WorldWideScience

Sample records for central respiratory depression

  1. Depression in chronic respiratory disorders in a tertiary rural hospital of Central India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sameer singhal; Pankaj Banode; Nitish Baisakhiya

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine prevalence of depression in chronic respiratory disorders in a tertiary rural hospital of Central India. Various studies done in past have shown that prevalence of depression in diabetes and hypertension is around 40%-57%. Few studies have been done to screen depression in chronic respiratory disorders. This study was conducted in a tertiary rural hospital of Central India to find out prevalence of depression in indoor patients suffering from chronic respiratory disorders. Methods: Total 68 patients were evaluated for depression. Patients suffering from chronic respiratory disorders (total duration of illness >3 months) were evaluated using Prime MD Questionnaire. Patients suffering from diabetes, heart diseases, stroke, having past history of psychiatric illness, drug abusers, having lack of social support and suffering from chronic upper respiratory tract infections were excluded from this study. Questionnaire was asked when treatment for acute phase of illness is over. Results: Out of 68 patients evaluated, 36 (53%) were found out to be suffering from depression. Female gender (80%) was more prone to depression, inspite of the fact that all alcoholics were male. 39% of all chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients were suffering from depression in comparison to 65% for pulmonary tuberculosis and 44% for other chronic respiratory illness. 54% of patients suffering from depression are 60 yrs of age, suggesting that age has no relation with depression. No association was seen between alcoholism and depression. Conclusion: Prevalence of depression in patients of chronic respiratory illness is very high, like in cases of diabetes and hypertension. Further community and hospital based studies are needed to find out exact prevalence of depression in chronic respiratory illnesses.

  2. Antagonism of morphine-induced central respiratory depression by donepezil in the anesthetized rabbit

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    MIKI TSUJITA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphine is often used in cancer pain and postoperative analgesic management but induces respiratory depression. Therefore, there is an ongoing search for drug candidates that can antagonize morphine-induced respiratory depression but have no effect on morphine-induced analgesia. Acetylcholine is an excitatory neurotransmitter in central respiratory control and physostigmine antagonizes morphine-induced respiratory depression. However, physostigmine has not been applied in clinical practice because it has a short action time, among other characteristics. We therefore asked whether donepezil (a long-acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease can antagonize morphine-induced respiratory depression. Using the anesthetized rabbit as our model, we measured phrenic nerve discharge as an index of respiratory rate and amplitude. We compared control indices with discharges after the injection of morphine and after the injection of donepezil. Morphine-induced depression of respiratory rate and respiratory amplitude was partly antagonized by donepezil without any effect on blood pressure and end-tidal C0(2. In the other experiment, apneic threshold PaC0(2 was also compared. Morphine increased the phrenic nerve apnea threshold but this was antagonized by donepezil. These findings indicate that systemically administered donepezil partially restores morphine-induced respiratory depression and morphine-deteriorated phrenic nerve apnea threshold in the anesthetized rabbit

  3. Central nervous system site of action for the respiratory depressant effect of diacetylmorphine (heroin) in the cat.

    OpenAIRE

    Taveira da Silva, A M; J.D Souza; Quest, J A; Pagani, F D; Moerschbaecher, J M; Buller, A; Hamosh, P; Gillis, R A

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify central nervous system sites involved in the respiratory depressant effect of drugs that stimulate opioid receptors. Diacetylmorphine (heroin) was administered into several cerebroventricular regions of chloralose-anesthetized cats, while monitoring pulmonary ventilation with a Fleisch pneumotachograph. Administration of heroin (17, 50, 150, and 450 micrograms) into the forebrain ventricles, which was restricted to these ventricles, resulted in no sign...

  4. Respiratory Depression Caused by Heroin Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Hakan Cansiz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Heroin is a semisynthetic narcotic analgesic and heroin abuse is common due to its pleasure-inducing effect. For the last 30 years heroin abuse has become an important worldwide public health problem. Heroin can be administered in many different ways as preferred. Heroin affects many systems including respiratory system, cardiovascular system and particulary the central nervous system. Overdose use of heroin intravenously can be fatal due to respiratory depression. In this letter, we wanted to engage attention to respiratory depression caused by heroin abuse and potential benefits of using naloxone. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 248-250

  5. Respiratory Depression Caused by Heroin Use

    OpenAIRE

    Kadir Hakan Cansiz; Gokhan Inangil; Murat Kuyumcu; Ahmet Erturk Yedekci; Huseyin Sen; Sezai Ozkan; Guner Dagli

    2012-01-01

    Summary Heroin is a semisynthetic narcotic analgesic and heroin abuse is common due to its pleasure-inducing effect. For the last 30 years heroin abuse has become an important worldwide public health problem. Heroin can be administered in many different ways as preferred. Heroin affects many systems including respiratory system, cardiovascular system and particulary the central nervous system. Overdose use of heroin intravenously can be fatal due to respiratory depression. In this letter, we ...

  6. Thalamic mediation of hypoxic respiratory depression in lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Brian J; Rajaee, Arezoo; Ibe, Basil; Guerra, Catalina; Kruger, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Immaturity of respiratory controllers in preterm infants dispose to recurrent apnea and oxygen deprivation. Accompanying reductions in brain oxygen tensions evoke respiratory depression, potentially exacerbating hypoxemia. Central respiratory depression during moderate hypoxia is revealed in the ventilatory decline following initial augmentation. This study determined whether the thalamic parafascicular nuclear (Pf) complex involved in adult nociception and sensorimotor regulation (Bentivoglio M, Balerecia G, Kruger L.Prog Brain Res87: 53-80, 1991) also becomes a postnatal controller of hypoxic ventilatory decline. Respiratory responses to moderate isocapnic hypoxia were studied in conscious lambs. Hypoxic ventilatory decline was compared with peak augmentation. Pf and/or adjacent thalamic structures were destroyed by the neuron-specific toxin ibotenic acid (IB). IB lesions involving the thalamic Pf abolished hypoxic ventilatory decline. Lesions of adjacent thalamic nuclei that spared Pf and control injections of vehicle failed to blunt hypoxic respiratory depression. Our findings reveal that the thalamic Pf region is a critical controller of hypoxic ventilatory depression and thus a key target for exploring molecular concomitants of forebrain pathways regulating hypoxic ventilatory depression in early development. PMID:26818057

  7. Ampakine therapy to counter fentanyl-induced respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, John J; Ren, Jun

    2009-08-31

    Opioid analgesics are the most widely used and effective pharmacological agents for the treatment of acute, postoperative and chronic pain. However, activation of opiate receptors leads to significant depression of respiratory frequency in a subpopulation of patients. Here we test the hypothesis that the AMPAKINE CX717 is effective for alleviating fentanyl-induced respiratory depression without interfering with analgesia. Ampakines are a relatively new class of compounds that are in Phase II clinical trials as potential treatments for cognitive disorders and the enhancement of memory and attentiveness. They function by allosterically binding to amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors and modulating the kinetics of channel closing, transmitter dissociation and desensitization. AMPA receptor mediated conductances play a central role in controlling respiratory rhythmogenesis and drive to motoneurons. Here, we demonstrate that CX717 counters fentanyl-induced respiratory depression without significantly altering analgesia and sedation, or noticeably affecting the animals' behavior. Collectively, the preclinical data demonstrate the significant potential for the use of ampakines in respiratory medicine. PMID:19712906

  8. Neonatal respiratory depression associated with epidural analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Gálvez Toro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidural analgesia is the most effective analgesics used during childbirth but is not without its problems.In the Hospital San Juan de la Cruz of Ubeda from November 2011 we have detected 3 cases of newborn infants with signs of respiratory depression. Appeared in them: normal cardiotocographic records during childbirth, use of epidural associated with fentanyl, termination by vacuum and elevated temperature in one case.ObjectivesKnow if the neonatal adaptation to extrauterine life may be influenced by the use of epidural analgesia in childbirth. Review what role can have the rise in maternal temperature and the use of epidural fentanyl with the appearance of newborn respiratory distress.MethodsLiterature Review conducted in February of 2012 in Pubmed and the Cochrane Library, using the key words: childbirth, epidural analgesia, neonatal respiratory depression.ResultsOn the respiratory depression associated with fentanyl, a Cochrane review found indicating that newborns of mothers with an epidural, had a lower pH and were less need for administration of naloxone.On PubMed we find a review study that indicates that the respiratory depression caused by the administration of opioids via neuroaxial is rare, placing it below 1 per 1000, and a clinical case that concluded that doses of fentanyl exceeding 300 µg (approx. 5 µg/kg for 4 hours previous to childbirth, have a high risk of neonatal respiratory depression at birth.The same Cochrane review indicates that the women with epidural analgesia had increased risk of maternal fever of at least 38 ° C and a recent cohort study relates this increase in temperature with a greater likelihood of neonatal adverse events (from 37.5 ° C.ConclusionsThe studies found considered safe epidurals to the neonate and the mother, except when certain conditions are met. The literature and our clinical experience have been reports linking neonatal respiratory depression with increasing temperature (37

  9. Central Neurogenic Respiratory Failure: A Challenging Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Flávio A.; Bernardino, Tenille; Maciel, Ricardo O.H.; Felizola, Sérgio F.A.; Costa, Eduardo L.V.; Silva, Gisele S

    2011-01-01

    Background Central nervous system lesions are rare causes of respiratory failure. Simple observation of the breathing pattern can help localize the lesion, but the examiner needs to be aware of potential pitfalls such as metabolic or pulmonary alterations. Methods We describe 3 cases in which central neurogenic respiratory failure occurred simultaneously with other alterations or in an unusual presentation. Results All patients were diagnosed with central neurogenic respiratory failure and tr...

  10. Respiratory neuroplasticity following carotid body denervation Central and peripheral adaptations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew R. Hodges; Hubert V. Forster

    2012-01-01

    Historically, the role of the carotid bodies in ventilatory control has been understated, but the current view suggests that the carotid bodies (1) provide a tonic, facilitory input to the respiratory network, (2) serve as the major site of peripheral O2 chemoreception and minor contributor to CO2/H+ chemoreception, and (3) are required for ventilatory adaptation to high altitude. Each of these roles has been demonstrated in studies of ventilation in mammals after carotid body denervation. Following carotid body denervation, many of the compromised ventilatory "functions" show a time-dependent recovery plasticity that varies in the degree of recovery and time required for recovery. Respiratory plasticity following carotid body denervation is also dependent on species, with contributions from peripheral and central sites/mechanisms driving the respiratory plasticity. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of the data pointing to peripheral and central mechanisms of plasticity following carotid body denervation. We speculate that after carotid body denervation there are altered excitatory and/or inhibitory neuromodulator mechanisms that contribute to the initial respiratory depression and the subsequent respiratory plasticity, and further suggest that the continued exploration of central effects of carotid body denervation might provide useful information regarding the capacity of the respiratory network for plasticity following neurologic injury in humans.

  11. Respiratory depression in rats induced by alcohol and barbiturate and rescue by ampakine CX717.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun; Ding, Xiuqing; Greer, John J

    2012-10-01

    Barbiturate use in conjunction with alcohol can result in severe respiratory depression and overdose deaths. The mechanisms underlying the additive/synergistic actions were unresolved. Current management of ethanol-barbiturate-induced apnea is limited to ventilatory and circulatory support coupled with drug elimination. Based on recent preclinical and clinical studies of opiate-induced respiratory depression, we hypothesized that ampakine compounds may provide a treatment for other types of drug-induced respiratory depression. The actions of alcohol, pentobarbital, bicuculline, and the ampakine CX717, alone and in combination, were measured via 1) ventral root recordings from newborn rat brain stem-spinal cord preparations and 2) plethysmographic recordings from unrestrained newborn and adult rats. We found that ethanol caused a modest suppression of respiratory drive in vitro (50 mM) and in vivo (2 g/kg ip). Pentobarbital induced an ∼50% reduction in respiratory frequency in vitro (50 μM) and in vivo (28 mg/kg for pups and 56 mg/kg for adult rats ip). However, severe life-threatening apnea was induced by the combination of the agents in vitro and in vivo via activation of GABA(A) receptors, which was exacerbated by hypoxic (8% O(2)) conditions. Administration of the ampakine CX717 alleviated a significant component of the respiratory depression in vitro (50-150 μM) and in vivo (30 mg/kg ip). Bicuculline also alleviated ethanol-/pentobarbital-induced respiratory depression but caused seizure activity, whereas CX717 did not. These data demonstrated that ethanol and pentobarbital together caused severe respiratory depression, including lethal apnea, via synergistic actions that blunt chemoreceptive responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia and suppress central respiratory rhythmogenesis. The ampakine CX717 markedly reduced the severity of respiratory depression. PMID:22837171

  12. Genioglossal inspiratory activation: central respiratory vs mechanoreceptive influences

    OpenAIRE

    Pillar, Giora; Fogel, Robert B.; Malhotra, Atul; Beauregard, Josée; Edwards, Jill K.; Shea, Steven A.; White, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Upper airway dilator muscles are phasically activated during respiration. We assessed the interaction between central respiratory drive and local (mechanoreceptive) influences upon genioglossal (GG) activity throughout inspiration. GGEMG and airway mechanics were measured in 16 awake subjects during baseline spontaneous breathing, increased central respiratory drive (inspiratory resistive loading; IRL), and decreased respiratory drive (hypocapnic negative pressure ventilation), both prior to ...

  13. Myxedema coma leading to respiratory depression in a dog

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Kathryn; Aubert, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    A 10-year-old, intact male, cocker spaniel was presented with hypothermia, without shivering, and progressive stupor leading to coma. Myxedema coma, potentially precipitated by diuretic therapy, was tentatively diagnosed and treatment initiated, but progressive respiratory depression led to the decision to euthanize. Postmortem findings supported the diagnosis of myxedema coma.

  14. Developing a Respiratory Depression Scorecard for Capnography Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Felhofer, Pharm.D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulse oximetry is the most common way to measure a patient’s respiratory status in the hospital setting; however, capnography monitoring is a more accurate and sensitive technique which can more comprehensively measure respiratory function. Due to the limited number of capnography monitoring equipment at the University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview (UMMC-Fairview, we analyzed which patients should preferentially be chosen for capnography monitoring over pulse oximetry based on risk of respiratory depression. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all serious opioid-induced over-sedation events that occurred at UMMC-Fairview between January 1, 2008 and June 30, 2012. Thirteen risk factors were identified which predispose patients to respiratory depression. The average patient demonstrated 3.75 risk factors. The most commonly occurring risk factor was the concomitant use of multiple opioids or an opioid and a CNS-active sedative, followed by an ASA score ≥ 3. Based on this data, we developed a scorecard for choosing patients at the most risk of developing respiratory depression; these patients are the best candidates for capnography. Although further studies are necessary to corroborate this research, at this time giving extra consideration to patients demonstrating the previously stated risk factors is prudent when assessing those patients most in need of capnography.

  15. Central depression of nuclear charge density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The center-depressed nuclear charge distributions are investigated with the parametrized distribution and the relativistic mean-field theory, and their corresponding charge form factors are worked out with the phase shift analysis method. The central depression of nuclear charge distribution of 46Ar and 44S is supported by the relativistic mean-field calculation. According to the calculation, the valence protons in 46Ar and 44S prefer to occupy the 1d3/2 state rather than the 2s1/2 state, which is different from that in the less neutron-rich argon and sulfur isotopes. As a result, the central proton densities of 46Ar and 44S are highly depressed, and so are their central charge densities. The charge form factors of some argon and sulfur isotopes are presented, and the minima of the charge form factors shift upward and inward when the central nuclear charge distributions are more depressed. Besides, the effect of the central depression on the charge form factors is studied with a parametrized distribution, when the root-mean-square charge radii remain constant.

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is required for normal development of the central respiratory rhythm in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkowiec, A; Katz, D M

    1998-07-15

    1. Molecular mechanisms underlying maturation of the central respiratory rhythm are largely unknown. Previously, we found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for expression of normal breathing behaviour in newborn mice, raising the possibility that maturation of central respiratory output is dependent on BDNF. 2. Respiratory activity was recorded in vitro from cervical ventral roots (C1 or C4) using the isolated brainstem-spinal cord preparation from postnatal day (P) 0.5-2.0 and P4.5 wild-type mice and mice lacking functional bdnf alleles. 3. Loss of one or both bdnf alleles resulted in an approximately 50% depression of central respiratory frequency compared with wild-type controls. In addition, respiratory cycle length variability was 214% higher in bdnf null (bdnf-/-) animals compared with controls at P4.5. In contrast, respiratory burst duration was unaffected by bdnf gene mutation. 4. These derangements of central respiratory rhythm paralleled the ventilatory depression and irregular breathing characteristic of bdnf mutants in vivo, indicating that central deficits can largely account for the abnormalities in resting ventilation produced by genetic loss of BDNF. BDNF is thus the first growth factor identified that is required for normal development of the central respiratory rhythm, including the stabilization of central respiratory output that occurs after birth. PMID:9706001

  17. Opioid-induced respiratory depression: ABCB1 transporter pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhasivam, S; Chidambaran, V; Zhang, X; Meller, J; Esslinger, H; Zhang, K; Martin, L J; McAuliffe, J

    2015-04-01

    Opioid-related respiratory depression (RD) is a serious clinical problem as it causes multiple deaths and anoxic brain injuries. Morphine is subject to efflux via P-glycoprotein transporter encoded by ABCB1, also known as MDR1. ABCB1 polymorphisms may affect blood-brain barrier transport of morphine and therefore individual response to its central analgesic and adverse effects. This study aimed to determine specific associations between common ABCB1 genetic variants and clinically important outcomes including RD and RD resulting in prolonged stay in hospital with intravenous morphine in a homogenous pediatric surgical pain population of 263 children undergoing tonsillectomy. Children with GG and GA genotypes of ABCB1 polymorphism rs9282564 had higher risks of RD resulting in prolonged hospital stays; adding one copy of the minor allele (G) increased the odds of prolonged hospital stay due to postoperative RD by 4.7-fold (95% confidence interval: 2.1-10.8, P=0.0002). PMID:25311385

  18. Unrecognized Hypoxia and Respiratory Depression in Emergency Department Patients Sedated for Psychomotor Agitation: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Deitch, Kenneth; Rowden, Adam; Damiron, Kathia; Lares, Claudia; Oqroshidze, Nino; Aguilera, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of respiratory depression in patients who are chemically sedated in the emergency department (ED) is not well understood. As the drugs used for chemical restraint are respiratory depressants, improving respiratory monitoring practice in the ED may be warranted. The objective of this study is to describe the incidence of respiratory depression in patients chemically sedated for violent behavior and psychomotor agitation in the ED. Methods: Adult patients wh...

  19. Unrecognized Hypoxia and Respiratory Depression in Emergency Department Patients Sedated For Psychomotor Agitation: Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Deitch, Kenneth; Rowden, Adam; Damiron, Kathia; Lares, Claudia; Oqroshidze, Nino; Aguilera, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of respiratory depression in patients who are chemically sedated in the emergency department (ED) is not well understood. As the drugs used for chemical restraint are respiratory depressants, improving respiratory monitoring practice in the ED may be warranted. The objective of this study is to describe the incidence of respiratory depression in patients chemically sedated for violent behavior and psychomotor agitation in the ED. Methods Adult patients who met eligi...

  20. Reversal of morphine-induced respiratory depression by doxapram in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Akira; Kimura, Satoko; Ohi, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate whether doxapram, a blocker of tandem pore K(+) (TASK-1/-3) channels, is a useful tool for recovery from morphine-induced ventilatory disturbances. Spontaneous ventilation and the hind leg withdrawal response against noxious thermal stimulation were recorded simultaneously in anesthetized rats. Morphine (1.0mg/kg, i.v.) decreased the minute volume resulting from depression of the ventilatory rate and tracheal airflow. Concomitantly, it prolonged the latency of withdrawal response against the thermal stimulation. Subsequent intravenous injection of doxapram recovered the morphine-induced ventilatory depression. This effect of doxapram declined rapidly after a single injection (1.0-3.0mg/kg, i.v.) but persisted with a continuous infusion (0.33mg/kg/min). Neither single injection nor continuous infusion of doxapram had any detectable effect on the analgesic potency of morphine. The central respiratory activity was recorded from the phrenic nerve in anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated rats. Morphine (3.0mg/kg, i.v.) induced respiratory depression, characterized by a prolonged plateau-like inspiratory discharge (apneustic discharge) in the phrenic nerve. Doxapram (10mg/kg, i.v.) restored the morphine-induced apneustic discharge to an augmenting inspiratory discharge. This study demonstrated that doxapram counteracted morphine-induced respiratory depression by stimulating the central respiratory network without compromising morphine antinociception. These results support the clinical use of doxapram for amelioration of ventilatory disturbances in patients treated with opioids. PMID:27038521

  1. Opioid therapy : a trade-off between opioid-analgesia and opioid-induced respiratory depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, Maria Catharina Anna

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions that may be drawn from the data in this thesis: 1. The ideal drug for antagonism of respiratory depression has not yet been found. At present naloxone seems the most appropriate drug although reversal of respiratory depression coincides with loss of analgesia. New reversal agents acting

  2. Opioid-induced respiratory depression: reversal by non-opioid drugs

    OpenAIRE

    van der Schier, Rutger; Roozekrans, Margot; van Velzen, Monique; Dahan, Albert; Niesters, Marieke

    2014-01-01

    The human body is critically dependent on the ventilatory control system for adequate uptake of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). Potent opioid analgesics, through their actions on μ-opioid receptor (MOR) expressed on respiratory neurons in the brainstem, depress ventilation. Opioid-induced respiratory depression (OIRD) is potentially life threatening and the cause of substantial morbidity and mortality. One possible way of prevention of OIRD is by adding a respiratory stimulant to ...

  3. Minocycline suppresses morphine-induced respiratory depression, suppresses morphine-induced reward, and enhances systemic morphine-induced analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Mark R Hutchinson; Northcutt, Alexis L.; Chao, Lindsey W.; Kearney, Jeffrey J.; Zhang, Yingning; Berkelhammer, Debra L.; Loram, Lisa C.; Rozeske, Robert R; Bland, Sondra T.; Maier, Steven F.; Gleeson, Todd T.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent data suggest that opioids can activate immune-like cells of the central nervous system (glia). This opioid-induced glial activation is associated with decreased analgesia, owing to the release of proinflammatory mediators. Here we examine in rats whether the putative microglial inhibitor, minocycline, may affect morphine-induced respiratory depression and/or morphine-induced reward (conditioned place preference). Systemic co-administration of minocycline significantly attenuated morphi...

  4. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Caroline J.; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F.; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% 10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:26495843

  5. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J Jolley

    Full Text Available Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone (IOT, and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%, end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2% and neural respiratory drive (NRD (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography. Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% 10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression.

  6. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Caroline J; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% 10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:26495843

  7. Central depression of the nuclear charge distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a systematic feature of all measured charge distributions we find a shift in the form-factor zeroes as compared to a simple folding model. To first order, this shift can be interpreted as resulting from the central depression w, caused by the Coulomb repulsion. Accounting for it leads to an increase in the surface width of nuclear charge distributions by 0.105 fm. This interpretation of the experimental findings is compared with the droplet model, which relates w with the compression modulus K and the asymmetry energy J. Accounting for w leads to an increase in the extrapolated nuclear matter density by 7.5%. However, this macroscopic model is not able to describe the experimental results in detail since w is also influenced by shell effects. HF+BCS calculations with effective Skyrme-type interactions reproduce part of the data, revealing the influence of shells on w. Here, too, there remain discrepancies in details. A level of accuracy is reached at which most probably also the skewness of the charge distribution must be taken into account. (orig.)

  8. Respiratory depression in rats induced by alcohol and barbiturate and rescue by ampakine CX717

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Jun; Ding, Xiuqing; Greer, John J

    2012-01-01

    Barbiturate use in conjunction with alcohol can result in severe respiratory depression and overdose deaths. The mechanisms underlying the additive/synergistic actions were unresolved. Current management of ethanol-barbiturate-induced apnea is limited to ventilatory and circulatory support coupled with drug elimination. Based on recent preclinical and clinical studies of opiate-induced respiratory depression, we hypothesized that ampakine compounds may provide a treatment fo...

  9. Unrecognized Hypoxia and Respiratory Depression in Emergency Department Patients Sedated For Psychomotor Agitation: Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Deitch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The incidence of respiratory depression in patients who are chemically sedated in the emergency department (ED is not well understood. As the drugs used for chemical restraint are respiratory depressants, improving respiratory monitoring practice in the ED may be warranted. The objective of this study is to describe the incidence of respiratory depression in patients chemically sedated for violent behavior and psychomotor agitation in the ED. Methods: Adult patients who met eligibility criteria with psychomotor agitation and violent behavior who were chemically sedated were eligible. SpO2 and ETCO2 (end-tidal CO2 was recorded and saved every 5 seconds. Demographic data, history of drug or alcohol abuse, medical and psychiatric history, HR and BP every 5 minutes, any physician intervention for hypoxia or respiratory depression, or adverse events were also recorded. We defined respiratory depression as an ETCO2 of >50 mmHg, a change of 10% above or below baseline, or a loss of waveform for >15 seconds. Hypoxia was defined as a SpO2 of 15 seconds. Results: We enrolled 59 patients, and excluded 9 because of >35% data loss. Twenty-eight (28/50 patients developed respiratory depression at least once during their chemical restraint (56%, 95% CI 42-69%; the median number of events was 2 (range 1-6. Twenty-one (21/50 patients had at least one hypoxic event during their chemical restraint (42%, 95% CI 29-55%; the median number of events was 2 (range 1-5. Nineteen (19/21 (90%, 95% CI 71-97% of the patients that developed hypoxia had a corresponding ETCO2 change. Fifteen (15/19 (79%, 95% CI 56-91% patients who became hypoxic met criteria for respiratory depression before the onset of hypoxia. The sensitivity of ETCO2 to predict the onset of a hypoxic event was 90.48% (95% CI: 68-98% and specificity 69% (95% CI: 49-84%. Five patients received respiratory interventions from the healthcare team to improve respiration [Airway repositioning: (2

  10. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia as a predictor of outcome in major depressive disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Rottenberg, Jonathan; Wilhelm, Frank H.; Gross, James J.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is a noninvasive measure of parasympathetic tone that has been related to emotion regulatory capacity. While some previous work indicates that clinically depressed persons exhibit lower levels of RSA than do normal controls, there is nevertheless considerable between-subject variation in RSA among depressed persons. The current study evaluated the significance of variation in RSA among depressed persons by examining whether levels of RSA predicte...

  11. [Respiratory depression in delirium tremens patients treated with phenobarbital. A retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutzen, L.; Poulsen, L.M.; Ulrichsen, J.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Delirium tremens (DT) is the most severe manifestation of alcohol withdrawal which--if untreated--has a high rate of mortality. Barbiturates are the most effective drug but respiratory depression may occur. In the present study we investigated the frequency of respiratory problems......-DT and full blown DT were included in the study. RESULTS: While we did not detect any respiratory problems among patients with pre-DT, we found 9 cases among 73 patients with full blown DT, 5 of which were considered serious. In two of these the frequency of respiration (FR) was decreased (5-6 per min). Both...... to ketoacidosis. The death could not be attributed to the phenobarbital treatment. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, we found that the frequency of phenobarbital-induced respiratory depression was low. However, if the DT was complicated with pneumonia, life-threatening respiratory insufficiency could be the outcome...

  12. Central Neurochemical Ultradian Variability in Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald M. Salomon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is characterized by blunted behavior and neuroendocrine function that generally improve with antidepressant treatment. This study examined intrinsic variability in brain neurotransmitter function, since it may be a source of blunted behavior and neuroendocrine function in depression and a marker for the illness, and has not previously been analyzed using wavelet decomposition. To measure variability in monoamine metabolites, lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was collected in serial samples in depressed patients before and after treatment. We hypothesized that changes in variability would be observed after treatment. Mechanisms that control such variability may be critical to the pathophysiology of depression. Method: Time series data was obtained from serial ten-min sampling over a 24-hr period (N = 144 from thirteen depressed patients, with a repeat collection after 5 weeks of antidepressant (sertraline or bupropion treatment. Concentrations of tryptophan (TRP, the monoamine metabolites 5-HIAA (metabolite of serotonin and HVA (metabolite of dopamine, and the HVA:5HIAA ratio were transformed to examine power in slowly (160 min/cycle to rapidly (20 min/cycle occurring events. Power, the sum of the squares of the coefficients in each d (detail wavelet, reflects variability within a limited frequency bandwidth for that wavelet. Pre-treatment to post-treatment comparisons were conducted with repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Antidepressant treatment was associated with increased power in the d2 wavelet from the HVA (p = 0.03 and the HVA:5-HIAA ratio (p = 0.03 series. The d1 and d3 wavelets showed increased power following antidepressant treatment for the ratio series (d1, p = 0.01; d3, p = 0.05. Significant changes in power were not observed for the 5-HIAA data series. Power differences among analytes suggest that the findings are specific to each system. Conclusion: The wavelet transform analysis shows changes in neurochemical signal

  13. Influenza and other respiratory viruses in three Central American countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna‐Torres, Victor A.; Sánchez‐Largaespada, José F.; Lorenzana, Ivette; Forshey, Brett; Aguilar, Patricia; Jimenez, Mirna; Parrales, Eduardo; Rodriguez, Francisco; García, Josefina; Jimenez, Ileana; Rivera, Maribel; Perez, Juan; Sovero, Merly; Rios, Jane; Gamero, María E.; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Laguna‐Torres et al. (2011) Influenza and other respiratory viruses in three Central American countries. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(2), 123–134. Background  Despite the disease burden imposed by respiratory diseases on children in Central America, there is a paucity of data describing the etiologic agents of the disease. Aims  To analyze viral etiologic agents associated with influenza‐like illness (ILI) in participants reporting to one outpatient health center, one pediatric hospital, and three general hospitals in El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua Material & Methods  Between August 2006 and April 2009, pharyngeal swabs were collected from outpatients and inpatients. Patient specimens were inoculated onto cultured cell monolayers, and viral antigens were detected by indirect and direct immunofluorescence staining. Results  A total of 1,756 patients were enrolled, of whom 1,195 (68.3%) were under the age of 5; and 183 (10.4%) required hospitalization. One or more viral agents were identified in 434 (24.7%) cases, of which 17 (3.9%) were dual infections. The most common viruses isolated were influenza A virus (130; 7.4% of cases), respiratory syncytial virus (122; 6.9%), adenoviruses (63; 3.6%), parainfluenza viruses (57; 3.2%), influenza B virus (47; 2.7% of cases), and herpes simplex virus 1 (22; 1.3%). In addition, human metapneumovirus and enteroviruses (coxsackie and echovirus) were isolated from patient specimens. Discussion  When compared to the rest of the population, viruses were isolated from a significantly higher percentage of patients age 5 or younger. The prevalence of influenza A virus or influenza B virus infections was similar between the younger and older age groups. RSV was the most commonly detected pathogen in infants age 5 and younger and was significantly associated with pneumonia (p < 0.0001) and hospitalization (p < 0.0001). Conclusion  Genetic analysis of influenza

  14. Developing a Respiratory Depression Scorecard for Capnography Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Katie Felhofer, Pharm.D.

    2013-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is the most common way to measure a patient’s respiratory status in the hospital setting; however, capnography monitoring is a more accurate and sensitive technique which can more comprehensively measure respiratory function. Due to the limited number of capnography monitoring equipment at the University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview (UMMC-Fairview), we analyzed which patients should preferentially be chosen for capnography monitoring over pulse oximetry based on risk of...

  15. S-Methadone augments R-methadone induced respiratory depression in the neonatal guinea pig

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Daniel A. N.; Nettleton, Rosemary T.; Spencer, Katherine B.; Wallisch, Michael; Olsen, George D.

    2009-01-01

    Methadone is administered as a racemic mixture, although its analgesic and respiratory effects are attributed to R-isomer activity at the mu-opioid receptor (MOP). Recently, we observed a four-fold increase in inspiratory time in three-day old guinea pigs following an injection of racemic methadone. We hypothesized that this effect was due to augmentation of R-methadone induced respiratory depression by the S-methadone isomer. In the current longitudinal study, we injected three-, seven-, and...

  16. Opioid-induced respiratory depression: reversal by non-opioid drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schier, Rutger; Roozekrans, Margot; van Velzen, Monique; Dahan, Albert; Niesters, Marieke

    2014-01-01

    The human body is critically dependent on the ventilatory control system for adequate uptake of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). Potent opioid analgesics, through their actions on μ-opioid receptor (MOR) expressed on respiratory neurons in the brainstem, depress ventilation. Opioid-induced respiratory depression (OIRD) is potentially life threatening and the cause of substantial morbidity and mortality. One possible way of prevention of OIRD is by adding a respiratory stimulant to the opioid treatment, which through activation of non-opioidergic pathways will excite breathing and consequently will offset OIRD and should not affect analgesia. Various new respiratory stimulants are currently under investigation including (a) potassium channel blockers acting at the carotid bodies, and (b) ampakines and (c) serotonin receptor agonists acting within the brainstem. (a) GAL-021 targets BKCa-channels. Initial animal and human experimental evidence indicates that this potassium channel blocker is a potent respiratory stimulant that reverses OIRD without affecting antinociception. GAL021 is safe and better tolerated than the older K(+)-channel blocker doxapram and more efficacious in its effect on respiration. (b) Ampakines modulate glutamatergic respiratory neurons in brainstem respiratory centers. Various ampakines have been studied showing their ability to increase respiratory drive during OIRD by increasing respiratory rate. Currently, CX717 is the most promising ampakine for use in humans as it is safe and does not affect opioid analgesia. (c) While animal studies show that serotonin receptor agonists increase respiratory drive via activation of serotonin receptors in brainstem respiratory centers, human studies are without success. Further clinical studies are required to improve our care of patients that are treated with potent opioid analgesics. The use of non-opioid adjuvants may reduce the probability of OIRD but does never relieve us of our duty to

  17. Ethanol Reversal of Tolerance to the Respiratory Depressant Effects of Morphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Rob; Lyndon, Abi; Withey, Sarah; Roberts, Joanne; Kershaw, Yvonne; MacLachlan, John; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Kelly, Eamonn; Bailey, Chris; Hickman, Matthew; Henderson, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the most common drugs associated with unintentional drug overdose. Death results from respiratory depression. Prolonged use of opioids results in the development of tolerance but the degree of tolerance is thought to vary between different effects of the drugs. Many opioid addicts regularly consume alcohol (ethanol), and post-mortem analyses of opioid overdose deaths have revealed an inverse correlation between blood morphine and ethanol levels. In the present study, we determined whether ethanol reduced tolerance to the respiratory depressant effects of opioids. Mice were treated with opioids (morphine, methadone, or buprenorphine) for up to 6 days. Respiration was measured in freely moving animals breathing 5% CO2 in air in plethysmograph chambers. Antinociception (analgesia) was measured as the latency to remove the tail from a thermal stimulus. Opioid tolerance was assessed by measuring the response to a challenge dose of morphine (10 mg/kg i.p.). Tolerance developed to the respiratory depressant effect of morphine but at a slower rate than tolerance to its antinociceptive effect. A low dose of ethanol (0.3 mg/kg) alone did not depress respiration but in prolonged morphine-treated animals respiratory depression was observed when ethanol was co-administered with the morphine challenge. Ethanol did not alter the brain levels of morphine. In contrast, in methadone- or buprenorphine-treated animals no respiratory depression was observed when ethanol was co-administered along with the morphine challenge. As heroin is converted to morphine in man, selective reversal of morphine tolerance by ethanol may be a contributory factor in heroin overdose deaths. PMID:26171718

  18. γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB)-Induced Respiratory Depression: Combined Receptor-Transporter Inhibition Therapy for Treatment in GHB Overdose

    OpenAIRE

    Morse, Bridget L.; Vijay, Nisha; Morris, Marilyn E.

    2012-01-01

    Overdose of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) frequently causes respiratory depression, occasionally resulting in death; however, little is known about the dose-response relationship or effects of potential overdose treatment strategies on GHB-induced respiratory depression. In these studies, the parameters of respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute volume were measured using whole-body plethysmography in rats administered GHB. Intravenous doses of 200, 600, and 1500 mg/kg were administered to asses...

  19. Postoperative Respiratory Depression Associated with Pregabalin: A Case Series and a Preoperative Decision Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Eipe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregabalin is gaining popularity in the perioperative period for its usefulness in treating neuropathic pain and its apparent opioid-sparing effect. The present report describes the perioperative course of three patients who received pregabalin and experienced significant respiratory depression in the postoperative period. All three patients consented to the report and publication of the present case series. The first patient was elderly with borderline renal dysfunction. She experienced respiratory arrest in the immediate postoperative period following a craniotomy for tumour excision. The second patient presented with severe respiratory depression 12 h after receiving a spinal anesthetic for joint replacement, and was later found to have clinically significant obstructive sleep apnea. The third patient, who was an otherwise healthy elderly individual on benzodiazepines for anxiety, experienced respiratory arrest in the postanesthesia care unit after an uneventful anesthesia for lumbar spine decompression. All of these patients were treated successfully with standard resuscitation measures. Although other causes of respiratory depression in these patients were considered, there appears to be an association between pregabalin and this complication. The present article briefly reviews the evidence regarding the perioperative use of pregabalin. Based on the authors’ experience and the available evidence, they believe that pregabalin may be useful in the management of acute pain in carefully selected patients undergoing certain surgeries. A clinical algorithm has been developed to guide the perioperative use of pregabalin. This algorithm may be helpful in increasing the safety of perioperative pregabalin use.

  20. On the central depression in density of 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A successful reproduction of the charge density distribution and the deep central depression in the point-proton density distribution of 4He is presented using only two functions (1s and 1d) and totally three parameters. This d particle-state wavefunction is furthermore related to the d-state admixture earlier reported for 4He. (author)

  1. Central origin of respiratory arrest in beta-blocker intoxication in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Langemeijer, J.J.M.; de Wildt, D J; de Groot, G.; Sangster, B.

    1987-01-01

    Propranolol HCl (7.5 mg·kg−1), timolol maleate (7.0 mg·kg−1), and sotalol HCl (10 mg·kg−1) were administered intracerebroventricularly (icv) to spontaneously breathing (SB) rats. The respiratory rate declined until the rats all died from respiratory arrest. Artificial ventilation resulted in survival of the rats for a 3-hr observation period. Intravenous (iv) administration of the same doses of the three beta blockers to SB rats did not result in either respiratory depression or death. Except...

  2. Sex-Dependent Depression-Like Behavior Induced by Respiratory Administration of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Lian; Zhang, Chengcheng; Meng, Qingtao; Wu, Shenshen; Wang, Shizhi; Ding, Zhen; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaobo; Chen, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Ultrafine aluminum oxide, which are abundant in ambient and involved occupational environments, are associated with neurobehavioral alterations. However, few studies have focused on the effect of sex differences following exposure to environmental Al₂O₃ ultrafine particles. In the present study, male and female mice were exposed to Al₂O₃ nanoparticles (NPs) through a respiratory route. Only the female mice showed depression-like behavior. Although no obvious pathological changes were observed in mice brain tissues, the neurotransmitter and voltage-gated ion channel related gene expression, as well as the small molecule metabolites in the cerebral cortex, were differentially modulated between male and female mice. Both mental disorder-involved gene expression levels and metabolomics analysis results strongly suggested that glutamate pathways were implicated in sex differentiation induced by Al₂O₃ NPs. Results demonstrated the potential mechanism of environmental ultrafine particle-induced depression-like behavior and the importance of sex dimorphism in the toxic research of environmental chemicals. PMID:26690197

  3. Sex-Dependent Depression-Like Behavior Induced by Respiratory Administration of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine aluminum oxide, which are abundant in ambient and involved occupational environments, are associated with neurobehavioral alterations. However, few studies have focused on the effect of sex differences following exposure to environmental Al2O3 ultrafine particles. In the present study, male and female mice were exposed to Al2O3 nanoparticles (NPs through a respiratory route. Only the female mice showed depression-like behavior. Although no obvious pathological changes were observed in mice brain tissues, the neurotransmitter and voltage-gated ion channel related gene expression, as well as the small molecule metabolites in the cerebral cortex, were differentially modulated between male and female mice. Both mental disorder-involved gene expression levels and metabolomics analysis results strongly suggested that glutamate pathways were implicated in sex differentiation induced by Al2O3 NPs. Results demonstrated the potential mechanism of environmental ultrafine particle-induced depression-like behavior and the importance of sex dimorphism in the toxic research of environmental chemicals.

  4. Anesthetic complications including two cases of postoperative respiratory depression in living liver donor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Beebe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Living liver donation is becoming a more common means to treat patients with liver failure because of a shortage of cadaveric organs and tissues. There is a potential for morbidity and mortality, however, in patients who donate a portion of their liver. The purpose of this study is to identify anesthetic complications and morbidity resulting from living liver donor surgery. Patients and Methods: The anesthetic records of all patients who donated a segment of their liver between January 1997 and January 2006 at University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical and anesthesia time, blood loss, hospitalization length, complications, morbidity, and mortality were recorded. Data were reported as absolute values, mean ± SD, or percentage. Significance (P < 0.05 was determined using Student′s paired t tests. Results: Seventy-four patients (34 male, 40 female, mean age = 35.5 ± 9.8 years donated a portion of their liver and were reviewed in the study. Fifty-seven patients (77% donated the right hepatic lobe, while 17 (23% donated a left hepatic segment. The average surgical time for all patients was 7.8 ± 1.5 hours, the anesthesia time was 9.0 ± 1.3 hours, and the blood loss was 423 ± 253 ml. Forty-six patients (62.2% received autologous blood either from a cell saver or at the end of surgery following acute, normovolemic hemodilution, but none required an allogenic transfusion. Two patients were admitted to the intensive care unit due to respiratory depression. Both patients donated their right hepatic lobe. One required reintubation in the recovery room and remained intubated overnight. The other was extubated but required observation in the intensive care unit for a low respiratory rate. Twelve patients (16.2% had complaints of nausea, and two reported nausea with vomiting during their hospital stay. There were four patients who developed complications related to positioning during the

  5. Is depression associated with dysfunction of the central reward system?

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Soelch, C

    2009-01-01

    The neural substrates of MDD (major depressive disorder) are complex and not yet fully understood. In the present review, I provide a short overview of the findings supporting the hypothesis of a dysfunctional dopamine system in the pathophysiology of depression. Because the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system is involved in reward processing, it has been hypothesized that a reduced function of this system could underlie the anhedonia and amotivation associated with depression. This hypothesis ...

  6. Physiological and pathophysiological interactions between the respiratory central pattern generator and the sympathetic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zoccal, Daniel B; Baekey, David M; Abdala, Ana P L; Machado, Benedito H; Dick, Thomas E; Paton, Julian F R; Rybak, Ilya A

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory modulation seen in the sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) implies that the respiratory and sympathetic networks interact. During hypertension elicited by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the SNA displays an enhanced respiratory modulation reflecting strengthened interactions between the networks. In this chapter, we review a series of experimental and modeling studies that help elucidate possible mechanisms of sympatho-respiratory coupling. We conclude that this coupling significantly contributes to both the sympathetic baroreflex and the augmented sympathetic activity after exposure to CIH. This conclusion is based on the following findings. (1) Baroreceptor activation results in perturbation of the respiratory pattern via transient activation of postinspiratory neurons in the Bötzinger complex (BötC). The same BötC neurons are involved in the respiratory modulation of SNA, and hence provide an additional pathway for the sympathetic baroreflex. (2) Under hypercapnia, phasic activation of abdominal motor nerves (AbN) is accompanied by synchronous discharges in SNA due to the common source of this rhythmic activity in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN). CIH conditioning increases the CO2 sensitivity of central chemoreceptors in the RTN which results in the emergence of AbN and SNA discharges under normocapnic conditions similar to those observed during hypercapnia in naïve animals. Thus, respiratory-sympathetic interactions play an important role in defining sympathetic output and significantly contribute to the sympathetic activity and hypertension under certain physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and the theoretical framework presented may be instrumental in understanding of malfunctioning control of sympathetic activity in a variety of disease states. PMID:25194190

  7. Central depression in nuclear density and its consequences for the shell structure of superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the central depression in the density distribution of spherical superheavy nuclei on the shell structure is studied within the relativistic mean-field theory. A large depression leads to the shell gaps at the proton Z=120 and neutron N=172 numbers, whereas a flatter density distribution favors N=184 and leads to the appearance of a Z=126 shell gap and to the decrease of the size of the Z=120 shell gap. The correlations between the magic shell gaps and the magnitude of the central depression are discussed for relativistic and nonrelativistic mean field theories

  8. Central depression in nuclear density and its consequences for the shell structure of superheavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasjev, A V

    2005-01-01

    The influence of the central depression in the density distribution of spherical superheavy nuclei on the shell structure is studied within the relativistic mean field theory. Large depression leads to the shell gaps at the proton Z=120 and neutron N=172 numbers, while flatter density distribution favors N=184 for neutrons and leads to the appearance of a Z=126 shell gap and to the decrease of the size of the Z=120 shell gap. The correlations between the magic shell gaps and the magnitude of central depression are discussed for relativistic and non-relativistic mean field theories.

  9. PCA-induced respiratory depression simulating stroke following endoluminal repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Javed; Riley Richard; Sieunarine Kishore

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Aim To report a case of severe respiratory depression with PCA fentanyl use simulating stroke in a patient who underwent routine elective endoluminal graft repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Case presentation A 78-year-old obese lady underwent routine endoluminal graft repair for AAA that was progressively increasing in size. Following an uneventful operation postoperative analgesia was managed with a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device with fentanyl. On the morning fol...

  10. Maternal depression and the heart of parenting: respiratory sinus arrhythmia and affective dynamics during parent-adolescent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Arin M; Hughes-Scalise, Abigail; Klostermann, Susan; Azem, Talla

    2011-10-01

    Maternal depression is associated with problematic parenting and the development of emotional and behavior problems in children and adolescents. While emotional regulatory abilities are likely to influence emotional exchanges between parents and teens, surprisingly little is known about the role of emotion regulation during parent-child interactions, particularly in high-risk families. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) has been widely linked to emotion regulatory abilities in recent research, and the current study investigated RSA and maternal depression in relation to dyadic flexibility, as well as mutuality of negative and positive affect displayed during three discussion tasks between 59 mother-adolescent pairs (age 11-17 years). Dyadic flexibility was predicted by the interaction of maternal depression, maternal RSA, and teen RSA, with higher maternal RSA predicting greater dyadic flexibility, particularly in highest risk dyads (i.e., elevated maternal depression and lower teen RSA). Teen RSA interacted with maternal depression to predict mutual negative affect, serving as a protective factor. Finally, maternal and teen RSA interacted to predict mutual positive affect, with maternal RSA buffering against low teen RSA to predict higher mutual positive affect. Results support the role of RSA in affectively laden interactions between parents and adolescents, particularly in the face of maternal depression. PMID:21875198

  11. Analysis of genetic variation of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates in Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Can; Ning, Yibao; Xu, Binrui; Gong, Wenzhi; Zhang, Dongdong

    2016-05-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an epidemic etiology in pigs of all ages causing reproductive failure and respiratory manifestation. PRRSV has been circulating in Chinese pig farms for almost 20 years. The aim of the present study was to fully understand the extent of the genetic diversity and molecular characteristics of PRRSVs in Central China. A strain of PRRSV isolated from a recent outbreak farm in Hunan province in Central China, designated HUN-2014, was sequenced and analyzed with 39 other PRRSVs from 1998 to 2014 in Central China. Comparative results of genomic sequences revealed that all 40 PRRSVs belonged to the North American genotype (NA genotype) and shared 88.8-99.0% homology. Phylogenetic analysis showed three subgenotypes, namely conventional PRRSV (C-PRRSV), specially mutant PRRSV (S-PRRSV) and highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV), in all 40 PRRSVs. Moreover, comparative analysis of amino acid (AA) sequences of NSP2, GP3, GP5 and ORF5a revealed the main evolution trend of PRRSVs in Central China from 1998 to 2014, which was from C-PRRSV to HP-PRRSV, accompanied by different evolving directions to S-PRRSV. In conclusion, both the major evolutionary trend and special features of genetic variation should be emphasized as theoretical basis for development of new vaccines and control strategies for PRRS. PMID:26781704

  12. The effects of centrally injected arachidonic acid on respiratory system: Involvement of cyclooxygenase to thromboxane signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, Leman Gizem; Guvenc, Gokcen; Altinbas, Burcin; Niaz, Nasir; Yalcin, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is present in the phospholipids of the cell membranes of the body and is abundant in the brain. Exogenously administered AA has been shown to affect brain metabolism and to exhibit cardiovascular and neuroendocrine actions. However, little is known regarding its respiratory actions and/or central mechanism of its respiratory effects. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the possible effects of centrally injected AA on respiratory system and the mediation of the central cyclooxygenase (COX) to thromboxane A2 (TXA2) signaling pathway on AA-induced respiratory effects in anaesthetized rats. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of AA induced dose- and time-dependent increase in tidal volume, respiratory rates and respiratory minute ventilation and also caused an increase in partial oxygen pressure (pO2) and decrease in partial carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) in male anaesthetized Spraque Dawley rats. I.c.v. pretreatment with ibuprofen, a non-selective COX inhibitor, completely blocked the hyperventilation and blood gases changes induced by AA. In addition, central pretreatment with different doses of furegrelate, a TXA2 synthesis inhibitor, also partially prevented AA-evoked hyperventilation and blood gases effects. These data explicitly show that centrally administered AA induces hyperventilation with increasing pO2 and decreasing pCO2 levels which are mediated by the activation of central COX to TXA2 signaling pathway. PMID:26767978

  13. Respiratory virus laboratory pandemic planning an surveillance in central Viet Nam, 2008-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinh Xuan Mai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Laboratory capacity is needed in central Viet Nam to provide early warning to public health authorities of respiratory outbreaks of importance to human health, for example the outbreak of influenza A(H1N1 pandemic in 2009. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR procedures established as part of a capacity-building process were used to conduct prospective respiratory surveillance in a region where few previous studies have been undertaken.Methods: Between October 2008 and September 2010, nose and throat swabs from adults and children (approximately 20 per week presenting with an acute respiratory illness to the Ninh Hoa General Hospital were collected. Same-day PCR testing and result reporting for 13 respiratory viruses were carried out by locally trained scientists.Results: Of 2144 surveillance samples tested, 1235 (57.6% were positive for at least one virus. The most common were influenza A strains (17.9%, with pandemic influenza A(H1N1 2009 and seasonal H3N2 strain accounting for 52% and 43% of these, respectively. Other virus detections included: rhinovirus (12.4%, enterovirus (8.9%, influenza B (8.3%, adenovirus (5.3%, parainfluenza (4.7%, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV (3.9%, human coronavirus (3.0% and human metapneumovirus (0.3%. The detection rate was greatest in the 0–5 year age group. Viral co-infections were identified in 148 (6.9% cases.Discussion: The outbreak in 2009 of the influenza A(H1N1 pandemic strain provided a practical test of the laboratory’s pandemic plan. This study shows that the availability of appropriate equipment and molecular-based testing can contribute to important individual and public health outcomes in geographical locations susceptible to emerging infections.

  14. The role of P2Y1 receptor signaling in central respiratory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajani, V; Zhang, Y; Revill, A L; Funk, G D

    2016-06-01

    The profile of P2 receptor signaling in respiratory control has increased substantially since the first suggestions more than 15 years ago of roles in central chemoreception and modulating inspiratory motor outflow. Part of this reflects the paradigm shift that glia participate in information processing and that ATP is a major gliotransmitter. P2 receptors are a diverse family. Here, we review ATP signaling in respiratory control, highlighting G-protein coupled P2Y1 receptors that have been a focus of recent work. Despite strong evidence of a role for glia and P2 receptor signaling in the central chemosensitivity mediated by the retotrapezoid nucleus, P2Y1 receptors do not appear to be directly involved. Evidence that central P2 receptors and glia contribute to the hypoxic ventilatory response is compelling and P2Y1 receptors are the strongest candidate. However, functional significance in vivo, details of the signaling pathways and involvement of other receptor subtypes remain important questions. PMID:26476057

  15. POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION – THE CENTRAL PROBLEM OF MENTAL HEALTH OF EARLY MOTHERHOOD

    OpenAIRE

    N. A. Kornetov

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal mental health of the mother occupies a central position in healthcare, the same as caring for a newborn baby. Maternal depression is the lead pathology of postpartum period. Despite the high prevalence and importance to the overall development of children, most cases of depression are unappreciated, unrecognized and untreated. Inattention to issues which are related to physical and mental health of women, leads to severe negative social and economic consequences for society. Statist...

  16. POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION – THE CENTRAL PROBLEM OF MENTAL HEALTH OF EARLY MOTHERHOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Kornetov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal mental health of the mother occupies a central position in healthcare, the same as caring for a newborn baby. Maternal depression is the lead pathology of postpartum period. Despite the high prevalence and importance to the overall development of children, most cases of depression are unappreciated, unrecognized and untreated. Inattention to issues which are related to physical and mental health of women, leads to severe negative social and economic consequences for society. Statistical comparison of the total number of pregnant women, the number of births in the United States in 2007, excluding cases of fetal loss, including still-births and miscarriages with similar Russian data allowed to calculate the approximate prevalence of postpartum depression in the same period. Presumable probability of postpartum depression is 15% in different regions of the world, and the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV for postpartum depression are representative for comparison. Considering these assumptions, according to 2007 each year about 260,000 out of 1 mln. 600,000 of Russian women in childbirth may suffer from post-natal depression. The results have a probabilistic character. For the mothers the consequences of unrecognized and untreated depression after childbirth are the most frequent. It should be seen as a depressive episode or recurrent depressive disorder which has a singular coloring due to the appearance in the peak period of reproductive age of women. Postpartum depression may increase the possibility of occurrence of relapse of a depressive disorder as well as the transition to a state of chronic depression. Alcoholism or drug use is a common complication of depression; the risk of suicide increases, especially during the time of reducing the severity of the most severe symptoms of depression, though it is below the prevalence of suicide among the population. Particular attention should be paid to such symptoms as instability in mood and

  17. Diarrhea and respiratory symptoms among travelers to Asia, Africa, and South and Central America from Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Christopher Allan; Maclennan, Alice; Wilson, Eleanor; Walker, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Surveillance using admissions to hospital, while being useful, is a poor indicator of the real incidence of disease encountered by travelers. An alternative is self-reported illness among those who attended at a pretravel clinic prior to their travels. Estimates of incidence and risk factors were determined for attendees at a travel clinic in Scotland using a questionnaire. Analysis for risk factors was carried out for those travelers visiting countries in Africa, Asia, or South and Central America, who had traveled for 1 week or more and had returned between 1997 and 2001 (N= 4,856). Multivariate logistic regression was used to test the hypotheses that time abroad and age-group would be significant for both respiratory and diarrheal symptoms regardless of which of the three geographical areas are visited. From 2006 returned questionnaires (response rate = 41.3%), diarrhea and respiratory symptoms were reported by 44.2 and 16.8% of respondents, respectively; the incidence was significantly greater among travelers to Asia for both diarrheal (55.5%) and respiratory (23.7%) symptoms than among travelers to Africa (36.6 and 12.2%, respectively) or South and Central America (39.5 and 16.2%, respectively). For diarrhea, age was a highly significant risk factor for travelers to Asia, South and Central America, and Africa. Being a self-organized tourist/backpacker, traveling to Asia was associated with increased risk, while for Africa and South and Central America visiting family or friends was associated with a lower risk. For travelers to Asia, traveling to the Indian subcontinent was significantly associated with increased risk. The majority of travelers had an adverse event while traveling abroad, with diarrhea and respiratory conditions being especially common despite attending a travel clinic for advice prior to departure. However, the limitations of this surveillance-based strategy have highlighted the requirement for more research to understand more fully the

  18. Central effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212-2 on respiratory and cardiovascular regulation in anaesthetised rats

    OpenAIRE

    Pfitzer, Torsten; Niederhoffer, Nathalie; Szabo, Bela

    2004-01-01

    The primary aim was to study the central respiratory effects of cannabinoids (CB). To this end, the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212-2 was injected into the cisterna magna of urethane-anaesthetised rats and changes in respiratory parameters were observed. The secondary aim was to observe the centrally elicited cardiovascular actions of WIN55212-2. Involvement of opioid mechanisms in the central effects of WIN55212-2 was also studied.Intracisternal (i.c.) application of WIN55212-2 (1, 3, ...

  19. Central depressant and nootropic effects of daytime melatonin in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Onaolapo, Olakunle J; Onaolapo, Adejoke Y; Abiola, Akanni A; Lillian, Eniafe A

    2014-01-01

    Background Effects of orally administered daytime melatonin on novelty induced behaviors and spatial working memory in mice were evaluated using the open field, the Y maze and the radial arm maze. Purpose To ascertain the possible nootropic and/or central excitatory or inhibitory effects of daytime oral melatonin in mice. Methods Adult male mice from our colony, assigned to three and four groups for open field tests and memory tests respectively were given vehicle (normal saline), a standard ...

  20. Central CO2 chemoreception and integrated neural mechanisms of cardiovascular and respiratory control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stornetta, Ruth L.; Abbott, Stephen B. G.; Depuy, Seth D.; Fortuna, Michal G.; Kanbar, Roy

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we examine why blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) increase during a rise in central nervous system (CNS) Pco2 (central chemoreceptor stimulation). CNS acidification modifies SNA by two classes of mechanisms. The first one depends on the activation of the central respiratory controller (CRG) and causes the much-emphasized respiratory modulation of the SNA. The CRG probably modulates SNA at several brain stem or spinal locations, but the most important site of interaction seems to be the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM), where unidentified components of the CRG periodically gate the baroreflex. CNS Pco2 also influences sympathetic tone in a CRG-independent manner, and we propose that this process operates differently according to the level of CNS Pco2. In normocapnia and indeed even below the ventilatory recruitment threshold, CNS Pco2 exerts a tonic concentration-dependent excitatory effect on SNA that is plausibly mediated by specialized brain stem chemoreceptors such as the retrotrapezoid nucleus. Abnormally high levels of Pco2 cause an aversive interoceptive awareness in awake individuals and trigger arousal from sleep. These alerting responses presumably activate wake-promoting and/or stress-related pathways such as the orexinergic, noradrenergic, and serotonergic neurons. These neuronal groups, which may also be directly activated by brain acidification, have brainwide projections that contribute to the CO2-induced rise in breathing and SNA by facilitating neuronal activity at innumerable CNS locations. In the case of SNA, these sites include the nucleus of the solitary tract, the ventrolateral medulla, and the preganglionic neurons. PMID:20075262

  1. Two long-lasting central respiratory responses following acute hypoxia in glomectomized cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallman, E A; Millhorn, D E

    1988-01-01

    1. Central respiratory response to acute (10 min) hypoxia, as measured by phrenic nerve activity, was determined in peripheral chemo-denervated cats. 2. Hypoxia was induced by ventilating cats for 10 min at reduced inspired oxygen levels (inspired O2 fraction, FI,O2 = 0.06-0.15). The degree of hypoxaemia was determined from an arterial blood sample and ranged from 'severe' (arterial O2 pressure, Pa,O2 less than 26 Torr) to 'mild' (Pa,O2 greater than 35 Torr). The respiratory response was monitored for 1 h following return to ventilation with 100% oxygen. 3. The results confirmed the finding of prolonged (greater than 60 min) inhibition of respiration upon return to hyperoxic conditions following severe hypoxia, as reported previously (Millhorn, Eldridge, Kiley & Waldrop, 1984). A new finding was a long-lasting (greater than 60 min) facilitation of respiration following exposure to less severe (Pa,O2 greater than 35 Torr) hypoxia. 4. Medullary extracellular fluid pH was measured in six cats. Changes in pH could not explain either the prolonged inhibition following severe hypoxia or the long-lasting facilitation observed following mild hypoxia. 5. Ablation studies were performed in order to determine the locations of the neuronal substrates for the inhibitory and facilitatory mechanisms. The results of this series of experiments indicate that the mesencephalon is necessary for activation of the inhibitory mechanism, while the facilitatory mechanism requires the presence of higher brain structures, notably the diencephalon. 6. Following removal of the diencephalon, the inhibitory response was seen following even mild hypoxic insults, i.e. those shown to produce facilitation in animals with intact brains. In the absence of the mesencephalon, neither prolonged inhibition nor prolonged facilitation could be produced following hypoxia. 7. It is proposed that there are two centrally mediated long-lasting responses to acute hypoxia. Facilitation is seen following mild

  2. Dexamethasone hepatic induction in rats subsequently treated with high dose buprenorphine does not lead to respiratory depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In humans, asphyxic deaths and severe poisonings have been attributed to high-dosage buprenorphine, a maintenance therapy for heroin addiction. However, in rats, intravenous buprenorphine at doses up to 90 mg kg-1 was not associated with significant effects on arterial blood gases. In contrast, norbuprenorphine, the buprenorphine major cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A-derived metabolite, is a potent respiratory depressant. Thus, our aim was to study the consequences of CYP3A induction on buprenorphine-associated effects on resting ventilation in rats. We investigated the effects on ventilation of 30 mg kg-1 buprenorphine alone or following cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A induction with dexamethasone, using whole body plethysmography (N = 24) and arterial blood gases (N = 12). Randomized animals in 4 groups received sequential intraperitoneal dosing with: (dexamethasone [days 1-3] + buprenorphine [day 4]), (dexamethasone solvent [days 1-3] + buprenorphine [day 4]), (dexamethasone [days 1-3] + buprenorphine solvent [day 4]), or (dexamethasone solvent [days 1-3] + buprenorphine solvent [day 4]). Buprenorphine alone caused a significant rapid and sustained increase in the inspiratory time (P -1 buprenorphine on rat ventilation. Our results suggest a limited role of drug-mediated CYP3A induction in the occurrence of buprenorphine-attributed respiratory depression in addicts

  3. Endomorphin analog analgesics with reduced abuse liability, respiratory depression, motor impairment, tolerance, and glial activation relative to morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadina, James E; Nilges, Mark R; Morgenweck, Jenny; Zhang, Xing; Hackler, Laszlo; Fasold, Melita B

    2016-06-01

    Opioids acting at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are the most effective analgesics, however adverse side effects severely limit their use. Of particular importance, abuse liability results in major medical, societal, and economic problems, respiratory depression is the cause of fatal overdoses, and tolerance complicates treatment and increases the risk of side effects. Motor and cognitive impairment are especially problematic for older adults. Despite the host of negative side effects, opioids such as morphine are commonly used for acute and chronic pain conditions. Separation of analgesia from unwanted effects has long been an unmet goal of opioid research. Novel MOR agonist structures may prove critical for greater success. Here we tested metabolically stable analogs of the endomorphins, endogenous opioids highly selective for the MOR. Compared to morphine, the analogs showed dramatically improved analgesia-to-side-effect ratios. At doses providing equal or greater antinociception than morphine in the rat, the analogs showed reduced a) respiratory depression, b) impairment of motor coordination, c) tolerance and hyperalgesia, d) glial p38/CGRP/P2X7 receptor signaling, and e) reward/abuse potential in both conditioned place preference and self-administration tests. Differential effects on glial activation indicate a mechanism for the relative lack of side effects by the analogs compared to morphine. The results suggest that endomorphin analogs described here could provide gold standard pain relief mediated by selective MOR activation, but with remarkably safer side effect profiles compared to opioids like morphine. PMID:26748051

  4. Central depression in nuclear density and its consequences for the shell structure of superheavy nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Frauendorf, S.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the central depression in the density distribution of spherical superheavy nuclei on the shell structure is studied within the relativistic mean field theory. Large depression leads to the shell gaps at the proton Z=120 and neutron N=172 numbers, while flatter density distribution favors N=184 for neutrons and leads to the appearance of a Z=126 shell gap and to the decrease of the size of the Z=120 shell gap. The correlations between the magic shell gaps and the magnitude of ...

  5. Effect of a botanical composition, UP446, on respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous systems in beagle dogs and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young Chul; Jia, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Extensive safety evaluation of UP446, a botanical composition comprised of standardized extracts from roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and heartwoods of Acacia catechu, has been reported previously. Here we carried out additional studies to assess the effect of UP446 on respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous (CNS) systems. A Functional observational battery (FOB) and whole body plethysmography system in rats and implanted telemetry in dogs were utilized to evaluate the potential CNS, respiratory and cardiovascular toxicity, respectively. UP446 was administered orally at dose levels of 800, 2000 and 5000 mg/kg to SpragueDawley rats and at 4 ascending dose levels (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) to beagle dogs. No abnormal effects were observed on the cage side, open field, hand held, and sensori-motor observations suggestive of toxicity in respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous (CNS) systems. Rectal temperatures were comparable for each treatment groups. Similarly, respiratory rate, tidal volume and minute volume were unaffected by any of the treatment groups. No UP446 related changes were observed on blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiogram in beagle dogs at dose levels of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg. Some minor incidental, non-dose correlated changes were observed in the FOB assessment. These data suggest that UP446 has minimal or no pharmaco-toxicological effect on the respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous systems. PMID:27012374

  6. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually feel better with the right treatment. What Causes Depression? There is no one cause of depression. For ... changes in the brain can affect mood and cause depression. Sometimes, those under a lot of stress, like ...

  7. Bi-level CPAP does not change central blood flow in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Aquilano, Giulia; Galletti, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Vitali, Francesca; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Background Current literature provides limited data on the hemodynamic changes that may occur during bi-level continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) support in preterm infants. However, the application of a positive end-expiratory pressure may be transmitted to the heart and the great vessels resulting in changes of central blood flow. Objective To assess changes in central blood flow in infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) during bi-level CPAP support. Design A prospective st...

  8. The hydrology of a drained topographical depression within an agricutlural field in north-central Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jason L.; Capel, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    North-central Iowa is an agriculturally intensive area comprising the southeastern portion of the Prairie Pothole Region, a landscape containing a high density of enclosed topographical depressions. Artificial drainage practices have been implemented throughout the area to facilitate agricultural production. Vertical surface drains are utilized to drain the topographical depressions that accumulate water. This study focuses on the hydrology of a drained topographical depression located in a 39.5 ha agricultural field. To assess the hydrology of the drained depression, a water balance was constructed for 11 ponding events during the 2008 growing season. Continuous pond and groundwater level data were obtained with pressure transducers. Flows into the vertical surface drain were calculated based on pond depth. Precipitation inflows and evaporative outflows of the ponds were calculated using climatic data. Groundwater levels were used to assess groundwater/pond interactions. Results of the water balances show distinct differences between the inflows to and outflows from the depression based on antecedent conditions. In wet conditions, groundwater inflow sustained the ponds. The ponds receded only after the groundwater level declined to below the land surface. In drier conditions, groundwater was not a source of water to the depression. During these drier conditions, infiltration comprised 30% of the outflows from the depression during declining pond stages. Over the entire study period, the surface drain, delivering water to the stream, was the largest outflow from the pond, accounting for 97% of the outflow, while evapotranspiration was just 2%. Precipitation onto the pond surface proved to be a minor component, accounting for 4% of the total inflows.

  9. Hydrology and plant survival in excavated depressions near an earthen dam in north-central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynde L.; Hudak, Paul F.

    2005-09-01

    This investigation examined plant survival and water sources for small depressions excavated to build an earthen dam and nature trail in north-central Texas, USA. These “inadvertent wetlands” occupy part of an outdoor education facility, overlying alluvial deposits of the Trinity River. A large lake behind the earthen dam strongly influences surface water and groundwater levels in the area. Excavated depressions receive direct precipitation, runoff, and groundwater inputs, losing water by seepage and evapotranspiration. Hydroperiods varied with location and water input: excavations receiving groundwater held water year round; others periodically desiccated. Groundwater-fed depressions had higher salinity; however, the highest average value (1,304 μS/cm) was within the freshwater range. A total of 66 to 75% of emergent and floating wetland species planted in three depressions survived after 2 years. The developing wetlands appear viable under hydrologic conditions typical of the study period. Ultimately, variable hydroperiods among wetlands, and water level fluctuations within individual wetlands, may foster diverse plant-species compositions. Depressed lake levels following long-term drought or increased water demands pose the greatest threat to the developing wetlands.

  10. Respiratory virus infection and risk of invasive meningococcal disease in central Ontario, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashleigh R Tuite

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In temperate climates, invasive meningococcal disease (IMD incidence tends to coincide with or closely follow peak incidence of influenza virus infection; at a seasonal level, increased influenza activity frequently correlates with increased seasonal risk of IMD. METHODS: We evaluated 240 cases of IMD reported in central Ontario, Canada, from 2000 to 2006. Associations between environmental and virological (influenza A, influenza B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV exposures and IMD incidence were evaluated using negative binomial regression models controlling for seasonal oscillation. Acute effects of weekly respiratory virus activity on IMD risk were evaluated using a matched-period case-crossover design with random directionality of control selection. Effects were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Multivariable negative binomial regression identified elevated IMD risk with increasing influenza A activity (per 100 case increase, incidence rate ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.06, 1.31. In case-crossover models, increasing weekly influenza A activity was associated with an acute increase in the risk of IMD (per 100 case increase, odds ratio (OR  = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.28 to 3.23. Increasing weekly RSV activity was associated with increased risk of IMD after adjusting for RSV activity in the previous 3 weeks (per 100 case increase, OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.14, 16.32. No change in disease risk was seen with increasing influenza B activity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified an acute effect of influenza A and RSV activity on IMD risk. If confirmed, these finding suggest that influenza vaccination may have the indirect benefit of reducing IMD risk.

  11. PCA-induced respiratory depression simulating stroke following endoluminal repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Javed

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To report a case of severe respiratory depression with PCA fentanyl use simulating stroke in a patient who underwent routine elective endoluminal graft repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA Case presentation A 78-year-old obese lady underwent routine endoluminal graft repair for AAA that was progressively increasing in size. Following an uneventful operation postoperative analgesia was managed with a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA device with fentanyl. On the morning following operation the patient was found to be unusually drowsy and unresponsive to stimuli. Her GCS level was 11 with plantars upgoing bilaterally. A provisional diagnosis of stroke was made. Urgent transfer to a high-dependency unit (HDU was arranged and she was given ventilatory support with a BiPap device. CT was performed and found to be normal. Arterial blood gas (ABG analysis showed respiratory acidosis with PaCO2 81 mmHg, PaO2 140 mmHg, pH 7.17 and base excess -2 mmol/l. A total dose of 600 mcg of fentanyl was self-administered in the 16 hours following emergence from general anaesthesia. Naloxone was given with good effect. There was an increase in the creatinine level from 90 μmol/L preoperatively to 167 μmol/L on the first postoperative day. The patient remained on BiPap for two days that resulted in marked improvement in gas exchange. Recovery was complete.

  12. American Society for Pain Management Nursing guidelines on monitoring for opioid-induced sedation and respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzyna, Donna; Jungquist, Carla R; Pasero, Chris; Willens, Joyce S; Nisbet, Allison; Oakes, Linda; Dempsey, Susan J; Santangelo, Diane; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2011-09-01

    As the complexity of analgesic therapies increases, priorities of care must be established to balance aggressive pain management with measures to prevent or minimize adverse events and to ensure high quality and safe care. Opioid analgesia remains the primary pharmacologic intervention for managing pain in hospitalized patients. Unintended advancing sedation and respiratory depression are two of the most serious opioid-related adverse events. Multiple factors, including opioid dosage, route of administration, duration of therapy, patient-specific factors, and desired goals of therapy, can influence the occurrence of these adverse events. Furthermore, there is an urgent need to educate all members of the health care team about the dangers and potential attributes of administration of sedating medications concomitant with opioid analgesia and the importance of initiating rational multimodal analgesic plans to help avoid adverse events. Nurses play an important role in: 1) identifying patients at risk for unintended advancing sedation and respiratory depression from opioid therapy; 2) implementing plans of care to assess and monitor patients; and 3) intervening to prevent the worsening of adverse events. Despite the frequency of opioid-induced sedation, there are no universally accepted guidelines to direct effective and safe assessment and monitoring practices for patients receiving opioid analgesia. Moreover, there is a paucity of information and no consensus about the benefits of technology-supported monitoring, such as pulse oximetry (measuring oxygen saturation) and capnography (measuring end-tidal carbon dioxide), in hospitalized patients receiving opioids for pain therapy. To date, there have not been any randomized clinical trials to establish the value of technologic monitoring in preventing adverse respiratory events. Additionally, the use of technology-supported monitoring is costly, with far-reaching implications for hospital and nursing practices. As a

  13. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of......The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued, that...... depression are presented....

  14. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued, that...... these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of...... depression are presented....

  15. Aberrant emotion networks in early major depressive disorder patients: an eigenvector centrality mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Z; Zhang, M; Huang, P

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a serious mental disorder that negatively affects the quality of life of many individuals, and is a heavy economic burden to society. In recent years it was thought that depression is a 'disconnection syndrome'. Disorganized brain activity and un-modulated emotion responses were considered the key neuropathologies underlying depression. In the present study, we investigated the alteration of whole brain network connectivity in 28 first-episode, drug-naive patients, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and a new analytical method called voxel-based eigenvector centrality mapping. We found that compared with normal controls, MDD patients had lower functional connectivity in the bilateral middle frontal gyrus, insula, hippocampus, amygdala and cerebellum, and higher functional connectivity in the medial prefrontal cortex. The functional connectivity strength at the right hippocampus (r=-0.413, P=0.032) and the right insula (r=-0.372, P=0.041) negatively correlated with the severity of the disease. We further examined coordination among these regions, and found that frontal-subcortical connection was reduced and insula-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) connection was increased. These results are consistent with previous hypotheses on the neural mechanism of MDD, and provide further evidence that emotion networks are already interrupted in early stages of depression. PMID:27219345

  16. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or more of the following: Your genes. Sometimes depression is hereditary, meaning it runs in your family. If you have a parent or sibling who has depression, you may be more at risk for having ...

  17. Respiratory depression following morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide in normal subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, P. I.; Joel, S P; John, L.; Wedzicha, J A; M Maclean; Slevin, M L

    1995-01-01

    1. Morphine 6-glucuronide (M6G) is a metabolite of morphine with analgesic activity. A double-blind, randomised comparison of the effects of morphine and M6G on respiratory function was carried out in 10 normal subjects after i.v. morphine (10 mg 70 kg-1) or M6G (1, 3.3 and 5 mg 70 kg-1). Analgesic potency was also assessed using an ischaemic pain test and other toxic effects were monitored. 2. Following morphine there was a significant increase in arterial PCO2, as measured by blood gases 45...

  18. Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Sherry L; Gucciardi Enza; Stewart Donna E

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Health Issue Depression causes significant distress or impairment in physical, social, occupational and other key areas of functioning. Women are approximately twice as likely as men to experience depression. Psychosocial factors likely mediate the risks for depression incurred by biological influences. Key Findings Data from the 1999 National Population Health Survey show that depression is more common among Canadian women, with an annual self-reported incidence of 5.7% compared wit...

  19. Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Donna E.; Gucciardi, Enza; Grace, Sherry L.

    2004-01-01

    Health Issue Depression causes significant distress or impairment in physical, social, occupational and other key areas of functioning. Women are approximately twice as likely as men to experience depression. Psychosocial factors likely mediate the risks for depression incurred by biological influences. Key Findings Data from the 1999 National Population Health Survey show that depression is more common among Canadian women, with an annual self-reported incidence of 5.7% compared with 2.9% in...

  20. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P;

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal a...... strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role in the...... bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  1. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cycle Depression and insomnia References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  2. Complexity measures of the central respiratory networks during wakefulness and sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragomir, Andrei; Akay, Yasemin; Curran, Aidan K.; Akay, Metin

    2008-06-01

    Since sleep is known to influence respiratory activity we studied whether the sleep state would affect the complexity value of the respiratory network output. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that the complexity values of the diaphragm EMG (EMGdia) activity would be lower during REM compared to NREM. Furthermore, since REM is primarily generated by a homogeneous population of neurons in the medulla, the possibility that REM-related respiratory output would be less complex than that of the awake state was also considered. Additionally, in order to examine the influence of neuron vulnerabilities within the rostral ventral medulla (RVM) on the complexity of the respiratory network output, we inhibited respiratory neurons in the RVM by microdialysis of GABAA receptor agonist muscimol. Diaphragm EMG, nuchal EMG, EEG, EOG as well as other physiological signals (tracheal pressure, blood pressure and respiratory volume) were recorded from five unanesthetized chronically instrumented intact piglets (3-10 days old). Complexity of the diaphragm EMG (EMGdia) signal during wakefulness, NREM and REM was evaluated using the approximate entropy method (ApEn). ApEn values of the EMGdia during NREM and REM sleep were found significantly (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively) lower than those of awake EMGdia after muscimol inhibition. In the absence of muscimol, only the differences between REM and wakefulness ApEn values were found to be significantly different.

  3. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  4. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the brain. There are a variety of causes, including genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. Depression can happen at any age, but it often begins in teens and young adults. It is much more common in women. Women ...

  5. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment of insomnia that share many of the properties of benzodiazepines. Other CNS depressants include meprobamate, methaqualone ( ... they are prescribed for to put you to sleep, relieve anxiety and muscle spasms, and prevent seizures. ...

  6. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other long-term effects include: impaired sexual function insomnia and other sleep problems breathing problems convulsions (similar to seizures) depression and other mental health issues continue Other Possible Problems Taking too much ...

  7. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caring for children and aging parents, abuse, and poverty may trigger depression in some people. Medical illness – ... and places that can help you get treatment. Family doctor Counselors or social workers Family service, social ...

  8. Prevalence of depression, suicidal ideation, alcohol intake and nicotine consumption in rural Central India. The Central India Eye and Medical Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jost B Jonas

    Full Text Available To investigate the prevalence of depression, suicidal ideations, alcohol and nicotine consumption in adults in an agrarian society mostly unchanged by the effects of urbanization.The Central India Eye and Medical Study is a population-based study in rural Central India close to the tribal belt and included 4711 subjects (aged 30+ years. Depression was assessed by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD, suicidal ideation by six standardized questions, nicotine use by the Fagerstroem Nicotine Tolerance Questionnaire (FTNQ, and alcohol consumption by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT.Mild to moderate depression (CESD sum score: 15-21 was detected in 1862 (39.6% individuals (33.5% of men, 44.8 of women, and major depression (CESD sum score >21 in 613 (13.0% individuals (8.1 of men, 17.3% of women. Suicide attempt was reported by 199 (4.2% participants and suicidal thoughts during the last 6 months by 238 (5.1% individuals. There were 887 (18.9% smokers and smokeless tobacco was consumed by 1968 (41.8% subjects. Alcohol consumption was reported by 1081 (23.0% participants; 283 (6.0% subjects had an AUDIT score ≥ 8 (hazardous drinking, and 108 (4.63% subjects a score ≥ 13 (women or ≥ 15 (men (alcohol dependence.In rural Central India, prevalence of major depression was comparable to figures reported from other developing countries. Prevalence of smoking and hazardous alcohol consumption was higher than as reported from urban regions. Measures should be taken to address the relatively high prevalence of suicide attempts and thoughts on suicide in rural Central India.

  9. Theoretical study of the central depression of nuclear charge density distribution by electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charge form factors of elastic electron scattering for isotones with N=20 and N=28 are calculated using the phase-shift analysis method, with corresponding charge density distributions from relativistic mean-field theory. The results show that there are sharp variations at the inner parts of charge distributions with the proton number decreasing. The corresponding charge form factors are divided into two groups because of the unique properties of the s-states wave functions, though the proton numbers change uniformly in two isotonic chains. Meanwhile, the shift regularities of the minima are also discussed, and we give a clear relation between the minima of the charge form factors and the corresponding charge radii. This relation is caused by the diffraction effect of the electron. Under this conclusion, we calculate the charge density distributions and the charge form factors of the A=44 nuclei chain. The results are also useful for studying the central depression in light exotic nuclei. (authors)

  10. Fast oscillations during gasping and other non-eupneic respiratory behaviors: Clues to central pattern generation

    OpenAIRE

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki; Marchenko, Vitaliy

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian nervous system exhibits fast synchronous oscillations, which are especially prominent in respiratory-related nerve discharges. In the phrenic nerve, they include high- (HFO), medium- (MFO), and low-frequency (LFO) oscillations. Because motoneurons firing at HFO-related frequencies had never been recorded, an epiphenomenological mechanism for their existence had been posited. We have recently recorded phrenic motoneurons firing at HFO-related frequencies in unanesthetized decereb...

  11. Airway inflammation and central respiratory control: results from in vivo and in vitro neonatal rat

    OpenAIRE

    Gresham, Kenneth; Boyer, Brooke; Mayer, Catherine; Foglyano, Ryan; Martin, Richard; Wilson, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    In infants, respiratory infection elicits tachypnea. To begin to evaluate the role of brainstem cytokine expression in modulation of breathing pattern changes, we compared the pattern generated after endotracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in in vivo rat pups to local pro-inflammatory cytokine injection in the nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS) in an in vitro en bloc brainstem spinal cord preparation. We hypothesized that both challenges would elicit similar changes in patterning ...

  12. Central neural mechanisms of progesterone action: application to the respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E

    1992-08-01

    Around the turn of the century, it was recognized that women hyperventilate during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and during pregnancy. Although a causative role for the steroid hormone progesterone in this hyperventilation was suggested as early as the 1940s, there has been no clear indication as to the mechanism by which it produces its respiratory effects. In contrast, much mechanistic information has been obtained over the same period about a different effect of progesterone, i.e., the facilitation of reproductive behaviors. In this case, the bulk of the evidence supports the hypothesis that progesterone acts via a genomic mechanism with characteristics not unlike those predicted by classic models for steroid hormone action. We recently, therefore, undertook a series of experiments to test predictions of those same models with reference to the respiratory effects of progesterone. Here we highlight the results of those studies; as background to and precedent for our experiments, we briefly review previous work in which effects of progesterone on respiration and reproductive behaviors have been studied. Our results indicate that the respiratory response to progesterone is mediated at hypothalamic sites through an estrogen- (E2) dependent progesterone receptor- (PR) mediated mechanism requiring RNA and protein synthesis, i.e., gene expression. The E2 dependence of the respiratory response to progesterone is likely a consequence of the demonstrated induction of PR mRNA and PR in hypothalamic neurons by E2. In short, we found that neural mechanisms underlying the stimulation of respiration by progesterone were similar to those mediating its reproductive effects. PMID:1399957

  13. Always Consider the Possibility of Opioid Induced Respiratory Depression in Patients Presenting with Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure Who Fail to Improve as Expected with Appropriate Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steynor, Martin; MacDuff, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Hypercapnic respiratory failure is a frequently encountered medical emergency. Two common causes are acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and as a side effect of opioids. The two causes may coexist leading to diagnostic confusion and consequent delay in optimal management. We report a case of what was initially thought to be an exacerbation of COPD. The patient failed to improve with treatment as expected which led to the empirical administration of naloxone resulting in a dramatic reversal of her respiratory failure. The patient was subsequently discovered to be taking regular dihydrocodeine for chronic back pain. PMID:25893118

  14. Always Consider the Possibility of Opioid Induced Respiratory Depression in Patients Presenting with Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure Who Fail to Improve as Expected with Appropriate Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Steynor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercapnic respiratory failure is a frequently encountered medical emergency. Two common causes are acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and as a side effect of opioids. The two causes may coexist leading to diagnostic confusion and consequent delay in optimal management. We report a case of what was initially thought to be an exacerbation of COPD. The patient failed to improve with treatment as expected which led to the empirical administration of naloxone resulting in a dramatic reversal of her respiratory failure. The patient was subsequently discovered to be taking regular dihydrocodeine for chronic back pain.

  15. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to get better. Not a Normal Part of Aging Click for more information Depression is a common problem among older adults, but it is NOT a ... Z | videos A-Z | training | about us | contact us | site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. National Library of Medicine | National Institutes of ...

  16. Formation and Accumulation of Hydrocarbons in the Central Uplift, Dongying Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Sumei; Qiu Guiqiang; Gao Yongjin; Jiang Zhenxue

    2006-01-01

    A large number of crude oil and rock samples from various oil pools of the Central Uplift in Dongying Depression were investigated to reveal the origin and accumulation of hydrocarbons. The results showed that the composition and areal distribution of hydrocarbons vary with the location of the oil pools. An increasing trend of gammacerane/C30-hopane and steranes/hopanes but a decreasing trend of prystane/phytane (Pr/Ph) and 18(H)-/17(H)-trisnorhopane (Ts/Tm) ratios were observed from southwest to northeast. This indicates a variation of source rocks and hydrocarbon properties. An increasing trend of water salinity with much more input of algae-rich microorganisms in the deposition environment of the source rock was observed from southwest to northeast. However, the thermal maturity of the source rocks showed a decreasing trend in the same direction. Oil-to-oil and oil-to-source rock correlations showed that most oils were sourced from Es3 and Es4 members with a burial depth of more than 3,000-3,150 m and 2,700 m respectively. The oils in the Shinan and Ying 11 sand bodies, which were generally mixed with the Es4 sourced oils, came mostly from Es3 mudstones. It is quite significant that the Es4 derived oils migrated vertically for hundreds of meters and accumulated in an overlying lithologic pool of the Es3m, i.e., Ying 11 synclinal lithologic pool, which suggests that the mechanisms of migration and accumulation for subtle oil pools in the Dongying Depression are more complex than that of the previously expected.

  17. Caesium 137 in humus horizons of middle mountain depressions soils (Central Altai)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soils of Kansk, Abay and Uymon depressions in Altai were studied. It was found that the level of cesium 137 specific activity in humus horizons of depression soils considerably varies. The maximal values of cesium 137 activity are characteristic for top humus horizons. The levels of soil contamination by cesium 137 in mid depressions are harmless for stable functioning of living organisms

  18. Respiratory dysfunction associated with traumatic injury to the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, R S; Shucart, W

    1994-12-01

    Pulmonary dysfunction is a common complication of head trauma and spinal cord injury. Abnormal breathing patterns reflect the influence of altered neural integration. Early arterial hypoxemia can result from ventilation-perfusion mismatching, microatelectasis, aspiration, fat embolism, or the development of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. Significant changes in lung volumes, ventilation, and gas exchange can occur in spinal cord injury as a result of the loss of diaphramatic or intercostal muscle function. Recruitment of accessory respiratory muscles plays an important role in stabilizing the rib cage and improving expiratory function. Strength training improves expiratory muscle function in quadriplegics and should be continued indefinitely. Most importantly, survival of patients with CNS injuries improves with meticulous and vigorous pulmonary hygiene. The pulmonary hygiene program should include regular changes in the patient's position, assisted coughing and deep breathing exercises, incentive spirometer, bronchodilators, fiberoptic bronchoscopy when indicated, and frequent monitoring of pulmonary mechanics. Long-term survival of the patient with head trauma or spinal cord injury is correlated to successful weaning from mechanical ventilation. Various forms of mechanical ventilator support can be adopted for the patient's ventilatory needs, and many patients will achieve some degree of freedom from mechanical ventilation. Newer ventilatory assist devices that do not require tracheostomy should be considered. PMID:7867288

  19. Always Consider the Possibility of Opioid Induced Respiratory Depression in Patients Presenting with Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure Who Fail to Improve as Expected with Appropriate Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Steynor; Andrew MacDuff

    2015-01-01

    Hypercapnic respiratory failure is a frequently encountered medical emergency. Two common causes are acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and as a side effect of opioids. The two causes may coexist leading to diagnostic confusion and consequent delay in optimal management. We report a case of what was initially thought to be an exacerbation of COPD. The patient failed to improve with treatment as expected which led to the empirical administration of naloxone res...

  20. Swift onset of central nervous system depression and asystole followingan overdose of Guaifenesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okic, Merisa; Johnson, Tom; Crifasi, Joseph A; Long, Christopher; Mitchell, Erik K

    2013-06-01

    Guaifenesin is an over-the-counter expectorant used for chest congestion and is available both in single-ingredient formulations and in combination with antihistamines, cough suppressants and decongestants. The documented side-effects of guaifenesin are generally mild. We present the case of a 23-year-old female who committed suicide by ingestion of guaifenesin along with small amounts of cetirizine, ethanol and sertraline. Approximately 2 h after ingestion, the patient experienced central nervous system depression followed by asystole. No anatomic cause of death could be determined at autopsy. The initial toxicology detected only ethanol, which was found at a concentration insufficient to cause death. Upon further analysis, guaifenesin was detected in femoral blood at 25.0 μg/mL, urine at >50.0 μg/mL, vitreous fluid at 9.2 μg/mL, brain at 17.0 μg/g and liver at 25.0 μg/g. This is the first reported human case that can be considered a death to which guaifenesin was the significant pharmacologic contributor. Guaifenesin is not detected by the primary screening methods employed by some labs and may be missed in toxicological analyses of overdoses unless specifically suspected. PMID:23580607

  1. Can ophthalmic drops cause central nervous system depression and cardiogenic shock in infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiryazov, Kiril; Stefova, Mariyka; Iotova, Violeta

    2013-11-01

    Topical ocular medications have been widely prescribed and successfully used in children for the management of different ophthalmic disorders. We present 2 infants admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit who developed altered state of consciousness, hypotonia, hypothermia, bradycardia, and apnea after instillation of ophthalmic drops. The second infant also had hypotension and broncho-obstruction. Few days before admission, both infants were diagnosed with congenital glaucoma, and topical antiglaucoma treatment was initiated. Ophthalmic drops with brimonidine and brinzolamide were prescribed to both patients, whereas the second infant also received topical timolol. After elimination of other possible causes, the diagnosis of intoxication with topical antiglaucoma medications was established. After discontinuation of eye drops and vigorous symptomatic treatment, both infants recovered without sequels. Topically applied ophthalmic drops may cause life-threatening systemic adverse effects in infants, such as central nervous system depression and cardiogenic shock. Moreover, these 2 patients illustrate the importance of careful evaluation of all topical medications and their consideration as possible causes of the derangements in critically ill infants. PMID:24196091

  2. Abnormal degree centrality in Alzheimer's disease patients with depression: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhongwei; Liu, Xiaozheng; Hou, Hongtao; Wei, Fuquan; Liu, Jian; Chen, Xingli

    2016-06-15

    Depression is common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and occurs in AD patients with a prevalence of up to 40%. It reduces cognitive function and increases the burden on caregivers. Currently, there are very few medications that are useful for treating depression in AD patients. Therefore, understanding the brain abnormalities in AD patients with depression (D-AD) is crucial for developing effective interventions. The aim of this study was to investigate the intrinsic dysconnectivity pattern of whole-brain functional networks at the voxel level in D-AD patients based on degree centrality (DC) as measured by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI). Our study included 32 AD patients. All patients were evaluated using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and further divided into two groups: 15 D-AD patients and 17 non-depressed AD (nD-AD) patients. R-fMRI datasets were acquired from these D-AD and nD-AD patients. First, we performed a DC analysis to identify voxels that showed altered whole brain functional connectivity (FC) with other voxels. We then further investigated FC using the abnormal DC regions to examine in more detail the connectivity patterns of the identified DC changes. D-AD patients had lower DC values in the right middle frontal, precentral, and postcentral gyrus than nD-AD patients. Seed-based analysis revealed decreased connectivity between the precentral and postcentral gyrus to the supplementary motor area and middle cingulum. FC also decreased in the right middle frontal, precentral, and postcentral gyrus. Thus, AD patients with depression fit a 'network dysfunction model' distinct from major depressive disorder and AD. PMID:27079332

  3. Respiratory control in the newborn : Central chemosensitivity, neuropeptides and nicotinic effects

    OpenAIRE

    Wickström, Ronny

    2002-01-01

    Breathing is regulated by a complex network of neurons located mainly in the brainstem. For the newborn, it is critical for survival that a continuous respiration is established after birth. However, the regulation of respiration also undergoes maturation in the postnatal period. This thesis focuses on some of the systems modulating respiration that may be of great importance for the newborn: central (C02) chemosensitivity and the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and galanin ...

  4. Cognitive impairment in patients clinically recovered from central nervous system depressant drug overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassanayake, Tharaka L; Michie, Patricia T; Jones, Alison; Carter, Gregory; Mallard, Trevor; Whyte, Ian

    2012-08-01

    Central nervous system depressant drugs (CNS-Ds) are known to impair cognitive functions. Overdose of these drugs is common, and most of the hospital-treated patients are discharged within 24 to 48 hours. No previous studies have examined whether they have residual impairment at the time of discharge. Our aim was to evaluate whether patients with CNS-D overdose are impaired in cognitive domains important in daily activities at that time. We compared visuomotor skills (Trail-Making Test A and Choice Reaction Time), executive functions (viz attentional set-shifting: Trail-Making Test B; and planning: Stockings of Cambridge Task from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery), working memory (Letter-Number Sequencing), and impulsivity and decision making (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Information Sampling) in 107 patients with CNS-D overdose (benzodiazepines, opioids, or antipsychotics) with a control group of 68 with non-CNS-D overdose (acetaminophen, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors) on discharge from hospital. Outcome measures were adjusted for demographic and clinical covariates in multivariate regression models. Compared with the controls, patients in the CNS-D group were significantly impaired in all domains: they had prolonged Trail-Making completion times and reaction times, poorer working memory and planning and were more impulsive in decision making. Their Stockings of Cambridge Task performance was comparable to that of the control group for simple problems but worsened with increasing task complexity. The results show that patients with CNS-D overdose could be impaired in multiple cognitive domains underlying everyday functioning even at the time they are deemed medically fit to be discharged. Such impairments could adversely affect social and professional lives of this relatively young population during the immediate postdischarge period. PMID:22722510

  5. Risk factors of Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI in under-fives in a rural hospital of Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar M. Taksande

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries in children especially in under-fives. Every year in the world, about 13 million under-5 children dies, 95% from developing countries; one third of total deaths are due to ARI. The aim of this study was to identify the significant risk factors for ARI in children less than five years of age living in rural areas of Central India.Methods: A hospital based case control study was undertaken to determine risk factors associated with respiratory tract infections in children. Children less than 5 years admitted in a pediatric ward with diagnosis of ARI were enrolled in the study as cases (n = 300 while the same number of controls (n = 300 were selected from neighborhood and were matched for age, sex and religion. Details of risk factors in cases and controls were recorded in pre-designed proforma. Results: A significant association was found between ARI and lack of breastfeeding, nutritional status, immunization status, delayed weaning, prelactal feeding, living in overcrowded conditions, mothers’ literacy status, low birth weight and prematurity. Among the environmental variables, inadequate ventilation, improper housing condition, exposure to indoor air pollution in form of combustion from fuel used for cooking were found as significant risk factors for ARI in under-fives.Conclusions: ARIs are affected by socio-demographic and socio-cultural risk factors, which can be modified with simple interventions. The various risk factors identified in this study were lack of breastfeeding, undernutrition, delayed weaning, overcrowding and prelactal feeding.

  6. Isoflurane anesthetic hypersensitivity and progressive respiratory depression in a mouse model with isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, S.; Manjeri, G.R.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Driessen, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with mitochondrial disorders are frequently anesthetized for a wide range of operations. These disorders may interfere with the response to surgery and anesthesia. We examined anesthetic sensitivity to and respiratory effects of isoflurane in the Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mouse model

  7. Central Serotonin-2A (5-HT2A Receptor Dysfunction in Depression and Epilepsy: The Missing Link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pierre Guiard

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available 5-Hydroxytryptamine 2A receptors (5-HT2A-Rs are G-protein coupled receptors. In agreement with their location in the brain, they have been implicated not only in various central physiological functions including memory, sleep, nociception, eating and reward behaviors, but also in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Interestingly, a bidirectional link between depression and epilepsy is suspected since patients with depression and especially suicide attempters have an increased seizure risk, while a significant percentage of epileptic patients suffer from depression. Such epidemiological data led us to hypothesize that both pathologies may share common anatomical and neurobiological alteration of the 5-HT2A signaling. After a brief presentation of the pharmacological properties of the 5-HT2A-Rs, this review illustrates how these receptors may directly or indirectly control neuronal excitability in most networks involved in depression and epilepsy through interactions with the monoaminergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmissions. It also synthetizes the preclinical and clinical evidence demonstrating the role of these receptors in antidepressant and antiepileptic responses.

  8. Depression in Aboriginal men in central Australia: adaptation of the Patient Health Questionnaire 9

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Alex DH; Mentha, Ricky; Rowley, Kevin G; Skinner, Timothy; Davy, Carol; O’Dea, Kerin

    2013-01-01

    Background While Indigenous Australians are believed to be at a high risk of psychological illness, few screening instruments have been designed to accurately measure this burden. Rather than simply transposing western labels of symptoms, this paper describes the process by which a screening tool for depression was specifically adapted for use across multiple Indigenous Australian communities. Method Potential depression screening instruments were identified and interrogated according to a se...

  9. Mental health and migration: depression, alcohol abuse, and access to health care among migrants in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismayilova, Leyla; Lee, Hae Nim; Shaw, Stacey; El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Terlikbayeva, Assel; Rozental, Yelena

    2014-12-01

    One-fifth of Kazakhstan's population is labor migrants working in poor conditions with limited legal rights. This paper examines self-rated health, mental health and access to health care among migrant workers. Using geo-mapping, a random sample of internal and external migrant market workers was selected in Almaty (N = 450). We used survey logistic regression adjusted for clustering of workers within stalls. Almost half of participants described their health as fair or poor and reported not seeing a doctor when needed, 6.2% had clinical depression and 8.7% met criteria for alcohol abuse. Female external migrants were at higher risk for poor health and underutilization of health services. High mobility was associated with depression among internal migrants and with alcohol abuse among female migrant workers. This study demonstrates the urgent need to address health and mental health needs and improve access to health care among labor migrants in Central Asia. PMID:24186359

  10. The anti-malarial drug Mefloquine disrupts central autonomic and respiratory control in the working heart brainstem preparation of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lall Varinder K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mefloquine is an anti-malarial drug that can have neurological side effects. This study examines how mefloquine (MF influences central nervous control of autonomic and respiratory systems using the arterially perfused working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP of the rat. Recordings of nerve activity were made from the thoracic sympathetic chain and phrenic nerve, while heart rate (HR and perfusion pressure were also monitored in the arterially perfused, decerebrate, rat WHBP. MF was added to the perfusate at 1 μM to examine its effects on baseline parameters as well as baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. Results MF caused a significant, atropine resistant, bradycardia and increased phrenic nerve discharge frequency. Chemoreceptor mediated sympathoexcitation (elicited by addition of 0.1 ml of 0.03% sodium cyanide to the aortic cannula was significantly attenuated by the application of MF to the perfusate. Furthermore MF significantly decreased rate of return to resting HR following chemoreceptor induced bradycardia. An increase in respiratory frequency and attenuated respiratory-related sympathetic nerve discharge during chemoreceptor stimulation was also elicited with MF compared to control. However, MF did not significantly alter baroreceptor reflex sensitivity. Conclusions These studies indicate that in the WHBP, MF causes profound alterations in autonomic and respiratory control. The possibility that these effects may be mediated through actions on connexin 36 containing gap junctions in central neurones controlling sympathetic nervous outflow is discussed.

  11. Correspondence: risk factors of acute respiratory infection in under-fives in a rural hospital of Central India – Authors’ reply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Taksande

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor,We thank the authors for their interest and comments on our paper. They have raised some very valid points. This corrispondence refers to the following article:Taksande AM, Yeole M. Risk factors of Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI in under-fives in a rural hospital of Central India. J Pediatr Neonat Individual Med. 2016;5(1:e050105. doi: 10.7363/050105 br />Comments can be found in the following article:Mandal A, Sahi PK. Correspondence: risk factors of acute respiratory infection in under-fives in a rural hospital of Central India. J Pediatr Neonat Individual Med. 2016;5(2:e050207. doi: 10.7363/050207

  12. Effects of mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease on morbidity and mortality of gopher tortoises in northern and central Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berish, Joan E Diemer; Wendland, Lori D; Kiltie, Richard A; Garrison, Elina P; Gates, Cyndi A

    2010-07-01

    Gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) populations on four tracts of public lands in northern and central Florida were studied from 1998 to 2001 to assess the effects of mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease (URTD). Adult gopher tortoises (n=205) were marked for identification, serum and nasal flush samples were obtained for mycoplasmal diagnostic assays, and clinical signs of URTD (nasal discharge, ocular discharge, palpebral edema, and conjunctivitis) were evaluated. A subset of tortoises (n=68) was radio-instrumented to facilitate repeated sampling and document potential mortality. Presence of serum antibody to Mycoplasma agassizii was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and mollicutes species were detected in nasal flushes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Antibody prevalence varied among sites and years but was highest in 1998, exceeding 70% at two sites. Only 11 tortoises (5%) were positive by PCR, and three species (M. agassizii, M. testudineum, and a nonpathogenic Acholeplasma) were identified in nasal flush specimens. Nasal discharge, though rare (6% of tortoises), was significantly correlated with higher ELISA ratios, study site, and positive PCR status. Mortality events (n=11) occurred on two of the three M. agassizii-positive sites; no mortality was observed on the M. agassizii-negative control site. However, none of the tested variables (ELISA result, study site, year, sex, presence of clinical signs, or carapace length) showed significant ability to predict the odds of death. Mycoplasmal URTD is believed to be a chronic disease with high morbidity but low mortality, and follow-up studies are needed to detect long-term effects. PMID:20688675

  13. Central estrogenic pathways protect against the depressant action of acute nicotine on reflex tachycardia in female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously shown that acute exposure of male rats to nicotine preferentially attenuates baroreceptor-mediated control of reflex tachycardia in contrast to no effect on reflex bradycardia. Here, we investigated whether female rats are as sensitive as their male counterparts to the baroreflex depressant effect of nicotine and whether this interaction is modulated by estrogen. Baroreflex curves relating reflex chronotropic responses evoked by i.v. doses (1–16 μg/kg) of phenylephrine (PE) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were constructed in conscious freely moving proestrus, ovariectomized (OVX), and estrogen (50 μg/kg/day s.c., 5 days)-replaced OVX (OVXE2) rats. Slopes of the curves were taken as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRSPE and BRSSNP). Nicotine (100 μg/kg i.v.) reduced BRSSNP in OVX rats but not in proestrus or OVXE2 rats. The attenuation of reflex tachycardia by nicotine was also evident in diestrus rats, which exhibited plasma estrogen levels similar to those of OVX rats. BRSPE was not affected by nicotine in all rat preparations. Experiments were then extended to determine whether central estrogenic receptors modulate the nicotine–BRSSNP interaction. Intracisteral (i.c.) treatment of OVX rats with estrogen sulfate (0.2 μg/rat) abolished the BRSSNP attenuating effect of i.v. nicotine. This protective effect of estrogen disappeared when OVX rats were pretreated with i.c. ICI 182,780 (50 μg/rat, selective estrogen receptor antagonist). Together, these findings suggest that central neural pools of estrogen receptors underlie the protection offered by E2 against nicotine-induced baroreceptor dysfunction in female rats. -- Highlights: ► Estrogen protects against the depressant effect of nicotine on reflex tachycardia. ► The baroreflex response and estrogen status affect the nicotine–BRS interaction. ► The protection offered by estrogen is mediated via central estrogen receptors.

  14. Petroleum System of the Sufyan Depression at the Eastern Margin of a Huge Strike-slip Fault Zone in Central Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yamin; GU Qin

    2009-01-01

    The present paper mainly studies the petroleum system of the Sufyan Depression in the Muglad Basin of central Africa and analyzes its control of hydrocarbon accumulation. On the basis of comprehensive analysis of effective source rock, reservoir bed types and source-reservoir-seal assemblages, petroleum system theory has been used to classify the petroleum system of the Sufyan Depression. Vertically, the Sufyan Depression consists of two subsystems. One is an Abu Gabra subsystem as a serf generating, accumulating and sealing assemblage. The other subsystem is composed of an Abu Gabra source rock, Bentiu channel sandstone reservoir and Darfur group shale seal, which is a prolific assemblage in this area. Laterally, the Sufyan Depression is divided into eastern and western parts with separate hydrocarbon generation centers more than 10 000 m deep. The potential of the petroleum system is tremendous. Recently, there has been a great breakthrough in exploration. The Sufyan C-1 well drilled in the central structural belt obtained high-yielding oil flow exceeding 100 tons per day and controlled geologic reserves of tens of millions of tons. The total resource potential of the Sufyan Depression is considerable. The central structural belt is most favorable as an exploration and development prospect.

  15. Anxiety and depression during pregnancy in Central America: a cross-sectional study among pregnant women in the developing country Nicaragua

    OpenAIRE

    Verbeek, T.; Arjadi, R.; Vendrik, J. J.; Burger, H.; Berger, M.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Around the world, maternal psychopathology during pregnancy is associated with a range of negative consequences for mother and child. Nevertheless, in Central America the magnitude of this public health problem is still unknown. The objective of this first explorative study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of anxiety and depression during pregnancy in the Central American developing country Nicaragua, as well as the availability of mental health care and to compare w...

  16. Depression Plagues Many with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159436.html Depression Plagues Many With COPD Studies found 1 in ... pulmonary disorder (COPD) may raise the risk of depression among patients with the incurable respiratory illness, two ...

  17. Depression Plagues Many with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159436.html Depression Plagues Many With COPD Studies found 1 in ... pulmonary disorder (COPD) may raise the risk of depression among patients with the incurable respiratory illness, two ...

  18. Central estrogenic pathways protect against the depressant action of acute nicotine on reflex tachycardia in female rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M., E-mail: mahelm@hotmail.com; Fouda, Mohamed A.; El-gowilly, Sahar M.; Saad, Evan I.

    2012-02-01

    We have previously shown that acute exposure of male rats to nicotine preferentially attenuates baroreceptor-mediated control of reflex tachycardia in contrast to no effect on reflex bradycardia. Here, we investigated whether female rats are as sensitive as their male counterparts to the baroreflex depressant effect of nicotine and whether this interaction is modulated by estrogen. Baroreflex curves relating reflex chronotropic responses evoked by i.v. doses (1–16 μg/kg) of phenylephrine (PE) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were constructed in conscious freely moving proestrus, ovariectomized (OVX), and estrogen (50 μg/kg/day s.c., 5 days)-replaced OVX (OVXE{sub 2}) rats. Slopes of the curves were taken as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS{sub PE} and BRS{sub SNP}). Nicotine (100 μg/kg i.v.) reduced BRS{sub SNP} in OVX rats but not in proestrus or OVXE{sub 2} rats. The attenuation of reflex tachycardia by nicotine was also evident in diestrus rats, which exhibited plasma estrogen levels similar to those of OVX rats. BRS{sub PE} was not affected by nicotine in all rat preparations. Experiments were then extended to determine whether central estrogenic receptors modulate the nicotine–BRS{sub SNP} interaction. Intracisteral (i.c.) treatment of OVX rats with estrogen sulfate (0.2 μg/rat) abolished the BRS{sub SNP} attenuating effect of i.v. nicotine. This protective effect of estrogen disappeared when OVX rats were pretreated with i.c. ICI 182,780 (50 μg/rat, selective estrogen receptor antagonist). Together, these findings suggest that central neural pools of estrogen receptors underlie the protection offered by E{sub 2} against nicotine-induced baroreceptor dysfunction in female rats. -- Highlights: ► Estrogen protects against the depressant effect of nicotine on reflex tachycardia. ► The baroreflex response and estrogen status affect the nicotine–BRS interaction. ► The protection offered by estrogen is mediated via central estrogen receptors.

  19. Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. The Respiratory System The respiratory system is made up of organs ... and the muscles that enable breathing. The Respiratory System Figure A shows the location of the respiratory ...

  20. The ventilatory responses of conscious dogs to isocapnic oxygen tests. a method of exploring the central component of respiratory drive and its dependence on O2 and CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, A; Bouverot, P

    1980-02-01

    rather than a normoxic background is still observed at PACO2 above normal, thus cannot be due only to hypocapnia related to preceding hypoxic hyperventilation must be caused by a central respiratory inhibition directly or indirectly related to depressant effect of even moderate hypoxia. PMID:6769143

  1. Evaluation of the SHIFT-Depression® Inventory With a Sample of Australian Women, Demonstrating the Centrality of Gendered Role Expectations to Their Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Helen C. Vidler

    2013-01-01

    To address the double fold incidence and prevalence rates of depression in women compared to men needs more than symptom management. In primary health care where time does not normally allow for thorough assessments of what causes or maintains depression, using a brief questionnaire is warranted. A means must be found to address system level barriers to care and the poor quality of life so many women experience. Using an online survey and mixed method design, initial evaluation of a measure d...

  2. Evaluation of the SHIFT-Depression® Inventory With a Sample of Australian Women, Demonstrating the Centrality of Gendered Role Expectations to Their Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C. Vidler

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To address the double fold incidence and prevalence rates of depression in women compared to men needs more than symptom management. In primary health care where time does not normally allow for thorough assessments of what causes or maintains depression, using a brief questionnaire is warranted. A means must be found to address system level barriers to care and the poor quality of life so many women experience. Using an online survey and mixed method design, initial evaluation of a measure developed to identify individual and contextual issues connected to depression in women, examined underlying factor structure. 266 depressed women aged 18 to 85yrs also completed the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CESD and provided written commentary about any further issues. The SHIFT-Depression® Inventory analysis revealed five reliable underlying factors explaining 59% of the variance. The factors identified were; 'diminished self/feels powerless/focused on other's care'; 'financial problems, lacks access to healthcare, healthy food, housing, exercise’; 'relationship difficulties, loss/betrayal/abuse’; ‘women’s problems’ and 'lack of social support/feels isolated'. Analysis of participant’s comments found four groupings similar to the identified factors. This initial evaluation of the SHIFT-Depression® Inventory showed evidence of the multiple issues impacting on depressed women spanning the physical, intrapsychic, relational, social and contextual areas. The inventory provides preliminary assessment which can identify when more extensive questioning and referrals to various services may be appropriate. It could be used in primary health care settings when consultation times are brief, or as an adjunct to assessment in the mental health setting.

  3. Coma blisters after poisoning caused by central nervous system depressants: case report including histopathological findings Bolhas do coma pós-intoxicação por depressores do sistema nervoso central: relato de caso incluindo achados histopatológicos

    OpenAIRE

    Maira Migliari Branco; Eduardo Mello De Capitani; Maria Letícia Cintra; Stephen Hyslop; Adriana Camargo Carvalho; Fabio Bucaretchi

    2012-01-01

    Blister formation and eccrine sweat gland necrosis is a cutaneous manifestation associated with states of impaired consciousness, most frequently reported after overdoses of central nervous system depressants, particularly phenobarbital. The case of a 45-year-old woman who developed "coma blisters" at six distinct anatomic sites after confirmed (laboratory) phenobarbital poisoning, associated with other central nervous system depressants (clonazepam, promethazine, oxcarbazepine and quetiapine...

  4. A clinical tool for reducing central nervous system depression among neonates exposed to codeine through breast milk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E Kelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neonates are commonly exposed to maternal codeine through breast milk. Central Nervous System (CNS depression has been reported in up to 24% of nurslings following codeine exposure. In 2009, we developed guidelines to improve the safety of codeine use during breastfeeding based on previously established pharmacogenetic and clinical risk factors. The primary objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the effectiveness of these guidelines in ensuring neonatal safety. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Women taking codeine for pain following caesarean section were given safety guidelines, including advice to use the lowest codeine dose for no longer than four days and to switch to a non-opioid when possible. Mothers provided a saliva sample for analysis of genes involved in opioid disposition, metabolism and response. A total of 238 consenting women participated. Neonatal sedation was reported in 2.1% (5/238 of breastfeeding women taking codeine according to our safety guidelines. This rate was eight fold lower than that reported in previous prospective studies. Women reporting sedated infants were taking codeine for a significantly longer period of time (4.80±2.59 days vs. 2.52±1.58 days, p = 0.0018. While following the codeine safety guidelines, mothers were less likely to supplement with formula, reported lower rates of sedation in themselves and breastfed more frequently throughout the day when compared to previously reported rates. Genotyping analysis of cytochrome p450 2D6 (CYP2D6, uridine-diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT 2B7, p-glycoprotein (ABCB1, the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1 and catechol-o-demethyltransferase (COMT did not predict codeine response in breastfeeding mother/infant pairs when following the safety guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: The only cases of CNS depression occurred when the length of codeine use exceeded the guideline recommendations. Neonatal safety of codeine can be improved using evidence

  5. Insulin-like growth factor-I peptides act centrally to decrease depression-like behavior of mice treated intraperitoneally with lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Sook-Eun

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Centrally administered insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I has anti-depressant activity in several rodent models, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced depression. In this study we tested the ability of IGF-I and GPE (the N-terminal tri-peptide derived from IGF-I to alter depression-like behavior induced by intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of LPS in a preventive and curative manner. In the first case, IGF-I (1 μg or GPE (5 μg was administered i.c.v. to CD-1 mice followed 30 min later by 330 μg/kg body weight i.p. LPS. In the second case, 830 μg/kg body weight LPS was given 24 h prior to either IGF-I or GPE. When administered i.p., LPS induced full-blown sickness assessed as a loss of body weight, decrease in food intake and sickness behavior. None of these indices were affected by IGF-I or GPE. LPS also induced depression-like behavior; assessed as an increased duration of immobility in the tail suspension and forced swim tests. When administered before or after LPS, IGF-I and GPE abrogated the LPS response; attenuating induction of depression-like behaviors and blocking preexistent depression-like behaviors. Similar to previous work with IGF-I, GPE decreased brain expression of cytokines in response to LPS although unlike IGF-I, GPE did not induce the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. LPS induced expression of tryptophan dioxygenases, IDO1, IDO2 and TDO2, but expression of these enzymes was not altered by GPE. Thus, both IGF-I and GPE elicit specific improvement in depression-like behavior independent of sickness, an action that could be due to their anti-inflammatory properties.

  6. Major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... Doctors do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  7. Peripheral chemoreceptors determine the respiratory sensitivity of central chemoreceptors to CO2 : role of carotid body CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Curtis A; Blain, Grégory M; Henderson, Kathleen S; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2015-09-15

    We asked if the type of carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor stimulus influenced the ventilatory gain of the central chemoreceptors to CO2 . The effect of CB normoxic hypocapnia, normocapnia and hypercapnia (carotid body PCO2 ≈ 22, 41 and 68 mmHg, respectively) on the ventilatory CO2 sensitivity of central chemoreceptors was studied in seven awake dogs with vascularly-isolated and extracorporeally-perfused CBs. Chemosensitivity with one CB was similar to that in intact dogs. In four CB-denervated dogs, absence of hyper-/hypoventilatory responses to CB perfusion with PCO2 of 19-75 mmHg confirmed separation of the perfused CB circulation from the brain. The group mean central CO2 response slopes were increased 303% for minute ventilation (V̇I)(P ≤ 0.01) and 251% for mean inspiratory flow rate (VT /TI ) (P ≤ 0.05) when the CB was hypercapnic vs. hypocapnic; central CO2 response slopes for tidal volume (VT ), breathing frequency (fb ) and rate of rise of the diaphragm EMG increased in 6 of 7 animals but the group mean changes did not reach statistical significance. Group mean central CO2 response slopes were also increased 237% for V̇I(P ≤ 0.01) and 249% for VT /TI (P ≤ 0.05) when the CB was normocapnic vs. hypocapnic, but no significant differences in any of the central ventilatory response indices were found between CB normocapnia and hypercapnia. These hyperadditive effects of CB hyper-/hypocapnia agree with previous findings using CB hyper-/hypoxia.We propose that hyperaddition is the dominant form of chemoreceptor interaction in quiet wakefulness when the chemosensory control system is intact, response gains physiological, and carotid body chemoreceptors are driven by a wide range of O2 and/or CO2 . PMID:26171601

  8. Radiotherapy for breast carcinoma: an evaluation of the relationship between the central lung depth and respiratory symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Treatment for early breast cancer is multimodal with radiotherapy playing a fundamental role. This study investigated the relationship between the depth of lung incorporated in the tangential chest wall fields and self-reported respiratory symptoms. Method: A randomised trial was conducted with 350 patients from one radiotherapy centre, randomised to one of two lung depth categories (0-2 cm or 0-2.5 cm). The primary outcome measure was the self-reported incidence of dry unproductive cough (DUC) post-treatment. Results: On an intention to treat basis no difference in post-treatment symptoms for DUC could be identified between the two lung depth categories. A logistic regression analysis identified patient age, the use of nodal irradiation, and symptoms of DUC pre-treatment as significant in determining the risk of patients developing symptoms post-treatment. Conclusion: These results confirm the importance of considering total volume of lung incorporated in the radiotherapy portals (identified by the relationship between reported symptoms and the use of nodal irradiation). The results of this study serve to further emphasise the need for evidence-based study into the radiotherapy policies employed in the UK

  9. The effects of a single intravenous injection of novel activin A/BMP-2 (AB204) on toxicity and the respiratory and central nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Byung-Hak; Lee, Jae Hyup; Na, Kyuheum; Ahn, Chihoon; Cho, Jongho; Ahn, Hyun Chan; Choi, Jungyoun; Oh, Hyosun; Kim, Byong Moon; Choe, Senyon

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a single intravenous injection of a novel osteoinductive material, activin A/BMP-2 (AB204), to rodents on toxicity and their respiratory functions and central nervous system (CNS). A single intravenous injection of AB204 was given to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in doses of 0, 0.625, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg to observe the mortality rate, the general symptoms for 14 days. The experimental groups were also given 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg of AB204, respectively, and the respiration rate, the tidal volume and the minute volume were measured for 240 min. The experimental groups of imprinting control region (ICR) mice were given a single intravenous injection of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg of AB204, respectively. Their body temperature was taken and general behaviors were observed to evaluate the effect of AB204 on the CNS for 240 min. The study on toxicity of a single intravenous injection found no death or abnormal symptoms, abnormal findings from autopsy, or abnormal body weight gain or loss in all the experimental groups. No abnormal variation associated with the test substance was observed in the respiration rate, the tidal volume, the minute volume, body temperature or the general behaviors. On the basis of these results, the approximate lethal dose of AB204 for a single intravenous injection exceeds 10 mg/kg for SD rats and a single intravenous injection of ≤0.8 mg/kg AB204 has no effect on their respiratory system for SD rat and no effect on their CNS for ICR mice. PMID:26446865

  10. Depression Socialization Within Friendship Groups at the Transition to Adolescence: The Roles of Gender and Group Centrality as Moderators of Peer Influence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conway, C.C.; Rancourt, D.; Adelman, C.B.; Burk, W.J.; Prinstein, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Tests of interpersonal theories of depression have established that elevated depression levels among peers portend increases in individuals' own depressive symptoms, a phenomenon known as depression socialization. Susceptibility to this socialization effect may be enhanced during the transition to a

  11. Respiratory System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    8.1 Respiratory failure2007204 Comparison of the effects of BiPAP ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers and low tidal volume A/C ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. WANG Xiaozhi(王晓芝),et al. Dept Respir & Intensive Care Unit, Binzhou Med Coll, Binzhou 256603. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2007;30(1):44-47. Objective To compare the effects of BiPAP ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers(LRM) with low tidal volume A/C ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods A prospective, randomized comparison of BiPAP mechanical ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers(test group) with low tidal volume A/C ventilation (control group) was conducted in 28 patients with ARDS. FiO2/PaO2 ratio, respiratory system compliance(Cs), central venous pressure (CVP), duration of ventilation support were recorded at 0 h, 48 h and 72 h separately. The ventilation associated lung injury and mortality at 28 d were also recorded. Results The FiO2/PaO2 ratio were (298±16) and (309±16) cm H2O, Cs were (38.4±2.2) and (42.0±1.3) ml/cm H2O, CVP were (13.8±0.8) and (11.6±0.7) cm H2O in the test group at 48 h and 72 h separately. In the control group, FiO2/PaO2 ratio were (212±12) and (246±17) cm H2O, Cs were (29.5±1.3) and (29.0±1.0) ml/cm H2O, CVP were 18.6±1.1 and (16.8±1.0) cm H2O. The results were better in the test group as compared with the control group (t=10.03-29. 68, all P<0.01). The duration of ventilation support in the test group was shorter than the control group [(14±3) d vs (19±3)d, t=4.80, P<0.01]. The mortality in 28 d and ventilation associated lung injury were similar in the two groups. Conclusion The results show that combination of LRM with BiPAP mode ventilation, as compared with the control group, contributes to the improved FiO2/PaO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, stable homodynamic and shorter duration of ventilation support in patients with ARDs.

  12. Tamanho e Número Ideal de Amostras para Coleta de Gafanhotos na Região Depressão Central do Rio Grande do Sul

    OpenAIRE

    Nathália Carvalho; Ervandil Costa; Danilo Souza; Juliana Garlet

    2013-01-01

    Objetivando observar a viabilidade de um novo método para amostragem de acridóideos (conhecidos vulgarmente por gafanhotos), bem como a distancia percorrida e número ideal de amostras para amostragem foi proposto o estudo. Os levantamentos foram conduzidos em duas áreas de campo nativo no município de São Sepé, localizado na região Depressão Central no RS. As coletas foram realizadas durante o verão de 2009 com o auxilio de uma rede de coleta adaptada. As distâncias avaliadas foram de 5, 10, ...

  13. Records of human occupation from Pleistocene river terrace and aeolian sediments in the Arneiro depression (Lower Tejo River, central eastern Portugal)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunha, Pedro P.; Almeida, Nelson A.C.; Aubry, Thierry;

    2012-01-01

    In the uppermost reach of the Lower Tejo River (eastern central Portugal), where the river crosses two quartzite ridges that separate the Ródão (upstream) and Arneiro (downstream) depressions, Palaeolithic artefacts have been recovered from three lower river terrace levels and a cover unit of...... aeolian sediment transport. In the Lower Tejo River, the integration of absolute age datasets with archaeological, geomorphological and sedimentary data indicate that in westernmost Iberia the first appearance of artefacts in river terrace sediments suggests that the earliest marker for human occupation...

  14. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  15. Postpartum depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression - postpartum; Postnatal depression; Postpartum psychological reactions ... term complications are the same as in major depression . Untreated postpartum depression may put you at risk of harming ...

  16. Alcohol and drug consumption, depressive features, and family violence as associated with complaints to the Prosecutor's Office in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillermina Natera; García, Francisco Juárez; Icaza, María Elena Medina-Mora; Sainz, Marcela Tiburcio

    2007-01-01

    The article is aimed at reporting the characteristics of the population detected at State Prosecutors' Offices including the two such offices that existed in the city selected for the study, one located in a general hospital for the inspection of violence-related cases (n = 156); and the second in the facility where all detainees are taken when arrested (n = 129), and where victims can file a complaint (n = 186). A household survey undertaken among the population 18 to 65 years of age (n = 887) was used as a group of reference. Both studies were undertaken in Pachuca City, the capital of Hidalgo, located 100 km from Mexico City during the second half of 1996. Face-to-face questionnaires were used to obtain sociodemographic data, drug use and drinking patterns, depressive symptomatology, and family violence. Discriminant and logistic regression analysis were undertaken. The age group from 18 to 24 displayed the highest number of legal complaints and arrests (OR = 1.773). The likelihood for appearing at a State Prosecutor's Office was higher for those living in an atmosphere of threats and injuries within the family (OR = 19) and for those that reported alcohol consumption on the day of the event (OR = 14). Extremely high rates of family violence were obtained in this sample, increasing the likelihood of arriving at the Prosecutor's Office either because arrested or for being a victim. Results confirm the relationship between alcohol use, depression, and violence, reinforcing the need to prevent alcohol abuse, especially among youth. PMID:17918021

  17. Late Holocene evolution of playa lakes in the central Ebro depression based on geophysical surveys and morpho-stratigraphic analysis of lacustrine terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, F.; Valero-Garcés, B.; Desir, G.; González-Sampériz, P.; Gutiérrez, M.; Linares, R.; Zarroca, M.; Moreno, A.; Guerrero, J.; Roqué, C.; Arnold, L. J.; Demuro, M.

    2013-08-01

    The origin and morpho-stratigraphic evolution of the largest playa-lake system (La Playa-El Pueyo) in the Bujaraloz-Sástago endorheic area, located in the semiarid central sector of the Ebro Depression, are analysed. The enclosed depressions are developed on gypsiferous Tertiary bedrock and show a prevalent WNW-ESE orientation parallel to the direction of the prevalent strong local wind (Cierzo). Yardangs have been carved in bedrock and unconsolidated terrace deposits in the leeward sector of the largest lake basins. A sequence of three lacustrine terrace levels has been identified by detailed geomorphological mapping. The treads of the upper, middle and lower terrace levels are situated at + 9 m, + 6 m and + 0.5 m above the playa-lake floors, respectively. Seismic refraction and electrical resistivity profiles acquired in La Playa reveal a thin basin fill (~ 2 m) with a planar base. These data allow ruling out the genetic hypothesis for the depressions involving the collapse of large bedrock cavities and support a mixed genesis of combined widespread dissolution and subsidence by groundwater discharge and eolian deflation during dry periods. The 5 m thick deposit of the middle terrace was investigated in hand-dug and backhoe trenches. Six AMS radiocarbon ages from this terrace indicate an aggradation phase between 3.9 ka and ca. 2 ka. These numerical ages yield a maximum average aggradation rate of 2.6 mm/yr and a minimum excavation rate by wind deflation of 3 mm/yr subsequent to the accumulation of the middle terrace. The latter figure compares well with those calculated in several arid regions of the world using yardangs carved in palaeolake deposits. The aggradation phase between 4 and 2 ka is coherent with other Iberian and Mediterranean records showing relatively more humid conditions after 4 ka, including the Iron Ages and the Iberian-Roman Period.

  18. Respiratory Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Özyılmaz, Ezgi

    2014-01-01

    The main function of the lungs is to maintain the exchange between the pulmonary capillary and the air in the alveoli. By this way, the arteriel oxygen and carbondioxide tension remains constant. Respiratory failure is a syndrome which is defined as the loss of the ability of respiratory system to exchange oxygen and carbondioxide elimination function. The main pathophysiological causes of respiratory failure include ventilation-perfusion mismatch, alveolar hypoventilation, impaired diffusion...

  19. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic studies of the Upper Paleozoic ignimbrites from Tokrau depression (Central Kazakhstan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allowing for errors , Rb-Sr isochronous age of the Akron's massif ignimbrites (303±5 million years) and that of Korgants massif ones supper imposing them (299±5 million years) should be dated by 310±3 million years. The initial ratios (87Sr/86Sr), constitute 0.7046-0.7048 in the rocks of both massifs. And is positive and makes up 0.94-2.92. The crust's age, i. e. the source of ignimbrites forming molten runs up to 0.8-1.0 billion years by Nd-model dating. Within boundary of Middle Late Carboniferous there was no Pre-Raphanin granite continental crust below the Tokrau depression. (author)

  20. Depression - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  1. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  2. Depositional Characteristics of Lake-Floor Fan of Cretaceous Lower Yaojia Formation in Western Part of Central Depression Region,Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Renchen; Li Guifan; Feng Zhiqiang; Liang Jiangping; Lin Changsong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the integrated subsurface data,including those of over 600 m drilled cores,more than 30 drilled wells and 600 km2 three-dimensional (3D) seismic-reflection data of the study area, the characteristics of the lake-floor fan of lower Yaojia(姚家) Formation have been clarified.An evident lacustrine slope break and a steep slope belt developed in the west of Songliao(松辽)basin during depositional period of Qingshankou(青山口)-Yaojia formations(K2).The slope gradient was about 15 m/km.During the depositional period of lower Yaojia Formation,the lake shrank and the shore line of the western Songliao basin shifted to the lacustrine slope-break.The wedge-shaped sediment body,which is interpreted as the lowstand system tract of SQy1 (LSTy1),developed in the area below the slope-break.The LSTyl is pinched out in the west of the study area.As to the thickness of LSTyl,ft is thicker in the east with SO m in its thickness than in the west The LSTyl,rich in sandstone,can be divided into lower part LSTylL and upper part LSTy1u based on two onlap seismic reflection phases,and core and logging data clearly.The various sediments' gravity flow deposits developed and the complex of lake-floor fan formed in the LSTyl under the slope-break in the western part of the central depression region.The lake-floor fan consists of various sediments' gravity flow deposits,including: (1) turbidity deposits with characteristics of Bouma sequences; (2) sand-bearing muddy debrite dominated by mud and mixed by sand; (3) mud-bearing sandy debrites characterized by dominated sand and mixed by mud; (4) sandy debris laminar flow deposits with massive or inclined bedding,and (5) sandy slump deposits developed as deforma tional sedimentary structure.During the lower lake-level period (LSTy1L),the western clinoform region was erosion or sediment pass-by area; the terrigenous clastic was directly transported to deep-water area,converted to channelized sandy debris flow,and combined with slump

  3. How Childhood Maltreatment Is Related to Suicidality, Bipolarity and Central Serotonergic Activity in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Cross-Sectional Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to determine whether childhood maltreatment contributes to the occurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) with bipolarity, and whether there is a relationship between central serotonergic activity, as assessed using loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP), and childhood maltreatment. Methods Thirty-five MDD patients were stratified according to the presence or absence of childhood trauma into two subgroups, childhood trauma (CT) and no childhood trauma (NCT), using the Korean version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (K-CTQ). The CT group was subjected to further analysis. Several psychometric ratings were also applied. In addition, auditory processing for the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP), which was used as a marker of serotonergic activity, was measured before beginning medication. Results There was a significant difference in total Korean Bipolar Spectrum Disorder Scale score between the CT and NCT groups (t=-2.14, p=0.04). The total K-CTQ score was positively correlated with the total Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation (BSS) score (r=0.36, p=0.036). In particular, emotional abuse was positively correlated with the total Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (r=0.38, p=0.026), BSS (r=0.38, p=0.025), and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) (r=0.36, p=0.035) scores. There was also a positive correlation between LDAEP and total Hypomania Personality Scale (r=0.49, p=0.02) and HAMD (r=0.58, p=0.004) scores within CT group. Conclusion The findings of this study support that there is a relationship between childhood maltreatment and bipolarity in patients with MDD. PMID:27081379

  4. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zammit

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.Keywords: obesity, lung function, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anesthesia

  5. The Effect of Test Dose Fentanyl on Predicting Postoperative Respiratory Depression in Patients with Continuous Intravenous Morphine Analgesia%试验剂量芬太尼在预测术后持续吗啡静脉镇痛患者发生呼吸抑制的可能性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁正年; 王忠云; 惠宁宁

    2003-01-01

    目的:评估试验剂量芬太尼所致低氧血症在预测术后吗啡静脉镇痛患者镇痛效果及发生呼吸抑制可能性中的作用.方法:在35例准备术后使用吗啡持续静脉镇痛(12 μg@kg-1@h-1)的患者术前静脉注射2μg/kg的芬太尼.结果:在吸空气状态下芬太尼注入后,有19人血氧饱和度(SpO2)降至95%以下,16人SpO2仍维持在95%或以上.在SpO2降至95%以下的19例患者,术后使用吗啡持续静脉镇痛时,有8人在术后24或40 h清醒状态下发生呼吸抑制(SpO2<95%),而在使用芬太尼后SpO2大于或等于95%的患者中,无一人发生呼吸抑制(P<0.01).术前使用芬太尼后最低的SpO2与术后24和40h的最低SpO2显著相关(P<0.01),但与术后8、16、24和40 h时的镇痛效果无关(P>0.05).结论:术前静脉注射芬太尼易致脱氧的患者,术后使用吗啡持续静脉镇痛时易于发生呼吸抑制,但其镇痛效果不一定好.%Objective: To evaluate the effect of test dose fentanyl on predicting postoperative analgesia and respiratory depression. Methods: Preoperatively the lowest pulse oximeter saturation ( SpO2 ) under room air breathing was measured after 2μg/kg of fentanyl given intravenously in 35 patients who were scheduled with continuous intravenous morphine analgesia(12μg@kg-1@h-1) postoperatively. Results: The test dose fentanyl resulted in respiratory depression in 19 of 35 cases, while 8 (42.1%) of the 19 cases developed respiratory depression postoperatively. However in the rest 16 patients, no patient (0) developed respiratory depression(P<0.01 ). The fentanyl-induced lowest SpO2 significantly correlated with the lowest SpO2 postoperatively (P<0.01). The analgesia effect in terms of verbal analogue scale was correlated neither with the fentanyl-induced lowest SpO2 nor with the lowest SpO2 postoperatively ( P>0.05). Conclusion: The patient who was sensitive to fentanyl-induced respiratory depression would take a high risk to develop

  6. Panigarh cave stalagmite evidence of climate change in the Indian Central Himalaya since AD 1256: Monsoon breaks and winter southern jet depressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fuyuan; Brook, George A.; Kotlia, Bahadur S.; Railsback, L. Bruce; Hardt, Benjamin; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Kandasamy, Selvaraj

    2015-09-01

    Variations in petrography, stable isotopes, reflectance, and luminescence along the central growth axis of a 14.5 cm stalagmite from Panigarh cave indicate cooler and slightly wetter conditions in the Himalayan foothills of northern India during the Little Ice Age (LIA), which lasted from ˜AD 1489-1889 based on deposition of calcite, and AD 1450-1820 based on rapid changes in δ18O values. Conditions were warmer and drier during the preceding Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and also in the post-LIA periods, as evidenced by deposition of aragonite. A review of currently existing stalagmite and other proxy data from south and east Asia reveals a broad spatial pattern in precipitation over south and east Asia during the LIA, with northern areas showing generally increased precipitation and southern areas reduced precipitation. During the MCA and after the LIA, the records suggest this pattern was reversed. Weaker ISM during the LIA brought drought conditions to the core ISM area but triggered more monsoon 'breaks' that brought higher precipitation to the Himalayas. At the same time, the weaker ISM may also have pushed more depressions along the path of the southern winter jet which brought more winter precipitation to the Himalayas and therefore a LIA wetter in our study area.

  7. Crescimento de canela-lageana, Ocotea pulchella Nees et Mart. ex Nees, na Depressão Central do estado do Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Scheeren Weber

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work had as objectives the study of the growth in DBH, commercial volume (CV, current annual increment in percentage of the commercial volume (CAI and the determination of the commercial form factor (f for Ocotea pulchella Nees et Mart. ex Nees, in the Central Depression of the Rio Grande do Sul State. The growth data were tested with three mathematical equations, for the adjustment of diameter and commercial volume without bark. The quadratic equation resulted as a more efficient model, for the CV and DBH estimate, adjusted in function of the age of the trees. The Backman equation was selected for the CAI and for the f estimate. The values were determined in function of the DBH to facilitate practical application. The commercial form factor varied from 0,40 for a DBH of 5 cm to a maximum value of 0,85 for a DBH from 22 to 32 cm, decreasing up to 0,78 at 51 cm of DBH, between the ages of 10 and 100 years. The average annual increment in percentage of the commercial volume varied from 17,48% for 10 years to 1,33% for 100 years of age. The species presented a good growth potential, that associated with management practices can increase its productivity.

  8. Effect of analgesics, antidepressants and their combinations on changes of structures' of the central nervous system activity in animals with simulated depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khomiak O.V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out on outbred rabbits of both sexes using neurophysiological methods. We resurched the ability of analgesics, antidepressants and their combinations tochange parameters of electrophysiological brain activity under conditions of normal functioning of the central nervous system and on the background ofsimulated depression. Found that in brain pathology combination analgesics with amitriptyline caused activation of the reticular formation (RF and in-creased excitability of dorsomedial tonsils (DMT in comparison with its action in intact rabbits. Analysis of these data on reserpine showed the change of the sign of excitability in the frontal cortex (FC, RF (from inhibition to activation, and re-duction in the dorsal hippocampus (DH, or leveling DMT increased excitability of brain structures under the influence of this combination. Functional relationships between structures were characterized by increasing activating influence of RFon the FC and inhibiting influence of RFon DMT (increasing analgesic activity and reduce brake control DH on FC (increase antidepressant properties. Notably, the combination of celecoxib with the amitriptyline caused fewer changes in excitability of brain structures and intracentral relationships between them that assotiates with less manifested analgesic activity com-pared with the combination of" meloxicam +amitriptyline."

  9. Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Ozyilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main function of the lungs is to maintain the exchange between the pulmonary capillary and the air in the alveoli. By this way, the arteriel oxygen and carbondioxide tension remains constant. Respiratory failure is a syndrome which is defined as the loss of the ability of respiratory system to exchange oxygen and carbondioxide elimination function. The main pathophysiological causes of respiratory failure include ventilation-perfusion mismatch, alveolar hypoventilation, impaired diffusion capacity and increased shunt. A number of diseases may result in respiratory failure by different pathophysiological reasons. The most common causes are Type 1 (hypoxemic and Type 2 (hypercapnic respiratory failure. When suspected with clinical signs and symptoms, the diagnosis should be confirmed with arterial blood gases. At this step, other diagnostic interventions, which could be performed, may be used to enlighten the underlying pathophysiological cause. Although the main therapeutic approach is similar, specific treatment are also required based on the underlying cause. The basic pathophysiological points, diagnosis and basic treatment approach have been evaluated in this review article. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 428-442

  10. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    9. 1 Upper respiratory tract disease and bronchial asthma2004223 Inhibitive effect on airway mucus overproduction of DNA vaccine based on xenogeneic homologous calcium-activated chloride channel in asthmatic mice. SONG Liqiang (宋立强), et al. Dept Respir Med, Xijing Hosp , 4th Milit Med Univ, Xi’an 710032. Natl Med J China 2004;84(4):329-333.

  11. A new paradigm for depression in new mothers: the central role of inflammation and how breastfeeding and anti-inflammatory treatments protect maternal mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall-Tackett Kathleen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research in the field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI has revealed that depression is associated with inflammation manifested by increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Discussion The old paradigm described inflammation as simply one of many risk factors for depression. The new paradigm is based on more recent research that has indicated that physical and psychological stressors increase inflammation. These recent studies constitute an important shift in the depression paradigm: inflammation is not simply a risk factor; it is the risk factor that underlies all the others. Moreover, inflammation explains why psychosocial, behavioral and physical risk factors increase the risk of depression. This is true for depression in general and for postpartum depression in particular. Puerperal women are especially vulnerable to these effects because their levels of proinflammatory cytokines significantly increase during the last trimester of pregnancy – a time when they are also at high risk for depression. Moreover, common experiences of new motherhood, such as sleep disturbance, postpartum pain, and past or current psychological trauma, act as stressors that cause proinflammatory cytokine levels to rise. Breastfeeding has a protective effect on maternal mental health because it attenuates stress and modulates the inflammatory response. However, breastfeeding difficulties, such as nipple pain, can increase the risk of depression and must be addressed promptly. Conclusion PNI research suggests two goals for the prevention and treatment of postpartum depression: reducing maternal stress and reducing inflammation. Breastfeeding and exercise reduce maternal stress and are protective of maternal mood. In addition, most current treatments for depression are anti-inflammatory. These include long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, cognitive therapy, St. John's wort, and conventional antidepressants.

  12. Depression (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... others. Family members also have a risk of depression. Anxiety and depression are also common in family members ... cancer . A small number of children may have: Depression . Anxiety . Trouble sleeping. Problems getting along with family or ...

  13. Caregiver Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not sell or share your name. Caregiver Depression Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | Print Many caregivers ... depression See your doctor Treatment Coping Symptoms of depression Caregiving is hard — and can lead to feelings ...

  14. Respiratory Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The University of Miami School of Medicine asked the Research Triangle Institute for assistance in improvising the negative pressure technique to relieve respiratory distress in infants. Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center engineers adapted this idea to the lower-body negative-pressure system seals used during the Skylab missions. Some 20,000 babies succumb to respiratory distress in the U.S. each year, a condition in which lungs progressively lose their ability to oxygenate blood. Both positive and negative pressure techniques have been used - the first to force air into lungs, the second to keep infant's lungs expanded. Negative pressure around chest helps the baby expand his lungs and maintain proper volume of air. If doctors can keep the infant alive for four days, the missing substance in the lungs will usually form in sufficient quantity to permit normal breathing. The Skylab chamber and its leakproof seals were adapted for medical use.

  15. The Dynamics and Characteristics of Aeolian Dust in Dryland Central Asia: Possible Impacts on Respiratory Health in the Aral Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggs, G. F.; O'Hara, S.; Wegerdt, J.; van der Meer, J.; Small, I.; Hubbard, R.

    2003-12-01

    Over the last 40 years over 36,000 km2 of the former Aral Sea bed have been exposed creating a potentially significant aeolian dust source. It is widely believed, but little researched, that increased dust storm activity in the region has had a major impact on human health. In this paper we report the findings of a study into the link between dust exposure and respiratory health amongst children in the Autonomous Republic of Karakalpakstan, located on the southern shore of the Aral Sea. Data were collected over a 12 month period at 16 sites located within a broad transect running north to south through Karakalpakstan. At each site monthly measurements of dust deposition were undertaken linked with daily meteorological data at 6 stations. At 3 sites weekly measurements of PM10 were also carried out. Approximately 100 children (aged 7-10 years) were randomly selected within 5 km of each dust trap site and data were collected on their respiratory health and environmental exposures. Lung function data were also collected using a handheld spirometer. A linear regression model was used to predict lung function for the children incorporating variables for Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1), age, gender, height and weight and we estimated the impact of dust deposition rates on the odds of having abnormal lung function using logistic regression. The findings indicate that dust deposition rates across the region are high with sites located near the former shore of the sea being the worst affected. For these northerly regions the former Aral Sea bed is the most likely source of dust. The situation for the rest of the country seems to be far more complex. In these regions it appears that local sources (agricultural fields, abandoned irrigation grounds, overgrazed dunes, and unpaved roads) and more distant sources to the south and south-west represent significant sediment providers, particularly in the early summer when agricultural fields are ploughed. We found some

  16. Etnografía de la infección respiratoria aguda en una zona rural del altiplano mexicano Ethnography of acute respiratory illnesses in a rural zone of the Mexican central highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOMERO MARTÍNEZ

    1997-05-01

    menor costo fueron razones frecuentemente aducidas para estas elecciones. Conclusiones. Esta información puede resultar útil para mejorar la comunicación con las madres.Objective. To identify the terms used by mothers to refer to diseases, signs and symptoms related to acute respiratory illnesses (ARI, alarming signs which should motivate them to seek medical attention, and to describe common home practices of disease care and treatment. Material and methods. An ethnographic study was performed in six rural communities of the Mexican central highlands. Interviews were collected from 12 key informers, six mothers of children who had died from ARI and 24 mothers of children younger than five years of age, with several ethnographic techniques to complement information ("triangulation". Results. The most commonly identified diseases were cold, sore throat, cough, bronchitis, pneumonia and "broncomonía". Key signs to establish diagnosis included nasal discharge, sore throat, cough, head and body ache, fever, "bubbling" chest, general malaise and shortness of breath. Tachypnea was referred to as "b breathing", "much breathing", "rapid breathing" or "sizzle"; intercostal depression as "the chest sinks", stridor as "chest moan or chest snore", sibilance as "chest snore" and cyanosis as "he turns purple". Home treatments include herbal teas, lemon, green or red tomato or potato applied to the throat externally, as well as creams applied to chest or back. Antibiotic prescription was not common, contrary to antipiretics. Most mothers recognized mild illnesses: severe illnesses were recognized less frequently. When faced with a severe ARI, mothers sought attention firstly at the project clinic, second in frequency with a private physician in the capital of the province and then at the Health Ministry of the district. The reasons to choose these possibilities were mainly proximity and lower costs. Conclusions. This information can be useful to improve communication with mothers.

  17. Health Instruction Packages: Respiratory Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavich, Margot; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to teach respiratory therapy students a variety of job-related skills. The first module, "Anatomy and Physiology of the Central Controls of Respiration" by Margot Lavich, describes the functions of the five centers of the brain that control respiration and identifies…

  18. Paediatric intensive care in Sweden. : I Mechanical ventilation and central haemodynamics. II Outcome of paediatric intensive care with special reference to respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Gullberg, Ninna

    2008-01-01

    The ABC of acute care is to maintain Airway, Breathing and Circulation or oxygen delivery, which depends on the product of cardiac output (CO) and oxygenation. Thus knowledge of how different modes of mechanical ventilation affect central haemodynamics is essential. Paper I: Improved triggering function made pressure support ventilation (PSV) possible for neonates and infants. We evaluated the effect on cardiac output of this mode in comparison with conventional pressure ...

  19. A new paradigm for depression in new mothers: the central role of inflammation and how breastfeeding and anti-inflammatory treatments protect maternal mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Kendall-Tackett Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Research in the field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) has revealed that depression is associated with inflammation manifested by increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Discussion The old paradigm described inflammation as simply one of many risk factors for depression. The new paradigm is based on more recent research that has indicated that physical and psychological stressors increase inflammation. These recent studies constitute an important shift in the depressi...

  20. Respiratory insufficiency correlated strongly with mortality of rodents infected with West Nile virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Morrey

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV disease can be fatal for high-risk patients. Since WNV or its antigens have been identified in multiple anatomical locations of the central nervous system of persons or rodent models, one cannot know where to investigate the actual mechanism of mortality without careful studies in animal models. In this study, depressed respiratory functions measured by plethysmography correlated strongly with mortality. This respiratory distress, as well as reduced oxygen saturation, occurred beginning as early as 4 days before mortality. Affected medullary respiratory control cells may have contributed to the animals' respiratory insufficiency, because WNV antigen staining was present in neurons located in the ventrolateral medulla. Starvation or dehydration would be irrelevant in people, but could cause death in rodents due to lethargy or loss of appetite. Animal experiments were performed to exclude this possibility. Plasma ketones were increased in moribund infected hamsters, but late-stage starvation markers were not apparent. Moreover, daily subcutaneous administration of 5% dextrose in physiological saline solution did not improve survival or other disease signs. Therefore, infected hamsters did not die from starvation or dehydration. No cerebral edema was apparent in WNV- or sham-infected hamsters as determined by comparing wet-to-total weight ratios of brains, or by evaluating blood-brain-barrier permeability using Evans blue dye penetration into brains. Limited vasculitis was present in the right atrium of the heart of infected hamsters, but abnormal electrocardiograms for several days leading up to mortality did not occur. Since respiratory insufficiency was strongly correlated with mortality more than any other pathological parameter, it is the likely cause of death in rodents. These animal data and a poor prognosis for persons with respiratory insufficiency support the hypothesis that neurological lesions affecting respiratory

  1. Maturação de frutos de seis cultivares de laranjas-doces na Depressão Central do Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARTORI IVAR ANTONIO

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivando a determinação do período de produção de laranjas no município de Eldorado do Sul, Depressão Central do Rio Grande do Sul, foram avaliados parâmetros de maturação de seis cultivares de laranjeiras-doces. O estudo foi realizado durante 6 anos, de 1992 a 1997, com as cultivares, Rubi, Hamlin, Tobias e Pêra-Rio, durante 4 anos com 'Valência' e 3 anos com 'Folha-Murcha', na coleção de citros da Estação Experimental Agronômica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS, situada em Eldorado do Sul-RS, à latitude 30degrees39'S e longitude 51degrees06'W, em solo Podzólico Vermelho Amarelo. Quinzenalmente, com início em abril e término em março, foram colhidas amostras de 20 frutos de 5 plantas de cada cultivar; a coleta de amostras começou no início da mudança de coloração da casca do fruto de verde para amarelo. Após a amostragem, os frutos foram acondicionados em sacos de polietileno e armazenados durante 1 a 5 dias a temperaturas entre 4 e 7masculineC, até serem analisados, para determinação dos teores percentuais da relação suco/bagaço, sólidos solúveis totais (SST, acidez total titulável (ATT e relação SST/ATT. A colheita pode ser iniciada na 2feminine quinzena de abril, com laranjas-'Hamlin' e prolongar-se até a 2feminine quinzena de fevereiro, com laranjas-'Folha-Murcha'. As laranjas-'Hamlin' podem ser colhidas desde a 2feminine quinzena de abril até a 1feminine quinzena de outubro; as laranjas-'Rubi' desde a 1feminine quinzena de maio até a 2feminine quinzena de setembro; as laranjas-'Tobias', desde a 1feminine quinzena de julho até a 1feminine quinzena de novembro; as laranjas-'Pêra-Rio' desde a 2feminine quinzena de agosto até a 1feminine quinzena de fevereiro; as laranjas-'Valência' desde a 2feminine quinzena de agosto até a 1feminine quinzena de janeiro e as laranjas-'Folha-Murcha' desde a 1feminine quinzena de setembro até a 2feminine quinzena de fevereiro.

  2. Understanding Depression

    OpenAIRE

    McNair, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    To understand the effects of depression on a patient's life, the physician must be aware how depression manifests itself. Somatic tension, strategies to relieve discomfort and social withdrawal must be recognized as symptoms of depression. An awareness of life situations which can give rise to these symptoms, as well as the effect of the physician's own reactions to the patient's depression, are helpful.

  3. Central administration of murine interferon-α induces depressive-like behavioral, brain cytokine and neurochemical alterations in mice: a mini-review and original experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayley, Shawn; Scharf, Jeff; Anisman, Hymie

    2013-07-01

    A role for pro-inflammatory cytokines and their neuroinflammatory signaling cascades in depressive pathology has increasingly gained acceptance. In this regard, several lines of evidence suggested that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) can provoke neurochemical and hormonal changes akin to those associated with psychological stressors, and that these cytokines also induce sickness behaviors that resemble some of the neurovegetative features of depression. Similarly, human depressed patients often display marked changes of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and immune cell activity. Perhaps more germane in the analysis of the cytokine-depression connection, reports of humans undergoing interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment for certain cancers or viral infections have indicated that the pro-inflammatory cytokine caused signs of major depression in a substantial subset of those treated. In the present investigation, we demonstrated that acute or repeated infusion of IFN-α into the lateral ventricles provoked depressive-like behavior and concomitant changes in serotonin (5-HT) and mRNA expression of particular 5-HT receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokines. These actions were less evident following administration directly into the prefrontal cortex and not apparent at all when administered to the dorsal raphe nucleus. The data are discussed in relation to the induction of depression elicited by IFN-α, and are presented in the context of a mini-review that highlights potential mechanisms through which the cytokine might act to promote psychomotor and affective disturbances and interact with stressors. PMID:22884959

  4. An Achondroplasic Case with Foramen Magnum Stenosis, Hydrocephaly, Cortical Atrophy, Respiratory Failure and Sympathetic Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Bulent Karapinar; Mehmet Tayip Arslan; Mustafa Ozcetin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Achondroplasia is a relatively frequent genetic disorder that may lead to limb weakness, motor-mental retardation, hydrocephaly, and respiratory disorders. In this pathology, foramen magnum stenosis and accompanying disorders like respiratory depression is well documented.Case Presentation: A 2.5 year-old child with the diagnosis of achondroplasia admitted to our clinic with severe respiratory depression, limb weakness, and motor mental retardation as well as sympathetic dysfuncti...

  5. Adaptabilidade e estabilidade de cultivares registradas de feijão em diferentes épocas de semeadura para a depressão central do Rio Grande do Sul

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro Nerinéia Dalfollo; Jost Evandro; Possebon Sandro Borba; Cargnelutti Filho Alberto

    2004-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar cultivares de feijão com adaptação geral ou específica ao cultivo em diferentes épocas de semeadura e com estabilidade de produção na região da depressão central do Rio Grande do Sul, principalmente, para fins de melhoramento. Os experimentos foram conduzidos no Campus da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, durante os anos agrícolas 2000/01, 2001/02 e 2002/03, nos cultivos de safra (ambientes favoráveis) e de safrinha (ambientes desfavoráveis). O del...

  6. Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Parents > Lungs and Respiratory System Print ... have taken at least 600 million breaths. Respiratory System Basics All of this breathing couldn't happen ...

  7. Respiratory Issues in OI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delivery, and other respiratory disorders may lead to respiratory failure and death particularly in people with OI Type ... have OI. It is a sobering fact that respiratory failure is the leading cause of death for people ...

  8. Atypical Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Ertekin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atypical depression is defined as a specifier of major depressive disorder. Columbia criteria for atypical depression are commonly used to make a diagnosis. Female sex, onset at early age, chronic course, and higher rate of comorbidity (especially anxiety disorder and bipolar disorder is noteworthy in atypical depression. Although, the atypical depression seems to support the familial genetic transition, there is not any specific study supporting these data. In the treatment of atypical depression, monoamine oxidase inhibitors are reported to be more effective than tricyclic antidepressants. In recent studies, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have also proven to be efficient.

  9. The panic disorder respiratory ratio: a dimensional approach to the respiratory subtype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Christophe Freire

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The respiratory ratio is a dimensional construct of the respiratory subtype of panic disorder (PD. The respiratory subtype has been correlated with an increased sensitivity to CO2 inhalation, positive family history of PD and low comorbidity with depression. The objective of our study was to determine whether the respiratory ratio is correlated with CO2-induced panic attacks and other clinical and demographic features. METHODS: We examined 91 patients with PD and submitted them to a double-breath 35% CO2 challenge test. The respiratory ratio was calculated based on the Diagnostic Symptom Questionnaire (DSQ scores recorded in a diary in the days preceding the CO2 challenge. The scores of the respiratory symptoms were summed and divided by the total DSQ score. RESULTS: The respiratory ratio was correlated with CO2 sensitivity, and there was a non-statistically significant trend towards a correlation with a family history of PD. CONCLUSIONS: The positive correlation between the respiratory ratio and the anxiety elicited by the CO2 inhalation indicates that the intensity of respiratory symptoms may be proportional to the sensitivity to carbon dioxide.

  10. Resíduos de agrotóxicos na água de rios da Depressão Central do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Residues of pesticides in the water of the Depression Central rivers in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enio Marchesan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A atividade orizícola é conduzida com uso intensivo de agrotóxicos, os quais, dependendo do manejo e das precipitações pluviais, podem chegar até os rios. O objetivo do trabalho foi determinar resíduos dos herbicidas clomazona, quincloraque, propanil, bentazona, 2,4-D e imazethapyr e dos inseticidas carbofurano e fipronil nos rios Vacacaí e Vacacaí-Mirim, situados na Depressão Central do Rio Grande do Sul, nas safras de 2003/04 a 2007/08, com coletas realizadas de novembro a fevereiro (cultivo do arroz. As análises dos herbicidas e do carbofurano foram realizadas por HPLC-DAD, e a análise do fipronil foi realizada por GC-ECD. Na safra 2003/04, em ambos os rios, os herbicidas clomazona, 2,4-D e propanil foram os mais frequentes nas amostras de água. Na safra 2004/05, o quincloraque foi detectado em maior número de amostras, já nas safras 2005/06 e 2006/07 fipronil foi o agrotóxico mais frequente nas amostras nos rios Vacacaí e Vacacaí-Mirim. Na safra de 2007/08, houve menor presença de resíduos de agrotóxicos nos rios Vacacaí e Vacacaí-Mirim. Há presença de agrotóxicos utilizados na lavoura de arroz nos rios Vacacaí e Vacacaí-Mirim durante o período de cultivo de arroz irrigado, destacando-se, entre os analisados, os herbicidas clomazona e quincloraque e o inseticida fipronil.The rice-growing activity is conducted out with intensive use of agrochemicals, which, depending on the management and rainfall can reach rivers. The study aimed to determine the residues of herbicides clomazone, quinclorac, propanil, bentazone, 2,4-D and imazethapyr and insecticides carbofuran and fipronil in the Vacacaí and Vacacaí-Mirim rivers, located in the Central Depression of Rio Grande do Sul, in the crop of 2003/04 untill 2007/08. Samples were collected from November to February (rice growing season. Analysis of herbicides and carbofuran were performed by HPLC-DAD and fipronil by GC-ECD. During 2003/04, in both rivers, the herbicide

  11. Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and do not need treatment. The symptoms of postpartum depression last longer and are more severe. You may ... get treatment right away, often in the hospital. Postpartum depression can begin anytime within the first year after ...

  12. Depression - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression may be described as feeling sad, blue, unhappy, miserable, or down in the dumps. Most of ... one time or another for short periods. Clinical depression is a mood disorder in which feelings of ...

  13. Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not need treatment. The symptoms of postpartum depression last longer and are more severe. You may ... treatment right away, often in the hospital. Postpartum depression can begin anytime within the first year after ...

  14. Perinatal depression

    OpenAIRE

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Alvarez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Perinatal depression is a common condition with significant adverse maternal, fetal, neonatal, and early childhood outcomes. The perinatal period is an opportune time to screen, diagnose, and treat depression. Improved recognition of perinatal depression, particularly among low-income women, can lead to improved perinatal health outcomes.

  15. Respiratory and locomotor stimulation by low doses of dermorphin - a Mu1-receptor mediated effect

    OpenAIRE

    Paakkari, P.; Paakkari, I.; Sirén, Anna-Leena; Feuerstein, G

    2012-01-01

    The selective opioid mu receptor agonist dermorphin increased the locomotor activity of rats dose dependently at 1 0 to 1 00 pmolfkg i.c.v. Respiratory rate, relative tidal volume and respiratory minute volume also increased unrelated to changes in locomotor activity. Higher doses, on the other hand, produced catalepsy and respiratory depression. Pretreatment of the rats with the mu,-selective antagonist naloxonazine (10 mgfkg i.v.) blocked the stimulant locomotor and respiratory effects of l...

  16. Bioactive Polyphenols from the Methanol Extract of Cnicus arvensis (L. Roth Demonstrated Antinociceptive and Central Nervous System Depressant Activities in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmudur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cnicus arvensis is used by many ethnic groups for inflammation, pain, and other ailments. In this study, reducing sugar, carbohydrate, alkaloid, steroid, tannin, flavonoid, and saponin groups were identified using standard chromogenic method. In high-performance liquid chromatography, vanillic acid and epicatechin were identified in the extract. Antinociceptive test by acetic acid induced writhing inhibition resulted 43.17 and 95.08% inhibition for 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight, comparing with standard diclofenac Na with 74.86% inhibition for 25 mg/kg body weight. In formalin induced paw licking test for antinociceptive activity, the extract inhibited 69.87 and 75.55% licking for 150 and 300 mg/kg body weight comparing with the inhibition (68.56% of diclofenac Na for 10 mg/kg body weight at first phase. At late phase, the extract showed 73.12 and 87.46% licking comparing with licking inhibition (71.69% by diclofenac Na at the same dose. In open field test for CNS depressant activity, the extract showed depression of locomotor activity for 150 and 300 mg/kg body weight comparing with diazepam for 10 mg/kg body weight. All results were statistically significant (P<0.01. The identified polyphenols are reputed for antinociceptive and CNS depressant activity. The present findings support the use of this plant in pain.

  17. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  18. Retrotrapezoid nucleus, respiratory chemosensitivity and breathing automaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyenet, Patrice G.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Fortuna, Michal G.; Abbott, Stephen B.; Depuy, Seth D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Breathing automaticity and CO2 regulation are inseparable neural processes. The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a group of glutamatergic neurons that express the transcription factor Phox2b, may be a crucial nodal point through which breathing automaticity is regulated to maintain CO2 constant. This review updates the analysis presented in prior publications. Additional evidence that RTN neurons have central respiratory chemoreceptor properties is presented but this is only one of many factors that determine their activity. The RTN is also regulated by powerful inputs from the carotid bodies and, at least in the adult, by many other synaptic inputs. We also analyze how RTN neurons may control the activity of the downstream central respiratory pattern generator. Specifically, we review the evidence which suggests that RTN neurons a) innervate the entire ventral respiratory column, and b) control both inspiration and expiration. Finally, we argue that the RTN neurons are the adult form of the parafacial respiratory group in neonate rats. PMID:19712903

  19. Real Stories of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Depression Publications About Men and Depression Getting Help Real Stories of Depression Bill Maruyama , Lawyer Jimmy Brown , ... in Men Signs & Symptoms Depression Treatment Getting Help Real Stories of Depression Publications About Men and Depression ...

  20. Degeneracy as a Substrate for Respiratory Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Mellen, Nicholas M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies in vivo and in vitro suggest that both respiratory rhythmogenesis and its central chemosensory modulation arise from multiple, mechanistically and/or anatomically distinct networks whose outputs are similar. These observations are consistent with degeneracy, defined as the ability of structurally distinct elements to generate similar function. This review argues that degeneracy is an essential feature of respiratory networks, ensuring the survival of the individual organism ove...

  1. Endothelin involvement in respiratory centre activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, M; Lafortuna, C L; Ciminaghi, B; Mazzola, S; Clement, M G

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the role of endothelin (ET) in respiratory homeostasis we studied the effects of the ET(A) and ET(B) receptor blocking agent bosentan on respiratory mechanics and control in seven anaesthetised spontaneously breathing pigs, for 180 min after single bolus administration (20 mg/kg i.v.). The results show that the block of ET receptors induced a significant increase in compliance and decrease in resistance of the respiratory system, entailing a significant reduction of diaphragmatic electromyographic activity, without affecting the centroid frequency of the power spectrum. Bosentan administration induced a significant increase in tidal volume (V(T)), accompanied by a significant decrease in respiratory frequency, without any significant change in pulmonary ventilation, CO(2) arterial blood gas pressure or pH. Since the relationship between V(T) and inspiratory time remained substantially constant after bosentan administration, the changes in respiratory pattern appear to be the result of an upward shift in inspiratory off-switch threshold. Both inspiratory and expiratory times during occluded breathing were increased by block of ET receptors, suggesting also a central respiratory neuromodulator effect of ET. In conclusion the present results suggest that the block of ET receptors in spontaneously breathing pigs exerts a role on mechanical properties of the respiratory system as well as on peripheral and central mechanisms of breathing control. PMID:11728166

  2. Capnography is superior to pulse oximetry for the detection of respiratory depression during colonoscopy La capnografía es superior a la pulsioximetría en la detección de depresión respiratoria durante las colonoscopias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cacho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: pulse oximetry is a widely accepted procedure for ventilatory monitoring during gastrointestinal endoscopy, but this method provides an indirect measurement of the respiratory function. In addition, detection of abnormal ventilatory activity can be delayed, especially if supplemental oxygen is provided. Capnography offers continuous real-time measurement of expiratory carbon dioxide. Objective: we aimed at prospectively examining the advantages of capnography over the standard pulse oximetry monitoring during sedated colonoscopies. Patients and methods:fifty patients undergoing colonoscopy were simultaneously monitored with pulse oximetry and capnography by using two different devices in each patient. Several sedation regimens were administered. Episodes of apnea or hypoventilation detected by capnography were compared with the occurrence of hypoxemia. Results: twenty-nine episodes of disordered respiration occurred in 16 patients (mean duration 54.4 seconds. Only 38% of apnea or hypoventilation episodes were detected by pulse oximetry. A mean delay of 38.6 seconds was observed in the events detected by pulse oximetry (two episodes of disturbed ventilation were simultaneously detected by capnography and pulse oximetry. Conclusions: apnea or hypoventilation commonly occurs during colonoscopy with sedation. Capnography is more reliable than pulse oximetry in early detection of respiratory depression in this setting.

  3. Human Parechovirus in Respiratory Specimens from Children in Kansas City, Missouri

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Justin; Bell, Jeremiah; Harrison, Christopher J.; Nix, W. Allan; Oberste, M. Steven; Selvarangan, Rangaraj

    2012-01-01

    We detected a 3% prevalence rate for human parechovirus (HPeV) in 720 respiratory specimens collected from 637 children seen in our hospital in 2009. Fifteen of 20 were HPeV-3 and two were HPeV-1. Only nonspecific, modest respiratory symptoms were evident in patients with detectable HPeV in respiratory specimens. Seven patients had concurrent respiratory and central nervous system (CNS) HPeV-3 infection, suggesting a possible respiratory route of acquisition.

  4. Coma blisters after poisoning caused by central nervous system depressants: case report including histopathological findings Bolhas do coma pós-intoxicação por depressores do sistema nervoso central: relato de caso incluindo achados histopatológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Migliari Branco

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Blister formation and eccrine sweat gland necrosis is a cutaneous manifestation associated with states of impaired consciousness, most frequently reported after overdoses of central nervous system depressants, particularly phenobarbital. The case of a 45-year-old woman who developed "coma blisters" at six distinct anatomic sites after confirmed (laboratory phenobarbital poisoning, associated with other central nervous system depressants (clonazepam, promethazine, oxcarbazepine and quetiapine, is presented. A biopsy from the left thumb blister taken on day 4 revealed focal necrosis of the epidermis and necrosis of sweat gland epithelial cells; direct immunofluorescence was strongly positive for IgG in superficial blood vessel walls but negative for IgM, IgA, C3 and C1q. The patient was discharged on day 21 with no sequelae.Formação de bolhas e necrose de glândula sudoríparas écrinas é uma manifestação cutânea associada com estados de diminuição da consciência, mais frequentemente relatada após superdosagens de depressores do sistema nervoso central, particularmente fenobabital. Relatamos o caso de uma paciente de 45 anos que desenvolveu "bolhas do coma" após tentativa de suicídio por fenobarbital (confirmada laboratorialmente, associada a outros depressores do sistema nervoso central (clonazepam, prometazina, oxcarbazepina e quetiapina. Biópsia da bolha do 1o quirodáctilo esquerdo no 4o dia de internação revelou necrose focal da epiderme e necrose de células epiteliais de glândula sudorípara; a imunofluorescência direta foi fortemente positiva para IgG na parede superficial dos vasos sanguíneos, mas negativa para IgM, IgA, C3 e C1q. A paciente teve alta no 21o dia, sem seqüelas.

  5. Myeshenia Gravis Presented with Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Dhangar, Snehal B Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of 41 year old female known case of depression since 10 years, developed dry cough, low grade fever, breathlessness and drowsiness since 4 days was admitted in ICU and initially diagnosed as type 2 respiratory failure due to pneumonia but on further investigating for altered sensorium patient was found to be NCV positive and was diagnosed as seronegative myasthenia gravis.

  6. Anxiety and depression during pregnancy in Central America : a cross-sectional study among pregnant women in the developing country Nicaragua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, T.; Arjadi, R.; Vendrik, J. J.; Burger, H.; Berger, M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Around the world, maternal psychopathology during pregnancy is associated with a range of negative consequences for mother and child. Nevertheless, in Central America the magnitude of this public health problem is still unknown. The objective of this first explorative study was to invest

  7. Central neurobiological mechanism of liver depression and spleen deficiency syndrome based on chronic stress: a review%从慢性应激探讨肝郁脾虚证的中枢神经生物学机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓红; 李晶晶; 刘玥芸; 陈家旭

    2012-01-01

    Some researchers focus on research of the nature of syndromes. The methods of combining traditional Chinese medicine syndrome and diseases and the correspondence between formulas and syndromes may be used in research of the nature of syndromes. According to combined theories of zang-organ state and seven emotions in traditional Chinese medicine with stress theory in modern medicine, the authors applied the methods of chronic immobilization stress to induce liver depression and spleen deficiency syndrome in rats based on the thinking of relativity on formula and syndrome. The research showed that the central neurobiology mechanism of liver depression and spleen deficiency syndrome closely correlates to the hypo-thalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, brain-gut axis, myriad central neurotrophic factors, neurotransmitters, neuropep-tides and hormones and their receptors, involving in many encephalic regions such as the hypothalamus, hippocampus, cortex, amygdale, etc. The authors will combine their previous work with multi-disciplinary research, such as genomics, proteomics, metabolomics and bioinformatics in future studies, to reveal the scientific connotations of liver depression and spleen deficiency syndrome.%证实质的研究一直是很多学者研究的重点方向,可利用中医病证结合、方证相关的研究思路来探寻证候的生物学基础.从现代应激理论入手,结合中医脏象理论和七情学说,运用中医方证相关的研究思路,通过慢性束缚应激的方法复制肝郁脾虚证大鼠模型,前期实验结果提示肝郁脾虚证的中枢神经生物学机制与下丘脑-垂体-肾上腺轴、脑肠轴以及中枢多种神经营养因子、神经递质、神经肽、激素及其受体密切相关,涉及下丘脑、海马、皮层、杏仁核等多个脑区.今后将结合基因组学、蛋白质组学、代谢组学,并与生物信息学等多学科结合,以期揭示肝郁脾虚证的科学内涵.

  8. Avian respiratory system disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  10. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Respiratory Failure? Diseases and conditions that impair breathing can cause ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the lungs, ...

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Respiratory Failure Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  12. Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Teens > Lungs and ... you didn't breathe, you couldn't live. Lungs & Respiratory System Basics Each day we breathe about ...

  13. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Respiratory Syncytial Virus KidsHealth > For Parents > Respiratory Syncytial Virus Print A A A Text Size What's in ... RSV When to Call the Doctor en español Virus respiratorio sincitial About RSV Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH- ...

  14. Post-hypoxic recovery of respiratory rhythm generation is gender dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo J Garcia

    Full Text Available The preBötzinger complex (preBötC is a critical neuronal network for the generation of breathing. Lesioning the preBötC abolishes respiration, while when isolated in vitro, the preBötC continues to generate respiratory rhythmic activity. Although several factors influence rhythmogenesis from this network, little is known about how gender may affect preBötC function. This study examines the influence of gender on respiratory activity and in vitro rhythmogenesis from the preBötC. Recordings of respiratory activity from neonatal mice (P10-13 show that sustained post-hypoxic depression occurs with greater frequency in males compared to females. Moreover, extracellular population recordings from the preBötC in neonatal brainstem slices (P10-13 reveal that the time to the first inspiratory burst following reoxygenation (TTFB is significantly delayed in male rhythmogenesis when compared to the female rhythms. Altering activity of ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP with either the agonist, diazoxide, or the antagonist, tolbutamide, eliminates differences in TTFB. By contrast, glucose supplementation improves post-hypoxic recovery of female but not male rhythmogenesis. We conclude that post-hypoxic recovery of respiration is gender dependent, which is, in part, centrally manifested at the level of the preBötC. Moreover, these findings provide potential insight into the basis of increased male vulnerability in a variety of conditions such as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS.

  15. The effect of Sopfrology childbirth method training, Kegel training and Lamaze respiratory training on depression and sexual life of perinatal pregnant woman%联想分娩、Lamaze呼吸与Kegel运动三联训练对围产期孕妇抑郁及性生活质量的干预作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田丽娟; 李春晓; 满冬梅

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of Sopfrology childbirth method training,Kegel training and Lamaze respiratory training (SLK training) on depression and sexual life of perinatal pregnant woman..Methods The women in 24 weeks of pregnancy who came to the clinic to receive the pregancy test were divided into study group(n=232) and control group(n=126) according whether they voluntered to participate the study.All the women in two group were subjected to regular prenatal care and the women in study group received SLK training additionally.The depression,pelvic floor muscle tension and female sexual function index were evaluated by Self Rating Depression Scale(SDS),the Pelvic Floor Muscle Examination Grading Standards and the Female Sexual Function Inventory (FSFI) respectively.Results 6 months after delivery,the incidence of depression,SDS score,pelvic floor muscle tension score and live index standard rate in study group and the control group respectivelywere(10.3% vs 18.3%),((43.6±5.1) vs(45.3±6.3)),((3.36±0.33) vs(2.46±0 89)),(81.5% vs 65.9%),and the differences were statistically significant(P<0.05).Conclusion SLK training program for perinatal women has the effects of preventing,treating prenatal depression and postpartum depression,improves pregnancy index and the quality of sexual life,worthy of further study.%目的 探讨联想分娩、Lamaze呼吸与Kegel运动三联训练(SLK训练)对围产期抑郁(Perinatal depression,PND)及产后性生活质量的作用.方法 妊娠24周前来本院产科门诊孕检的单胎初产妇,按照是否自愿参加SLK训练分为研究组(n=232)和对照组(n=126),2组孕妇均接受常规产前保健,研究组额外进行SLK训练.应用抑郁自评量表(SDS)、国际盆底肌检查分级标准、女性性功能指数(The female sexual function inventory,FSFI),评定抑郁、盆底综合肌张力及性功能指数(The female sexual function inventory,FSFI).结果 分娩后6个月,研究

  16. Real Stories of Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Men and Depression Getting Help Real Stories of Depression Bill Maruyama , Lawyer Jimmy Brown , Firefighter Melvin Martin , ... Sierra , Trauma and Recovery Specialist Share Men and Depression Depression in Men Signs & Symptoms Depression Treatment Getting ...

  17. Real Stories of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Men and Depression Getting Help Real Stories of Depression Bill Maruyama , Lawyer Jimmy Brown , Firefighter Melvin Martin , ... Sierra , Trauma and Recovery Specialist Share Men and Depression Depression in Men Signs & Symptoms Depression Treatment Getting ...

  18. Debt, social disadvantage and maternal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, R; Reynolds, S

    2001-08-01

    Depression is common among women with young children, and is strongly associated with financial adversity. Debt is a common feature of such adversity, yet its relationship with depression has not been examined before. We have used longitudinal data, collected over six months, on 271 families with young children, to examine this relationship. Multiple regression was used to identify independent predictors of the total Edinburgh Post-natal Depression Scale score from a range of socioeconomic, demographic, social support and child health related variables. Worry about debt was the strongest independent socioeconomic predictor of the depression score at both initial and follow-up occasions. To account for the possibility of reverse causation, i.e. depression causing worry about debt, alternative regression models are reported which show that owing money by itself predicts depression and earlier debt worries predicts depression six months later. We were unable to show that earlier debt worries independently predicted subsequent depression scores after the initial depression score had been taken into account in the analysis. Although debt has not been shown to be an independent prospective predictor of depression, our results suggest it has a central place in the association between socioeconomic hardship and maternal depression. Evidence from qualitative studies on poverty and from studies on the causes of depression support this hypothesis. The implications for policy are that strategies to enable families to control debt should be an explicit part of wider antipoverty measures which are designed to reduce depression and psychological distress among mothers of young children. PMID:11459395

  19. Postnatal depression.

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, Michael; Howard, Louise Michele

    1991-01-01

    The differentiation between postnatal depression and other types of depression is often unclear, but there are treatment issues in nursing mothers that do not apply in other situations. Overall, the prevalence of depression in postpartum women is the same as the prevalence in women generally, at about 12–13%.Suicide is a major cause of maternal mortality in resource-rich countries, but rates are lower in women postpartum than in women who have not had a baby.Most episodes resolve spontaneo...

  20. A DISCUSSION ON EVOLUTION MECHANISM OF THE CENTRAL FAULT BELT IN THE TERTIARY DONGYING DEPRESSION, EAST CHINA%东营第三系凹陷中央断裂带的演化机制探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Central Fault Belt is located in the Dongying depression of East China. The Tertiary clastic rocks over 7 000 m in thickness occur. The main exploration target is the Tertiary Shahejie Group.There are three major geomechanical controlling factors of the fault belt: (1) The origin of the crestal collapse grabens for a faulted depression controlled by a listrical Chennan fault, bounding the depression on the north. (2) Origin of extension by uplifting of the plastic materials, such as salt dome beneath the central belt. (3) The origin of the NNW-SSE tensile force associated with the regional dextral tensile shearing stress field. These origins are likely interdependent and are not isolated in time. The crestal collapse grabens were controlled not only by the regional structure and sedimentation, but also by the dextral tensile shearing forces. Meanwhile, it was associated with the upper bending of the Tertiary strata caused by the uplifting of the salt body. Therefore, the formation of the Central Fault Belt is a synthetic result by stacking all the geomechanical factors in time and space, including the crestal collapse grabens, the uplifting of the plastic body and the regional dextral tenso-shearing stress force.Seismic profiles across the Xianhezhuang oilfield, the western part of the Central Fault Belt, are interpreted. The kinematics characteristics of the fault system are studied from the structural restoration models based upon the seismic sections. Four evolution stages of the Central Fault Belt can be recognized and described. They are the primitive depression stage, early uplifting and faulting stage, middle fault-depression stage and late stable stage.Based on the analysis of the geology, sedimentation, structure pattern and evolution, the petroleum system of the fault belt is studied by discussing the combination of the source rocks, reservoirs and cap rocks, together with the types of the traps. The paper points out that the faulted closed highs

  1. Enhanced central serotonin release from slices of rat hypothalamus following repeated nialamide administration: evidence supporting the overactive serotonin receptor theory of depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers are suggesting unipolar affective disorders may be related to an abnormality in biogenic amine receptor-sensitivity. This abnormality may be a result of a dysfunction in central serotonin (5-HT) release mechanisms. 5-HT neurotransmission is modulated by presynaptic autoreceptors, which are members of the 5-HT1 receptor subtype. The autoreceptor is thought to play an important role in the homeostasis of the central 5-HT synapse and could be a site at which some antidepressants mediate their therapeutic effect. The number of 5-HT1 type receptor binding sites are reduced and behavior mediated by this receptor is abolished following repeated injections of monoamine oxidase inhibitor type antidepressants. These changes did not occur following a single injection. It was hypothesized that repeated treatment with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor would reduce the sensitivity of 5-HT autoreceptors and enhance 5-HT release. Rats were pretreated with single or repeated (twice daily for 7 days) intraperitoneal injections of nialamide (40 mg/kg) or chlorimipramine (10 mg/kg) and the ability of the autoreceptor agonist to inhibit potassium-induced 3H-5-HT release was evaluated using an in vitro superfusion system. These changes in 5-HT autoreceptor activity are consistent with other reports evaluating monoamine oxidase inhibitors on 5-HT1 type receptors. It is hypothesized that the changes in 5-HT neurotransmission are related to the antidepressant mechanism of monoamine oxidase inhibitors

  2. Self-reported pain severity, quality of life, disability, anxiety and depression in patients classified with 'nociceptive', 'peripheral neuropathic' and 'central sensitisation' pain. The discriminant validity of mechanisms-based classifications of low back (±leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-04-01

    Evidence of validity is required to support the use of mechanisms-based classifications of pain clinically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discriminant validity of \\'nociceptive\\' (NP), \\'peripheral neuropathic\\' (PNP) and \\'central sensitisation\\' (CSP) as mechanisms-based classifications of pain in patients with low back (±leg) pain by evaluating the extent to which patients classified in this way differ from one another according to health measures associated with various dimensions of pain. This study employed a cross-sectional, between-subjects design. Four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (±leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Clinicians classified each patient\\'s pain using a mechanisms-based classification approach. Patients completed a number of self-report measures associated with pain severity, health-related quality of life, functional disability, anxiety and depression. Discriminant validity was evaluated using a multivariate analysis of variance. There was a statistically significant difference between pain classifications on the combined self-report measures, (p = .001; Pillai\\'s Trace = .33; partial eta squared = .16). Patients classified with CSP (n = 106) reported significantly more severe pain, poorer general health-related quality of life, and greater levels of back pain-related disability, depression and anxiety compared to those classified with PNP (n = 102) and NP (n = 256). A similar pattern was found in patients with PNP compared to NP. Mechanisms-based pain classifications may reflect meaningful differences in attributes underlying the multidimensionality of pain. Further studies are required to evaluate the construct and criterion validity of mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain.

  3. Postpartum Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne

    Background: In three academic articles, this PhD thesis investigates maternal postpartum depression (PPD) as a risk factor for the infant-mother attachment and infant development. Previous studies have been contradictory with respect to the question of whether PPD can have long term effects on...... offspring. This may be due to not differing between when PPD is only occurring in the postpartum period and when effects are also due to ongoing or recurrent depression. However, it may also be due to viewing maternal depression as a unitary construct, and not considering underlying maternal psychological...... difficulties which may moderate potential adverse effects. The present thesis investigates two potential maternal moderators of risk:. Comorbid personality disorder and adult attachment insecurity. Moreover, the question of early environmental effects of PPD versus effects of later or ongoing depression is...

  4. Teen Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a real, treatable brain illness, or health problem. Depression can be caused by big transitions in life, stress, or changes in your body’s chemicals that affect your thoughts and moods. Even ...

  5. Major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... period of time. It also changes how your body works. ... prescription. It may help some people with mild depression. But it can change the way other medicines work in your body, including antidepressants. Talk to your provider before trying ...

  6. Postpartum Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne

    Background: In three academic articles, this PhD thesis investigates maternal postpartum depression (PPD) as a risk factor for the infant-mother attachment and infant development. Previous studies have been contradictory with respect to the question of whether PPD can have long term effects on...... offspring. This may be due to not differing between when PPD is only occurring in the postpartum period and when effects are also due to ongoing or recurrent depression. However, it may also be due to viewing maternal depression as a unitary construct, and not considering underlying maternal psychological...... months with the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, third edition. Additionally, at 13 months infant-mother attachment security was assessed using Strange Situation Procedure. Results: We found that even in a well-functioned sample, symptoms of depression in the postpartum period was...

  7. Achromobacter respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Colin E; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2015-02-01

    Achromobacteria are ubiquitous environmental organisms that may also become opportunistic pathogens in certain conditions, such as cystic fibrosis, hematologic and solid organ malignancies, renal failure, and certain immune deficiencies. Some members of this genus, such as xylosoxidans, cause primarily nosocomially acquired infections affecting multiple organ systems, including the respiratory tract, urinary tract, and, less commonly, the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Despite an increasing number of published case reports and literature reviews suggesting a global increase in achromobacterial disease, most clinicians remain uncertain of the organism's significance when clinically isolated. Moreover, effective treatment can be challenging due to the organism's inherent and acquired multidrug resistance patterns. We reviewed all published cases to date of non-cystic fibrosis achromobacterial lung infections to better understand the organism's pathogenic potential and drug susceptibilities. We found that the majority of these cases were community acquired, typically presenting as pneumonias (88%), and were most frequent in individuals with hematologic and solid organ malignancies. Our findings also suggest that achromobacterial lung infections are difficult to treat, but respond well to extended-spectrum penicillins and cephalosporins, such as ticarcillin, piperacillin, and cefoperazone. PMID:25706494

  8. Baseline body temperatures, heart rates, and respiratory rates of moose in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzmann, A W; Schwartz, C C; Johnson, D C

    1984-10-01

    Baseline body temperatures (BT), heart rates (HR) and respiratory rates (RR) were obtained from Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas Miller) at the Moose Research Center (MRC), Alaska. Excitability, seasons and drugs influenced the values to varying degrees. Excitability was the most influential factor. Safe expected ranges were: BT 38.4 to 38.9 C, HR 70 to 91 beats/min (b/min), and RR 13 to 40 respirations/min (r/min). These ranges incorporated all seasons, a central nervous system depressant drug and a paralyzing drug. Values which may be considered critical and an indication that corrective action should be taken include: BT 40.2 C, HR 102 b/min, and RR 40 r/min. It is recommended that persons trained in monitoring vital signs be on hand during moose capture and immobilization procedures. PMID:6530720

  9. Cumulative Effect of Depression on Dementia Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Olazarán, J.; Trincado, R.; Bermejo-Pareja, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To analyze a potential cumulative effect of life-time depression on dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD), with control of vascular factors (VFs). Methods. This study was a subanalysis of the Neurological Disorders in Central Spain (NEDICES) study. Past and present depression, VFs, dementia status, and dementia due to AD were documented at study inception. Dementia status was also documented after three years. Four groups were created according to baseline data: never depression (n...

  10. Regionalização das temperaturas mínimas do ar prejudiciais à fecundação das flores de arroz para a região climática da depressão central, RS Minimum air temperatures probabilities harmful to the fecundation of rice flowers in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Galileo Adeli Buriol; Valduíno Estefanel; Sílvio Steinmetz; Jacques Leandro Schvambach; Marino Antônio Didone

    2000-01-01

    Foram mapeadas as probabilidades de ocorrência de temperaturas mínimas do ar prejudiciais à fecundação das flores de arroz na Região Climática da Depressão Central do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Utilizaram-se os valores de probabilidade de ocorrência de temperaturas mínimas do ar iguais ou inferiores a 13, 15 e 17°C em um ou mais dias, cinco ou mais dias e dei ou mais dias para os meses de dezembro, janeiro, fevereiro e março. As isolinhas de probabilidade foram traçadas em um mapa ipsom...

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in an alpaca cria

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Katharine M.; Streeter, Robert N.; Genova, Suzanne G.

    2011-01-01

    A 7-hour-old alpaca was presented for lethargy and depression. The cria responded favorably to initial treatment but developed acute-onset dyspnea 48 hours later. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed by thoracic imaging and blood gas analysis. The cria was successfully treated with corticosteroids and discharged from the hospital.

  12. [Effect of phenibut on the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakanov, I A; Tarasova, N N; Belova, E A; Safonov, V A

    2006-01-01

    The role of the GABAergic system in mechanisms of the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin administration was studied in anaesthetized rats. Under normal conditions, the systemic administration of serotonin (20-60 mg/kg, i.v.) resulted in drastic changes of the respiratory pattern, whereby the initial phase of increased respiratory rate was followed by the respiratory arrest. The preliminary injection of phenibut (400 mg/kg, i.p.) abolished or sharply reduced the duration of the respiratory arrest phase induced by serotonin. Bilateral vagotomy following the phenibut injection potentiated the anti-apnoesic effect of phenibut, which was evidence of the additive action of vagotomy and phenibut administration. The mechanism of apnea caused by serotonin administration is suggested to include a central GABAergic element, which is activated by phenibut so as to counteract the respiratory arrest. PMID:16579056

  13. Selective antagonism of opioid-induced ventilatory depression by an ampakine molecule in humans without loss of opioid analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Felden, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Despite sensible guidelines for the use of opioid analgesics, respiratory depression remains a significant risk with a possibility of fatal outcomes. Clinicians need to find a balance of analgesia with manageable respiratory effects. The ampakine CX717 (Cortex Pharmaceuticals, Irvine, CA, USA), an allosteric enhancer of glutamate-stimulated AMPA receptor activation, has been shown to counteract opioid-induced respiratory depression in rats while preserving opioid-induced analgesia. Adopting a...

  14. Targeting astrocytes in major depression

    OpenAIRE

    Verkhratsky, Alexej; Peng, Liang; Gu, Li; Li, Baoman

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes represent a highly heterogeneous population of neural cells primarily responsible for the homeostasis of the central nervous system. Astrocytes express multiple receptors for neurotransmitters, including the serotonin 5-HT2B receptors and interact with neurones at the synapse. Astroglia contribute to neurological diseases through homeostatic response, neuroprotection and reactivity. In major depression, astrocytes show signs of degeneration and are decreased in numbe...

  15. The successful treatment of hypercapnic respiratory failure with oral modafinil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parnell H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helen Parnell,1 Ginny Quirke,1 Sally Farmer,1 Sumbo Adeyemo,2 Veronica Varney11Respiratory Department, 2Pharmacy Department, St Helier Hospital, Carshalton, Surrey, UKAbstract: Hypercapnic respiratory failure is common in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is usually treated by nasal ventilation. Not all patients requiring such ventilation can tolerate it, with anxiety and phobia influencing their reaction, along with treatment failure. We report the case histories of six patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure who were at risk of death due to refusal of nasal ventilation or its failure despite ongoing treatment. We report their improvement with oral modafinil 200 mg tablets used as a respiratory stimulant, which led to discharge, improved arterial blood gases, and offset further admissions with hypercapnic respiratory failure. This drug is licensed for narcolepsy and is said to stimulate the respiratory system via the central nervous system. Its use in respiratory failure is an unlicensed indication, and there are no case reports or studies of such use in the literature. Its respiratory stimulant effects appear better than those with protriptyline, which was a drug previously used until its production was discontinued. Our findings suggest that a study of modafinil in hypercapnic respiratory failure would be warranted, especially for patients with treatment failure or intolerance to nasal ventilation. This may offer a way of shortening hospital stay, improving outcome and quality of life, and reducing death and readmissions.Keywords: COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, nasal ventilation, acidosis, modafinil, hypercapnic respiratory failure

  16. Older Adults and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Older Adults and Depression Share Older Adults and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Download Mobi Order a ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone feels down or sad sometimes, but these ...

  17. Caregiving and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FCA - A A + A You are here Home Depression and Caregiving Order this publication Printer-friendly version ... a more serious depression over time. Symptoms of Depression People experience depression in different ways. Some may ...

  18. Postpartum Depression Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for herself or her family. What is postpartum depression? Postpartum depression is a mood disorder that can affect ... for themselves or for others. What causes postpartum depression? Postpartum depression does not have a single cause, but ...

  19. Respiratory effects of kynurenic acid microinjected into the ventromedullary surface of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.P. Tolentino-Silva

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies demonstrate that, within the ventral medullary surface (VMS, excitatory amino acids are necessary components of the neural circuits involved in the tonic and reflex control of respiration and circulation. In the present study we investigated the cardiorespiratory effects of unilateral microinjections of the broad spectrum glutamate antagonist kynurenic acid (2 nmol/200 nl along the VMS of urethane-anesthetized rats. Within the VMS only one region was responsive to this drug. This area includes most of the intermediate respiratory area, partially overlapping the rostral ventrolateral medulla (IA/RVL. When microinjected into the IA/RVL, kynurenic acid produced a respiratory depression, without changes in mean arterial pressure or heart rate. The respiratory depression observed was characterized by a decrease in ventilation, tidal volume and mean inspiratory flow and an increase in respiratory frequency. Therefore, the observed respiratory depression was entirely due to a reduction in the inspiratory drive. Microinjections of vehicle (200 nl of saline into this area produced no significant changes in breathing pattern, blood pressure or heart rate. Respiratory depression in response to the blockade of glutamatergic receptors inside the rostral VMS suggests that neurons at this site have an endogenous glutamatergic input controlling the respiratory cycle duration and the inspiratory drive transmission.

  20. Neuroplasticity Underlying the Comorbidity of Pain and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Doan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pain induces depressed mood, and chronic pain is known to cause depression. Depression, meanwhile, can also adversely affect pain behaviors ranging from symptomology to treatment response. Pain and depression independently induce long-term plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS. Comorbid conditions, however, have distinct patterns of neural activation. We performed a review of the changes in neural circuitry and molecular signaling pathways that may underlie this complex relationship between pain and depression. We also discussed some of the current and future therapies that are based on this understanding of the CNS plasticity that occurs with pain and depression.

  1. Newborn Respiratory Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, Christian L; Mahajan, Anand

    2015-12-01

    Newborn respiratory distress presents a diagnostic and management challenge. Newborns with respiratory distress commonly exhibit tachypnea with a respiratory rate of more than 60 respirations per minute. They may present with grunting, retractions, nasal flaring, and cyanosis. Common causes include transient tachypnea of the newborn, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia, sepsis, pneumothorax, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and delayed transition. Congenital heart defects, airway malformations, and inborn errors of metabolism are less common etiologies. Clinicians should be familiar with updated neonatal resuscitation guidelines. Initial evaluation includes a detailed history and physical examination. The clinician should monitor vital signs and measure oxygen saturation with pulse oximetry, and blood gas measurement may be considered. Chest radiography is helpful in the diagnosis. Blood cultures, serial complete blood counts, and C-reactive protein measurement are useful for the evaluation of sepsis. Most neonates with respiratory distress can be treated with respiratory support and noninvasive methods. Oxygen can be provided via bag/mask, nasal cannula, oxygen hood, and nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Ventilator support may be used in more severe cases. Surfactant is increasingly used for respiratory distress syndrome. Using the INSURE technique, the newborn is intubated, given surfactant, and quickly extubated to nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Newborns should be screened for critical congenital heart defects via pulse oximetry after 24 hours but before hospital discharge. Neonatology consultation is recommended if the illness exceeds the clinician's expertise and comfort level or when the diagnosis is unclear in a critically ill newborn. PMID:26760414

  2. The therapeutic or prophylactic effect of exogenous melatonin against depression and depressive symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt Hansen, Melissa; Danielsen, A K; Hageman, I;

    2014-01-01

    Circadian- and sleep disturbances may be central for understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. The effect of melatonin on depression/depressive symptoms has been investigated previously. This systematic review assesses the current evidence of a therapeutic- and prophylactic...... effect of melatonin in adult patients against depression or depressive symptoms. A search was performed in The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE and PsycINFO for published trials on November 14th 2013. Inclusion criteria were English language, RCTs or crossover trials. Our outcome was measurement of...... meta-analyses. Melatonin doses varied from 0.5-6 mg daily and the length of follow-up varied from 2 weeks to 3.5 years. Three studies were done on patients without depression at inclusion, two studies in patients with depression and five studies included a mixture. Six studies showed an improvement in...

  3. [Postpartum depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S F

    1993-09-01

    A retrospective study was carried out in Beijing, China, in 1992. Edinburgh postnatal depression scale was used to inquire the mothers at 6-12 month after delivery. A total of 550 women were investigated by mailing. 425 women replied. The positive rate of PPD in our study was 17.9%. Women who had had a history of mood disorder before pregnancy had a higher risk of PPD. Social and psychological factors such as lacking support from the women's relatives, the poor marital relationship and the bad living condition shown to be significantly associated with postnatal depression. PPD can seriously affected the physical and mental health and well-being of women, her child's early education causing delayed development and her family causing a great deal of suffering, personal distress and marital troubles even causing divorce and suicide. Thus it is important to identify the high risk women and give treatment as early as possible. PMID:8313745

  4. Noninvasive respiratory monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Transcutaneous Monitoring of Respiratory Gases; Computed Tomography of the Chest; Measurement and Monitoring of Exhaled Carbon Dioxide; Oximetry; and Ultrasonic Evaluation of the Chest Wall and Pleura

  5. Noninvasive respiratory monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nochomovitz, M.L.; Cherniack, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Transcutaneous Monitoring of Respiratory Gases; Computed Tomography of the Chest; Measurement and Monitoring of Exhaled Carbon Dioxide; Oximetry; and Ultrasonic Evaluation of the Chest Wall and Pleura.

  6. Upper respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grief, Samuel N

    2013-09-01

    Upper respiratory infections (URIs) are infections of the mouth, nose, throat, larynx (voice box), and trachea (windpipe). This article outlines the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and management of URIs, including nasopharyngitis (common cold), sinusitis, pharyngitis, laryngitis, and laryngotracheitis. PMID:23958368

  7. Living with Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tips below. Ongoing Care If you have respiratory failure, see your doctor for ongoing medical care. Your doctor may refer you to pulmonary rehabilitation (rehab). Rehab can involve exercise training, education, and counseling. Your rehab team might include doctors, ...

  8. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Zammit; Helen Liddicoat; Ian Moonsie; et al

    2010-01-01

    Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ produ...

  9. Microspectrophotometry of respiratory pigments

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanagh, Karen Yvonne, (Thesis)

    2003-01-01

    This research thesis describes the design, construction and optical testing of three fibre-optic microspectrophotometer systems to monitor the reduction of mitochondrial respiratory pigments. The optical and biochemical characteristics of mitochondrial respiration are discussed and the current optical techniques employed in the biochemical analysis of respiratory enzymes are presented. The primary focus of this study is the system parameters surrounding the spectrophotometric determination of...

  10. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  11. [Phytotherapy of respiratory tract diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylka, Wiesława; Witkowska-Banaszczak, Ewa; Studzińska-Sroka, Elzbieta; Matławska, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been used in cough due to their antitussive and expectorant activity. Antitussives act either centrally on the cough center of the brain or peripherally on the cough receptors in the respiratory passages. The antitussive effect of many herbs results from the content of mucilage, which exerts protective and demulcent activity. The activity of expectorant herbs results primarily from their influence on the gastric mucose (saponins and ipec alkaloids). This proves reflex stimulation which leads to an increase in the secretion of bronchial glands. Volatile-oil type expectorant herbs exert a direct stimulatory effect on the bronchial glands by means of local irritation with antibacterial activity. In colds and flu, herbs containing volatile oil can be used; also, volatile oils are ingredients of syrups and liquids as well as external phytomedicines in the form of liniments, ointments, and inhalations. The paper shows the herbs and phytomedicines present on the Polish market used for the treatment of respiratory tract diseases. PMID:23289257

  12. Regionalização das temperaturas mínimas do ar prejudiciais à fecundação das flores de arroz para a região climática da depressão central, RS Minimum air temperatures probabilities harmful to the fecundation of rice flowers in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galileo Adeli Buriol

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram mapeadas as probabilidades de ocorrência de temperaturas mínimas do ar prejudiciais à fecundação das flores de arroz na Região Climática da Depressão Central do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Utilizaram-se os valores de probabilidade de ocorrência de temperaturas mínimas do ar iguais ou inferiores a 13, 15 e 17°C em um ou mais dias, cinco ou mais dias e dei ou mais dias para os meses de dezembro, janeiro, fevereiro e março. As isolinhas de probabilidade foram traçadas em um mapa ipsométrico da região. Os resultados mostram que as menores probabilidades se situam nas partes de menor altitude como nos vales dos rios Ibicuí, Jacuí, Taquari, estuário do Guaíba e seus afluentes e que o período de menor periculosidade das temperaturas mínimas do ar ocorre nos meses de janeiro e fevereiro.The probability of occurency of minimum air temperatures harmful to the fecundation of rice flowers in the Central Region of Rio Grande do Sul State was shown in a map. Minimum air temperatures lower or equal to 13, 15 e 17°C occuring during one or more days, five or more days and ten or more days in December, Jannary, February and March were used. The isolines of probability were drown on a map. The results showed that the lower probabilities are located in the parts of the land with lower altitude like the valley of Ibicui, Jacui, Taquari, and Guaiba rivers. Besides, January and February are the months where the risks of low temperatures to rice flowering is lower.

  13. Cardiolipin-Dependent Formation of Mitochondrial Respiratory Supercomplexes

    OpenAIRE

    Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Dowhan, William

    2013-01-01

    The organization of individual respiratory Complexes I, III, and IV (mammalian cells) or III and IV (yeast) of the mitochondria into higher order supercomplexes (SCs) is generally accepted. However, the factors that regulate SC formation and the functional significance of SCs are not well understood. The mitochondrial signature phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) plays a central role in formation and stability of respiratory SCs from yeast to man. Studies in yeast mutants in which the CL level can ...

  14. Adaptive servoventilation improves cardiac function and respiratory stability

    OpenAIRE

    Oldenburg, Olaf; Bitter, Thomas; Lehmann, Roman; Korte, Stefan; Dimitriadis, Zisis; Faber, Lothar; Schmidt, Anke; Westerheide, Nina; Horstkotte, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Cheyne–Stokes respiration (CSR) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) is of major prognostic impact and expresses respiratory instability. Other parameters are daytime pCO2, VE/VCO2-slope during exercise, exertional oscillatory ventilation (EOV), and increased sensitivity of central CO2 receptors. Adaptive servoventilation (ASV) was introduced to specifically treat CSR in CHF. Aim of this study was to investigate ASV effects on CSR, cardiac function, and respiratory stability. A total ...

  15. Hippocampal neurogenesis dysfunction linked to depressive-like behaviors in a neuroinflammation induced model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-Ming; Lin, Wen-Juan; Pan, Yu-Qin; Guan, Xi-Ting; Li, Ying-Cong

    2016-07-01

    Our previous work found that triple central lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration could induce depressive-like behaviors and increased central pro-inflammatory cytokines mRNA, hippocampal cytokine mRNA in particular. Since several neuroinflammation-associated conditions have been reported to impair neurogenesis, in this study, we further investigated whether the neuroinflammation induced depression would be associated with hippocampal neurogenesis dysfunction. An animal model of depression induced by triple central lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration was used. In the hippocampus, the neuroinflammatory state evoked by LPS was marked by an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. It was found that rats in the neuroinflammatory state exhibited depressive-like behaviors, including reduced saccharin preference and locomotor activity as well as increased immobility time in the tail suspension test and latency to feed in the novelty suppressed feeding test. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis was concomitantly inhibited, including decreased cell proliferation and newborn cell survival. We also demonstrated that the decreased hippocampal neurogenesis in cell proliferation was significantly correlated with the depressive-like phenotypes of decreased saccharine preference and distance travelled, the core and characteristic symptoms of depression, under neuro inflammation state. These findings provide the first evidence that hippocampal neurogenesis dysfunction is correlated with neuroinflammation-induced depression, which suggests that hippocampal neurogenesis might be one of biological mechanisms underlying depression induced by neruoinflammation. PMID:27106565

  16. Depression after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library CARING FOR SOMEONE WITH EMOTIONAL & BEHAVIORAL NEEDS Depression After Stroke After a stroke, your loved one ... available! Almost half of all stroke survivors have depression. Depression is a normal response to the losses ...

  17. CHLOROQUINE—RELATED DEPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Das, E. Mohan; Mohan, D.

    1981-01-01

    SUMMARY Drugs are known to induce depressive states. Chloroquine, an antimalarial, in therapeutic doses administered for malaria therapy, may produce symptoms rather indistinguishable from endogenous depression. The possible mechanisms of production of depression related to chloroquine use are hypothesised.

  18. Depression and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society ... Twitter Email Home Symptoms & Diagnosis MS Symptoms Depression Depression Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print In this ...

  19. Men and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in crisis? For more information Share Men and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone feels sad or irritable sometimes, or has ...

  20. Depression in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or someone I know is in crisis? Share Depression in Women Download PDF Download ePub Order a ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone sometimes feels sad, but these feelings usually ...

  1. Various forms of depression

    OpenAIRE

    BENAZZI, FRANCO

    2006-01-01

    The current subtyping of depression is based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) categorical division of bipolar and depressive disorders. Current evidence, however, supports a dimensional approach to depression, as a continuum/spectrum of overlapping disorders, ranging from bipolar I depression to major depressive disorder. Types of depression which have recently been the focus of most research will be reviewed ; bipolar II depressi...

  2. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia KP Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Design: Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Participants: Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Intervention: Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Outcome measures: Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Results: Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8, showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14 and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25; it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96 compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. Conclusion: This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30 minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42015020683. [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016 Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory

  3. Depression and Anxiety in Obese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Gulec Oyekcin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Epidemiologic data suggests an association between obesity and depression. However, a limited number of studies have investigated the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms among obese patients without a psychiatric diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine psychiatric diagnosis in patients with obesity who applied to the endocrinology department and to determine the pattern of the depression and anxiety symptom levels in obese patients without a psychiatric diagnosis.Materials and Methods: 62 patients with obesity (obesity group and 27 control subjects (control group attending the endocrinology outpatient clinic were included in the study. Body mass index was calculated and diagnostic psychiatric assessment carried out for all patients. All participants were evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HAM-D] and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale [HAM-A].Results: Total scores obtained both from HAM-D and HAM-A were significantly greater in the obesity group than in the control group. The most common psychiatric diagnose among obese patients was depression. Nearly more than half of the obese patients without any psychiatric diagnosis marked one of the HAM-D items which describes depressed mood, guilt feeling, somatic anxiety, work and activity loss and general somatic symptoms as well as the items within the HAM-A scale which describes anxious mood, tension, cognitive difficulties, insomnia, depressed mood, somatic anxiety, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal and autonomic symptoms.Conclusion: Most common psychiatric diagnosis in patients with obesity was major depressive disorder. Obese patients who have not been diagnosed with any psychiatric disorder also show certain anxiety and depressive symptoms. The presence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients having any psychiatric disorder may be due to the psychosocial effects of obesity and these symptoms should be followed up in obese patients so that

  4. The importance of norepinephrine in depression

    OpenAIRE

    Moret C.; Briley M

    2011-01-01

    Chantal Moret, Mike BrileyNeuroBiz Consulting and Communication, Castres, FranceAbstract: Depression is one of the most common psychological diseases with significant potential morbidity and mortality. Although the underlying pathophysiology of depression has not been clearly defined, preclinical and clinical evidence suggest disturbances in serotonin (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Virtually all currently available antidepressan...

  5. K+ channels and the microglial respiratory burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, R; Roy, L; Zhu, X; Schlichter, L C

    2001-04-01

    Microglial activation following central nervous system damage or disease often culminates in a respiratory burst that is necessary for antimicrobial function, but, paradoxically, can damage bystander cells. We show that several K+ channels are expressed and play a role in the respiratory burst of cultured rat microglia. Three pharmacologically separable K+ currents had properties of Kv1.3 and the Ca2+/calmodulin-gated channels, SK2, SK3, and SK4. mRNA was detected for Kv1.3, Kv1.5, SK2, and/or SK3, and SK4. Protein was detected for Kv1.3, Kv1.5, and SK3 (selective SK2 and SK4 antibodies not available). No Kv1.5-like current was detected, and confocal immunofluorescence showed the protein to be subcellular, in contrast to the robust membrane localization of Kv1.3. To determine whether any of these channels play a role in microglial activation, a respiratory burst was stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and measured using a single cell, fluorescence-based dihydrorhodamine 123 assay. The respiratory burst was markedly inhibited by blockers of SK2 (apamin) and SK4 channels (clotrimazole and charybdotoxin), and to a lesser extent, by the potent Kv1.3 blocker agitoxin-2. PMID:11245596

  6. Heart Rate Variability and the Efficacy of Biofeedback in Heroin Users with Depressive Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, I-Mei; Ko, Jiun-Min; Fan, Sheng-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective Low heart rate variability (HRV) has been confirmed in heroin users, but the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback in heroin users remain unknown. This study examined (1) correlations between depression and HRV indices; (2) group differences in HRV indices among a heroin-user group, a group with major depressive disorder but no heroin use, and healthy controls; and (3) the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiratory rate...

  7. Depressed REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Patients Are Less Likely to Recall Enacted Dreams than Non-Depressed Ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Gon; Choi, Jae Won; Lee, Yu Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is associated with psychiatric symptoms, such as anxiety and alexithymia. However, only a few studies on the relationship between depression and RBD have been published. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of depression and associated factors in patients with RBD. Methods In total 94 patients (mean age: 61.9±12.7 years, male: 70.2%) diagnosed as RBD were examined using detailed clinical histories, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and nocturnal polysomnography (PSG). Results The mean BDI score of all patients was 12.4±10.3 and 44.7% of RBD patients showed depressed mood (BDI >11 points). Depressed RBD patients were less able to recall enacted dreams than were non-depressed patients (61.9% vs. 86.5%, p=0.008). Logistic regression analysis showed that failure to recall enacted dreams was significantly associated with depression, after controlling for confounding variables including the respiratory disturbance index and a history of psychiatric disorders (odds ratio=0.323, p=0.041). Conclusion In this study, 44.7% of RBD patients were found to suffer from depressed mood. And, depression was found to be associated with reduced ability to recall enacted dreams. We suggest that routine evaluation of depression be performed in RBD patients, particularly when failure to recall enacted dreams is evident. We speculate that such failure may be associated with emotional dysregulation or neurodegeneration. PMID:27081385

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus infection of the lower respiratory tract: radiological findings in 108 children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For years the typical appearance of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced infection of the lower respiratory tract has been discussed. All available studies have led to different results. The aim of this study was to control these results, with 108 children. The age range was 1 day to 10 years (median 7 months). Within 72 h of admission, all children developed an RSV infection of the lower respiratory tract. Chest X-rays (pa-view) of 55 children under, and 53 children over, the age of 6 months (10/53>24 months) were evaluated. The diagnosis of RSV and the chest X-ray were mostly done on the same day. The major radiological findings of the two age-groups were compared by Wilcoxon's unpaired rank sum test. Major radiological findings were: normal chest X-ray (30%), central pneumonia (32%) or peribronchitis (26%). There was no statistical significance between the age-groups. Other findings were emphysema (11%), pleural effusion (6%), lobar- or broncho-pneumonia (each 6%), atelectasis (5%) or pneumothorax in one case. Therefore, the most common radiological findings in RSV-induced infection of the lower respiratory tract, supported by our results (RSV infection without bacterial superinfection) are central pneumonia, peribronchitis or normal chest X-ray. Thus an age-group separation into under or over 6 months is no longer necessary. (orig.)

  9. Mechanisms Underlying Neurocognitive Dysfunctions in Recurrent Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałecki, Piotr; Talarowska, Monika; Anderson, George; Berk, Michael; Maes, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Recent work shows that depression is intimately associated with changes in cognitive functioning, including memory, attention, verbal fluency, and other aspects of higher-order cognitive processing. Changes in cognitive functioning are more likely to occur when depressive episodes are recurrent and to abate to some degree during periods of remission. However, with accumulating frequency and duration of depressive episodes, cognitive deficits can become enduring, being evident even when mood improves. Such changes in cognitive functioning give depression links to mild cognitive impairment and thereby with neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, and multiple sclerosis. Depression may then be conceptualized on a dimension of depression – mild cognitive impairment – dementia. The biological underpinnings of depression have substantial overlaps with those of neurodegenerative conditions, including reduced neurogenesis, increased apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, tryptophan catabolites, autoimmunity, and immune-inflammatory processes, as well as decreased antioxidant defenses. These evolving changes over the course of depressive episodes drive the association of depression with neurodegenerative conditions. As such, the changes in cognitive functioning in depression have important consequences for the treatment of depression and in reconceptualizing the role of depression in wider neuroprogressive conditions. Here we review the data on changes in cognitive functioning in recurrent major depression and their association with other central conditions. PMID:26017336

  10. Your Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Lungs & Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Lungs & Respiratory System Print A A A Text Size What's in ... your body, and they work with your respiratory system to allow you to take in fresh air, ...

  11. Effects of a quaternary lidocaine derivative, QX-314, on the respiratory activity in brainstem-spinal cord preparation from newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Chikara; Onimaru, Hiroshi

    2016-04-21

    In the clinical setting, the use of QX-314 (a quaternary derivative of lidocaine) has been proposed to achieve the selective inhibition of nociceptors that express transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels with fewer motor deficits. However, it has been also reported that QX-314 may produce systemic CNS toxicities with relative potencies that are approximately twice as high as those of lidocaine. There are no reports concerning the effects of extracellular QX-314 on the rhythm-generating neurons in the respiratory center. In the present study, we examined the effects of QX-314 on respiratory rhythm generation in brainstem-spinal cord preparations from newborn rats. The extracellular application of QX-314 (200μM) decreased the C4 burst rate, amplitude and slope during the initial rising phase, and the effects slowly developed with a half-decay time of approximately 20min. The combined application of capsaicin (10 or 100μM) with QX-314 (100μM) showed no additional effect. The intracellular application of QX-314 (100μM) to respiratory neurons depressed the action potentials with a half-decay time of around 5min. Our findings could explain one of the mechanisms underlying the central toxicities that occur after the systemic application of QX-314. PMID:26992939

  12. Depression and Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Someone Quit Stress & Mood Stress & Mood Smoking & Mood Stress Depression Anger Weight Management Weight Management Smoking and Weight ... Lifestyle Healthier Lifestyle Physical Fitness Food & Nutrition Sleep, Stress & Relaxation ... » Tools » Depression Basics » Depression and Smoking Depression and Smoking Why ...

  13. Pulse transit time as a measure of respiratory effort under noninvasive ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Contal, Olivier; Carnevale, Claudio; Borel, Jean-Christian; Sabil, AbdelKébir; Tamisier, Renaud; Lévy, Patrick; Janssens, Jean-Paul; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Among the respiratory events that may occur during nocturnal noninvasive ventilation (NIV), differentiating between central and obstructive events requires appropriate indicators of respiratory effort. The aim of the present study was to assess pulse transit time (PTT) as an indicator of respiratory effort under NIV in comparison with oesophageal pressure (P(oes)). During wakefulness, PTT was compared to P(oes) during spontaneous breathing and under NIV with or without induced leaks in 11 hea...

  14. Fluoxetine Treatment Abolishes the In Vitro Respiratory Response to Acidosis in Neonatal Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Voituron, Nicolas; Shvarev, Yuri; Menuet, Clément; Bevengut, Michelle; Fasano, Caroline; Vigneault, Erika; Mestikawy, Salah El; Hilaire, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    Background To secure pH homeostasis, the central respiratory network must permanently adapt its rhythmic motor drive to environment and behaviour. In neonates, it is commonly admitted that the retrotrapezoid/parafacial respiratory group of neurons of the ventral medulla plays the primary role in the respiratory response to acidosis, although the serotonergic system may also contribute to this response. Methodology/Principal Findings Using en bloc medullary preparations from neonatal mice, we ...

  15. Climate change and respiratory disease: European Respiratory Society position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, J G; Forsberg, B; Annesi-Maesano, I; Dey, R; Ebi, K L; Helms, P J; Medina-Ramón, M; Windt, M; Forastiere, F

    2009-08-01

    Climate change will affect individuals with pre-existing respiratory disease, but the extent of the effect remains unclear. The present position statement was developed on behalf of the European Respiratory Society in order to identify areas of concern arising from climate change for individuals with respiratory disease, healthcare workers in the respiratory sector and policy makers. The statement was developed following a 2-day workshop held in Leuven (Belgium) in March 2008. Key areas of concern for the respiratory community arising from climate change are discussed and recommendations made to address gaps in knowledge. The most important recommendation was the development of more accurate predictive models for predicting the impact of climate change on respiratory health. Respiratory healthcare workers also have an advocatory role in persuading governments and the European Union to maintain awareness and appropriate actions with respect to climate change, and these areas are also discussed in the position statement. PMID:19251790

  16. The factor structure of lifetime depressive spectrum in patients with unipolar depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, G.B.; Benvenuti, A.; Miniati, M.; Calugi, S.; Mula, M.; Maggi, L.; Rucci, P.; Fagiolini, A.; Perris, F.; Frank, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background While previous attempts to elucidate the factor structure of depression tended to agree on a central focus on depressed mood, other factors were not replicated across studies. By examining data from a large number of items covering the range of depressive symptoms, the aim of the present study is to contribute to the identification of the structure of depression on a lifetime perspective. Methods The study sample consisted of 598 patients with unipolar depression who were administered the Mood Spectrum Self-Report (lifetime version) in Italian (N=415) or English (N=183). In addition to classical exploratory factor analysis using tetrachoric correlation coefficients, an IRT-based factor analysis approach was adopted to analyze the data on 74 items of the instrument that explore cognitive, mood and energy/activity features associated with depression. Results Six factors were identified, including `Depressive Mood', `Psychomotor Retardation', `Suicidality', `Drug/Illness related depression', `Psychotic Features' and `Neurovegetative Symptoms', accounting overall for 48.3% of the variance of items. Limitations Clinical information on onset of depression and duration of illness is available only for 350 subjects. Therefore, differences between sites can only be partially accounted using available data. Conclusions Our study confirms the central role of depressed mood, psychomotor retardation and suicidality and identifies the factors `Drug/Illness related depression', `Psychotic features' and the neurovegetative dysregulation not captured by the instruments most frequently used in previous studies. The identification of patients with specific profiles on multiple factors may be useful in achieving greater precision in neuroimaging studies and in informing treatment selection. PMID:18947882

  17. Therapieresistente Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holsboer-Trachsler E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In der Behandlung einer Depression wird ein Nichtansprechen auf zwei adäquate Antidepressivatherapien während je 6–8 Wochen als Therapieresistenz bezeichnet. Da häufig zu geringe Dosierungen oder eine zu kurze Behandlungsdauer die Ursache für ein Nichtansprechen sind, sollte in einem ersten Schritt die medikamentöse Therapie hinsichtlich Dauer und Dosierung, eventuell unter Einbezug von Plasmaspiegelbestimmungen, überprüft und optimiert werden. Als pharmakologische Maßnahmen werden zunächst ein Wechsel des Antidepressivums und danach eine Kombination von verschiedenen Antidepressiva mit unterschiedlichem biochemischem Wirkungsansatz empfohlen. Zeigen beide nicht den gewünschten Erfolg, so sollte zusätzlich zur bestehenden Antidepressivabehandlung eine Augmentationstherapie, primär mit Lithium und/oder dem Schilddrüsenhormon T3, durchgeführt werden. Ein neuer, vielversprechender Behandlungsansatz ist eine Augmentationstherapie mit atypischen Neuroleptika. Als akut wirkende nichtpharmakologische Zusatzmaßnahme hat sich der partielle Schlafentzug bewährt. Weitere nichtpharmakologische Strategien umfassen Psychotherapie, Elektrokrampftherapie und Vagusnervstimulationsbehandlung.

  18. Frequency of depression among patients with neurocysticercosis Depressão em pacientes portadores de neurocisticercose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Monteiro de Almeida

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is a common central nervous system infection caused by Taenia solium metacestodes. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the occurrence of depression in patients with calcified NCC form. The study group consisted of 114 patients subdivided in four groups: NCC with epilepsy, NCC without epilepsy, epilepsy without NCC and chronic headache. METHOD: Depression was evaluated and quantified by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD-21. RESULTS: Percentage of patients with depression was as follows: group 1 (83%; group 2 (88%; group 3 (92%; group 4 (100%. The majority of patients had moderate depression. CONCLUSION: Incidence of depression in all groups was higher than in the general population. It is possible that, in a general way, patients with chronic diseases would have depression with similar intensity. NCC is associated with the presence of depression.Neurocysticercose (NCC é uma infecção do sistema nervoso central comum causada por metacestodes da Taenia solium. OBJETIVO: investigar a ocorrência de depressão nos pacientes com NCC forma calcificada. O grupo de estudo é formado por 114 pacientes subdivididos em quatro grupos: NCC com epilepsia, NCC sem epilepsia, epilepsia sem NCC e cefaléia crônica. MÉTODO: A presença de depressão foi determinada e quantificada pela Escala de Depressão de Hamilton (HRSD-21. RESULTADOS: A porcentagem de pacientes com depressão foi: grupo 1 (83%; grupo 2 (88%; grupo 3 (92%; grupo 4 (100%. A maioria dos pacientes apresentou depressão moderada. CONCLUSÃO: A incidência da depressão em todos os grupos foi mais elevada do que na população geral, contudo não houve diferença entre os grupos estudados. É possível que, de uma maneira geral, os pacientes portadores de doença crônica apresentarem a depressão em intensidade similar. NCC está associada com a presença de depressão.

  19. The Personal Importance of Being Independent: Associations with Changes in Disability and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monin, Joan K.; Schulz, Richard; Martire, Lynn M.; Connelly, Dyan; Czaja, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective This study examined the role of independence centrality (the personal importance of being functionally independent) in adapting to functional disability in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). We assessed how changes in disability related to changes in depressive symptoms, the association between independence centrality and depressive symptoms, and the role of independence centrality in moderating the association between changes in disability and changes in depressive symptoms. Research method/Design Using data from a randomized controlled trial (Schulz, Czaja, Lustig, Zdaniuk, Martire, & Perdomo, 2009) we focused on 173 SCI survivors who completed baseline and 12-month follow-up measures of independence centrality, disability (activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living needs), and depressive symptoms. Results Consistent with our predictions, increased disability was related to increased depressive symptoms, and higher independence centrality was associated with more depressive symptoms at baseline. Consistent with the lifespan theory of control, SCI survivors with high independence centrality experienced more depressive symptoms when disability increased but less depressive symptoms when disability decreased. SCI survivors low in independence centrality were less affected by changing levels of disability. Conclusion/Implications Persons with SCI with high in independence centrality have higher levels of depressive symptoms and are more responsive to changes in functional status. Given the functional status trajectories of SCI survivors, having low independence centrality may be adaptive because it facilitates disengagement from unattainable goals. PMID:24320943

  20. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechan

  1. Investigating the complexity of respiratory patterns during the laryngeal chemoreflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curran Aidan K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The laryngeal chemoreflex exists in infants as a primary sensory mechanism for defending the airway from the aspiration of liquids. Previous studies have hypothesized that prolonged apnea associated with this reflex may be life threatening and might be a cause of sudden infant death syndrome. Methods In this study we quantified the output of the respiratory neural network, the diaphragm EMG signal, during the laryngeal chemoreflex and eupnea in early postnatal (3–10 days piglets. We tested the hypothesis that diaphragm EMG activity corresponding to reflex-related events involved in clearance (restorative mechanisms such as cough and swallow exhibit lower complexity, suggesting that a synchronized homogeneous group of neurons in the central respiratory network are active during these events. Nonlinear dynamic analysis was performed using the approximate entropy to asses the complexity of respiratory patterns. Results Diaphragm EMG, genioglossal activity EMG, as well as other physiological signals (tracheal pressure, blood pressure and respiratory volume were recorded from 5 unanesthetized chronically instrumented intact piglets. Approximate entropy values of the EMG during cough and swallow were found significantly (p p Conclusion Reduced complexity values of the respiratory neural network output corresponding to coughs and swallows suggest synchronous neural activity of a homogeneous group of neurons. The higher complexity values exhibited by eupneic respiratory activity are the result of a more random behaviour, which is the outcome of the integrated action of several groups of neurons involved in the respiratory neural network.

  2. Ethnic Variables and Negative Life Events as Predictors of Depressive Symptoms and Suicidal Behaviors in Latino College Students: On the Centrality of "Receptivo a los Demás"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Edward C.; Yu, Elizabeth A.; Yu, Tina; Kahle, Emma R.; Hernandez, Viviana; Kim, Jean M.; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.; Hirsch, Jameson K.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we examined ethnic variables (viz., multigroup ethnic identity and other group orientation) along with negative life events as predictors of depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors in a sample of 156 (38 male and 118 female) Latino college students. Results of conducting hierarchical regression analyses indicated that the…

  3. Attitude scale and general health questionnaire subscales predict depression?

    OpenAIRE

    Amrollah Ebrahimi; Hamid Afshar; Hamid Taher Neshat Doost; Seyed Ghafur Mousavi; Hoseyn Moolavi

    2012-01-01

    Background: According to Beck theory, dysfunctional attitude has a central role in emergence of depression. The aim of this study was to determine contributions of dysfunctional attitude and general health index to depression. Methods: In this case-control study, two groups of subjects participated. The first group consisted of 65 patients with major depression and dysthymic disorder, who were recruited from Noor and Navab Safavi Psychiatry Clinics in Isfa-han. The control group was consi...

  4. Adult respiratory distress syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to improved emergency resuscitation procedures, and with advancing medical technology in the field of critical care, an increasing number of patients survive the acute phase of shock and catastrophic trauma. Patients who previously died of massive sepsis, hypovolemic or hypotensive shock, multiple fractures, aspiration, toxic inhalation, and massive embolism are now surviving long enough to develop previously unsuspected and unrecognized secondary effects. With increasing frequency, clinicians are recognizing the clinical and radiographic manifestations of pathologic changes in the lungs occurring secondary to various types of massive insult. This paper gives a list of diseases that have been shown to precipitate or predispose to diffuse lung damage. Various terms have been used to describe the lung damage and respiratory failure secondary to these conditions. The term adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is applied to several cases of sudden respiratory failure in patients with previously healthy lungs following various types of trauma or shock. Numerous investigations and experiments have studied the pathologic changes in ARDS, and, while there is still no clear indication of why it develops, there is now some correlation of the sequential pathologic developments with the clinical and radiographic changes

  5. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-01-01

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task. PMID:26021823

  6. Anaesthetic, cardiovascular and respiratory effects of a new steroidal agent CT 1341: a comparison with other intravenous anaesthetic drugs in the unrestrained cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, K J; Davis, B; Dodds, M G; Twissell, D J

    1972-10-01

    1. The anaesthetic, cardiovascular, respiratory and adverse effects produced by the intravenous injection of CT 1341, thiopentone, methohexitone, pentobarbitone, propanidid and ketamine have been compared in unrestrained cats prepared with chronically implanted venous and arterial cannulae. Aortic blood pressure and heart rates were monitored before, during and after loss of consciousness.2. CT 1341 produced rapid induction of anaesthesia followed by moderately rapid recovery, was active over a wide range of doses and caused minimal respiratory depression and few adverse effects. It caused an initial short-lasting tachycardia and fall in aortic blood pressure succeeded by a secondary depressor response.3. The safety margin was narrower with the barbiturate drugs than with CT 1341, and large doses induced apnoea and respiratory depression. Small doses of methohexitone elicited excitatory effects and large doses caused severe respiratory and circulatory depression, and recovery from anaesthesia was protracted.4. Propanidid induced short-lasting light anaesthesia. The safety margin was narrowest with this drug and induction was associated with adverse circulatory, respiratory and other effects.5. Ketamine was active over a wide range of doses but exhibited qualitatively different properties from the other anaesthetics. Induction was slower after small doses and these produced circulatory stimulation, catatonia and bizarre behavioural effects. Large doses caused respiratory and circulatory depression and recovery was protracted.6. It is concluded that CT 1341 has a wider therapeutic latitude, produces less respiratory depression and has other advantages over the currently used intravenous anaesthetics. PMID:4651769

  7. Has the airway microbiome been overlooked in respiratory disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Salami, Olawale; Marsland, Benjamin J

    2015-01-01

    Editorial summary The respiratory disease field is changing because of recent advances in our understanding of the airway microbiome. Central to this is dysbiosis, an imbalance of microbial communities that can lead to and flag inflammation in the airways. The increasing momentum of research in this area holds promise for novel treatment strategies.

  8. Haemodynamic and respiratory effects of an abdominal compression binder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, M.H.; Bulow, J.; Simonsen, L.

    2008-01-01

    In order to elucidate the circulatory and respiratory effects of a newly developed abdominal compression binder 25 healthy, normal weight subjects were studied. In supine position the central haemodynamics were measured and estimated with a Finapress device. Lower extremity venous haemodynamics...

  9. Cognitive Vulnerability-Stress Model of Depression during Adolescence: Investigating Depressive Symptom Specificity in a Multi-Wave Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2008-01-01

    Depression commonly co-occurs with anxiety and externalizing problems. Etiological factors from a central cognitive theory of depression, the Hopelessness Theory (Abramson et al. "Psychological Review," 96, 358-372, 1989), were examined to evaluate whether a negative inferential style about cause, consequence, and self interacted with stressors…

  10. [Respiratory preparation before surgery in patients with chronic respiratory failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, Jean-Marc; Jaber, Samir

    2012-03-01

    Scheduled and/or thoracic, abdominal surgeries increase the risk of respiratory postoperative complications. In patients with chronic respiratory failure, preoperative evaluation should be performed to evaluate respiratory function in aim to optimize perioperative management. Preoperative gas exchange abnormalities (hypoxemia or hypercapnia) are associated with respiratory postoperative complications. Respiratory physiotherapy and prophylactic non-invasive ventilation should be integrated in a global rehabilitation management for cardiothoracic or abdominal surgery procedures, which are at high risk of postoperative respiratory dysfunction. Stopping tobacco consummation should be benefit, but decease risk of postoperative complications is relevant only after a period for 6 to 8 weeks of cessation. Bronchodilatator aerosol therapy (beta-agonists and atropinics) and inhaled corticotherapy allow a rapid preparation for 24 to 48 h. Systematic preoperative antibiotherapy should not be recommended. PMID:22004791

  11. Probabilidade de ocorrência de temperaturas mínimas do ar prejudiciais à fecundação das flores de arroz na região da depressão central, Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Probability of occurence of minimum air temperature harmful to fecundation of rice flowers in the central region of the Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Galileo Adeli Buriol; Valduíno Estefanel; Roberto André Grave; Ivo Antônio Didonet; Sílvio Steinmeiz

    1998-01-01

    Utilizando-se os registros de temperatura mínima do ar de nove estações meteorológicas situadas na região da Depressão Central do Rio Grande do Sul, calculou-se as probabilidades de ocorrerem dias com temperatura do ar ≤13°C, 15°C e 17°C. Foram considerados os períodos mensal e decendial dos meses de dezembro, janeiro, fevereiro e março, época em que essas temperaturas podem prejudicar as lavouras de arroz em floração. Também foram calculadas as probabilidades de ocorrência de ...

  12. Pathophysiology of central sleep apneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Adam B; Patil, Susheel P

    2016-05-01

    The transition from wake to sleep is accompanied by a host of physiologic changes, which result in major alterations in respiratory control and may result in sleep-related breathing disorders. The central sleep apneas are a group of sleep-related breathing disorders that are characterized by recurrent episodes of airflow reduction or cessation due to a temporary reduction or absence of central respiratory drive. The fundamental hallmark of central sleep apnea (CSA) disorders is the presence of ventilatory control instability; however, additional mechanisms play a role in one or more specific manifestations of CSA. CSA may manifest during conditions of eucapnia/hypocapnia or chronic hypercapnia, which is a useful clinical classification that lends understanding to the underlying pathophysiology and potential therapies. In this review, an overview of normal breathing physiology is provided, followed by a discussion of pathophysiologic mechanisms that promote CSA and the mechanisms that are specific to different manifestations of CSA. PMID:26782104

  13. Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Chakravarti; Bineeta Kashyap

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Acute lower respiratory infections lead to high morbidity and mortality rates in children from developing countries. The aim of this study was to look into the extent of respiratory syncytial virus infections in children with special reference to the role of specific immunoglobulins in protection against infection as well as the association with bacterial pathogens. Material & Methods: Nasopharyngeal aspirates were tested for respiratory syncytial virus antigen by enzyme immunoassa...

  14. Burnout-depression overlap: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Renzo; Schonfeld, Irvin Sam; Laurent, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Whether burnout is a form of depression or a distinct phenomenon is an object of controversy. The aim of the present article was to provide an up-to-date review of the literature dedicated to the question of burnout-depression overlap. A systematic literature search was carried out in PubMed, PsycINFO, and IngentaConnect. A total of 92 studies were identified as informing the issue of burnout-depression overlap. The current state of the art suggests that the distinction between burnout and depression is conceptually fragile. It is notably unclear how the state of burnout (i.e., the end stage of the burnout process) is conceived to differ from clinical depression. Empirically, evidence for the distinctiveness of the burnout phenomenon has been inconsistent, with the most recent studies casting doubt on that distinctiveness. The absence of consensual diagnostic criteria for burnout and burnout research's insufficient consideration of the heterogeneity of depressive disorders constitute major obstacles to the resolution of the raised issue. In conclusion, the epistemic status of the seminal, field-dominating definition of burnout is questioned. It is suggested that systematic clinical observation should be given a central place in future research on burnout-depression overlap. PMID:25638755

  15. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabeticketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidityand mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requiresfocused clinical monitoring, careful interpretationof arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditionsthat can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions thatcompromise respiratory function caused by DKA can bedetected at presentation but are usually more prevalentduring treatment. These conditions include deficits ofpotassium, magnesium and phosphate and hydrostatic ornon-hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Conditions not causedby DKA that can worsen respiratory function under theadded stress of DKA include infections of the respiratorysystem, pre-existing respiratory or neuromuscular diseaseand miscellaneous other conditions. Prompt recognitionand management of the conditions that can lead torespiratory failure in DKA may prevent respiratory failureand improve mortality from DKA.

  16. Dementia: Depression and Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Dementia | Depression and Alzheimer’s Disease What is depression? When doctors talk about depression, they mean the medical illness called major depression. Someone who has ...

  17. Depression Disturbs Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The suicide of Robert Enke,the goalkeeper of the Germany national football team who had battled depression for years,stunned the country and cast depression into the national spotlight as a disturbing disease.

  18. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a number of topics, including depression with a self-test to help identify the signs of depression. ... Get involved Become a peer mentor Advocate for change Fundraise with Team Reeve Champions Committee Volunteering About ...

  19. Depression and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other mental health issues? Reference Share Depression and College Students Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy Answers to college students’ frequently asked questions about depression Feeling moody, sad, ...

  20. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of your life. Depression can cause physical and psychological symptoms. It can worsen pain, make sleep difficult, ... affecting about 1 in 5 people. There are treatments available to ease the symptoms of depression using ...

  1. Depression and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Steven M; Rumsfeld, John S

    2015-10-01

    There is a wealth of evidence linking depression to increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and worse outcomes among patients with known CVD. In addition, there are safe and effective treatments for depression. Despite this, depression remains under-recognized and undertreated in patients at risk for or living with CVD. In this review, we first summarize the evidence linking depression to increased risk of CVD and worse patient outcomes. We then review the mechanisms by which depression may contribute to cardiovascular risk and poor cardiovascular outcomes. We then summarize prior studies of depression treatment on cardiovascular outcomes. Finally, we offer guidance in the identification and management of depression among CVD populations. Given that 1 in 4 CVD patients has concurrent depression, application of these best-practices will assist providers in achieving optimal outcomes for their CVD patients. PMID:25850976

  2. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... depression and adjustment to my SCI? How do I deal with depression and adjustment to my SCI? ☷ ▾ ... following an SCI? What are the secondary conditions? I have no health insurance, what are my options? ...

  3. Depression in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Student - College Concerns Stressed or Depressed? Know the Difference Boost Your School Performance by Taking Care of You Top Ten Freshman Year Issues Alcohol, Substance Abuse and Depression Winter Break Survival Tips for College ...

  4. Depression: Working It Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression Working It Out Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... of this technique. Especially when combined with medications, it can help relieve depression. Research shows that it ...

  5. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ... at risk for: Returning symptoms, such as severe depression Increased risk of suicide (for some people) Withdrawal ...

  6. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  7. Depression and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Depression and Pregnancy Thursday, 20 March 2014 In every ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to depression may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  8. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  9. Learning about depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000325.htm Learning about depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... trigger or reason. What Are the Signs of Depression? You may notice some or all of the ...

  10. Depression and Suicide Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression and Suicide Risk (2014) Definition: A mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and ... i Prevalence: 1. Ranges of lifetime risk for depression: from 6.7% overall to 40% in men, ...

  11. Depression in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance 5 Myths About Mental Illness Support an Employee Workplace Bullying & Violence Signs of a Healthy Workplace Complementary Medicine ... depression can be successfully treated. With early recognition, intervention, and support, most employees can overcome clinical depression and pick up where ...

  12. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to my SCI? How do I deal with depression and adjustment to my SCI? ☷ ▾ Page contents The ... the moment you are injured. Understanding adjustment and depression Adjustment to paralysis is a process of changing ...

  13. Postpartum Depression Action Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Postpartum Depression | Postpartum Depression Action Plan Patient __________________________ Physician/NP/PA __________________ Clinic ____________________________ Phone Number ____________________ Choose one area and add other areas as you begin to feel ...

  14. Recognizing teen depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000648.htm Recognizing teen depression To use the sharing features on this ... teen's life. Be Aware of the Risk for Teen Depression Your teen is more at risk for ...

  15. Paediatric respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Everard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infections remain a major cause of infant and child mortality worldwide and are responsible for a substantial burden of morbidity. During the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, some of the main findings from peer-reviewed articles addressing this topic that were published in the preceding 12 months were reviewed in a Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session. The following article highlights some of the insights provided by these articles into the complex interactions of the human host with the extensive and dynamic populations of microorganisms that call an individual “home”.

  16. Respiratory System Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Danielle M; Singh, Shipra

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory system involvement in cystic fibrosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene throughout the sinopulmonary tract result in recurrent infections with a variety of organisms including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Lung disease occurs earlier in life than once thought and ideal methods of monitoring lung function, decline, or improvement with therapy are debated. Treatment of sinopulmonary disease may include physiotherapy, mucus-modifying and antiinflammatory agents, antimicrobials, and surgery. In the new era of personalized medicine, CFTR correctors and potentiators may change the course of disease. PMID:27469180

  17. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Naren N; Pine, Harold S; Underbrink, Michael P

    2012-06-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare, benign disease with no known cure. RRP is caused by infection of the upper aerodigestive tract with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Passage through the birth canal is thought to be the initial transmission event, but infection may occur in utero. HPV vaccines have helped to provide protection from cervical cancer; however, their role in the prevention of RRP is undetermined. Clinical presentation of initial symptoms of RRP may be subtle. RRP course varies, and current management focuses on surgical debulking of papillomatous lesions with or without concurrent adjuvant therapy. PMID:22588043

  18. Respiratory tract and mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory tract problems originating in attempts to diagnose and treat illness are commonplace. They range from pharyngeal trauma during intubation to radiation-induced thyroid carcinoma. Occasionally, as with pulmonary hypervolemia accompanying drug-induced renal failure, they originate at a distance. Their actual number far exceeds those brought to clinical attention. Familiarity with the procedures which give rise to these complications is helpful in detecting and remedying them. It is important, therefore, to discuss their pathogenesis as well as their clinical and radiological findings

  19. Current devices of respiratory physiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hristara-Papadopoulou, A; Tsanakas, J; Diomou, G; Papadopoulou, O.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years patients with respiratory diseases use various devices, which help the removal of mucus from the airways and the improvement of pulmonary function. The aim of the present study is to determine the effectiveness of the current devices of respiratory physiotherapy, as it comes from the review of literature. The current devices of physiotherapy for patients with respiratory diseases, are presented as an alternative therapy method or a supplemental therapy and they can motivate pa...

  20. Auscultation of the respiratory system

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Auscultation of the lung is an important part of the respiratory examination and is helpful in diagnosing various respiratory disorders. Auscultation assesses airflow through the trachea-bronchial tree. It is important to distinguish normal respiratory sounds from abnormal ones for example crackles, wheezes, and pleural rub in order to make correct diagnosis. It is necessary to understand the underlying pathophysiology of various lung sounds generation for better understanding of disease proc...

  1. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Rohrscheib, Mark; Agaba, Emmanuel I.; Dorin, Richard I.; Murata, Glen H.; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidity and mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requires focused clinical monitoring, careful interpretation of arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditions that can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions that compromise respiratory function caused by DKA can be detected at presentation but are usually more prevalent during treatment. These conditions include de...

  2. Depression in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Thapar, Anita; Collishaw, Stephan; Pine, Daniel S.; Thapar, Ajay K

    2012-01-01

    Unipolar depressive disorder in adolescence is common worldwide but often unrecognised. The incidence, notably in girls, rises sharply after puberty and, by the end of adolescence, the 1 year prevalence rate exceeds 4%. The burden is highest in low-income and middle-income countries. Depression is associated with sub stantial present and future morbidity, and heightens suicide risk. The strongest risk factors for depression in adolescents are a family history of depression and exposure to psy...

  3. DEPRESSION IN CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Voskresenskaya, Tatyana

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses the topical problem of depression in cerebrovascular diseases. It shows its possible causes, mechanisms of occurrence, clinical picture and negative impact on the course of cerebrovascular disease and recovery of neurological functions. There is a bilateral association between stroke and depression: on the one hand, stroke is a risk factor for the development of depression and, on the other, depression is a both direct and indirect risk factor for the development of stroke...

  4. DEPRESSION IN CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Tat'yana Gratsievna Voznesenskaya; Tatyana Gratsievna Voskresenskaya

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses the topical problem of depression in cerebrovascular diseases. It shows its possible causes, mechanisms of occurrence, clinical picture and negative impact on the course of cerebrovascular disease and recovery of neurological functions. There is a bilateral association between stroke and depression: on the one hand, stroke is a risk factor for the development of depression and, on the other, depression is a both direct and indirect risk factor for the development of str...

  5. Method of treating depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Fritz

    2013-04-09

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  6. Depression bei Koronarer Herzerkrankung

    OpenAIRE

    Rieckmann, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a common comorbid condition in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) which causes substantial burden of disease. Furthermore, depression negatively impacts the medical prognosis of CHD patients. After an acute coronary syndrome (acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina), patients with a major depressive episode as well as patients with subthreshold depression symptoms are at increased risk for re-hospitalization for a major adverse cardiac event and mortality. This in...

  7. Method of treating depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Fritz

    2012-01-24

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  8. Management of Postoperative Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Michael S; Berfield, Kathleen S; Abbaszadeh, Ryan V

    2015-11-01

    Despite best efforts, postoperative complications such as postoperative respiratory failure may occur and prompt recognition of the process and management is required. Postoperative respiratory failure, such as postoperative pneumonia, postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress-like syndromes, and pulmonary embolism, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The causes of these complications are multifactorial and depend on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, some of which are modifiable. The article identifies some of the risk factors, causes, and treatment strategies for successful management of the patient with postoperative respiratory failure. PMID:26515943

  9. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department (ED are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  10. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease and depression often go hand-in-hand. You are are more likely to feel sad or depressed after a heart attack ... heart disease. The good news is that treating depression may help improve both your mental and physical ...

  11. Understanding Depression (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Depression KidsHealth > For Parents > Depression Print A A A ... to Help en español Comprender la depresión About Depression It's normal for kids to feel sad, down, ...

  12. Measuring psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Meyers, B S; Flint, A J;

    Psychotic depression (PD) is a highly debilitating condition, which needs intensive monitoring. However, there is no established rating scale for evaluating the severity of PD. The aim of this analysis was to assess the psychometric properties of established depression rating scales and a number of...... new composite rating scales, covering both depressive and psychotic symptoms, in relation to PD....

  13. Help With Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... five to 10 percent of black men have depression. Several factors can contribute to college-aged black men becoming depressed, such as the ... Groups National Institute on Mental Health What is Depression? Clinical Trials Physician Review ... Students Patients & Families About APA Newsroom News Releases Psychiatric ...

  14. Central sleep apnea – a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dybala Andrzej; Dyczko Monika; Makaruk Boguslaw; Kicinski Pawel; Bartoszek Elzbieta; Myslinski Wojciech; Rahnama Mansur; Mosiewicz Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a disease characterized by repetitive episodes of the socalled central apneas during sleep. The disease has a very complex etiology. In clinical practice, the most important causes of CSA are disorders of the central nervous system, congestive heart failure or certain pathological changes of the respiratory muscles. We present a case of a 43-year-old male with severe CSA, who was successfully treated with BiPAP ST equipment.

  15. Central sleep apnea – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dybala Andrzej

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central sleep apnea (CSA is a disease characterized by repetitive episodes of the socalled central apneas during sleep. The disease has a very complex etiology. In clinical practice, the most important causes of CSA are disorders of the central nervous system, congestive heart failure or certain pathological changes of the respiratory muscles. We present a case of a 43-year-old male with severe CSA, who was successfully treated with BiPAP ST equipment.

  16. Respiratory symptoms of megaesophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Di Stefano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Megaesophagus as the end result of achalasia is the consequence of disordered peristalsis and the slow decompensation of the esophageal muscular layer. The main symptoms of achalasia are dysphagia, regurgitation, chest pain and weight loss, but respiratory symptoms, such as coughing, particularly when patients lie in a horizontal position, may also be common due to microaspiration. A 70-year old woman suffered from a nocturnal cough and shortness of breath with stridor. She reported difficulty in swallowing food over the past ten years, but had adapted by eating a semi-liquid diet. Chest X-ray showed right hemithorax patchy opacities projecting from the posterior mediastinum. Chest computed tomography scan showed a marked dilatation of the esophagus with abundant food residues. Endoscopy confirmed the diagnosis of megaesophagus due to esophageal achalasia, excluding other causes of obstruction, such as secondary esophagitis, polyps, leiomyoma or leiomyosarcoma. In the elderly population, swallowing difficulties due to esophageal achalasia are often underestimated and less troublesome than the respiratory symptoms that are caused by microaspiration. The diagnosis of esophageal achalasia, although uncommon, should be considered in patients with nocturnal chronic coughs and shortness of breath with stridor when concomitant swallowing difficulties are present.

  17. Alterations in cholinergic sensitivity of respiratory neurons induced by pre-natal nicotine: a mechanism for respiratory dysfunction in neonatal mice

    OpenAIRE

    Coddou, Claudio; Bravo, Eduardo; Eugenín, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine may link cigarette smoking during pregnancy with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Pre-natal nicotine leads to diminished ventilatory responses to hypercarbia and reduced central chemoreception in mice at post-natal days 0–3. We studied how pre-natal nicotine exposure changes the cholinergic contribution to central respiratory chemoreception in neonatal isolated brainstem–spinal cord and slice preparations.

  18. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; Heerde, van, H.J.W; Twisk, J W R; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation with heliox in these patients is unclear. The objective of this prospective cross-over study was to determine the effects of mechanical ventilation with heliox 60/40 versus convent...

  19. Implementing change in respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2010-06-01

    Though people are generally averse to change, change and innovation are critically important in respiratory care to maintain scientific and clinical progress. This paper reviews the issue of change in respiratory care. I summarize several available models of organizational and personal change (ie, those of Kotter and of Silversin and Kornacki, and the Intentional Change Theory of Boyatzis), review the characteristics of change-avid respiratory therapy departments, offer an example of a change effort in respiratory care (implementation of respiratory care protocols) and then analyze this change effort as it took place at one institution, the Cleveland Clinic, using these models. Finally, I present the results of an analysis of change-avid respiratory therapy departments and offer some suggestions regarding change management for the profession and for individual respiratory care clinicians. Common features of theories of organizational change include developing a sense of urgency, overcoming resistance, developing a guiding coalition, and involving key stakeholders early. With the understanding that change efforts may seem unduly "clean" and orderly in retrospect, the models help explain the sustainable success of efforts to implement the Respiratory Therapy Consult Service at the Cleveland Clinic. By implication, these models offer value in planning change efforts prospectively. Further analysis of features of change-avid respiratory therapy departments indicates 11 highly desired features, of which four that especially characterize change-avid departments include: having an up-to-date leadership team; employee involvement in change; celebrating wins; and an overall sense of progressiveness in the department. This analysis suggests that understanding and embracing change is important. To anchor change in our profession, greater attention should be given to developing a pipeline of respiratory care clinicians who, by virtue of their advanced training, have the skills

  20. Structure of bacterial respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrisford, John M; Baradaran, Rozbeh; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-07-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) plays a central role in cellular energy production, coupling electron transfer between NADH and quinone to proton translocation. It is the largest protein assembly of respiratory chains and one of the most elaborate redox membrane proteins known. Bacterial enzyme is about half the size of mitochondrial and thus provides its important "minimal" model. Dysfunction of mitochondrial complex I is implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases. The L-shaped complex consists of a hydrophilic arm, where electron transfer occurs, and a membrane arm, where proton translocation takes place. We have solved the crystal structures of the hydrophilic domain of complex I from Thermus thermophilus, the membrane domain from Escherichia coli and recently of the intact, entire complex I from T. thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 iron-sulphur clusters, 64 transmembrane helices). The 95Å long electron transfer pathway through the enzyme proceeds from the primary electron acceptor flavin mononucleotide through seven conserved Fe-S clusters to the unusual elongated quinone-binding site at the interface with the membrane domain. Four putative proton translocation channels are found in the membrane domain, all linked by the central flexible axis containing charged residues. The redox energy of electron transfer is coupled to proton translocation by the as yet undefined mechanism proposed to involve long-range conformational changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26807915

  1. Sleep deprivation in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doongaji D

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Ten patients diagnosed as suffering from depressive illness were treated with 2 consecutive nights of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation was effective in both types of depression viz. endoge-nous and reactive. The improvement was greater and seemed to last longer in endogenous depression as compared to reactive depression at the time of evaluation, 7 days after completion of sleep deprivation. Depressed mood, suicidal tendencies and retard-ation seemed to show the greatest improvement while insight and gastro-intestinal and somatic symptoms, improved the least.

  2. [Symptomatic and concurrent depressions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, J L

    1999-04-01

    The symptomatic and concurrent depressions description need to resort to comorbidity and symptomatic co-occurrence concepts. Patients with depressive symptoms or in a major depressive episode may also be suffering from another nonmood psychiatric disorders as alcoholism, anxiety or eating disorders. Many general medical conditions which are link with depression are illustrated with the examples of cancer, coronary artery disease, endocrinologic diseases, dementia, stroke and chronic fatigue syndrome. When depression and another psychiatric or medical conditions occur together, it is important to provide to the practitioner guidelines for the decision to treat one of the two disorders. This paper contains an example of decisional algorithm. PMID:10337217

  3. Respiratory mechanics studied by forced oscillations during artificial ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslin, R; Felicio da Silva, J; Duvivier, C; Chabot, F

    1993-06-01

    Potential advantages of the forced oscillation technique over other methods for monitoring total respiratory mechanics during artificial ventilation are that it does not require patient relaxation, and that additional information may be derived from the frequency dependence of the real (Re) and imaginary (Im) parts of respiratory impedance. We wanted to assess feasibility and usefulness of the forced oscillation technique in this setting and therefore used the approach in 17 intubated patients, mechanically ventilated for acute respiratory failure. Sinusoidal pressure oscillations at 5, 10 and 20 Hz were applied at the airway opening, using a specially devised loudspeaker-type generator placed in parallel with the ventilator. Real and imaginary parts were corrected for the flow-dependent impedance of the endotracheal tube; they usually exhibited large variations during the respiratory cycle, and were computed separately for the inspiratory and expiratory phases. In many instances the real part was larger during inspiration, probably due to the larger respiratory flow, and decreased with increasing frequency. The imaginary part of respiratory impedance usually increased with increasing frequency during expiration, as expected for a predominately elastic system, but often varied little, or even decreased, with increasing frequency during inspiration. In most patients, the data were inconsistent with the usual resistance-inertance-compliance model. A much better fit was obtained with a model featuring central airways and a peripheral pathway in parallel with bronchial compliance. The results obtained with the latter model suggest that dynamic airway compression occurred during passive expiration in a number of patients. We conclude that the use of forced oscillation is relatively easy to implement during mechanical ventilation, that it allows the study of respiratory mechanics at various points in the respiratory cycle, and may help in detecting expiratory flow

  4. Recovery and outcomes after the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients and their family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herridge, Margaret S; Moss, Marc; Hough, Catherine L; Hopkins, Ramona O; Rice, Todd W; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Azoulay, Elie

    2016-05-01

    Outcomes after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are similar to those of other survivors of critical illness and largely affect the nerve, muscle, and central nervous system but also include a constellation of varied physical devastations ranging from contractures and frozen joints to tooth loss and cosmesis. Compromised quality of life is related to a spectrum of impairment of physical, social, emotional, and neurocognitive function and to a much lesser extent discrete pulmonary disability. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is ubiquitous and includes contributions from both critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy, and recovery from these lesions may be incomplete at 5 years after ICU discharge. Cognitive impairment in ARDS survivors ranges from 70 to 100 % at hospital discharge, 46 to 80 % at 1 year, and 20 % at 5 years, and mood disorders including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are also sustained and prevalent. Robust multidisciplinary and longitudinal interventions that improve these outcomes are still uncertain and data in our literature are conflicting. Studies are needed in family members of ARDS survivors to better understand long-term outcomes of the post-ICU family syndrome and to evaluate how it affects patient recovery. PMID:27025938

  5. Unsuspected myasthenia gravis presenting as respiratory failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Mier, A; Laroche, C; Green, M

    1990-01-01

    A patient developed respiratory failure after surgical removal of a recurrent thymoma, which necessitated removal of part of the diaphragm. The respiratory failure was due to previously undiagnosed myasthenia gravis, which had selectively affected the respiratory muscles.

  6. Stressful Life Events Prior to Depression Onset and the Cortisol Response to Stress in Youth with First Onset Versus Recurrent Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurka, R; Wynne-Edwards, K E; Harkness, K L

    2016-08-01

    The strongest proximal predictors of depression onset in adolescence are stressful life events (SLEs). Changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress are theorized to mediate the etiological effect of SLEs on depression onset. The goal of the current study was to examine differences in the cortisol response to a laboratory-induced stressor between youth with versus without at least one SLE in the etiologically-central 3-month period prior to depression onset. One hundred adolescents (24 first-onset depression, 18 recurrent depression, and 58 non-depressed controls) had five salivary cortisol samples collected over the course of the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). SLEs were assessed using a rigorous contextual interview and rating system. Among those with an SLE, youth on their first onset of depression had a flatter cortisol reactivity slope relative to non-depressed adolescents, and youth on a recurrent episode of depression had a steeper recovery slope relative to first-onsets and non-depressed adolescents. In contrast, no between-group differences were found among those with no SLE prior to onset. These results suggest that differences in the HPA axis response pattern may represent a neurobiological mechanism that distinguishes depressed and non-depressed groups but only for adolescents whose depression is precipitated by SLEs. Further, this neurobiological mechanism may play a different role in the very first episode of depression than it does in recurrent episodes. PMID:26610671

  7. The development of lurasidone for bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebel, Antony; Xu, Jane; Hsu, Jay; Cucchiaro, Josephine; Pikalov, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic, recurrent illness that ranks among the top 10 causes of disability in the developed world. As the illness progresses, major depressive episodes increasingly predominate. However, few treatment options are available that have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of bipolar depression, either as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy in combination with mood stabilizers. Lurasidone is an atypical antipsychotic drug that was initially developed for the treatment of schizophrenia. Since no previous atypical antipsychotic development program had proceeded directly from work on schizophrenia to bipolar depression, the decision to focus on this indication represented an innovation in central nervous system drug development and was designed to address a clinically significant unmet need. The current review summarizes key results of a clinical development program undertaken to characterize the efficacy and safety of lurasidone in patients diagnosed with bipolar depression. Lurasidone is currently the only treatment for bipolar depression approved in the United States as both a monotherapy and an adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate. The approval of lurasidone expands available treatment options for patients with bipolar depression and provides a therapy with an overall favorable risk-benefit profile. PMID:26771990

  8. Divergent mitochondrial respiratory chains in phototrophic relatives of apicomplexan parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Flegontov, Pavel

    2015-02-06

    Four respiratory complexes and ATP-synthase represent central functional units in mitochondria. In some mitochondria and derived anaerobic organelles, a few or all of these respiratory complexes have been lost during evolution. We show that the respiratory chain of Chromera velia, a phototrophic relative of parasitic apicomplexans, lacks complexes I and III, making it a uniquely reduced aerobic mitochondrion. In Chromera, putative lactate:cytochrome c oxidoreductases are predicted to transfer electrons from lactate to cytochrome c, rendering complex III unnecessary. The mitochondrial genome of Chromera has the smallest known protein-coding capacity of all mitochondria, encoding just cox1 and cox3 on heterogeneous linear molecules. In contrast, another photosynthetic relative of apicomplexans, Vitrella brassicaformis, retains the same set of genes as apicomplexans and dinoflagellates (cox1, cox3, and cob). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. Caudal Nuclei Of The Rat Nucleus Of The Solitary Tract Differentially Innervate Respiratory Compartments Within The Ventrolateral Medulla

    OpenAIRE

    Alheid, George F.; Jiao, Weijie; McCrimmon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial array of respiratory, cardiovascular, visceral and somatic afferents are relayed via the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) to the brainstem (and forebrain). Despite some degree of overlap within the NTS, specificity is maintained in central respiratory reflexes driven by 2nd order afferent relay neurons in the NTS. While the topographical arrangement of respiratory-related afferents targeting the NTS has been extensively investigated, their higher order brainstem targets beyon...

  10. [The role of opioidergic and GABAergic systems in the mechanosensitivity regulation of the respiratory system in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirova, L N; Safina, N F; Tarakanov, I A

    2015-01-01

    In anaesthetized white outbred male rats we investigated the change of respiratory mechanoreceptors sensitivity to morphine and phenibut. Bilateral transection of the vagus nerves causes a severely slowdown of respiratory rate in 30 minutes after the systemic administration of morphine, however after administration of phenibut the respiratory rate and other respiration parameters have not changed significantly. It means that the activation of opioid receptors by morphine does not significantly affect the function of the respiratory mechanoreceptor control loop, and transection of the vagus nerves on this background increases the probability of respiratory rhythm disorders. Activation of GABAergic system by phenibut significantly weakened the impact of the regulating contour of the respiratory mechanoreceptor on breathing parameters, up to effect of "central vagotomy": that is, to no changes in respiratory parameters after cutting the vagus nerves. PMID:27116874

  11. The neuronal insulin sensitizer dicholine succinate reduces stress-induced depressive traits and memory deficit: possible role of insulin-like growth factor 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline Brandon H

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of epidemiological studies have established a link between insulin resistance and the prevalence of depression. The occurrence of depression was found to precede the onset of diabetes and was hypothesized to be associated with inherited inter-related insufficiency of the peripheral and central insulin receptors. Recently, dicholine succinate, a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor, was shown to stimulate insulin-dependent H2O2 production of the mitochondrial respiratory chain leading to an enhancement of insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons. As such, this mechanism can be a novel target for the elevation of insulin signaling. Results Administration of DS (25 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal in CD1 mice for 7 days prior to the onset of stress procedure, diminished manifestations of anhedonia defined in a sucrose test and behavioral despair in the forced swim test. Treatment with dicholine succinate reduced the anxiety scores of stressed mice in the dark/light box paradigm, precluded stress-induced decreases of long-term contextual memory in the step-down avoidance test and hippocampal gene expression of IGF2. Conclusions Our data suggest that dicholine succinate has an antidepressant-like effect, which might be mediated via the up-regulation of hippocampal expression of IGF2, and implicate the neuronal insulin receptor in the pathogenesis of stress-induced depressive syndrome.

  12. Sphingolipids in Major Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L. Jernigan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Major depression is one of the most common and severe diseases affecting the world's population. However, the pathogenesis of the disease remains inadequately defined. Previously, a lack of monoaminergic neurotransmitters was the focus of pathophysiological concepts; however, recent concepts focus on a alteration of neurogenesis in the hippocampus. This concept suggests that neurogenesis is decreased in major depression with a rarefication of neuronal networks and a lack of new, immature neurons in the hippocampus, events that may result in the clinical symptoms of major depression. However, molecular targets involved in the pathogenesis of major depression and, in particular, a reduction of neurogenesis, are largely unknown. We have recently discovered that an inhibition of the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide system mediates the effects of tri- and tetracyclic antidepressants. Moreover, an accumulation of ceramide in the hippocampus results in depression-like symptoms. This suggests the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide system is very important in the pathogenesis of major depression.

  13. Measuring psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Meyers, B S; Flint, A J; Mulsant, B H; Whyte, E M; Ulbricht, C M; Bech, P; Rothschild, A J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Psychotic depression (PD) is a highly debilitating condition, which needs intensive monitoring. However, there is no established rating scale for evaluating the severity of PD. The aim of this analysis was to assess the psychometric properties of established depression rating scales and...... a number of new composite rating scales, covering both depressive and psychotic symptoms, in relation to PD. METHOD: The psychometric properties of the rating scales were evaluated based on data from the Study of Pharmacotherapy of Psychotic Depression. RESULTS: A rating scale consisting of the 6...... Hamilton Depression Scale failed to meet criteria for unidimensionality. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the HAMD-BPRS11 is a more valid measure than pure depression scales for evaluating the severity of PD....

  14. What is depression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofie Davidsen, Annette; Fosgerau, Christina Fogtmann

    2014-01-01

    depression is insufficient and a collaborative care (CC) model between general practice and psychiatry has been proposed to overcome this. However, for successful implementation, a CC model demands shared agreement about the concept of depression and the diagnostic process in the two sectors. We aimed to......The diagnosis of depression is defined by psychiatrists, and guidelines for treatment of patients with depression are created in psychiatry. However, most patients with depression are treated exclusively in general practice. Psychiatrists point out that general practitioners' (GPs') treatment of...... explore how depression is understood by GPs and clinical psychiatrists. We carried out qualitative in-depth interviews with 11 psychiatrists and 12 GPs. Analysis was made by Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. We found that the two groups of physicians differed considerably in their views on the...

  15. Standardization of depression measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Inka; Löwe, Bernd; Bjørner, Jakob;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To provide a standardized metric for the assessment of depression severity to enable comparability among results of established depression measures. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A common metric for 11 depression questionnaires was developed applying item response theory (IRT) methods. Data...... of 33,844 adults were used for secondary analysis including routine assessments of 23,817 in- and outpatients with mental and/or medical conditions (46% with depressive disorders) and a general population sample of 10,027 randomly selected participants from three representative German household...... surveys. RESULTS: A standardized metric for depression severity was defined by 143 items, and scores were normed to a general population mean of 50 (standard deviation = 10) for easy interpretability. It covers the entire range of depression severity assessed by established instruments. The metric allows...

  16. Pulsed depressed collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, Mark A

    2015-11-03

    A high power RF device has an electron beam cavity, a modulator, and a circuit for feed-forward energy recovery from a multi-stage depressed collector to the modulator. The electron beam cavity include a cathode, an anode, and the multi-stage depressed collector, and the modulator is configured to provide pulses to the cathode. Voltages of the electrode stages of the multi-stage depressed collector are allowed to float as determined by fixed impedances seen by the electrode stages. The energy recovery circuit includes a storage capacitor that dynamically biases potentials of the electrode stages of the multi-stage depressed collector and provides recovered energy from the electrode stages of the multi-stage depressed collector to the modulator. The circuit may also include a step-down transformer, where the electrode stages of the multi-stage depressed collector are electrically connected to separate taps on the step-down transformer.

  17. Depression, diet and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacka, Felice N; Berk, Michael

    2013-09-16

    Unhealthy lifestyle behaviour is driving an increase in the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that poor diet and a lack of exercise contribute to the genesis and course of depression. While studies examining dietary improvement as a treatment strategy in depression are lacking, epidemiological evidence clearly points to diet quality being of importance to the risk of depression. Exercise has been shown to be an effective treatment strategy for depression, but this is not reflected in treatment guidelines, and increased physical activity is not routinely encouraged when managing depression in clinical practice. Recommendations regarding dietary improvement, increases in physical activity and smoking cessation should be routinely given to patients with depression. Specialised and detailed advice may not be necessary. Recommendations should focus on following national guidelines for healthy eating and physical activity. PMID:25370279

  18. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Mary (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas (Livermore, CA); Birch, James M. (Albany, CA)

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  19. Respiratory function of people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and caregiver distress level: a correlational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagnini Francesco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a rare, fatal neurodegenerative disorder with no curative treatment characterized by degeneration of motor neurons involving a progressive impairment of motor and respiratory functions. Most patients die of ventilator respiratory failure. Caregivers have a great influence on the patient”s quality of life as well as on the quality of care. Home influence of the caregiver on patient care is notable. To date, no study has investigated how psychological issues of caregivers would influence respiratory variables of ALS patients. The study aimed at finding out if there is a relationship between the respiratory function of ALS patients and the level of distress of their caregivers. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate respiratory issues (PCF and FVC and the perception of social support of ALS patients. Caregivers filled questionnaires about trait anxiety, depression, and burden of care. Forty ALS patients and their caregivers were recruited. Results FVC and PCF were positively related to patient perception of social support and negatively related to caregiver anxiety, depression, and burden. Discussion The distress of ALS caregivers is related to patient respiratory issues. The first and more intuitive explanation emphasizes the impact that the patient’s clinical condition has with respect to the caregiver. However, it is possible to hypothesize that if caregivers feel psychologically better, their patient’s quality of life improves and that a condition of greater well-being and relaxation could also increase ventilatory capacity. Furthermore, care management could be carried out more easily by caregivers who pay more attention to the patient's respiratory needs. Conclusion Patient perception of social support and caregiver distress are related to respiratory issues in ALS.

  20. Fibromyalgia and Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Gracely, Richard H.; M. Catherine Bushnell; Marta Ceko

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia and depression might represent two manifestations of affective spectrum disorder. They share similar pathophysiology and are largely targeted by the same drugs with dual action on serotoninergic and noradrenergic systems. Here, we review evidence for genetic and environmental factors that predispose, precipitate, and perpetuate fibromyalgia and depression and include laboratory findings on the role of depression in fibromyalgia. Further, we comment on several aspects of fibromyal...

  1. Physical activity & depression

    OpenAIRE

    Tsiantoula E.; Tsiadoula L.; Patsiaouras A.; Kokaridas D.

    2012-01-01

    Depression is a major public health disorder. Clinical depression is the most frequent disability in North America among other countries and by 2020 it is estimated that it will represent the second most common disability worldwide. Physical activity can be used to prevent as well as treat depression. Its characteristics and structure should be individualized to the personality and special needs of the patient as well as to the severity of the disorder. Intensity, duration and the place of pe...

  2. The Nation in Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Christina D. Romer

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the American Great Depression and the ways in which the U.S. experience during the 1930s resembled that of other countries in some regards and fundamentally differed in other aspects. I also evaluate the evidence on the causes of the Great Depression in the United States and the sources of the eventual recovery. The picture painted of the American Great Depression is one that stresses the importance of national, rather than international, aggregate demand shocks. The exper...

  3. Stress, norepinephrine and depression.

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, B E

    2001-01-01

    Stress is an important precipitant factor in depression, and the changes in various body systems that occur in depression are similar to those observed in response to stress. This paper discusses the interactions among the immune, endocrine and norepinephrine systems that are evident in patients with depression, as well as those affected by stress. Many of the stress-induced changes can be reversed by antidepressants, particularly norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.

  4. DEPRESSION IN CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tat'yana Gratsievna Voznesenskaya

    2009-06-01

    both direct and indirect risk factor for the development of stroke. on the other. The vascular depression concept by G.S. Alexopoulos and its main points are discussed. The author gives her own data on the prevalence of depression in dyscirculatory encephalopathy with non-dementia cognitive disorders. She gives prove that a neurologist should diagnose and treat depression and to choose antidepressants for its treatment.

  5. Management of Bipolar Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Jae Seung Chang; Kyooseob Ha

    2011-01-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder spend more time in a depressed than manic state, even with individualized treatment. To date, bipolar depression is often misdiagnosed and ineffectively managed both for acute episodes and residual symptoms. This review attempts to summarize the current status of available treatment strategies in the treatment of bipolar depression. For acute and prophylactic treatment, a substantial body of evidence supports the antidepressive efficacy of lithium for bipolar di...

  6. Depression in Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Fiske, Amy; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Gatz, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Depression is less prevalent among older adults than among younger adults but can have serious consequences. Over half of cases represent a first onset in later life. Although suicide rates in the elderly are declining, they are still higher than in younger adults and more closely associated with depression. Depressed older adults are less likely to endorse affective symptoms and more likely to display cognitive changes, somatic symptoms, and loss of interest than are younger adults. Risk fac...

  7. Depression and eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, R C

    1998-01-01

    Both depressive disorders and eating disorders are multidimensional and heterogeneous disorders. This paper examines the nature of their relationship by reviewing clinical descriptive, family-genetic, treatment, and biological studies that relate to the issue. The studies confirm the prominence of depressive symptoms and depressive disorders in eating disorders. Other psychiatric syndromes which occur with less frequency, such as anxiety disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorders in anorexia nervosa, or personality disorders, anxiety disorders, and substance abuse in bulimia nervosa, also play an important role in the development and maintenance of eating disorders. Since few studies have controlled for starvation-induced physical, endocrine, or psychological changes which mimic the symptoms considered diagnostic for depression, further research will be needed. The evidence for a shared etiology is not compelling for anorexia nervosa and is at most suggestive for bulimia nervosa. Since in contemporary cases dieting-induced weight loss is the principal trigger, women with self-critical or depressive features will be disproportionately recruited into eating disorders. The model that fits the data best would accommodate a relationship between eating disorders and the full spectrum of depressive disorders from no depression to severe depression, with somewhat higher rates of depression in bulimic anorectic and bulimia nervosa patients than in restricting anorexia nervosa patients, but the model would admit a specific pathophysiology and psychopathology in each eating disorder. PMID:9809221

  8. [Sleep in depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringuey, D; Darcourt, G

    1990-11-28

    Insomnia is a cardinal symptom of depression, side by side with alterations of mood and slowing down of psychomotor activities. It bears witness to a rupture in the built-in circadian rhythm: architectural changes in sleep betray a biological desynchronization. Insomnia is also a failed attempt at finding a solution to depression. Total deprivation of sleep for one night may damp down the depressive disorders, and so does partial sleep deprivation in the second part of the night during several days. This leads to the conclusion that the waking-sleep system participates in the expression of symptoms of depression or even contributes to the genesis of the disease. PMID:2148377

  9. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  10. [Vaccinations in respiratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lode, H M; Stahlmann, R

    2015-09-01

    Vaccinations are the most successful and cost-effective measures for prevention of infections. Important pathogens of respiratory tract infections (e.g. influenza viruses and pneumococci) can be effectively treated by vaccinations. The seasonal trivalent and recently now quadrivalent influenza vaccines include antigens from influenza A and B type viruses, which have to be modified annually oriented to the circulating strains. The effective protection by influenza vaccination varies considerably (too short protection time, mismatch); therefore, administration late in the year is the best approach (November/December). Two pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for adults: the over 30-year-old 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the 4-year-old 13-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV13). The immunological and clinical efficacy of PPV23 is controversially discussed; however, a moderate reduction of invasive pneumococcal infections is widely accepted. The PCV13 stimulates a T-cell response and has currently demonstrated its clinical efficacy in an impressive study (CAPiTA). The problem of PCV13 is the relatively limited coverage of only 47% of the currently circulating invasive pneumococcal serotypes. PMID:26330051

  11. Combinations of resting RSA and RSA reactivity impact maladaptive mood repair and depression symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Bylsma, Lauren M.; Rottenberg, Jonathan; Kovacs, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether the combined indices of respiratory sinus arrhythmia at rest (resting RSA) and in response to a sad film (RSA reactivity) predict effective and ineffective responses to reduce sadness (adaptive vs. maladaptive mood repair) in women with histories of juvenile-onset depression (n = 74) and no history of major mental disorders (n = 75). Structural equation models were used to estimate latent resting RSA, depression, and adaptive and maladaptive mood repair and to test the stu...

  12. High cardiac vagal control protects against future depressive symptoms under conditions of high social support

    OpenAIRE

    Hopp, Henrik; Shallcross, Amanda J.; Ford, Brett Q.; Troy, Allison S.; Wilhelm, Frank H.; Mauss, Iris B.

    2013-01-01

    High cardiac vagal control (as measured by respiratory sinus arrhythmia; RSA) is associated with lower depression. Recent theories argue that people’s responsiveness to social resources is a key mechanism in this association. This argument implies two hypotheses: first, high RSA should be related to decreased depressive symptoms only when social resources (social support) are available; second, utilization of available social resources (social engagement) should serve as a mechanism for the p...

  13. How Is Respiratory Failure Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Once your doctor figures out what's causing your respiratory failure, he or she will plan how to treat that disease or condition. Treatments may include medicines, procedures, and other therapies. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: December 19, 2011 Twitter ...

  14. Research outputs in respiratory medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Rippon, I; Lewison, G; Partridge, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is currently little information regarding how much the distribution of research activity in respiratory medicine reflects the interests of its clinicians and scientists, the disease burden in any country, or the availability of funding.

  15. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; Novel coronavirus; nCoV ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Middle East ... 2, 2015. www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/mers/faq.html . Accessed April ...

  16. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Boorsma, Carian E.; Christina Draijer; Barbro N. Melgert

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmon...

  17. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Modrykamien, Ariel M.; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss t...

  18. Nutritional Aspects of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Undine E. Lang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Several nutrition, food and dietary compounds have been suggested to be involved in the onset and maintenance of depressive disorders and in the severity of depressive symptoms. Nutritional compounds might modulate depression associated biomarkers and parallel the development of depression, obesity and diabetes. In this context, recent studies revealed new mediators of both energy homeostasis and mood changes (i.e. IGF-1, NPY, BDNF, ghrelin, leptin, CCK, GLP-1, AGE, glucose metabolism and microbiota acting in gut brain circuits. In this context several healthy foods such as olive oil, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, poultry, dairy and unprocessed meat have been inversely associated with depression risk and even have been postulated to improve depressive symptoms. In contrast, unhealthy western dietary patterns including the consumption of sweetened beverage, refined food, fried food, processed meat, refined grain, and high fat diary, biscuits, snacking and pastries have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of depression in longitudinal studies. However, it is always difficult to conclude a real prospective causal relationship from these mostly retrospective studies as depressed individuals might also change their eating habits secondarily to their depression. Additionally specific selected nutritional compounds, e.g. calcium, chromium, folate, PUFAs, vitamin D, B12, zinc, magnesium and D-serine have been postulated to be used as ad-on strategies in antidepressant treatment. In this context, dietary and lifestyle interventions may be a desirable, effective, pragmatical and non-stigmatizing prevention and treatment strategy for depression. At last, several medications (pioglitazone, metformin, exenatide, atorvastatin, gram-negative antibiotics, which have traditionally been used to treat metabolic disorders showed a certain potential to treat depression in first randomized controlled clinical trials.

  19. Climate Change and Respiratory Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Motahari, Hooman; Taghizadeh Khamesi, Mojdeh; Sharifi, Arash; Campos, Michael; Schraufnagel, Dean E

    2016-08-01

    The rate of global warming has accelerated over the past 50 years. Increasing surface temperature is melting glaciers and raising the sea level. More flooding, droughts, hurricanes, and heat waves are being reported. Accelerated changes in climate are already affecting human health, in part by altering the epidemiology of climate-sensitive pathogens. In particular, climate change may alter the incidence and severity of respiratory infections by affecting vectors and host immune responses. Certain respiratory infections, such as avian influenza and coccidioidomycosis, are occurring in locations previously unaffected, apparently because of global warming. Young children and older adults appear to be particularly vulnerable to rapid fluctuations in ambient temperature. For example, an increase in the incidence in childhood pneumonia in Australia has been associated with sharp temperature drops from one day to the next. Extreme weather events, such as heat waves, floods, major storms, drought, and wildfires, are also believed to change the incidence of respiratory infections. An outbreak of aspergillosis among Japanese survivors of the 2011 tsunami is one such well-documented example. Changes in temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, and air pollution influence viral activity and transmission. For example, in early 2000, an outbreak of Hantavirus respiratory disease was linked to a local increase in the rodent population, which in turn was attributed to a two- to threefold increase in rainfall before the outbreak. Climate-sensitive respiratory pathogens present challenges to respiratory health that may be far greater in the foreseeable future. PMID:27300144

  20. Depression in Children and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Return to Web version Depression in Children and Teens Depression in Children and Teens How are the symptoms ... aafp.org/afp/20001115/2297.html) Childhood and Adolescent Depression by SK Bhatia, M.D., and SC Bhatia, ...

  1. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prevention (7 items) Treatments (11 items) Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression ... why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression do work. One type of effective ...

  2. Helping your teen with depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000646.htm Helping your teen with depression To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your teen's depression may be treated with talk therapy, anti-depression ...

  3. Depression During and After Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression during and after pregnancy fact sheet ePublications Depression during and after pregnancy fact sheet This information in Spanish (en español) Print this fact sheet Depression during and after pregnancy fact sheet (PDF, 260 ...

  4. St. John's Wort and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... W X Y Z St. John's Wort and Depression: In Depth Share: On This Page Introduction Key ... will help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Depression Depression is a medical condition that affects about ...

  5. Capnography is superior to pulse oximetry for the detection of respiratory depression during colonoscopy La capnografía es superior a la pulsioximetría en la detección de depresión respiratoria durante las colonoscopias

    OpenAIRE

    G. Cacho; J. L. Pérez-Calle; Barbado, A.; J. L. Lledó; R. Ojea; C. M. Fernández-Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    Background: pulse oximetry is a widely accepted procedure for ventilatory monitoring during gastrointestinal endoscopy, but this method provides an indirect measurement of the respiratory function. In addition, detection of abnormal ventilatory activity can be delayed, especially if supplemental oxygen is provided. Capnography offers continuous real-time measurement of expiratory carbon dioxide. Objective: we aimed at prospectively examining the advantages of capnography over the standard pul...

  6. Mapping Depression in Schizophrenia: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Veena; Peters, Emmanuelle; Guinn, Ashley; Fannon, Dominic; Russell, Tamara; Sumich, Alexander; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Williams, Steven C R; Ffytche, Dominic H

    2016-05-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in schizophrenia, often left untreated, and associated with a high relapse rate, suicidal ideation, increased mortality, reduced social adjustment and poor quality of life. The neural mechanisms underlying depression in psychosis are poorly understood. Given reports of altered brain response to negative facial affect in depressive disorders, we examined brain response to emotive facial expressions in relation to levels of depression in people with psychosis. Seventy outpatients (finalN= 63) and 20 healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during an implicit affect processing task involving presentation of facial expressions of fear, anger, happiness as well as neutral expressions and a (no face) control condition. All patients completed Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and had their symptoms assessed on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). In patients, depression (BDI-II) scores associated positively with activation of the left thalamus, extending to the putamen-globus pallidus, insula, inferior-middle frontal and para-post-pre-central gyri during fearful expressions. Furthermore, patients with moderate-to-severe depression had significantly higher activity in these brain regions during fearful expressions relative to patients with no, minimal, or mild depression and healthy participants. The study provides first evidence of enhanced brain response to fearful facial expressions, which signal an uncertain source of threat in the environment, in patients with psychosis and a high level of self-reported depression. PMID:26712855

  7. Urgencias respiratorias Respiratory emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Martínez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Las urgencias respiratorias en un paciente con cáncer pueden tener su origen en patologías de la vía aérea, del parénquima pulmonar o de los grandes vasos. La causa puede ser el propio tumor o complicaciones concomitantes. La obstrucción de la vía aérea debería ser inicialmente evaluada con procedimientos endoscópicos. En situaciones severas, la cirugía raramente es posible. El emplazamiento endobronquial de stents e isótopos radiactivos (braquiterapia, la ablación tumoral por láser o la terapia fotodinámica, pueden aliviar de forma rápida los síntomas y reestablecer el flujo aéreo. El manejo de la hemoptisis depende de la causa que la provoque y de la cuantía de la misma. La broncoscopia sigue siendo el procedimiento de primera línea en la mayor parte de los casos; aporta información diagnóstica y puede interrumpir el sangrado mediante lavados con suero helado, taponamiento endobronquial o inyecciones tópicas de adrenalina o trombina. La radioterapia externa sigue siendo un procedimiento extraordinariamente útil para tratar la hemoptisis de causa tumoral y en situaciones bien seleccionadas la terapia endobronquial con láser o braquiterapia y la embolización arterial bronquial pueden proporcionar un gran rendimiento paliativo. Las urgencias respiratorias por enfermedad del parénquima pulmonar en un paciente oncológico, pueden tener causa tumoral, iatrogénica o infecciosa. El reconocimiento precoz de cada una de ellas determina la administración del tratamiento específico y las posibilidades de éxito.Respiratory emergencies in a patient with cancer can have their origin in pathologies of the airway, of the pulmonary parenchyma or the large vessels. The cause can be the tumour itself or concomitant complications. Obstruction of the airway should be initially evaluated with endoscopic procedures. Surgery is rarely possible in serious situations. The endobronchial placement of stents or radioactive isotopes

  8. Memory training in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, E.S.; Vanderhasselt, M.A.; Vrijsen, J.N.

    2015-01-01

    Memory biases, that is, general memory impairments as well as specific mood-congruent memory biases, are important vulnerability factors in depression. Recently, computerized memory trainings have been developed to target these biases, reducing rumination and lightening depressive symptoms. This rev

  9. Managing depression in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Sanati, Abdi; Young, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Depression is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. The majority of patients suffering from depressive disorder are diagnosed and managed in primary care. Optimal management reduces the risk of relapse and improves the quality of life. The main treatment modalities are antidepressants and psychological therapies. Lifestyle changes, exercise and psychoeducation also play an important role in management.

  10. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on navigating depression following a spinal cord injury. University of Washington provides pamphlets on depression with spinal ... grant number 90PR3002, from the U.S. Administration for Community Living, ... Services, Washington, D.C. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under ...

  11. Real Stories of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Depression Background on Educational Materials Resources for Health Care Providers Public Service Announcements (PSAs) Join A Study Depression Studies for Adults Contact Us Staff Directories Privacy Notice Policies FOIA Accessibility Topic ... The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is part of the National Institutes of ...

  12. Testosterone and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükrü Kartalcı

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgens have various effects on human body and mood. Testosterone, a hormone mainly secreted from testes and adrenals, is one of the most potent androgens. Multiple studies have found that testosterone plays a role in regulating sexual activity, libido, social behaviors, aggression, cognitive functions, sleep control and well-being in men and women. Testosterone deficiency in hypogonadic or elderly men leads to neuropsychiatric problems, such as fatigue, loss of libido, irritability, insomnia and depressive mood. Testosterone replacement therapy consistently reverses these sequel in men. On the other hand, hyperandrogenic states in women are related to aggression and antisocial behavior, which might lead to depressive mood. Low testosterone levels may also result in depression among oophorectomized women. Because of such effects, a relationship between testosterone and depression has long been an issue of speculation, but yet very few studies have addressed this relation. Along with clinical studies, experimental and epidemiological studies show that testosterone is related to depression in men and women. But studies of testosterone concentrations in depression have yielded inconsistent results reporting low as well as high testosterone levels associated with depression. In this article, the physiological and psychological effects of testosterone and evidence regarding its relationship to depressive disorders and possible gender differences have been reviewed.

  13. Depression Begets Depression: Comparing the Predictive Utility of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms to Later Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kate; Feng, Xin; Hipwell, Alison; Klostermann, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background: The high comorbidity between depressive and anxiety disorders, especially among females, has called into question the independence of these two symptom groups. It is possible that childhood anxiety typically precedes depression in girls. Comparing of the predictive utility of symptoms of anxiety with the predictive utility of symptoms…

  14. Depression and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a common, yet serious, medical illness. Clinical depression is a “whole-body” illness that affects your mood, thoughts, body and behavior. Without treatment, symptoms can last for weeks, months or years. Appropriate ... Clinical depression can affect anyone: Anyone can experience ...

  15. Real Stories of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Depression Background on Educational Materials Resources for Health Care Providers Public Service Announcements (PSAs) Join A Study Depression Studies for Adults Contact Us Staff Directories Privacy ... The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is part of the National Institutes of ...

  16. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 7309 ☰ Living with Paralysis Get Support Get Involved Research Events Blog & Forum About Us Donate Living with Paralysis > Newly paralyzed > How do I deal with depression and adjustment to my SCI? How do I deal with depression and ...

  17. Postpartum Depression: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Angela

    1993-01-01

    Occurring in about 12 percent of postpartum women, postpartum depression has been focus of considerable research. Variables that have been correlated with postpartum depression range from biological causes, to lack of social support, to relationship with husband, to attributional styles, to psychodynamic explanations. There is need for more…

  18. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Depression, however, is a serious medical disorder that affects your thoughts, feelings, physical health and behaviors as well as other aspects of your life. Depression can cause physical and psychological symptoms. It can worsen pain, make sleep difficult, cause loss of energy, take away your ...

  19. Remote Control of Respiratory Neural Network by Spinal Locomotor Generators

    OpenAIRE

    Le Gal, Jean-Patrick; Juvin, Laurent; Cardoit, Laura; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Morin, Didier

    2014-01-01

    During exercise and locomotion, breathing rate rapidly increases to meet the suddenly enhanced oxygen demand. The extent to which direct central interactions between the spinal networks controlling locomotion and the brainstem networks controlling breathing are involved in this rhythm modulation remains unknown. Here, we show that in isolated neonatal rat brainstem-spinal cord preparations, the increase in respiratory rate observed during fictive locomotion is associated with an increase in t...

  20. Rigid spine syndrome with respiratory failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Morita, H.; Kondo, K.; Hoshino, K; Maruyama, K; Yanagisawa, N

    1990-01-01

    The pathogenesis and therapy of respiratory failure in the rigid spine syndrome are discussed in two cases who improved with respiratory assistance. In both cases, the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide were reversed in arterial blood gas analysis and %VC was less than 30%. Remission from respiratory failure has been obtained by the use of a ventilator during the night. The cause of the respiratory failure in both cases was severe restrictive respiratory dysfunction due to extreme...

  1. [Depression and inflammation in rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buras, Aleksandra; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Szulc, Agata

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the prevalence of depression in rheumatologic patients is higher than in the general population. Socioeconomic factors are not a sufficient explanation of mood disorder in these patients. Symptoms reported by patients with chronic inflammatory diseases resemble changes defined as "sickness behavior". Mood disorders among somatic patients could be explained by disturbances of the immune system according to the monoaminergic theory of depression. Inflammatory factors such as IL-1 (interleukin-1), IL-2 (interleukin-2), IL-6 (interleukin-6), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α), and IFN-γ (interferon-γ) act within the CNS (central nervous system). They get through from peripheral tissues as well as being synthesized de novo by neurons. This cytokine activity correlates positively with depression intensity as well as with genetic polymorphism of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter. The theory of glucocorticoid resistance-mediated depression (limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [LHPA] axis) is also connected with gained proinflammatory cytokines activity. It might assume the form of a vicious circle. Depressed mood is probably linked with depression in immune-mediated diseases. An elevated level of proinflammatory cytokines is able to activate IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase)--an enzyme catabolizing tryptophan (5-HT precursor). Those reactions probably play the main role at the biochemical level. IDO metabolites extensively disturb neurotransmission. 3-Hydroxykynurenine (3OH-KYN), quinolinic acid (Quin) and kynurenic acid (KYNA) are neurotoxic by releasing oxidative stress mediators. Moreover, they activate MAO (monoamine oxidase), which degrades neurotransmitters responsible for stable mood. Bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems is significant for depression treatment, as well as CNS protection against incremental neurodegeneration among seemingly diverse diseases. PMID:26943313

  2. Depression and inflammation in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Buras

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the prevalence of depression in rheumatologic patients is higher than in the general population. Socioeconomic factors are not a sufficient explanation of mood disorder in these patients. Symptoms reported by patients with chronic inflammatory diseases resemble changes defined as “sickness behavior”. Mood disorders among somatic patients could be explained by disturbances of the immune system according to the monoaminergic theory of depression. Inflammatory factors such as IL-1 (interleukin-1, IL-2 (interleukin-2, IL-6 (interleukin-6, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α, and IFN-γ (interferon-γ act within the CNS (central nervous system. They get through from peripheral tissues as well as being synthesized de novo by neurons. This cytokine activity correlates positively with depression intensity as well as with genetic polymorphism of the serotonin (5-HT transporter. The theory of glucocorticoid resistance-mediated depression (limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [LHPA] axis is also connected with gained proinflammatory cytokines activity. It might assume the form of a vicious circle. Depressed mood is probably linked with depression in immune-mediated diseases. An elevated level of proinflammatory cytokines is able to activate IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase – an enzyme catabolizing tryptophan (5-HT precursor. Those reactions probably play the main role at the biochemical level. IDO metabolites extensively disturb neurotransmission. 3-Hydroxykynurenine (3OH-KYN, quinolinic acid (Quin and kynurenic acid (KYNA are neurotoxic by releasing oxidative stress mediators. Moreover, they activate MAO (monoamine oxidase, which degrades neurotransmitters responsible for stable mood. Bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems is significant for depression treatment, as well as CNS protection against incremental neurodegeneration among seemingly diverse diseases.

  3. [Severe depression : psychoanalysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet de la Maisonneuve, O

    2009-12-01

    The indication for psychoanalysis in severe depression is not clear. And yet, demands for this type of intervention are increasing, despite the absence of any form of consensus on the subject. Freud considered depression as a failure of analytical efforts and, based on this observation, revised his theory, in particular to include the notions of narcissism and the death drive. Many analysts have been reluctant to follow his teachings on this last point and provide depressed patients with analytical-type therapies aimed at restoring narcissism. Melanie Klein pushed Freud's ideas about depression even further and brought such therapies back to the heart of analytical practice. Jacques Lacan took the debate to another level by proposing an overhaul of the principles on which analysis has been based. Today, while following certain precautionary rules, true psychoanalyses can be proposed to patients with severe depression, whether of the bipolar, recurring or even neurotic type that can reach this level of severity. PMID:20141799

  4. Depression in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, R E

    1988-12-01

    Depressive syndromes that occur during the course of schizophrenia are not clearly understood but have important implications for the treatment of the schizophrenic patient. In this review of the literature on depression secondary to schizophrenia, the author notes that lack of tested diagnostic criteria has led to a misunderstanding of its relatively high frequency and its association with poor outcome features such as impaired psychosocial functioning, schizophrenic relapse, and suicide. Differential diagnosis, including ruling out akinetic depression, is essential, he believes, partly because the concept of schizophrenic depression as postpsychotic is not supported by evidence. Clinical management must address such increased risk factors as relapse and suicide, but evidence indicates that secondary depression in schizophrenia does not respond to antidepressant medication. PMID:3068116

  5. Lao Depression Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson-Muskin, M B; Golden, C

    1989-01-01

    There are no measurement tools that accurately measure depression among Lao refugees. The overall purpose of this research was to complete the development and validation procedures for the Lao Depression Inventory (LDI). The study consisted of 216 Ethnic Lao refugees. A clinical interview and 164 true/false questions were administered to identify specific items which could identify depression among the Ethnic Lao people. All items were administered in both English and Lao. Overall, 78 of the 164 items differentiated groups of depressed and nondepressed Lao at the .01 level. Results of validation procedures showed that a 30-item scale had an accuracy rate of 89% in identifying the presence of depression in the validation group; the hit-rate for the same items and cutoff was 92% in the cross-validation group. Potential uses of the scale are discussed. PMID:2918451

  6. Depression following myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjær

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe life event that is accompanied by an increased risk of depression. Mounting evidence suggests that post-MI depression is associated with adverse outcomes, but the underlying mechanisms of this association remain unclear, and no previous studies have examined...... whether the mental burden of MI is so heavy that it increases the risk of suicide. Although post-MI depression is common and burdensome, the condition remains under-recognised and under-treated. The development of new strategies to improve the quality of care for people with post-MI depression requires...... thorough understanding of the mechanisms that influence the prognosis as well as knowledge of the present care provided. The purpose of this PhD thesis is accordingly subdivided into four specific aims: 1. To estimate the prevalence of depression in people with MI after three months, and to estimate the...

  7. Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Series JOINT COMMISSION LAUNCHES EDUCATIONAL CAMPAIGN ON ADULT DEPRESSION Educational Brochure Provides Guidance on Recognizing and Treating Depression [PDF] DBSA 2013–2017 STRATEGIC PLAN Learn how ...

  8. Depression in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Wing Ma, Terry; Kam-Tao Li, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Depression is the most common psychiatric illness in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The reported prevalence of depression in dialysis population varied from 22.8% (interview-based diagnosis) to 39.3% (self- or clinician-administered rating scales). Such differences were attributed to the overlapping symptoms of uraemia and depression. Systemic review and meta-analysis of observational studies showed that depression was a significant predictor of mortality in dialysis population. The optimal screening tool for depression in dialysis patients remains uncertain. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD) have been validated for screening purposes. Patients who scored ≥14 using BDI should be referred to a psychiatrist for early evaluation. Structured Clinical Interview for DSM disorders (SCID) remains the gold standard for diagnosis. Non-pharmacological treatment options include cognitive behavioural therapy and exercise training programs. Although frequent haemodialysis may have beneficial effects on patients' physical and mental well-being, it cannot and should not be viewed as a treatment of depression. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are generally effective and safe in ESRD patients, but most studies were small, non-randomized and uncontrolled. The European Renal Best Practice (ERBP) guideline suggests a trial of SSRI for 8 to 12 weeks in dialysis patients who have moderate-major depression. The treatment effect should be re-evaluated after 12 weeks to avoid prolonging ineffective medication. This review will discuss the current understanding in the diagnosis and management of depression in dialysis patients. PMID:26860073

  9. Depression as a prognostic factor for breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerl, Karen; Andersen, Elisabeth W; Keiding, Niels;

    2003-01-01

    affective and anxiety disorders were divided and categorized into five ordinal diagnostic groups. Early-stage (N=10382) and late-stage (N=10211) breast cancer patients were analyzed separately with Cox's regression adjusted for well-documented somatic prognostic variables. The authors used survival analysis......It is unclear if depression or depressive symptoms have an effect on mortality in breast cancer patients. In this population-based, nationwide, retrospective cohort study in Denmark, depression was defined as affective or anxiety disorders that necessitated psychiatric hospital admission. All the...... of data from three central registers and found that breast cancer patients with depression had a modestly but significantly higher risk of mortality depending on stage of breast cancer and time of depression. The same result was found after censoring unnatural causes of death such as accident...

  10. Antagonism by theophylline of respiratory inhibition induced by adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, F L; Millhorn, D E; Kiley, J P

    1985-11-01

    The effects on respiration of an analogue of adenosine, L-2-N6-(phenylisopropyl)adenosine (PIA), and of the methylxanthine, theophylline, were determined in 19 vagotomized glomectomized cats whose end-tidal PCO2 was kept constant by means of a servo-controlled ventilator. Integrated phrenic nerve activity was used to represent respiratory output. Our results show that PIA, whether given systemically or into the third cerebral ventricle, depressed respiration. Systemically administered theophylline stimulated respiration. Theophylline given intravenously, or into the third ventricle not only reversed the depressive effects of previously administered PIA but caused further increases of respiration above the control level. Prior systemic administration of theophylline blocked both respiratory and hypotensive effects of subsequently administered PIA. Effects of either agent on medullary extracellular fluid pH did not explain the results. We conclude that the adenosine analogue PIA, acts to inhibit neurons in the brain that are involved in the control of respiration and that its effects are blocked by theophylline. We suggest that adenosine acts as a tonic modulator of respiration and that theophylline stimulates breathing by competitive antagonism of adenosine at neuronal receptor sites. PMID:4066573

  11. Reduced cerebrospinal fluid ethanolamine concentration in major depressive disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Shintaro Ogawa; Kotaro Hattori; Daimei Sasayama; Yuki Yokota; Ryo Matsumura; Junko Matsuo; Miho Ota; Hiroaki Hori; Toshiya Teraishi; Sumiko Yoshida; Takamasa Noda; Yoshiaki Ohashi; Hajime Sato; Teruhiko Higuchi; Nobutaka Motohashi

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids play key roles in the function of the central nervous system, and their alterations are implicated in psychiatric disorders. In the search for a biomarker for major depressive disorder (MDD), we used high-performance liquid chromatography to measure amino acids and related molecules in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 52 patients with MDD (42 depressed and 10 remitted; DSM-IV) and 54 matched controls. Significant differences were found in four amino acid concentrations between the...

  12. A Case Study of Respiratory Disease in a Veal Calf Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Palechek, Neil P.; Schoonderwoerd, Matt; Perry, Allen W.

    1987-01-01

    An outbreak of respiratory disease occurred in a central Alberta veal operation, after production capacity had been increased fourfold. Mortality rate reached 24.6% despite agressive antibiotic therapy. A review of the records revealed a cyclical disease pattern in each room. Weekly cleaning of occupied calf rooms was correlated with the disease pattern. Aerosols generated by a high pressure sprayer appeared to trigger transmission of respiratory pathogens in malnourished neonatal calves.

  13. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Neuromyelitis Optica Treated Successfully with Plasmapheresis

    OpenAIRE

    Massa Zantah; Coyle, Timothy B.; Debapriya Datta

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) is a demyelinating autoimmune disease involving the central nervous system. Acute respiratory failure from cervical myelitis due to NMO is known to occur but is uncommon in monophasic disease and is treated with high dose steroids. We report a case of a patient with NMO who developed acute respiratory failure related to cervical spinal cord involvement, refractory to pulse dose steroid therapy, which resolved with plasmapheresis.

  14. Crowding: risk factor or protective factor for lower respiratory disease in young children?

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, MRA; Cousens, SN; Siqueira, LFD; Alves, FM; D'Angelo, LAV

    2004-01-01

    Background: To study the effects of household crowding upon the respiratory health of young children living in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Methods: Case-control study with children aged from 2 to 59 months living within the boundaries of the city of Sao Paulo. Cases were children recruited from 5 public hospitals in central Sao Paulo with an acute episode of lower respiratory disease. Children were classified into the following diagnostic categories: acute bronchitis, acute bronchiolitis, ...

  15. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Neuromyelitis Optica Treated Successfully with Plasmapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massa Zantah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO is a demyelinating autoimmune disease involving the central nervous system. Acute respiratory failure from cervical myelitis due to NMO is known to occur but is uncommon in monophasic disease and is treated with high dose steroids. We report a case of a patient with NMO who developed acute respiratory failure related to cervical spinal cord involvement, refractory to pulse dose steroid therapy, which resolved with plasmapheresis.

  16. Acute respiratory distress in a silversmith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignesh Mukeshkumar Parikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old young male patient presented in casualty department with severe respiratory distress on the fourth day from onset of symptoms. The patient was nonsmoker and had no antecedent medical or drug history. Prior to admission, patient had dry cough and bilateral pleuritic chest pain for the last three days. He was in severe respiratory distress with use of accessory muscles of respiration. On examination, he had heart rate of 120 beats/min, blood pressure (BP of 150/80, respiratory rate of 48-52/min and central cyanosis present. On systemic examination, reduced intensity of breath sounds with extensive rhonchi and crepitation was found in both lung fields, with other examination being within normal limits. On pulse oximetry, oxygen saturation was 28% on room air, which increased up to 36% with the help of 4 L oxygen via nasal prongs. PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio was 100. Chest X-ray analysis was suggestive of non-cardiac pulmonary edema in view of bilateral fluffy opacity without cardiomegaly. In view of 2/3 positive criteria, his provisional diagnosis was Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. He required mechanical ventilatory support and was gradually weaned over a period of 10 days. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and other supportive measures. On re-evaluation of history, we found that he was a goldsmith by occupation, smelting silver and gold for the past 8-10 years. On the day of onset of symptoms, while smelting silver he was exposed to golden yellow fumes for around 15 minutes, with the quantum of exposure more than any other day earlier. From previous experience and analysis of similar silver metals, he was able to tell us that the silver was adulterated with large amount of cadmium on that day than before. Serum level of cadmium was 2.9 μg/L 6 days after initial exposure. At the time of discharge, he had residual opacities in the chest radiograph and resting oxygen saturation was 94% on room air.

  17. Unusual Respiratory Manifestations in Two Young Adults with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Lemay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult respirologists are often involved in the evaluation and treatment of young adult patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this context, the most frequent respiratory complication is nocturnal and daytime hypoventilation related to respiratory muscle weakness. The present article describes cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy involving two brothers, 17 and 19 years of age, respectively, who presented with less frequently reported respiratory complications of their disease: obstructive sleep apnea and Cheyne-Stokes respiration with central apnea, which were believed to be partially or completely related to congestive cardiomyopathy.

  18. Isovector coupling channel and central properties of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Haddad

    2010-09-01

    The influence of the isovector coupling channel on the central depression parameter and the central value of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei was studied. The isovector coupling channel leads to about 50% increase of the central depression parameter, and weakens the dependency of both central depression parameter and central density on the asymmetry, impressively contributing to the semibubble form of the charge density distribution in heavy nuclei, and increasing the probability of larger nuclei with higher proton numbers and higher neutron-to-proton ratios stable.

  19. Isovector coupling channel and central properties of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the isovector coupling channel on the central depression parameter and the central value of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei was studied. The isovector coupling channel leads to about 50% increase of the central depression parameter, and weakens the dependency of both central depression parameter and the central density on the asymmetry, impressively contributing to the semibubble form of the charge density distribution in heavy nuclei, and increasing the probability of larger nuclei with higher proton numbers and higher neutron-to-proton ratios stable. (author)

  20. Altered Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Parameswaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The major respiratory complications of obesity include a heightened demand for ventilation, elevated work of breathing, respiratory muscle inefficiency and diminished respiratory compliance. The decreased functional residual capacity and expiratory reserve volume, with a high closing volume to functional residual capacity ratio of obesity, are associated with the closure of peripheral lung units, ventilation to perfusion ratio abnormalities and hypoxemia, especially in the supine position. Conventional respiratory function tests are only mildly affected by obesity except in extreme cases. The major circulatory complications are increased total and pulmonary blood volume, high cardiac output and elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Patients with obesity commonly develop hypoventilation and sleep apnea syndromes with attenuated hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responsiveness. The final result is hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension and progressively worsening disability. Obese patients have increased dyspnea and decreased exercise capacity, which are vital to quality of life. Decreased muscle, increased joint pain and skin friction are important determinants of decreased exercise capacity, in addition to the cardiopulmonary effects of obesity. The effects of obesity on mortality in heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have not been definitively resolved. Whether obesity contributes to asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness is uncertain. Weight reduction and physical activity are effective means of reversing the respiratory complications of obesity.

  1. Depression in hypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, V; Parikh, G J; Srinivasan, V

    1983-10-01

    168 patients attending hypertension clinic were randomly selected for the study. They were thoroughly investigated using E.C.G., X-ray chest, Urine analysis, Blood sugar, Blood urea, Serum cholesterol, Serum K, Serum Na, Scrum creatinine and Uric acid level. Detailed psychiatric case history and mental examination was carried out. Beck Rating Scale was used to measure the depression. 25% of hypertensive subjects exhibited depressive features and their mean score in Beck Rating scale is 21.76. The mean score of non-depressives is 4.46. All patients were receiving methyl dopa.25 mg. twice or thrice daily with thiazide diuretic. No significant difference in the incidence of depression with the duration of medication was observed.The hypertension was classified into mild, moderate and severe depending on the diastolic pressure. Depression was more frequent in severe hypertensives but not to the statistically significant level.Further hypertensives were classified into:1. Hypertension without organ involvement2. Hypertension with LVH only3. Hypertension with additional organ involvement4. Malignant hypertensionDepression was significantly more frequent in hypertensives with complications and also hypertensives in whom the B.P. remained uncontrolled. As all the patients were on the same drug, the drug effect is common to all; hence, the higher incidence of depression in hypertensives with complications is due to the limitation and distress caused by the illness. PMID:21847301

  2. Predictors of depression stigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorm Anthony F

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate and compare the predictors of personal and perceived stigma associated with depression. Method Three samples were surveyed to investigate the predictors: a national sample of 1,001 Australian adults; a local community sample of 5,572 residents of the Australian Capital Territory and Queanbeyan aged 18 to 50 years; and a psychologically distressed subset (n = 487 of the latter sample. Personal and Perceived Stigma were measured using the two subscales of the Depression Stigma Scale. Potential predictors included demographic variables (age, gender, education, country of birth, remoteness of residence, psychological distress, awareness of Australia's national depression initiative beyondblue, depression literacy and level of exposure to depression. Not all predictors were used for all samples. Results Personal stigma was consistently higher among men, those with less education and those born overseas. It was also associated with greater current psychological distress, lower prior contact with depression, not having heard of a national awareness raising initiative, and lower depression literacy. These findings differed from those for perceived stigma except for psychological distress which was associated with both higher personal and higher perceived stigma. Remoteness of residence was not associated with either type of stigma. Conclusion The findings highlight the importance of treating the concepts of personal and perceived stigma separately in designing measures of stigma, in interpreting the pattern of findings in studies of the predictors of stigma, and in designing, interpreting the impact of and disseminating interventions for stigma.

  3. Comparison of Crocus sativus L. and imipramine in the treatment of mild to moderate depression: A pilot double-blind randomized trial [ISRCTN45683816

    OpenAIRE

    Jamshidi Amir-Hossein; Afkham Khosro; Fallah-Pour Hasan; Akhondzadeh Shahin; Khalighi-Cigaroudi Farahnaz

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background The morbidity and mortality associated with depression are considerable and continue to increase. Depression currently ranks fourth among the major causes of disability worldwide, after lower respiratory infections, prenatal conditions, and HIV/AIDS. Crocus sativus L. is used to treat depression. Many medicinal plants textbooks refer to this indication whereas there is no evidence-based document. Our objective was to compare the efficacy of stigmas of Crocus sativus (saffr...

  4. Respiratory Support for Pharmacologically Induced Hypoxia in Neonatal Calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, C. G.; Quinn, C. T.; Nielsen, S. G.; Raidal, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    Practical methods to provide respiratory support to bovine neonates in a field setting are poorly characterised. This study evaluated the response of healthy neonatal calves with pharmacologically induced respiratory suppression to nasal oxygen insufflation and to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivered via an off-the-shelf device. Ten calves were randomised to receive either nasal oxygen insufflation (Group 1, n = 5) or CPAP (Group 2, n = 5) as a first treatment after induction of respiratory depression by intravenous administration of xylazine, fentanyl, and diazepam. Calves received the alternate treatment after 10 minutes of breathing ambient air. Arterial blood gas samples were obtained prior to sedation, following sedation, following the first and second treatment, and after breathing ambient air before and after the second treatment. Oxygen insufflation significantly increased arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) but was also associated with significant hypercapnia. When used as the first treatment, CPAP was associated with significantly decreased arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide but did not increase PaO2. These results suggest that the use of CPAP may represent a practical method for correction of hypercapnia associated with inadequate ventilation in a field setting, and further research is required to characterise the use of CPAP with increased inspired oxygen concentrations. PMID:26998379

  5. From stress to inflammation and major depressive disorder: a social signal transduction theory of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavich, George M; Irwin, Michael R

    2014-05-01

    Major life stressors, especially those involving interpersonal stress and social rejection, are among the strongest proximal risk factors for depression. In this review, we propose a biologically plausible, multilevel theory that describes neural, physiologic, molecular, and genomic mechanisms that link experiences of social-environmental stress with internal biological processes that drive depression pathogenesis. Central to this social signal transduction theory of depression is the hypothesis that experiences of social threat and adversity up-regulate components of the immune system involved in inflammation. The key mediators of this response, called proinflammatory cytokines, can in turn elicit profound changes in behavior, which include the initiation of depressive symptoms such as sad mood, anhedonia, fatigue, psychomotor retardation, and social-behavioral withdrawal. This highly conserved biological response to adversity is critical for survival during times of actual physical threat or injury. However, this response can also be activated by modern-day social, symbolic, or imagined threats, leading to an increasingly proinflammatory phenotype that may be a key phenomenon driving depression pathogenesis and recurrence, as well as the overlap of depression with several somatic conditions including asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic pain, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and neurodegeneration. Insights from this theory may thus shed light on several important questions including how depression develops, why it frequently recurs, why it is strongly predicted by early life stress, and why it often co-occurs with symptoms of anxiety and with certain physical disease conditions. This work may also suggest new opportunities for preventing and treating depression by targeting inflammation. PMID:24417575

  6. Behandlingsresistent depression kan behandles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2011-01-01

    Depression is considered resistant when two treatment attempts with antidepressants from different classes fail to produce significant clinical improvement. In cases of treatment-resistant depression, it is recommended to reevaluate the diagnosis, clarify comorbidity, substance abuse and lack...... of compliance. Regarding treatment, evidence is sparse, but switching to a different antidepressant, and combination or augmentation with another agent, admission and treatment with ECT are the options. The choice of treatment must be based on the characteristics of the depression, the severity of treatment...

  7. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carian E. Boorsma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper will give an overview of what macrophage phenotypes have been described, what their known functions are, what is known about their presence in the different obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, and how they are thought to contribute to the etiology and resolution of these diseases.

  8. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Objectives:To know the relationship between hypothermia, etiology, respiratory failure and prognosis of submersion in environmental emergency medicine.Methods:FromDecember1, 2002 toSeptember30,2007, there were52 hospitalized near- drowning cases in a medical center at northernTaiwan.Retrospective study of52 submersion patients who were hospitalized during the duration was analyzed.Results:The hypothermic groups are more commonly seen in acute respiratory failure after submersion,36%vs.21%,P<0.05.The hypothermic submersion patients who are older in age than normothermic submersion patients(44vs.27 years old,P<0.05).The suicidal submersion patients are older, hypothermic and longer length of stay than accidental submersion patients.Conclusions:Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department(ED) are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  9. Response of respiratory components in x-irradiated Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron-containing cytochromes provide energy to repair radiation damage. The cytochromes of Micrococcus radiodurans are atypical in that they strongly resist reduction by sodium hydrosulfite or oxidation by potassium ferricyanide, but are typically highly sensitive to potassium cyanide inhibition of respiration. Respiration in this organism is highly resistant to radiation damage, being reduced to 60% of the control level 2 hours after an exposure of 600 kR, whereas other bacteria, such as E. coli, are reduced to near zero. This reduction in respiration may be due either to a defect produced in existing cytochromes or to a decrease in synthesis of new cytochromes. Growth in low iron medium yields reductions in growth rate, oxygen consumption per cell and radioresistance, the shoulder of the survival curve being obliterated. Analysis of 59Fe-labeled cell contents on Sephadex G-200 immediately following exposure shows little change in elution patterns of the cytochromes. Only about 7% of 59Fe label is lost from cells after 3 hours of incubation in YHC following 600 kR. No immediate loss of label is detected up to total exposures of 750 kR. The uptake of iron following x-ray exposure shows a depression of 40% of control at 600 kR. Incubation of labeled cells in Triton X-100 (0.25%, v/v) releases 20% of the total activity in 5 minutes. Spectral analysis of this material reveals the presence of both pigmentation and cytochrome. These observations suggest that very high doses of radiation do not produce gross structural changes in existing cytochromes, but their respiratory function is depressed. The delay exhibited in the depression of respiratory function may be the result of initial protein damage followed by some type of proteolytic degradation since there is an immediate decrease in iron uptake post-irradiation with no subsequent recovery even at sublethal exposures

  10. Respiratory disease surveillance in Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agocs, M.M.; Rudnai, P.; Etzel, R.A. (Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Centers for Disease Control, Budapest (Hungary))

    1992-08-28

    In October 1989, the Hungarian National Institute of Hygiene initiated the Children's Acute Respiratory Morbidity (CHARM) Surveillance System to assess the association between nine reportable respiratory diseases and air pollution. The weekly number of physician-diagnosed, reportable respiratory diseases among four age groups of children (less than 1, 1-2, 3-5, and 6-14 years) was tabulated for Sopron, a city with 60,000 residents. We calculated the proportion of diseases occurring during weeks with low, moderate, and high sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations. The weekly averages of the 24-hour median SO2 concentrations were divided into thirds at less than or equal to 17.6, greater than 17.6 to less than or equal to 26.3, and greater than 26.3 micrograms/m3 (range: 0.9-79.6 micrograms/m3), and the NO2 concentrations at less than or equal to 29.8, greater than 29.8 to less than or equal to 44.1, and greater than 44.1 micrograms/m3 (range: 4.2-90.1 micrograms/m3). During 1990, 11,474 respiratory disease cases occurred among the 4,020 children less than 15 years of age living in Sopron and monitored by the CHARM system. The two most frequently reported disease categories were rhinitis/tonsillitis/pharyngitis (71.5%) and acute bronchitis (8.5%). Sixty-seven percent of pneumonia cases occurred when SO2 concentrations were highest. We found no association between levels of NO2 and respiratory diseases. The CHARM Surveillance System may characterize more fully which groups of children develop particular respiratory diseases following exposure to air pollution.

  11. Sleep Management, Breastfeeding & Postpartum Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine Stone

    2013-01-01

    There are research that indicates that mothers with PPD who do not get enough sleep are at greater risk for more severe depression. The authors conclude that clinicians must address measures to improve sleep quality in depressed mothers in order to decrease the severity of depressive symptoms. Furthermore, researchers must develop interventions which facilitate better sleep quality in women with postpartum depression.

  12. Do You Have Major Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression Do You Have Major Depression? Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Simple ... member may have major depression. —NIMH Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  13. Respiratory tract infection during Hajj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzeer Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infection during Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca is a common illness, and it is responsible for most of the hospital admissions. Influenza virus is the leading cause of upper respiratory tract infection during Hajj, and pneumonia can be serious. Taking into account the close contacts among the pilgrims, as well as the crowding, the potential for transmission of M. tuberculosis is expected to be high. These pilgrims can be a source for spreading infection on their return home. Although vaccination program for influenza is implemented, its efficacy is uncertain in this religious season. Future studies should concentrate on prevention and mitigation of these infections.

  14. Attitude scale and general health questionnaire subscales predict depression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrollah Ebrahimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to Beck theory, dysfunctional attitude has a central role in emergence of depression. The aim of this study was to determine contributions of dysfunctional attitude and general health index to depression. Methods: In this case-control study, two groups of subjects participated. The first group consisted of 65 patients with major depression and dysthymic disorder, who were recruited from Noor and Navab Safavi Psychiatry Clinics in Isfa-han. The control group was consisted of 65 non-patient individuals who were accompanied or relatives of the patients and was matched with them based on age, sex and education. Both groups completed 26-item Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS-26 and 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28. Logistic regression and correlation methods were applied for statistical analysis. Results: Logistic regression analysis showed that by an increase of one level in categorized DAS-26 scores and one score in the physical symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and depression subscales of GHQ-28 the risk of depression increase by 6.8, 1.6, 1.9, 3.7, 4.78 times, respectively. Conclusions: Capability of dysfunctional attitude and general health subscales to predict depression supports the Beck′s cognitive diathesis stress theory of depression that dysfunctional attitude may be a predisposing risk factor for depression.

  15. The relationship of depression and diabetes: pathophysiological and treatment implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, James K; Musselman, Dominique L; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes is a highly prevalent, chronic disease that requires ongoing, multi-specialty medical care combined with patient self-management, family support, and education to prevent or delay end-organ morbidity and mortality. There is clearly an increased prevalence of major depressive disorder, a relatively common and costly central nervous system syndrome, in diabetic patients. During the past two decades, multiple studies reveal that not only are depressive symptoms a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes, but they have also been shown to contribute to hyperglycemia, diabetic complications, functional disability and all-cause mortality among diabetic patients. This article reviews studies examining the relationship between depression and diabetes, neurochemical underpinnings of the two disorders, and the diagnosis and treatment of depression associated with diabetes. We examine the validity of rating scales used to diagnose depression in diabetic patients and review the literature on psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic management for these patients. The challenges of optimal depression screening and treatment in primary care settings of diabetic patients are currently under close scrutiny, especially regarding their potential impact related to improvements in diabetes-related outcomes and decreased health care costs, be it "depression" or "diabetes" relevant. Much of the current literature regarding the intertwined nature of diabetes and depression is cross-sectional in nature. Future research should focus on longitudinal, prospective studies to determine causal factors. What is clear from the research reviewed in this article is that depression and diabetes should be treated together rather than as isolated diseases. The mind/body dualism is a false dichotomy and a truly team-based approach is necessary to address both issues of depression and diabetes. Collaborative care and the "patient-centered medical home" have emerged as potentially

  16. Changes in respiratory function following the intramuscular administration of etorphine to boer goats (Capra hircus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.E. Buss

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The physiological effects on respiratory function of etorphine (M99, Logos Agvet (30 µg/kg administered intramuscularly were determined in boer goats. The goats were habituated to the experimental procedures so that respiratory function could be determined while the animals stood quietly at rest. This enabled the physiological changes induced by etorphine to be measured and compared with those obtained before administration of the immobilising drug. The effectiveness of diprenorphine (M5050, Logos Agvet (3 mg/1 mg etorphine as an antagonist of the physiological changes induced by the etorphine treatment was also determined. Etorphine depressed respiratory function, which resulted in a decrease in PaO2 and an increase in PaCO2. These changes were limited and occurred as a result of decreases in respiratory minute volume and alveolar minute ventilation caused by a decrease in respiratory rate. The physiological shunt fraction did not change significantly but there was a significant decrease in percentage physiological dead space ventilation. It was not possible to determine how effectively diprenorphine reversed the respiratory effects due to etorphine.

  17. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... us anything ⟟ Resources in your area ☇ Fundraise with Team Reeve Need to talk to someone? We’re ... are looking for more information on how to manage depression or have a specific question, our information ...

  18. Suicide and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sign-Up Save. Suicide Awareness Voices of Education Suicide and Depression Q&A Why do people kill ... does not become an option. Do people attempt suicide to prove something or to get sympathy? No. ...

  19. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... our repository of fact sheets on hundreds of topics ranging from state resources to secondary complications of ... Center (MSKTC) maintains factsheets on a number of topics, including depression with a self-test to help ...

  20. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... feelings of helplessness and confusion is to arm yourself with information on what a spinal cord injury ... control, talking about your disability, taking care of yourself, and looking ahead. Depression, however, is a serious ...

  1. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... University of Washington provides pamphlets on depression with spinal cord injury and potential ... do I find a rehabilitation facility? How can I locate funding for rehabilitation ...

  2. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... adjustment and depression Adjustment to paralysis is a process of changing one's thoughts and feelings and is ... stem cell research? What is the clinical trials process? Get support Ask us anything Get a peer ...

  3. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... behaviors as well as other aspects of your life. Depression can cause physical and psychological symptoms. It ... loss of energy, take away your enjoyment of life and make it difficult for you to take ...

  4. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... yourself with information on what a spinal cord injury is, and what it means in terms of ... thoughts. Depression is common in the spinal cord injury population -- affecting about 1 in 5 people. There ...

  5. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as other aspects of your life. Depression can cause physical and psychological symptoms. It can worsen pain, make sleep difficult, cause loss of energy, take away your enjoyment of ...

  6. Recognizing teen depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your teen is more at risk for depression if: Mood disorders run in your family They experience a stressful life event like a death in the family, divorcing parents, bullying, a break up with a boyfriend or girlfriend, ...

  7. Persistent depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing, 2013. Fava M, Cassano P. Mood disorders: major depressive disorder and dysthymic ...

  8. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... grieving, taking control, talking about your disability, taking care of yourself, and looking ahead. Depression, however, is ... make it difficult for you to take good care of your health. Other symptoms include oversleeping, change ...

  9. Vision in depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubl, E.; Tebartz Van Elst, L.; Ebert, D.;

    2009-01-01

    Background. Reduced dopaminergic transmission has been implicated in the pathophysiology of major depression. Furthermore, dopaminergic neurotransmission plays an important role in the physiology of visual contrast sensitivity (CS). To test the hypothesis that altered dopaminergic neurotransmissi...

  10. Real Stories of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Care Providers Public Service Announcements (PSAs) Join A Study Depression Studies for Adults Contact Us Staff ... part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a component of the U.S. Department of Health and ...

  11. Adjustments and Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... helplessness and confusion is to arm yourself with information on what a spinal cord injury is, and ... Karp Resources If you are looking for more information on how to manage depression or have a ...

  12. Screening for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... improve the lives of people who have mood disorders. The Power of Peers DBSA envisions wellness for people who live with depression and bipolar disorder. Because DBSA was created for and is led ...

  13. Real Stories of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health & Education Mental Health Information Publications Educational Resources Clinical Trials — Participants Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News About Us Home > Health & Education > Mental Health Information > Depression > Men ...

  14. Hypothyroidism and Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Dayan, Colin M; Panicker, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Background: A relationship between hypothyroidism and depression has been assumed for many years; however, the true nature of this association has been difficult to define with many conflicting studies. In recent years, our knowledge in this area has increased significantly with large cohort studies and genetically driven studies being published. Objectives: We reviewed the literature on thyroid function and depression to determine if this relationship has been clarified. Methods: We performe...

  15. Identifying Depression on Twitter

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem, Moin

    2016-01-01

    Social media has recently emerged as a premier method to disseminate information online. Through these online networks, tens of millions of individuals communicate their thoughts, personal experiences, and social ideals. We therefore explore the potential of social media to predict, even prior to onset, Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in online personas. We employ a crowdsourced method to compile a list of Twitter users who profess to being diagnosed with depression. Using up to a year of pri...

  16. Sleep deprivation and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Elsenga, Simon

    1992-01-01

    The association between depression and sleep disturbances is perhaps as old as makind. In view of the longstanding experience with this association it is amazing that only some 20 years ago, a few depressed patients attracted attention to the fact that Total Sleep Deprivation (TSD) had antidepressant effects. A large number of studies have followed these observations. The purpose of the studies presented in this thesis was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of TSD and related procedures for ...

  17. LIFE EVENTS AND DEPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    R N Chatterjee; Mukherjee, S. P.; Nandi, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    SUMMARY The life events occurring in a 6 month period preceding onset of illness in 50 OPD primary depressives were inquired into by a Life Events Inventory and compared with those in a corresponding time period of 50 matched controls. The relation between life events and the depth of depression at initial interview was also studied. The results are analysed and the probable pitfalls discussed.

  18. Depression in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Romanovna Nodel

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multisystemic neurodegenerative disease with a wide spectrum of not only motor, but also neuropsychic disorders. Depression occurs in an average of 40-50% of patients and it is one of the leading factors that decrease their quality of life. The paper gives the present views of the clinical presentation and pathogenesis of depression, and approaches to its therapy in PD.

  19. Trace elements deficiencies in the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome in the mature newborn calf

    OpenAIRE

    Guyot, Hugues; Aliaoui, Hamani; Rollin, Frédéric

    2004-01-01

    In Belgium, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is one of the leading causes of neonatal death in the mature hypermuscled Belgian Blue calf (BB) but also occurs in other cattle breeds. Major clinical signs (tachypnea, tachycardia and sometimes depression) develop in the first hours after birth and are due to insufficiency of functional surfactant. Knowing that trace elements deficiencies can slow pulmonary maturation, the aim of this study was to investigate trace elements stat...

  20. Robust network oscillations during mammalian respiratory rhythm generation driven by synaptic dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrier, Claire; Hayes, John A.; Fortin, Gilles; Holcman, David

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying mammalian respiratory rhythm generation in the preBötzinger complex is still under debate. Here, we developed a simulation model to show that a synaptic depression/facilitation mechanism sufficient for neurons to generate network rhythms, without the need for intrinsically rhythmic neurons. Simulations of the model under several normal or pathological conditions the living system experiences, together with critical electrophysiological experiments, converge to show th...

  1. Separate Respiratory Phenotypes in Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2 (Mecp2) Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bissonnette, John M.; Knopp, Sharon J.

    2006-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) that encodes a DNA binding protein involved in gene silencing. Selective deletion of Mecp2 in post-mitotic neurons in mice results in a Rettlike phenotype characterized by disturbances in motor activity and body weight, suggesting that these symptoms are exclusively caused by neuronal deficiency. Included in the RTT phenotype are episodes of respiratory depression...

  2. Does bereavement-related first episode depression differ from other kinds of first depressions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Bock, Camilla;

    2009-01-01

    consecutively sampled from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. Patients participated in an extensive interview including the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) and the Interview of Recent Life Events (IRLE). RESULTS: Among 301 patients with a first depression, 26 patients...... (4.7%) had experienced death of a first degree relative (parent, sibling, child) or a near friend, 163 patients (54.2%) had experienced other moderate to severe stressful life events and 112 patients had not experienced stressful life events in a 6 months period prior to the onset of depression....... Patients who had experienced bereavement did not differ from patients with other stressful life events or from patients without stressful life events in socio-demographic variables or in the phenomenology of the depression, psychiatric comorbidity, family history or response to antidepressant treatment...

  3. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Postpartum Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal depression is prevalent and has a great impact on both mother and infant. There are empirically validated treatments for both postpartum depression and depression during pregnancy. Primary among these is interpersonal psychotherapy, which has been shown to be effective for postpartum women across the spectrum from mild to severe depression. At present, interpersonal psychotherapy is the best validated treatment for postpartum depression and should be considered first-line treatment,...

  4. The Molecular Neurobiology of Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, Richard C.

    2007-01-01

    The molecular neurobiology of depression begins with an idea: depressive disorders represent a family of related but distinct conditions. Different points of vulnerability in the brain may predispose to depressive disorders. For example, it is likely that the core pathophysiology of depression associated with early life adversity is different from non-trauma related disorders. In particular, the pathophysiology of trauma-related depression involves the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axi...

  5. Depression - The Proteus of Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, A. Venkoba

    2004-01-01

    Depression is discussed as a disease of antiquity with suitable contemporary references also. The prevalence of this disorder, which at a given time constitutes 121 millions world-wide is mentioned. Among the types of depression, comorbid depression forms an important one. Classical depression forms the visible part of the depression iceberg while somatic and other life contextual situation forms the submerged part. Somatic manifestations per se do not carry diagnostic weightage unless the co...

  6. Depression and Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Karina W

    2012-01-01

    There are exciting findings in the field of depression and coronary heart disease. Whether diagnosed or simply self-reported, depression continues to mark very high risk for a recurrent acute coronary syndrome or for death in patients with coronary heart disease. Many intriguing mechanisms have been posited to be implicated in the association between depression and heart disease, and randomized controlled trials of depression treatment are beginning to delineate the types of depression manage...

  7. Probabilidade de ocorrência de temperaturas mínimas do ar prejudiciais à fecundação das flores de arroz na região da depressão central, Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Probability of occurence of minimum air temperature harmful to fecundation of rice flowers in the central region of the Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galileo Adeli Buriol

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Utilizando-se os registros de temperatura mínima do ar de nove estações meteorológicas situadas na região da Depressão Central do Rio Grande do Sul, calculou-se as probabilidades de ocorrerem dias com temperatura do ar ≤13°C, 15°C e 17°C. Foram considerados os períodos mensal e decendial dos meses de dezembro, janeiro, fevereiro e março, época em que essas temperaturas podem prejudicar as lavouras de arroz em floração. Também foram calculadas as probabilidades de ocorrência de dias consecutivos com temperatura igual ou menor que os níveis térmicos mencionados. Verificou-se que o número total de dias com temperatura baixa adere à distribuição Binomial Negativa enquanto que as seqüências aderem melhor à distribuição de Poisson. Verificou-se também que as probabilidades de ocorrência de dias consecutivos e do total do número de dias com temperatura do ar igual ou abaixo dos níveis térmicos estudados é menor do 2° decêndio de janeiro ao 2° decêndio de fevereiro embora possam ocorrer dias frios também nesses meses. Dessa forma, para minimizar as perdas de rendimento devido a problemas de fecundação das flores, causados pelo frio, as cultivares de arroz e as épocas de semeadura devem ser escolhidas para que a floração aconteça nesse período.The probability of occurence of days in which the temperature is lower or equal to 13°C, 15°C, and 17°C in the Central Region of the Rio Grande do Sul State was determined. Sequences of days with temperature lower or equal to the thermal levels above cited were also determined. Data from nine Meteorological Stations for the months of December, January, February, and March were used in this study. The results showed that the risk of cold damage to the rice flowers fecundation is lower from the middle of January through middle of February. In order to reduce yield decreases by low temperatures, the choice of the cultivar and time of seeding should be done so that the

  8. Depressive symptoms and childhood sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carotenuto M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Marco Carotenuto,1 Maria Esposito,1 Lucia Parisi,2 Beatrice Gallai,3 Rosa Marotta,4 Antonio Pascotto,1 Michele Roccella21Sleep Clinic for Developmental Age, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 3Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, 4Department of Psychiatry, "Magna Graecia" University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, ItalyBackground: The relationship between sleep and mood regulation is well known, and some reports suggest a key role of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD in the development of the symptomatology of depression, even if no conclusive data are actually found in the clinical literature. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between SRBD and depressive symptoms in a population of school-aged children.Methods: The study population comprised 94 children affected by SRBD and 107 healthy children. To identify the severity of SRBD, an overnight respiratory evaluation was performed. All subjects filled out the Italian version of the Children Depression Inventory (CDI to screen for the presence of depressive symptoms.Results: The group with SRBD showed higher CDI scores than the group without SRBD, with a positive correlation found between CDI scores, apnea-hypopnea index, and oxygen desaturation index values. Logistic regression showed that an apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 3 and an oxygen desaturation index ≥ 1 could be risk factors for development of depressive symptoms. According to receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, the cutoff point for the apnea-hypopnea index that could cause a pathological CDI score (≥19 was >5.66, and the cutoff point for the oxygen desaturation index was >4.2. The limitations of this study are that our data are derived from one single psychometric test and not from a complete psychiatric evaluation, and our

  9. Neural Mechanisms of Exercise: Anti-Depression, Neurogenesis, and Serotonin Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Paes, Flávia; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Depression is associated with decreased serotonin metabolism and functioning in the central nervous system, evidenced by both animal models of depression and clinical patient studies. Depression is also accompanied by decreased hippocampal neurogenesis in diverse animal models. Neurogenesis is mainly defined in dentate gyrus of hippocampus as well as subventricular zone. Moreover, hypothalamus, amygdala, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex are reported with evidences of adult neurogenesis...

  10. Hypoventilatory respiratory failure in generalised scleroderma

    OpenAIRE

    Iliffe, Gerald D; Pettigrew, Norman M

    1983-01-01

    A patient with generalised cutaneous and gastrointestinal scleroderma subsequently died from respiratory failure secondary to hyperventilation. At necropsy changes consistent with scleroderma of the diaphragm were found; these were thought to have contributed appreciably to the terminal respiratory failure.

  11. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum KidsHealth > For Parents > Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum Print A A A ...

  12. Molecular detection of respiratory viruses: clinical impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) cause major morbidity in infants and children. Traditionally, respiratory viruses are detected with conventional tests (viral culture and direct immunofluorescence (DIF)), however nowadays viral diagnostics are being revolutionized by the increased implemen

  13. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan;

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the...

  14. Guide to industrial respiratory protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 has increased the emphasis on proper selection and use of respirators in situations where engineering controls are not feasible or are being implemented. Although a great deal of information on respiratory protection has been published, most of it is more technical than necessary for the average user faced with day-to-day problems of respiratory protection in industrial environments. This Guide is to provide the industrial user a single reference source containing enough information for establishing and maintaining a respirator program that meets the OSHA requirements outlined in 29 CFR Part 1910.134. It includes chapters on respirator selection, use, maintenance, and inspection, a complete description of all types of respirators and their advantages and limitations, and chapters on respirator fitting and wearer training, respiratory physiology, respiratory hazards, and physiological and psychological limitations. Also included are samples of the decision logic used in respirator selection, guidance on setting up an adequate respirator program through formulation of written standard operating procedures, and discussion of the meaning of the approved respirator

  15. The Efficacy of Supervised Home-based Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İpek Candemir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR programs can be carried out in hospital or home basis with a different organizational aspect and program content. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a multidisciplinary supervised home-based PR program in patients with chronic respiratory disorders. Methods: Forty patients with chronic respiratory disorders who admitted to our center between September 2007 and May 2012 were enrolled. In all patients before and after PR, dyspnea was assessed with Medical Research Council (MRC dyspnea scale, exercise capacity with Incremental Shuttle Walk Test (ISWT and Endurance Shuttle Walk Test (ESWT, health related quality of life with St. Geoerge Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ, psychosocial evaluation with hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD, the body composition with bioelectrical impedance method. Ten patients did not complete home-based PR for various reasons. Results: In patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, dyspnea sensation (p=0.026, exercise capacity (p=0.001, quality of life (p=0.001, body composition (p=0.012, anxiety and depression score (p=0.001 improvements were statistically significant. In all patients with COPD and non-COPD perception of dyspnea, exercise capacity, quality of life, anxiety and depression score improvements were above minimal clinically important differences. Conclusion: In this study supervised home-based pulmonary rehabilitation has been shown as an effective and safe modality when applied by an experiencied and multidisciplinary team in selected severe COPD or non-COPD patients.

  16. The effects of carbon monoxide on respiratory chemoreflexes in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As protection against low-oxygen and high-carbon-dioxide environments, the respiratory chemoreceptors reflexly increase breathing. Since CO is also frequently present in such environments, it is important to know whether CO affects the respiratory chemoreflexes responsiveness. Although the peripheral chemoreceptors fail to detect hypoxia produced by CO poisoning, whether CO affects the respiratory chemoreflex responsiveness to carbon dioxide is unknown. The responsiveness of 10 healthy male volunteers were assessed before and after inhalation of ∼1200 ppm CO in air using two iso-oxic rebreathing tests; hypoxic, to emphasize the peripheral chemoreflex, and hyperoxic, to emphasize the central chemoreflex. Although mean (SEM) COHb values of 10.2 (0.2)% were achieved, no statistically significant effects of CO were observed. The average differences between pre- and post-CO values for ventilation response threshold and sensitivity were -0.5 (0.9) mmHg and 0.8 (0.3) L/min/mmHg, respectively, for hyperoxia, and 0.7 (1.1) mmHg and 1.2 (0.8) L/min/mmHg, respectively, for hypoxia. The 95% confidence intervals for the effect of CO were small. We conclude that environments with low levels of CO do not have a clinically significant effect acutely on either the central or the peripheral chemoreflex responsiveness to carbon dioxide

  17. Métodos de preparo de solo e sua influência na erosão hídrica e no acúmulo de biomassa da parte aérea de Eucaliptus Saligna em um cambissolo háplico da depressão central do Rio Grande do Sul Methods of soil tillage and its influence in water erosion and initial development of Eucalyptus Saligna on the inceptisoil of the central depression of the State of Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Baptista

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo buscou identificar e quantificar o efeito de métodos de preparo de solo e manejo de resíduos da colheita sobre a erosão hídrica e o desenvolvimento inicial da floresta de Eucalyptus saligna em um Cambissolo háplico. O ensaio foi instalado em área experimental da Aracruz Celulose e Papel S. A., localizada no Município de Arroio dos Ratos, na região fisiográfica denominada Depressão Central. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos ao acaso com três repetições. Os tratamentos testados foram: subsolagem interrompida com resíduo (SIR, subsolagem contínua com resíduo (SCR e subsolagem contínua sem resíduo (SSR, todos no sentido do declive, e coveamento mecânico (CME. A perda de solo do SSR foi 10 vezes maior que a dos demais tratamentos de subsolagem e 100 vezes maior em relação ao coveamento mecânico (CME. O escoamento superficial nos tratamentos com resíduo correspondeu a 1,6% do total precipitado e no tratamento subsolagem sem resíduo, 2,9% do total precipitado. O preparo mais intensivo do solo aumentou a erosão, porém favoreceu o crescimento inicial do eucalipto. A biomassa aérea do E. saligna 12 meses após o plantio foi maior nos tratamentos com maior volume de solo mobilizado.The study sought to identify and quantify the effect of methods of tillage soil and solid waste management of the harvest on water erosion and initial development of the forest in a Inceptisoil. The test was installed in an experimental area of Aracruz Pulp and Paper S. A., located in the municipality of Arroio dos Ratos in the physiografic region called the Depression Center. The experimental design used was random block with three repetitions. The treatments tested were interrupted ripping with residue (CRS, continuous ripping with residue (SCR, continuous without residue (SSR all in the direction of the slope and mechanical digging (CME. The loss of soil from SSR was ten times larger than the other treatment of

  18. Detection of Respiratory Viruses by Molecular Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Mahony, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Clinical laboratories historically diagnose seven or eight respiratory virus infections using a combination of techniques including enzyme immunoassay, direct fluorescent antibody staining, cell culture, and nucleic acid amplification tests. With the discovery of six new respiratory viruses since 2000, laboratories are faced with the challenge of detecting up to 19 different viruses that cause acute respiratory disease of both the upper and lower respiratory tracts. The application o...

  19. Introduction to circulatory and respiratory system modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Gianfranco; Darowski, Marek; Golczewski, Tomasz; Gorczynska, Krystyna; Kozarski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    This chapter is focused on circulatory and respiratory system modeling. It includes a brief history of circulatory and respiratory system modeling development and a short description of the state of art. In the chapter also basic classification of mechanical circulatory and respiratory assistance is presented. The last part of the chapter deals with innovative approaches to modeling of both circulatory and respiratory system which concern hybrid models and virtual organs. Hybrid modeling cons...

  20. Depression Care for Patients at Home (Depression CAREPATH): Home Care Depression Care Management Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce, Martha L; Raue, Patrick J.; Sheeran, Thomas; Reilly, Catherine; Pomerantz, Judith C.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Zukowski, Diane

    2011-01-01

    High levels of depressive symptoms are common and contribute to poorer clinical outcomes even in geriatric patients who are already taking antidepressant medication. The Depression CARE for PATients at Home (Depression CAREPATH) intervention was designed to meet the needs of medical and surgical patients who suffer from depression. The intervention’s clinical protocols are designed to guide clinicians in managing depression as part of routine home care.

  1. Nonsomatic treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Joel T; Kovacs, Maria

    2002-07-01

    There is solid evidence that active and goal-oriented cognitive-behavioral or relationship-focused therapies are generally superior to more generic therapies or to no treatment for clinically diagnosed and for undiagnosed but symptomatic youths. Between 50% to 87% of diagnosed youths who received a targeted treatment had recovered from their depressive episodes, in comparison to 21% to 75% of those who received some other generic therapy and 5% to 48% of wait-listed youths. The cognitive behavioral and relationship-oriented interventions that were tested tended to be even more successful in reducing depressive symptoms in school-based samples, possibly because the participants in the school-based studies may have been less disturbed than the clinically diagnosed cases. Although the targeted treatments generally yielded better results than the comparison conditions, the targeted interventions seem to be similarly successful in ameliorating depression. Determining which psychosocial therapy works best for a given depressed youngster remains problematic. As noted in recent reviews [30,46,47], little attention has been devoted to which interventions, or parts of an intervention, are likely to be effective with children with various characteristics. This issue acquires added importance because in some diagnosed samples half or more of the treated participants were still in a depressive episode at the end of the trial. Likewise, in intervention studies involving symptomatic, school-based youngsters, not all children improved, and gains were not uniform across domains of functioning (e.g., severity of depression, self-esteem, global functioning). Possibly, for some of the nonresponders, the participant's characteristics and relevant problems and the target interventions were mismatched. For example, a depressed youth with a long history of highly dysfunctional relationships may not respond optimally to a therapy focusing on negative cognitions; alternatively

  2. Depression in hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure the frequency of depression and its risk factors in patients under going hemodialysis. It is a cross-sectional prospective study conducted at Hemodialysis unit of Shalamar Hospital and Shaikh Zayed Hospital, Lahore from 1/sup st/ January 2006 to 30/sup th/ April 2006. All patients getting regular hemodialysis for more than three months were included. Beck's Depression Inventory- II (BDI-II; adapted in Urdu) was administered on all the patients who were able to read or understand it. Blood sample were drawn at the same time for routine hematological, biochemical parameters and viral markers (Anti HCV and HbsAg). Diagnosis was made as per Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM IV) for correlation of psychological variables with clinical, hematological and biochemical parameters. Eighty nine patients were enrolled which included fifty two (58.4%) were male and seventy seven (86.5%) were married. Major causes of renal failure were diabetes, hypertension and chronic glomerulonephrotis. Duration of dialysis was from 03 to 49 months with mean of 19.64 +- 11.7 months. Severity of depression was categorized in to mild, moderate and severe on the basis of BDI score. Majority of the patients fifty (56.1%) were moderately to severely depressed and there was no gender difference in the prevalence of depression. Majority of patients undergoing hemodialysis were depressed. Major risk factors for depression were marital status, illiteracy, number of children, socioeconomic factors, gender, hypertension and hypoalbuminemia. Patients with anemia, hyponatremia and hyperkalemia had suicidal tendency. Patients with hepatitis C and disturbed liver function have strong correlation with psychological parameters. (author)

  3. Effects of Aging on the Respiratory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzky, Michael G.

    1984-01-01

    Relates alterations in respiratory system functions occurring with aging to changes in respiratory system structure during the course of life. Main alterations noted include loss of alveolar elastic recoil, alteration in chest wall structure and decreased respiratory muscle strength, and loss of surface area and changes in pulmonary circulation.…

  4. Atypical respiratory complications of dengue fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naveen Kumar; AK Gadpayle; Deepshikha Trisal

    2013-01-01

    In last decade, dengue has emerged as one of the most important vector born disease.With increasing cases, uncommon presentations and complications are now commonly recognized. Here, we report two cases of rare pattern of respiratory involvement in dengue: acute respiratory distress syndrome and bronchiolitis with respiratory failure.

  5. Within and between population variation in inbreeding depression in the locally threatened perennial Scabiosa columbaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angeloni, F.; Vergeer, P.; Wagemaker, C.A.M.; Ouborg, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    Inbreeding depression plays a central role within the conservation genetics paradigm. Until now inbreeding depression is incorporated into models of population viability as a mean value (e.g. number of lethal equivalents) for all traits in a population. In this study of the locally threatened perenn

  6. Depression and Racial/Ethnic Variations within a Diverse Nontraditional College Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Richard; Towey, James; Shinar, Ori

    2008-01-01

    The study's objective was to ascertain whether rates of depression were significantly higher for Dominican, Puerto Rican, South and Central American and Jamaican/Haitian students than for African American and White students. The sample consisted of 987 predominantly nontraditional college students. The depression rate for Dominican students was…

  7. Quest for biomarkers of treatment-resistant depression: shifting the paradigm toward risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Donald F.

    2013-01-01

    The search for potential biomarkers of psychiatric disorders is a central topic in biological psychiatry. This review concerns published studies on potential biomarkers of treatmentresistant depression (TRD). The search for biomarkers of TRD in the bloodstream has focused on cytokines and steroids...... esistance in untreated depressed individuals....

  8. Defense mechanisms of the respiratory membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G M; Jakab, G J; Low, R B; Davis, G S

    1977-03-01

    The success or failure of pulmonary defense mechanisms largely determines the appearance of clinical lung disease. The lung is protected by interlucking systems of nonspecific and specific defenses. Inhaled substrances can be isolated by mechanical barriers or can be physically removed from the lung either by transport up the bronchial mucociliary escalator or by transport through interstitial and lymphatic channels leading to lymph nodes. Substances can be locally detoxified within the lung by interaction with secretory proteins, such as antibodies, or by neutralization and dissolution within phagocytic cells. The pulmonary alveolar macrophage is the central figure in the protection of the respiratory membrane, operating in all 3 of the nonspecific modes of defense and augmented by specific immunologic mechanisms as well. Alterations in macrophage function and physiology may be crucial in determining the effectiveness of pulmonary defense. Recent advances in the cell biology of the alveolar macrophage have led to a greater understanding of its complex funcition. The multiple origins of macrophages from local and circulating cell pools and the variability in their fate and lifespan reflect the multi-faceted role of this cell type. The importance of the interactions between macrophages, orther lung cells, and other defense mechanisms has become increasingly clear. As well as functioning as resident defender of the alveolus, the macrophage is an important effector of the pulmonary immune response and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory, destructive, and fibrotic lung diseases. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses amplify and direct lung defenses against infection and may also participate in protection against other agents. Immunoglobulin A and G, microbial neutralizing and opsonizing anti-bodies, and macrophage-stimulating T lymphocytes are the major immunospecific forms of lung defense. Infectious agents, cigarette smoke, air

  9. Novel associations between FAAH genetic variants and postoperative central opioid-related adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhasivam, S; Zhang, X; Chidambaran, V; Mavi, J; Pilipenko, V; Mersha, T B; Meller, J; Kaufman, K M; Martin, L J; McAuliffe, J

    2015-10-01

    Opioid effects are potentiated by cannabinoid agonists including anandamide, an endocannabinoid. Inter-individual variability in responses to opioids is a major clinical problem. Multiple deaths and anoxic brain injuries occur every year because of opioid-induced respiratory depression (RD) in surgical patients and drug abusers of opioids and cannabinoids. This study aimed to determine specific associations between genetic variants of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and postoperative central opioid adverse effects in children undergoing tonsillectomy. This is a prospective genotype-blinded observational study in which 259 healthy children between 6 and 15 years of age who received standard perioperative care with a standard anesthetic and an intraoperative dose of morphine were enrolled. Associations between frequent polymorphisms of FAAH and central postoperative opioid adverse effects including, RD, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and prolonged stay in Post Anesthesia Recovery Room (postoperative anesthesia care unit, PACU) due to RD and PONV were analyzed. Five specific FAAH single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had significant associations with more than twofold increased risk for refractory PONV (adjusted PPACU stay in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. The FAAH SNP, rs324420, is a missense mutation with altered FAAH function and it is linked with other FAAH SNPs associated with PONV and RD in our cohort; association between PONV and rs324420 was confirmed in our extended cohort with additional 66 white children. Specific FAAH polymorphisms are associated with refractory PONV, opioid-related RD, and prolonged PACU stay due to opioid adverse effects in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. PMID:25558980

  10. Extraction of the respiratory signal from small-animal CT projections for a retrospective gating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ChavarrIas, C; Vaquero, J J; Sisniega, A; RodrIguez-Ruano, A; Soto-Montenegro, M L; GarcIa-Barreno, P; Desco, M [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Anexo PsiquiatrIa, 1 Planta. C/Ibiza, 43. Madrid 28007 (Spain)

    2008-09-07

    We propose a retrospective respiratory gating algorithm to generate dynamic CT studies. To this end, we compared three different methods of extracting the respiratory signal from the projections of small-animal cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners. Given a set of frames acquired from a certain axial angle, subtraction of their average image from each individual frame produces a set of difference images. Pixels in these images have positive or negative values (according to the respiratory phase) in those areas where there is lung movement. The respiratory signals were extracted by analysing the shape of the histogram of these difference images: we calculated the first four central and non-central moments. However, only odd-order moments produced the desired breathing signal, as the even-order moments lacked information about the phase. Each of these curves was compared to a reference signal recorded by means of a pneumatic pillow. Given the similar correlation coefficients yielded by all of them, we selected the mean to implement our retrospective protocol. Respiratory phase bins were separated, reconstructed independently and included in a dynamic sequence, suitable for cine playback. We validated our method in five adult rat studies by comparing profiles drawn across the diaphragm dome, with and without retrospective respiratory gating. Results showed a sharper transition in the gated reconstruction, with an average slope improvement of 60.7%.

  11. Respiratory Failure Associated with Ascariasis in a Patient with Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandra, Lanocha; Barbara, Zdziarska; Natalia, Lanocha-Arendarczyk; Danuta, Kosik-Bogacka; Renata, Guzicka-Kazimierczak; Ewa, Marzec-Lewenstein

    2016-01-01

    In industrialized countries, risk groups for parasitic diseases include travelers, recent immigrants, and patients with immunodeficiency following chemotherapy and radiotherapy and AIDS. A 66-year-old Polish male was admitted in December 2012 to the Department of Haematology in a fairly good general condition. On the basis of cytological, cytochemical, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow, the patient was diagnosed with acute myeloblastic leukemia. On the 7th day of hospitalization in the Department of Haematology, patient was moved to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) due to acute respiratory and circulatory failure. In March 2013, 3 months after the onset of respiratory failures, a mature form of Ascaris spp. appeared in the patient's mouth. This report highlights the importance of considering an Ascaris infection in patients with low immunity presenting no eosinophilia but pulmonary failure in the central countries of Europe. PMID:27313919

  12. Longitudinal Patterns of Autonomic Nervous System Responding to Emotion Evocation among Children with Conduct Problems and/or Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Karen C.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.

    2012-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) and depression co-occur at far greater levels than chance, despite largely separate diagnostic criteria. One potential shared mechanism of this comorbidity is emotion dysregulation, which characterizes both internalizing and externalizing disorders. Previous research demonstrates that respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA)—a peripheral biomarker of emotion regulation—is attenuated among children with CD, and among children with depression. However, few studies have examined ...

  13. Magnesium in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serefko, Anna; Szopa, Aleksandra; Wlaź, Piotr; Nowak, Gabriel; Radziwoń-Zaleska, Maria; Skalski, Michał; Poleszak, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium is one of the most essential mineral in the human body, connected with brain biochemistry and the fluidity of neuronal membrane. A variety of neuromuscular and psychiatric symptoms, including different types of depression, was observed in magnesium deficiency. Plasma/serum magnesium levels do not seem to be the appropriate indicators of depressive disorders, since ambiguous outcomes, depending on the study, were obtained. The emergence of a new approach to magnesium compounds in medical practice has been seen. Apart from being administered as components of dietary supplements, they are also perceived as the effective agents in treatment of migraine, alcoholism, asthma, heart diseases, arrhythmias, renal calcium stones, premenstrual tension syndrome etc. Magnesium preparations have an essential place in homeopathy as a remedy for a range of mental health problems. Mechanisms of antidepressant action of magnesium are not fully understood yet. Most probably, magnesium influences several systems associated with development of depression. The first information on the beneficial effect of magnesium sulfate given hypodermically to patients with agitated depression was published almost 100 years ago. Numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies confirmed the initial observations as well as demonstrated the beneficial safety profile of magnesium supplementation. Thus, magnesium preparations seem to be a valuable addition to the pharmacological armamentarium for management of depression. PMID:23950577

  14. Postperfusion lung syndrome: Respiratory mechanics, respiratory indices and biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Postperfusion lung syndrome is rare but lethal. Secondary inflammatory response was the popularly accepted theory for the underlying etiology. Respiratory index (RI) and arterial oxygen tension/fractional inspired oxygen can be reliable indices for the diagnosis of this syndrome as X-ray appearance is always insignificant at the early stage of the onset. Evaluations of extravascular lung water content and pulmonary compliance are also helpful in the definite diagnosis. Multiorgan failure and ...

  15. Habituation in neural processing and subjective perception of respiratory sensations

    OpenAIRE

    von Leupoldt, Andreas; Vovk, Andrea; Bradley, Margaret M.; Lang, Peter J.; Davenport, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Reduced perception of respiratory sensations is associated with negative treatment outcome in asthma. We examined whether habituation in the neural processing of repeatedly experienced respiratory sensations may underlie subjective reports of reduced respiratory perception. Respiratory-related evoked potentials (RREP) elicited by inspiratory occlusions and reports of respiratory perception were compared between early and late experimental periods in healthy subjects. Reports of respiratory pe...

  16. Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Depressive Disorders, and Antidepressant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Paizanis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence that neural stem cells reside in the adult central nervous system where neurogenesis occurs throughout lifespan. Neurogenesis concerns mainly two areas in the brain: the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, where it is controlled by several trophic factors and neuroactive molecules. Neurogenesis is involved in processes such as learning and memory and accumulating evidence implicates hippocampal neurogenesis in the physiopathology of depression. We herein review experimental and clinical data demonstrating that stress and antidepressant treatments affect neurogenesis in opposite direction in rodents. In particular, the stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis by all types of antidepressant drugs supports the view that neuroplastic phenomena are involved in the physiopathology of depression and underlie—at least partly—antidepressant therapy.

  17. Physical activity & depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiantoula E.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a major public health disorder. Clinical depression is the most frequent disability in North America among other countries and by 2020 it is estimated that it will represent the second most common disability worldwide. Physical activity can be used to prevent as well as treat depression. Its characteristics and structure should be individualized to the personality and special needs of the patient as well as to the severity of the disorder. Intensity, duration and the place of performance are of special importance. Research has identified neurobiological and psychological paths that can develop between physical activity and well being. More studies although are needed in order to standardize the use of physical activity as a treatment option, mainly in the groups of children and teenagers.

  18. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milgrom Jeannette

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Methods Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26–32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161 also completed questionnaires at 10–12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1. Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2. Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3. Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator

  19. Paroxetine versus other anti-depressive agents for depression

    OpenAIRE

    Cipriani, Andrea; Furukawa, Toshi A.; Veronese, Antonio; Watanabe, Norio; Churchill, Rachel; McGuire, Hugh; Barbui, Corrado

    2007-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine the efficacy of paroxetine in comparison with other anti-depressive agents in alleviating the acute symptoms of major depressive disorder.To review acceptability of treatment with paroxetine in comparison with other anti-depressive agents.To investigate the adverse effects of paroxetine in comparison with other anti-depressive agents.

  20. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Louise C

    2016-05-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging infectious disease that can present with flu-like symptoms. In individuals with comorbidities or who are immunosuppressed, it can be deadly. The disease is transmitted through contact with someone who has MERS-CoV. The occupational health nurse must be cognizant of and educate the workforce about MERS-CoV transmission, prevention, and treatment. PMID:26407596

  1. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Soraia Carvalho Abreu; Tatiana Maron-Gutierrez; Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez Garcia; Marcelo Marcos Morales; Patricia Rieken Macedo Rocco

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions ne...

  2. Accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for Identifying Depression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Nowak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychological morbidity is common in chronic respiratory diseases. The diagnostic accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and risk factors for comorbid depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are addressed. Consecutive COPD patients (GOLD stage I–IV, 40–75 years old were enrolled in a multicentre, cross-sectional cohort study. Diagnosis of depression was ascertained through clinical records. Lung function, HADS score, 6-minute walking test (6-MWT, MRC dyspnoea score, and COPD Assessment Test (CAT were evaluated. Two hundred fifty-nine COPD patients (mean age 62.5 years; 32% female; mean FEV1 48% predicted were included. Patients diagnosed with depression (29/259; 11.2% had significantly higher HADS-D and HADS-Total scores than nondepressed patients (median (quartiles HADS-D 6 [4; 9] versus 4 [2; 7], median HADS-Total 14 [10; 20] versus 8 [5; 14]. Receiver-operating characteristic plots showed moderate accuracy for HADS-D, AUC 0.662 (95%CI 0.601–0.719, and HADS-Total, AUC 0.681 (95%CI 0.620–0.737, with optimal cut-off scores of >5 and >9, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were 62.1% and 62.6% for HADS-D compared to 75.9% and 55.2% for HADS-Total. Age, comorbidities, sex, and lower airflow limitation predicted depression. The HADS exhibits low diagnostic accuracy for depression in COPD patients. Younger men with comorbidities are at increased risk for depression.

  3. Supramolecular Organization of Respiratory Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the existence of superassemblies between mitochondrial respiratory complexes, such superassemblies have been the object of a passionate debate. It is accepted that respiratory supercomplexes are structures that occur in vivo, although which superstructures are naturally occurring and what could be their functional role remain open questions. The main difficulty is to make compatible the existence of superassemblies with the corpus of data that drove the field to abandon the early understanding of the physical arrangement of the mitochondrial respiratory chain as a compact physical entity (the solid model). This review provides a nonexhaustive overview of the evolution of our understanding of the structural organization of the electron transport chain from the original idea of a compact organization to a view of freely moving complexes connected by electron carriers. Today supercomplexes are viewed not as a revival of the old solid model but rather as a refined revision of the fluid model, which incorporates a new layer of structural and functional complexity. PMID:26734886

  4. Respiratory analysis system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system is described for monitoring the respiratory process in which the gas flow rate and the frequency of respiration and expiration cycles can be determined on a real time basis. A face mask is provided with one-way inlet and outlet valves where the gas flow is through independent flowmeters and through a mass spectrometer. The opening and closing of a valve operates an electrical switch, and the combination of the two switches produces a low frequency electrical signal of the respiratory inhalation and exhalation cycles. During the time a switch is operated, the corresponsing flowmeter produces electric pulses representative of the flow rate; the electrical pulses being at a higher frequency than that of the breathing cycle and combined with the low frequency signal. The high frequency pulses are supplied to conventional analyzer computer which also receives temperature and pressure inputs and computes mass flow rate and totalized mass flow of gas. From the mass spectrometer, components of the gas are separately computed as to flow rate. The electrical switches cause operation of up-down inputs of a reversible counter. The respective up and down cycles can be individually monitored and combined for various respiratory measurements.

  5. Incidence of respiratory distress syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in hospital born babies. Subjects and Methods: All live born infants delivered at the hospital and who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were included in the study. Results: Ninety-four neonates developed RDS. Out of these, 88 (93.61%) were preterm and 06 (6.38%) were term infants. There was a male preponderance (65.95%). RDS was documented in 1.72% of total live births. 37.28% of preterm and 0.11% of term neonates born at the hospital. The incidence of RDS was 100% at 26 or less weeks of gestation, 57.14% at 32 weeks, and 3.70% at 36 weeks. The mortality with RDS was 41 (43.61%). Conclusion: RDS is the commonest cause of respiratory distress in the newborn, particularly, in preterm infants. It carries a high mortality rate and the incidence is more than that documented in the Western world. (author)

  6. Microglial dysfunction connects depression and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luís Eduardo; Beckman, Danielle; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are highly prevalent neuropsychiatric conditions with intriguing epidemiological overlaps. Depressed patients are at increased risk of developing late-onset AD, and around one in four AD patients are co-diagnosed with MDD. Microglia are the main cellular effectors of innate immunity in the brain, and their activation is central to neuroinflammation - a ubiquitous process in brain pathology, thought to be a causal factor of both AD and MDD. Microglia serve several physiological functions, including roles in synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis, which may be disrupted in neuroinflammation. Following early work on the 'sickness behavior' of humans and other animals, microglia-derived inflammatory cytokines have been shown to produce depressive-like symptoms when administered exogenously or released in response to infection. MDD patients consistently show increased circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and anti-inflammatory drugs show promise for treating depression. Activated microglia are abundant in the AD brain, and concentrate around senile plaques, hallmark lesions composed of aggregated amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). The Aβ burden in affected brains is regulated largely by microglial clearance, and the complex activation state of microglia may be crucial for AD progression. Intriguingly, recent reports have linked soluble Aβ oligomers, toxins that accumulate in AD brains and are thought to cause memory impairment, to increased brain cytokine production and depressive-like behavior in mice. Here, we review recent findings supporting the inflammatory hypotheses of AD and MDD, focusing on microglia as a common player and therapeutic target linking these devastating disorders. PMID:26612494

  7. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Autism (12 items) Bipolar Disorder (1 item) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression (16 items) Eating Disorders ( ... Autism (12 items) Bipolar Disorder (1 item) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression (16 items) Eating Disorders ( ...

  8. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Autism (12 items) Bipolar Disorder (1 item) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression (16 items) Eating Disorders (9 ... Autism (12 items) Bipolar Disorder (1 item) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression (16 items) Eating Disorders (9 ...

  9. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 4 items) NIMH (24 items) Psychotherapies (2 items) Suicide Prevention (7 items) Treatments (11 items) Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression discuss how ...

  10. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (3 items) Autism (12 items) Bipolar Disorder (1 item) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression ( ... Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (3 items) Autism (12 items) Bipolar Disorder (1 item) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression ( ...

  11. Major Depression and Complicated Grief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grieving process Symptoms of major depression and complicated grief Depression It’s common for people to have sadness, ... pain or trying to avoid letting go. Complicated grief If normal mourning does not occur, or if ...

  12. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression (16 items) Eating Disorders (9 items) Panic Disorder (1 item) Post- ... Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression (16 items) Eating Disorders (9 items) Panic Disorder (1 item) Post- ...

  13. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... yet completely understood. We do know that the brains of people with depression are different from those ... the National Institute of Mental Health are studying brain images of people who suffer from depression trying ...

  14. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... items) Suicide Prevention (7 items) Treatments (11 items) Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People ... of Brain Region is Associated with Response to PTSD Treatment Children of Depressed Parents at High Risk ...

  15. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (3 items) Autism (12 items) Bipolar Disorder (2 items) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression ( ... Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (3 items) Autism (12 items) Bipolar Disorder (2 items) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression ( ...

  16. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... continues to study the genetic, biological and environmental factors that influence depression so that new and better ... PTSD Treatment Children of Depressed Parents at High Risk of Adverse Consequences Into Adulthood More News From ...

  17. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Traumatic Events (3 items) NIMH (24 items) Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People ... is a serious illness that affects many people. Symptoms can vary, but many depressed people lose interest ...

  18. Postpartum Depression: An Interactional View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Mary Ann; Redman, E. Scott

    1986-01-01

    Postpartum depression is conceptualized as a predictable developmental, family crisis, which occurs when the natural difficulties of childbirth are benignly mishandled. Tactics are illustrated for interdicting maladaptive interpersonal spirals, including normalizing conflicting complaints; reframing depression as positive but costly; regulating…

  19. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... items) Autism (12 items) Bipolar Disorder (2 items) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression (16 items) Eating ... items) Autism (12 items) Bipolar Disorder (2 items) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression (16 items) Eating ...

  20. Depression in Childhood and Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Maughan, Barbara; Collishaw, Stephan; Stringaris, Argyris

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review recent evidence on child and adolescent depression.Method: Narrative review.Results: Rates of unipolar depression are low before puberty, but rise from the early teens, especially among girls. Concurrent comorbidity with both disruptive and emotional disorders is common, especially among younger children; across age, youth depression may be preceded by both anxiety and disruptive behaviour disorders, and increase risk for alcohol problems. Adolescent depression is associa...