardona, C; Seminara, G; Malfa, P; L'Anfusa, G; Calcara, G; Bisceglie, P; Puliatti, D; Di Landro, D

    2013-01-01

    Scientific data from current literature demonstrate an incidence of bacteraemia due to tunnelled central venous catheter (tCVC) use accounting for 1.6 / 1000 days per tCVC, with a range of 1.5 to 1.8. In Sicily no data on the incidence of tCVC- related bacteraemia are available. In our hospital, tCVC infection occurs 2.4 times in 1000 days during CVC use. A retrospective analysis carried out from 2006 to 2012 was performed on 650 patients with tunnelled catheters. Of the subjects who received tCVC in our hospital, 90% were destined to undergo haemodialysis in a private health care environment outside our hospital. In order to improve the aforementioned infection outcome, we planned and implemented a specific work project. The work project (WP) was subdivided into two steps: 1) The first step was further subdivided into two sub-phases. The first was principally concerned with the implementation of educational courses, conducted directly on the ward and aimed at the implementation of meticulous nursing regimes for the care of tCVC by our health care nurse. The courses were entitled Management of Vascular Access: from doing - to teaching to do!. These educational courses were organized by the Nephrology Department, which takes care of the management and handling of the major complications of tCVCs for the maintenance of haemodialysis. After this first step, the nurses who had participated became the promoters of the second part of the course, which concerned the development of know-how within an outpatient clinic, which deals exclusively with the nursing management of tCVCs. 2) The title of the second phase was Therapeutic Education: self-Care and understanding and managing your venous access at home. The aim of this step was the integration of correct in-hospital care with that available in outsourced private institutions, via the involvement of the patient in the management of their own central venous access. During our training project, a more detailed analysis of

  1. A Novel Nonantibiotic Nitroglycerin-Based Catheter Lock Solution for Prevention of Intraluminal Central Venous Catheter Infections in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Hachem, Ray; Szvalb, Ariel; Taremi, Mahnaz; Granwehr, Bruno; Viola, George Michael; Sapna, Amin; Assaf, Andrew; Numan, Yazan; Shah, Pankil; Gasitashvili, Ketevan; Natividad, Elizabeth; Jiang, Ying; Slack, Rebecca; Reitzel, Ruth; Rosenblatt, Joel; Mouhayar, Elie; Raad, Issam

    2017-07-01

    For long-term central lines (CL), the lumen is the major source of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). The current standard of care for maintaining catheter patency includes flushing the CL with saline or heparin. Neither agent has any antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, heparin may enhance staphylococcal biofilm formation. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a novel nonantibiotic catheter lock solution for the prevention of CLABSI. Between November 2015 and February 2016, we enrolled 60 patients with hematologic malignancies who had peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) to receive the study lock solution. The study lock consisted of 15 or 30 μg/ml of nitroglycerin in combination with 4% sodium citrate and 22% ethanol. Each lumen was locked for at least 2 h once daily prior to being flushed. After enrollment of 10 patients at the lower nitroglycerin dose without evidence of toxicity, the dose was escalated to the higher dose (30 μg/ml). There were no serious related adverse events or episodes of hypotension with lock administration. Two patients experienced mild transient adverse events (one headache and one rash) possibly related to the lock and that resolved without residual effect. The CLABSI rate was 0 on lock days versus 1.6/1,000 catheter days (CD) off lock prophylaxis, compared with a rate of 1.9/1,000 CD at the institution in the same patient population. In conclusion, the nitroglycerin-based lock prophylaxis is safe and well tolerated. It may prevent CLABSI when given daily to cancer patients. Large, prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to validate these findings. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT02577718.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Venous thromboembolism: The intricacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE has been a subject of great interest of late. Since Rudolph Virchow described the famous Virchow′s triad in 1856, there have been rapid strides in the understanding of the pathogenesis and factors responsible for it. Discovery of various thrombophilic factors, both primary and acquired, in the last 40 years has revolutionized prognostication and management of this potentially life-threatening condition due to its associated complication of pulmonary thromboembolism. Detailed genetic mapping and linkage analyses have been underlining the fact that VTE is a multifactorial disorder and a complex one. There are many gene-gene and gene-environment interactions that alter and magnify the clinical picture in this disorder. Point in case is pregnancy, where the risk of VTE is 100-150 times increased in the presence of Factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutation (Prothrombin 20210A and antithrombin deficiency. Risk of VTE associated with long-haul air flight has now been well recognized. Thrombotic events associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS are 70% venous and 30% arterial. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are the most common venous events, though unusual cases of catastrophes due to central vein thrombosis like renal vein thrombosis and Budd-Chiari syndrome (catastrophic APS may occur.

  3. A Retrospective Analysis of Bloodstream Infections in Pediatric Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients: The Role of Central Venous Catheters and Mucosal Barrier Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balian, Chelsea; Garcia, Michelle; Ward, Jessica

    2018-03-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Indwelling central venous catheters (CVCs) increase risk for BSIs, yet mucosal barrier injury-associated laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (MBI-LCBI) may also occur due to translocation of pathogenic organisms from the gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between stool organisms and BSIs in children with CVCs who underwent HSCT. We performed a retrospective analysis of 78 children who received allogeneic HSCT over 3 years (2012-2014). Surveillance stool cultures were analyzed pre- and post-HSCT to assess correlations between organisms isolated from stool and CVC cultures. Twenty-four of 78 children experienced 31 BSIs. Fifteen (48%) of these isolates were identified in stool within 30 days of the positive blood culture, and 11 (36%) isolates met criteria for MBI-LCBI. Mucosal barrier injury leads to translocation of pathogenic organisms into the bloodstream and accounts for a significant number of BSIs in children undergoing HSCT. Nursing assessment of mucosal changes during HSCT and interventions to preserve intact mucosa are essential to prevent MBI-LCBI.

  4. Tunnelled Central Venous Catheter-Related Problems in the Early Phase of Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Effects on Transplant Outcome

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    Mahmut Yeral

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Haematopoietic stem cell recipients need central venous catheters (CVCs for easy administration of intravenous fluid, medications, apheresis, or dialysis procedures. However, CVCs may lead to infectious or non-infectious complications such as thrombosis. The effect of these complications on transplantation outcome is not clear. This manuscript presents the complication rates of double-lumen tunnelled CVCs and their effect on transplantation outcome. METHODS: Data from 111 consecutive patients, of whom 75 received autologous and 36 received allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantations, were collected retrospectively. The data were validated by the Record Inspection Group of the related JACIE-accredited transplantation centre. RESULTS: Thrombosis developed in 2.7% of recipients (0.9 per 1000 catheter days. Catheter-related infection was identified in 14 (12.6% patients (3.6 per 1000 catheter days. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most common causative agent. Engraftment time, rate of 100-day mortality, and development of grade II-IV graft-versus-host disease were not found to be associated with catheter-related complications. CONCLUSION: Sonuçlarımız nakil hastalarında tünelli SVK komplikasyonlarının yönetilebilir olduğunu ve bu komplikasyonların nakil üzerine olumsuz bir etki yaratmadığını göstermektedir.

  5. Presentation and impact of catheter-associated thrombosis in patients with infected long-term central venous catheters: a prospective bicentric observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, Adrien; Lepeule, Raphaël; Goulenok, Tiphaine; Buzele, Rodolphe; de Lastours, Victoire; Fantin, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-associated thrombosis (CAT) in patients with infected long-term central venous catheter (LTCVC) has been poorly studied. We prospectively included patients with infected LTCVC and collected clinical data. Doppler ultrasound was systematically performed to screen for CAT. Outcome (death or infection relapse) was evaluated 12 weeks after infection diagnosis. 90 patients were included and CAT was diagnosed in 27 (30%). Local signs suggesting infection were more frequent in patients with CAT than without (11/27 versus 8/63, p = 0.03). Outcome was similar in patients with and without CAT. However, median duration of antimicrobials was longer (18 versus 14 days, p = 0.02), catheter removal tended to be more frequent (24/27 versus 46/63, p = 0.08), and anticoagulant therapy more often prescribed (17/27 versus 6/63, p thrombosis were more likely to have Staphylococcus aureus infections (4/7 versus 1/17, p = 0.02) and prolonged positivity of blood-cultures (3/7 versus 1/15, p = 0.02), than patients with non-occlusive thrombosis. CAT is associated with local signs suggesting infection. A more aggressive treatment in CAT cases allowed a similar outcome at 12 weeks between patients with and without CAT. Occlusive thrombosis represented a subgroup of patients at risk of delayed clearance of bacteremia.

  6. Particle image velocimetry-validated, computational fluid dynamics-based design to reduce shear stress and residence time in central venous hemodialysis catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareels, Guy; Kaminsky, Radoslav; Eloot, Sunny; Verdonck, Pascal R

    2007-01-01

    As crucial factors in blood clot formation, shear stress distribution and low flow zones are assessed in different central venous catheter tip designs by using a combined numeric and experimental approach. Computational Fluid Dynamics was validated with Particle Image Velocimetry by comparing simulated and measured velocities and shear strains in three designs of the blood withdrawing arterial lumen: cylindrical and with tip (1) cut straight, (2) cut at an angle, or (3) cut straight with a sleeve entrance. After validation, four additional designs were studied: (4) with two side holes and tip cut straight or (5) at an angle, (6) concentric lumens, and (7) Ash Split-based. In these seven designs, shear stress (SS), blood residence time (RT), and Platelet Lysis Index, which combines the influence of shear stress magnitude and exposure time, were simulated. Concentric catheter was discarded due to highly elevated SS. Ash Split-based design had elevated RT values in the distal tip zone as major inflow occurs through the most proximal side holes, but this is compensated by low average SS. A straight-cut tip and possibly two side holes are preferred when aiming at minimal SS and RT. These data may lead to more patent catheters.

  7. Complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters in neonates: Lesson learned over 2 years in a tertiary care centre in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to assess the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC in neonates admitted to neonatal surgical intensive care unit (NSICU. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 237 neonates admitted to NSICU from January 2010 to December 2011 was done. Results: Mean age at presentation was 5.8 days and mean weight was 1.94 kg. Mean number of attempts was 1.14, mean duration of insertion 8.4 min and mean duration of patency of catheter 3.14 days. Most common site of catheter insertion was upper extremity (basilic followed by cephalic. Overall complications were seen in 47 (23% cases. Infectious complications were seen in 22 (10.7% and non-infectious in 25 (12.2% cases. Significant correlation existed between non-infective complications and insertion site (P = 0.03 and duration of PICC (P = 0.04. Conclusion: Precautions should be taken and position must be confirmed during and after PICC insertion to avoid undue complications.

  8. Simulation-based medical education training improves short and long-term competency in, and knowledge of central venous catheter insertion: A before and after intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Vanessa; Inan, Cigdem; Zingg, Walter; Delhumeau, Cecile; Walder, Bernard; Savoldelli, Georges L

    2016-08-01

    Multimodal educational interventions have been shown to improve short-term competency in, and knowledge of central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. To evaluate the effectiveness of simulation-based medical education training in improving short and long-term competency in, and knowledge of CVC insertion. Before and after intervention study. University Geneva Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland, between May 2008 and January 2012. Residents in anaesthesiology aware of the Seldinger technique for vascular puncture. Participants attended a half-day course on CVC insertion. Learning objectives included work organization, aseptic technique and prevention of CVC complications. CVC insertion competency was tested pretraining, posttraining and then more than 2 years after training (sustainability phase). The primary study outcome was competency as measured by a global rating scale of technical skills, a hand hygiene compliance score and a checklist compliance score. Secondary outcome was knowledge as measured by a standardised pretraining and posttraining multiple-choice questionnaire. Statistical analyses were performed using paired Student's t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Thirty-seven residents were included; 18 were tested in the sustainability phase (on average 34 months after training). The average global rating of skills was 23.4 points (±SD 4.08) before training, 32.2 (±4.51) after training (P Simulation-based medical education training was effective in improving short and long-term competency in, and knowledge of CVC insertion.

  9. Comparison of hospital length of stay, costs, and readmissions of alteplase versus catheter replacement among patients with occluded central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Frank R; Chen, Er; Lipkin, Craig; Tayama, Darren; Amin, Alpesh N

    2014-08-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) occlusion is common, affecting 30% of all CVCs. To compare length of stay (LOS), costs, and readmissions associated with the use of alteplase to clear catheter blockage to outcomes associated with catheter replacement. Retrospective observational study utilizing a large hospital database. Hospitalized patients treated for catheter occlusion from January 2006 to December 2011. Univariate analyses of patient characteristics and treatment patterns and multivariable regression analyses of postocclusion hospital costs, LOS, and 30- and 90-day readmissions were conducted. We included 34,579 patients treated for a CVC occlusion by replacement (N=1028) or by alteplase (2 mg) administration (N=33,551). Patients receiving alteplase were somewhat younger than those having catheter replacement (60 ± 19 vs 62 ± 20 years old, P=0.0002). After adjusting for patient and hospital factors via regression modeling, average daily postocclusion costs were $317 lower for alteplase recipients than for catheter replacement patients (95% confidence interval [CI]: 238.22-392.24; P0.05). Odds of readmission were not significantly different at 30 or 90 days. Among patients treated for an occluded CVC, alteplase-treated patients had lower daily and total postocclusion costs than patients receiving catheter replacement. Cost differences were mainly driven by lower operating room/surgery, radiology, and supplier costs. Published 2014. The Authors Journal of Hospital Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Hospital Medicine.

  10. AngioVac Aspiration for Paradoxical Emboli Protection through a Fenestrated Fontan During Central Venous Thrombus Manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hakim, Ramsey; Patel, Komal; Moriarty, John M.

    2015-01-01

    This case reports describes a 39-year-old female with a history of surgically repaired hypoplastic left heart syndrome who presented with a left peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) with associated large volume subclavian and brachiocephalic vein thrombus. Due to the presence of a right-to-left shunt via a fenestrated Fontan, there was clinical concern for a paradoxical embolism during removal of the PICC. The AngioVac aspiration system was successfully utilized to aspirate thromboemboli from the level of the proximal Glenn shunt during manipulation and removal of the PICC. This is the first reported case to demonstrate the safe and effective use of the AngioVac aspiration system for protection of paradoxical emboli through a cardiac right-to-left shunt during a procedure at high risk for thromboembolism

  11. AngioVac Aspiration for Paradoxical Emboli Protection through a Fenestrated Fontan During Central Venous Thrombus Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hakim, Ramsey, E-mail: ralhakim@mednet.ucla.edu [University of California, Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Patel, Komal, E-mail: kdpatel@mednet.ucla.edu [University of California, Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology (United States); Moriarty, John M., E-mail: jmoriarty@mednet.ucla.edu [University of California, Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This case reports describes a 39-year-old female with a history of surgically repaired hypoplastic left heart syndrome who presented with a left peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) with associated large volume subclavian and brachiocephalic vein thrombus. Due to the presence of a right-to-left shunt via a fenestrated Fontan, there was clinical concern for a paradoxical embolism during removal of the PICC. The AngioVac aspiration system was successfully utilized to aspirate thromboemboli from the level of the proximal Glenn shunt during manipulation and removal of the PICC. This is the first reported case to demonstrate the safe and effective use of the AngioVac aspiration system for protection of paradoxical emboli through a cardiac right-to-left shunt during a procedure at high risk for thromboembolism.

  12. Is Routine Chest X-ray After Ultrasound-Guided Central Venous Catheter Insertion Choosing Wisely? A population-based retrospective study of 6875 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Jason; Saeed, Rasha; Jakobowski, Luke; Wang, Wanyu; Eldeyasty, Basem; Zhu, Angel; Fochesato, LeeAnne; Lavi, Ronit; Bainbridge, Daniel

    2018-02-28

    A routine chest X-ray (CXR) is recommended as a screening test after central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. We sought to assess the value of a routine post-procedural CXR in the era of ultrasound-guided CVC insertion. We performed a population-based retrospective cohort study to review the records of all adult patients who had a CVC inserted in the operating room in a tertiary institution between July 1, 2008 and December 31, 2015. We determined the incidence of pneumothorax and catheter misplacement after ultrasound-guided CVC insertion. We performed a logistic regression analysis to examine the potential risk factors associated with these complications, and a cost analysis to evaluate the economic impact. Of 18274 patients who had a CVC inserted, 6875 patients were included. The overall incidence of pneumothorax and catheter misplacement was 0.33% [95%CI: 0.22- 0.5%] (23 patients) and 1.91% [95% CI: 1.61- 2.26] (131 patients), respectively. The site of catheterization was the major determinant of pneumothorax and catheter misplacement; left subclavian vein catheterization was the site at a higher risk for pneumothorax [OR: 6.69 (2.45 - 18.28); pcatheter misplacement. Expenditures on routine post-procedural CXR were $105,000-$183,000 per year at our institution. This study shows that pneumothorax and catheter misplacement after ultrasound-guided CVC insertion were rare and the costs of a post-procedural CXR was exceedingly high. We concluded that a routine post-procedural CXR is unnecessary and not choosing-wisely in our setting. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The correlation between ATLS and junior doctors' anatomical knowledge of central venous catheter insertion at a major trauma centre in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, V Y; Odendaal, J J; Weale, R; Liu, M; Keene, C M; Sartorius, B; Clarke, D L

    2018-02-01

    To review the ability of junior doctors (JDs) in identifying the correct anatomical site for central venous catheterization (CVC) and whether prior Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) training influences this. We performed a prospective, observational study using a structured survey and asked a group of JDs (postgraduate year 1 [PGY1] or year 2 [PGY2]) to indicate on a photograph the exact site for CVC insertion via the internal jugular (IJV) and the subclavian (SCV) approach. This study was conducted in a large metropolitan university hospital in South Africa. A total of 139 JDs were included. Forty-four per cent (61/139) were males and the mean age was 25 years. There were 90 PGY1s (65%) and 49 PGY2s (35%). Overall, 32% (45/139) were able to identify the correct insertion site for the IJV approach and 60% (84/139) for the SCV approach. Of the 90 PGY1s, 34% (31/90) correctly identified the insertion site for the IJV approach and 59% (53/90) for the SCV approach. Of the 49 PGY2s, 29% (14/49) correctly identified the insertion site for the IJV approach and 63% (31/49) for the SCV approach. No significant difference between PGY1 and 2 were identified. Those with ATLS provider training were significantly more likely to identify the correct site for the IJV approaches [OR=4.3, p=0.001]. This was marginally statistically significant (i.e. p>0.05 but <0.1) for the SCV approach. The majority of JDs do not have sufficient anatomical knowledge to identify the correct insertion site CVCs. Those who had undergone ATLS training were more likely to be able to identify the correct insertion site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. NEOnatal Central-venous Line Observational study on Thrombosis (NEOCLOT): evaluation of a national guideline on management of neonatal catheter-related thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, Jeanine J; van de Loo, Moniek; Boerma, Marit; Bergman, Klasien A; Donker, Albertine E; van der Hoeven, Mark A H B M; Hulzebos, Christiaan V; Knol, Ronny; Djien Liem, K; van Lingen, Richard A; Lopriore, Enrico; Suijker, Monique H; Vijlbrief, Daniel C; Visser, Remco; Veening, Margreet A; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M; van Ommen, C Heleen

    2018-02-23

    In critically ill (preterm) neonates, central venous catheters (CVCs) are increasingly used for administration of medication or parenteral nutrition. A serious complication, however, is the development of catheter-related thrombosis (CVC-thrombosis), which may resolve by itself or cause severe complications. Due to lack of evidence, management of neonatal CVC-thrombosis varies among neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). In the Netherlands an expert-based national management guideline has been developed which is implemented in all 10 NICUs in 2014. The NEOCLOT study is a multicentre prospective observational cohort study, including 150 preterm and term infants (0-6 months) admitted to one of the 10 NICUs, developing CVC-thrombosis. Patient characteristics, thrombosis characteristics, risk factors, treatment strategies and outcome measures will be collected in a web-based database. Management of CVC-thrombosis will be performed as recommended in the protocol. Violations of the protocol will be noted. Primary outcome measures are a composite efficacy outcome consisting of death due to CVC-thrombosis and recurrent thrombosis, and a safety outcome consisting of the incidence of major bleedings during therapy. Secondary outcomes include individual components of primary efficacy outcome, clinically relevant non-major and minor bleedings and the frequency of risk factors, protocol variations, residual thrombosis and post thrombotic syndrome. The NEOCLOT study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new, national, neonatal CVC-thrombosis guideline. Furthermore, risk factors as well as long-term consequences of CVC-thrombosis will be analysed. Trial registration: Nederlands Trial Register NTR4336 . Registered 24 December 2013.

  15. The Global End-Diastolic Volume (GEDV) Could Be More Appropiate to Fluid Management Than Central Venous Pressure (CVP) During Closed Hyperthermic Intrabdominal Chemotherapy with CO2Circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Francisco Javier; Padilla, David; Villarejo, Pedro; Baladron, Victor; Faba, Patricia; Sánchez, Sergio; Muñoz-Rodríguez, José Ramón; Bejarano, Natalia

    2017-05-30

    Closed hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) may increase abdominal pressure and effects of hemodynamic changes due to maintenance hyperthermia. Our aim was to analyze the safety and effectiveness of our closed technique with CO 2 circulation in management fluid status and hemodynamic parameters by means of cardiac preload control measured by Global End Diastolic Values (GEDV) and a gas exchanger. A Pilot Clinical Study that included 18 advanced ovarian cancer patients undergoing citoreductive surgery and HIPEC. We used a closed-perfusion system (PRS Combat®) that includes CO 2 circulation and a gas exchanger. Transpulmonary thermodilutions and hemodynamic measurements (PiCCO 2 ®) were performed after citoreductive surgery (Pre-HIPEC); At half time of the HIPEC (Intra-HIPEC); After HIPEC (Post-HIPEC). No significant hemodynamic measurements changes in the three thermodilutions values of Cardiac Index (CI) (p = 0.227), Global End Diastolic Values (GEVD) (p = 0.966), Stroke Volume Variation (SVV) (p = 0,884) and Systemic Vascular Resistance Index (SVRI) (p = 0.082). No correlation between central venous pressure (CVP) and GEDV (Pre-HIPEC: r = 0.164, p = 0.211; Intra-HIPEC: r = 0.015, p = 0.900; Post-HIPEC: r = 0.018, p = 0.890). There was better correlation between GEDV and CI (Pre-HIPEC: r = 0.432, p = 0.071; Intra-HIPEC: r = 0.418, p = 0.074; Post-HIPEC: r = 0.411, p = 0.080). Closed intrabdominal chemotherapy with CO 2 circulation model may be a safe model for HIPEC by means of a gas exchanger. GEDV and its changes significantly correlated to CI, and not observed for CVP. GEDV values may be more appropriate for monitoring cardiac preload, blood loss limitation and to predict changes in intravascular volume status during intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

  16. Eliminating guidewire retention during ultrasound guided central venous catheter insertion via an educational program, a modified CVC set, and a drape with reminder stickers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peh, Wee Ming; Loh, Wann Jia; Phua, Ghee Chee; Loo, Chian Min

    2016-01-01

    Guidewire retention is a severe but preventable complication from central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. There were three cases of guidewire retention during CVC insertion in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) in Singapore General Hospital, in the period between December 2011 and February 2012. The primary objective of this quality improvement project was to eliminate future incidences of guidewire retention during CVC insertion in the MICU and medical intermediate care area (MICA) via a structured educational program and a cost effective modified CVC set. The secondary objective was to perform a cost analysis and comparison between the use of the conventional hospital CVC set and drape with our newly modified CVC dressing kit. Root cause analysis of the three cases identified major factors leading to guidewire retention. Interventions were planned and tested using PDSA cycles. Internal medicine trainees rotating through MICU and MICA during the period between February 2012 and June 2013 underwent a multi-modal structured CVC insertion training program with hands on simulation. They also used a newly modified CVC dressing kit and drape. The CVC dressing kit was modified (CVC PLUS) to include a sterile drape with reminder stickers stating "REMOVE the GUIDEWIRE," as well as a sterile ultrasound sleeve. The total number of CVC insertions performed and guidewire retentions were monitored. During the period of study there were 320 CVC insertions in the MICU and MICA. Since this quality improvement project was initiated, and up to the submission of this article, there have not been any further cases of guidewire retention in the MICU and MICA. The total cost reduction per use of CVC PLUS was S$29.26 (Singaporean Dollars). A multi-modal structured training program, integrated with a modified, pre-packed CVC set, and drapes with reminder stickers (all included in CVC PLUS) were cost effective, and improved patient safety by eliminating guidewire retention during CVC

  17. Variation in Frequency of Intraoperative Arterial, Central Venous and Pulmonary Artery Catheter Placement During Kidney Transplantation: An Analysis of Invasive Monitoring Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrebetsky, Alexander; Dutton, Richard P; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Urman, Richard D

    2018-03-02

    The rapidly increasing number of kidney transplantations warrants assessment of anesthesia care in this patient population. We explored the frequency of arterial catheter (AC), central venous catheter (CVC) and pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) placement during kidney transplantation in the USA using data from the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry (NACOR) and assessed the between-facility variation in the frequency of catheter placement. We defined cases of kidney transplantation using Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Clinical Classification Software. Placement of AC, CVC and PAC was defined by respective Current Procedural Terminology codes. The frequency of vascular catheter placement across facility types was compared using Pearson χ2 test. We identified 10,580 cases of kidney transplantation performed in 100 facilities from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2014. Placement of an AC was reported in 1700 (16.1%), CVC in 2580 (24.4%) and PAC in 50 (0.5%) of cases. The frequency of placement of specific types of catheters was statistically different across facility types (p AC, CVC and PAC ranged from 0% to 86%, 0% to 90% and 0% to 3%, respectively. Considerable between-facility variation in the frequency of AC, CVC and PAC placement during kidney transplantation raises concerns about the need for better practice standardization. Excess invasive monitoring may represent a safety risk as well as unnecessary additional cost. If kidney transplantation can be safely performed without an AC, CVC or PAC in most patients, facilities with above-average catheter placement rates may have an opportunity for measurable reduction in catheter-related perioperative complications. Optimizing perioperative monitoring is an important component of ensuring high functioning, high-value medical systems.

  18. The impact of an “acute dialysis start” on the mortality attributed to the use of central venous catheters: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tennankore Karthik K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central venous catheters (CVCs are associated with early mortality in dialysis patients. However, some patients progress to end stage renal disease after an acute illness, prior to reaching an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR at which one would expect to establish alternative access (fistula/peritoneal dialysis catheter. The purpose of this study was to determine if exclusion of this “acute start” patient group alters the association between CVCs and mortality. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 406 incident dialysis patients from 1 Jan 2006 to 31 Dec 2009. Patients were classified as acute starts if 1 the eGFR was >25 ml/min/1.73 m2, ≤3 months prior to dialysis initiation and declined after an acute event (n = 45, or 2 in those without prior eGFR measurements, there was no supporting evidence of chronic kidney disease on history or imaging (n = 12. Remaining patients were classified as chronic start (n = 349. Results 98 % and 52 % of acute and chronic starts initiated dialysis with a CVC. There were 148 deaths. The adjusted mortality hazard ratio (HR for acute vs. chronic start patients was 1.84, (95 % CI [1.19-2.85]. The adjusted mortality HR for patients dialyzing with a CVC compared to alternative access was 1.19 (95 % CI [0.80-1.77]. After excluding acute start patients, the adjusted HR fell to 1.03 (95 % CI [0.67-1.57]. Conclusions A significant proportion of early dialysis mortality occurs after an acute start. Exclusion of this population attenuates the mortality risk associated with CVCs.

  19. Comparative Efficacy of Antimicrobial Central Venous Catheters in Reducing Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections in Adults: Abridged Cochrane Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Huey Yi; Lai, Nai Ming; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2017-05-15

    The efficacy of antimicrobial central venous catheters (CVCs) remains questionable. In this network meta-analysis, we aimed to assess the comparative efficacy of antimicrobial CVC impregnations in reducing catheter-related infections in adults. We searched 4 electronic databases (Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, CINAHL) and internet sources for randomized controlled trials, ongoing clinical trials, and unpublished studies up to August 2016. Studies that assessed CVCs with antimicrobial impregnation with nonimpregnated catheters or catheters with another impregnation were included. Primary outcomes were clinically diagnosed sepsis, catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), and all-cause mortality. We performed a network meta-analysis to estimate risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Sixty studies with 17255 catheters were included. The effects of 14 impregnations were investigated. Both CRBSI and catheter colonization were the most commonly evaluated outcomes. Silver-impregnated CVCs significantly reduced clinically diagnosed sepsis compared with silver-impregnated cuffs (RR, 0.54 [95% CI, .29-.99]). When compared to no impregnation, significant CRBSI reduction was associated with minocycline-rifampicin (RR, 0.29 [95% CI, .16-.52]) and silver (RR, 0.57 [95% CI, .38-.86]) impregnations. No impregnations significantly reduced all-cause mortality. For catheter colonization, significant decreases were shown by miconazole-rifampicin (RR, 0.14 [95% CI, .05-.36]), 5-fluorouracil (RR, 0.34 [95% CI, .14-.82]), and chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (RR, 0.60 [95% CI, .50-.72]) impregnations compared with no impregnation. None of the studies evaluated antibiotic/antiseptic resistance as the outcome. Current evidence suggests that the minocycline-rifampicin-impregnated CVC appears to be the most effective in preventing CRBSI. However, its overall benefits in reducing clinical sepsis and mortality remain uncertain

  20. Pressão venosa central em cateter femoral: correlação com acesso superior após cirurgia cardíaca Central venous pressure in femoral catheter: correlation with superior approach after heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirley da Silva Pacheco

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: É comum a obtenção de acesso venoso femoral em pacientes submetidos a cirurgia cardíaca em associação ou como alternativa ao acesso superior (veia jugular interna ou veia subclávia. O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar as medidas de pressão venosa central (PVC em dois sítios diferentes (superior vs. femoral. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo e aberto com 60 pacientes submetidos a cirurgia cardíaca no período de julho a novembro de 2006. Foram obtidas três medidas de cada paciente em cada sítio (admissão, 6 e 12 horas após a cirurgia em duas inclinações diferentes da cabeceira do leito (zero e 30 graus, totalizando 720 medidas. RESULTADOS: Cinqüenta e cinco por cento dos pacientes foram submetidos a revascularização do miocárdio, 38% a cirurgia valvar e 7% a outras cirurgias. A média de PVC ± desvio padrão (DP medida no acesso superior foi de 13,0 ± 5,5 mmHg (zero grau e 13,3 ± 6,1 mmHg (30 graus, enquanto que as medidas no acesso inferior foram 11,1 ± 4,9 mmHg (zero grau e 13,7 ± 4,6 mmHg (30 graus. A correlação linear (r entre as medidas nos dois sítios foi de 0,66 (zero grau e 0,53 (30 graus, ambas com p OBJECTIVE: It is common to obtain femoral venous approach in patients undergoing combined heart surgery or as an alternative to superior approach (internal jugular vein or subclavian vein. The aim of this study was to compare the measures of central venous pressure (CVP at two different sites (superior versus femoral. METHODS: We prospectively and openly allocated 60 patients who underwent heart surgery between July from November 2006. Three measures were obtained from each patient at each site (admission, 6 and 12 hours after surgery in two different inclinations of the headboard (zero and 30 degrees totaling 720 measures. RESULTS: Fifty five percent of patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, 38% heart valve surgery and 7% other surgeries. The mean of CVP ± standard deviation (SD measured

  1. Metastatic Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Presenting as Jugular Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Cheriyan Modayil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Jugular venous thrombosis is unusual and is associated with central venous catheterisation, intravenous drug abuse and head and neck sepsis. It is rarely associated with malignancy. We report a case of metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary in a forty year old female which presented with jugular venous thrombosis. The discussion includes investigation and treatment options for this condition.

  2. Superficial venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kellie R; Rossi, Peter J

    2013-08-01

    Superficial venous disease is a common clinical problem. The concerning disease states of the superficial venous system are venous reflux, varicose veins, and superficial venous thrombosis. Superficial venous reflux can be a significant contributor to chronic venous stasis wounds of the lower extremity, the treatment of which can be costly both in terms of overall health care expenditure and lost working days for affected patients. Although commonly thought of as a benign process, superficial venous thrombosis is associated with several underlying pathologic processes, including malignancy and deep venous thrombosis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Cateterismo venoso central percutáneo en neonatos: preferencias, indicaciones y complicaciones Percutaneous central venous catheterization in newborns: preferences, indications, and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Díaz Álvarez

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Desde 1993 hemos recurrido al cateterismo venoso central percutáneo para posibilitar un tratamiento efectivo en el recién nacido críticamente enfermo. Realizamos un estudio descriptivo, que incluyó a todos los pacientes consecutivos a quienes se les realizó CVCP y que estuvieron ingresados en el Servicio de Neonatología del Hospital Pediátrico Universitario «Juan M. Márquez». Se realiza una revisión retrospectiva desde junio de 1993 hasta marzo de 1995 y desde entonces en forma prospectiva hasta febrero de 2001. Se recogieron distintas variables de estudio relacionadas con preferencias, indicaciones, condiciones en su ejecución y complicaciones o accidentes por el CVCP. Se realizaron 148 intentos de CVCP en 114 pacientes. El porcentaje de éxitos por intentos fue de 66,9 % y por pacientes de 86,8 %. Se intentó realizar el cateterismo principalmente en la vena femoral (77,0 %, más frecuentemente del lado derecho (49,3 %. El porcentaje de éxitos del CVCP fue similar entre las tentativas de cateterismo por las venas femorales y las subclavias (p = 0,90, y entre los intentos por el lado derecho en comparación con el izquierdo, para los grupos venosos femoral y subclavia (p = 0,29 y p = 0,89. El CVCP se decidió principalmente ante la presencia de sepsis o de meningitis. Las complicaciones más frecuentes relacionadas con la inserción del catéter fueron la hemorragia en 28 pacientes (24,6 % y la punción de una arteria en 10 recién nacidos (8,8 %. Tras la inserción del catéter lo más común fue la oclusión (12 pacientes; 12,1 % y el edema de la extremidad (11 pacientes. Solo un paciente tuvo sepsis relacionada con el catéter y otro, taponamiento cardíaco por hidropericardio. Hubo un fallecido, a causa de un taponamiento cardíaco, complicación del CVCP (0,9 %. El CVCP es un procedimiento necesario en pacientes que habitualmente tienen una condición crítica. La técnica de ejecución recaba entrenamiento, pero

  4. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Martin BC, Aebersold ML, Gonzalez L, eds. Clinical Nursing Skills: Basic to Advanced Skills . 9th ed. New York, NY: Pearson; 2017:chap 29. Read More Bone marrow transplant Patient Instructions After chemotherapy - discharge Bleeding during cancer treatment Bone marrow transplant - ...

  5. Gluon saturation in a saturated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    A bootstrap equation for self-quenched gluon shadowing leads to a reduced magnitude of broadening for partons propagating through a nucleus. Saturation of small-x gluons in a nucleus, which has the form of transverse momentum broadening of projectile gluons in pA collisions in the nuclear rest frame, leads to a modification of the parton distribution functions in the beam compared with pp collisions. In nucleus-nucleus collisions all participating nucleons acquire enhanced gluon density at small x, which boosts further the saturation scale. Solution of the reciprocity equations for central collisions of two heavy nuclei demonstrate a significant, up to several times, enhancement of Q sA 2 , in AA compared with pA collisions.

  6. ‘Matching Michigan’: a 2-year stepped interventional programme to minimise central venous catheter-blood stream infections in intensive care units in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bion, Julian; Richardson, Annette; Hibbert, Peter; Beer, Jeanette; Abrusci, Tracy; McCutcheon, Martin; Cassidy, Jane; Eddleston, Jane; Gunning, Kevin; Bellingan, Geoff; Patten, Mark; Harrison, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections from central venous catheters (CVC-BSIs) increase morbidity and costs in intensive care units (ICUs). Substantial reductions in CVC-BSI rates have been reported using a combination of technical and non-technical interventions. Methods We conducted a 2-year, four-cluster, stepped non-randomised study of technical and non-technical (behavioural) interventions to prevent CVC-BSIs in adult and paediatric ICUs in England. Random-effects Poisson regression modelling was used to compare infection rates. A sample of ICUs participated in data verification. Results Of 223 ICUs in England, 215 (196 adult, 19 paediatric) submitted data on 2479 of 2787 possible months and 147 (66%) provided complete data. The exposure rate was 438 887 (404 252 adult and 34 635 paediatric) CVC-patient days. Over 20 months, 1092 CVC-BSIs were reported. Of these, 884 (81%) were ICU acquired. For adult ICUs, the mean CVC-BSI rate decreased over 20 months from 3.7 in the first cluster to 1.48 CVC-BSIs/1000 CVC-patient days (p<0.0001) for all clusters combined, and for paediatric ICUs from 5.65 to 2.89 (p=0.625). The trend for infection rate reduction did not accelerate following interventions training. CVC utilisation rates remained stable. Pre-ICU infections declined in parallel with ICU-acquired infections. Criterion-referenced case note review showed high agreement between adjudicators (κ 0.706) but wide variation in blood culture sampling rates and CVC utilisation. Generic infection control practices varied widely. Conclusions The marked reduction in CVC-BSI rates in English ICUs found in this study is likely part of a wider secular trend for a system-wide improvement in healthcare-associated infections. Opportunities exist for greater harmonisation of infection control practices. Future studies should investigate causal mechanisms and contextual factors influencing the impact of interventions directed at improving patient care. PMID:22996571

  7. Teaching aseptic technique for central venous access under ultrasound guidance: a randomized trial comparing didactic training alone to didactic plus simulation-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Rana K; Bautista, Alexander F; Memon, Saima B; Smith, Elizabeth A; Wang, Chenxi; Wadhwa, Anupama; Carter, Mary B; Akca, Ozan

    2012-03-01

    Our goal was to determine whether simulation combined with didactic training improves sterile technique during ultrasound (US)-guided central venous catheter (CVC) insertion compared with didactic training alone among novices. We hypothesized that novices who receive combined didactic and simulation-based training would perform similarly to experienced residents in aseptic technique, knowledge, and perception of comfort during US-guided CVC insertion on a simulator. Seventy-two subjects were enrolled in a randomized, controlled trial of an educational intervention. Fifty-four novices were randomized into either the didactic group or the simulation combined with didactic group. Both groups received didactic training but the simulation combined with didactic group also received simulation-based CVC insertion training. Both groups were tested by demonstrating US-guided CVC insertion on a simulator. Aseptic technique was scored on 8 steps as "yes/no" and also using a 7-point Likert scale with 7 being "excellent technique" by a rater blinded to subject randomization. After initial testing, the didactic group was offered simulation-based training and retesting. Both groups also took a pre- and posttraining test of knowledge and rated their comfort with US and CVC insertion pre- and posttraining on a 5-point Likert scale. Subsequently, 18 experienced residents also took the test of knowledge, rated their comfort level, and were scored while performing aseptic US-guided CVC insertion using a simulator. The simulation combined with didactic group achieved a 167% (95% confidence interval [CI] 133%-167%) incremental increase in yes/no scores and 115% (CI 112%-127%) incremental increase in Likert scale ratings on aseptic technique compared with novices in the didactic group. Compared with experienced residents, simulation combined with didactic trained novices achieved an increase in aseptic scores with a 33.3% (CI 16.7%-50%) increase in yes/no ratings and a 20% (CI 13

  8. Combined short- and long-axis ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization is superior to conventional techniques: A cross-over randomized controlled manikin trial.

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    Jun Takeshita

    Full Text Available Visualizing the needle tip using the short-axis (SA ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization approach can be challenging. It has been suggested to start the process with the SA approach and then switch to the long-axis (LA; however, to our knowledge, this combination has not been evaluated. We compared the combined short- and long-axis (SLA approach with the SA approach in a manikin study.We performed a prospective randomized controlled cross-over study in an urban emergency department and intensive care unit. Resident physicians in post-graduate years 1-2 performed a simulated ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein puncture using the SA and SLA approaches on manikins. Twenty resident physicians were randomly assigned to two equal groups: (1 one group performed punctures using the SA approach followed by SLA; and (2 the other performed the same procedures in the opposite order. We compared the success rate and procedure duration for the two approaches. Procedural success was defined as insertion of the guide-wire into the vein while visualizing the needle tip at the time of anterior wall puncture, without penetrating the posterior wall.Six resident physicians (30% performed both approaches successfully, while 12 (60% performed the SLA approach, but not the SA, successfully. Those who performed the SA approach successfully also succeeded with the SLA approach. Two resident physicians (10% failed to perform both approaches. The SLA approach had a significantly higher success rate than the SA approach (P < 0.001. The median (interquartile range procedure duration was 59.5 [46.0-88.5] seconds and 45.0 [37.5-84.0] seconds for the SLA and SA approaches, respectively. The difference of the duration between the two procedures was 15.5 [0-28.5] seconds. There was no significant difference in duration between the two approaches (P = 0.12.Using the SLA approach significantly improved the success rate of internal jugular vein puncture performed by

  9. Transesophageal Echocardiography and Laryngeal Mask Airway for Placement of Permanent Central Venous Catheter in Cancer Patients with Radiographically Unidentifiable SVC-RA Junction: Effectiveness and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Hau Hsu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In patients who require a permanent central venous catheter (PCVC, the usual aim is to put the catheter tip at the superior vena cava and right atrium (SVC-RA junction. However, there is no study regarding how to guide the positioning of the catheter tip when the SVC-RA junction cannot be identified on chest radiograph. The objectives of this prospective study were: (1 to investigate the incidence and etiologies of radiographically undetermined SVC-RA junctions in cancer patients undergoing PCVC implantation; and (2 to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness and safety of combined transesophageal echocardiography (TEE and laryngeal mask airway (LMA to guide the positioning of catheters during implantations in patients without this radiographic landmark. Over a 1-year study period, 83 consecutive patients with oncologic diseases who required implantation of a PCVC in a tertiary center were screened. Their preoperative chest radiographs were examined by radiologists to identify the presence of the SVC-RA junction. Patients without a radiographically identifiable SVC-RA junction were classified as cancer-related or cancer-unrelated in terms of etiology. For patients without this landmark, we used TEE with a pediatric biplane transducer and a LMA under intravenous general anesthesia during PCVC implantation to guide the positioning of the catheter tip at the SVC-RA junction. We found that in 16% (13/83 of patients, the SVC-RA junction could not be identified on radiograph. Among the 13 patients, only three (23% had cancer-related etiologies. In all of the 13 patients, the LMA was successfully placed after the TEE transducer was inserted. No episode of air leak from the LMA was found during surgery. All had the catheter tip positioned in the anatomic SVC-RA junction under TEE guidance. In conclusion, 16% of cancer patients requiring PCVC implantation had no identifiable SVC-RA junction on chest radiograph and most causes were cancer-unrelated. In

  10. The catheter to vein ratio and rates of symptomatic venous thromboembolism in patients with a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC): a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Rebecca; Cummings, Melita; Fielder, Andrea; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina; Grech, Carol; Esterman, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are a common vascular access device used in clinical practice. Their use may be complicated by adverse events such as venous thromboembolism (VTE). The size of the vein used for PICC insertion and thus the catheter to vein ratio is thought to be a controllable factor in the reduction of VTE rates in patients who have a PICC. However, an optimal catheter to vein ratio for PICC insertion has not previously been investigated to inform clinical practice. To determine the effect of the catheter to vein ratio (proportion of the vein measured at the insertion point taken up by the catheter) on rates of symptomatic VTE in patients with a PICC and identify the optimal ratio cut-off point to reduce rates of this adverse event. Adult patients waiting for PICC insertion at a large metropolitan teaching hospital were recruited between May and December 2013. Vein diameter at the PICC insertion site was measured using ultrasound with in-built callipers. Participants were followed up at eight weeks to determine if they developed symptomatic VTE. Data were available for 136 patients (50% cancer; 44% infection; 6% other indication for PICC). Mean age was 57 years with 54% males. There were four cases of confirmed symptomatic VTE (two involving the deep veins, one peripheral vein and one pulmonary embolism). Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis determined that a 45% catheter to vein ratio was the ideal cut off point to maximise sensitivity and specificity (AUC 0.761; 95% CI 0.681-0.830). When a ratio of 46% or above was compared to one that was less than or equal to 45% using a log binomial generalised linear model it was found that participants with a catheter to vein ratio >45% were 13 times more likely to suffer VTE (relative risk 13, p=0.022; CI 1.445-122.788). It was found that a 45% catheter to vein ratio was the optimal cut off with high sensitivity and specificity to reduce the risk of VTE. However, further research

  11. Adverse effects on insulin secretion of replacing saturated fat with refined carbohydrate but not with monounsaturated fat: A randomized controlled trial in centrally obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lin F; Vethakkan, Shireene R; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi; Sanders, Thomas A B; Teng, Kim-Tiu

    Current dietary guidelines recommend the replacement of saturated fatty acids (SAFAs) with carbohydrates or monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) based on evidence on lipid profile alone, the chronic effects of the mentioned replacements on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity are however unclear. To assess the chronic effects of the substitution of refined carbohydrate or MUFA for SAFA on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in centrally obese subjects. Using a crossover design, randomized controlled trial in abdominally overweight men and women, we compared the effects of substitution of 7% energy as carbohydrate or MUFA for SAFA for a period of 6 weeks each. Fasting and postprandial blood samples in response to corresponding SAFA, carbohydrate, or MUFA-enriched meal-challenges were collected after 6 weeks on each diet treatment for the assessment of outcomes. As expected, postprandial nonesterified fatty acid suppression and elevation of C-peptide, insulin and glucose secretion were the greatest with high-carbohydrate (CARB) meal. Interestingly, CARB meal attenuated postprandial insulin secretion corrected for glucose response; however, the insulin sensitivity and disposition index were not affected. SAFA and MUFA had similar effects on all markers except for fasting glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide concentrations, which increased after MUFA but not SAFA when compared with CARB. In conclusion, a 6-week lower-fat/higher-carbohydrate (increased by 7% refined carbohydrate) diet may have greater adverse effect on insulin secretion corrected for glucose compared with isocaloric higher-fat diets. In contrast, exchanging MUFA for SAFA at 7% energy had no appreciable adverse impact on insulin secretion. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevention of hospital infections by intervention and training (PROHIBIT): results of a pan-European cluster-randomized multicentre study to reduce central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooi, Tjallie; Sax, Hugo; Pittet, Didier; van Dissel, Jaap; van Benthem, Birgit; Walder, Bernhard; Cartier, Vanessa; Clack, Lauren; de Greeff, Sabine; Wolkewitz, Martin; Hieke, Stefanie; Boshuizen, Hendriek; van de Kassteele, Jan; Van den Abeele, Annemie; Boo, Teck Wee; Diab-Elschahawi, Magda; Dumpis, Uga; Ghita, Camelia; FitzGerald, Susan; Lejko, Tatjana; Leleu, Kris; Martinez, Mercedes Palomar; Paniara, Olga; Patyi, Márta; Schab, Paweł; Raglio, Annibale; Szilágyi, Emese; Ziętkiewicz, Mirosław; Wu, Albert W; Grundmann, Hajo; Zingg, Walter

    2018-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of a central venous catheter (CVC) insertion strategy and a hand hygiene (HH) improvement strategy to prevent central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in European intensive care units (ICUs), measuring both process and outcome indicators. Adult ICUs from 14 hospitals in 11 European countries participated in this stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled multicentre intervention study. After a 6 month baseline, three hospitals were randomised to one of three interventions every quarter: (1) CVC insertion strategy (CVCi); (2) HH promotion strategy (HHi); and (3) both interventions combined (COMBi). Primary outcome was prospective CRBSI incidence density. Secondary outcomes were a CVC insertion score and HH compliance. Overall 25,348 patients with 35,831 CVCs were included. CRBSI incidence density decreased from 2.4/1000 CVC-days at baseline to 0.9/1000 (p < 0.0001). When adjusted for patient and CVC characteristics all three interventions significantly reduced CRBSI incidence density. When additionally adjusted for the baseline decreasing trend, the HHi and COMBi arms were still effective. CVC insertion scores and HH compliance increased significantly with all three interventions. This study demonstrates that multimodal prevention strategies aiming at improving CVC insertion practice and HH reduce CRBSI in diverse European ICUs. Compliance explained CRBSI reduction and future quality improvement studies should encourage measuring process indicators.

  13. Radiological placement of peripheral central venous access ports at the forearm. Technical results and long term outcome in 391 patients; Radiologische Implantation zentralvenoeser Portsysteme am Unterarm. Implantationsergebnisse und Langzeit-Follow-up bei 391 Patienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhart, M. [Sozialstiftung Bamberg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Schaetzler, S. [Klinikum der Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Manke, C. [Klinikum Fulda (DE). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie] (and others)

    2010-01-15

    To retrospectively analyze the technical result and long term outcome of central venous arm ports placed by radiologists. Over a 5-year period, 399 arm ports were implanted by radiologists in 391 patients. The system consists of a low profile titanium chamber and a silicone catheter. Ports were placed at the forearm after puncture of a vein proximally to the elbow under fluoroscopic guidance. In a retrospective analysis the technical results and the long term outcome were evaluated. Complications were documented according to the standards of the society of interventional radiology. In 391 patients a total of 98 633 catheter days were documented (1 - 1325 days, mean 252 days). Primary technical success was 99.25 % (396 / 399) with a 100 % secondary technical success rate. No severe procedural complications, e. g. pneumothorax or severe hemorrhage, were found. A total of 45 complications occurred (11.28 %, 0.45 / 1000 catheter days), including 8 portal pocket infections (27 - 205 days, mean 115 days). Fifteen ports were explanted because of complications. The complication rate corresponds to the data from subclavian ports and is less than the complication rates published in large surgical trials. Implantation of central-venous arm ports by radiologists is safe and minimally invasive. No severe immediate procedural complications occur due to the peripheral implantation site. Long term complication rates are comparable to other studies of radiological or surgical port implantation at different sites. (orig.)

  14. Sources and Formation Processes of Short-Chain Saturated Diacids (C2–C4 in Inhalable Particles (PM10 from Huangshi City, Central China

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    Hongxia Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available PM10 samples were collected from Huangshi (HS city, Central China during April 2012 to March 2013, and were analyzed for short-chain saturated dicarboxylic acids (diacids using a capillary gas chromatograph (GC. We found that oxalic acid (C2, 318 ± 104 ng·m−3 was the most abundant diacid species, followed by malonic acid (C3, 25.4 ± 9.11 ng·m−3 and succinic acid (C4, 2.09 ± 0.52 ng·m−3. The concentrations of C2 and C4 diacids were highest in winter, followed by summer and spring, and lowest in autumn. C3 diacid was decreased in the order of summer > winter > autumn > spring. Further, the seasonal variations of WSOC (water-soluble organic carbon- and OC (organic carbon-normalized diacid concentrations were similar to those of diacid concentrations, suggesting that both primary emission and secondary production are important sources for diacids in Huangshi (HS aerosols. Strong correlations were found among C2 diacid and the three ions SO42−, NO3−, and NH4+ in summer and winter, suggesting that the species could undergo a similar secondary oxidation processing. C2 had good correlation with K+ in summer and autumn, which indicates an enhanced contribution of combustion sources for C2 diacid. Moreover, according to the ratio of C2/K+, we can conclude that C2 diacid should be formed by a secondary reaction of biomass combustion in HS aerosols, especially in summer and autumn. The ratios of C2/C4 and C3/C4 were compared with those reported in other sites, and the results suggest that HS aerosols should be more photochemically aged than at other urban areas. Principal component analysis of diacids and selected water-soluble inorganic ions over four seasons suggests that HS aerosols are influenced not only from primary emission, but also from secondary reaction. According to the linear relation between C2 and C3 diacids, the results indicate that C2 diacid is formed from the oxidation of hydrocarbon compounds in spring, while it is from

  15. Pacientes assintomáticos apresentam infecção relacionada ao cateter venoso utilizado para terapia nutricional parenteral Asymptomatic patients present infection related to the central venous catheter used for total parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Deh Carvalho Machado

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a freqüência de infecção relacionada ao cateter venoso central em pacientes submetidos a terapia nutricional parenteral. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados os cateteres venosos centrais de pacientes em terapia nutricional parenteral que tiveram a indicação de retirada do cateter venoso central por infecção, alta hospitalar, ou trombose. Os pacientes com infecção foram denominados de Grupo 1 e os demais de Grupo 2. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante quanto ao estado nutricional dos 18 pacientes analisados. Foram analisados 28 cateteres e destes 68% estavam infectados, sendo 72% do Grupo 1 e 28% do Grupo 2 (assintomáticos. No Grupo 1, houve infecção sistêmica em 70% dos casos, já no Grupo 2 a hemocultura foi positiva em 17% dos casos. A colonização por Staphylococcus sp. ocorreu em 48% dos casos, seguida de Candida sp. (21%, Enterococcus faecalis (16%, Pseudomonas aerurginosa (10% e Proteus sp.(5%. CONCLUSÃO: A contaminação de cateter venoso central utilizado para terapia nutricional parenteral é freqüente. Mesmo pacientes assintomáticos recebendo nutrição parenteral têm uma incidência maior de infecção por Candida sp. Portanto é necessária a criação de barreiras que impeçam a colonização destes cateteres venosos centrais, a fim de diminuir a morbimortalidade de pacientes dependentes deste tipo de terapia.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of central venous catheter-related infections in hospitalized patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. METHODS: Central venous catheters were analyzed immediately after removal due to infection, hospital discharge or thrombosis. The patients with catheter-related infection were named Group 1 and the other patients were named Group 2. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were studied. There was no statistically significant difference in nutritional status between the two groups. A total of 28 catheters were analyzed

  16. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001157.htm Mesenteric venous thrombosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT) is a blood clot in one or ...

  17. Saturated fat (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saturated fat. Sources of saturated fat include whole-milk dairy products, like cheese, ice cream and butter. Animal fats ... saturated fat. Sources of saturated fat include whole-milk dairy products, like cheese, ice cream and butter. Animal fats ...

  18. Guidelines for the use of long-term central venous catheter in children with hemato-oncological disorders. On behalf of supportive therapy working group of Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, F; Cicalese, M P; Cesaro, S; De Santis, R; Zanazzo, G; Tornesello, A; Giordano, P; Bergadano, A; Giacchino, M

    2013-10-01

    In the last 30 years, the use of long-term central venous catheters (CVC) is increased especially for children with hemato-oncological disorders. However, the use of CVC is associated to complications, as mechanical accidents, thrombosis, and infections that can determine a prolongation of hospital stay, an increase of costs, and sometimes life-threatening conditions that require urgent systemic treatment or CVC removal. CVC removal may be troublesome especially in neonates, infants, or any other "highly needed CVC patients"; in these selected cases, the prevention and treatment of CVC-related complications play a pivotal role and specific surveillance programs are crucial. While extensive literature is focused on CVC management in adults, no guidelines are available for children. To this aim, the first recommendations for the management of CVC infectious complication in pediatric age have been written after pediatric and adult literature review and collegial discussion among members of Supportive Therapy working group of Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology. Compared to the adult age, the necessity of peripheral vein cultures for the diagnosis of CVC-related infection remains controversial in children because of the poorer venous asset and a conservative, pharmacologically focused management through CVC remains mandatory, with CVC removal to be performed only in selected cases.

  19. PLA2 polymorphism of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa but not Factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A polymorphisms is associated with venous thromboembolism and more recurrent events in central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourgheysari, Batoul; Boroujeni, Hamid Rouhi; Hasheminia, Ali Mohammad; Drees, Fatima

    2013-07-01

    Inherited thrombophilic gene polymorphisms have been linked to the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE). As there are very limited data of these polymorphisms in the Iranian population, we aimed to investigate the correlation between them and VTE in central Iran. Seventy-two unrelated VTE patients and 306 healthy control individuals were recruited for the study. Genotyping from venous blood with EDTA for the factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin (FII) G20210A, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and PLA2 polymorphism of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa were undertaken by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). A total of 57 investigated polymorphisms with a mean of 0.79 per individual and 151 with a mean of 0.49 were found in patients and controls, respectively (Pgenetic risk factor (P=0.007) and more recurrent events occurred in such patients. Patients with PLA2 polymorphism had more recurrent events than the other patients (P=0.02). Patients with more than one genetic risk factor and recurrent events were younger. The prevalence of these polymorphisms is different from some previously published data in other populations, but is consistent with some others. Higher prevalence of PLA2 polymorphism of GPIIa/IIIb in VTE patients is indicative of the impact of this polymorphism in the pathogenesis of VTE in this population. Because of the impact of coinheritance on the recurrence and the age of occurrence, such patients may need to be managed differently.

  20. Is 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% isopropyl alcohol more effective at preventing central venous catheter-related infections than routinely used chlorhexidine gluconate solutions: A pilot multicenter randomized trial (ISRCTN2657745)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Margaret; Fitzpatrick, Fidelma; Mellotte, George; Clarke, Michael

    2016-08-01

    A pilot randomized trial in 3 Irish outpatient hemodialysis units compared 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% isopropyl alcohol with routinely used CHG solutions for central venous catheter exit site antisepsis. We found no significant difference between the groups for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections (1/53 vs 2/52; relative risk [RR], 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-5.25; P = .55) and catheter-associated bloodstream infections (1/53 vs 4/52; RR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.03-2.12; P = .16). Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison between radiation exposure levels using an image intensifier and a flat-panel detector-based system in image-guided central venous catheter placement in children weighing less than 10 kg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Cortis, Kelvin; Gerasia, Roberta; Maggio, Simona; Luca, Angelo [Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo (Italy); Piazza, Marcello [Department of Anesthesia, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo (Italy); Tuzzolino, Fabio [Department of Information Technology, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo (Italy)

    2014-09-10

    Ultrasound-guided central venous puncture and fluoroscopic guidance during central venous catheter (CVC) positioning optimizes technical success and lowers the complication rates in children, and is therefore considered standard practice. The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation exposure levels recorded during CVC placement in children weighing less than 10 kg in procedures performed using an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS) to those performed in a flat-panel detector-based interventional suite (FPDS). A retrospective review of 96 image-guided CVC placements, between January 2008 and October 2013, in 49 children weighing less than 10 kg was performed. Mean age was 8.2 ± 4.4 months (range: 1-22 months). Mean weight was 7.1 ± 2.7 kg (range: 2.5-9.8 kg). The procedures were classified into two categories: non-tunneled and tunneled CVC placement. Thirty-five procedures were performed with the IIDS (21 non-tunneled CVC, 14 tunneled CVC); 61 procedures were performed with the FPDS (47 non-tunneled CVC, 14 tunneled CVC). For non-tunneled CVC, mean DAP was 113.5 ± 126.7 cGy cm{sup 2} with the IIDS and 15.9 ± 44.6 cGy . cm{sup 2} with the FPDS (P < 0.001). For tunneled CVC, mean DAP was 84.6 ± 81.2 cGy . cm{sup 2} with the IIDS and 37.1 ± 33.5 cGy cm{sup 2} with the FPDS (P = 0.02). The use of flat-panel angiographic equipment reduces radiation exposure in small children undergoing image-guided CVC placement. (orig.)

  2. Brain oxygen saturation assessment in neonates using T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alderliesten, Thomas; De Vis, Jill B; Lemmers, Petra Ma

    2017-01-01

    Although near-infrared spectroscopy is increasingly being used to monitor cerebral oxygenation in neonates, it has a limited penetration depth. The T2-prepared Blood Imaging of Oxygen Saturation (T2-BIOS) magnetic resonance sequence provides an oxygen saturation estimate on a voxel-by-voxel basis......, without needing a respiratory calibration experiment. In 15 neonates, oxygen saturation measured by T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy were compared. In addition, these measures were compared to cerebral blood flow and venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal...... sinus. A strong linear relation was found between the oxygen saturation measured by magnetic resonance imaging and the oxygen saturation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (R(2 )= 0.64, p infrared spectroscopy oxygen saturation...

  3. Retinal oxygen saturation in relation to retinal thickness in diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Peto, Tunde; Grauslund, Jakob

    .4 and 3.8 years. Median HbA1c was 61.5 mmol/mol and 22.2% were women. Mean oxygen saturation was higher in retinal macular venules as compared to global venous oxygen saturation (76.7% vs. 66.3%, p=0.0001), whereas there was no difference between macular and global arteriolar oxygen saturations (94.8% vs......Purpose: Retinal oximetry is a non-invasive measure of retinal metabolism. Diabetic retinopathy is associated with increased oxygen saturation in retinal venules. Hence, we examined if there are regional differences in retinal oxygen saturation, and if retinal oxygen saturation is correlated...... with DME had higher retinal oxygen saturation in macular venules as compared to the global retinal venous oxygen saturation. No correlation was demonstrated between retinal thickness and retinal oxygen saturation. Retinal oximetry may become an important clinical tool to monitor disease activity...

  4. Diagnosis of venous disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minar, E.

    1993-01-01

    Limited accuracy in the clinic diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (VT) makes such diagnostic tests such as duplex sonography or venography necessary. Exact information on the age and extent of the thrombus are necessary for the clinician to optimize the therapeutric management. The correct diagnosis of calf vein thrombosis and of recurrent VT in patients with postphlebitis changes also has implications for treatment. After exclusion of thrombosis, the radiologist should evaluate the leg for other possible causes of symptoms besides VT. Investigation of the venous sytem also has a role in the diagnosis in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. In patients with chronic venous insuffficiency the deep venous system should assessed for patency and venous valve function. The superficial veins should be differentiated in segments with sufficient or insufficient venous valves, and it is also necessary to look for insufficiency of the perforrating veins. In patients with superficial phlebitis there is risk of propagation into the deep venous system. (orig.) [de

  5. A rat model of central venous catheter to study establishment of long-term bacterial biofilm and related acute and chronic infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Chauhan

    Full Text Available Formation of resilient biofilms on medical devices colonized by pathogenic microorganisms is a major cause of health-care associated infection. While in vitro biofilm analyses led to promising anti-biofilm approaches, little is known about their translation to in vivo situations and on host contribution to the in vivo dynamics of infections on medical devices. Here we have developed an in vivo model of long-term bacterial biofilm infections in a pediatric totally implantable venous access port (TIVAP surgically placed in adult rats. Using non-invasive and quantitative bioluminescence, we studied TIVAP contamination by clinically relevant pathogens, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and we demonstrated that TIVAP bacterial populations display typical biofilm phenotypes. In our study, we showed that immunocompetent rats were able to control the colonization and clear the bloodstream infection except for up to 30% that suffered systemic infection and death whereas none of the immunosuppressed rats survived the infection. Besides, we mimicked some clinically relevant TIVAP associated complications such as port-pocket infection and hematogenous route of colonization. Finally, by assessing an optimized antibiotic lock therapy, we established that our in vivo model enables to assess innovative therapeutic strategies against bacterial biofilm infections.

  6. Brain oxygen saturation assessment in neonates using T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderliesten, Thomas; De Vis, Jill B; Lemmers, Petra Ma; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Groenendaal, Floris; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon Jnl; Petersen, Esben T

    2017-03-01

    Although near-infrared spectroscopy is increasingly being used to monitor cerebral oxygenation in neonates, it has a limited penetration depth. The T 2 -prepared Blood Imaging of Oxygen Saturation (T 2 -BIOS) magnetic resonance sequence provides an oxygen saturation estimate on a voxel-by-voxel basis, without needing a respiratory calibration experiment. In 15 neonates, oxygen saturation measured by T 2 -prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy were compared. In addition, these measures were compared to cerebral blood flow and venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. A strong linear relation was found between the oxygen saturation measured by magnetic resonance imaging and the oxygen saturation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy ( R 2  = 0.64, p infrared spectroscopy oxygen saturation, and magnetic resonance imaging measures of frontal cerebral blood flow, whole brain cerebral blood flow and venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus ( R 2  = 0.71, 0.50, 0.65; p infrared spectroscopy and T 2 -prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation, confirming the validity of using of these techniques for determining cerebral oxygenation.

  7. Chronic venous disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    engage in social and occupational activities, reduce QoL, and impose financial constraints. CVD has a significant financial ... 'heaviness or aching' aggravated by prolonged standing and relieved by elevation. Additionally, chronic .... of image acquisition based on venous filling. Abnormalities in venous flow are depicted.

  8. Continuous cardiac output and mixed venous oxygen saturation monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariou, A; Monchi, M; Dhainaut, J F

    1998-12-01

    Continuous assessment of cardiac output and SVO2 in the critically ill may be helpful in both the monitoring variations in the patient's cardiovascular state and in determining the efficacy of therapy. Commercially available continuous cardiac output (CCO) monitoring systems are based on the pulsed warm thermodilution technique. In vitro validation studies have demonstrated that this method provides higher accuracy and greater resistance to thermal noise than standard bolus thermodilution techniques. Numerous clinical studies comparing bolus with continuous thermodilution techniques have shown this technique similarly accurate to track each other and to have negligible bias between them. The comparison between continuous thermal and other cardiac output methods also demonstrates good precision of the continuous thermal technique. Accuracy of continuous oximetry monitoring using reflectance oximetry via fiberoptics has been assessed both in vitro and in vivo. Most of the studies testing agreement between continuous SVO2 measurements and pulmonary arterial blood samples measured by standard oximetry have shown good correlation. Continuous SVO2 monitoring is often used in the management of critically ill patients. The most recently designed pulmonary artery catheters are now able to simultaneously measure either SVO2 and CCO or SVO2 and right ventricular ejection fraction. This ability to view simultaneous trends of SVO2 and right ventricular performance parameters will probably allow the clinician to graphically see the impact of volume loading or inotropic therapy over time, as well as the influence of multiple factors, including right ventricular dysfunction, on SVO2. However, the cost-effectiveness of new pulmonary artery catheters application remains still questionable because no established utility or therapeutic guidelines are available.

  9. Prospects of Jugular Venous Pulse Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M D Bhattarai

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no controversy regarding the current clinical method of examination of waveform of jugular vein pulse. However there are limitations of clinical assessment of central venous pressure by jugular vein pressure measurement from the level of sternal angle. There are variations in the reported distances from sternal angle to right atrium as well as to upper limit of JVP. In erect position, anterior end of fourth intercostal space is at about the level of mid-right atrium. In patients with visible JVP at neck in erect position, measurement of CVP can be done more accurately directly from the anterior end of fourth intercostal space. For others, the position of mid-right atrium can be marked in lateral chest wall first in erect position at the mid-point of an anteroposterior line from anterior end of fourth intercostal space to back. Subsequently in reclining position, the vertical height of venous pressure can be measured from the horizontal plane of the midpoint marked at lateral chest wall to visible upper limit of JVP. Such measurement can be done in a more reliable way with venous pressure (VP manometer with its indicator rod at the horizontal plane of mid-right atrium and with its horizontal surface at upper limit of JVP. The venous pressure manometer can also be used to measure relatively less reliable upper limb venous pressure (ULVP, as indicated by the vertical distance at which veins of upper limb collapse, especially when JVP is not visualized due to subnormal CVP as in hypovolemia. Keywords: CVP, JVP, right atrium, sternal angle, upper limp venous pressure, venous pressure, venous pressure manometer

  10. On partially saturated formations of finite groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballester-Bolinches, Adolfo; Calvo, Clara; Shemetkov, L A

    2007-01-01

    Various types of partially saturated formations and connections between them are considered. It is shown that partially saturated formations can be characterized as classes of finite groups with generalized central series. A theorem on the decomposition of an FG-module into a sum of two submodules with special properties is proved. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  11. Site saturation mutagenesis demonstrates a central role for cysteine 298 as proton donor to the catalytic site in CaHydA [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Morra

    Full Text Available [FeFe]-hydrogenases reversibly catalyse molecular hydrogen evolution by reduction of two protons. Proton supply to the catalytic site (H-cluster is essential for enzymatic activity. Cysteine 298 is a highly conserved residue in all [FeFe]-hydrogenases; moreover C298 is structurally very close to the H-cluster and it is important for hydrogenase activity. Here, the function of C298 in catalysis was investigated in detail by means of site saturation mutagenesis, simultaneously studying the effect of C298 replacement with all other 19 amino acids and selecting for mutants with high retained activity. We demonstrated that efficient enzymatic turnover was maintained only when C298 was replaced by aspartic acid, despite the structural diversity between the two residues. Purified CaHydA C298D does not show any significant structural difference in terms of secondary structure and iron incorporation, demonstrating that the mutation does not affect the overall protein fold. C298D retains the hydrogen evolution activity with a decrease of k(cat only by 2-fold at pH 8.0 and it caused a shift of the optimum pH from 8.0 to 7.0. Moreover, the oxygen inactivation rate was not affected demonstrating that the mutation does not influence O(2 diffusion to the active site or its reactivity with the H-cluster. Our results clearly demonstrate that, in order to maintain the catalytic efficiency and the high turnover number typical of [FeFe] hydrogenases, the highly conserved C298 can be replaced only by another ionisable residue with similar steric hindrance, giving evidence of its involvement in the catalytic function of [FeFe]-hydrogenases in agreement with an essential role in proton transfer to the active site.

  12. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  13. [Developmental venous anomaly (DVA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, A; Hagen, T; Ahlhelm, F; Viera, J; Reith, W; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G

    2007-10-01

    As congenital anatomic variants of venous drainage, developmental venous anomalies (DVA) represent up to 60% of all cerebral vascular malformations. The prior term "venous angioma" is a misnomer implicating an abnormal vascular structure with an increased bleeding risk. They are often found incidentally and are hardly ever symptomatic. Their morphologic characteristics are dilated vessels in the white matter, which converge on a greater collector vein, forming the typical caput medusae. They drain into the superficial or deep venous system. The frequent association with other, potentially bleeding-prone vascular malformations is clinically relevant, in particular cavernous angioma, which might require therapeutic action. Therefore, coincident vascular lesions need to be actively sought by appropriate additional imaging techniques.

  14. Venous thrombosis - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100168.htm Venous thrombosis - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Deep Vein Thrombosis A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  15. A revised oxygen barometry in sulfide-saturated magmas and application to the Permian magmatic Ni-Cu deposits in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ya-Jing; Qin, Ke-Zhang; Barnes, Stephen J.; Ferraina, Clément; Iacono-Marziano, Giada; Verrall, Michael; Tang, Dongmei; Xue, Shengchao

    2017-11-01

    Oxygen fugacity is a key parameter in controlling the petrogenesis of mafic-ultramafic rocks and their associated sulfide mineralization, especially in convergent settings. This study uses new and previously published experimental data on olivine-sulfide pairs to reparameterize an expression for oxygen barometry using the distribution coefficient K D FeNi for Fe-Ni exchange between olivine and sulfide. We derive a new expression, ΔQFM = (9.775 + 0.416 • C Ni - K D FeNi)/4.308, where ΔQFM denotes divergence from the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer. The revised oxygen barometry has been applied to the Permian magmatic Ni-Cu deposits in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, NW China. The Ni-Cu deposits in the East Tianshan—North Tianshan, Central Tianshan, and Beishan—are considered as a single mineral system, whereas the spatially separated deposits in the East Junggar are considered as a separate system. The deposit of the East Tianshan group exhibits a large range of oxygen fugacity (QFM - 2 to QFM + 1) and Ni tenor (metal concentration in pure sulfide, 5 to 16 wt%). The Poyi and Huangshannan deposits contain high-Ni tenor sulfides, varying from 12 to 16 wt%. The relatively high Fo values (> 85 mol%) and Ni contents (> 2000 ppm) in olivine of these deposits indicate that the high-Ni tenor sulfides were segregated from less differentiated high-Ni magmas that also had relatively high oxygen fugacity ( QFM + 1). The remaining Ni-Cu deposits in the East Tianshan—the Huangshandong, Huangshanxi, Hulu, Tulaergen, Tudun, and Xiangshanzhong deposits—have intermediate Ni tenors (5-8 wt%). These sulfides correspond to intermediate Fo values (80-84 mol%) and Ni contents (700-1400 ppm) in the coexisting olivine, illustrating that they were segregated from magmas with lower Ni contents thought to be the result of a large amount (15-20%) of olivine fractionation at depth. These magmas are more reduced (- 2 fugacity and Ni tenor in the Permian Ni-Cu deposits in the Central

  16. Venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea; Adderley, Una

    2016-01-15

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0 in 1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20 in 1000 people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic overview, aiming to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2014 (Clinical Evidence overviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this overview). At this update, searching of electronic databases retrieved 116 studies. After deduplication and removal of conference abstracts, 63 records were screened for inclusion in the overview. Appraisal of titles and abstracts led to the exclusion of 43 studies and the further review of 20 full publications. Of the 20 full articles evaluated, four systematic reviews were updated and four RCTs were added at this update. We performed a GRADE evaluation for 23 PICO combinations. In this systematic overview, we categorised the efficacy for 13 interventions based on information about the effectiveness and safety of advice to elevate leg, advice to keep leg active, compression stockings for prevention of recurrence, compression bandages and stockings to treat venous leg ulcers, laser treatment (low level), leg ulcer clinics, pentoxifylline, skin grafting, superficial vein surgery for prevention of recurrence, superficial vein surgery to treat venous leg ulcers, therapeutic ultrasound, and topical negative pressure.

  17. Venous ulcer review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevis, Paul; Earnshaw, Jonothan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best treatment for venous ulcers? Results: Compression aids ulcer healing. Pentoxifylline can aid ulcer healing. Artificial skin grafts are more effective than other skin grafts in helping ulcer healing. Correction of underlying venous incompetence reduces ulcer recurrence. Implementation: Potential pitfalls to avoid are: Failure to exclude underlying arterial disease before application of compression.Unusual-looking ulcers or those slow to heal should be biopsied to exclude malignant transformation. PMID:21673869

  18. Venous ulcer review

    OpenAIRE

    Bevis, Paul; Earnshaw, Jonothan

    2011-01-01

    Paul Bevis, Jonothan Earnshaw Department of Vascular Surgery, Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, Great Western Road, Gloucester, UKDate of preparation: 3 February 2011Conflict of interest: None declared.Clinical question: What is the best treatment for venous ulcers?Results: Compression aids ulcer healing. Pentoxifylline can aid ulcer healing. Artificial skin grafts are more effective than other skin grafts in helping ulcer healing. Correction of underlying venous incompetence reduces ulcer recu...

  19. Prophylaxis of Venous Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Samuel Z.

    2001-06-01

    Mechanical measures such as graduated compression stockings and intermittent compression boots are available for venous thrombosis prophylaxis, but compliance may be limited. Plantar venous pneumatic compression devices have attained widespread acceptance by both patients and nurses because of their comfort and compact size, but their track record for efficacy is poor. Inferior vena cava filters prevent pulmonary embolism, but do not halt the thrombotic process or prevent venous thrombosis. Pharmacologic prophylaxis traditionally has relied upon minidose unfractionated heparin; however, re-examination is warranted in the face of increasingly ill and complex patients. My opinion is that small, fixed doses of once-daily low molecular weight heparin will eventually replace minidose unfractionated heparin as the standard pharmacologic prophylaxis regimen for most surgical and medical patients. Prolongation of prophylaxis after hospital discharge should receive increased emphasis. Most patients being transferred to a skilled nursing facility should receive venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Similarly, most patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement should receive prolonged preventive regimens, with at least 1 month of anticoagulation. Despite advances, certain aspects of venous thrombosis prophylaxis remain problematic. First, a surprisingly high number of hospitalized patients develop venous thrombosis because of failed (rather than omitted) prophylaxis. Second, many patients in intensive care have a combination of peripheral vascular disease and active bleeding (usually gastrointestinal) that precludes mechanical or pharmacologic prophylaxis. Third, neurosurgical patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumors suffer a high rate of venous thrombosis and major pulmonary embolism despite the routine use of combined mechanical and pharmacologic prophylaxis. My opinion is that these three areas, in addition to the hospital culture of prophylaxis, should receive

  20. Brain venous pathologies: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatico, Rosana; Gonzalez, Alejandro; Yanez, Paulina; Romero, Carlos; Trejo, Mariano; Lambre, Hector

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe MRI findings of the different brain venous pathologies. Material and Methods: Between January 2002 and March 2004, 18 patients were studied 10 males and 8 females between 6 and 63 years old; with different brain venous pathologies. In all cases brain MRI were performed including morphological sequences with and without gadolinium injection and angiographic venous sequences. Results: 10 venous occlusions were found, 6 venous angiomas, and 2 presented varices secondary to arteriovenous dural fistula. Conclusion: Brain venous pathologies can appear in many different clinical contexts, with different prognosis and treatment. In all the cases brain MRI was the best imaging study to disclose typical morphologic abnormalities. (author) [es

  1. Effect of chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated central venous catheters in an intensive care unit with a low blood stream infection rate after implementation of an educational program: a before-after trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerer, Douglas J E; Zack, Jeanne E; Thomas, James; Borecki, Ingrid B; Sona, Carrie S; Schallom, Marilyn E; Venker, Melissa; Nemeth, Jennifer L; Ward, Myrna R; Verjan, Linda; Warren, David K; Fraser, Victoria J; Mazuski, John E; Boyle, Walter A; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-08-01

    Current guidelines recommend using antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated central venous catheters (CVCs) if, following a comprehensive strategy to prevent catheter-related blood stream infection (CR-BSI), infection rates remain above institutional goals based on benchmark values. The purpose of this study was to determine if chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated CVCs could decrease the CR-BSI rate in an intensive care unit (ICU) with a low baseline infection rate. Pre-intervention and post-intervention observational study in a 24-bed surgical/trauma/burn ICU from October, 2002 to August, 2005. All patients requiring CVC placement after March, 2004 had a chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheter inserted (post-intervention period). Twenty-three CR-BSIs occurred in 6,960 catheter days (3.3 per 1,000 catheter days)during the 17-month control period. After introduction of chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters, 16 CR-BSIs occurred in 7,732 catheter days (2.1 per 1,000 catheter days; p = 0.16). The average length of time required for an infection to become established after catheterization was similar in the two groups (8.4 vs. 8.6 days; p = 0.85). Chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters did not result in a statistically significant change in the microbiological profile of CR-BSIs, nor did they increase the incidence of resistant organisms. Although chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters are useful in specific patient populations, they did not result in a statistically significant decrease in the CR-BSI rate in this study, beyond what was achieved with education alone.

  2. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Byung Boong; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    aspects of management for venous disease by evidence-based principles. These included experts from various member societies including the European Venous Forum (EVF), American Venous Forum (AVF), American College of Phlebology (ACP) and Cardiovascular Disease Educational and Research Trust (CDERT...

  3. Direct venous thrombolysis and venous angioplasty in the upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollmann, J.P.; Guenther, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Venous thromboses of stenoses in the upper extremity are often the result of a compression syndrome of the shoulder girdle, the Paget-von Schroetter syndrome, vascular surgery, space-occupying lesions in the mediastinum or the result of catheterisation. Direct venous thrombolysis and venous angioplasty were performed successfully in six patients. (orig.) [de

  4. Chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinsky, Claire D; Waldorf, Heidi

    2009-11-01

    Identifying characteristic cutaneous findings is important in determining the appropriate management of certain venous diseases. The health care provider should be familiar with the classic description of patterns and distributions of skin manifestations, such as varicose veins, stasis dermatitis, palpable cord, petechiae, and telangiectasias. In addition to the gross appearance of the skin, a skin biopsy may help elucidate a diagnosis. General treatment and prevention of the underlying venous pathology is essential. Furthermore, specific management of skin findings should include therapy to ameliorate progression of disease and symptomatology when warranted.

  5. Hormonal contraception and venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Milsom, Ian; Geirsson, Reynir Tomas

    2012-01-01

    New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published.......New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published....

  6. Saturated Switching Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Benzaouia, Abdellah

    2012-01-01

    Saturated Switching Systems treats the problem of actuator saturation, inherent in all dynamical systems by using two approaches: positive invariance in which the controller is designed to work within a region of non-saturating linear behaviour; and saturation technique which allows saturation but guarantees asymptotic stability. The results obtained are extended from the linear systems in which they were first developed to switching systems with uncertainties, 2D switching systems, switching systems with Markovian jumping and switching systems of the Takagi-Sugeno type. The text represents a thoroughly referenced distillation of results obtained in this field during the last decade. The selected tool for analysis and design of stabilizing controllers is based on multiple Lyapunov functions and linear matrix inequalities. All the results are illustrated with numerical examples and figures many of them being modelled using MATLAB®. Saturated Switching Systems will be of interest to academic researchers in con...

  7. Carbon dioxide as a venous contrast agent: Applications in interventional radiology=20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Seong Tae; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon Yul; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pfammatter, Thomas; Cho, Kyung Jae [Univ. of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor (United States)

    1997-09-01

    To evaluate the safety and usefulness of carbon dioxide(CO{sub 2}) as a venous contrast agent for upper-arm placement of peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC), vena caval filter placement, and for visualization of the portal vein in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt(TIPS). About 20-30ml of CO{sub 2} was used as an alternative to iodinated contrast material for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and fluoroscopy to guide upper-arm placement of PICC in 46 patients, for inferior venacavogram before filter placement in five, and for visualization of the portal vein during TIPS in two. Vital signs, peripheral arterial oxygen saturation, and renal function were checked during and after delivery of CO{sub 2}. All CO{sub 2} DSA for PICC placement clearly delineated patency or stenosis of the central veins. In 41 of 46 patients (89 %), PICC placement with CO{sub 2} guidance was successful. The mean number of venipunctures for PICC placement was 1.9, and the mean volume of CO{sub 2} injected for venipuncture was 35ml. In five patients, Titanium Greenfield filters were successfully implanted into the inferior vena cava following CO{sub 2} vena cavography. In two patients in whom hepatopetal portal flow was seen on indirect portography, the portal vein was visualized by CO{sub 2}-wedged hepatic venography. Injection of CO{sub 2} into the splenic vein following TIPS placement revealed shunt patency. Vital signs and oxygen saturation did not change, and there was no evidence of renal toxicity following CO{sub 2}injection. CO{sub 2} is a safe and useful alternative contrast agent for upper-arm placement of PICC, pre-filter placement cavography, and wedged hepatic venography and portography for TIPS.

  8. Carbon dioxide as a venous contrast agent: Applications in interventional radiology=20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Seong Tae; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon Yul; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Pfammatter, Thomas; Cho, Kyung Jae

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and usefulness of carbon dioxide(CO 2 ) as a venous contrast agent for upper-arm placement of peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC), vena caval filter placement, and for visualization of the portal vein in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt(TIPS). About 20-30ml of CO 2 was used as an alternative to iodinated contrast material for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and fluoroscopy to guide upper-arm placement of PICC in 46 patients, for inferior venacavogram before filter placement in five, and for visualization of the portal vein during TIPS in two. Vital signs, peripheral arterial oxygen saturation, and renal function were checked during and after delivery of CO 2 . All CO 2 DSA for PICC placement clearly delineated patency or stenosis of the central veins. In 41 of 46 patients (89 %), PICC placement with CO 2 guidance was successful. The mean number of venipunctures for PICC placement was 1.9, and the mean volume of CO 2 injected for venipuncture was 35ml. In five patients, Titanium Greenfield filters were successfully implanted into the inferior vena cava following CO 2 vena cavography. In two patients in whom hepatopetal portal flow was seen on indirect portography, the portal vein was visualized by CO 2 -wedged hepatic venography. Injection of CO 2 into the splenic vein following TIPS placement revealed shunt patency. Vital signs and oxygen saturation did not change, and there was no evidence of renal toxicity following CO 2 injection. CO 2 is a safe and useful alternative contrast agent for upper-arm placement of PICC, pre-filter placement cavography, and wedged hepatic venography and portography for TIPS

  9. Models of the venous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J

    2000-01-01

    of the venous system require at least three elements: a resistor, a capacitor and an inductor, with the latter being of more importance in the venous than in the arterial system. Non-linearities must be considered in pressure/flow relations in the small venules, during venous collapse, or low flow conditions...

  10. Cerebral venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvis, Suzanne M.; de Sousa, Diana Aguiar; Ferro, José M.; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an important cause of stroke in young adults. Data from large international registries published in the past two decades have greatly improved our knowledge about the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and prognosis of CVT. The presentation of symptoms is

  11. Port Placement via the Anterior Jugular Venous System: Case Report, Anatomic Considerations, and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Rott

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a patient who was referred for port implantation with a two-chamber pacemaker aggregate on the right and total occlusion of the central veins on the left side. Venous access for port implantation was performed via left side puncture of the horizontal segment of the anterior jugular vein system (AJVS and insertion of the port catheter using a crossover technique from the left to the right venous system via the jugular venous arch (JVA. The clinical significance of the AJVS and the JVA for central venous access and port implantation is emphasised and the corresponding literature is reviewed.

  12. Venous ulcer: what is new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffetto, Joseph D; Marston, William A

    2011-01-01

    The pathophysiology of venous dermal abnormality in chronic venous ulcers is reflective of a complex interplay that involves sustained venous hypertension, inflammation, changes in the microcirculation, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase activation, and altered cellular function. Red blood cells and macromolecules extravasate into the interstitium and activate endothelial cells. Endothelial expression of specific adhesion molecules recruits leukocytes and causes diapedesis of these cells into the dermal microvasculature, promoting an inflammatory response with activation of cytokines and proteinases. Altered cell function enhances a state of vulnerability in the surrounding tissues, initiating specific changes associated with venous disease. Ultimately, the persistent inflammatory-proteinase activity leads to advanced chronic venous insufficiency and ulcer formation. The mainstay of therapy in venous ulcer abnormality is correction of the underlying venous hypertension through compression therapy and/or surgery. Understanding the science involved in the pathophysiology of venous ulcer formation has led to the development of adjunctive treatment directed at the dysregulated molecular pathways. Randomized clinical trials are critical for determining the most effective evidence-based treatments for venous ulcer, and this review discusses important trials that have had a significant impact on venous ulcer healing. In addition, the authors have included subsections referred to as "Translational Implications for Therapy" in the basic science sections of the review to help bridge the basic science knowledge with clinical applications that may help to modulate the molecular abnormalities in the pathophysiologic cascade leading to venous ulcers.

  13. Venous thromboembolism and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristella D’Uva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Maristella D’Uva1, Pierpaolo Di Micco2, Ida Strina1, Giuseppe De Placido1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Human Reproduction, “Federico II” University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Internal Medicine Division, Buonconsiglio Fatebenefratelli Hospital of Naples, Naples, ItalyAbstract: In recent decades, the association between a hypercoagulable state and its causes and adverse pregnancy outcome, in particular recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL has been studied extensively. Although the first studies were focused only on the association between thrombophilia and RPL, subsequent studies underlined also a potential role of antithrombotic treatment to prevent vascular complication such as venous thromboembolism (VTE during pregnancy. Thromboprophylaxis should be considered also for pregnant subjects carriers of molecular thrombophilia or that previously experienced VTE, in order to prevent VTE during pregnancy, while antithrombotic treatment for VTE should be performed during all pregnant periods.Keywords: thrombophilia, venous thromboembolism, recurrent pregnancy loss, factor V Leiden

  14. The dynamics of venous return and response to hypervolemia in the toad, Bufo marinus (L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Killorn, Erin E; Toews, Daniel P

    2001-01-01

    Background Venous return from the posterior region of amphibians travels by either two renal portal veins to the kidney or a central abdominal vein that drains into the hepatic portal system. The relative proportions of blood flow in these vessels has never been measured nor has a modification of flow been determined when venous return increases by changes in blood volume during hypervolemia or during increased volume input from the posterior lymph hearts. Results Venous return from the poste...

  15. 'Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency' in multiple sclerosis. Is multiple sclerosis a disease of the cerebrospinal venous outflow system?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattjes, M.P.; Doepp, F.; Bendszus, M.; Fiehler, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic impaired venous outflow from the central nervous system has recently been claimed to be associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. This resulted in the term chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in MS. The concept of CCSVI is based on sonography studies showing that impaired venous outflow leading to pathological reflux is almost exclusively present in MS patients but not in healthy controls. Based on these findings, a new pathophysiological concept has been introduced suggesting that chronic venous outflow obstruction and venous reflux in the CNS result in pathological iron depositions leading to inflammation and neurodegeneration. The theory of CCSVI in MS has rapidly generated tremendous interest in the media and among patients and the scientific community. In particular, the potential shift in treatment concepts possibly leading to an interventional treatment approach including balloon angioplasty and venous stent placement is currently being debated. However, results from recent studies involving several imaging modalities have raised substantial concerns regarding the CCSVI concept in MS. In this review article, we explain the concept of CCSVI in MS and discuss this hypothesis in the context of MS pathophysiology and imaging studies which have tried to reproduce or refute this theory. In addition, we draw some major conclusions focusing in particular on the crucial question as to whether interventional treatment options are expedient. In conclusion, the present conclusive data confuting the theory of CCSVI in MS should lead to reluctance with respect to the interventional treatment of possible venous anomalies in MS patients. (orig.)

  16. Venous access: options, approaches and issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asch, M.R. [Univ. of Toronto, Mount Sinai Hospital, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2001-06-01

    Venous access is an essential part of medical practice. It is needed to obtain blood samples to make the diagnosis and to administer fluids or medicines as part of treatment. Although relatively new in the history of medicine, the placement and maintenance of the various venous access devices now occupies a significant portion of many vascular and interventional radiology practices. Thus, it is important to have a thorough understanding of these devices and their uses. The first long-term venous access devices were used in 1973. These were placed via a surgical cut-down on the subclavian vein. In 1982, the first subcutaneous implantable ports were described. These procedures were initially performed by surgeons, but over the last 5-10 years, both the insertion and management of these devices has shifted to interventional radiologists. Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) lines have almost completely supplanted the use of standard central lines (Fig. 1). A number of factors have facilitated this - namely, ready and less expensive room access, outpatient procedure and radiologists' accessibility and familiarity with image-guidance procedures and catheters and guide wires. (author)

  17. Venous access: options, approaches and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asch, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Venous access is an essential part of medical practice. It is needed to obtain blood samples to make the diagnosis and to administer fluids or medicines as part of treatment. Although relatively new in the history of medicine, the placement and maintenance of the various venous access devices now occupies a significant portion of many vascular and interventional radiology practices. Thus, it is important to have a thorough understanding of these devices and their uses. The first long-term venous access devices were used in 1973. These were placed via a surgical cut-down on the subclavian vein. In 1982, the first subcutaneous implantable ports were described. These procedures were initially performed by surgeons, but over the last 5-10 years, both the insertion and management of these devices has shifted to interventional radiologists. Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) lines have almost completely supplanted the use of standard central lines (Fig. 1). A number of factors have facilitated this - namely, ready and less expensive room access, outpatient procedure and radiologists' accessibility and familiarity with image-guidance procedures and catheters and guide wires. (author)

  18. Retinal oxygen saturation before and after glaucoma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Eri; Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Shimazaki, Takeru; Sato, Shino; Ukegawa, Kaori; Nakano, Yuki; Tsujikawa, Akitaka

    2017-08-01

    This study compared retinal vessel oxygen saturation before and after glaucoma surgery. Retinal oxygen saturation in glaucoma patients was measured using a non-invasive spectrophotometric retinal oximeter. Adequate image quality was found in 49 of the 108 consecutive glaucoma patients recruited, with 30 undergoing trabeculectomy, 11 EX-PRESS and eight trabeculotomy. Retinal oxygen saturation measurements in the retinal arterioles and venules were performed at 1 day prior to and at approximately 10 days after surgery. Statistical analysis was performed using a Student's t-test. After glaucoma surgery, intraocular pressure (IOP) decreased from 19.8 ± 7.7 mmHg to 9.0 ± 5.7 mmHg (p glaucoma surgery had an effect on the retinal venous oxygen saturation. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Malposition and complications following venous catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffesanti, M.; Bortolotto, P.; Kette, F.

    1988-01-01

    Malposition and complications following central venous catheterization largely depend on the site of venous approach. Malpositions are very common after subclavian vein catheterization, and even more common after left jugular vein catheterization. On the contrary, their incidence after right jugular puncture is very low. Among complications, pneumothorax is quate common after subclavian vein catheterization, and migration of the catheter towards the heart after right jugular puncture. Vascular damages may occur in any approach: their early detection on chest radiographs very much depends on a rigorous technique. Radiology plays an important role in the early detection of malposition and complications, which is greatly facilitated by a few ml of contrast medium injected through the catheter

  20. Venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea

    2011-12-21

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide

  1. Inadvertent brachial plexus anesthesia associated with local anesthetic infiltration during internal jugular venous cannulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabiyik, L; Tezer, T

    2011-01-01

    In the development of neurological complications due to central venous cannulation, the properties of the anatomical region and the experience of the practitioner are important. In this case report, an inadvertent brachial plexus anesthesia after repeated local anesthetic infiltrations during failed attempts of internal jugular venous cannulation by an inexperienced practitioner in cardiovascular intensive care unit is described. The neurological complications due to central venous cannulation are reviewed in the light of actual literature data.

  2. Variabilidade na determinação do ponto externo de referência para a medida de pressão venosa central em crianças Variability in the establishment of an external reference point for central venous pressure measurement in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline S. C. Belela

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar variabilidade na determinação da linha axilar média como ponto externo de referência (PER, por diferentes profissionais de saú de, para a aferição de pressão venosa central em crianças. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo e de correlação realizado em uma unidade de cuidados intensivos pediátricos de um hospital universitário. Durante a determinação da linha axilar média como PER para a aferição da pressão venosa central, cinco avaliações realizadas no mesmo paciente por profissionais de saúde e uma realizada por um avaliador treinado foram comparadas. O resultado foi um total de 120 indicações de 44 profissionais de saúde, 17 (38,6% auxiliares e técnicos de enfermagem, 16 (36,3% enfermeiros e 11 (25,1% médicos, além de 24 identificações realizadas por avaliador treinado. Os dados foram analisados utilizando os testes do qui-quadrado, ANOVA, Kruskall-Wallis e teste t, fixando o nível de significância em 5%. RESULTADOS: Houve diferença significante entre as identificações realizadas pelos profissionais de saúde e pelo avaliador (p OBJECTIVE: To investigate the variability in the establishment of the midaxillary line as external reference point (ERP, by different healthcare workers, for the measurement of central venous pressure in children. METHODS: Descriptive and correlational study carried out in a pediatric intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. During the establishment of the midaxillary line as ERP for central venous pressure measurement, five assessments of the same patient made by healthcare workers and one assessment made by a trained evaluator were compared. A total of 120 assessments were made by 44 healthcare workers, 17 (38.6% by nursing assistants and nursing technicians, 16 (36.3% by nurses and 11 (25.1% by physicians, in addition to 24 assessments made by the trained evaluator. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test, ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test and t test. Significance

  3. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Método bundle na redução de infecção de corrente sanguínea relacionada a cateteres centrais: revisão integrativa Método bundle en la redución de infecciones relacionadas a catéteres centrales: una revisión integrativa Care bundle to reduce central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Dane Pereira Brachine

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma revisão integrativa da literatura, que objetivou identificar intervenções baseadas em evidência que compõem o método bundle, designados à redução de infecção de corrente sanguínea relacionada ou associada a cateter intravenoso central. Para a coleta de dados online, em bases nacionais e internacionais, foram utilizados a palavra-chave bundle e os descritores catheter-related infection, infection control e central venous catheterization, resultando, após aplicação dos critérios de inclusão, amostra de quinze artigos. Este trabalho evidenciou cinco intervenções como as mais frequentemente empregadas na construção dos bundles: higienização das mãos, gluconato de clorexidina como antisséptico para pele, uso de barreira máxima de precaução durante a inserção cateter, evitar acessar veia femoral e verificar necessidade diária de permanência do cateter, com sua remoção imediata quando não mais indicado. A maioria dos estudos demonstrou resultados estatisticamente significantes na redução de infecção de corrente sanguínea relacionada ou associada a cateter intravenoso central.Esta es una revisión integradora tuvo como objetivo identificar intervenciones basadas en evidencias que componen método bundle de reducción de infección sanguínea relacionadas o asociadas con catéter intravenoso central. Para recopilar los datos en las bases brasileñas e internacionales, utilizando la palabra clave bundle y los descriptores infecciones relacionadas con catéteres, control de infecciones y cateterización venosa central, identificando, con los criterios de inclusión, muestra de quince artículo. Este estudio muestra cinco intervenciones como comúnmente empleadas en los métodos bundles: higiene de las manos, clorhexidina como antiséptico para la piel, uso de precaución de barrera máxima durante la inserción del catéter, evitar el acceso de la vena femoral y comprobar la necesidad diaria del cat

  5. Densities in the left innominate vein after removal of an implantable venous device: a case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastelaar, J. van; Janssen, C.H.; Bont, E. de; Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Baren, R. van

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Pericatheter calcifications are unusual and rare after removal of indwelling central venous catheters with few reports in the literature. We present a case of a woman with calcifications in her left innominate vein after removal of an implantable venous device. CASE

  6. Cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, A; Bousser, M G

    1992-02-01

    Neuroimagining facilities allow early recognition of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), which now appears far more common than previously assumed. The diagnosis remains difficult because of a wide spectrum of clinical presentation and a highly variable mode of onset. Numerous conditions (presently mostly noninfectious) can cause or predispose to CVT, which therefore requires an extensive etiologic work-up. The functional and vital prognosis is much better than classically thought with, in noninfectious CVT, a fatality rate of less than 10% and a complete recovery in over 70%. Although spontaneous recovery is possible, the efficacy of heparin is now well established.

  7. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Raphael Alvis-Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  8. Venous Thromboembolism in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Samková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE during childhood is low with two peaks – neonatal and adolescent age. This retrospective study is focused on clinical characteristics of VTE during adolescence. The main goals are to assess the most frequent inherited and acquired risk factors and to evaluate the benefit of D-dimers in diagnostics of venous thromboemblism. The data of 18 adolescents were analysed – 16 girls (88.9%, 2 boys (11.1%. In 9 patients (50% thrombosis of the lower limb deep veins was diagnosed, six patients (33.3% suffered from symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE and 3 patients (16.7% from thrombosis at unusual sites. One patient had an idiopathic VTE, the mean number of the inherited and acquired risk factors was 2.6. The most frequent inherited risk factor was Leiden mutation of factor V (27.8%. The most frequent acquired risk factor was oral contraception (OC in 12 out of 16 girls (75%. All of our patients on oral contraception had one or more additional risk factors. 10 out of 18 (55.6% patients with VTE had elevated activity of factor VIII. The sensitivity of D-dimers was low (50% in patients with distal lower limb thrombosis, but very high (100% in patients with PE.

  9. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with

  10. Clinical overview of venous thromboembolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the result of a venous blood clot formation which may manifest itself as deep vein thrombosis. (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE).1,2 DVT and PE are part of the same syndrome. However, important distinguishing factors in terms of epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment exist between.

  11. Cortical venous thrombosis – a rare complication of tuberculous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occlusion of the central veins and sinuses occurs owing to thrombus, thrombophlebitis, or tumours. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is less frequent than arterial thrombosis, but can produce a cascade of sequelae and may be fatal. The usual predisposing factors for CVT include infections, pregnancy and puerperium, ...

  12. July/August 2009 89 Improvised Venous Canula Myringostomy i

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    http://www.bioline.org.br/. East and Central African Journal of Surgery - Volume 14 Number 2 – July/August 2009. 89. Improvised Venous Canula Myringostomy in Acute Otitis Media: Analysis of outcome in Nigeris. F. Olatoke1, O.A. Lasisi2, S. B. Alabi3, A.A. Aluko4. 1 Consultant ENT Surgeon, Federal Medical Centre Lokoja ...

  13. Saturated salt solution method: a useful cadaver embalming for surgical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shogo; Homma, Hiroshi; Naito, Munekazu; Oda, Jun; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Kawamoto, Atsuo; Kawata, Shinichi; Sato, Norio; Fukuhara, Tomomi; Taguchi, Hirokazu; Mashiko, Kazuki; Azuhata, Takeo; Ito, Masayuki; Kawai, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tomoya; Nishizawa, Yuji; Araki, Jun; Matsuno, Naoto; Shirai, Takayuki; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Fukui, Hidekimi; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Itoh, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    This article evaluates the suitability of cadavers embalmed by the saturated salt solution (SSS) method for surgical skills training (SST). SST courses using cadavers have been performed to advance a surgeon's techniques without any risk to patients. One important factor for improving SST is the suitability of specimens, which depends on the embalming method. In addition, the infectious risk and cost involved in using cadavers are problems that need to be solved. Six cadavers were embalmed by 3 methods: formalin solution, Thiel solution (TS), and SSS methods. Bacterial and fungal culture tests and measurement of ranges of motion were conducted for each cadaver. Fourteen surgeons evaluated the 3 embalming methods and 9 SST instructors (7 trauma surgeons and 2 orthopedists) operated the cadavers by 21 procedures. In addition, ultrasonography, central venous catheterization, and incision with cauterization followed by autosuture stapling were performed in some cadavers. The SSS method had a sufficient antibiotic effect and produced cadavers with flexible joints and a high tissue quality suitable for SST. The surgeons evaluated the cadavers embalmed by the SSS method to be highly equal to those embalmed by the TS method. Ultrasound images were clear in the cadavers embalmed by both the methods. Central venous catheterization could be performed in a cadaver embalmed by the SSS method and then be affirmed by x-ray. Lungs and intestines could be incised with cauterization and autosuture stapling in the cadavers embalmed by TS and SSS methods. Cadavers embalmed by the SSS method are sufficiently useful for SST. This method is simple, carries a low infectious risk, and is relatively of low cost, enabling a wider use of cadavers for SST.

  14. Venous thromboembolism in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Group, ESHRE Capri Workshop; Skouby, Sven Olaf

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a specific reproductive health risk for women. METHODS Searches were performed in Medline and other databases. The selection criteria were high-quality studies and studies relevant to clinical reproductive medicine. Summaries were presented and discussed...... is associated with an inherited thrombophilia in men and women. Changes in the coagulation system and in the risk of clinical VTE in women also occur during pregnancy, with the use of reproductive hormones and as a consequence of ovarian stimulation when hyperstimulation syndrome and conception occur together...... therapy (HRT) increases the VTE risk 2- to 4-fold. There is a synergistic effect between thrombophilia and the various reproductive risks. Prevention of VTE during pregnancy should be offered to women with specific risk factors. In women who are at high risk, CHC and HRT should be avoided. CONCLUSIONS...

  15. Epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, D.D.; Lijfering, W.M.; Barreto, S.M.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Rezende, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Venous thrombosis, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a common disease that frequently recurs. Recurrence can be prevented by anticoagulants, but this comes at the risk of bleeding. Therefore, assessment of the risk of recurrence is important to balance the risks and benefits of anticoagulant treatment. This review briefly outlines what is currently known about the epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis, and focuses in more detail on potential new risk factors for venous recurrence. The general implications of these findings in patient management are discussed. PMID:22183247

  16. Infecções em cateteres venosos centrais de longa permanência: revisão da literatura Infection of long-term central venous catheters: review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Alves das Neves Junior

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cateteres venosos de longa permanência são amplamente utilizados em pacientes com necessidade de acesso venoso por período prolongado. A infecção relacionada a esses cateteres permanece um desafio na prática clínica. Revisamos a literatura acerca da epidemiologia e tratamento das infecções relacionadas a cateteres. Staphylococcus aureus é a bactéria mais comumente isolada. Os cateteres semi-implantáveis apresentam taxas de infecção maiores que os totalmente implantáveis. O tratamento pode ser feito com locks, antibioticoterapia sistêmica e até mesmo com retirada do cateter, dependendo do tipo de infecção, do microrganismo isolado e das condições clínicas do paciente. O salvamento do cateter deve ser tentado sempre que possível.Long-term venous catheters are widely used in patients with needs of venous access for prolonged periods. The infection related to these catheters remains a challenge in clinical practice. We reviewed the literature about infection epidemiology and treatment related to catheters. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common isolated bacteria. Tunneled catheters present higher infection rates than implanted ports. Treatment may consist in the use of locks, systemic antibiotics, and even catheter removal, depending on the kind of infection, the isolated microorganism, and the patient's clinical conditions. Catheter salvation should be tried whenever possible.

  17. Compression for preventing recurrence of venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea; Bell-Syer, Sally E M

    2014-09-09

    Up to 1% of adults will have a leg ulcer at some time. The majority of leg ulcers are venous in origin and are caused by high pressure in the veins due to blockage or weakness of the valves in the veins of the leg. Prevention and treatment of venous ulcers is aimed at reducing the pressure either by removing/repairing the veins, or by applying compression bandages/stockings to reduce the pressure in the veins.The majority of venous ulcers heal with compression bandages, however ulcers frequently recur. Clinical guidelines therefore recommend that people continue to wear compression, usually in the form of hosiery (tights, stockings, socks) after their ulcer heals, to prevent recurrence. To assess the effects of compression (socks, stockings, tights, bandages) in preventing the recurrence of venous ulcers. If compression does prevent ulceration compared with no compression, then to identify whether there is evidence to recommend particular levels of compression (high, medium or low, for example), types of compression, or brands of compression to prevent ulcer recurrence after healing. For this second update we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 4 September 2014) which includes the results of regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 8). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs)evaluating compression bandages or hosiery for preventing the recurrence of venous ulcers. Two review authors undertook data extraction and risk of bias assessment independently. Four trials (979 participants) were eligible for inclusion in this review. One trial in patients with recently healed venous ulcers (n = 153) compared recurrence rates with and without compression and found that compression significantly reduced ulcer recurrence at six months (Risk ratio (RR) 0.46, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.76).Two trials compared high-compression hosiery (equivalent to UK class 3) with

  18. Massive superior mesenteric venous aneurysm with portal venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikov, Anna; Bartolotta, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    Portal venous aneurysm is a rare and sometimes dangerous vascular pathology, which can result in thrombosis or rupture. We present the computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and sonographic imaging of a 27-year-old man with superior mesenteric venous aneurysm and subsequent thrombosis following acute pancreatitis. This multimodality imaging approach can prove useful in the evaluation of these rare aneurysms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gluon saturation and baryon stopping in the SPS, RHIC, and LHC energy regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuang; Feng Shengqin

    2012-01-01

    A new geometrical scaling method with a gluon saturation rapidity limit is proposed to study the gluon saturation feature of the central rapidity region of relativistic nuclear collisions. The net-baryon number is essentially transported by valence quarks that probe the saturation regime in the target by multiple scattering. We take advantage of the gluon saturation model with geometric scaling of the rapidity limit to investigate net baryon distributions, nuclear stopping power and gluon saturation features in the SPS and RHIC energy regions. Predictions for net baryon rapidity distributions, mean rapidity loss and gluon saturation feature in central Pb + Pb collisions at the LHC are made in this paper. (authors)

  20. Large multiplicity fluctuations and saturation effects in onium collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper studies two related questions in high energy onium-onium scattering: the probability of producing an unusually large number of particles in a collision, where it is found that the cross section for producing a central multiplicity proportional to k should decrease exponentially in √(k). Secondly, the nature of gluon (dipole) evolution when dipole densities become so high that saturation effects due to dipole-dipole interactions become important: measures of saturation are developed to help understand when saturation becomes important, and further information is obtained by exploiting changes of frame, which interchange unitarity and saturation corrections. (orig.)

  1. Total anomalous pulmonary venous return

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pulmonary venous return, x-ray References Fraser CD, Kane LC. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, ... 62. Review Date 10/17/2017 Updated by: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, ...

  2. Hydrocephalus in cerebral venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M.; van den Berg, René; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B.; Stam, Jan; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure is common in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), but hydrocephalus is rarely reported in these patients. We examined the frequency, pathophysiology and associated clinical manifestations of hydrocephalus in patients with CVT admitted to our hospital between 2000 and

  3. Effect of venous stenting on intracranial pressure in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matloob, Samir A; Toma, Ahmed K; Thompson, Simon D; Gan, Chee L; Robertson, Fergus; Thorne, Lewis; Watkins, Laurence D

    2017-08-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is characterised by an increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of any central nervous system disease or structural abnormality and by normal CSF composition. Management becomes complicated once surgical intervention is required. Venous sinus stenosis has been suggested as a possible aetiology for IIH. Venous sinus stenting has emerged as a possible interventional option. Evidence for venous sinus stenting is based on elimination of the venous pressure gradient and clinical response. There have been no studies demonstrating the immediate effect of venous stenting on ICP. Patients with a potential or already known diagnosis of IIH were investigated according to departmental protocol. ICP monitoring was performed for 24 h. When high pressures were confirmed, CT venogram and catheter venography were performed to look for venous stenosis to demonstrate a pressure gradient. If positive, venous stenting would be performed and ICP monitoring would continue for a further 24 h after deployment of the venous stent. Ten patients underwent venous sinus stenting with concomitant ICP monitoring. Nine out of ten patients displayed an immediate reduction in their ICP that was maintained at 24 h. The average reduction in mean ICP and pulsatility was significant (p = 0.003). Six out of ten patients reported a symptomatic improvement within the first 2 weeks. Venous sinus stenting results in an immediate reduction in ICP. This physiological response to venous stenting has not previously been reported. Venous stenting could offer an alternative treatment option in correctly selected patients with IIH.

  4. Hepatic venous oxygen content in alcoholic cirrhosis and non-cirrhotic alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Widding, A

    1987-01-01

    Blood gas analyses and hepatic blood flow were determined during hepatic vein catheterization in order to establish a possible hypoxic component in alcoholic liver disease. Fifty-six patients (9 non-cirrhotic liver disease, 14 cirrhosis Child-Turcotte class A, 23 class B, 10 class C) and 10 control...... venous difference of base excess was small and of the same size in all groups, indicating no enhanced production of lactic acid in the liver. Our results do not support the concept that hepatic venous oxygen content is low in alcoholic liver disease and thereby contributes to hypoxic liver damage....... subjects were studied. Mean hepatic venous oxygen saturation and tension were almost the same in all groups, and hepatic blood flow was inversely correlated to the arteriohepatic venous oxygen difference (r = -0.53, P less than 0.01). Splanchnic oxygen uptake was similar in all groups studied. The arterio-hepatic...

  5. The dynamics of venous return and response to hypervolemia in the toad, Bufo marinus (L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Toews Daniel P; Killorn Erin E

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Background Venous return from the posterior region of amphibians travels by either two renal portal veins to the kidney or a central abdominal vein that drains into the hepatic portal system. The relative proportions of blood flow in these vessels has never been measured nor has a modification of flow been determined when venous return increases by changes in blood volume during hypervolemia or during increased volume input from the posterior lymph hearts. Results Venous return from ...

  6. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of central venous catheters treated with Minocycline and Rifampicin in preventing bloodstream infections in intensive care patients [Medizinische Wirksamkeit und Kosteneffektivität von Minocyclin/Rifampicin-beschichteten zentralvenösen Kathetern zur Prävention von Blutbahninfektionen bei Patienten in intensivmedizinischer Betreuung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusser, Silke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available [english] The use of central venous catheters coated with antibiotics can avoid bloodstream infections with intensive care patients. This is the result of a scientific examination which has been published by the DIMDI. Costs could be also saved in this way. However, according to the authors, the underlying studies do not allow absolutely valid statements.[german] Der Einsatz bestimmter Antibiotika-beschichteter Venenkatheter kann bei Intensivpatienten Blutbahninfektionen vermeiden. So das Ergebnis einer wissenschaftlichen Untersuchung, die das DIMDI veröffentlicht hat. Auch ließen sich damit Kosten einsparen. Allerdings erlauben, laut den Autoren, die zugrunde gelegten Studien keine uneingeschränkt gültigen Aussagen.

  7. Measurement of retinal oxygen saturation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palkovits, Stefan; Lasta, Michael; Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Kaya, Semira; Hammer, Martin; Marzluf, Beatrice; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Frantal, Sophie; Schmetterer, Leopold; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2013-02-05

    There is growing evidence that disturbances in retinal oxygenation may trigger ocular diseases. New instruments allow for the noninvasive measurement of retinal oxygen saturation in humans. The present study was designed to investigate the retinal oxygen saturation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This was also done in an effort to test the validity of retinal oxygenation measurements with a retinal vessel analyzer. In all, 16 patients with severe COPD grade 4 who were on long-term oxygen treatment were included in the study. For each patient two identical study days were scheduled. Measurements of retinal arterial and venous oxygen saturation were done using a commercially available instrument for retinal oxygen analysis. Peripheral arterial oxygen saturation values were analyzed with pulse oximetry and via a capillary blood sample drawn from the earlobe. Measurements were performed during oxygen treatment and during a period without oxygen supplementation. Analysis of all images for retinal oxygen saturation quantification was done by a masked investigator. Analysis was done using Pearson's correlation and a multivariate regression model. Arterial and venous retinal oxygen saturation decreased significantly after the cessation of the oxygen therapy. The arteriovenous oxygen difference was unchanged while breathing ambient air or pure oxygen-enriched air. With both Pearson's correlation and the multivariate model, we found significant positive correlation coefficients between retinal arterial and peripheral arterial oxygen saturation as assessed with pulse oximetry as well as between retinal arterial and peripheral arterial oxygen saturation measured in blood samples. The change of oxygen saturation after discontinuation of oxygen supplementation showed a good correlation between retinal arterial oxygen saturation and peripheral arterial oxygen saturation (r = 0.53, P arterial and peripheral arterial oxygen saturation indicating good

  8. Combined oral contraceptives: venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bastos, Marcos; Stegeman, Bernardine H; Rosendaal, Frits R; Van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Helmerhorst, Frans M; Stijnen, Theo; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2014-03-03

    Combined oral contraceptive (COC) use has been associated with venous thrombosis (VT) (i.e., deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism). The VT risk has been evaluated for many estrogen doses and progestagen types contained in COC but no comprehensive comparison involving commonly used COC is available. To provide a comprehensive overview of the risk of venous thrombosis in women using different combined oral contraceptives. Electronic databases (Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier and ScienceDirect) were searched in 22 April 2013 for eligible studies, without language restrictions. We selected studies including healthy women taking COC with VT as outcome. The primary outcome of interest was a fatal or non-fatal first event of venous thrombosis with the main focus on deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Publications with at least 10 events in total were eligible. The network meta-analysis was performed using an extension of frequentist random effects models for mixed multiple treatment comparisons. Unadjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were reported.Two independent reviewers extracted data from selected studies. 3110 publications were retrieved through a search strategy; 25 publications reporting on 26 studies were included. Incidence of venous thrombosis in non-users from two included cohorts was 0.19 and 0.37 per 1 000 person years, in line with previously reported incidences of 0,16 per 1 000 person years. Use of combined oral contraceptives increased the risk of venous thrombosis compared with non-use (relative risk 3.5, 95% confidence interval 2.9 to 4.3). The relative risk of venous thrombosis for combined oral contraceptives with 30-35 μg ethinylestradiol and gestodene, desogestrel, cyproterone acetate, or drospirenone were similar and about 50-80% higher than for combined oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. A dose related effect of ethinylestradiol was observed for gestodene

  9. [Duplexsonography investigation in patients with venous ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneret-Gris, Christina

    2011-03-01

    Venous hypertension due to venous insufficiency causes venous ulcers. Duplexsonography is a widely accepted non invasive method to assess venous insufficiency with venous reflux measurements. Retrograde venous flow is defined as venous reflux. The testing of venous reflux is reliable if transvalvular pressure is sufficiently high and transvalvular flow velocity exceeds 30 cm/s. Reflux testing in the proximal leg veins (V. femoralis communis, V. femoralis, V. saphena magna) is done using a standardised Valsalva Manoeuvre (exspiration into a tube up to a pressure of 30 mmHg, pressure established within 0.5 seconds, pressure hold for 3 seconds). Distal leg vein testing (V. poplitea, V. tibialis posterior, V. saphena parva) is recommended with a two handed - compression distally to the tested veins. The most important parameter is venous reflux time, a cut off of > 2 seconds is recommended.

  10. Contemporary diagnosis of venous malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee BB

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BB Lee,1 I Baumgartner21Department of Surgery, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA; 2Swiss Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Bern, Bern, SwitzerlandAbstract: Venous malformation is a congenital vascular malformation resulting from defective development during various stages of embryogenesis and selectively affecting the venous system. Depending on the embryologic stage when the developmental arrest occurred, the clinical presentation of venous malformation is extremely variable in location, extent, severity, natural progression, and hemodynamic impact. Extratruncular lesions occur in the earlier stages of embryonic life, and retain characteristics unique to mesenchymal cells (angioblasts, growing and proliferating when stimulated internally (eg, by menarche, pregnancy, and hormones or externally (eg, by trauma or surgery. These lesions also have a significant hemodynamic impact on the venous system involved, in addition to the risk of localized intravascular coagulopathy. However, truncal lesions, as defective developments along the late stage, no longer carry the risk of proliferation and recurrence due to lack of mesenchymal characteristics. Although, they often have serious hemodynamic consequences due to direct involvement of the main vein trunk. Therefore, a thorough clinical history and careful physical examination should be followed by an appropriate combination of noninvasive and less invasive tests (eg, Doppler ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography to confirm the clinical impression as well as to define the extent and severity of the venous malformation. Invasive tests, eg, phlebography or angiography, are seldom needed for the diagnosis per se. Additional evaluation for coagulation abnormalities, eg, D-dimer and fibrinogen levels, is generally recommended, especially for the treatment of surgery and endovascular candidates with extensive lesions to assess the localized intravascular

  11. Venous chest anatomy: clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasen, M.H.; Charnsangavej, C.

    1998-01-01

    This article provides a practical approach to the clinical implications and importance of understanding the collateral venous anatomy of the thorax. Routine radiography, conventional venography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies provide correlative anatomic models for the demonstration of how interconnecting collateral vascular networks within the thorax maintain venous stability at all times. Five major systems comprise the collateral venous network of the thorax ( Fig. 1 ). These include the paravertebral, azygos-hemiazygos, internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and anterior jugular venous systems (AJVS). The five systems are presented in the following sequence: (a) a brief introduction to the importance of catheter position and malposition in understanding access to the thoracic venous system, (b) the anatomy of the azygos-hemiazygos systems and their relationship with the paravertebral plexus, (c) the importance of the AJVS, (d) 'loop' concepts interconnecting the internal mammary and azygos-hemiazygos systems by means of the lateral thoracic and intercostal veins, and (e) the interconnecting venous networks on the thoracic side of the thoracoabdominal junction. Certain aspects of the venous anatomy of the thorax will not be discussed in this chapter and include (a) the intra-abdominal anastomoses between the superior and inferior vena cavae (IVC) via the internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and azygos-hemiazygos systems (beyond the scope of this article), (b) potential collateral vessels involving vertebral, parascapular, thyroidal, thymic, and other smaller veins that might anastomose with the major systems, and (c) anatomic variants and pitfalls that may mimic pathologic conditions (space limitations). (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  12. Fingertip Reconstruction Using Free Toe Tissue Transfer Without Venous Anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Young Yoon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis study was designed to introduce the feasibility of toe tissue transfer without venous outflow for fingertip reconstruction.MethodsFive cases of fingertip defects were treated successfully with this method. Four cases were traumatic fingertip defects, and one case was a hook-nail deformity. The lateral pulp of a great toe or medioinferior portion of a second toe was used as the donor site. An arterial pedicle was dissected only within the digit and anastomosis was performed within 2 cm around the defect margin. The digital nerve was repaired simultaneously. No additional dissection of the dorsal or volar pulp vein was performed in either the donor or recipient sites. Other surgical procedures were performed following conventional techniques. Postoperative venous congestion was monitored with pulp temperature, color, and degree of tissue oxygen saturation. Venous congestion was decompressed with a needle-puncture method intermittently, but did not require continuous external bleeding for salvage.ResultsVenous congestion was observed in all the flaps, but improved within 3 or 4 days postoperatively. The flap size was from 1.5×1.5 cm2 to 2.0×3.0 cm2. The mean surgical time was 2 hours and 20 minutes. A needle puncture was carried out every 2 hours during the first postoperative day, and then every 4 hours thereafter. The amount of blood loss during each puncture procedure was less than 0.2 mL. In the long-term follow-up, no flap atrophy was observed.ConclusionsWhen used properly, the free toe tissue transfer without venous anastomosis method can be a treatment option for small defects on the fingertip area.

  13. No association of abnormal cranial venous drainage with multiple sclerosis: a magnetic resonance venography and flow-quantification study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattjes, M.P.; van Oosten, B.W.; de Graaf, W.L.; Seewann, A.M.; Bot, J.C.J.; van den Berg, R.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.; Barkhof, F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recent studies using colour-coded Doppler sonography showed that chronic impaired venous drainage from the central nervous system is almost exclusively found in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. This study aimed to investigate the intracranial and extracranial venous anatomy and the

  14. No association of abnormal cranial venous drainage with multiple sclerosis: a magnetic resonance venography and flow-quantification study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattjes, Mike P.; van Oosten, Bob W.; de Graaf, Wolter L.; Seewann, Alexandra; Bot, Joseph C. J.; van den Berg, René; Uitdehaag, Bernard M. J.; Polman, Chris H.; Barkhof, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies using colour-coded Doppler sonography showed that chronic impaired venous drainage from the central nervous system is almost exclusively found in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. This study aimed to investigate the intracranial and extracranial venous anatomy and the intracerebral

  15. Adverse Events Related to the Use of Central Venous Catheters in Hospitalized Newborns Eventos adversos relacionados con el uso de catéteres venosos centrales en recién nacidos hospitalizados Eventos adversos relacionados ao uso de cateteres venosos centrais em recém-nascidos hospitalizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Tomazi Franceschi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study identifies the adverse events related to the use of central venous catheters (CVC in newborns admitted to a neonatal care unit. This is a quantitative, descriptive and retrospective study. The population consisted of 167 newborns admitted in the neonatal unit of the Hospital de Clínicas at Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil which used CVCs inserted through percutaneous puncture (PICC and surgical insertion, totaling 241 catheters. There was a higher prevalence of mechanical adverse events in the PICC line insertions, with a preponderance of catheter occlusions (19.44% and ruptures (8.8%. The surgically inserted CVCs had a higher prevalence of catheter-related infectious adverse events with the most common being clinical sepsis (16%. This study suggests that the correct insertion technique should be used and a specialized team should monitor the CVCs to ensure safety and prevent adverse events.El objetivo de este estudio fue identificar los eventos adversos relacionados con el uso de catéteres venosos centrales (CVC, en recién nacidos internados en una unidad neonatal. Se trata de investigación cuantitativa, descriptiva, retrospectiva. La población fue constituida por 167 neonatos internados en la unidad neonatal del Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre que utilizaron CVCs, inseridos por punción percutánea (PICC e inserción quirúrgica, totalizando 241 catéteres. En los PICCs hubo mayor incidencia de eventos adversos mecánicos, predominando la oclusión (19,44% y la ruptura del catéter (8,8%. Los CVCs por inserción quirúrgica presentaron la mayor incidencia de los eventos adversos infecciosos relacionados al catéter, siendo el más frecuente la sepsis clínica (16%. El estudio sugiere que, para mayor seguridad del uso de CVCs, es importante que sea utilizada la técnica correcta de inserción del catéter y realizado el acompañamiento de los CVCs por un equipo especializado y atento a la prevención de eventos adversos.O objetivo

  16. Hybrid interventions for catheter placement in pediatric intestinal rehabilitation patients with end-stage venous access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieverding, Ludger; Busch, Andreas; Gesche, Jens; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Sturm, Ekkehard; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Piersma, Femke; Hauser, Anja; Wiegand, Gesa; Hartleif, Steffen; Hofbeck, Michael; Fuchs, Jörg; Warmann, Steven W

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the combined approach of endovascular and open surgical procedures for insertion of permanent central venous catheters in children with intestinal failure and end-stage venous access. Data of 14 children (16 interventions) with intestinal failure and end-stage venous access, treated within the pediatric intestinal rehabilitation program at our institution between September 2011 and November 2016, were retrospectively reviewed. The patients underwent hybrid endovascular/open surgical approaches for insertion of central venous catheters. Access to central veins was established through endovascular intervention; catheter placement was achieved with combined interventional and surgical measures depending on the individual vascular conditions. Median age at intervention was 47months (interquartile range (IQR),29-74), median time for interventions was 66min (IQR,42-111). Catheter placement was successfully achieved in all patients. The median dose of irradiation during angiography was 0.2Gy*cm 2 (IQR, 0.2-0.6), no complications occurred during or after interventions. Hybrid endovascular/open surgical procedures can be successfully applied for restoring or maintaining permanent central venous catheters in children with intestinal failure and end-stage venous access. These approaches are a valuable contribution in intestinal rehabilitation programs contributing to a further decrease of the need for intestinal transplantation in affected patients. Treatment Study. Level IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevention of catheter-related venous thrombosis with nadroparin in patients receiving chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies: a randomized, placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niers, T. M. H.; Di Nisio, M.; Klerk, C. P. W.; Baarslag, H. J.; Bueller, H. R.; Biemond, B. J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemato-oncology patients treated with intensive chemotherapy usually require the placement of a central venous catheter (CVC). CVCs are frequently complicated by catheter-related central venous thrombosis (CVT), which has been associated with an increased risk of pulmonary embolism and

  18. Short-term and long-term outcome of radiological-guided insertion of central venous access port devices implanted at the forearm: a retrospective monocenter analysis in 1704 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Borgmeyer, Sebastian; Haller, Bernhard; Jansen, Heike; Gaa, Jochen; Kiechle, Marion; Meier, Reinhard; Ettl, Johannes; Berger, Hermann

    2015-03-01

    The objectives are to analyze the technical success rate as well as the short-term and long-term complications of totally implantable venous access ports (TIVAPs) at the forearm. Retrospective analysis of 1,704 consecutively implanted TIVAPs was performed. Primary endpoints were defined as technical success rate, clinical outcome, device service interval, and rates of major complications. Minor complications not requiring port explantation were defined as secondary endpoints. The technical success rate was 99.2 % with no major complications. During follow-up, a total of 643,200 catheter-days were documented, the mean device service interval was 380.6 days/patient. A total of 243 complications (14.4 %) in 226 patients were observed (0.4/1000 catheter-days), in 140 patients (8.3 %) the port device had to be explanted. Disconnection between the port device and the catheter (1.6 %) was more frequent than fracture (0.8 %) and leakage (0.6 %) of the catheter, which occurred more frequently when the catheter was inserted via the cephalic versus the brachial vein. TIVAP implantation at the forearm is a simple and safe procedure with a low rate of early and late complications.

  19. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  20. Dutch Venous Ulcer guideline update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maessen-Visch, M Birgitte; de Roos, Kees-Peter

    2014-05-01

    The revised guideline of 2013 is an update of the 2005 guideline "venous leg ulcer". In this special project four separate guidelines (venous leg ulcer, varicose veins, compression therapy and deep venous disorders) were revised and developed simultaneously. A meeting was held including representatives of any organisation involved in venous disease management including patient organizations and health insurance companies. Eighteen clinical questions where defined, and a new strategy was used to accelerate the process. This resulted in two new and two revised guidelines within one year. The guideline committee advises use of the C of the CEAP classification as well as the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and a Quality of life (QoL) score in the assessment of clinical signs. These can provide insight into the burden of disease and the effects of treatment as experienced by the patient. A duplex ultrasound should be performed in every patient to establish the underlying aetiology and to evaluate the need for treatment (which is discussed in a separate guideline). The use of the TIME model for describing venous ulcers is recommended. There is no evidence for antiseptic or antibiotic wound care products except for a Cochrane review in which some evidence is presented for cadexomer iodine. Signs of infection are the main reason for the use of oral antibiotics. When the ulcer fails to heal the use of oral aspirin and pentoxifylline can be considered as an adjunct. For the individual patient, the following aspects should be considered: the appearance of the ulcer (amount of exudate) according to the TIME model, the influence of wound care products on moisturising the wound, frequency of changing compression bandages, pain and allergies. The cost of the dressings should also be considered. Education and training of patients t improves compliance with compression therapy but does not influence wound healing rates. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Venous leg ulcer in the context of chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano Sánchez, F S; Marinel lo Roura, J; Carrasco Carrasco, E; González-Porras, J R; Escudero Rodríguez, J R; Sánchez Nevarez, I; Díaz Sánchez, S

    2014-05-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a frequent disorder with a high socioeconomic impact. Little is known about the possible differences between healed ulcer (C5 group) and active ulcer (C6 group) in terms of disease severity and quality of life (QoL). Our aim was to determine the possible differences in severity disease and QoL between the C5-C6 and C1 (control) group. Data from a national, multicentre, observational and cross-sectional study (n = 1598) were used to compare three groups of CVD: C1 (n = 243), C5 (n = 136) and C6 (n = 70). CVD severity was assessed with the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and QoL with the Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12) and Chronic Lower Limb Venous Insufficiency Questionnaire (CIVIQ-20). Patients with active ulcers had a higher mean total VCSS than patients with healed ulcers (P ulcers than in those with C1 (P ulcers (C6) had lower QoL scores, but the differences were not statistically significant. Patients with venous leg ulcers (C5-C6) are associated with high severity and poor QoL. However, the healing of a leg ulcer did not contribute to improvement of QoL.

  2. nitrogen saturation in stream ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Earl, S. R.; Valett, H. M.; Webster, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of nitrogen (N) saturation has organized the assessment of N loading in terrestrial ecosystems. Here we extend the concept to lotic ecosystems by coupling Michaelis-Menten kinetics and nutrient spiraling. We propose a series of saturation response types, which may be used to characterize the proximity of streams to N saturation. We conducted a series of short-term N releases using a tracer ((NO3)-N-15-N) to measure uptake. Experiments were conducted in streams spanning a gradient ...

  3. Thrombotic obstruction of the central venous catheter in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation Obstrucción trombótica del catéter venoso central en pacientes sometidos al trasplante de células-tronco hematopoyéticas Obstrução trombótica do cateter venoso central em pacientes submetidos ao transplante de células-tronco hematopoéticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Michelli Bertoldi Arone

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This is an integrative literature review with the aim of summarizing the prevention measures and treatment of thrombotic obstruction of long-term semi-implanted central venous catheters, in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The sample consisted of seven studies, being two randomized controlled clinical trials, three cohort studies and two case series. Regarding the prevention measures, one single study demonstrated effectiveness, which was a cohort study on the oral use of warfarin. In relation to the treatment measures, three studies evidenced effectiveness, one highlighted the efficacy of streptokinase or urokinase, one demonstrated the benefit of using low-molecular-weight heparin and the other treated the obstruction with heparin or urokinase. Catheter patency research shows a restricted evolution that does not follow the evolution of transplantations, mainly regarding nursing care.Se trata de una revisión integradora de la literatura con objeto de sintetizar las medidas de prevención y tratamiento de obstrucción trombótica del catéter venosos central de larga permanencia y semi-implantado, en pacientes sometidos al trasplante de células-tronco hematopoyéticas. La muestra abarcó a siete estudios: dos ensayos clínicos controlados aleatorizados, tres estudios de cohorte y dos series de casos. Respecto a las medidas de prevención, fue identificado un único estudio efectivo, uno cohorte sobre el uso de la warfarina oral. Sobre las medidas de tratamiento, tres estudios evidenciaron efectividad, uno apuntó la eficacia de la estreptoquinasa o uroquinasa, otro mostró beneficio del uso de heparina de bajo peso molecular y otro trató la obstrucción con heparina o uroquinasa. Se observa que la evolución de la investigación sobre la permeabilidad del catéter fue limitada, no acompañando la evolución del trasplante, principalmente respecto a los cuidados de enfermería.Trata-se de revisão integrativa da

  4. Familial Clustering of Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindet-Pedersen, Caroline; Oestergaard, Louise Bruun; Gundlund, Anna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) is of utmost importance to improve current prophylactic regimes and treatment guidelines. The extent to which a family history contributes to the risk of VTE needs further exploration. OBJECTIVES: To examine the relative ...

  5. History of venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfaldoni, S; Wollina, U; Lotti, J; Gianfaldoni, R; Lotti, T; Fioranelli, M; Roccia, M G

    To retrieve the history of venous ulcers and of skin lesions in general, we must go back to the appearance of human beings on earth. It is interesting to note that cutaneous injuries evolved parallel to human society. An essential first step in the pathogenesis of ulcers was represented by the transition of the quadruped man to Homo Erectus. This condition was characterized by a greater gravitational pressure on the lower limbs, with consequences on the peripheral venous system. Furthermore, human evolution was characterized by an increased risk of traumatic injuries, secondary to his natural need to create fire and hunt (e.g. stones, iron, fire, animal fighting). Humans then began to fight one another until they came to real wars, with increased frequency of wounds and infectious complications. The situation degraded with the introduction of horse riding, introduced by the Scites, who first tamed animals in the 7th century BC. This condition exhibited iliac veins at compression phenomena, favouring the venous stasis. With time, man continued to evolve until the modern age, which is characterized by increased risk factors for venous wounds such as poor physical activity and dietary errors (1, 2).

  6. Prostacyclin Increases Portal Venous Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)</