WorldWideScience

Sample records for central pain mechanisms

  1. Pain Mechanisms and Centralized Pain in Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, D E; Schrepf, A; Clauw, D J

    2016-09-01

    Until recently, most clinicians and scientists believed that the experience of pain is perceptually proportional to the amount of incoming peripheral nociceptive drive due to injury or inflammation in the area perceived to be painful. However, many cases of chronic pain have defied this logic, leaving clinicians perplexed as to how patients are experiencing pain with no obvious signs of injury in the periphery. Conversely, there are patients who have a peripheral injury and/or inflammation but little or no pain. What makes some individuals experience intense pain with minimal peripheral nociceptive stimulation and others experience minimal pain with serious injury? It is increasingly well accepted in the scientific community that pain can be generated and maintained or, through other mechanisms, suppressed by changes in the central nervous system, creating a complete mismatch between peripheral nociceptive drive and perceived pain. In fact, there is no known chronic pain condition where the observed extent of peripheral damage reproducibly engenders the same level of pain across individuals. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are no exception. This review focuses on the idea that TMD patients range on a continuum-from those whose pain is generated peripherally to those whose pain is centralized (i.e., generated, exacerbated, and/or maintained by central nervous system mechanisms). This article uses other centralized chronic pain conditions as a guide, and it suggests that the mechanistic variability in TMD pain etiology has prevented us from adequately treating many individuals who are diagnosed with the condition. As the field moves forward, it will be imperative to understand each person's pain from its own mechanistic standpoint, which will enable clinicians to deliver personalized medicine to TMD patients and eventually provide relief in even the most recalcitrant cases. PMID:27422858

  2. Central Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  3. Electroacupuncture in conscious free-moving mice reduces pain by ameliorating peripheral and central nociceptive mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Mihir; Peng, Fei; Lam, Sarah; Jha, Ritu; Raduenz, Ellis; Beitz, Al J.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Integrative approaches such as electroacupuncture, devoid of drug effects are gaining prominence for treating pain. Understanding the mechanisms of electroacupuncture induced analgesia would benefit chronic pain conditions such as sickle cell disease (SCD), for which patients may require opioid analgesics throughout life. Mouse models are instructive in developing a mechanistic understanding of pain, but the anesthesia/restraint required to administer electroacupuncture may alter the underlying mechanisms. To overcome these limitations, we developed a method to perform electroacupuncture in conscious, freely moving, unrestrained mice. Using this technique we demonstrate a significant analgesic effect in transgenic mouse models of SCD and cancer as well as complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced pain. We demonstrate a comprehensive antinociceptive effect on mechanical, cold and deep tissue hyperalagesia in both genders. Interestingly, individual mice showed a variable response to electroacupuncture, categorized into high-, moderate-, and non-responders. Mechanistically, electroacupuncture significantly ameliorated inflammatory and nociceptive mediators both peripherally and centrally in sickle mice correlative to the antinociceptive response. Application of sub-optimal doses of morphine in electroacupuncture-treated moderate-responders produced equivalent antinociception as obtained in high-responders. Electroacupuncture in conscious freely moving mice offers an effective approach to develop a mechanism-based understanding of analgesia devoid of the influence of anesthetics or restraints. PMID:27687125

  4. Poststroke Pain – but Multiple Pain Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinjamuri Chari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old man presented with acute left hemiplegia due to a right frontotemporal hemorrhagic stroke and left-sided pain. While the initial presentation suggested central poststroke pain, subsequent investigations also implicated heterotopic ossification of the left hip and amplification of previous low back pain by the new central pain. While heterotopic ossification has been commonly associated with brain injury, spinal cord injury or osseous injury, it is only rarely associated with stroke. Poststroke pain may be multifactorial, and discovering the pain mechanisms has important implications for treatment.

  5. The Central Analgesic Mechanism of YM-58483 in Attenuating Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zeyou; Wang, Yaping; Zhou, Haocheng; Liang, Na; Yang, Lin; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Calcium channel antagonists are commonly used to treat neuropathic pain. Their analgesic effects rely on inhibiting long-term potentiation, and neurotransmitters release in the spinal cord. Store-operated Ca(2+)channels (SOCCs) are highly Ca(2+)-selective cation channels broadly expressed in non-excitable cells and some excitable cells. Recent studies have shown that the potent inhibitor of SOCCs, YM-58483, has analgesic effects on neuropathic pain, but its mechanism is unclear. This experiment performed on spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic pain model in rats tries to explore the mechanism, whereby YM-58483 attenuates neuropathic pain. The left L5 was ligated to produce the SNL neuropathic pain model in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The withdrawal threshold of rats was measured by the up-down method and Hargreaves' method before and after intrathecal administration of YM-58483 and vehicle. The SOCCs in the spinal dorsal horn were located by immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated ERK and phosphorylated CREB, CD11b, and GFAP proteins in spinal level was tested by Western blot, while the release of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, PGE2) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Intrathecal YM-58483 at the concentration of 300 μM (1.5 nmol) and 1000 μM (10 nmol) produced a significant central analgesic effect on the SNL rats, compared with control + vehicle (n = 7, P  0.05). YM-58483 also inhibited the release of spinal cord IL-1β, TNF-α, and PGE2, compared with control + vehicle (n = 5, #P < 0.001). The analgesic mechanism of YM-58483 may be via inhibiting central ERK/CREB signaling in the neurons and decreasing central IL-1β, TNF-α, and PGE2 release to reduce neuronal excitability in the spinal dorsal horn of the SNL rats. PMID:26514127

  6. The Discriminative validity of "nociceptive," "peripheral neuropathic," and "central sensitization" as mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: Empirical evidence of discriminative validity is required to justify the use of mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discriminative validity of mechanisms-based classifications of pain by identifying discriminatory clusters of clinical criteria predictive of "nociceptive," "peripheral neuropathic," and "central sensitization" pain in patients with low back (+\\/- leg) pain disorders. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional, between-patients design using the extreme-groups method. Four hundred sixty-four patients with low back (+\\/- leg) pain were assessed using a standardized assessment protocol. After each assessment, patients\\' pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist indicating the presence\\/absence of various clinical criteria. RESULTS: Multivariate analyses using binary logistic regression with Bayesian model averaging identified a discriminative cluster of 7, 3, and 4 symptoms and signs predictive of a dominance of "nociceptive," "peripheral neuropathic," and "central sensitization" pain, respectively. Each cluster was found to have high levels of classification accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, positive\\/negative predictive values, positive\\/negative likelihood ratios). DISCUSSION: By identifying a discriminatory cluster of symptoms and signs predictive of "nociceptive," "peripheral neuropathic," and "central" pain, this study provides some preliminary discriminative validity evidence for mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain. Classification system validation requires the accumulation of validity evidence before their use in clinical practice can be recommended. Further studies are required to evaluate the construct and criterion validity of mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain.

  7. Imaging central pain syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuijzen, Dieuwke S; Greenspan, Joel D; Kim, Jong H; Coghill, Robert C; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Ohara, Shinji; Lenz, Frederick A

    2007-06-01

    Anatomic, functional, and neurochemical imaging studies have provided new investigative tools in the study of central pain. High-resolution imaging studies allow for precise determination of lesion location, whereas functional neuroimaging studies measure pathophysiologic consequences of injury to the central nervous system. Additionally, magnetic resonance spectroscopy evaluates lesion-induced neurochemical changes in specific brain regions that may be related to central pain. The small number of studies to date precludes definitive conclusions, but the recent findings provide information that either supports or refutes current hypotheses and can serve to generate new ideas.

  8. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 1 of 3: symptoms and signs of central sensitisation in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'central sensitisation pain\\' (CSP) refers to pain arising from a dominance of neurophysiological dysfunction within the central nervous system. Symptoms and signs associated with an assumed dominance of CSP in patients attending for physiotherapy have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of CSP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Patients\\' pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist specifying the presence or absence of various clinical criteria. A binary logistic regression analysis with Bayesian model averaging identified a cluster of three symptoms and one sign predictive of CSP, including: \\'Disproportionate, non-mechanical, unpredictable pattern of pain provocation in response to multiple\\/non-specific aggravating\\/easing factors\\

  9. Self-reported pain severity, quality of life, disability, anxiety and depression in patients classified with 'nociceptive', 'peripheral neuropathic' and 'central sensitisation' pain. The discriminant validity of mechanisms-based classifications of low back (±leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-04-01

    Evidence of validity is required to support the use of mechanisms-based classifications of pain clinically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discriminant validity of \\'nociceptive\\' (NP), \\'peripheral neuropathic\\' (PNP) and \\'central sensitisation\\' (CSP) as mechanisms-based classifications of pain in patients with low back (±leg) pain by evaluating the extent to which patients classified in this way differ from one another according to health measures associated with various dimensions of pain. This study employed a cross-sectional, between-subjects design. Four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (±leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Clinicians classified each patient\\'s pain using a mechanisms-based classification approach. Patients completed a number of self-report measures associated with pain severity, health-related quality of life, functional disability, anxiety and depression. Discriminant validity was evaluated using a multivariate analysis of variance. There was a statistically significant difference between pain classifications on the combined self-report measures, (p = .001; Pillai\\'s Trace = .33; partial eta squared = .16). Patients classified with CSP (n = 106) reported significantly more severe pain, poorer general health-related quality of life, and greater levels of back pain-related disability, depression and anxiety compared to those classified with PNP (n = 102) and NP (n = 256). A similar pattern was found in patients with PNP compared to NP. Mechanisms-based pain classifications may reflect meaningful differences in attributes underlying the multidimensionality of pain. Further studies are required to evaluate the construct and criterion validity of mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain.

  10. [Physiological Basis of Pain Mechanisms for Pain Management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, Mikito

    2016-05-01

    Physician anesthesiologists should ensure a future leadership position in perioperative medicine and pain medicine. In order to establish the missions, anesthesiologists need to know how to relieve pain in surgical patients, critically ill patients and patients with cancer and non-cancer chronic pain. Thus, anesthesiologists should realize physiology of pain representation from pain management I will review physiological basis of pain mechanisms in this manuscript which includes 1) evolutional aspect of pain perception, 2) transduction of noxious stimuli, 3) the types of nociceptors and conduction of noxious stimuli, 4) the ascending pathway of pain and central modulation of pain, 5) the descending inhibitory pain system, and 6) various types of pain. Finally, anesthesiologists should manage pain from physiological basis of pain mechanisms. PMID:27319092

  11. Central adaptation of pain perception in response to rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Sundstrup, Emil;

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of long-standing musculoskeletal pain and adaptations in response to physical rehabilitation is important for developing optimal treatment strategies. The influence of central adaptations of pain perception in response to rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain remains...

  12. The characteristics of chronic central pain after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Hadas; Defrin, Ruth

    2007-10-01

    Central pain following traumatic brain injury (TBI) has not been studied in depth. Our purpose was to conduct a systematic study of patients with TBI suffering from chronic central pain, and to describe the characteristics of the central pain. Groups were TBI patients with (TBIP) and without central pain (TBINP) and healthy controls. TBI patients with other pain mechanisms were excluded from the study. Participants underwent quantitative somatosensory testing in the painful and pain-free body regions. Thresholds for warmth, cold, heat-pain, touch and graphesthesia were measured and pathologically evoked pain (allodynia, hyperpathia and wind-up pain) evaluated. Chronic pain was mapped and characterized. Chronic pain developed at a relatively late onset (6.6+/-9 months) was almost exclusively unilateral and reported as pricking, throbbing and burning. Although both TBIP and TBINP exhibited a significant reduction in thermal and tactile sensations compared to controls, thermal sensations in the painful regions of TBIP were significantly more impaired than pain-free regions in the same patients (p<0.01) and in TBINP (p<0.01). Painful regions also exhibited very high rates of allodynia, hyperpathia and exaggerated wind-up. The characteristics of the chronic pain resembled those of other central pain patients although TBIP displayed several unique features. The sensory profile indicated that damage to the pain and temperature systems is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the development of chronic central pain following TBI. Neuronal hyperexcitability may be a contributing factor to the chronic pain.

  13. Poststroke Pain – but Multiple Pain Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Vinjamuri Chari; Eldon Tunks

    2010-01-01

    A 42-year-old man presented with acute left hemiplegia due to a right frontotemporal hemorrhagic stroke and left-sided pain. While the initial presentation suggested central poststroke pain, subsequent investigations also implicated heterotopic ossification of the left hip and amplification of previous low back pain by the new central pain. While heterotopic ossification has been commonly associated with brain injury, spinal cord injury or osseous injury, it is only rarely associated with str...

  14. Spinal cord injury pain: mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Baastrup, Cathrine

    2012-06-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) may experience several types of chronic pain, including peripheral and central neuropathic pain, pain secondary to overuse, painful muscle spasms, and visceral pain. An accurate classification of the patient's pain is important for choosing the optimal treatment strategy. In particular, neuropathic pain appears to be persistent despite various treatment attempts. In recent years, we have gained increasing knowledge of SCI pain mechanisms from experimental models and clinical studies. Nevertheless, treatment remains difficult and inadequate. In line with the recommendations for peripheral neuropathic pain, evidence from randomized controlled treatment trials suggests that tricyclic antidepressants and pregabalin are first-line treatments. This review highlights the diagnosis and classification of SCI pain and recent improvements in the understanding of underlying mechanisms, and provides an update on treatment of SCI pain. PMID:22392531

  15. Peripheral Pain Mechanisms in Chronic Widespread Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Staud, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Clinical symptoms of chronic widespread pain (CWP) conditions including fibromyalgia (FM), include pain, stiffness, subjective weakness, and muscle fatigue. Muscle pain in CWP is usually described as fluctuating and often associated with local or generalized tenderness (hyperalgesia and/or allodynia). This tenderness related to muscle pain depends on increased peripheral and/or central nervous system responsiveness to peripheral stimuli which can be either noxious (hyperalgesia) or non-noxiou...

  16. Central or peripheral delivery of an adenosine A1 receptor agonist improves mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, N K; Ryals, J M; Wright, D E

    2015-01-29

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, and a significant proportion of individuals suffer debilitating pain that significantly affects their quality of life. Unfortunately, symptomatic treatment options have limited efficacy, and often carry significant risk of systemic adverse effects. Activation of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) by the analgesic small molecule adenosine has been shown to have antinociceptive benefits in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The current study used a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy to determine the effect of diabetes on endogenous adenosine production, and if central or peripheral delivery of adenosine receptor agonists could alleviate signs of mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced using streptozocin in male A/J mice. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds were measured weekly to characterize neuropathy phenotype. Hydrolysis of AMP into adenosine by ectonucleotidases was determined in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord at 8 weeks post-induction of diabetes. AMP, adenosine and the specific A1R agonist, N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), were administered both centrally (intrathecal) and peripherally (intraplantar) to determine the effect of activation of adenosine receptors on mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Eight weeks post-induction, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased hydrolysis of extracellular AMP in the DRG; at this same time, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal thresholds compared to nondiabetic controls. Central delivery AMP, adenosine and CPA significantly improved mechanical withdrawal thresholds in diabetic mice. Surprisingly, peripheral delivery of CPA also improved mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. This study provides new evidence that diabetes significantly affects endogenous AMP hydrolysis, suggesting that altered adenosine production could contribute to the development of

  17. Mechanisms of postoperative pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Yun

    2007-01-01

    @@ The practice of modern anaesthesiology has extended into perioperative medicine. Due to their expertise in analgesic drug pharmacology and peripheral nerve blocking, anaesthesiologists have pioneered in the management of acute postoperative pain. Effective postoperative analgesia reduces the incidence of postoperative chronic pain, improves the functioning of organs following surgery and shortens the hospital stay.1,2 Although a variety of analgesic techniques and preventative approaches are at the disposal of modem aneasthesiologists, including patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA), patient controlled intravenous analgesia, multimodal analgesia and pre-empty analgesia.Despite this array of strategies, these predominantly opioid based techniques are still limited by side-effects such as vomiting, nausea, itching and urinary retention.To optimize further the management of acute postoperative pain, basic mechanisms of postoperative pain must be explored and new treatments must continue to be developed.

  18. Central hypersensitivity in chronic musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curatolo, Michele; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Clinical research has consistently detected alteration in central pain processing leading to hypersensitivity. Most methods used in humans are reliable and have face validity to detect widespread central hypersensitivity. However, construct validity is difficult to investigate due to lack of gold...... standards. Reference values in the pain-free population have been generated, but need replication. Research on pain biomarkers that reflect specific central hypersensitivity processes is warranted. Few studies have analyzed the prognostic value of central hypersensitivity. Most medications acting at central...

  19. Phantom Limb Pain: Mechanisms and Treatment Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Bishnu Subedi; George T. Grossberg

    2011-01-01

    The vast amount of research over the past decades has significantly added to our knowledge of phantom limb pain. Multiple factors including site of amputation or presence of preamputation pain have been found to have a positive correlation with the development of phantom limb pain. The paradigms of proposed mechanisms have shifted over the past years from the psychogenic theory to peripheral and central neural changes involving cortical reorganization. More recently, the role of mirror neuron...

  20. Central Hyperexcitability in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Conceptual Breakthrough with Multiple Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lidbeck

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations of dysfunctional pain processing in the central nervous system have contributed much knowledge about the development of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Many common chronic musculoskeletal pain syndromes - including regional myofascial pain syndromes, whiplash pain syndromes, refractory work-related neck-shoulder pain, certain types of chronic low back pain, fibromyalgia and others - may essentially be explained by abnormalities in central pain modulation. The growing awareness of dysfunctional central pain modulation may be a conceptual breakthrough leading to a better understanding of common chronic pain disorders. A new paradigm will have multiple clinical implications, including re-evaluation of clinical practice routines and rehabilitation methods, and will focus on controversial issues of medicolegal concern. The concept of dysfunctional central pain processing will also necessitate a mechanism-based classification of pain for the selection of individual treatment and rehabilitation programs for subgroups of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain due to different pathophysiological mechanisms.

  1. Phantom Limb Pain: Mechanisms and Treatment Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Bishnu; Grossberg, George T.

    2011-01-01

    The vast amount of research over the past decades has significantly added to our knowledge of phantom limb pain. Multiple factors including site of amputation or presence of preamputation pain have been found to have a positive correlation with the development of phantom limb pain. The paradigms of proposed mechanisms have shifted over the past years from the psychogenic theory to peripheral and central neural changes involving cortical reorganization. More recently, the role of mirror neurons in the brain has been proposed in the generation of phantom pain. A wide variety of treatment approaches have been employed, but mechanism-based specific treatment guidelines are yet to evolve. Phantom limb pain is considered a neuropathic pain, and most treatment recommendations are based on recommendations for neuropathic pain syndromes. Mirror therapy, a relatively recently proposed therapy for phantom limb pain, has mixed results in randomized controlled trials. Most successful treatment outcomes include multidisciplinary measures. This paper attempts to review and summarize recent research relative to the proposed mechanisms of and treatments for phantom limb pain. PMID:22110933

  2. Phantom Limb Pain: Mechanisms and Treatment Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu Subedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast amount of research over the past decades has significantly added to our knowledge of phantom limb pain. Multiple factors including site of amputation or presence of preamputation pain have been found to have a positive correlation with the development of phantom limb pain. The paradigms of proposed mechanisms have shifted over the past years from the psychogenic theory to peripheral and central neural changes involving cortical reorganization. More recently, the role of mirror neurons in the brain has been proposed in the generation of phantom pain. A wide variety of treatment approaches have been employed, but mechanism-based specific treatment guidelines are yet to evolve. Phantom limb pain is considered a neuropathic pain, and most treatment recommendations are based on recommendations for neuropathic pain syndromes. Mirror therapy, a relatively recently proposed therapy for phantom limb pain, has mixed results in randomized controlled trials. Most successful treatment outcomes include multidisciplinary measures. This paper attempts to review and summarize recent research relative to the proposed mechanisms of and treatments for phantom limb pain.

  3. Habituation to pain: further support for a central component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennefeld, C; Wiech, K; Schoell, E D; Lorenz, J; Bingel, U

    2010-03-01

    Habituation to repetitive painful stimulation may represent an important protection mechanism against the development of chronic pain states. However, the exact neurobiological mechanisms of this phenomenon remain unclear. In this study we (i) explore the somatotopic specificity of pain attenuation over time and (ii) investigate the role of the endogenous opioid system in its development. We investigated 24 healthy volunteers with a paradigm of daily painful stimulation of the left volar forearm for 1 week. Habituation was assessed by comparing pain-related responses (ratings and thresholds) between days 1 and 8. To test whether a repetition-dependent attenuation of pain is restricted to the site of stimulus application or induces additional systemic effects indicative of a central mechanism, we also measured pain-related responses at the contralateral arm and the left leg. To assess the role of the endogenous opioid system in this mechanism, we used the opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone in a double-blind design. Repetitive painful stimulation over several days resulted in a significant habituation to pain at the site of daily stimulation. In addition, we also observed significant pain attenuation at the non-stimulated limbs. This effect was less pronounced at the untreated arm compared to the treated arm and even weaker in the leg, displaying a significant Stimulation-Site x Time interaction. The development of pain habituation was unaffected by the opioid antagonist naloxone. Taken together, these results strongly support the role of central components in the mechanism of pain habituation that do not directly involve the endogenous opioid system. PMID:20097005

  4. "BreakThrough cancer Pain" biomolecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Amato

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The BTcP is a transitory exacerbation of pain of moderate to high intensity, which occurs, either spontaneously or as a result of a trigger factor, in patients with pain basic maintained for most of the day or under control of mild . The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of this type of pain seem to depend on several factors including an increase in the activity of the receptors TRPV1, central sensitization, activation of Glia etc. To better manage the disease can interfere with rapid analgesia of short duration that best overlaps the temporal characteristics of BTcP.

  5. Neuropathic pain due to malignancy: Mechanisms, clinical manifestations and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pjević Miroslava

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neuropathic pain in cancer patients requires a focused clinical evaluation based on knowledge of common neuropathic pain syndromes. Definition Neuropathic pain is a non-nociceptive pain or "differentiation" pain, which suggests abnormal production of impulses by neural tissue that is separated from afferent input. Impulses arise from the peripheral nervous system or central nervous system. Causes of neuropathic pain due to malignancy Neuropathic pain is caused directly by cancer-related pathology (compression/infiltration of nerve tissue, combination of compression/infiltration or by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures (surgical procedures, chemotherapy, radiotherapy. Mechanisms Pathophysiological mechanisms are very complex and still not clear enough. Neuropathic pain is generated by electrical hyperactivity of neurons along the pain pathways. Peripheral mechanisms (primary sensitization of nerve endings, ectopically generated action potentials within damaged nerves, abnormal electrogenesis within sensory ganglia and central mechanisms (loss of input from peripheral nociceptors into dorsal horn, aberrant sprouting within dorsal horn, central sensitization, loss of inhibitory interneurons, mechanisms at higher centers are involved. Diagnosis The quality of pain presents as spontaneous pain (continuous and paroxysmal, abnormal pain (allodynia, hyperalgesia, hyperpathia, paroxysmal pain. Clinical manifestations Clinically, neuropathic pain is described as the pain in the peripheral nerve (cranial nerves, other mononeuropathies, radiculopathy, plexopathy, paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathy and relatively infrequent, central pain syndrome. Therapy Treatment of neuropathic pain remains a challenge for clinicians, because there is no accepted algorithm for analgesic treatment of neuropathic pain. Pharmacotherapy is considered to be the first line therapy. Opioids combined with non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs are warrented. If

  6. A Review of Select Centralized Pain Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Spiegel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain can be broadly divided into 3 classes, including nociceptive or inflammatory pain (protective, neuropathic (pathological, occurring after damage to the nervous system, or centralized (pathological, due to abnormal function but with no damage or inflammation to the nervous system. The latter has been posited to occur when descending analgesic pathways are attenuated and/or glutamatergic transmission is facilitated. Additionally, this “pain prone phenotype” can be associated with early life trauma and a suboptimal response to opiates. This article will review the relationships between centralized pain syndromes (ie, fibromyalgia, chronic low back pain, childhood sexual abuse, and opiate misuse. Finally, treatment implications, potentially effecting primary care physicians, will be discussed.

  7. Recognition of central sensitization in patients with musculoskeletal pain: Application of pain neurophysiology in manual therapy practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, J.; Houdenhove, B. Van; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2010-01-01

    Central sensitization plays an important role in the pathophysiology of numerous musculoskeletal pain disorders, yet it remains unclear how manual therapists can recognize this condition. Therefore, mechanism based clinical guidelines for the recognition of central sensitization in patients with mus

  8. Central poststroke pain: somatosensory abnormalities and the presence of associated myofascial pain syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira Rogério Adas; de Andrade Daniel; Machado André Guelman; Teixeira Manoel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is a neuropathic pain syndrome associated with somatosensory abnormalities due to central nervous system lesion following a cerebrovascular insult. Post-stroke pain (PSP) refers to a broader range of clinical conditions leading to pain after stroke, but not restricted to CPSP, including other types of pain such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), painful shoulder, lumbar and dorsal pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and spasticity-related ...

  9. Clinical analysis and treatment of central pain due to headinjury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Central pain is induced by the involvement of the abnormal pain pathway due to diseases of the central nervous system. Central pain after brain trauma is common clinically, but it is often misdiagnosed and neglected because of lack of objective disturbances. We treated 20 cases of central pain after head injury by invigorating blood circulation and satisfactory result was obtained.

  10. Central pain: definition, phisiopathology and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Moschini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Central pain is the expression of an injury and/or a primary or secondary dysfunction of the central nervous system.1 It is based on total or partial damage along the spinal-thalamic-cortical pathways and it may have cerebral or spinal origin. It has variable incidence according to its etiology: 8-10% in stroke patients, 30% in multiple sclerosis patients, 30-60% in paraplegic patients.2-3 At the spinal level, the most frequent causes are: traumatic injuries, cancer, plaques from multiple sclerosis, syringomyelia. In this review, we examine the main symptoms that contribute to confirm the diagnosis of central pain, neuropathic or thalamic. The presence of nerve injury, evaluated by neuroimaging and neurophysiological tests, allows us to complete the diagnostic picture.

  11. Central poststroke pain: somatosensory abnormalities and the presence of associated myofascial pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Oliveira Rogério Adas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central post-stroke pain (CPSP is a neuropathic pain syndrome associated with somatosensory abnormalities due to central nervous system lesion following a cerebrovascular insult. Post-stroke pain (PSP refers to a broader range of clinical conditions leading to pain after stroke, but not restricted to CPSP, including other types of pain such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS, painful shoulder, lumbar and dorsal pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and spasticity-related pain. Despite its recognition as part of the general PSP diagnostic possibilities, the prevalence of MPS has never been characterized in patients with CPSP patients. We performed a cross-sectional standardized clinical and radiological evaluation of patients with definite CPSP in order to assess the presence of other non-neuropathic pain syndromes, and in particular, the role of myofascial pain syndrome in these patients. Methods CPSP patients underwent a standardized sensory and motor neurological evaluation, and were classified according to stroke mechanism, neurological deficits, presence and profile of MPS. The Visual Analogic Scale (VAS, McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ, and Beck Depression Scale (BDS were filled out by all participants. Results Forty CPSP patients were included. Thirty-six (90.0% had one single ischemic stroke. Pain presented during the first three months after stroke in 75.0%. Median pain intensity was 10 (5 to 10. There was no difference in pain intensity among the different lesion site groups. Neuropathic pain was continuous-ongoing in 34 (85.0% patients and intermittent in the remainder. Burning was the most common descriptor (70%. Main aggravating factors were contact to cold (62.5%. Thermo-sensory abnormalities were universal. MPS was diagnosed in 27 (67.5% patients and was more common in the supratentorial extra-thalamic group (P Conclusions The presence of MPS is not an exception after stroke and may present in association with CPSP

  12. The pain of RSI. The central issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintner, J L

    1989-12-01

    In this paper RSI (repetition strain injury) is used to refer to those diffuse neck and arm pain syndromes that appear to be directly related to occupational factors; for example, occupational overuse syndrome (OOS) and occupational cervicobrachial disorder (OCD). The author examines the clinical evidence that suggests the involvement of neural tissues in the pathogenesis of these conditions. He also speculates on the possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that may explain their development and persistence. PMID:2696462

  13. Neuroimmunological mechanisms of chronic pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vyshlova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the mechanisms of chronic low back pain. Three pathophysiological mechanisms: nociceptive, neurogenic (neuropathic, and psychogenic are noted to be involved in the development of pain syndrome. The role of cellular and molecular changes in the posterior horn and in the somatosensory dysregulated mechanism of neuropathic pain is shown. Immunological processes, including neurohumoral (serotoninergic and hormonal (sex hormones and specific proteins ones, play an important role in the development of pain. The generalization and further study of these mechanisms are embodied in approaches to therapy for pain syndromes and hence these require analysis and further investigation. 

  14. Chronic neuropathic pain: mechanisms, drug targets and measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Sindrup, Søren H.; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in many diseases or injuries of the peripheral or central nervous system, and has a substantial impact on quality of life and mood. Lesions of the nervous system may lead to potentially irreversible changes and imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory systems. Precli...... assess various symptoms and signs in neuropathic pain and knowledge of drug mechanisms are prerequisites for pursuing this approach. The present review summarizes mechanisms of neuropathic pain, targets of currently used drugs, and measures used in neuropathic pain trials.......Neuropathic pain is common in many diseases or injuries of the peripheral or central nervous system, and has a substantial impact on quality of life and mood. Lesions of the nervous system may lead to potentially irreversible changes and imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory systems...

  15. Altered central sensitization and pain modulation in the CNS in chronic joint pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Nielsen, Thomas Arendt;

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain disorders are the second largest contributor to global disability underlining the significance of effective treatments. However, treating chronic musculoskeletal pain, and chronic joint pain (osteoarthritis (OA)) in particular, is challenging as the underlying peripheral and ...... mechanisms, available tools are important for patent profiling and providing the basic knowledge for development of new drugs and for developing pain management regimes....... of human quantitative pain assessment tools (quantitative sensory testing (QST)) have been developed providing new opportunities for profiling patients and reaching a greater understanding of the mechanisms involved in chronic joint pain. As joint pain is a complex interaction between many different pain...

  16. Mechanism of Chronic Pain in Rodent Brain Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pei-Ching

    Chronic pain is a significant health problem that greatly impacts the quality of life of individuals and imparts high costs to society. Despite intense research effort in understanding of the mechanism of pain, chronic pain remains a clinical problem that has few effective therapies. The advent of human brain imaging research in recent years has changed the way that chronic pain is viewed. To further extend the use of human brain imaging techniques for better therapies, the adoption of imaging technique onto the animal pain models is essential, in which underlying brain mechanisms can be systematically studied using various combination of imaging and invasive techniques. The general goal of this thesis is to addresses how brain develops and maintains chronic pain in an animal model using fMRI. We demonstrate that nucleus accumbens, the central component of mesolimbic circuitry, is essential in development of chronic pain. To advance our imaging technique, we develop an innovative methodology to carry out fMRI in awake, conscious rat. Using this cutting-edge technique, we show that allodynia is assoicated with shift brain response toward neural circuits associated nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex that regulate affective and cognitive component of pain. Taken together, this thesis provides a deeper understanding of how brain mediates pain. It builds on the existing body of knowledge through maximizing the depth of insight into brain imaging of chronic pain.

  17. Myofascial Pain: Mechanisms to Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricton, James

    2016-08-01

    More than 100 million adults in the United States have chronic pain conditions, costing more than $500 billion annually in medical care and lost productivity. They are the most common reason for seeking health care, for disability and addiction, and the highest driver of health care costs. Myofascial pain is the most common condition causing chronic pain and can be diagnosed through identifying clinical characteristics and muscle palpation. Management is focused on integrating patient training in changing lifestyle risk factors with evidence-based treatment. Understanding the cause, diagnosis, and management of myopain conditions will help prevent the impact of chronic pain.

  18. Neural mechanisms of pain: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, K L

    1982-01-01

    There are two essential components of pain: discriminative and affective. The discriminative component includes the ability to identify the stimulus as originating from somatic or visceral tissue, determine some of the physical properties of the stimulus, and localize it in space, time, and along a continuum of intensities. The affective component is the experience of aversiveness which motivates escape, avoidance, and protective behavior. Both of these components of pain were acknowledged by Sir Charles Sherrington (1947) and must be considered in any discussion of the neurophysiological basis of pain. The neural mechanisms subserving discrimination and affect are different and may be differentially affected by drugs or surgical procedures. A consideration of pain mechanisms must also include the neural systems modulating pain, for it is well known that pain can be profoundly influenced by other somatic stimuli and by attentional, emotional, and cognitive factors. A thorough and detailed discussion of pain mechanisms is beyond the scope of this brief overview, but I will cover major features of the neural mechanisms currently thought to underlie the discriminative and affective dimensions of pain and the mechanisms by which pain may be modulated.

  19. Mechanism for chronic pain generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Neuropathic pain and the other abnormalities of sensation induced by axon injury or by peripheral nerve inflammation should result from functional compensations of the injured neurons during their regeneration. Ectopic distribution of proteins related to Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels as well as of receptors on both membranes of injured axon and its cell body becomes a main pacemaker from which spontaneous ectopic afferent of primary sensatory neurons and crosstalk between neurons occur. Abnormal ectopic afferent activities lead to disorders of the sensation, such as hyperalgesia, allodynia, spontaneous pain and paraesthesia. Administration of some ion channel agents and/or α2-adrenergic blockers has shown efficiency in preventing neuropathic pain development and in relieving neuropathic pain.

  20. Common mechanisms of pain and depression: Are antidepressants also analgesics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza eNekovarova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neither pain, nor depression exist as independent phenomena per se, they are highly subjective inner states, formed by our brain and built on the bases of our experiences, cognition and emotions. Chronic pain is associated with changes in brain physiology and anatomy. It has been suggested that the neuronal activity underlying subjective perception of chronic pain may be divergent from the activity associated with acute pain. We will discuss the possible common pathophysiological mechanism of chronic pain and depression with respect to the default mode network of the brain, neuroplasticity and the effect of antidepressants on these two pathological conditions. The default mode network of the brain has an important role in the representation of introspective mental activities and therefore can be considered as a nodal point, common for both chronic pain and depression. Neuroplasticity which involves molecular, cellular and synaptic processes modifying connectivity between neurons and neuronal circuits can also be affected by pathological states such as chronic pain or depression. We suppose that pathogenesis of depression and chronic pain shares common negative neuroplastic changes in the central nervous system. The positive impact of antidepressants would result in a reduction of these pathological cellular/molecular processes and in the amelioration of symptoms, but it may also increase survival times and quality of life of patients with chronic cancer pain.

  1. Pain sensitivity and headache: an examination of the central theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, N I

    1992-01-01

    The central theory of headache was investigated by examining pain sensitivity in headache sufferers and headache-free controls. Headache subjects had lower pain threshold and tolerance levels than controls for electrical stimulation of the finger. Headache subjects also had a lesser tolerance for pain induced by the application of ice to the temporal region, but there was no significant difference between groups on temporal ice pain threshold. Sensitivity to finger pain was not affected by the presence or absence of headache at the time of testing. No significant differences between tension and migraine subjects were observed; neither were headache subjects, reporting unilateral headaches, significantly more sensitive to temporal ice pain on the side affected by headache. It was concluded that headache sufferers may be more sensitive to pain than headache-free persons but, that this heightened sensitivity is not specific to the head, and in itself, seems unable to account for the locus of headache. PMID:1538347

  2. Correlation of Mechanical Factors and Gallbladder Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. G. Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acalculous biliary pain occurs in patients with no gallstones, but is similar to that experienced by patients with gallstones. Surgical removal of the gallbladder (GB in these patients is only successful in providing relief of symptoms to about half of those operated on, so a reliable pain-prediction model is needed. In this paper, a mechanical model is developed for the human biliary system during the emptying phase, based on a clinical test in which GB volume changes are measured in response to a standard stimulus and a recorded pain profile. The model can describe the bile emptying behaviour, the flow resistance in the biliary ducts, the peak total stress, including the passive and active stresses experienced by the GB during emptying. This model is used to explore the potential link between GB pain and mechanical factors. It is found that the peak total normal stress may be used as an effective pain indicator for GB pain. When this model is applied to clinical data of volume changes due to Cholecystokinin stimulation and pain from 37 patients, it shows a promising success rate of 88.2% in positive pain prediction.

  3. Evidence for a central mode of action for etoricoxib (COX-2 inhibitor) in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Petersen, Kristian Kjær

    2016-08-01

    The COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib modulates the peripheral and central nociceptive mechanisms in animals. This interaction has not been studied in patients with pain. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover, 4-week treatment study investigated the pain mechanisms modulated by etoricoxib in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis. Patients were randomized to group A (60 mg/d etoricoxib followed by placebo) or B (placebo followed by 60 mg/d etoricoxib). The quantitative, mechanistic pain biomarkers were pressure pain thresholds, temporal summation (TS), and conditioning pain modulation. Clinical readouts were Brief Pain Inventory, WOMAC, painDETECT questionnaire (PD-Q), and time and pain intensity during walking and stair climbing. Etoricoxib as compared with placebo significantly modulated the pressure pain thresholds (P = 0.012, localized sensitization) at the knee and leg (control site) (P = 0.025, spreading sensitization) and TS assessed from the knee (P = 0.038) and leg (P = 0.045). Conditioning pain modulation was not modulated. The Brief Pain Inventory (pain scores), PD-Q, WOMAC, and walking and stair climbing tests were all significantly improved by etoricoxib. Based on a minimum of 30% or 50% pain alleviation (day 0-day 28), responders and nonresponders were defined. The nonresponders showed a significant association between increased facilitation of TS and increased pain alleviation. None of the other parameters predicted the degree of pain alleviation. Generally, a responder to etoricoxib has the most facilitated TS. In conclusion, etoricoxib (1) modulated central pain modulatory mechanisms and (2) improved pain and function in painful osteoarthritis. Stronger facilitation of TS may indicate a better response to etoricoxib, supporting the central mode-of-action of the drug. PMID:27007068

  4. Central Pain Processing in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Laser Pain fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschow, Christine; Scheef, Lukas; Paus, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Nadine; Schild, Hans H.; Klockgether, Thomas; Boecker, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objective Pain is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson’s disease. As dopaminergic dysfunction is suggested to affect intrinsic nociceptive processing, this study was designed to characterize laser-induced pain processing in early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients in the dopaminergic OFF state, using a multimodal experimental approach at behavioral, autonomic, imaging levels. Methods 13 right-handed early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients without cognitive or sensory impairment were investigated OFF medication, along with 13 age-matched healthy control subjects. Measurements included warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, and central pain processing with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (erfMRI) during laser-induced pain stimulation at lower (E = 440 mJ) and higher (E = 640 mJ) target energies. Additionally, electrodermal activity was characterized during delivery of 60 randomized pain stimuli ranging from 440 mJ to 640 mJ, along with evaluation of subjective pain ratings on a visual analogue scale. Results No significant differences in warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, electrodermal activity and subjective pain ratings were found between Parkinson’s disease patients and controls, and erfMRI revealed a generally comparable activation pattern induced by laser-pain stimuli in brain areas belonging to the central pain matrix. However, relatively reduced deactivation was found in Parkinson’s disease patients in posterior regions of the default mode network, notably the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusion Our data during pain processing extend previous findings suggesting default mode network dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease. On the other hand, they argue against a genuine pain-specific processing abnormality in early-stage Parkinson’s disease. Future studies are now required using similar multimodal experimental designs to examine pain processing in more advanced

  5. Postamputation pain: epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu E

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Eugene Hsu,1 Steven P Cohen21Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Uniformed Services, University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Postamputation pain (PAP is highly prevalent after limb amputation but remains an extremely challenging pain condition to treat. A large part of its intractability stems from the myriad pathophysiological mechanisms. A state-of-art understanding of the pathophysiologic basis underlying postamputation phenomena can be broadly categorized in terms of supraspinal, spinal, and peripheral mechanisms. Supraspinal mechanisms involve somatosensory cortical reorganization of the area representing the deafferentated limb and are predominant in phantom limb pain and phantom sensations. Spinal reorganization in the dorsal horn occurs after deafferentation from a peripheral nerve injury. Peripherally, axonal nerve damage initiates inflammation, regenerative sprouting, and increased "ectopic" afferent input which is thought by many to be the predominant mechanism involved in residual limb pain or neuroma pain, but may also contribute to phantom phenomena. To optimize treatment outcomes, therapy should be individually tailored and mechanism based. Treatment modalities include injection therapy, pharmacotherapy, complementary and alternative therapy, surgical therapy, and interventions aimed at prevention. Unfortunately, there is a lack of high quality clinical trials to support most of these treatments. Most of the randomized controlled trials in PAP have evaluated medications, with a trend for short-term efficacy noted for ketamine and opioids. Evidence for peripheral injection therapy with botulinum toxin and pulsed radiofrequency for residual limb pain is limited to very small trials and case series. Mirror therapy is a safe and cost-effective alternative treatment modality for PAP. Neuromodulation using implanted motor cortex stimulation has shown a trend

  6. Pain and efficacy of local anesthetics for central venous access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C Culp Jr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available William C Culp Jr1, Mohammed Yousaf2, Benjamin Lowry1, Timothy C McCowan3, William C Culp21Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology, Scott and White Hospital, The Texas A&M University College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USA; 2Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 3Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USAPurpose: To compare pain during injection and efficacy of analgesia of local anesthetics during central venous line placement.Methods: Sixty-two patients were studied in a randomized, double-blinded prospective fashion. Patients received 1% lidocaine (L, buffered 1% lidocaine (LB, or 2% chloroprocaine (CP injected around the internal jugular vein for procedural analgesia for central venous access. Patients reported pain via a standard linear visual analog scale, with 0 representing no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable.Results: Overall patient perception of pain was better with CP and L than LB with mean scores of CP 2.4, L 2.6, LB 4.2. Pain with injection mean scores were CP 2.1, L 2.5, LB 3.2. Pain with catheter placement scores were CP 2.5, L 1.7, LB 3.4. Operator assessment of overall pain values were CP 1.9, L 2.2, LB 3.4. LB consistently scored the worst, though compared with CP, this only reached statistical significance in overall patient pain and pain at catheter insertion compared with L.Conclusion: Though chloroprocaine scored better than lidocaine in 3 of 4 parameters, this trend did not achieve statistical significance. Adding sodium bicarbonate to lidocaine isn’t justified in routine practice, nor is routine replacement of lidocaine with chloroprocaine.Keywords: local anesthesia, analgesia, central venous access, lidocaine, chloroprocaine

  7. Cancer Pain: A Critical Review of Mechanism-based Classification and Physical Therapy Management in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Senthil P

    2011-05-01

    Mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of pain is essential to effectively manage painful symptoms in patients attending palliative care. The objective of this review is to provide a detailed review of mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of patients with cancer pain. Cancer pain can be classified based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Classification based upon mechanisms not only addresses the underlying pathophysiology but also provides us with an understanding behind patient's symptoms and treatment responses. Existing evidence suggests that the five mechanisms - central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, sympathetically maintained pain, nociceptive and cognitive-affective - operate in patients with cancer pain. Summary of studies showing evidence for physical therapy treatment methods for cancer pain follows with suggested therapeutic implications. Effective palliative physical therapy care using a mechanism-based classification model should be tailored to suit each patient's findings, using a biopsychosocial model of pain. PMID:21976851

  8. Cancer pain: A critical review of mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of pain is essential to effectively manage painful symptoms in patients attending palliative care. The objective of this review is to provide a detailed review of mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of patients with cancer pain. Cancer pain can be classified based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Classification based upon mechanisms not only addresses the underlying pathophysiology but also provides us with an understanding behind patient′s symptoms and treatment responses. Existing evidence suggests that the five mechanisms - central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, sympathetically maintained pain, nociceptive and cognitive-affective - operate in patients with cancer pain. Summary of studies showing evidence for physical therapy treatment methods for cancer pain follows with suggested therapeutic implications. Effective palliative physical therapy care using a mechanism-based classification model should be tailored to suit each patient′s findings, using a biopsychosocial model of pain.

  9. Exercise Strengthens Central Nervous System Modulation of Pain in Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Laura D.; Stegner, Aaron J.; Schwabacher, Isaac J.; Koltyn, Kelli F.; Cook, Dane B.

    2016-01-01

    To begin to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the benefits of exercise for chronic pain, we assessed the influence of exercise on brain responses to pain in fibromyalgia (FM). Complete data were collected for nine female FM patients and nine pain-free controls (CO) who underwent two functional neuroimaging scans, following exercise (EX) and following quiet rest (QR). Brain responses and pain ratings to noxious heat stimuli were compared within and between groups. For pain ratings, there was a significant (p < 0.05) Condition by Run interaction characterized by moderately lower pain ratings post EX compared to QR (d = 0.39–0.41) for FM but similar to ratings in CO (d = 0.10–0.26), thereby demonstrating that exercise decreased pain sensitivity in FM patients to a level that was analogous to pain-free controls. Brain responses demonstrated a significant within-group difference in FM patients, characterized by less brain activity bilaterally in the anterior insula following QR as compared to EX. There was also a significant Group by Condition interaction with FM patients showing less activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex following QR as compared to post-EX and CO following both conditions. These results suggest that exercise appeared to stimulate brain regions involved in descending pain inhibition in FM patients, decreasing their sensitivity to pain. Thus, exercise may benefit patients with FM via improving the functional capacity of the pain modulatory system. PMID:26927193

  10. Methods to measure peripheral and central sensitization using quantitative sensory testing: A focus on individuals with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkweather, Angela R; Heineman, Amy; Storey, Shannon; Rubia, Gil; Lyon, Debra E; Greenspan, Joel; Dorsey, Susan G

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative sensory testing can be used to assess peripheral and central sensitization; important factors that contribute to the individual's experience of pain and disability. Many studies use quantitative sensory testing in patients with low back pain to detect alterations in pain sensitivity, however, because investigators employ different protocols, interpretation of findings across studies can become problematic. The purpose of this article is to propose a standardized method of testing peripheral and central pain sensitization in patients with low back pain. Video clips are provided to demonstrate correct procedures for measuring the response to experimental pain using mechanical, thermal and pressure modalities. As nurse researchers and clinicians increase utilization of quantitative sensory testing to examine pain phenotypes, it is anticipated that more personalized methods for monitoring the trajectory of low back pain and response to treatment will improve outcomes for this patient population.

  11. The role of sleep problems in central pain processing in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yvonne C.; Lu, Bing; Edwards, Robert R.; Wasan, Ajay D.; Nassikas, Nicholas J.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, pain may exist out of proportion to peripheral inflammation. This observation suggests that central nervous system pain amplification mechanisms, such as diminished conditioned pain modulation (CPM), may play a role in enhancing pain perception among some RA patients. We examined CPM, pressure pain threshold and pressure pain tolerance among RA patients compared to controls. Methods Fifty-eight female RA patients and 54 age-matched controls without chronic pain underwent quantitative sensory testing (QST) to assess CPM, pressure pain threshold and pressure pain tolerance. CPM was induced using a cold water bath, and pain threshold (when patients first felt pain) and tolerance (when pain was too much to bear) were assessed with an algometer. Associations between RA and QST measures were analyzed using linear regression. Sleep problems, mental health and inflammation were assessed as mediators of the relationship between RA and QST measures. Results Median CPM levels were 0.5 kg/cm2 (interquartile range (IQR) −0.1, 1.6) among RA patients compared to 1.5 kg/cm2 (IQR −0.1, 2.5) among controls (P = 0.04). Relative to controls, RA patients had lower pain threshold and tolerance at the wrists (P ≤ 0.05). Compared to controls, RA patients had greater problems with sleep, catastrophizing, depression and anxiety (P < 0.0001). Mediation analyses suggested that low CPM levels may be partially attributable to sleep disturbance (P = 0.04). Conclusion RA patients have impaired CPM relative to pain-free controls. Sleep problems may mediate the association between RA and attenuated CPM. PMID:23124650

  12. Peripheral Mechanisms of Dental Pain: The Role of Substance P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Sacerdote

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current evidence supports the central role of neuropeptides in the molecular mechanisms underlying dental pain. In particular, substance P, a neuropeptide produced in neuron cell bodies localised in dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, contributes to the transmission and maintenance of noxious stimuli and inflammatory processes. The major role of substance P in the onset of dental pain and inflammation is increasingly being recognised. Well-grounded experimental and clinical observations have documented an increase in substance P concentration in patients affected by caries, pulpitis, or granulomas and in those undergoing standard orthodontic or orthodontic/dental care procedures. This paper focuses on the role of substance P in the induction and maintenance of inflammation and dental pain, in order to define future lines of research for the evaluation of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the complex effects of this mediator in oral tissues.

  13. Peripheral mechanisms of dental pain: the role of substance P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacerdote, Paola; Levrini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Current evidence supports the central role of neuropeptides in the molecular mechanisms underlying dental pain. In particular, substance P, a neuropeptide produced in neuron cell bodies localised in dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, contributes to the transmission and maintenance of noxious stimuli and inflammatory processes. The major role of substance P in the onset of dental pain and inflammation is increasingly being recognised. Well-grounded experimental and clinical observations have documented an increase in substance P concentration in patients affected by caries, pulpitis, or granulomas and in those undergoing standard orthodontic or orthodontic/dental care procedures. This paper focuses on the role of substance P in the induction and maintenance of inflammation and dental pain, in order to define future lines of research for the evaluation of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the complex effects of this mediator in oral tissues.

  14. Peripheral Mechanisms of Dental Pain: The Role of Substance P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacerdote, Paola; Levrini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Current evidence supports the central role of neuropeptides in the molecular mechanisms underlying dental pain. In particular, substance P, a neuropeptide produced in neuron cell bodies localised in dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, contributes to the transmission and maintenance of noxious stimuli and inflammatory processes. The major role of substance P in the onset of dental pain and inflammation is increasingly being recognised. Well-grounded experimental and clinical observations have documented an increase in substance P concentration in patients affected by caries, pulpitis, or granulomas and in those undergoing standard orthodontic or orthodontic/dental care procedures. This paper focuses on the role of substance P in the induction and maintenance of inflammation and dental pain, in order to define future lines of research for the evaluation of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the complex effects of this mediator in oral tissues. PMID:22474402

  15. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnman, Clas; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain pathway, from injury site to behavioral consequence, in a quantitative manner. Such a development could lead to diagnostics determining the source of pain (peripheral or central), objective monitoring of treatment progression, and, hopefully, objective biomarkers of pain. PMID:24228169

  16. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clas Linnman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain pathway, from injury site to behavioral consequence, in a quantitative manner. Such a development could lead to diagnostics determining the source of pain (peripheral or central, objective monitoring of treatment progression, and, hopefully, objective biomarkers of pain.

  17. Slow temporal summation of pain for assessment of central pain sensitivity and clinical pain of fibromyalgia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Staud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In healthy individuals slow temporal summation of pain or wind-up (WU can be evoked by repetitive heat-pulses at frequencies of ≥.33 Hz. Previous WU studies have used various stimulus frequencies and intensities to characterize central sensitization of human subjects including fibromyalgia (FM patients. However, many trials demonstrated considerable WU-variability including zero WU or even wind-down (WD at stimulus intensities sufficient for activating C-nociceptors. Additionally, few WU-protocols have controlled for contributions of individual pain sensitivity to WU-magnitude, which is critical for WU-comparisons. We hypothesized that integration of 3 different WU-trains into a single WU-response function (WU-RF would not only control for individuals' pain sensitivity but also better characterize their central pain responding including WU and WD. METHODS: 33 normal controls (NC and 38 FM patients participated in a study of heat-WU. We systematically varied stimulus intensities of.4 Hz heat-pulse trains applied to the hands. Pain summation was calculated as difference scores of 1st and 5th heat-pulse ratings. WU-difference (WU-Δ scores related to 3 heat-pulse trains (44°C, 46°C, 48°C were integrated into WU-response functions whose slopes were used to assess group differences in central pain sensitivity. WU-aftersensations (WU-AS at 15 s and 30 s were used to predict clinical FM pain intensity. RESULTS: WU-Δ scores linearly accelerated with increasing stimulus intensity (pNC from WD to WU. Slope of WU-RF, which is representative of central pain sensitivity, was significantly steeper in FM patients than NC (p<.003. WU-AS predicted clinical FM pain intensity (Pearson's r = .4; p<.04. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to single WU series, WU-RFs integrate individuals' pain sensitivity as well as WU and WD. Slope of WU-RFs was significantly different between FM patients and NC. Therefore WU-RF may be useful for assessing central

  18. Mechanism-based classification of pain for physical therapy management in palliative care: A clinical commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain relief is a major goal for palliative care in India so much that most palliative care interventions necessarily begin first with pain relief. Physical therapists play an important role in palliative care and they are regarded as highly proficient members of a multidisciplinary healthcare team towards management of chronic pain. Pain necessarily involves three different levels of classification-based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Mechanism-based treatments are most likely to succeed compared to symptomatic treatments or diagnosis-based treatments. The objective of this clinical commentary is to update the physical therapists working in palliative care, on the mechanism-based classification of pain and its interpretation, with available therapeutic evidence for providing optimal patient care using physical therapy. The paper describes the evolution of mechanism-based classification of pain, the five mechanisms (central sensitization, peripheral neuropathic, nociceptive, sympathetically maintained pain and cognitive-affective are explained with recent evidence for physical therapy treatments for each of the mechanisms.

  19. Neural mechanisms of pain and alcohol dependence☆

    OpenAIRE

    Apkarian, A. Vania; Neugebauer, Volker; Koob, George; Edwards, Scott; Levine, Jon D.; Ferrari, Luiz; Egli, Mark; Regunathan, Soundar

    2013-01-01

    An association between chronic pain conditions and alcohol dependence has been revealed in numerous studies with episodes of alcohol abuse antedating chronic pain in some people and alcohol dependence emerging after the onset of chronic pain in others. Alcohol dependence and chronic pain share common neural circuits giving rise to the possibility that chronic pain states could significantly affect alcohol use patterns and that alcohol dependence could influence pain sensitivity. The reward an...

  20. Pain mechanisms and ultrasonic inflammatory activity as prognostic factors in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Christensen, Robin; Dreyer, Lene;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Persistent pain is a major concern for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Pain may be due to inflammatory activity or augmented central pain processing. Unawareness of the origin and mechanisms of pain can lead to misinterpretation of disease activity (by composite scores......) and erroneous treatments. Ultrasonography (US) is a highly sensitive method to detect tissue inflammation. Evaluating pain mechanisms in relation to US measures may prove valuable in predicting response to treatment in PsA. AIMS: To study the association and prognostic value of pain mechanisms, ultrasonic...... activity and clinical outcomes in patients with PsA who intensify antirheumatic treatment. METHODS AND ANALYSES: 100 participants >18 years of age with PsA who initiate or switch antirheumatic treatment (biologicals and/or conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs...

  1. Relationship between mechanical sensitivity and postamputation pain: A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Lone; IlKjær, Susanne; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2000-01-01

    Limb amputation is followed by stump and phantom pain in a large proportion of amputees and postamputation pain may be associated with signs of hyperexcitability such as hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation. The present study examined the possible relationship between mechanical pain threshold...

  2. A novel use for testosterone to treat central sensitization of chronic pain in fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Hillary D; Robinson, Thomas D

    2015-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a diffuse chronic pain condition that occurs predominantly in women and may be under-reported in men. Symptoms include a loss of feeling of well-being and generalized widespread flu-like muscle aches and pain that fail to resolve due to central sensitization of nociceptive neurons. It has commonalities with a myriad of other chronic pain conditions which include PTSD, "Gulf War Syndrome", and various stress-induced conditions caused, for example, by viral infection, emotional or physical stress, trauma, combat, accident or surgery. It is not understood why some individuals are susceptible to this condition and others are not. White et al., elsewhere in this issue, present a clinical feasibility study designed to test the hypothesis that 1) low or deficient testosterone serum levels are linked to a high risk for an inflamed nociceptive nervous system and resultant chronic pain states, and 2) a testosterone transdermal gel applied once a day by fibromyalgia patients can be an effective therapeutic against chronic pain. Here, a short profile of fibromyalgia is provided along with a brief summary of best practices currently recommended by clinical specialists. The link between testosterone and pain is then discussed, with an overview of scientific studies that lay the foundation for testosterone as a possible important additional therapeutic that has the potential to be safely administered and effective but also avoid the adverse effects of other therapeutics. Finally, novel mechanisms by which testosterone therapy is likely to down-modulate pain signaling are proposed.

  3. Perturbed connectivity of the amygdala and its subregions with the central executive and default mode networks in chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Oathes, Desmond; Hush, Julia; Darnall, Beth; Charvat, Mylea; Mackey, Sean; Etkin, Amit

    2016-09-01

    Maladaptive responses to pain-related distress, such as pain catastrophizing, amplify the impairments associated with chronic pain. Many of these aspects of chronic pain are similar to affective distress in clinical anxiety disorders. In light of the role of the amygdala in pain and affective distress, disruption of amygdalar functional connectivity in anxiety states, and its implication in the response to noxious stimuli, we investigated amygdala functional connectivity in 17 patients with chronic low back pain and 17 healthy comparison subjects, with respect to normal targets of amygdala subregions (basolateral vs centromedial nuclei), and connectivity to large-scale cognitive-emotional networks, including the default mode network, central executive network, and salience network. We found that patients with chronic pain had exaggerated and abnormal amygdala connectivity with central executive network, which was most exaggerated in patients with the greatest pain catastrophizing. We also found that the normally basolateral-predominant amygdala connectivity to the default mode network was blunted in patients with chronic pain. Our results therefore highlight the importance of the amygdala and its network-level interaction with large-scale cognitive/affective cortical networks in chronic pain, and help link the neurobiological mechanisms of cognitive theories for pain with other clinical states of affective distress.

  4. Perturbed connectivity of the amygdala and its subregions with the central executive and default mode networks in chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Oathes, Desmond; Hush, Julia; Darnall, Beth; Charvat, Mylea; Mackey, Sean; Etkin, Amit

    2016-09-01

    Maladaptive responses to pain-related distress, such as pain catastrophizing, amplify the impairments associated with chronic pain. Many of these aspects of chronic pain are similar to affective distress in clinical anxiety disorders. In light of the role of the amygdala in pain and affective distress, disruption of amygdalar functional connectivity in anxiety states, and its implication in the response to noxious stimuli, we investigated amygdala functional connectivity in 17 patients with chronic low back pain and 17 healthy comparison subjects, with respect to normal targets of amygdala subregions (basolateral vs centromedial nuclei), and connectivity to large-scale cognitive-emotional networks, including the default mode network, central executive network, and salience network. We found that patients with chronic pain had exaggerated and abnormal amygdala connectivity with central executive network, which was most exaggerated in patients with the greatest pain catastrophizing. We also found that the normally basolateral-predominant amygdala connectivity to the default mode network was blunted in patients with chronic pain. Our results therefore highlight the importance of the amygdala and its network-level interaction with large-scale cognitive/affective cortical networks in chronic pain, and help link the neurobiological mechanisms of cognitive theories for pain with other clinical states of affective distress. PMID:27168362

  5. Pregabalin and placebo responders show different effects on central pain processing in chronic pancreatitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwense SA

    2015-07-01

    -generating study provides the first evidence that pain relief with pregabalin is associated with anti-hyperalgesic effects and increased endogenous inhibitory modulation. No such effects were observed in patients experiencing pain relief with the placebo treatment. The mechanisms underlying analgesic response to placebo vs drug treatments are different and, together with their interactions, deserve further study.Keywords: chronic pancreatitis, pregabalin, placebo, chronic pain treatment, quantitative sensory testing, central sensitization

  6. Care-related pain in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayasrah, S

    2016-07-01

    Despite advances in pain management, critically ill patients continue to have unacceptably high rates of uncontrolled pain. Using the Behavioural Pain Scale and physiological indicators of pain, this study examines pain levels in mechanically ventilated patients prior to and during routine nursing procedures. A prospective descriptive design was used to assess and describe care-related pain associated with nociceptive procedures (repositioning, endotracheal suctioning, and vascular punctures) and non-nociceptive procedures (mouth care, eye care and dressing change). A sample of 247 mechanically ventilated Jordanian patients was recruited from intensive care units in a military hospital. The overall mean procedural pain score of 6.34 (standard deviation [SD] 2.36) was significantly higher than the mean preprocedural pain score of 3.43 (SD 0.67, t[246]=20.82, Pindicating that patients were either anxious or responsive to command only. The mean physiological indicators of pain increased during repositioning and endotracheal suctioning and decreased during the rest of the procedures. Mechanically ventilated patients experience pain prior to and during routine nursing procedures. Harmless and comfort procedures are actually painful. When caring for nonverbal critically ill patients, clinicians need to consider care-related pain associated with their interventions. Relying on changes in vital signs as a primary indicator of pain can be misleading. PMID:27456175

  7. Clinical use of pregabalin in the management of central neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanna B Finnerup

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanna B Finnerup, Troels S JensenDanish Pain Research Center, Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, DenmarkAbstract: Central neuropathic pain (central pain is treated with antidepressants, various anticonvulsants, opioids, and cannabinoids, but in many cases treatment is insufficient and associated with a range of side-effects. This review addresses a new treatment for neuropathic pain, the anticonvulsant pregabalin. We review the pharmacology, mode of action, pharmacokinetics, and safety of pregabalin as well as two randomized efficacy studies in central pain and a brief overview of efficacy in peripheral neuropathic pain. Pregabalin appears to have efficacy in treating central pain comparable to that in peripheral neuropathic pain as well as efficacy of other recommended drugs for central pain. Pregabalin also improves disturbed sleep and anxiety. Pregabalin is well tolerated; the most common side-effects are somnolence, dizziness, ataxia, and weight gain. Pregabalin is suitable for patients on multiple drugs although there may be additive CNS-related side-effects. Thus, pregabalin has a primary role in central pain patients.Keywords: central pain, neuropathic pain, pregabalin, pharmacology

  8. Why Social Pain Can Live on: Different Neural Mechanisms Are Associated with Reliving Social and Physical Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan L Meyer

    Full Text Available Although social and physical pain recruit overlapping neural activity in regions associated with the affective component of pain, the two pains can diverge in their phenomenology. Most notably, feelings of social pain can be re-experienced or "relived," even when the painful episode has long passed, whereas feelings of physical pain cannot be easily relived once the painful episode subsides. Here, we observed that reliving social (vs. physical pain led to greater self-reported re-experienced pain and greater activity in affective pain regions (dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula. Moreover, the degree of relived pain correlated positively with affective pain system activity. In contrast, reliving physical (vs. social pain led to greater activity in the sensory-discriminative pain system (primary and secondary somatosensory cortex and posterior insula, which did not correlate with relived pain. Preferential engagement of these different pain mechanisms may reflect the use of different top-down neurocognitive pathways to elicit the pain. Social pain reliving recruited dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, often associated with mental state processing, which functionally correlated with affective pain system responses. In contrast, physical pain reliving recruited inferior frontal gyrus, known to be involved in body state processing, which functionally correlated with activation in the sensory pain system. These results update the physical-social pain overlap hypothesis: while overlapping mechanisms support live social and physical pain, distinct mechanisms guide internally-generated pain.

  9. Chronic musculoskeletal pain: review of mechanisms and biochemical biomarkers as assessed by the microdialysis technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerdle B

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Björn Gerdle,1,2 Bijar Ghafouri,1,3 Malin Ernberg,4 Britt Larsson1,21Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 2Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden; 3Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 4Department of Dental Medicine, Section of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, SwedenAbstract: Chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions are multifaceted, and approximately 20% of the adult population lives with severe chronic pain, with a higher prevalence in women and in lower income groups. Chronic pain is influenced by and interacts with physical, emotional, psychological, and social factors, and a biopsychosocial framework is increasingly applied in clinical practice. However, there is still a lack of assessment procedures based on the activated neurobiological pain mechanisms (ie, the biological part of the biopsychosocial model of pain, which may be a necessary step for further optimizing outcomes after treatments for patients with chronic pain. It has been suggested that chronic pain conditions are mainly driven by alterations in the central nervous system with little or no peripheral stimuli or nociception. In contrast, other authors argue that such central alterations are driven by peripheral alterations and nociceptive input. Microdialysis is an in vivo method for studying local tissue alterations and allows for sampling of substances in the interstitium of the muscle, where nociceptor free nerve endings are found close to the muscle fibers. The extracellular matrix plays a key role in physiologic functions of cells, including the primary afferent nociceptor. The present review mainly concerns the results of microdialysis studies and how they can contribute to the understanding of activated peripheral nociceptive and pain

  10. The Pain System in Oesophageal Disorders: Mechanisms, Clinical Characteristics, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Lottrup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is common in gastroenterology. This review aims at giving an overview of pain mechanisms, clinical features, and treatment options in oesophageal disorders. The oesophagus has sensory receptors specific for different stimuli. Painful stimuli are encoded by nociceptors and communicated via afferent nerves to the central nervous system. The pain stimulus is further processed and modulated in specific pain centres in the brain, which may undergo plastic alterations. Hence, tissue inflammation and long-term exposure to pain can cause sensitisation and hypersensitivity. Oesophageal sensitivity can be evaluated ,for example, with the oesophageal multimodal probe. Treatment should target the cause of the patient's symptoms. In gastro-oesophageal reflux diseases, proton pump inhibitors are the primary treatment option, surgery being reserved for patients with severe disease resistant to drug therapy. Functional oesophageal disorders are treated with analgesics, antidepressants, and psychological therapy. Lifestyle changes are another option with less documentation.

  11. Gabapentin reverses central pain sensitization following a collagenase-induced intrathalamic hemorrhage in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castel A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aude Castel, Pascal VachonFaculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Veterinary Biomedicine, University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, CanadaPurpose: The treatment of central neuropathic pain remains amongst the biggest challenges for pain specialists. The main objective of this study was to assess gabapentin (GBP, amitriptyline (AMI, and carbamazepine (CARBA for the treatment of a rodent central neuropathic pain model.Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were trained on the rotarod, Hargreaves, Von Frey and acetone behavioral tests, and baseline values were obtained prior to surgery. A stereotaxic injection of either a collagenase solution or saline was made in the right ventral posterolateral thalamic nucleus. The rats were tested on days 2, 4, 8, and 11 postsurgery. They were retested at regular intervals from day 15 to day 25 postsurgery, after oral administration of either the vehicle (n=7 and n=8 rats with intracerebral injections of collagenase and saline, respectively or the different drugs (GBP [60 mg/kg], AMI [10 mg/kg], CARBA [100 mg/kg]; n=8 rats/drug.Results: A significant decrease in the mechanical thresholds and no change in heat threshold were observed in both hind limbs in the collagenase group, as we had previously shown elsewhere. Reversal of the mechanical hypersensitivity was achieved only with GBP (P<0.05. AMI and CARBA, at the dosages used, failed to show any effect on mechanical thresholds. Transient cold allodynia was observed in some collagenase-injected rats but failed to be statistically significant.Conclusion: Intrathalamic hemorrhaging in the ventrolateral thalamic nucleus induced a bilateral mechanical allodynia, which was reversed by GBP but not AMI or CARBA.Keywords: central pain, thalamus, amitriptyline, carbamazepine

  12. Reaction to topical capsaicin in spinal cord injury patients with and without central pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Pedersen, Louise H.; Terkelsen, Astrid J.;

    2007-01-01

    Central neuropathic pain is a debilitating and frequent complication to spinal cord injury (SCI). Excitatory input from hyperexcitable cells around the injured grey matter zone is suggested to play a role for central neuropathic pain felt below the level of a spinal cord injury. Direct evidence...... of a spinal cord injury which already is hyperexcitable, would cause enhanced responses in patients with central pain at the level of injury compared to patients without neuropathic pain and healthy controls. Touch, punctuate stimuli, cold stimuli and topical capsaicin was applied above, at, and below injury...... at the level of injury. Keywords: Spinal cord injury; Neuropathic pain; Capsaicin; Neuronal hyperexcitability; Hyperalgesia; Blood flow...

  13. Beep tones attenuate pain following Pavlovian conditioning of an endogenous pain control mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuren, Raymonde; Anton, Fernand; Erpelding, Nathalie; Michaux, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Heterotopic noxious counter-stimulation (HNCS) is commonly used to study endogenous pain control systems. The resulting pain inhibition is primarily based on spinal cord-brainstem loops. Recently, functional imaging studies have shown that limbic structures like the anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala are also implicated. Since these structures are involved in learning processes, it is possible that the HNCS-induced pain inhibition may depend on specific cues from the environment that have been associated with pain reduction through associative learning. We investigated the influence of Pavlovian conditioning on HNCS-induced pain inhibition in 32 healthy subjects by using a differential conditioning paradigm in which two different acoustic stimuli were either repeatedly paired or unpaired with HNCS. Series of noxious electrical pulse trains delivered to the non-dominant foot served as test stimuli. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC)-like effects were induced by concurrent application of tonic HNCS (immersion of the contralateral hand in ice water). Subjective pain intensity and pain unpleasantness ratings and electromyographic recordings of the facial corrugator muscle and the nocifensive RIII flexion reflex were used to measure changes in pain sensitivity. HNCS induced significant pain and reflex inhibitions. In the post-conditioning phase, only the paired auditory cue was able to significantly reduce pain perceptions and corrugator muscle activity. No conditioned effect could be observed in RIII reflex responses. Our results indicate that the functional state of endogenous pain control systems may depend on associative learning processes that, like in the present study, may lead to an attenuation of pain perception. Similar albeit opposite conditioning of pain control mechanisms may significantly be involved in the exacerbation and chronification of pain states.

  14. Beep tones attenuate pain following Pavlovian conditioning of an endogenous pain control mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymonde Scheuren

    Full Text Available Heterotopic noxious counter-stimulation (HNCS is commonly used to study endogenous pain control systems. The resulting pain inhibition is primarily based on spinal cord-brainstem loops. Recently, functional imaging studies have shown that limbic structures like the anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala are also implicated. Since these structures are involved in learning processes, it is possible that the HNCS-induced pain inhibition may depend on specific cues from the environment that have been associated with pain reduction through associative learning. We investigated the influence of Pavlovian conditioning on HNCS-induced pain inhibition in 32 healthy subjects by using a differential conditioning paradigm in which two different acoustic stimuli were either repeatedly paired or unpaired with HNCS. Series of noxious electrical pulse trains delivered to the non-dominant foot served as test stimuli. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC-like effects were induced by concurrent application of tonic HNCS (immersion of the contralateral hand in ice water. Subjective pain intensity and pain unpleasantness ratings and electromyographic recordings of the facial corrugator muscle and the nocifensive RIII flexion reflex were used to measure changes in pain sensitivity. HNCS induced significant pain and reflex inhibitions. In the post-conditioning phase, only the paired auditory cue was able to significantly reduce pain perceptions and corrugator muscle activity. No conditioned effect could be observed in RIII reflex responses. Our results indicate that the functional state of endogenous pain control systems may depend on associative learning processes that, like in the present study, may lead to an attenuation of pain perception. Similar albeit opposite conditioning of pain control mechanisms may significantly be involved in the exacerbation and chronification of pain states.

  15. Detection of central circuits implicated in the formation of novel pain memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadhyay J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jaymin Upadhyay,1 Julia Granitzka,1 Thomas Bauermann,2 Ulf Baumgärtner,3 Markus Breimhorst,1 Rolf-Detlef Treede,3 Frank Birklein1 1Department of Neurology, 2Department of Neuroradiology, University Medical Centre, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, 3Department of Neurophysiology, Center for Biomedicine and Medical Technology Mannheim (CBTM, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany Abstract: Being able to remember physically and emotionally painful events in one’s own past may shape behavior, and can create an aversion to a variety of situations. Pain imagination is a related process that may include recall of past experiences, in addition to production of sensory and emotional percepts without external stimuli. This study aimed to understand 1 the central nervous system processes that underlie pain imagination, 2 the retrieval of pain memories, and 3 to compare the latter with visual object memory. These goals were achieved by longitudinally investigating brain function with functional magnetic resonance imaging in a unique group of healthy volunteers who had never experienced tooth pain. In these subjects, we compared brain responses elicited during three experimental conditions in the following order: imagination of tooth pain (pain imagination, remembering one’s own house (object memory, and remembrance of tooth pain following an episode of induced acute tooth pain (pain memory. Key observations stemming from group-level conjunction analyses revealed common activation in the posterior parietal cortex for both pain imagination and pain memory, while object and pain memory each had strong activation predominantly within the middle frontal gyrus. When contrasting pain imagination and memory, significant activation differences were observed in subcortical structures (ie, parahippocampus – pain imagination > pain memory; midbrain – pain memory > pain imagination. Importantly, these findings were observed in the presence of

  16. The neural mechanisms of pain-related affect and memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The pain experience includes a sensory-discriminative and an emotional-affective components. The affective dimension refers to the unpleasantness or aversion of sensation. The great progress at the genetic, molecular, cellular, and systemic levels on the study of the sensory dimension of pain has been made over past four decades. However, "to consider only the sensory features of pain, and ignore its motivational and affective properties, is to look at only part of the problem and not even the most important part of that". A line of clinic observations indicate that the patients with chronic pain suffer from much more affective disturbance than pain itself. Obviously,physiological arousal and hypervigilance to pain cause negative affect, such as anxiety, anger, worry, aversion, even tendency of suicide,these negative affective states in turn enhance pain sensation. Today, more and more attention has been paid to the study on mechanisms underlying affective dimension of pain. In order to deepen and expand our understanding of the nature of pain, this review summarizes the main progress and recent findings from our laboratory regarding affective component of pain in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and cell biochemistry.

  17. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Fernanda Spitoni

    Full Text Available Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient's left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20, in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions.

  18. Uncomplicated mechanically induced pelvic pain and organic dysfunction in low back pain patients

    OpenAIRE

    Browning, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Mechanical disorders of the lumbar spine have been given much attention in the literature. Short of an acute cauda equina syndrome, few reports exist detailing the findings and clinical course of patients with pelvic and disorders of bladder, bowel and gynecologic/sexual function of spinal origin. Two uncomplicated representative cases of mechanically induced pelvic pain and organic dysfunction (PPOD) in patients presenting with low back pain are detailed. These patients typically reveal a wi...

  19. Mindfulness meditation-related pain relief: Evidence for unique brain mechanisms in the regulation of pain

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidan, F.; Grant, J.A.; Brown, C. A.; McHaffie, J.G.; Coghill, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    The cognitive modulation of pain is influenced by a number of factors ranging from attention, beliefs, conditioning, expectations, mood, and the regulation of emotional responses to noxious sensory events. Recently, mindfulness meditation has been found attenuate pain through some of these mechanisms including enhanced cognitive and emotional control, as well as altering the contextual evaluation of sensory events. This review discusses the brain mechanisms involved in mindfulness meditation-...

  20. Pain in the Blood? Envisioning Mechanism-Based Diagnoses and Biomarkers in Clinical Pain Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Bäckryd

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is highly prevalent, and pain medicine lacks objective biomarkers to guide diagnosis and choice of treatment. The current U.S. “opioid epidemic” is a reminder of the paucity of effective and safe treatment options. Traditional pain diagnoses according to the International Classification of Diseases are often unspecific, and analgesics are often prescribed on a trial-and-error basis. In contrast to this current state of affairs, the vision of future mechanism-based diagnoses of chronic pain conditions is presented in this non-technical paper, focusing on the need for biomarkers and the theoretical complexity of the task. Pain is and will remain a subjective experience, and as such is not objectively measurable. Therefore, the concept of “noci-marker” is presented as an alternative to “pain biomarker”, the goal being to find objective, measurable correlates of the pathophysiological processes involved in different chronic pain conditions. This vision entails a call for more translational pain research in order to bridge the gap between clinical pain medicine and preclinical science.

  1. Usefulness of the Pain Tracking Technique in Acute Mechanical Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Bravo Acosta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the usefulness of the pain tracking technique in acute mechanical low back pain. Method. We performed an experimental prospective (longitudinal explanatory study between January 2011 and September 2012. The sample was randomly divided into two groups. Patients were assessed at the start and end of the treatment using the visual analogue scale and the Waddell test. Treatment consisted in applying the pain tracking technique to the study group and interferential current therapy to the control group. At the end of treatment, cryotherapy was applied for 10 minutes. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and the Mann Whitney test were used. They were performed with a predetermined significance level of p≤0.05. Results. Pain was triggered by prolonged static posture and intense physical labor and intensified through trunk movements and when sitting and standing. The greatest relief was reported in lateral decubitus position and in William’s position. The majority of the patients had contracture. Pain and disability were modified with the rehabilitation treatment in both groups. Conclusions. Both the pain tracking and interferential current techniques combined with cryotherapy are useful treatments for acute mechanical low back pain. The onset of analgesia is faster when using the pain tracking technique.

  2. Usefulness of the Pain Tracking Technique in Acute Mechanical Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Acosta, Tania; Martín Cordero, Jorge E; Hernández Tápanes, Solangel; Pedroso Morales, Isis; Fernández Cuesta, José Ignacio; Leyva Serrano, Maritza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the usefulness of the pain tracking technique in acute mechanical low back pain. Method. We performed an experimental prospective (longitudinal) explanatory study between January 2011 and September 2012. The sample was randomly divided into two groups. Patients were assessed at the start and end of the treatment using the visual analogue scale and the Waddell test. Treatment consisted in applying the pain tracking technique to the study group and interferential current therapy to the control group. At the end of treatment, cryotherapy was applied for 10 minutes. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and the Mann Whitney test were used. They were performed with a predetermined significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results. Pain was triggered by prolonged static posture and intense physical labor and intensified through trunk movements and when sitting and standing. The greatest relief was reported in lateral decubitus position and in William's position. The majority of the patients had contracture. Pain and disability were modified with the rehabilitation treatment in both groups. Conclusions. Both the pain tracking and interferential current techniques combined with cryotherapy are useful treatments for acute mechanical low back pain. The onset of analgesia is faster when using the pain tracking technique. PMID:26240758

  3. Central adaptation of pain perception in response to rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Sundstrup, Emil;

    2012-01-01

    pain remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of neck/shoulder resistance training on pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the painful neck/shoulder muscles (upper trapezius) and a non-painful reference muscle of the leg (tibialis anterior) in adults with neck/shoulder pain. STUDY DESIGN...... of pain 186 days during the previous year, computer use 93% of work time) were randomly allocated to 10 weeks of specific resistance training for the neck/shoulder muscles for 2 or 12 minutes per day 5 times a week, or weekly information on general health (control group). Primary outcomes were changes...... in PPT of the painful neck/shoulder muscles (upper trapezius) and a distant non-painful reference muscle (tibialis anterior) at 10 weeks. RESULTS: PPT of both the trained painful trapezius and the non-trained reference muscle of the leg increased more in the training groups compared with the control...

  4. Pain in Breast Cancer Treatment: Aggravating Factors and Coping Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fatima Guerreiro Godoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate pain in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema and the characteristics of aggravating factors and coping mechanisms. The study was conducted in the Clinica Godoy, São Jose do Rio Preto, with a group of 46 women who had undergone surgery for the treatment of breast cancer. The following variables were evaluated: type and length of surgery; number of radiotherapy and chemotherapy sessions; continued feeling of the removed breast (phantom limb, infection, intensity of pain, and factors that improve and worsen the pain. The percentage of events was used for statistical analysis. About half the participants (52.1% performed modified radical surgery, with 91.3% removing only one breast; 82.6% of the participants did not perform breast reconstruction surgery. Insignificant pain was reported by 32.60% of the women and 67.3% said they suffered pain; it was mild in 28.8% of the cases (scale 1–5, moderate in 34.8% (scale 6–9, and severe in 4.3%. The main mechanisms used to cope with pain were painkillers in 41.30% of participants, rest in 21.73%, religious ceremonies in 17.39%, and chatting with friends in 8.69%. In conclusion, many mastectomized patients with lymphedema complain of pain, but pain is often underrecognized and undertreated.

  5. Detection of central circuits implicated in the formation of novel pain memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Granitzka, Julia; Bauermann, Thomas; Baumgärtner, Ulf; Breimhorst, Markus; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Birklein, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Being able to remember physically and emotionally painful events in one’s own past may shape behavior, and can create an aversion to a variety of situations. Pain imagination is a related process that may include recall of past experiences, in addition to production of sensory and emotional percepts without external stimuli. This study aimed to understand 1) the central nervous system processes that underlie pain imagination, 2) the retrieval of pain memories, and 3) to compare the latter with visual object memory. These goals were achieved by longitudinally investigating brain function with functional magnetic resonance imaging in a unique group of healthy volunteers who had never experienced tooth pain. In these subjects, we compared brain responses elicited during three experimental conditions in the following order: imagination of tooth pain (pain imagination), remembering one’s own house (object memory), and remembrance of tooth pain following an episode of induced acute tooth pain (pain memory). Key observations stemming from group-level conjunction analyses revealed common activation in the posterior parietal cortex for both pain imagination and pain memory, while object and pain memory each had strong activation predominantly within the middle frontal gyrus. When contrasting pain imagination and memory, significant activation differences were observed in subcortical structures (ie, parahippocampus − pain imagination > pain memory; midbrain − pain memory > pain imagination). Importantly, these findings were observed in the presence of consistent and reproducible psychophysical and behavioral measures that informed on the subjects’ ability to imagine novel and familiar thoughts, as well as the subjects’ pain perception.

  6. Pathogenesis and mechanisms of pain in chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dale E. Bockman

    2003-01-01

    The pathology of chronic pancreatitis is well known but the early events leading to the condition are less certain. Common characteristics of chronic pancreatitis, including fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and disappearance of parenchyma, usually are well established by the time tissue can be studied. Characteristics of acute pancreatitis may co-exist. Some experts assert that chronic pancreatitis begins with acute pancreatitis. Others consider that chronic pancreatitis develops first, and acute attacks occur on this background. The pain associated with chronic pancreatitis can be initiated through a variety of mechanisms. Increased pressure may distort nerves, affect blood flow, change pH, and cause retention of noxious substances, initiating action potentials. Tissue destruction and inflammation release biologically active materials capable of activating afferent nerves. Furthermore, inflammation damages nerves directly, triggering neuropathic pain. Understanding the neural pathways in the periphery and central nervous system that transmit impulses interpreted as pain should suggest the best methods for alleviating pancreatic pain. Pain may be transmitted through splanchnic, vagus, spinal, and phrenic peripheral nerves. It may be relayed through the dorsal columns of the spinal cord in addition to the spinothalamic tract. New methods of treating pancreatic pain therefore are possible.%虽然慢性胰腺炎的病理已经十分清楚,但其早期的致病机制尚不明确.慢性胰腺炎的一般特点为纤维化,慢性炎症和胰腺实质的消失,这些特征会随着疾病的发展而逐渐出现,同时还伴有急性胰腺炎的症状.一些专家认为慢性胰腺炎继发于急性胰腺炎.另一些则认为慢性胰腺炎首先发生,急性胰腺炎则在此基础上发生.慢性胰腺炎所引起的疼痛可通过许多机制发生.增高的胰腺压力可干扰神经,影响血流,改变pH值,并引起有毒物质的潴留,激活动作电位.组织的

  7. Forebrain Mechanisms of Nociception and Pain: Analysis through Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kenneth L.

    1999-07-01

    Pain is a unified experience composed of interacting discriminative, affective-motivational, and cognitive components, each of which is mediated and modulated through forebrain mechanisms acting at spinal, brainstem, and cerebral levels. The size of the human forebrain in relation to the spinal cord gives anatomical emphasis to forebrain control over nociceptive processing. Human forebrain pathology can cause pain without the activation of nociceptors. Functional imaging of the normal human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) shows synaptically induced increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in several regions specifically during pain. We have examined the variables of gender, type of noxious stimulus, and the origin of nociceptive input as potential determinants of the pattern and intensity of rCBF responses. The structures most consistently activated across genders and during contact heat pain, cold pain, cutaneous laser pain or intramuscular pain were the contralateral insula and anterior cingulate cortex, the bilateral thalamus and premotor cortex, and the cerebellar vermis. These regions are commonly activated in PET studies of pain conducted by other investigators, and the intensity of the brain rCBF response correlates parametrically with perceived pain intensity. To complement the human studies, we developed an animal model for investigating stimulus-induced rCBF responses in the rat. In accord with behavioral measures and the results of human PET, there is a progressive and selective activation of somatosensory and limbic system structures in the brain and brainstem following the subcutaneous injection of formalin. The animal model and human PET studies should be mutually reinforcing and thus facilitate progress in understanding forebrain mechanisms of normal and pathological pain.

  8. Time perception mechanisms at central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Rhailana Fontes; Jéssica Ribeiro; Gupta, Daya S.; Dionis Machado; Fernando Lopes-Júnior; Francisco Magalhães; Victor Hugo Bastos; Kaline Rocha; Victor Marinho; Gildário Lima; Bruna Velasques; Pedro Ribeiro; Marco Orsini; Bruno Pessoa; Marco Antonio Araujo Leite

    2016-01-01

    The five senses have specific ways to receive environmental information and lead to central nervous system. The perception of time is the sum of stimuli associated with cognitive processes and environmental changes. Thus, the perception of time requires a complex neural mechanism and may be changed by emotional state, level of attention, memory and diseases. Despite this knowledge, the neural mechanisms of time perception are not yet fully understood. The objective is to relate the mechanisms...

  9. Pain in chronic pancreatitis: a salutogenic mechanism or a maladaptive brain response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregni, Felipe; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Freedman, Steven D

    2007-01-01

    Pain in chronic pancreatitis is frequently refractory to medical and even surgical treatment. This refractoriness leads us to believe that a pancreas-independent, brain-mediated mechanism must be responsible. If so, several scenarios are worth considering. First, chronic pain could be the consequence of undesirable neuroplastic changes, by which pathology becomes established and causes disability. Alternatively, pain may be linked to the salutogenic (from salutogenesis, the Latin word for health and well-being) central nervous system response (we defined 'salutogenic response' as the specific modulation of the immune system induced by brain activity changes) to promote healing of the injured viscera. If so, chronic pain could index the ongoing nervous system attempt to promote healing. In this review, we discuss (1) the mechanisms of pain in chronic pancreatitis; (2) potential brain-related salutogenic mechanisms, and (3) the potential relationship of these two factors to the disease status. Furthermore, we consider these aspects in light of a new approach to treat visceral pain: transcranial magnetic stimulation, a noninvasive method of brain stimulation. PMID:17898531

  10. Differential effect of ketamine and lidocaine on spontaneous and mechanical evoked pain in patients with nerve injury pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, Hanne; Bach, Flemming Winther; Juhl, Gitte Irene;

    2006-01-01

    ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist and lidocaine, a sodium channel blocker, on spontaneous pain, brush-evoked pain, and pinprick-evoked pain in patients with nerve injury pain. METHODS: Twenty patients participated in two randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover...... experiments in which they, on four different days, received a 30-minute intravenous infusion of ketamine (0.24 mg/kg), lidocaine (5 mg/kg), or saline. Ongoing pain, pain evoked by brush and repetitive pinprick stimuli, and acetone was measured before, during, and after infusion. RESULTS: Ketamine...... significantly reduced ongoing pain and evoked pain to brush and pinprick, whereas lidocaine only reduced evoked pain to repetitive pinprick stimuli. In individual patients, there was no correlation between the pain-relieving effect of lidocaine and ketamine on ongoing or mechanically evoked pains. CONCLUSIONS...

  11. Central Sensitization in Functional Chronic Pain Syndromes: Overview and Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Liz; Moore, Ki

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this review and clinical application article is to offer nurses up-to-date knowledge on peripheral and central sensitization in chronic functional pain syndromes, and to discuss therapies that have shown efficacy in treating various aspects of these disorders. Central sensitization is a result of changes in the peripheral and central nervous system due to noxious stimuli, such as illness or trauma. Once these changes occur, treatment for the associated syndromes requires a multimodal approach that includes behavioral pain psychology, physical therapy, and pharmacological agents that specifically target neuroinflammation, pain modulation, and amplification of pain pathways. More research needs to be conducted on the basis and patient perception of functional pain syndromes to reduce the morbidity and significant disability associated with these illnesses. Nurses have the opportunity to be at the forefront of this research because of their holistic and multidimensional approach to patient care, assessment, and symptom management. PMID:27553129

  12. A possible neural mechanism for photosensitivity in chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martenson, Melissa E; Halawa, Omar I; Tonsfeldt, Karen J; Maxwell, Charlene A; Hammack, Nora; Mist, Scott D; Pennesi, Mark E; Bennett, Robert M; Mauer, Kim M; Jones, Kim D; Heinricher, Mary M

    2016-04-01

    Patients with functional pain disorders often complain of generalized sensory hypersensitivity, finding sounds, smells, or even everyday light aversive. The neural basis for this aversion is unknown, but it cannot be attributed to a general increase in cortical sensory processing. Here, we quantified the threshold for aversion to light in patients with fibromyalgia, a pain disorder thought to reflect dysregulation of pain-modulating systems in the brain. These individuals expressed discomfort at light levels substantially lower than that of healthy control subjects. Complementary studies in lightly anesthetized rat demonstrated that a subset of identified pain-modulating neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla unexpectedly responds to light. Approximately half of the pain-facilitating "ON-cells" and pain-inhibiting "OFF-cells" sampled exhibited a change in firing with light exposure, shifting the system to a pronociceptive state with the activation of ON-cells and suppression of OFF-cell firing. The change in neuronal firing did not require a trigeminal or posterior thalamic relay, but it was blocked by the inactivation of the olivary pretectal nucleus. Light exposure also resulted in a measurable but modest decrease in the threshold for heat-evoked paw withdrawal, as would be expected with engagement of this pain-modulating circuitry. These data demonstrate integration of information about light intensity with somatic input at the level of single pain-modulating neurons in the brain stem of the rat under basal conditions. Taken together, our findings in rodents and humans provide a novel mechanism for abnormal photosensitivity and suggest that light has the potential to engage pain-modulating systems such that normally innocuous inputs are perceived as aversive or even painful. PMID:26785323

  13. Musculoskeletal pain among postmenopausal women in Nigeria: Association with overall and central obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omoyemi O. Ogwumike, PhD

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Lower extremity and back pain symptoms were the most prevalent. For overall and central obesity directly associated with MSP, WHtR seemed the best obesity screening tool for MSP in postmenopausal women.

  14. Central pain processing in chronic tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindelof, Kim; Ellrich, Jens; Jensen, Rigmor;

    2009-01-01

    ) reflects neuronal excitability due to nociceptive input in the brainstem. The aim of this study was to investigate nociceptive processing at the level of the brainstem in an experimental pain model of CTTH symptoms. METHODS: The effect of conditioning pain, 5 min infusion of hypertonic saline into the neck......: A combined homotopic and heterotopic effect of the conditioning pain onto the blink reflex could account for this finding....... muscles, was investigated in 20 patients with CTTH and 20 healthy controls. In addition, a pilot study with isotonic saline was performed with 5 subjects in each group. The BR was elicited by electrical stimuli with an intensity of four times the pain threshold, with a superficial concentric electrode. We...

  15. Conceptual Conditioning: Mechanisms Mediating Conditioning Effects on Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepma, Marieke; Wager, Tor D

    2015-11-01

    Classical conditioning can profoundly modify subsequent pain responses, but the mechanisms that drive this effect are unresolved. In pain-conditioning studies, cues are typically conditioned to primary aversive reinforcers; hence, subsequent pain modulation could reflect learned precognitive associations (i.e., those involving neural plasticity independent of expectations and other forms of conceptual thought) or conceptual expectancies. We isolated conceptual contributions using a thermal pain-conditioning procedure in which different conditioned stimulus (CS) cues were repeatedly paired with symbolic representations of high and low noxious heat. In a subsequent test phase, identical noxious stimuli evoked larger skin conductance responses (SCRs) and pain ratings when preceded by CS cues associated with high temperature than by those associated with low temperature. These effects were mediated by participants' self-reported expectancies. CS cues associated with high temperature also evoked larger anticipatory SCRs than did CS cues associated with low temperature, but larger anticipatory SCRs predicted smaller subsequent heat-evoked SCRs. These results provide novel evidence that conditioned modulation of pain physiology can be acquired through purely conceptual processes, and that self-reported expectancies and physiological threat responses have opposing effects on pain.

  16. Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: Mechanism, Assessment and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Mete Civelek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a devastating disease which may cause physical, psychological and social dysfunction. Neuropathic pain (NP after SCI is common, can be seen in varying degrees and is one of the most difficultly treated problems developing after SCI. With the addition of the NP to loss of function after SCI, sleep patterns, moods and daily activities of patients are adversely affected. In order to treat pain effectively, classification of pain after SCI must be done carefully and correctly. According to classification of International Pain Study Group, pain after SCI is divided into two main groups as nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is defined as %u201Cpain occuring as a direct result of a disease or lesion directly affecting somato-sensorial system%u201D. NP after SCI can be classified according to anatomical region (above the level of lesion, at the level of lesion, below the level of lesion. Treatment of NP after SCI is often challenging and receiving response to treatment may take long time. Therefore, treatment of NP after SCI should be multifactorial. Treatment options include pharmochologic treatment, application of transcutanous electrical nerve stimulation, psychiatric treatment approaches, and surgical approaches in selected cases. In pharmachologic treatment, first line agents are tricyclic antidepresants, pregabalin and gabapentin. In this review, mechanisms and assessment and treatment of NP after SCI is discussed with the guide of current literature.

  17. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Clas Linnman; David Borsook

    2013-01-01

    This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain p...

  18. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms Linking Pain and Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiergiel, Artur H; Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Stankiewicz, Adrian M

    2015-01-01

    The neurophysiological link between neuropathic pain and depression remains unknown despite evident high comorbidity of these two disorders. However, there is convincing evidence that genotype plays a role in both pain and depression. Using various types of genetic analysis - population genetics, cytogenetics and molecular technologies - specific genes have been implicated in mediating almost all aspects of nociception and mood disorders. The current review attempts to identify specific genes and epigenetic mechanisms common to both disorders. It is concluded that external and internal factors (inflammation, stress, gender, etc.) that contribute to the pathologies may do so through epigenetic mechanisms that may affect expression of these particular genes. The possible involvement of epigenetic regulation in pain and psychiatric disorders suggests that treatments targeting epigenetic mechanisms that mediate adverse life events should be considered. PMID:26436761

  19. Assessment of pressure-pain thresholds and central sensitization of pain in lateral epicondylalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Anders; Amris, Kirstine; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE.: To assess pain sensitivity and spreading hyperalgesia in lateral epicondylalgia (LE). SUBJECTS.: Twenty-two women with LE, and 38 controls were included. OUTCOME MEASURES.: Computerized cuff pressure algometry was used for assessment of pressure-pain threshold and tolerance. The stimu...

  20. The Effects of Lamotrigine on Pain, Sleep, and Mood in Refractory Form of Central Post-Stroke Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Petramfar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Central post-stroke pain (CPSP is a distressingpain syndrome, sometimes become refractory to the conventionalpain managements. Anticonvulsants have been used toalleviate different central pains. Lamotrigine is a novel anticonvulsantand its proper dosage and its efficacy have notbeen well studied yet. The aim of this study was to evaluatethe effect of 100 mg lamotrigine on refractory form of CPSP.Methods: The medical files of 17 patients with CPSP who hadnot responded to the other drugs and were treated with lamotriginewere studied. Using Brief Pain Inventory, pain, sleepand mood were assessed before, and after 8 and 24 weeks oftreatment.Results: After 24 weeks, 70.5 % of the patients responded tolamotrigine, and there was an improvement of 2.41 in themean score of average pain (P=0.001.Conclusion: Lamotrigine 100 mg daily was effective in thetreatment of refractory CPSP, and might be prescribed beforeplanning for more aggressive surgical managements.Iran J Med Sci 2010; 35(4: 299-303.

  1. Analgesic effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on central post-stroke pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sea-Hyun; Kim, Gi-Do; Kim, Kyung-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Pain that occurs after a stroke lowers the quality of life. Such post-stroke pain is caused in part by the brain lesion itself, called central post-stroke pain. We investigated the analgesic effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in stroke patients through quantitative sensory testing. Fourteen participants with central post-stroke pain (7 female and 7 male subjects) were recruited and were allocated to either tDCS (n = 7) or sham-tDCS (n = 7) group. Their ages ranged from 45 to 55 years. tDCS was administered for 20 min at a 2-mA current intensity, with anodal stimulations were performed at primary motor cortex. The sham-tDCS group was stimulated 30-second current carrying time. Both group interventions were given for 3 days per week, for a period of 3 weeks. Subjective pain was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) of 0 to 10. Sensations of cold and warmth, and pain from cold and heat were quantified to examine analgesic effects. The sham-tDCS group showed no statistically significant differences in time. In contrast, tDCS group showed decreased VAS scores and skin temperature (p temperatures for the sense of cold and pain from cold increased (p heat decreased (p stroke patients with central post-stroke pain. PMID:25341455

  2. Probable Mechanisms of Needling Therapies for Myofascial Pain Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Wei Chou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS has been defined as a regional pain syndrome characterized by muscle pain caused by myofascial trigger points (MTrPs clinically. MTrP is defined as the hyperirritable spot in a palpable taut band of skeletal muscle fibers. Appropriate treatment to MTrPs can effectively relieve the clinical pain of MPS. Needling therapies, such as MTrP injection, dry needling, or acupuncture (AcP can effectively eliminate pain immediately. AcP is probably the first reported technique in treating MPS patients with dry needling based on the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM theory. The possible mechanism of AcP analgesia were studied and published in recent decades. The analgesic effect of AcP is hypothesized to be related to immune, hormonal, and nervous systems. Compared to slow-acting hormonal system, nervous system acts in a faster manner. Given these complexities, AcP analgesia cannot be explained by any single mechanism. There are several principles for selection of acupoints based on the TCM principles: “Ah-Shi” point, proximal or remote acupoints on the meridian, and extra-meridian acupoints. Correlations between acupoints and MTrPs are discussed. Some clinical and animal studies of remote AcP for MTrPs and the possible mechanisms of remote effectiveness are reviewed and discussed.

  3. Mechanisms of disease: mechanism-based classification of neuropathic pain - a critical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    Classification of neuropathic pain according to etiology or localization has clear limitations. The discovery of specific molecular and cellular events following experimental nerve injury has raised the possibility of classifying neuropathic pain on the basis of the underlying neurobiological...... mechanisms. Application of this approach in the clinic is problematic, however, owing to a lack of precise tools to assess symptoms and signs, and difficulties in correlating symptoms and signs with mechanisms. Development and validation of diagnostic methods to identify mechanisms, together...... with pharmacological agents that specifically target these mechanisms, seems to be the most logical and rational way of improving neuropathic pain treatment....

  4. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of acupuncture on neuropathic pain**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziyong Ju; Huashun Cui; Xiaohui Guo; Huayuan Yang; Jinsen He; Ke Wang

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used to treat neuropathic pain for a long time, but its mechanisms of action remain unknown. In this study, we observed the effects of electroacupuncture and manual acu-puncture on neuropathic pain and on ephrin-B/EphB signaling in rats models of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain. The results showed that manual acupuncture and elec-puncture significantly reduced mechanical hypersensitivity fol owing chronic constriction injury, es-pecial y electroacupuncture treatment. Real-time PCR results revealed that ephrin-B1/B3 and EphB1/B2 mRNA expression levels were significantly increased in the spinal dorsal horns of chronic constriction injury rats. Electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture suppressed the high sion of ephrin-B1 mRNA, and elevated EphB3/B4 mRNA expression. Electroacupuncture signifi-cantly enhanced the mRNA expression of ephrin-B3 and EphB3/B6 in the dorsal horns of neuro-pathic pain rats. Western blot results revealed that electroacupuncture in particular, and manual acupuncture, significantly up-regulated ephrin-B3 protein levels in rat spinal dorsal horns. The re-sults of this study suggest that acupuncture could activate ephrin-B/EphB signaling in neuropathic pain rats and improve neurological function.

  5. Huperzine A Alleviates Mechanical Allodynia but Not Spontaneous Pain via Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Xing Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health issue and most patients suffer from spontaneous pain. Previous studies suggest that Huperzine A (Hup A, an alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herb Huperzia serrata, is a potent analgesic with few side effects. However, whether it alleviates spontaneous pain is unclear. We evaluated the effects of Hup A on spontaneous pain in mice using the conditioned place preference (CPP behavioral assay and found that application of Hup A attenuated the mechanical allodynia induced by peripheral nerve injury or inflammation. This effect was blocked by atropine. However, clonidine but not Hup A induced preference for the drug-paired chamber in CPP. The same effects occurred when Hup A was infused into the anterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, ambenonium chloride, a competitive inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, also increased the paw-withdrawal threshold but failed to induce place preference in CPP. Therefore, our data suggest that acetylcholinesterase in both the peripheral and central nervous systems is involved in the regulation of mechanical allodynia but not the spontaneous pain.

  6. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Gallbladder Calculosis in Fibromyalgia Patients: Impact on Musculoskeletal Pain, Somatic Hyperalgesia and Central Sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Costantini, Raffaele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Massimini, Francesca; Tana, Claudio; Innocenti, Paolo; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia, a chronic syndrome of diffuse musculoskeletal pain and somatic hyperalgesia from central sensitization, is very often comorbid with visceral pain conditions. In fibromyalgia patients with gallbladder calculosis, this study assessed the short and long-term impact of laparoscopic cholecystectomy on fibromyalgia pain symptoms. Fibromyalgia pain (VAS scale) and pain thresholds in tender points and control areas (skin, subcutis and muscle) were evaluated 1week before (basis) and 1wee...

  7. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 3 of 3: symptoms and signs of nociceptive pain in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'nociceptive pain\\' (NP) refers to pain attributable to the activation of the peripheral receptive terminals of primary afferent neurones in response to noxious chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. The symptoms and signs associated with clinical classifications of NP have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of NP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol after which their pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist indicating the presence\\/absence of various symptoms and signs. A regression analysis identified a cluster of seven clinical criteria predictive of NP, including: \\'Pain localised to the area of injury\\/dysfunction\\

  8. Pregabalin and placebo responders show different effects on central pain processing in chronic pancreatitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwense, S.A.; Olesen, S.S.; Drewes, A.M.; Goor, H. van; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain control in chronic pancreatitis is a major challenge; the mechanisms behind analgesic treatment are poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the differences in pain sensitivity and modulation in chronic pancreatitis patients, based on their clinical response (responders vs

  9. Transcranial magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound: noninvasive central lateral thalamotomy for chronic neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanmonod, D.; Werner, B.; Morel, A.; Michels, L; Zadicario, E; Schiff, G.; Martin, E.

    2012-01-01

    Object Recent technological developments open the field of therapeutic application of focused ultrasound to the brain through the intact cranium. The goal of this study was to apply the new transcranial magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound (tcMRgFUS) technology to perform noninvasive central lateral thalamotomies (CLTs) as a treatment for chronic neuropathic pain. Methods In 12 patients suffering from chronic therapy-resistant neuropathic pain, tcMRgFUS CLT was propos...

  10. The influence of μ-opioid and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition in the modulation of pain responsive neurones in the central amygdala by tapentadol in rats with neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    L. Gonçalves; Friend, L. V.; Dickenson, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Treatments for neuropathic pain are either not fully effective or have problematic side effects. Combinations of drugs are often used. Tapentadol is a newer molecule that produces analgesia in various pain models through two inhibitory mechanisms, namely central μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonism and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition. These two components interact synergistically, resulting in levels of analgesia similar to opioid analgesics such as oxycodone and morphine, but with more tolerabl...

  11. Antinociception of ciproxifan in mice and its central mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-jingWANG; Zhi-liHUANG; Ying-qingLU; RongYU; Qin-yanGONG; Nian-ciSHI; Ming-huiYAO

    2005-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of ciproxifan (CPF), an H3 receptor antagnist, on modulation of pain transmission in mice and its central mechanism. METHODS The antinociceptive effect of CPF was observed in three hyperalgesic models of mice (hot plate test, writhing test and formalin test). At the same time, α-fluoromethylhistidine (α-FMH), a specific inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase(HDC), was used to determine whether histamine participate in this process. After formalin test, the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in brain, spinal and serum were assessed. Furthermore, the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in brain and spinal cord was observed by immunohistology and Western blot in formalin test. RESULTS CPF produced antinociceptive effect inall of the three hyperalgesic models.

  12. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 2 of 3: symptoms and signs of peripheral neuropathic pain in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'peripheral neuropathic pain\\' (PNP) refers to pain arising from a primary lesion or dysfunction in the peripheral nervous system. Symptoms and signs associated with an assumed dominance of PNP in patients attending for physiotherapy have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of PNP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Patients\\' pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist specifying the presence or absence of various clinical criteria. A binary logistic regression analysis with Bayesian model averaging identified a cluster of two symptoms and one sign predictive of PNP, including: \\'Pain referred in a dermatomal or cutaneous distribution\\

  13. The major brain endocannabinoid 2-AG controls neuropathic pain and mechanical hyperalgesia in patients with neuromyelitis optica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah L Pellkofer

    Full Text Available Recurrent myelitis is one of the predominant characteristics in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO. While paresis, visual loss, sensory deficits, and bladder dysfunction are well known symptoms in NMO patients, pain has been recognized only recently as another key symptom of the disease. Although spinal cord inflammation is a defining aspect of neuromyelitis, there is an almost complete lack of data on altered somatosensory function, including pain. Therefore, eleven consecutive patients with NMO were investigated regarding the presence and clinical characteristics of pain. All patients were examined clinically as well as by Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST following the protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS. Additionally, plasma endocannabinoid levels and signs of chronic stress and depression were determined. Almost all patients (10/11 suffered from NMO-associated neuropathic pain for the last three months, and 8 out of 11 patients indicated relevant pain at the time of examination. Symptoms of neuropathic pain were reported in the vast majority of patients with NMO. Psychological testing revealed signs of marked depression. Compared to age and gender-matched healthy controls, QST revealed pronounced mechanical and thermal sensory loss, strongly correlated to ongoing pain suggesting the presence of deafferentation-induced neuropathic pain. Thermal hyperalgesia correlated to MRI-verified signs of spinal cord lesion. Heat hyperalgesia was highly correlated to the time since last relapse of NMO. Patients with NMO exhibited significant mechanical and thermal dysesthesia, namely dynamic mechanical allodynia and paradoxical heat sensation. Moreover, they presented frequently with either abnormal mechanical hypoalgesia or hyperalgesia, which depended significantly on plasma levels of the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerole (2-AG. These data emphasize the high prevalence of neuropathic pain and hyperalgesia

  14. Brain Mechanisms Supporting Modulation of Pain by Mindfulness Meditation

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidan, F.; Martucci, K.T.; Kraft, R.A.; Gordon, N. S.; McHaffie, J.G.; Coghill, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    The subjective experience of one’s environment is constructed by interactions among sensory, cognitive, and affective processes. For centuries, meditation has been thought to influence such processes by enabling a non-evaluative representation of sensory events. To better understand how meditation influences the sensory experience, we employed arterial spin labeling (ASL) functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the neural mechanisms by which mindfulness meditation influences pain in h...

  15. Pain in Breast Cancer Treatment: Aggravating Factors and Coping Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Maria de Fatima Guerreiro Godoy; Livia Maria Pereira de Godoy; Stelamarys Barufi; José Maria Pereira de Godoy

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate pain in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema and the characteristics of aggravating factors and coping mechanisms. The study was conducted in the Clinica Godoy, São Jose do Rio Preto, with a group of 46 women who had undergone surgery for the treatment of breast cancer. The following variables were evaluated: type and length of surgery; number of radiotherapy and chemotherapy sessions; continued feeling of the removed breast (phantom limb), i...

  16. Population-based study of central post-stroke pain in Rimini district, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaeli W

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available William Raffaeli,1 Cristina E Minella,2 Francesco Magnani,3 Donatella Sarti3 1ISAL Foundation, Institute for Research on Pain, Torre Pedrera, Rimini, Italy 2Pain Therapy Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy 3Department of Pain Therapy and Palliative Care, Infermi Hospital, Rimini, Italy Abstract: Central post-stroke pain (CPSP is still an underestimated complication of stroke, resulting in impaired quality of life and, in addition to the functional and cognitive consequences of stroke, the presence of CPSP may be associated with mood disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances. This type of pain may also impair activities of daily living and further worsen quality of life, negatively influencing the rehabilitation process. The prevalence of CSPS in the literature is highly variable (1%–12% according to different studies, and this variability could be influenced by selection criteria and the different ethnic populations being investigated. With this scenario in mind, we performed a population-based study to assess the prevalence of CPSP and its main features in a homogeneous health district (Rimini, Italy, including five hospitals for a total population of 329,970 inhabitants. From 2008 to 2010, we selected 1,494 post-stroke patients and were able to interview 660 patients, 66 (11% of whom reported pain with related tactile and thermal hyperesthesia, accompanied by needle puncture, tingling, swelling, and pressure sensations. Patients reported motor impairment and disability, which influenced their working ability, rehabilitation, and social life. Despite this severe pain state, there was a high percentage of patients who did not receive adequate treatment for pain. Keywords: stroke, central post-stroke pain, disability

  17. Double-Cone Coil TMS Stimulation of the Medial Cortex Inhibits Central Pain Habituation.

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    Federico D'Agata

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS applied over the medial line of the scalp affects the subjective perception of continuous pain induced by means of electric stimulation. In addition, we wanted to identify the point of stimulation where this effect was maximum.Superficial electrical stimulation was used to induce continuous pain on the dominant hand. At the beginning of the experiment we reached a pain rating of 5 on an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS; 0 = no pain and 10 = maximum tolerable pain for each subject by setting individually the current intensity. The TMS (five pulses at increasing intensities was applied on 5 equidistant points (one per session over the medial line of the scalp in 13 healthy volunteers using a double-cone coil to stimulate underlying parts of the brain cortex. In every experimental session the painful stimulation lasted 45 minutes, during which pain and distress intensities NRS were recorded continuously. We calculated the effect of adaptation and the immediate effect of the TMS stimulation for all locations. Additionally, an ALE (Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analysis was performed to compare our results with the neuroimaging literature on subjective pain rating.TMS stimulation temporarily decreased the pain ratings, and pain adaptation was suppressed when applying the TMS over the FCz site on the scalp. No effect was found for distress ratings.The present data suggest that the medial cortex in proximity of the cingulated gyrus has a causal role in adaptation mechanisms and in processing ongoing pain and subjective sensation of pain intensity.

  18. [Pathophysiology of neuropathic pain: review of experimental models and proposed mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Magnin, Michel

    2008-02-01

    Neuropathic pain can be conceptualized as the result of an "aberrant learning" process, associated with maladaptive plasticity of the nervous system. A number of modifications of the peripheral nervous system have been described in animal models of neuropathic pain, but their relation with different symptoms in humans is far from fully understood. We note in particular ectopic discharges in damaged myelinated fibers, abnormal activity in undamaged fibers, overexpression of calcium channels increasing the release of excitatory neurotransmitters, and sympathetic sprouting towards the spinal ganglia. Spinal mechanisms involve central sensitization, kindling and potentiation phenomena. Underlying these phenomena may be connectivity changes--still controversial--of non-nociceptive terminals and variations in the sensitivity of postsynaptic receptors. Also contributing to these pathophysiologic modifications are attenuation of spinal inhibition by selective neuronal loss and the development of inflammatory phenomena, including cytokine secretion by macrophages and glial cells. Changes in the dorsal horn modify the activity of projections towards the brainstem and increase spinal hyperactivity still further by feedback loops. These effects are delayed, suggesting that maintenance of spinal sensitization requires the involvement of mechanisms of descending facilitation involving the brainstem. These phenomena induce changes in the activity of thalamocortical networks, which develop autonomous processes that maintain the pain. The cortical representation of body areas change after nervous lesions, and these changes may correlate with the emergence of pain. Neuropathic allodynia and hyperalgesia are supported by cortical modifications that experimental models reproduce very incompletely. Experimental allodynia and neuropathic allodynia share the activation of the cortical pain matrix as well as the bilateralization of insular activity. However, although experimental

  19. Time perception mechanisms at central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhailana Fontes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The five senses have specific ways to receive environmental information and lead to central nervous system. The perception of time is the sum of stimuli associated with cognitive processes and environmental changes. Thus, the perception of time requires a complex neural mechanism and may be changed by emotional state, level of attention, memory and diseases. Despite this knowledge, the neural mechanisms of time perception are not yet fully understood. The objective is to relate the mechanisms involved the neurofunctional aspects, theories, executive functions and pathologies that contribute the understanding of temporal perception. Articles form 1980 to 2015 were searched by using the key themes: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, theories, time cells, memory, schizophrenia, depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and Parkinson’s disease combined with the term perception of time. We evaluated 158 articles within the inclusion criteria for the purpose of the study. We conclude that research about the holdings of the frontal cortex, parietal, basal ganglia, cerebellum and hippocampus have provided advances in the understanding of the regions related to the perception of time. In neurological and psychiatric disorders, the understanding of time depends on the severity of the diseases and the type of tasks.

  20. Does Acupuncture Alter Pain-related Functional Connectivity of the Central Nervous System? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal Santiago, María; Tumilty, Steve; Mącznik, Aleksandra; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture has been studied for several decades to establish evidence-based clinical practice. This systematic review aims to evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in influencing the functional connectivity of the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify studies in which the central response of acupuncture in patients with musculoskeletal pain was evaluated by neuroimaging techniques. Databases searched were AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PEDro, Pubmed, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscuss, and Web of Science. Included studies were assessed by two independent reviewers for their methodological quality by using the Downs and Black questionnaire and for their levels of completeness and transparency in reporting acupuncture interventions by using Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) criteria. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four studies were nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs). The neuroimaging techniques used were functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Positive effects on the functional connectivity of the central nervous system more consistently occurred during long-term acupuncture treatment. The results were heterogeneous from a descriptive perspective; however, the key findings support acupuncture's ability to alter pain-related functional connectivity in the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. PMID:27555221

  1. Does Acupuncture Alter Pain-related Functional Connectivity of the Central Nervous System? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal Santiago, María; Tumilty, Steve; Mącznik, Aleksandra; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture has been studied for several decades to establish evidence-based clinical practice. This systematic review aims to evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in influencing the functional connectivity of the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify studies in which the central response of acupuncture in patients with musculoskeletal pain was evaluated by neuroimaging techniques. Databases searched were AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PEDro, Pubmed, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscuss, and Web of Science. Included studies were assessed by two independent reviewers for their methodological quality by using the Downs and Black questionnaire and for their levels of completeness and transparency in reporting acupuncture interventions by using Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) criteria. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four studies were nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs). The neuroimaging techniques used were functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Positive effects on the functional connectivity of the central nervous system more consistently occurred during long-term acupuncture treatment. The results were heterogeneous from a descriptive perspective; however, the key findings support acupuncture's ability to alter pain-related functional connectivity in the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain.

  2. Central mechanisms II: pharmacology of brainstem pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolser, D C

    2009-01-01

    Following systemic administration, centrally acting antitussive drugs are generally assumed to act in the brainstem to inhibit cough. However, recent work in humans has raised the possibility of suprapontine sites of action for cough suppressants. For drugs that may act in the brainstem, the specific locations, types of neurones affected, and receptor specificities of the compounds represent important issues regarding their cough-suppressant actions. Two medullary areas that have received the most attention regarding the actions of antitussive drugs are the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) and the caudal ventrolateral respiratory column. Studies that have implicated these two medullary areas have employed both microinjection and in vitro recording methods to control the location of action of the antitussive drugs. Other brainstem regions contain neurones that participate in the production of cough and could represent potential sites of action of antitussive drugs. These regions include the raphe nuclei, pontine nuclei, and rostral ventrolateral medulla. Specific receptor subtypes have been associated with the suppression of cough at central sites, including 5-HT1A, opioid (mu, kappa, and delta), GABA-B, tachykinin neurokinin-1 (NK-1) and neurokinin-2, non-opioid (NOP-1), cannabinoid, dopaminergic, and sigma receptors. Aside from tachykinin NK-1 receptors in the NTS, relatively little is known regarding the receptor specificity of putative antitussive drugs in particular brainstem regions. Our understanding of the mechanisms of action of antitussive drugs would be significantly advanced by further work in this area. PMID:18825342

  3. Imaging Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martucci, Katherine T; Mackey, Sean C

    2016-06-01

    The challenges and understanding of acute and chronic pain have been illuminated through the advancement of central neuroimaging. Through neuroimaging research, new technology and findings have allowed us to identify and understand the neural mechanisms contributing to chronic pain. Several regions of the brain are known to be of particular importance for the maintenance and amplification of chronic pain, and this knowledge provides novel targets for future research and treatment. This article reviews neuroimaging for the study of chronic pain, and in particular, the rapidly advancing and popular research tools of structural and functional MRI. PMID:27208709

  4. Central origin of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klede, Monika; Handwerker, Hermann O; Schmelz, Martin

    2003-07-01

    The contribution for the development of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia by peripheral mechanisms has not been fully elucidated. We have reevaluated the effects of local anesthetics on electrically evoked flare reaction and mechanical hyperalgesia in human skin. We applied 2% lidocaine via intradermal microdialysis fibers at a length of 10 cm for 110 min to the volar forearm to establish a narrow and stable "anesthetic strip." After 60 min of lidocaine perfusion, transdermal electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 50 mA) was applied at a distance of 1 cm from the microdialysis fibers for 30 min. The areas of allodynia and punctate hyperalgesia were marked at the end of the stimulation period. The flare reaction was assessed by laser Doppler scanner and infrared thermography. Total protein content of the dialysate collected at the stimulating electrode was measured photometrically. We found no increase in protein content during electrical stimulation. Flare area (12.4 +/- 2.3 vs. 3.5 +/- 1.2 cm2) and intensity (426 +/- 24 vs. 257 +/- 21 PU) were significantly reduced beyond the lidocaine strip. The mean temperature increase in the area beyond the lidocaine strip was significantly reduced (1.1 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.2 +/- 0.1 degrees C) and did not differ from control areas. In contrast, allodynia (7.4 +/- 0.7 and 8.6 +/- 0.9 cm) and punctate hyperalgesia (7.6 +/- 0.7 and 8.6 +/- 0.9 cm) developed symmetrically on both sides of the anesthetic strip. Allodynia subsided 4 min after the end of the electrical stimulation. We conclude that the development of allodynia and punctate hyperalgesia in human skin is centrally mediated, whereas the axon reflex vasodilation is of peripheral origin. PMID:12843313

  5. Reduction of central neuropathic pain with ketamine infusion in a patient with Ehlers–Danlos syndrome: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Tony Chung Tung; Yeung, Stephen Tung; Lee, Sujin; Skavinski, Kira; Liao, Solomon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ehlers–Danlos syndrome frequently causes acute and chronic pain because of joint subluxations and dislocations secondary to hypermobility. Current treatments for pain related to Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and central pain syndrome are inadequate. This case report discusses the therapeutic use of ketamine intravenous infusion as an alternative. Case report A 27-year-old Caucasian female with a history of Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and spinal cord ischemic myelopathy resulting in central pain syndrome, presented with severe generalized body pain refractory to multiple pharmacological interventions. After a 7-day course of ketamine intravenous infusion under controlled generalized sedation in the intensive care unit, the patient reported a dramatic reduction in pain levels from 7–8 out of 10 to 0–3 out of 10 on a numeric rating scale and had a significant functional improvement. The patient tolerated a reduction in her pain medication regimen, which originally included opioids, gabapentin, pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Conclusion Ketamine infusion treatment has been used in various pain syndromes, including central neuropathic pain, ischemic pain, and regional pain syndrome. Reports have suggested that ketamine modulates pain by the regression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor to a resting state. As such, propagation of nociceptive signal to brain is interrupted allowing for the restoration of physiological balance between pain inhibition and facilitation. The present report shows that this treatment option can be used in patients with refractory central pain syndrome in the setting of spinal cord myelopathy secondary to Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. In addition, as seen in this case, this protocol can potentially decrease the chronic use of pain medication, such as opioids.

  6. Potential Mechanisms Supporting the Value of Motor Cortex Stimulation to Treat Chronic Pain Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DosSantos, Marcos F.; Ferreira, Natália; Toback, Rebecca L.; Carvalho, Antônio C.; DaSilva, Alexandre F.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the first years of the twenty-first century, neurotechnologies such as motor cortex stimulation (MCS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have attracted scientific attention and been considered as potential tools to centrally modulate chronic pain, especially for those conditions more difficult to manage and refractory to all types of available pharmacological therapies. Interestingly, although the role of the motor cortex in pain has not been fully clarified, it is one of the cortical areas most commonly targeted by invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation technologies. Recent studies have provided significant advances concerning the establishment of the clinical effectiveness of primary MCS to treat different chronic pain syndromes. Concurrently, the neuromechanisms related to each method of primary motor cortex (M1) modulation have been unveiled. In this respect, the most consistent scientific evidence originates from MCS studies, which indicate the activation of top-down controls driven by M1 stimulation. This concept has also been applied to explain M1-TMS mechanisms. Nevertheless, activation of remote areas in the brain, including cortical and subcortical structures, has been reported with both invasive and non-invasive methods and the participation of major neurotransmitters (e.g., glutamate, GABA, and serotonin) as well as the release of endogenous opioids has been demonstrated. In this critical review, the putative mechanisms underlying the use of MCS to provide relief from chronic migraine and other types of chronic pain are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the most recent scientific evidence obtained from chronic pain research studies involving MCS and non-invasive neuromodulation methods (e.g., tDCS and TMS), which are analyzed comparatively. PMID:26903788

  7. Potential mechanisms supporting the value of motor cortex stimulation to treat chronic pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Fabio DosSantos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the first years of the twenty-first century, neurotechnologies such as motor cortex stimulation (MCS, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS have attracted scientific attention and been considered as potential tools to centrally modulate chronic pain, especially for those conditions more difficult to manage and refractory to all types of available pharmacological therapies. Interestingly, although the role of the motor cortex in pain has not been fully clarified, it is one of the cortical areas most commonly targeted by invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation technologies. Recent studies have provided significant advances concerning the establishment of the clinical effectiveness of primary motor cortex stimulation to treat different chronic pain syndromes. Concurrently, the neuromechanisms related to each method of primary motor cortex (M1 modulation have been unveiled. In this respect, the most consistent scientific evidence originates from MCS studies, which indicate the activation of top-down controls driven by M1 stimulation. This concept has also been applied to explain M1-TMS mechanisms. Nevertheless, activation of remote areas in the brain, including cortical and subcortical structures, has been reported with both invasive and non-invasive methods and the participation of major neurotransmitters (e.g. glutamate, GABA and serotonin as well as the release of endogenous opioids has been demonstrated. In this critical review, the putative mechanisms underlying the use of motor cortex stimulation to provide relief from chronic migraine and other types of chronic pain are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the most recent scientific evidence obtained from chronic pain research studies involving MCS and non-invasive neuromodulation methods (e.g. tDCS and TMS, which are analyzed comparatively.

  8. Unity vs. diversity of neuropathic pain mechanisms: Allodynia and hyperalgesia in rats selected for heritable predisposition to spontaneous pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv-Sefer, Sagit; Raber, Pnina; Barbash, Shahar; Devor, Marshall

    2009-11-01

    Do contrasting neuropathic pain diagnoses share common pathophysiological mechanisms? Selective breeding was used to derive rat lines with a common genetic background but a striking difference in the degree of spontaneous pain behavior expressed in the neuroma model of neuropathic pain (HA rats (high autotomy) and LA rats (low autotomy)). The contrasting pain phenotype in these lines is attributable to allelic differences at a small number of genetic loci. Here we show that HA and LA rats also differ in their nocifensive response to applied stimuli in the Chung (spinal nerve ligation, SNL) model of neuropathic pain. This includes tactile allodynia and hyperalgesia, and heat allodynia. The degree of hypersensibility varied with sex, age at the time of nerve injury, and the extent of the nerve lesion. F1 crosses of HA and LA rats and inbred Lewis rats showed low levels of autotomy but variable levels of hypersensibility to applied stimuli. Results indicate that alleles which predispose to spontaneous neuropathic pain also predispose to stimulus-evoked pain (allodynia and hyperalgesia). This, in turn, suggests that despite contrasting etiology and behavioral endpoints, pain phenotype in the neuroma and the SNL models shares common pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:19683390

  9. Pain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Foulkes

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Pain, which afflicts up to 20% of the population at any time, provides both a massive therapeutic challenge and a route to understanding mechanisms in the nervous system. Specialised sensory neurons (nociceptors signal the existence of tissue damage to the central nervous system (CNS, where pain is represented in a complex matrix involving many CNS structures. Genetic approaches to investigating pain pathways using model organisms have identified the molecular nature of the transducers, regulatory mechanisms involved in changing neuronal activity, as well as the critical role of immune system cells in driving pain pathways. In man, mapping of human pain mutants as well as twin studies and association studies of altered pain behaviour have identified important regulators of the pain system. In turn, new drug targets for chronic pain treatment have been validated in transgenic mouse studies. Thus, genetic studies of pain pathways have complemented the traditional neuroscience approaches of electrophysiology and pharmacology to give us fresh insights into the molecular basis of pain perception.

  10. Back pain in space and post-flight spine injury: Mechanisms and countermeasure development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayson, Jojo V.; Lotz, Jeffrey; Parazynski, Scott; Hargens, Alan R.

    2013-05-01

    During spaceflight many astronauts experience moderate to severe lumbar pain and deconditioning of paraspinal muscles. There is also a significant incidence of herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in astronauts post-flight being most prevalent in cervical discs. Relief of in-flight lumbar back pain is facilitated by assuming a knee-to-chest position. The pathogenesis of lumbar back pain during spaceflight is most likely discogenic and somatic referred (from the sinuvertebral nerves) due to supra-physiologic swelling of the lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs) due to removal of gravitational compressive loads in microgravity. The knee-to-chest position may reduce lumbar back pain by redistributing stresses through compressive loading to the IVDs, possibly reducing disc volume by fluid outflow across IVD endplates. IVD stress redistribution may reduce Type IV mechanoreceptor nerve impulse propagation in the annulus fibrosus and vertebral endplate resulting in centrally mediated pain inhibition during spinal flexion. Countermeasures for lumbar back pain may include in-flight use of: (1) an axial compression harness to prevent excessive IVD expansion and spinal column elongation; (2) the use of an adjustable pulley exercise developed to prevent atrophy of spine muscle stabilisers; and (3) other exercises that provide Earth-like annular stress with low-load repetitive active spine rotation movements. The overall objective of these countermeasures is to promote IVD health and to prevent degenerative changes that may lead to HNPs post-flight. In response to "NASA's Critical Path Roadmap Risks and Questions" regarding disc injury and higher incidence of HNPs after space flight (Integrated Research Plan Gap-B4), future studies will incorporate pre- and post-flight imaging of International Space Station long-duration crew members to investigate mechanisms of lumbar back pain as well as degeneration and damage to spinal structures. Quantitative results on morphological, biochemical

  11. Spinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  12. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  13. Effects of dexmedetomidine on procedural pain and discomfort associated with central venous catheter insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloka Samantaray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Central venous catheter (CVC insertion induces pain and discomfort to a conscious patient despite application of a local anaesthetic (LA field block and this pain can be greatly lessened by using additional analgesics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of dexmedetomidine along with LA field infiltration in controlling pain and discomfort associated with CVC insertion. Methods: A prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 54 patients scheduled for planned CVC insertion was undertaken. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups of 27 each, to receive either dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg or 0.9% normal saline, along with LA field infiltration. Pain and discomfort score was measured at 5 time points. Results: The median pain score was worst for placebo group at local anaesthetic injection (6 [4-7] and at the end of procedure (5 [4-5], which was significantly attenuated in the dexmedetomidine group (4 [4-5] and 4 [3-5]; P = 0.007 and 0.040 respectively. The lower procedure related discomfort score in the immediate post-procedural period was statistically significant in dexmedetomidine group compared to placebo (4 [4-5] vs. 5 [4-6]; P = 0.008. Conclusions: Pre-procedural bolus dexmedetomidine infusion provides adequate analgesia and patient comfort for CVC insertion along LA field block. However, the tendency for excessive sedation and bradycardia associated with dexmedetomidine render it less desirable for this purpose.

  14. Reduction of central neuropathic pain with ketamine infusion in a patient with Ehlers–Danlos syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo TC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tony Chung Tung Lo,1,* Stephen Tung Yeung,2,* Sujin Lee,1 Kira Skavinski,3 Solomon Liao,4 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of California Irvine, Orange, CA, 2Department of Immunology, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, 3Department of Palliative Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, 4Department of Palliative Medicine, University of California Irvine, Orange, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Ehlers–Danlos syndrome frequently causes acute and chronic pain because of joint subluxations and dislocations secondary to hypermobility. Current treatments for pain related to Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and central pain syndrome are inadequate. This case report discusses the therapeutic use of ketamine intravenous infusion as an alternative. Case report: A 27-year-old Caucasian female with a history of Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and spinal cord ischemic myelopathy resulting in central pain syndrome, presented with severe generalized body pain refractory to multiple pharmacological interventions. After a 7-day course of ketamine intravenous infusion under controlled generalized sedation in the intensive care unit, the patient reported a dramatic reduction in pain levels from 7–8 out of 10 to 0–3 out of 10 on a numeric rating scale and had a significant functional improvement. The patient tolerated a reduction in her pain medication regimen, which originally included opioids, gabapentin, pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Conclusion: Ketamine infusion treatment has been used in various pain syndromes, including central neuropathic pain, ischemic pain, and regional pain syndrome. Reports have suggested that ketamine modulates pain by the regression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor to a resting state. As such, propagation of nociceptive signal to brain is interrupted allowing for the restoration of

  15. Validation of a pain mechanism classification system (PMCS) in physical therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolski, Melissa C; O'Connor, Annie; Van Der Laan, Krista; Lee, Jungwha; Kozlowski, Allan J; Deutsch, Anne

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the clinical application of a pain mechanism classification system (PMCS) in clinical practice. We analyzed data abstracted from the medical records of patients who were treated in the outpatient clinics of a large urban rehabilitation hospital in Chicago. We hypothesized that there would be good agreement between the PMCS determined by trained therapists and the PMCS category assigned based on a computer-generated statistical model using patients' signs and symptoms. Using cluster analysis, when we assumed five groups, 97% of patients could be classified. Sensitivity and specificity results with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the categories using the physical therapist assigned categories (PMCS) as the criterion standard. Sensitivity for four of the five categories (inflammatory, ischemia, peripheral neurogenic, and other ranged from 72·0 to 83·1%). For the central mechanism, sensitivity was much lower at 15%. Specificity for the five categories ranged from 72·4% (ischemia) to 98·8% (central). This study provides empirical support for recent findings in the literature that the peripheral components of a PMCS can be implemented consistently in an outpatient pain clinical practice. PMID:27582618

  16. Advances in understanding the mechanisms and management of persistent pain in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, J F; Shega, J W; Morone, N E; Weiner, D K

    2008-07-01

    Older adults with persistent pain are not simply a chronologically older version of younger pain patients. Pain-related disability in older adults may be driven by pain 'homeostenosis', that is, diminished ability to effectively respond to the stress of persistent pain. Some of the comorbidities of ageing that can contribute to pain homeostenosis include cognitive and physical impairments, increased sensitivity to suprathreshold pain stimuli, medical and psychological comorbidities, altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and social isolation. A key distinction between older and younger individuals with persistent pain is the normal and pathological ageing-associated brain changes. These may alter the expression and experience of pain with impaired descending inhibition and dysfunction of pain gating mechanisms. Cognizance of these brain changes is needed to guide appropriate evaluation and treatment approaches. This paper reviews data that support these ageing-associated phenomena. Specifically, we discuss age-related changes in the brain (both normal and pathological) and in pain physiology; changes in experience and expression of pain that occur with dementia and contribute to pain homeostenosis; and unique aspects of age and pain-associated psychological function and their contribution to disability. We also present data demonstrating changes in brain morphology and neuropsychological performance that accompany persistent non-malignant pain in older adults and the treatment implications of these brain changes. Finally, preliminary data are presented on the efficacy of mindfulness meditation, a treatment that has been examined explicitly in older adults and targets optimizing brain function and descending inhibition.

  17. Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Presentations, Mechanisms, and Exercise Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Min; Sharma, Neena; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Kluding, Patricia M

    2013-06-30

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a frequent complication of diabetes and a major cause of morbidity and increased mortality. It is typically characterized by significant deficits in tactile sensitivity, vibration sense, lower-limb proprioception, and kinesthesia. Painful diabetic neuropathy (P-DPN) is a common phenotype of DPN that affects up to one-third of the general diabetic population. P-DPN has been shown to be associated with significant reductions in overall quality of life, increased levels of anxiety and depression, sleep impairment, and greater gait variability. The purpose of this review is to examine proposed mechanisms of P-DPN, summarize current treatment regimen, and assess exercise as a potential therapy for P-PDN. Although exercise has been shown to be an effective therapeutic modality for diabetes, its specific effects on DPN and especially the painful phenotype have not been sufficiently investigated in current literature. Several rodent models and clinical trials have presented promising results in this area, and warrant further investigations examining the effect of exercise on P-DPN.

  18. Momentary Pain and Coping in Temporomandibular Disorder Pain: Exploring Mechanisms of Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Chronic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Litt, Mark D.; Shafer, David M.; Ibanez, Carlos R.; Kreutzer, Donald L.; Tawfik-Yonkers, Zeena

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) operates by effecting changes in cognitions, affects, and coping behaviors in the context of painful episodes. Patients were 54 men and women with temporomandibular dysfunction-related orofacial pain (TMD) enrolled in a study of brief (6 weeks) standard conservative treatment (STD) or standard treatment plus CBT (STD+CBT). Momentary affects, pain, and coping processes were recorded on a cellphone keypad fo...

  19. Biologic Mechanisms of Oral Cancer Pain and Implications for Clinical Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Viet, C.T.; SCHMIDT, B.L.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer pain is an ever-present public health concern. With innovations in treatment, cancer patients are surviving longer, but uncontrollable pain creates a poor quality of life for these patients. Oral cancer is unique in that it causes intense pain at the primary site and significantly impairs speech, swallowing, and masticatory functions. We propose that oral cancer pain has underlying biologic mechanisms that are generated within the cancer microenvironment. A comprehensive understanding ...

  20. Axial low back pain: one painful area--many perceptions and mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Förster

    Full Text Available Axial low back pain can be considered as a syndrome with both nociceptive and neuropathic pain components (mixed-pain. Especially neuropathic pain comprises a therapeutic challenge in practical experience and may explain why pharmacotherapy in back pain is often disappointing for both the patient and the therapist. This survey uses epidemiological and clinical data on the symptomatology of 1083 patients with axial low back pain from a cross sectional survey (painDETECT. Objectives were (1 to estimate whether neuropathic pain contributes to axial low back pain and if so to what extent. (2 To detect subgroups of patients with typical sensory symptom profiles and to analyse their demographic data and co-morbidities. (3 To compare patients with and without prior intervertebral disc surgery (IVD. Neuropathic pain components could be detected in 12% of the entire cohort. Cluster analyses of these patients revealed five distinct subgroups of patients showing a characteristic sensory profile, i.e. a typical constellation and combination of symptoms. All subgroups occurred in relevant numbers and some showed distinct neuropathic characteristics while others showed nociceptive features. Post-IVD-surgery patients showed a tendency to score more "neuropathic" than patients without surgery (not statistically significant. Axial low back pain has a high prevalence of co-morbidities with implication on therapeutic aspects. From these data it can be concluded that sensory profiles based on descriptor severity may serve as a better predictor for therapy assessment than pain intensity or sole diagnosis alone. Standardized phenotyping of pain symptoms with easy tools may help to develop an individualized therapy leading to a higher success rate in pharmacotherapy of axial low back pain.

  1. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors regulate central sensitization and pain responses associated with osteoarthritis of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burston, James J; Sagar, Devi Rani; Shao, Pin; Bai, Mingfeng; King, Emma; Brailsford, Louis; Turner, Jenna M; Hathway, Gareth J; Bennett, Andrew J; Walsh, David A; Kendall, David A; Lichtman, Aron; Chapman, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the joint is a prevalent disease accompanied by chronic, debilitating pain. Recent clinical evidence has demonstrated that central sensitization contributes to OA pain. An improved understanding of how OA joint pathology impacts upon the central processing of pain is crucial for the identification of novel analgesic targets/new therapeutic strategies. Inhibitory cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptors attenuate peripheral immune cell function and modulate central neuro-immune responses in models of neurodegeneration. Systemic administration of the CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 attenuated OA-induced pain behaviour, and the changes in circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines exhibited in this model. Electrophysiological studies revealed that spinal administration of JWH133 inhibited noxious-evoked responses of spinal neurones in the model of OA pain, but not in control rats, indicating a novel spinal role of this target. We further demonstrate dynamic changes in spinal CB2 receptor mRNA and protein expression in an OA pain model. The expression of CB2 receptor protein by both neurones and microglia in the spinal cord was significantly increased in the model of OA. Hallmarks of central sensitization, significant spinal astrogliosis and increases in activity of metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the spinal cord were evident in the model of OA pain. Systemic administration of JWH133 attenuated these markers of central sensitization, providing a neurobiological basis for analgesic effects of the CB2 receptor in this model of OA pain. Analysis of human spinal cord revealed a negative correlation between spinal cord CB2 receptor mRNA and macroscopic knee chondropathy. These data provide new clinically relevant evidence that joint damage and spinal CB2 receptor expression are correlated combined with converging pre-clinical evidence that activation of CB2 receptors inhibits central sensitization and its contribution to the manifestation of chronic OA

  2. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors regulate central sensitization and pain responses associated with osteoarthritis of the knee joint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Burston

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA of the joint is a prevalent disease accompanied by chronic, debilitating pain. Recent clinical evidence has demonstrated that central sensitization contributes to OA pain. An improved understanding of how OA joint pathology impacts upon the central processing of pain is crucial for the identification of novel analgesic targets/new therapeutic strategies. Inhibitory cannabinoid 2 (CB2 receptors attenuate peripheral immune cell function and modulate central neuro-immune responses in models of neurodegeneration. Systemic administration of the CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 attenuated OA-induced pain behaviour, and the changes in circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines exhibited in this model. Electrophysiological studies revealed that spinal administration of JWH133 inhibited noxious-evoked responses of spinal neurones in the model of OA pain, but not in control rats, indicating a novel spinal role of this target. We further demonstrate dynamic changes in spinal CB2 receptor mRNA and protein expression in an OA pain model. The expression of CB2 receptor protein by both neurones and microglia in the spinal cord was significantly increased in the model of OA. Hallmarks of central sensitization, significant spinal astrogliosis and increases in activity of metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the spinal cord were evident in the model of OA pain. Systemic administration of JWH133 attenuated these markers of central sensitization, providing a neurobiological basis for analgesic effects of the CB2 receptor in this model of OA pain. Analysis of human spinal cord revealed a negative correlation between spinal cord CB2 receptor mRNA and macroscopic knee chondropathy. These data provide new clinically relevant evidence that joint damage and spinal CB2 receptor expression are correlated combined with converging pre-clinical evidence that activation of CB2 receptors inhibits central sensitization and its contribution to the manifestation

  3. Beep Tones Attenuate Pain following Pavlovian Conditioning of an Endogenous Pain Control Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Raymonde Scheuren; Fernand Anton; Nathalie Erpelding; Gilles Michaux

    2014-01-01

    Heterotopic noxious counter-stimulation (HNCS) is commonly used to study endogenous pain control systems. The resulting pain inhibition is primarily based on spinal cord-brainstem loops. Recently, functional imaging studies have shown that limbic structures like the anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala are also implicated. Since these structures are involved in learning processes, it is possible that the HNCS-induced pain inhibition may depend on specific cues from the environment that have...

  4. Pain-related mediators underlie incision-induced mechanical nociception in the dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuhong Yuan; Xiangyan Liu; Qiuping Tang; Yunlong Deng

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50-70% of patients experience incision-induced mechanical nociception after sur-gery. However, the mechanism underlying incision-induced mechanical nociception is stil unclear. Interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are important pain mediators, but whether in-terleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are involved in incision-induced mechanical no-ciception remains uncertain. In this study, forty rats were divided randomly into the incision surgery (n=32) and sham surgery (n=8) groups. Plantar incision on the central part of left hind paw was performed under anesthesia in rats from the surgery group. Rats in the sham surgery group re-ceived anesthesia, but not an incision. Von Frey test results showed that, compared with the sham surgery group, incision surgery decreased the withdrawal threshold of rats at 0.5, 3, 6 and 24 hours after incision. Immunofluorescence staining in the dorsal root ganglia of the spinal cord (L 3-5 ) showed that interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were expressed mainly on smal-and medium-sized neurons (diameter40μm) at 6 and 24 hours after incision surgery, which corresponded to the decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold of rats in the surgery group. These experimental findings suggest that expression pattern shift of interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor induced by inci-sion surgery in dorsal root ganglia of rats was closely involved in lowering the threshold to me-chanical stimulus in the hind paw fol owing incision surgery. Pain-related mediators induced by in-cision surgery in dorsal root ganglia of rats possibly underlie mechanical nociception in ipsilateral hind paws.

  5. Chronic whiplash and central sensitization; an evaluation of the role of a myofascial trigger points in pain modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Michael D

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective it has been established that chronic neck pain following whiplash is associated with the phenomenon of central sensitization, in which injured and uninjured parts of the body exhibit lowered pain thresholds due to an alteration in central pain processing. it has furthermore been hypothesized that peripheral sources of nociception in the muscles may perpetuate central sensitization in chronic whiplash. the hypothesis explored in the present study was whether myofascial trigger points serve as a modulator of central sensitization in subjects with chronic neck pain. Design controlled case series. Setting outpatient chronic pain clinic. Subjects seventeen patients with chronic and intractable neck pain and 10 healthy controls without complaints of neck pain. Intervention symptomatic subjects received anesthetic infiltration of myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscles and controls received the anesthetic in the thigh. Outcome measures: pre and post injection cervical range of motion, pressure pain thresholds (ppt over the infraspinatus, wrist extensor, and tibialis anterior muscles. sensitivity to light (photophobia and subjects' perception of pain using a visual analog scale (vas were also evaluated before and after injections. only the ppt was evaluated in the asymptomatic controls. Results immediate (within 1 minute alterations in cervical range of motion and pressure pain thresholds were observed following an average of 3.8 injections with 1–2 cc of 1% lidocaine into carefully identified trigger points. cervical range of motion increased by an average of 49% (p = 0.000 in flexion and 44% (p = 0.001 in extension, 47% (p = 0.000 and 28% (p Conclusion the present data suggest that myofascial trigger points serve to perpetuate lowered pain thresholds in uninjured tissues. additionally, it appears that lowered pain thresholds associated with central sensitization can be immediately reversed, even when associated

  6. Persistent facial pain conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forssell, Heli; Alstergren, Per; Bakke, Merete;

    2016-01-01

    , clinical features, consequences, central and peripheral mechanisms, diagnostic criteria (DC/TMD), and principles of management. For each of the neuropathic facial pain entities, the definitions, prevalence, clinical features, and diagnostics are described. The current understanding of the pathophysiology...

  7. Cannabinoids and centrak neuropathic pain. A review (Cannabinoidi e dolore neuropatico centrale. Una rassegna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Crestani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Only recently, the medical community highlighted the pharmacological scientific bases of the effects of Cannabis. The most important active principle, Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol was identified in the second half of the last century, and receptors were subsequently identified and endogenous ligands, called endocannabinoids, were characterized. The effectiveness of the cannabinoids in the treatment of nausea and vomit due to anti-neoplastic chemotherapy and in the wasting-syndrome during AIDS is recognized. Moreover, the cannabinoids have shown analgesic properties, particularly interesting with regard to the central neuropathic pain. This article will review the current knowledge and will give practical guidance on how to proceed in prescribing cannabinoids.

  8. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Pain Threshold of Laboring Rats and the Expression of Norepinephrine Transporter and α2 Adrenergic Receptor in the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianli Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To observe the effects of electroacupuncture on pain threshold of laboring rats and the expression of norepinephrine transporter and α2 adrenergic receptor in the central nervous system to determine the mechanism of the analgesic effect of labor. 120 pregnant rats were divided into 6 groups: a control group, 4 electroacupuncture groups, and a meperidine group. After interventions, the warm water tail-flick test was used to observe pain threshold. NE levels in serum, NET, and α2AR mRNA and protein expression levels in the central nervous system were measured. No difference in pain threshold was observed between the 6 groups before intervention. After intervention, increased pain thresholds were observed in all groups except the control group with a higher threshold seen in the electroacupuncture groups. Serum NE levels decreased in the electroacupuncture and MP groups. Increases in NET and α2AR expression in the cerebral cortex and decreases in enlarged segments of the spinal cord were seen. Acupuncture increases uptake of NE via cerebral NET and decreases its uptake by spinal NET. The levels of α2AR are also increased and decreased, respectively, in both tissues. This results in a decrease in systemic NE levels and may be the mechanism for its analgesic effects.

  9. A comparative behavioural study of mechanical hypersensitivity in 2 pain models in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Marie-Céline; Hrncic, Dragan; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Caspani, Ombretta

    2016-06-01

    The assessment of pain sensitivity in humans has been standardized using quantitative sensory testing, whereas in animals mostly paw withdrawal thresholds to diverse stimuli are measured. This study directly compares tests used in quantitative sensory testing (pinpricks, pressure algometer) with tests used in animal studies (electronic von Frey test: evF), which we applied to the dorsal hind limbs of humans after high frequency stimulation and rats after tibial nerve transection. Both experimental models induce profound mechanical hypersensitivity. At baseline, humans and rats showed a similar sensitivity to evF with 0.2 mm diameter tips, but significant differences for other test stimuli (all P positive sensory sign after peripheral nerve injury in humans-is a novel finding in the tibial nerve transection model. By testing outside the primary zone of nerve damage (rat) or activation (humans), our methods likely involve effects of central sensitization in both species. PMID:26859819

  10. The influence of μ-opioid and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition in the modulation of pain responsive neurones in the central amygdala by tapentadol in rats with neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Leonor; Friend, Lauren V; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-02-15

    Treatments for neuropathic pain are either not fully effective or have problematic side effects. Combinations of drugs are often used. Tapentadol is a newer molecule that produces analgesia in various pain models through two inhibitory mechanisms, namely central μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonism and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition. These two components interact synergistically, resulting in levels of analgesia similar to opioid analgesics such as oxycodone and morphine, but with more tolerable side effects. The right central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is critical for the lateral spinal ascending pain pathway, regulates descending pain pathways and is key in the emotional-affective components of pain. Few studies have investigated the pharmacology of limbic brain areas in pain models. Here we determined the actions of systemic tapentadol on right CeA neurones of animals with neuropathy and which component of tapentadol contributes to its effect. Neuronal responses to multimodal peripheral stimulation of animals with spinal nerve ligation or sham surgery were recorded before and after two doses of tapentadol. After the higher dose of tapentadol either naloxone or yohimbine were administered. Systemic tapentadol resulted in dose-dependent decrease in right CeA neuronal activity only in neuropathy. Both naloxone and yohimbine reversed this effect to an extent that was modality selective. The interactions of the components of tapentadol are not limited to the synergy between the MOR and α2-adrenoceptors seen at spinal levels, but are seen at this supraspinal site where suppression of responses may relate to the ability of the drug to alter affective components of pain. PMID:25576174

  11. Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta 9-THC Treatment in Chronic Central Neuropathic Pain and Fibromyalgia Patients: Results of a Multicenter Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Weber

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Central neuropathic pain is difficult to treat, but delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC may be a promising therapeutic agent. We administered in 172 patients on average 7.5 mg delta 9-THC over 7 months. Of these, 48 patients prematurely withdrew due to side effects, insufficient analgesia, or expense of therapy. Thus, 124 patients were assessed retrospectively in a multicenter telephone survey. Reported changes in pain intensity, recorded on a numeric rating scale (NRS, Pain Disability Index (PDI, Medical Outcomes Short-Form (SF-12, Quality of Life Impairment by Pain (QLIP, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS, and amount of concomitant pain medication were recorded. Psychometric parameters (PDI, SF-12, QLIP, HADS and pain intensity improved significantly during delta 9-THC treatment. Opioid doses were reduced and patients perceived THC therapy as effective with tolerable side effects. About 25% of the patients, however, did not tolerate the treatment. Therapy success and tolerance can be assessed by a transient delta 9-THC titration and its maintained administration for several weeks. The present survey demonstrates its ameliorating potential for the treatment of chronic pain in central neuropathy and fibromyalgia. A supplemental delta 9-THC treatment as part of a broader pain management plan therefore may represent a promising coanalgesic therapeutic option.

  12. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Gallbladder Calculosis in Fibromyalgia Patients: Impact on Musculoskeletal Pain, Somatic Hyperalgesia and Central Sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Raffaele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Massimini, Francesca; Tana, Claudio; Innocenti, Paolo; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia, a chronic syndrome of diffuse musculoskeletal pain and somatic hyperalgesia from central sensitization, is very often comorbid with visceral pain conditions. In fibromyalgia patients with gallbladder calculosis, this study assessed the short and long-term impact of laparoscopic cholecystectomy on fibromyalgia pain symptoms. Fibromyalgia pain (VAS scale) and pain thresholds in tender points and control areas (skin, subcutis and muscle) were evaluated 1week before (basis) and 1week, 1,3,6 and 12months after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in fibromyalgia patients with symptomatic calculosis (n = 31) vs calculosis patients without fibromyalgia (n. 26) and at comparable time points in fibromyalgia patients not undergoing cholecystectomy, with symptomatic (n = 27) and asymptomatic (n = 28) calculosis, and no calculosis (n = 30). At basis, fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis patients presented a significant linear correlation between the number of previously experienced biliary colics and fibromyalgia pain (direct) and muscle thresholds (inverse)(pfibromyalgia pain significantly increased and all thresholds significantly decreased at 1week and 1month (1-way ANOVA, pFibromyalgia pain and thresholds returned to preoperative values at 3months, then pain significantly decreased and thresholds significantly increased at 6 and 12months (pfibromyalgia patients undergoing cholecystectomy thresholds did not change; in all other fibromyalgia groups not undergoing cholecystectomy fibromyalgia pain and thresholds remained stable, except in fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis at 12months when pain significantly increased and muscle thresholds significantly decreased (pfibromyalgia symptoms and that laparoscopic cholecystectomy produces only a transitory worsening of these symptoms, largely compensated by the long-term improvement/desensitization due to gallbladder removal. This study provides new insights into the role of visceral pain comorbidities and the effects of

  13. Brain stimulation therapy for central post-stroke pain from a perspective of interhemispheric neural network remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eMorishita

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Central post-stroke pain (CPSP is a debilitating, severe disorder affecting patient quality of life. Since CPSP is refractory to medication, various treatment modalities have been tried with marginal results. Following the first report of epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS for CPSP, many researchers have investigated the mechanisms of electrical stimulation of the motor cortex. CPSP is currently considered to be a maladapted network reorganization problem following stroke, and recent studies have revealed that the activities of the impaired hemisphere after stroke may be inhibited by the contralesional hemisphere. Even though this interhemispheric inhibition (IHI theory was originally proposed to explain the motor recovery process in stroke patients, we considered that IHI may also contribute to the CPSP mechanism. Based on the IHI theory and the fact that electrical stimulation of the motor cortex suppresses CPSP, we hypothesized that the inhibitory signals from the contralesional hemisphere may suppress the activities of the motor cortex in the ipsilesional hemisphere, and therefore pain suppression mechanisms may be malfunctioning in CPSP patients. In this context, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS was considered to be a reasonable procedure to address the interhemispheric imbalance, as the bilateral motor cortex can be simultaneously stimulated using an anode (excitatory and cathode (inhibitory. In this paper, we review the potential mechanisms and propose a new model of CPSP. We also report two cases where CPSP was addressed with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, discuss the potential roles of tDCS in the treatment of CPSP, and make recommendations for future studies.

  14. Brain Stimulation Therapy for Central Post-Stroke Pain from a Perspective of Interhemispheric Neural Network Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Takashi; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is a debilitating, severe disorder affecting patient quality of life. Since CPSP is refractory to medication, various treatment modalities have been tried with marginal results. Following the first report of epidural motor cortex (M1) stimulation (MCS) for CPSP, many researchers have investigated the mechanisms of electrical stimulation of the M1. CPSP is currently considered to be a maladapted network reorganization problem following stroke, and recent studies have revealed that the activities of the impaired hemisphere after stroke may be inhibited by the contralesional hemisphere. Even though this interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) theory was originally proposed to explain the motor recovery process in stroke patients, we considered that IHI may also contribute to the CPSP mechanism. Based on the IHI theory and the fact that electrical stimulation of the M1 suppresses CPSP, we hypothesized that the inhibitory signals from the contralesional hemisphere may suppress the activities of the M1 in the ipsilesional hemisphere, and therefore pain suppression mechanisms may be malfunctioning in CPSP patients. In this context, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was considered to be a reasonable procedure to address the interhemispheric imbalance, as the bilateral M1 can be simultaneously stimulated using an anode (excitatory) and cathode (inhibitory). In this article, we review the potential mechanisms and propose a new model of CPSP. We also report two cases where CPSP was addressed with tDCS, discuss the potential roles of tDCS in the treatment of CPSP, and make recommendations for future studies.

  15. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) reduces pain, fatigue, and hyperalgesia while restoring central inhibition in primary fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Dailey, Dana L.; Rakel, Barbara A.; Vance, Carol GT; Liebano, Richard E.; Anand, Amrit S; Bush, Heather M.; Lee, Kyoung S; Lee, Jennifer E.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Because TENS works by reducing central excitability and activating central inhibition pathways, we tested the hypothesis that TENS would reduce pain and fatigue and improve function and hyperalgesia in people with fibromyalgia who have enhanced central excitability and reduced inhibition. The current study used a double-blinded randomized, placebo controlled cross-over design to test effects of a single treatment of TENS in people with fibromyalgia. Three treatments were assessed in random or...

  16. Neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Re

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is the expression of a dysfunction or primary lesion of a nerve in the peripheral or central nervous system, or both, rather than the biological signal transmitted by the nerve following peripheral nociceptor activation. It represents about 20% of all painful syndromes, with an estimated prevalence of 1.5%, however is actual incidence is hard to pinpoint due to the difficulties encountered in distinguishing it from chronic pain, of which it represents a significant percentage, on account of the not infrequent concurrence of conditions. It is crucial to recognise the variety of symptoms with which it can present: these can be negative and positive and, in turn, motor, sensitive and autonomic. In public health terms, it is important to emphasise that the diagnosis of neuropathic pain does not in most cases require sophisticated procedures and does not therefore weigh on health expenditure. In clinical practice, a validated scale (the LANSS is mentioned is useful for identifying patients presenting neuropathic pain symptoms. Therapy is based on three categories of medication: tricyclic antidepressants, anti-epileptics and opioids at high doses: neuropathic pain has a bad reputation for often resisting common therapeutic approaches and responding less well that nociceptor pain to monotherapy. Therapeutic strategies are all the more adequate the more they are based on symptoms and therefore on the pain generation mechanisms, although the recommendations are dictated more by expert opinions that double-blind randomised trials.

  17. Agmatine reversed mechanical allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGHong-Ju; ZhAONan; GONGZheng-Hua; YUANWei-Xiou; LIYunFeng; LI-Jin; LUOZhi-Pu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Agmatine is an endogenous neuromodulator present in the brain and spinal cord, agmatine has both NMDA receptor antagonist and NOS inhibitor activities, which may participate the pathological process in the neuropathic pain. The effect of agmatine on the mechanical allodynia in a rat model of the neuropathic pain was investigated in this experiment.

  18. Insufficient pain relief after surgical neuroma treatment : Prognostic factors and central sensitisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokvis, Annemieke; Coert, J. Henk; van Neck, Johan W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Treatment of patients with neuromatous pain is difficult. Numerous treatment methods have been described, but none has been completely effective in providing sufficient pain relief. Patient-specific prognostic factors, predicting pain after surgical neuroma treatment, can help clinicians

  19. The influence of negative emotions on pain: behavioral effects and neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiech, Katja; Tracey, Irene

    2009-09-01

    The idea that pain can lead to feelings of frustration, worry, anxiety and depression seems obvious, particularly if it is of a chronic nature. However, there is also evidence for the reverse causal relationship in which negative mood and emotion can lead to pain or exacerbate it. Here, we review findings from studies on the modulation of pain by experimentally induced mood changes and clinical mood disorders. We discuss possible neural mechanisms underlying this modulatory influence focusing on the periaqueductal grey (PAG), amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and anterior insula as key players in both, pain and affective processing.

  20. Understanding Central Mechanisms of Acupuncture Analgesia Using Dynamic Quantitative Sensory Testing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Ti Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the emerging translational tools for the study of acupuncture analgesia with a focus on psychophysical methods. The gap between animal mechanistic studies and human clinical trials of acupuncture analgesia calls for effective translational tools that bridge neurophysiological data with meaningful clinical outcomes. Temporal summation (TS and conditioned pain modulation (CPM are two promising tools yet to be widely utilized. These psychophysical measures capture the state of the ascending facilitation and the descending inhibition of nociceptive transmission, respectively. We review the basic concepts and current methodologies underlying these measures in clinical pain research, and illustrate their application to research on acupuncture analgesia. Finally, we highlight the strengths and limitations of these research methods and make recommendations on future directions. The appropriate addition of TS and CPM to our current research armamentarium will facilitate our efforts to elucidate the central analgesic mechanisms of acupuncture in clinical populations.

  1. SPINAL PAIN SYNDROME: DEVELOPMENT MECHANISMS AND APPROACHES TO COMBINATION THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Martynov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers an association between spinal pain syndrome and the magnitude of vertebral column changes in osteochondrosis and the specific features and characteristics of pain syndrome. It gives the data that allow the consideration of spinal osteochondrosis as a degenerative and dystrophic process that is concurrent with the compensatory rearrangement of a vertebral motor segment, chiefly a disk, and aimed at adapting the functional capacities of the vertebral column as a whole. The issues of therapy for spinal pain syndrome with a combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and a vitamin B (B1, B6, and B12 complex are covered.

  2. SPINAL PAIN SYNDROME: DEVELOPMENT MECHANISMS AND APPROACHES TO COMBINATION THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Martynov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers an association between spinal pain syndrome and the magnitude of vertebral column changes in osteochondrosis and the specific features and characteristics of pain syndrome. It gives the data that allow the consideration of spinal osteochondrosis as a degenerative and dystrophic process that is concurrent with the compensatory rearrangement of a vertebral motor segment, chiefly a disk, and aimed at adapting the functional capacities of the vertebral column as a whole. The issues of therapy for spinal pain syndrome with a combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and a vitamin B (B1, B6, and B12 complex are covered.

  3. [The pain from burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, J

    2002-03-01

    The painful events associated with the treatment of a severe burn can, because of their long-lasting and repetitive characteristics, be one of the most excruciating experiences in clinical practice. Moreover, burn pain has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Although nociception and peripheral hyperalgesia are considered the major causes of burn pain, the study of more hypothetical mechanisms like central hyperalgesia and neuropathic pain may lead to a better understanding of burn pain symptoms and to new therapeutic approaches. Continuous pain and intermittent pain due to therapeutic procedures are two distinct components of burn pain. They have to be evaluated and managed separately. Although continuous pain is by far less severe than intermittent pain, the treatment is, in both cases, essentially pharmacological relying basically on opioids. Because of wide intra- and inter-individual variations, protocols will have to leave large possibilities of adaptation for each case, systematic pain evaluation being mandatory to achieve the best risk/benefit ratio. Surprisingly, the dose of medication decreases only slowly with time, a burn often remaining painful for long periods after healing. Non pharmacological treatments are often useful and sometimes indispensable adjuncts; but their rationale and their feasibility depends entirely on previous optimal pharmacological control of burn pain. Several recent studies show that burn pain management is inadequate in most burn centres.

  4. Mechanisms of PDGF siRNA-mediated inhibition of bone cancer pain in the spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Liu, Jia; He, Mu; Liu, Ran; Belegu, Visar; Dai, Ping; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Shang, Fei-Fei; Luo, Chao-Zhi; Zhou, Xue; Liu, Su; McDonald, JohnW.; Liu, Jin; Zuo, Yun-Xia; Liu, Fei; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Patients with tumors that metastasize to bone frequently suffer from debilitating pain, and effective therapies for treating bone cancer are lacking. This study employed a novel strategy in which herpes simplex virus (HSV) carrying a small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was used to alleviate bone cancer pain. HSV carrying PDGF siRNA was established and intrathecally injected into the cavum subarachnoidale of animals suffering from bone cancer pain and animals in the negative group. Sensory function was assessed by measuring thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. The mechanism by which PDGF regulates pain was also investigated by comparing the differential expression of pPDGFRα/β and phosphorylated ERK and AKT. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia developed in the rats with bone cancer pain, and these effects were accompanied by bone destruction in the tibia. Intrathecal injection of PDGF siRNA and morphine reversed thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in rats with bone cancer pain. In addition, we observed attenuated astrocyte hypertrophy, down-regulated pPDGFRα/β levels, reduced levels of the neurochemical SP, a reduction in CGRP fibers and changes in pERK/ERK and pAKT/AKT ratios. These results demonstrate that PDGF siRNA can effectively treat pain induced by bone cancer by blocking the AKT-ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27282805

  5. Lumbar Mechanics in Tennis Groundstrokes: Differences in Elite Adolescent Players With and Without Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Amity; Straker, Leon; Whiteside, David; O'Sullivan, Peter; Elliott, Bruce; Reid, Machar

    2016-02-01

    Adolescent tennis players are at risk for low back pain (LBP). Recent research has demonstrated a potential mechanical etiology during serves; however, groundstrokes have also been suggested to load this region. Therefore, this study compared lumbar mechanics between players with and without a history of LBP during open and square stance tennis forehands and backhands. Nineteen elite, adolescent, male tennis players participated, 7 with a history of recurrent disabling LBP and 12 without. Differences in three-dimensional lumbar kinetics and kinematics were compared between pain/no pain groups and groundstrokes using linear mixed models (P tennis players. PMID:26367081

  6. Assessment of Effectiveness of Percutaneous Adhesiolysis in Managing Chronic Low Back Pain Secondary to Lumbar Central Spinal Canal Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Laxmaiah Manchikanti, Kimberly A. Cash, Vidyasagar Pampati, Bradley W. Wargo, Yogesh Malla

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic persistent low back and lower extremity pain secondary to central spinal stenosis is common and disabling. Lumbar surgical interventions with decompression or fusion are most commonly performed to manage severe spinal stenosis. However, epidural injections are also frequently performed in managing central spinal stenosis. After failure of epidural steroid injections, the next sequential step is percutaneous adhesiolysis and hypertonic saline neurolysis with a targeted deli...

  7. Segmental hypersensitivity and spinothalamic function in spinal cord injury pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Sørensen, Leif Hougaard; Biering-Sørensen, Fin;

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying central pain following spinal cord injury (SCI) are unsettled. The purpose of the present study was to examine differences in spinothalamic tract function below injury level and evoked pain in incomplete SCI patients with neuropathic pain below injury level (central pain...... in central SCI pain and furthermore - in contrast to previous findings - that loss of spinothalamic functions does not appear to be a predictor for central neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury....... and thermal detection thresholds below injury level. SCI patients with central pain had sensory hypersensitivity in dermatomes corresponding to the lesion level more frequently than SCI patients without pain, but this may in part be explained by the exclusion of at-level spontaneous pain in the pain...

  8. Sex differences in cerebellar mechanisms involved in pain-related safety learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrenz, Franziska; Icenhour, Adriane; Thürling, Markus; Schlamann, Marc; Forsting, Michael; Timmann, Dagmar; Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the cerebellum contributes to the central processing of pain, including pain-related learning and memory processes. As a complex experience with multiple emotional and cognitive facets, the response to pain and its underlying neural correlates differ between men and women. However, it remains poorly understood whether and to what extent sex differences exist in the cerebellar contribution to pain-related associative learning processes. In the present conditioning study with experimental abdominal pain as unconditioned stimuli (US), we assessed sex-dependent differences in behavioral and neural responses to conditioned warning and safety cues in healthy volunteers. The results revealed that in response to visual stimuli signaling safety from abdominal pain (CS(-)), women showed enhanced cerebellar activation in lobules I-IV, V, VI, VIIIa, IX and X as well as Crus II and the dentate nucleus, which are mostly representative of somatomotor networks. On the other hand, men showed enhanced neural activation in lobules I-IV, VI, VIIb, VIIIb, IX as well as Crus I and II in response to CS(-), which are representative of frontoparietal and ventral attention networks. No sex differences were observed in response to pain-predictive warning signals (CS(+)). Similarly, men and women did not differ in behavioral measures of conditioning, including conditioned changes in CS valence and contingency awareness. Together, we could demonstrate that the cerebellum is involved in associative learning processes of conditioned anticipatory safety from pain and mediates sex differences in the underlying neural processes. Given the high prevalence of chronic pain conditions in women, these results may contribute to improve our understanding of the acquisition and manifestation of chronic abdominal pain syndromes. PMID:26004678

  9. Neurocutaneous disease: Cutaneous neuroanatomy and mechanisms of itch and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuquilin, Miguel; Alghalith, Yazan; Fernandez, Kristen Heins

    2016-02-01

    Few sources of information exist regarding cutaneous innervation and how to apply this basic neurologic science to the clinical treatment of itch, as often performed on a daily basis by dermatologists. We address the types of nerve fibers that innervate the skin and their different components and discuss the similarities and differences between itch and pain. We hope that increased knowledge of this topic will improve the recognition and treatment of neuropathic itch. PMID:26775771

  10. Mechanism of inflammatory cytokines in osteoarthritis pain%炎症细胞因子在骨性关节炎疼痛中的作用机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚志华; 裘敏蕾; 樊天佑

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide theoretical basis for the clinical treatment of osteoarthritis, the mechanism of inflammatory cytokines in osteoarthritis pain was investigated. A computer-based search of PubMed and China National Knowledge Infrastructure ( CNKI ) database was performed for the related articles with the keywords of“inflammatory cytokines, interleukin, tumor necrosis factor, chemokines, osteoarthritis pain, neuropathic pain and biochemical mechanisms”in English or in Chinese. The literatures related to the mechanism of inlfammatory cytokines in osteoarthritis pain were selected. A total of 84 literatures were primarily selected and 42 articles were reviewed according to the inclusion criteria. Osteoarthritis pain is one of the main factors affecting the life quality of the patients, and a variety of abnormal cells of the peripheral and central nervous systems were involved. Inlfammatory cytokines played an important role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. The relationship between osteoarthritis pain and common inlfammatory cytokines were reviewed in the review, so as to explore the important role of inlfammatory cytokines in osteoarthritis pain and provide theoretical basis for the clinical treatment of osteoarthritis.

  11. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of levetiracetam in central pain in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falah, M; Madsen, C; Holbech, J V;

    2012-01-01

    as pain intensity of more than 4 on a 0 to 10-point numeric rating scale were included in the study. The primary outcome measure was pain relief at the end of each treatment period as measured on a 6-point verbal scale. Eighty-nine patients were screened for participation and 30 patients entered the study...... of patients. However, there was significant reduction of pain, increased pain relief and/or more favourable pain relief with levetiracetam than with placebo in patients with lancinating or without touch-evoked pain (p = 0.025-0.046). This study found no effect of the anticonvulsant levetiracetam in non...

  12. Comparison of thermal and mechanical quantitative sensory testing in client-owned dogs with chronic naturally occurring pain and normal dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Mila; Knazovicky, David; Case, Beth; Thomson, Andrea; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2016-04-01

    Detecting dogs with central sensitization (CS) secondary to chronic pain is hampered by the current inability to measure this condition. The current study aimed to use quantitative sensory testing (QST) to measure (CS) in normal dogs and dogs with painful degenerative joint disease (DJD). It was hypothesized that QST would differ between these two groups of animals. Mechanical and thermal sensory thresholds obtained in animals with DJD-associated pain on two time points 28 days apart were compared with those of normal dogs. Values of sensory thresholds in DJD dogs obtained 28 days after the first evaluation were significantly lower than the results on the first day of evaluation but no differences were found when these results were compared with those of normal dogs. In conclusion, whether QST is different between dogs with chronic pain and normal dogs needs further investigation using a larger group of animals and age, weight and sex matched groups.

  13. Psychological flexibility and catastrophizing as associated change mechanisms during online Acceptance & Commitment Therapy for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompetter, Hester R; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Fox, Jean-Paul; Schreurs, Karlein M G

    2015-11-01

    The underlying mechanisms of the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural interventions for chronic pain need further clarification. The role of, and associations between, pain-related psychological flexibility (PF) and pain catastrophizing (PC) were examined during a randomized controlled trial on internet-based Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) for chronic pain. We assessed (1) the unique and combined indirect effects of PF and PC on outcomes, and (2) the causality of relations between PF, PC and the primary outcome pain interference in daily life (MPI) during ACT. A total of 238 pain sufferers were allocated to either ACT, a control condition on Expressive Writing, or a waiting list condition. Non-parametric cross-product of coefficients mediational analyses and cross-lagged panel designs were applied. Compared to control conditions, both baseline to post-intervention changes in PF and PC seemed to uniquely mediate baseline to three-month follow-up changes in pain interference and psychological distress. Only PF mediated changes in pain intensity. Indirect effects were twice as large for PF (κ2 = .09-.19) than for PC (κ² PCS = .05-.10). Further assessment of changes during ACT showed, however, that only PF, and not PC, predicted subsequent changes in MPI, while early and late changes in both PF and PC predicted later changes in each other. In conclusion, only PF functioned as a direct, causal working mechanism during ACT, with larger indirect effects that occurred earlier than changes in PC. Additionally, PC may function as an indirect mechanism of change during ACT for chronic pain via its direct influence on PF.

  14. Regular physical activity prevents development of chronic pain and activation of central neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sluka, Kathleen A; O'Donnell, James M.; DANIELSON, JESSICA; Rasmussen, Lynn A.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a significant health problem and is associated with increases in pain during acute physical activity. Regular physical activity is protective against many chronic diseases; however, it is unknown if it plays a role in development of chronic pain. The current study induced physical activity by placing running wheels in home cages of mice for 5 days or 8 wk and compared these to sedentary mice without running wheels in their home cages. Chronic muscle pain was in...

  15. Dopamine and 5-HT supersensitivity in nonorganic central pain and in morphine abstinence: fortuitous or renal analogy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicuteri, F; Anselmi, B; Del Bianco, P L

    1980-01-01

    Unexplained pain, such as central panalgesia, might be the most common clinical expression of a deficiency, central in nature, of the endorphin system. Acute natural opioid deficiency is comparable to morphine withdrawal in addicts characterized by vegetative, psychic disorder and the appearance of pain. An impressive supersensitivity (up to 1000 fold) to dopamine and 5-HT of the smooth muscle (hand dorsal vein: venotest) is detected both in central panalgesia sufferers and in addicts during spontaneous (withdrawal) or pharmacological (naloxone) abstinence. A 5-HT and dopamine supersensitivity, of less intensity, however, (10-30 fold), is found during migraine attacks: on these occasions, morphine-like factors in CSF appear reduced or undetectable, reinforcing the chemical analogy between morphine abstinence and migraine attacks. In the present study, evidence of opiate receptors in the human vein is also provided: 5-HT venospasms, inhibited by morphine, promptly emerge when naloxone is inoculated locally. PMID:7395606

  16. Molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced analgesic effect of oxycodone compared to morphine in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Thibault

    Full Text Available Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone.

  17. SHORT TERM EFFICACY OF KINESIOTAPING AND EXERCISES ON CHRONIC MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Prachi Sanjay 1 , 2 , 3 ,

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and introduction:The purpose of study is to determine the short term effectiveness of Kinesiotapingcombined with Exercises in reducing pain and improving Cervical range of motion and functional ability forsubjects with Chronic Mechanical Neck pain.Method::Pre to post test experimental study design randomised thirty Chronic Mechanical Neck pain patientseach 15 into KT and control group. KT group received kinesiotaping with exercises and Control groupreceivedonly exercises for 3 times a week for 4 weeks.Pain, active cervical range of motion and functional ability weremeasured before and after 4 weeks of intervention.Results:Comparative analysis using Independent‘t’ test and Mann Whitney U test found that there is a statisticallysignificant difference (p<0.05 in means of NPRS, active Flexion, Extension, Rotation to right, Rotation to LeftROM, Neck Disability Index (NDI in percentage when compared post intervention means between the groups.Pre to post test within the group analysis in both the groups using Paired‘t’ test and Wilcoxon signed rank testfound that there is a statistically significant change in means of NPRS, Flexion, Extension, Rotation to right,Rotation to Left ROM, NDI.Conclusion:Kinesiotaping combined with exercises for 4 weeks found short term effect in improving pain,active cervical ROM and functional ability than exercises alone in treatment of chronic Mechanical neck pain

  18. Role of COX-1 in the process of neuropathic pain and its mechanism Zhi-hong LU, Qi - bing MEI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    AIM In neuropathic pain the peripheral or central nervous systems are malfunctioning and become the cause of the pain. Unlike other pain styles, most neuropathic pain responds poorly to opioid analgesics. The mainstay of treatment is predominantly the tricyclic antidepressants, the anticonvulsants and the systemic local anesthetics of which the long- term use could lead to great side effects. Recently, proin-flammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, TNF-α, etc, have been proved to be involved in the process of neuropathic pain, indicating the cross - talking between neuropathic pain and inflammation. As an important member in inflammatory process, COX is expected to play a part in the process of neuropathic pain.In this study, we observed the change of COX-1 after neuropathic pain and further investigated thechange it caused in the brain. METHODS Spared nerve injury (SNI) is used to induce neuropathic painin mice.

  19. Overlapping mechanisms of stress-induced relapse to opioid use disorder and chronic pain: Clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udi E Ghitza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, a steeply growing number of persons with chronic non-cancer pain have been using opioid analgesics chronically to treat it, accompanied by a markedly increased prevalence of individuals with opioid-related misuse, opioid use disorders, emergency department visits, hospitalizations, admissions to drug treatment programs, and drug overdose deaths. This opioid misuse and overdose epidemic calls for well-designed randomized-controlled clinical trials into more skillful and appropriate pain management and for developing effective analgesics which have lower abuse liability and are protective against stress induced by chronic non-cancer pain. However, incomplete knowledge regarding effective approaches to treat various types of pain has been worsened by an under-appreciation of overlapping neurobiological mechanisms of stress, stress-induced relapse to opioid use, and chronic non-cancer pain in patients presenting for care for these conditions. This insufficient knowledge base has unfortunately encouraged common prescription of conveniently-available opioid pain-relieving drugs with abuse liability, as opposed to treating underlying problems using team-based multidisciplinary, patient-centered, collaborative-care approaches for addressing pain and co-occurring stress and risk for opioid use disorder. This paper reviews recent neurobiological findings regarding overlapping mechanisms of stress-induced relapse to opioid misuse and chronic non-cancer pain, and then discusses these in the context of key outstanding evidence gaps and clinical-treatment research directions which may be pursued to fill these gaps. Such research directions, if conducted through well-designed randomized controlled trials, may substantively inform clinical practice in general medical settings on how to effectively care for patients presenting with pain-related distress and these common co-occurring conditions.

  20. Efficacy of methylprednisolone versus other pharmacologic interventions for the treatment of central post-stroke pain: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellicane AJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Anthony J Pellicane, Scott R Millis Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan in the Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA Purpose: To determine if an oral, tapered methylprednisolone regimen is superior to other commonly used pharmacologic interventions for the treatment of central post-stroke pain (CPSP. Patients and methods: In this study, the charts of 146 stroke patients admitted to acute inpatient rehabilitation were retrospectively reviewed. Patients diagnosed with CPSP underwent further chart review to assess numerical rating scale for pain scores and as-needed pain medication usage at different time points comparing CPSP patients treated with methylprednisolone to those treated with other pharmacologic interventions. Results: In the sample, 8.2% were diagnosed with CPSP during acute care or inpatient rehabilitation. Mean numerical rating scale for pain scores day of symptom onset did not differ between those patients treated with methylprednisolone versus those treated with other pharmacologic interventions (mean ± standard deviation; 6.1 ± 2.3 versus 5.7 ± 1.6, P = 0.77. However, mean numerical rating scale for pain scores differed significantly 1-day after treatment initiation (1.7 ± 2.1 versus 5.0 ± 1.9, P = 0.03 and 1-day prior to rehabilitation discharge (0.3 ± 0.9 versus 4.1 ± 3.2, P = 0.01 between the two groups. Compared to day of symptom onset, as-needed pain medication usage within the methylprednisolone group was marginally less 1-day after treatment initiation (Z = -1.73, P = 0.08 and 1-day prior to rehabilitation discharge (Z = -1.89, P = 0.06. No difference in as-needed pain medication usage existed within the non-steroid group at the same time points. Conclusion: Methylprednisolone is a potential therapeutic option for CPSP. The findings herein warrant study in prospective trials. Keywords: stroke, pain, central post

  1. A central analgesic mechanism of acupuncture for migraine An ongoing functional MRI study**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Lan; Yujie Gao; Fang Zeng; Wei Qin; Mingkai Dong; Mailan Liu; Taipin Guo; Fanrong Liang

    2013-01-01

    Shaoyang acupoints are the most frequently used in migraine treatment. However, the central anal-gesic mechanism remains poorly understood. Studies have demonstrated that single stimulus of the verum acupuncture in healthy subjects can induce significant connectivity or activity changes in pain-related central networks compared with sham acupuncture. However, these findings are not indicative of the central analgesic mechanism of acupuncture at Shaoyang acupoints. Thus, we recruited 100 migraine sufferers and randomly assigned them into five groups: Shaoyang uncommon acupoint, Shaoyang common acupoint, Yangming uncommon acupoint, non-acupoint control, and blank control groups. Subjects were subjected to evaluation of curative effects and functional MRI prior to and after 10 and 20 acupuncture treatments. Al subjects were diagnosed by physicians and enrol ed fol owing clinical physical examination. Subjects were observed during 1-4 weeks after inclusion. At the fifth week, the first clinical evaluation and resting functional MRI were conducted. The Shaoyang uncom-mon acupoint, Shaoyang common acupoint, Yangming uncommon acupoint, and non-acupoint control grousp then were treated with acupuncture, five times per week, 20 times in total over 4 weeks. The second and third clinical evaluations and resting functional MRI screenings were conducted fol owing 10 and 20 acupuncture treatments. The blank control group was observed during the 5 to 8 week pe-riod, fol owed by clinical evaluation and resting functional MRI. The aim of this study was to examine changes in brain functional activity and central networks in subjects with migraine undergoing acu-puncture at Shaoyang uncommon acupoints. This study provides a further explanation of the central analgesic mechanism by which acupuncture at Shaoyang acupoints treats migraine.

  2. Multimodal pain stimulation of the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes; Hans Gregersen

    2006-01-01

    Understanding and characterization of pain and other sensory symptoms are among the most important issues in the diagnosis and assessment of patient with gastrointestinal disorders. Methods to evoke and assess experimental pain have recently developed into a new area with the possibility for multimodal stimulation (e.g.,electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical stimulation)of different nerves and pain pathways in the human gut. Such methods mimic to a high degree the pain experienced in the clinic. Multimodal pain methods have increased our basic understanding of different peripheral receptors in the gut in health and disease. Together with advanced muscle analysis, the methods have increased our understanding of receptors sensitive to mechanical,chemical and temperature stimuli in diseases, such as systemic sclerosis and diabetes. The methods can also be used to unravel central pain mechanisms, such as those involved in allodynia, hyperalgesia and referred pain. Abnormalities in central pain mechanisms are often seen in patients with chronic gut pain and hence methods relying on multimodal pain stimulation may help to understand the symptoms in these patients.Sex differences have been observed in several diseases of the gut, and differences in central pain processing between males and females have been hypothesized using multimodal pain stimulations. Finally, multimodal methods have recently been used to gain more insight into the effect of drugs against pain in the GI tract.Hence, the multimodal methods undoubtedly represents a major step forward in the future characterization and treatment of patients with various diseases of the gut.

  3. Chronic neuropathic pain: mechanisms, drug targets and measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna B; Sindrup, Søren H; Jensen, Troels S

    2007-01-01

    . Preclinical research provides several promising targets for treatment such as sodium and calcium channels, glutamate receptors, monoamines and neurotrophic factors; however, treatment is often insufficient. A mechanism-based treatment approach is suggested to improve treatment. Valid and reliable tools...

  4. Assessment of Effectiveness of Percutaneous Adhesiolysis in Managing Chronic Low Back Pain Secondary to Lumbar Central Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmaiah Manchikanti, Kimberly A. Cash, Carla D. McManus, Vidyasagar Pampati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic persistent low back and lower extremity pain secondary to central spinal stenosis is common and disabling. Lumbar surgical interventions with decompression or fusion are most commonly performed to manage severe spinal stenosis. However, epidural injections are also frequently performed in managing central spinal stenosis. After failure of epidural steroid injections, the next sequential step is percutaneous adhesiolysis and hypertonic saline neurolysis with a targeted delivery. The literature on the effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis in managing central spinal stenosis after failure of epidural injections has not been widely studied.Study Design: A prospective evaluation.Setting: An interventional pain management practice, a specialty referral center, a private practice setting in the United States.Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis in patients with chronic low back and lower extremity pain with lumbar central spinal stenosis.Methods: Seventy patients were recruited. The initial phase of the study was randomized, double-blind with a comparison of percutaneous adhesiolysis with caudal epidural injections. The 25 patients from the adhesiolysis group continued with follow-up, along with 45 additional patients, leading to a total of 70 patients. All patients received percutaneous adhesiolysis and appropriate placement of the Racz catheter, followed by an injection of 5 mL of 2% preservative-free lidocaine with subsequent monitoring in the recovery room. In the recovery room, each patient also received 6 mL of 10% hypertonic sodium chloride solution, and 6 mg of non-particulate betamethasone, followed by an injection of 1 mL of sodium chloride solution and removal of the catheter.Outcomes Assessment: Multiple outcome measures were utilized including the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS, the Oswestry Disability Index 2.0 (ODI, employment status, and opioid intake with assessment at 3, 6

  5. Pain in Down's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Mafrica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a homeostatic mechanism that intervenes to protect the organism from harmful stimuli that could damage its integrity. It is made up of two components: the sensory-discriminative component, which identifies the provenance and characteristics of the type of pain; and the affective-motivational component, on which emotional reflexes, following the painful sensation, depend.There is a system for pain control at an encephalic and spinal level, principally made up of the periaqueductal grey matter, the periventricular area, the nucleus raphe magnus, and the pain-inhibition complex situated in the posterior horns of the spinal cord. Through the activation of these pain-control systems, the nervous system suppresses the afference of pain signals. Endogenous opioids represent another analgesic system.In the course of various studies on pain transmission in Down patients, the reduced tolerance of pain and the incapacity to give a qualitative and quantitative description emerged in a powerful way. All of these aspects cause difficulty in evaluating pain. This is linked to several learning difficulties. However, it cannot be excluded that in these anomalies of pain perception, both the anatomical and the neurotransmitter alteration, typical of this syndrome, may hold a certain importance.This fact may have important clinical repercussions that could affect the choice of therapeutic and rehabilitative schemes for treatment of pathologies in which pain is the dominant symptom, such as postoperative pain. It could influence research on analgesics that are more suitable for these patients, the evaluation of the depth of analgesia during surgical operation, and ultimately, absence of obvious pain manifestations. In conclusion, alterations of the central nervous system, neurotransmitters, pain transmission, and all related problems should be considered in the management of pain in patients with Down's syndrome, especially by algologists and

  6. Mechanisms Underlying the Analgesic Effect of Moxibustion on Visceral Pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renjia Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional bowel disorder that causes recurrent abdominal (visceral pain. Epidemiological data show that the incidence rate of IBS is as high as 25%. Most of the medications may lead to tolerance, addiction and toxic side effects. Moxibustion is an important component of traditional Chinese medicine and has been used to treat IBS-like abdominal pain for several thousand years in China. As a mild treatment, moxibustion has been widely applied in clinical treatment of visceral pain in IBS. In recent years, it has played an irreplaceable role in alternative medicine. Extensive clinical studies have demonstrated that moxibustion for treatment of visceral pain is simple, convenient, and inexpensive, and it is being accepted by an increasing number of patients. There have not been many studies investigating the analgesic mechanisms of moxibustion. Studies exploring the analgesic mechanisms have mainly focused on visceral hypersensitivity, brain-gut axis neuroendocrine system, and immune system. This paper reviews the latest developments in moxibustion use for treatment of visceral pain in IBS from these perspectives. It also evaluates potential problems in relevant studies on the mechanisms of moxibustion therapy to promote the application of moxibustion in the treatment of IBS.

  7. Mechanisms of nerve capping technique in prevention of painful neuroma formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hede Yan

    Full Text Available Nerve capping techniques have been introduced as a promising treatment modality for the treatment of painful neuroma with varied outcomes; however, its exact mechanism is still unknown. RhoA is one of the members of the RAS superfamily of GTPases that operate as molecular switches and plays an important role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Our aim was to investigate the structural and morphologic mechanisms by which the nerve capping technique prevents the formation of painful neuromas after neuroectomy. We also hoped to provide a theoretical basis for this treatment approach. An aligned nanofiber conduit was used for the capping procedure and the sciatic nerve of Sprague-Dawley rats was selected as the animal model. Behavioral analysis, extent of neuroma formation, histological assessment, expressions of pain markers of substance P and c-fos, molecular biological changes as well as ultrastructural features were investigated and compared with the findings in a no-capping control group. The formation of traumatic neuromas was significantly inhibited in the capping group with relatively "normal" structural and morphological features and no occurrence of autotomy and significantly lower expression of pain markers compared to the no-capping group. The gene expression of RhoA was consistently in a higher level in the capping group within 8 weeks after surgery. This study shows that capping technique will alter the regeneration state of transected nerves and reduce painful neuroma formation, indicating a promising approach for the treatment of painful neuroma. The initiation of the "regenerative brake" induced by structural as well as morphological improvements in the severed nerve is theorized to be most likely a key mechanism for the capping technique in the prevention of painful neuroma formation.

  8. Effect of TENS on pain in relation to central sensitization in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beckwée David

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central sensitization has recently been documented in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OAk. So far, the presence of central sensitization has not been considered as a confounding factor in studies assessing the pain inhibitory effect of tens on osteoarthritis of the knee. The purpose of this study is to explore the pain inhibitory effect of burst tens in OAk patients and to explore the prognostic value of central sensitization on the pain inhibitory effect of tens in OAk patients. Methods Patients with knee pain due to OAk will be recruited through advertisements in local media. Temporal summation, before and after a heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulation, will be measured. In addition, pain on a numeric rating score, WOMAC subscores for pain and function and global perceived effect will be assessed. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups (tens, sham tens. Follow-up measurements will be scheduled after a period of 6 and 12 weeks. Discussion Tens influences pain through the electrical stimulation of low-threshold A-beta cutaneous fibers. The responsiveness of central pain-signaling neurons of centrally sensitized OAk patients may be augmented to the input of these electrical stimuli. This would encompass an adverse therapy effect of tens. To increase treatment effectiveness it might be interesting to identify a subgroup of symptomatic OAk patients, i.e., non-sensitized patients, who are likely to benefit from burst tens. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01390285

  9. Entropy as a new measure of mechanical pain sensitivity in the masseter muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrillon, Eduardo; Sato, Hitoshi; Tanosoto, Tomohiro;

    ENTROPY AS A NEW MEASURE OF MECHANICAL PAIN SENSITIVITY IN THE MASSETER MUSCLE Author Block: E. E. Castrillon1, H. Sato2,3, T. Tanosoto4, T. Arima4, L. Baad-Hansen1, P. Svensson1, 1Clinical Oral Physiology, Århus Univ., Aarhus, Denmark, 2Dept. of Dentistry & Oral Physiology, Sch. of Med., Keio Univ.......e., entropy). Methods: Twenty healthy and pain-free subjects (10 women 25.2±4.0 and 10 men 26.5±3.2 years old) volunteered for this study. Pain levels were assessed on a 0-10 electronic visual analog scale (VAS) and the sensitivity to mechanical palpation was assessed at 15 sites (3 x 5) marked and equally....... In the glutamate session, there were significant effects of sex, time, force and site on raw NRS scores (P

  10. 疼痛共情的神经机制%Neural Mechanisms Underlying Empathy for Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程真波; 黄宇霞

    2012-01-01

    one's and others' pain in the ACC and AI and then used them as seed regions for two kinds of functional connectivity analyses. Their analyses identified clusters in the midbrain and periaqueductal gray with greater connectivity to the AI during one's own pain as opposed to other pain. The opposite pattern was found in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex that showed greater connectivity to the ACC and AI during other pain than during self pain. This demonstrated that regions showing similar activity during one's and other's pain may nonetheless be part of distinct functional networks ; these networks could not have been detected in prior work that examined overlaps between one's and other's pain in terms of average activity, but not connectivity. Empathy, however, is a complex construct consisting not only of emotional but also of cognitive and somatomotor components. The sensory dimension of pain is mainly coded in parietal sensorimotor neural structures, including the somatosensory cortices. Thus, it is entirely possible that empathy may also rely on basic resonant mechanisms that allow mapping others' sensation onto one' s own sensorimotor system. Single-pulse TM5 may provide indirect information about the sensorimotor structures involved in this mapping. The primary somatosensory cortex (S1) is involved in pain and touch shared representations by recording somatosensory-evoked potentials during the direct observation of painful and nonpainful stimuli delivered to a human model' s hand. This paper reviews the research advance in the field of the neural bases of empathy for pain from the perspective of the affective aspect and the sensory aspect respectively. Future studies should pay more attention to the research technologies, analysis methods and experimental manipulation.%疼痛是一种多维度的体验。情感成分和感觉成分是疼痛体验的主要成分,二者有着不同的神经机制。疼痛共情是痛觉“共鸣”的

  11. Solving for three-dimensional central potentials using matrix mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jugdutt, B A

    2012-01-01

    Matrix mechanics is an important component of an undergraduate education in quantum mechanics. Unfortunately it is generally taught only in the abstract, with real implementations relegated to more advanced degrees, and usually in the context of many-body physics. In this paper we present several examples of the use of matrix mechanics to solve for a number of three dimensional problems involving central forces. These include examples with which the student is familiar, such as the Coulomb interaction -- in this case we obtain excellent agreement with exact analytical methods, -- along with other interesting `non-solvable' examples, such as the Yukawa potential. Much less mathematical expertise is required for these methods, while some minimal familiarity with the usage of numerical diagonalization software is necessary.

  12. A preconditioning nerve lesion inhibits mechanical pain hypersensitivity following subsequent neuropathic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Ann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A preconditioning stimulus can trigger a neuroprotective phenotype in the nervous system - a preconditioning nerve lesion causes a significant increase in axonal regeneration, and cerebral preconditioning protects against subsequent ischemia. We hypothesized that a preconditioning nerve lesion induces gene/protein modifications, neuronal changes, and immune activation that may affect pain sensation following subsequent nerve injury. We examined whether a preconditioning lesion affects neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation after peripheral nerve injury. Results We found that a preconditioning crush injury to a terminal branch of the sciatic nerve seven days before partial ligation of the sciatic nerve (PSNL; a model of neuropathic pain induced a significant attenuation of pain hypersensitivity, particularly mechanical allodynia. A preconditioning lesion of the tibial nerve induced a long-term significant increase in paw-withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli and paw-withdrawal latency to thermal stimuli, after PSNL. A preconditioning lesion of the common peroneal induced a smaller but significant short-term increase in paw-withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli, after PSNL. There was no difference between preconditioned and unconditioned animals in neuronal damage and macrophage and T-cell infiltration into the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs or in astrocyte and microglia activation in the spinal dorsal and ventral horns. Conclusions These results suggest that prior exposure to a mild nerve lesion protects against adverse effects of subsequent neuropathic injury, and that this conditioning-induced inhibition of pain hypersensitivity is not dependent on neuroinflammation in DRGs and spinal cord. Identifying the underlying mechanisms may have important implications for the understanding of neuropathic pain due to nerve injury.

  13. Short Term Effects of Mobilization Techniques on Neck Pain and Deep Neck Flexor Muscle Endurance in Patients with Mechanical Chronic Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılınç, Hasan Erkan; Harput, Gülcan; Baltacı, Gül; İnce, Deniz İnal

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate short term effects of cervical and scapular mobilization techniques on neck pain and deep cervical muscles endurance in chronical mechanical neck pain patients. Methods: 22 chronical mechanic neck pain patients four male 18 female (mean age: mean±sd 35.59± 15.85) were included. Before treatment, neck pain level (visual analog scale) and deep neck flexor muscles endurance (in supine position with digital chronometer) of all patients were evaluated. Cyriax cervical mobilization for 10 minutes and scapular mobilization for 10 repetition 10 sets were performed to patients as treatment protocol. After treatment, 24 hours after and a week after evaluations of neck pain and deep cervical muscles endurance were repeated. Results: Before treatment Neck pain Visual Analog Scale scores was 5.78±1.43 point, 2.80±1.99 point after treatment, 24 hours later 3.36±2.12 point, one week later 3.91±2.24 point. This alteration was found significant statistically (p<0.01). Before treatment deep cervical flexor muscle endurance score was 27.25±17.74 sec, after treatment 39.46±25.20 sec, 24 hours later 38.67±28.43 and one week later 40.11±27.82 sec. This alteration was also found significant statistically (p=0.01). Conclusion: Initially neck pain scores in our subjects decreased quickly, after 24 hours these scores increased but last scores were below first neck pain level in a week follow-up. Deep neck cervical flexor muscles test scores also increased quickly, after 24 hours later this scores were stable along a week. Mobilization techniques are effective methods on neck pain and endurance in chronical mechanic neck pain patients.

  14. Dor: aspectos atuais da sensibilização periférica e central Dolor: aspectos actuales de la sensibilización periférica y central Pain: current aspects on peripheral and central sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Perpétua Carvalho Rocha

    2007-02-01

    conducción nerviosa central y periférica.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Current research has focused on the biochemical and structural plasticity of the nervous system secondary to tissue injury. The mechanisms involved in the transition from acute to chronic pain are complex and involve the interaction of receptor systems and the flow of intracellular ions, second messenger systems, and new synaptic connections. The aim of this article was to discuss the new mechanisms concerning peripheral and central sensitization. CONTENTS: Tissue injury increases the response of nociceptors, known as sensitization or facilitation. These phenomena begin after the local release of inflammatory mediators and the activation of the cells of the immune system or specific receptors in the peripheral and central nervous system. CONCLUSIONS: Tissue and neuronal lesions result in sensitization of the nociceptors and facilitation of the central and peripheral nervous conduction.

  15. A tarantula spider toxin, GsMTx4, reduces mechanical and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Pyo; Kim, Byung Moon; Koo, Jae Yeon; Cho, Hawon; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Misook; Na, Heung Sik; Oh, Uhtaek

    2008-07-01

    Mechanosensitive channels mediate various physiological functions including somatic sensation or pain. One of the peptide toxins isolated from the venom of the Chilean rose tarantula spider (Grammostola spatulata), mechanotoxin 4 (GsMTx4) is known to block stretch-activated cation channels. Since mechanosensitive channels in sensory neurons are thought to be molecular sensors for mechanotransduction, i.e., for touch, pressure, proprioception, and pain, we considered that the venom might block some types of mechanical pain. In order to prepare sufficiently large amounts of GsMTx4 for in vivo nociceptive behavioral tests, we constructed recombinant peptide of GsMTx4. Because the amino-acid sequence of the toxin, but not the nucleotide sequence, is known, we back-translated its amino-acid sequence to nucleotide sequence of yeast codons, constructed a template DNA, subcloned this into a Pichia pastoris expression vector, and purified the recombinant peptide. Intraperitoneal injection of the recombinant GsMTx4 to rats significantly increased the mechanical threshold for paw withdrawal in Randall Sellito test, eliciting significant analgesic responses to inflammation-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. GsMTx4 also reduced mechanical allodynia induced by inflammation and by sciatic nerve injury in Von Frey test. However, the venom was ineffective at changing withdrawal latency in hot plate and tail-flick tests. These results suggest that GsMTx4 selectively alleviates mechanical hyperalgesia, which it presumably achieves by blocking mechanosensitive channels. Because the peptide venom induces analgesia for some forms of mechanical pain, GsMTx4 appears to have potential clinical use as a pain treatment. PMID:18359568

  16. Dissociable neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain and anxiety? An FMRI pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Wiech

    Full Text Available The down-regulation of pain through beliefs is commonly discussed as a form of emotion regulation. In line with this interpretation, the analgesic effect has been shown to co-occur with reduced anxiety and increased activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC, which is a key region of emotion regulation. This link between pain and anxiety modulation raises the question whether the two effects are rooted in the same neural mechanism. In this pilot fMRI study, we compared the neural basis of the analgesic and anxiolytic effect of two types of threat modulation: a "behavioral control" paradigm, which involves the ability to terminate a noxious stimulus, and a "safety signaling" paradigm, which involves visual cues that signal the threat (or absence of threat that a subsequent noxious stimulus might be of unusually high intensity. Analgesia was paralleled by VLPFC activity during behavioral control. Safety signaling engaged elements of the descending pain control system, including the rostral anterior cingulate cortex that showed increased functional connectivity with the periaqueductal gray and VLPFC. Anxiety reduction, in contrast, scaled with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation during behavioral control but had no distinct neural signature during safety signaling. Our pilot data therefore suggest that analgesic and anxiolytic effects are instantiated in distinguishable neural mechanisms and differ between distinct stress- and pain-modulatory approaches, supporting the recent notion of multiple pathways subserving top-down modulation of the pain experience. Additional studies in larger cohorts are needed to follow up on these preliminary findings.

  17. Pulsed radiofrequency treatment in interventional pain management: mechanisms and potential indications-a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chua Hai Liang, N.; Vissers, K.C.P.; Sluijter, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this review is to evaluate the efficacy of Pulsed Radiofrequency (PRF) treatment in chronic pain management in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and well-designed observational studies. The physics, mechanisms of action, and biological effects are discussed to provide th

  18. The stress response to surgery: release mechanisms and the modifying effect of pain relief

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1989-01-01

    This short review updates information on the release mechanisms of the systemic response to surgical injury and the modifying effect of pain relief. Initiation of the response is primarily due to afferent nerve impulses combined with release of humoral substances (such as prostaglandins, kinins...

  19. Bright artificial light subsensitizes a central muscarinic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilsaver, S C; Majchrzak, M J

    1987-12-14

    Supersensitivity of a muscarinic mechanism is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Bright artificial light is efficacious in the treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). We studied the effect of constant bright light (11,500 lux) on the sensitivity of adult, male rats to oxotremorine, 1.5 mg/kg ip, using a repeated measures design. Oxotremorine challenges were proceeded by the injection of methylscopolamine, 1 mg/kg ip, by 30 minutes. Temperature was telemetrically measured every 10 minutes for 120 minutes starting 10 minutes after the injection of oxotremorine. Prior to and after 7 continuous days of exposure to bright light, the sample exhibited a hypothermic response of 2.50 +/- 0.48 degrees C (mean +/- SEM) and 0.29 +/- 0.31 degrees C (mean +/- SEM), respectively (p less than 0.0014). All 7 animals exhibited blunting to the thermic response to oxotremorine. Bright light also blocked the capacity of amitriptyline to supersensitize a central muscarinic mechanism. Exposure to light at an intensity of 300 lux for 7 days had no effect on the thermic response to oxotremorine. These data are consistent with the hypotheses that the biology of depression involves supersensitivity of central muscarinic mechanisms and that the effects of bright artificial light are not the consequence of shifting circadian rhythms. PMID:3695799

  20. Using the principles of interactive cartography to communicate the mechanisms of migraine pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ardis; Wilson-Pauwels, Linda; Mazierski, David; Wall, Shelley

    2008-01-01

    The program entitled 'Mapping Migraine Pain' was created based on the principles of interactive cartography to communicate the complexity of the mechanisms of migraine pain. An innovative zoom slider was developed to enhance spatial orientation and comprehension of multiple scales of information from the anatomical to the cellular and molecular levels. Think-aloud protocols were conducted with ten undergraduate first-year medical students to evaluate the significance and usability of the program. The zoom slider, based on interactive cartography, proved to be an effective and intuitive navigational element.

  1. The antalgic effects of non-invasive physical modalities on central post-stroke pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chung; Chuang, Yu-Fen; Huang, Andrew Chih-Wei; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Chang, Ya-Ju

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study systematically reviewed the antalgic effects of non-invasive physical modalities (NIPMs) on central post-stroke pain (CPSP). [Subjects and Methods] Clinical studies were sought on September 2015 in 10 electronic databases, including Medline and Scopus. The searching strings were "central pain and stroke" and "treatment, and physical or non-pharmacological". The inclusion and exclusion criteria were set for screening the clinical articles by two reviewers. Pain scores on visual analog scale in an article were used as the outcome measure for resulting judgment. The NIPMs intervention summarized from the eligible articles was rated from Levels A to C according to Evidence Classification Scheme for Therapeutic Interventions. [Results] Over 1200 articles were identified in the initial searches and 85 studies were retrieved. Sixteen studies were eligible and judged. Caloric vestibular stimulation (n=3), heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulation (n=1), and transcutaneous electrical stimulation (n=1) were rated below Level C. Transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS; n=2) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS; n=9) were rated as Level B. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that TMS and TDCS were better than other treatments for CPSP relief but the studies were of insufficient quality. PMID:27190485

  2. Untangling nociceptive, neuropathic and neuroplastic mechanisms underlying the biological domain of back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hush, Julia M; Stanton, Tasha R; Siddall, Philip; Marcuzzi, Anna; Attal, Nadine

    2013-05-01

    SUMMARY Current clinical practice guidelines advocate a model of diagnostic triage for back pain, underpinned by the biopsychosocial paradigm. However, limitations of this clinical model have become apparent: it can be difficult to classify patients into the diagnostic triage categories; patients with 'nonspecific back pain' are clearly not a homogenous group; and mean effects of treatments based on this approach are small. In this article, it is proposed that the biological domain of the biopsychosocial model needs to be reconceptualized using a neurobiological mechanism-based approach. Recent evidence about nociceptive and neuropathic contributors to back pain is outlined in the context of maladaptive neuroplastic changes of the somatosensory system. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed.

  3. Central chemoreceptors and neural mechanisms of cardiorespiratory control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Moreira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The arterial partial pressure (P CO2 of carbon dioxide is virtually constant because of the close match between the metabolic production of this gas and its excretion via breathing. Blood gas homeostasis does not rely solely on changes in lung ventilation, but also to a considerable extent on circulatory adjustments that regulate the transport of CO2 from its sites of production to the lungs. The neural mechanisms that coordinate circulatory and ventilatory changes to achieve blood gas homeostasis are the subject of this review. Emphasis will be placed on the control of sympathetic outflow by central chemoreceptors. High levels of CO2 exert an excitatory effect on sympathetic outflow that is mediated by specialized chemoreceptors such as the neurons located in the retrotrapezoid region. In addition, high CO2 causes an aversive awareness in conscious animals, activating wake-promoting pathways such as the noradrenergic neurons. These neuronal groups, which may also be directly activated by brain acidification, have projections that contribute to the CO2-induced rise in breathing and sympathetic outflow. However, since the level of activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus is regulated by converging inputs from wake-promoting systems, behavior-specific inputs from higher centers and by chemical drive, the main focus of the present manuscript is to review the contribution of central chemoreceptors to the control of autonomic and respiratory mechanisms.

  4. Electromagnetic Field Devices and Their Effects on Nociception and Peripheral Inflammatory Pain Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Christina L; Teli, Thaleia; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2016-03-01

    Context • During cell-communication processes, endogenous and exogenous signaling affects normal and pathological developmental conditions. Exogenous influences, such as extra-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) have been shown to affect pain and inflammation by modulating G-protein coupling receptors (GPCRs), downregulating cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) activity, and downregulating inflammatory modulators, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) as well as the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). EMF devices could help clinicians who seek an alternative or complementary treatment for relief of patients chronic pain and disability. Objective • The research team intended to review the literature on the effects of EMFs on inflammatory pain mechanisms. Design • We used a literature search of articles published in PubMed using the following key words: low-frequency electromagnetic field therapy, inflammatory pain markers, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), opioid receptors, G-protein coupling receptors, and enzymes. Setting • The study took place at the Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, NC, USA. Results • The mechanistic pathway most often considered for the biological effects of EMF is the plasma membrane, across which the EMF signal induces a voltage change. Oscillating EMF exerts forces on free ions that are present on both sides of the plasma membrane and that move across the cell surface through transmembrane proteins. The ions create a forced intracellular vibration that is responsible for phenomena such as the influx of extracellular calcium (Ca2+) and the binding affinity of calmodulin (CaM), which is the primary transduction pathway to the secondary messengers, cAMP and cGMP, which have been found to influence inflammatory pain. Conclusions • An emerging body of evidence indicates the existence of a frequency

  5. A connectionist modeling study of the neural mechanisms underlying pain's ability to reorient attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowman, Robert; Ritz, Benjamin; Fowler, Kathleen

    2016-08-01

    Connectionist modeling was used to investigate the brain mechanisms responsible for pain's ability to shift attention away from another stimulus modality and toward itself. Different connectionist model architectures were used to simulate the different possible brain mechanisms underlying this attentional bias, where nodes in the model simulated the brain areas thought to mediate the attentional bias, and the connections between the nodes simulated the interactions between the brain areas. Mathematical optimization techniques were used to find the model parameters, such as connection strengths, that produced the best quantitative fits of reaction time and event-related potential data obtained in our previous work. Of the several architectures tested, two produced excellent quantitative fits of the experimental data. One involved an unexpected pain stimulus activating somatic threat detectors in the dorsal posterior insula. This threat detector activity was monitored by the medial prefrontal cortex, which in turn evoked a phasic response in the locus coeruleus. The locus coeruleus phasic response resulted in a facilitation of the cortical areas involved in decision and response processes time-locked to the painful stimulus. The second architecture involved the presence of pain causing an increase in general arousal. The increase in arousal was mediated by locus coeruleus tonic activity, which facilitated responses in the cortical areas mediating the sensory, decision, and response processes involved in the task. These two neural network architectures generated competing predictions that can be tested in future studies. PMID:27112345

  6. Ethanol Increases Mechanical Pain Sensitivity in Rats via Activation of GABAA Receptors in Medial Prefrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Kai-Wen; He, Ting; Wang, Rui-Rui; Li, Chun-Li; Luo, Wen-Jun; Wu, Fang-Fang; Wang, Yan; Li, Zhen; Lu, Yun-Fei; Guan, Su-Min; Chen, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Ethanol is widely known for its ability to cause dramatic changes in emotion, social cognition, and behavior following systemic administration in humans. Human neuroimaging studies suggest that alcohol dependence and chronic pain may share common mechanisms through amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) interactions. However, whether acute administration of ethanol in the mPFC can modulate pain perception is unknown. Here we showed that bilateral microinjections of ethanol into the prelimbic and infralimbic areas of the mPFC lowered the bilateral mechanical pain threshold for 48 h without influencing thermal pain sensitivity in adult rats. However, bilateral microinjections of artificial cerebrospinal fluid into the mPFC or bilateral microinjections of ethanol into the dorsolateral PFC (also termed as motor cortex area 1 in Paxinos and Watson's atlas of The Rat Brain. Elsevier Academic Press, Amsterdam, 2005) failed to do so, suggesting regional selectivity of the effects of ethanol. Moreover, bilateral microinjections of ethanol did not change the expression of either pro-apoptotic (caspase-3 and Bax) or anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) proteins, suggesting that the dose was safe and validating the method used in the current study. To determine whether γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors are involved in mediating the ethanol effects, muscimol, a selective GABAA receptor agonist, or bicuculline, a selective GABAA receptor antagonist, was administered alone or co-administered with ethanol through the same route into the bilateral mPFC. The results showed that muscimol mimicked the effects of ethanol while bicuculline completely reversed the effects of ethanol and muscimol. In conclusion, ethanol increases mechanical pain sensitivity through activation of GABAA receptors in the mPFC of rats. PMID:27628528

  7. A possible central mechanism in autism spectrum disorders, part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, Russell L

    2008-01-01

    The autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of related neurodevelopmental disorders that have been increasing in incidence since the 1980s. Despite a considerable amount of data being collected from cases, a central mechanism has not been offered. A careful review of ASD cases discloses a number of events that adhere to an immunoexcitotoxic mechanism. This mechanism explains the link between excessive vaccination, use of aluminum and ethylmercury as vaccine adjuvants, food allergies, gut dysbiosis, and abnormal formation of the developing brain. It has now been shown that chronic microglial activation is present in autistic brains from age 5 years to age 44 years. A considerable amount of evidence, both experimental and clinical, indicates that repeated microglial activation can initiate priming of the microglia and that subsequent stimulation can produce an exaggerated microglial response that can be prolonged. It is also known that one phenotypic form of microglia activation can result in an outpouring of neurotoxic levels of the excitotoxins, glutamate and quinolinic acid. Studies have shown that careful control of brain glutamate levels is essential to brain pathway development and that excesses can result in arrest of neural migration, as well as dendritic and synaptic loss. It has also been shown that certain cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, can, via its receptor, interact with glutamate receptors to enhance the neurotoxic reaction. To describe this interaction I have coined the term immunoexcitotoxicity, which is described in this article.

  8. Spinal astrocytic activation contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Tuan Ji

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain (CNP is the major dose-limiting factor in cancer chemotherapy. However, the neural mechanisms underlying CNP remain enigmatic. Accumulating evidence implicates the involvement of spinal glia in some neuropathic pain models. In this study, using a vincristine-evoked CNP rat model with obvious mechanical allodynia, we found that spinal astrocyte rather than microglia was dramatically activated. The mechanical allodynia was dose-dependently attenuated by intrathecal administratration of L-α-aminoadipate (astrocytic specific inhibitor; whereas minocycline (microglial specific inhibitor had no such effect, indicating that spinal astrocytic activation contributes to allodynia in CNP rat. Furthermore, oxidative stress mediated the development of spinal astrocytic activation, and activated astrocytes dramatically increased interleukin-1β expression which induced N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR phosphorylation in spinal neurons to strengthen pain transmission. Taken together, our findings suggest that spinal activated astrocytes may be a crucial component of the pathophysiology of CNP and "Astrocyte-Cytokine-NMDAR-neuron" pathway may be one detailed neural mechanisms underlying CNP. Thus, inhibiting spinal astrocytic activation may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treating CNP.

  9. Cortical Mechanisms of Central Fatigue and Sense of Effort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A Sharples

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate cortical mechanisms upstream to the corticospinal motor neuron that may be associated with central fatigue and sense of effort during and after a fatigue task. We used two different isometric finger abduction protocols to examine the effects of muscle activation and fatigue the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI of 12 participants. One protocol was intended to assess the effects of muscle activation with minimal fatigue (control and the other was intended to elicit central fatigue (fatigue. We hypothesized that high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the supplementary motor area (SMA would hasten recovery from central fatigue and offset a fatigue-induced increase in sense of effort by facilitating the primary motor cortex (M1. Constant force-sensation contractions were used to assess sense of effort associated with muscle contraction. Paired-pulse TMS was used to assess intracortical inhibition (ICI and facilitation (ICF in the active M1 and interhemispheric inhibitory (IHI was assessed to determine if compensation occurs via the resting M1. These measures were made during and after the muscle contraction protocols. Corticospinal excitability progressively declined with fatigue in the active hemisphere. ICF increased at task failure and ICI was also reduced at task failure with no changes in IHI found. Although fatigue is associated with progressive reductions in corticospinal excitability, compensatory changes in inhibition and facilitation may act within, but not between hemispheres of the M1. rTMS of the SMA following fatigue enhanced recovery of maximal voluntary force and higher levels of ICF were associated with lower sense of effort following stimulation. rTMS of the SMA may have reduced the amount of upstream drive required to maintain motor output, thus contributing to a lower sense of effort and increased rate of recovery of maximal force.

  10. Cortical Mechanisms of Central Fatigue and Sense of Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharples, Simon A; Gould, Jason A; Vandenberk, Michael S; Kalmar, Jayne M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cortical mechanisms upstream to the corticospinal motor neuron that may be associated with central fatigue and sense of effort during and after a fatigue task. We used two different isometric finger abduction protocols to examine the effects of muscle activation and fatigue the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) of 12 participants. One protocol was intended to assess the effects of muscle activation with minimal fatigue (control) and the other was intended to elicit central fatigue (fatigue). We hypothesized that high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the supplementary motor area (SMA) would hasten recovery from central fatigue and offset a fatigue-induced increase in sense of effort by facilitating the primary motor cortex (M1). Constant force-sensation contractions were used to assess sense of effort associated with muscle contraction. Paired-pulse TMS was used to assess intracortical inhibition (ICI) and facilitation (ICF) in the active M1 and interhemispheric inhibitory (IHI) was assessed to determine if compensation occurs via the resting M1. These measures were made during and after the muscle contraction protocols. Corticospinal excitability progressively declined with fatigue in the active hemisphere. ICF increased at task failure and ICI was also reduced at task failure with no changes in IHI found. Although fatigue is associated with progressive reductions in corticospinal excitability, compensatory changes in inhibition and facilitation may act within, but not between hemispheres of the M1. rTMS of the SMA following fatigue enhanced recovery of maximal voluntary force and higher levels of ICF were associated with lower sense of effort following stimulation. rTMS of the SMA may have reduced the amount of upstream drive required to maintain motor output, thus contributing to a lower sense of effort and increased rate of recovery of maximal force.

  11. Pricing Mechanism Design for Centralized Pollutant Treatment with SME Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyu; Huang, Bo; Tao, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we assume that a professional pollutant treatment enterprise treats all of the pollutants emitted by multiple small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). In order to determine the treatment price, SMEs can bargain with the pollutant treatment enterprise individually, or through forming alliances. We propose a bargaining game model of centralized pollutant treatment to study how the pollutant treatment price is determined through negotiation. Then, we consider that there is a moral hazard from SMEs in centralized pollutant treatment; in other words, they may break their agreement concerning their quantities of production and pollutant emissions with the pollutant treatment enterprise. We study how the pollutant treatment enterprise can prevent this by pricing mechanism design. It is found that the pollutant treatment enterprise can prevent SMEs’ moral hazard through tiered pricing. If the marginal treatment cost of the pollutant treatment enterprise is a constant, SMEs could bargain with the pollutant treatment enterprise individually, otherwise, they should form a grand alliance to bargain with it as a whole. PMID:27338440

  12. Pricing Mechanism Design for Centralized Pollutant Treatment with SME Alliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyu; Huang, Bo; Tao, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we assume that a professional pollutant treatment enterprise treats all of the pollutants emitted by multiple small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). In order to determine the treatment price, SMEs can bargain with the pollutant treatment enterprise individually, or through forming alliances. We propose a bargaining game model of centralized pollutant treatment to study how the pollutant treatment price is determined through negotiation. Then, we consider that there is a moral hazard from SMEs in centralized pollutant treatment; in other words, they may break their agreement concerning their quantities of production and pollutant emissions with the pollutant treatment enterprise. We study how the pollutant treatment enterprise can prevent this by pricing mechanism design. It is found that the pollutant treatment enterprise can prevent SMEs' moral hazard through tiered pricing. If the marginal treatment cost of the pollutant treatment enterprise is a constant, SMEs could bargain with the pollutant treatment enterprise individually, otherwise, they should form a grand alliance to bargain with it as a whole. PMID:27338440

  13. Pain-related increase of excitatory transmission and decrease of inhibitory transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala are mediated by mGluR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neugebauer Volker

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroplasticity in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA, particularly its latero-capsular division (CeLC, is an important contributor to the emotional-affective aspects of pain. Previous studies showed synaptic plasticity of excitatory transmission to the CeLC in different pain models, but pain-related changes of inhibitory transmission remain to be determined. The CeLC receives convergent excitatory inputs from the parabrachial nucleus in the brainstem and from the basolateral amygdala (BLA. In addition, feedforward inhibition of CeA neurons is driven by glutamatergic projections from the BLA area to a cluster of GABAergic neurons in the intercalated cell masses (ITC. Using patch-clamp in rat brain slices we measured monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs and polysynaptic inhibitory currents (IPSCs that were evoked by electrical stimulation in the BLA. In brain slices from arthritic rats, input-output functions of excitatory synaptic transmission were enhanced whereas inhibitory synaptic transmission was decreased compared to control slices from normal untreated rats. A non-NMDA receptor antagonist (NBQX blocked the EPSCs and reduced the IPSCs, suggesting that non-NMDA receptors mediate excitatory transmission and also contribute to glutamate-driven feed-forward inhibition of CeLC neurons. IPSCs were blocked by a GABAA receptor antagonist (bicuculline. Bicuculline increased EPSCs under normal conditions but not in slices from arthritic rats, which indicates a loss of GABAergic control of excitatory transmission. A metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1 antagonist (LY367385 reversed both the increase of excitatory transmission and the decrease of inhibitory transmission in the arthritis pain model but had no effect on basal synaptic transmission in control slices from normal rats. The inhibitory effect of LY367385 on excitatory transmission was blocked by bicuculline suggesting the involvement of a GABAergic

  14. Effect of dexmedetomidine on mechanical pain threshold and emergence agitation after laparoscopic myomectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Qin; Xiao-Mei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of dexmedetomidine on mechanical pain threshold and emergence agitation after laparoscopic myomectomy.Methods:Random number table was used to divide 82 cases of patients who received laparoscopic myomectomy in our hospital from May 2012 to October 2014 into dexmedetomidine group (Dex group) and control group (Con group), and postoperative mechanical pain threshold and emergence agitation extent were assessed.Results: 4 h, 8 h, 12 h and 24 h after operation, mechanical pain threshold of both Dex group and Con group were significantly lower than those before operation (P<0.05) and mechanical pain threshold of Dex group 4 h, 8 h, 12 h and 24 h after operation were significantly higher than those of Con group (P<0.05); both incidence and average grade of emergence agitation of Dex group were significantly lower than those of Con group (P<0.05); serum melatonin content of Dex group in recovery period were not significantly different from those in anesthesia induction period, serum melatonin content of Con group in recovery period were significantly lower than those in anesthesia induction period, and serum melatonin content of Dex group in recovery period were significantly higher than those of Con group (P<0.05); serum cortisol content of both Dex group and Con group in recovery period were significantly higher than those before anesthesia induction and cortisol content of Dex group in recovery period was significantly lower than that of Con group (P<0.05).Conclusions:Dexmedetomidine for laparoscopic myomectomy can reduce postoperative hyperalgesia and prevent emergence agitation, and it has positive clinical value.

  15. Altered pain modulation in patients with persistent postendodontic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Khan, Junad; Benoliel, Rafael; Feng, Changyong; Yarnitsky, David; Kuo, Fengshen; Hirschberg, Craig; Hartwell, Gary; Huang, Ching-Yu; Heir, Gary; Korczeniewska, Olga; Diehl, Scott R; Eliav, Eli

    2015-10-01

    Persistent pain may follow nerve injuries associated with invasive therapeutic interventions. About 3% to 7% of the patients remain with chronic pain after endodontic treatment, and these are described as suffering from painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy (PTTN). Unfortunately, we are unable to identify which patients undergoing such procedures are at increased risk of developing PTTN. Recent findings suggest that impaired endogenous analgesia may be associated with the development of postsurgical chronic pain. We hypothesized that patients with PTTN display pronociceptive pain modulation, in line with other chronic pain disorders. Dynamic (conditioned pain modulation, temporal summation) and static (response to mechanical and cold stimulation) psychophysical tests were performed intraorally and in the forearm of 27 patients with PTTN and 27 sex- and age-matched controls. The dynamic sensory testing demonstrated less efficient conditioned pain modulation, suggesting reduced function of the inhibitory endogenous pain-modulatory system, in patients with PTTN, mainly in those suffering from the condition for more than a year. The static sensory testing of patients with PTTN demonstrated forearm hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation mainly in patients suffering from the condition for less than a year and prolonged painful sensation after intraoral cold stimulus mainly in patients suffering from the condition for more than a year. These findings suggest that PTTN is associated more with the inhibitory rather than the facilitatory arm of pain modulation and that the central nervous system has a role in PTTN pathophysiology, possibly in a time-dependent fashion. PMID:26098442

  16. Spatial and temporal activation of spinal glial cells: role of gliopathy in central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Young S; Kang, Jonghoon; Unabia, Geda C; Hulsebosch, Claire E

    2012-04-01

    In the spinal cord, neuron and glial cells actively interact and contribute to neurofunction. Surprisingly, both cell types have similar receptors, transporters and ion channels and also produce similar neurotransmitters and cytokines. The neuroanatomical and neurochemical similarities work synergistically to maintain physiological homeostasis in the normal spinal cord. However, in trauma or disease states, spinal glia become activated, dorsal horn neurons become hyperexcitable contributing to sensitized neuronal-glial circuits. The maladaptive spinal circuits directly affect synaptic excitability, including activation of intracellular downstream cascades that result in enhanced evoked and spontaneous activity in dorsal horn neurons with the result that abnormal pain syndromes develop. Recent literature reported that spinal cord injury produces glial activation in the dorsal horn; however, the majority of glial activation studies after SCI have focused on transient and/or acute time points, from a few hours to 1 month, and peri-lesion sites, a few millimeters rostral and caudal to the lesion site. In addition, thoracic spinal cord injury produces activation of astrocytes and microglia that contributes to dorsal horn neuronal hyperexcitability and central neuropathic pain in above-level, at-level and below-level segments remote from the lesion in the spinal cord. The cellular and molecular events of glial activation are not simple events, rather they are the consequence of a combination of several neurochemical and neurophysiological changes following SCI. The ionic imbalances, neuroinflammation and alterations of cell cycle proteins after SCI are predominant components for neuroanatomical and neurochemical changes that result in glial activation. More importantly, SCI induced release of glutamate, proinflammatory cytokines, ATP, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neurotrophic factors trigger activation of postsynaptic neuron and glial cells via their own receptors

  17. Advances in understanding the mechanisms and management of persistent pain in older adults†

    OpenAIRE

    Karp, J. F.; Shega, J. W.; Morone, N. E.; Weiner, D. K.

    2008-01-01

    Older adults with persistent pain are not simply a chronologically older version of younger pain patients. Pain-related disability in older adults may be driven by pain ‘homeostenosis’, that is, diminished ability to effectively respond to the stress of persistent pain. Some of the comorbidities of ageing that can contribute to pain homeostenosis include cognitive and physical impairments, increased sensitivity to suprathreshold pain stimuli, medical and psychological comorbidities, altered p...

  18. Mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of persons with cancer pain: A prospective case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Mechanism-based classification (MBC was established with current evidence and physical therapy (PT management methods for both cancer and for noncancer pain. Aims: This study aims to describe the efficacy of MBC-based PT in persons with primary complaints of cancer pain. Settings and Design: A prospective case series of patients who attended the physiotherapy department of a multispecialty university-affiliated teaching hospital. Material and Methods: A total of 24 adults (18 female, 6 male aged 47.5 ± 10.6 years, with primary diagnosis of heterogeneous group of cancer, chief complaints of chronic disabling pain were included in the study on their consent for participation The patients were evaluated and classified on the basis of five predominant mechanisms for pain. Physical therapy interventions were recommended based on mechanisms identified and home program was prescribed with a patient log to ensure compliance. Treatments were given in five consecutive weekly sessions for five weeks each of 30 min duration. Statistical Analysis Used: Pre-post comparisons for pain severity (PS and pain interference (PI subscales of Brief pain inventory-Cancer pain (BPI-CP and, European organization for research and treatment in cancer-quality of life questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30 were done using Wilcoxon signed-rank test at 95% confidence interval using SPSS for Windows version 16.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL. Results: There were statistically significant ( P < 0.05 reduction in pain severity, pain interference and total BPI-CP scores, and the EORTC-QLQ-C30. Conclusion: MBC-PT was effective for improving BPI-CP and EORTC-QLQ-C30 scores in people with cancer pain.

  19. Signaling mechanisms regulating myelination in the central nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jared T.Ahrendsen; Wendy Macklin

    2013-01-01

    The precise and coordinated production of myelin is essential for proper development and function of the nervous system.Diseases that disrupt myelin,including multiple sclerosis,cause significant functional disability.Current treatment aims to reduce the inflammatory component of the disease,thereby preventing damage resulting from demyelination.However,therapies are not yet available to improve natural repair processes after damage has already occurred.A thorough understanding of the signaling mechanisms that regulate myelin generation will improve our ability to enhance repair.In this review,we summarize the positive and negative regulators of myelination,focusing primarily on central nervous system myelination.Axon-derived signals,extracellular signals from both diffusible factors and the extracellular matrix,and intracellular signaling pathways within myelinating oligodendrocytes are discussed.Much is known about the positive regulators that drive myelination,while less is known about the negative regulators that shift active myelination to myelin maintenance at the appropriate time.Therefore,we also provide new data on potential negative regulators of CNS myelination.

  20. On the G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromers and Their Allosteric Receptor-Receptor Interactions in the Central Nervous System: Focus on Their Role in Pain Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kjell Fuxe; Tarakanov, Alexander O.; Luigi F. Agnati; Alicia Rivera; Kathleen Van Craenenbroeck; Wilber Romero-Fernandez; Dasiel O. Borroto-Escuela

    2013-01-01

    The modulatory role of allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in the pain pathways of the Central Nervous System and the peripheral nociceptors has become of increasing interest. As integrators of nociceptive and antinociceptive wiring and volume transmission signals, with a major role for the opioid receptor heteromers, they likely have an important role in the pain circuits and may be involved in acupuncture. The delta opioid receptor (DOR) exerts an antagonistic allosteric influence on ...

  1. Mindfulness Meditation-Based Pain Relief Employs Different Neural Mechanisms Than Placebo and Sham Mindfulness Meditation-Induced Analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidan, Fadel; Emerson, Nichole M.; Farris, Suzan R.; Ray, Jenna N.; Jung, Youngkyoo; McHaffie, John G.; Coghill, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation reduces pain in experimental and clinical settings. However, it remains unknown whether mindfulness meditation engages pain-relieving mechanisms other than those associated with the placebo effect (e.g., conditioning, psychosocial context, beliefs). To determine whether the analgesic mechanisms of mindfulness meditation are different from placebo, we randomly assigned 75 healthy, human volunteers to 4 d of the following: (1) mindfulness meditation, (2) placebo condition...

  2. Heightened cold pain and pressure pain sensitivity in young female adults with moderate-to-severe menstrual pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Helen; Paananen, Markus; Smith, Anne J; OʼSullivan, Peter; Briggs, Andrew M; Hickey, Martha; Mountain, Jenny; Karppinen, Jaro; Beales, Darren

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the association between menstrual pain severity and psychophysical measures of cold and pressure pain sensitivity. A cross-sectional design was used with young women (n = 432) from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Menstrual pain severity and oral contraception use was obtained from questionnaires at 20 and 22-year follow-ups. A visual analog scale (VAS; range from 0 [none] to 10 [unbearable]) was used to measure menstrual pain severity at both 20 and 22 years over the 3-year period, with 3 groups created: (1) no pain or mild pain (VAS 0-3), (2) at least moderate pain at a minimum of 1 of the 2 time points (hereafter named "mixed)", and (3) severe pain (VAS 8-10). Cold pain sensitivity (dorsal wrist) and pressure pain sensitivity (lumbar spine, upper trapezius, dorsal wrist, and tibialis anterior) were assessed using standardised quantitative sensory testing protocols. Confounding variables included number of musculoskeletal pain sites, oral contraceptive use, smoking, physical activity, body mass index, psychological distress, and sleep. Severe menstrual pain and mixed menstrual pain were positively associated with heightened cold pain sensitivity (distant from menstrual pain referral site) and pressure pain sensitivity (local to menstrual pain referral site). These associations remained significant after adjusting for potential confounding variables including multisite musculoskeletal pain. Our findings suggest peripheral and central neurophysiological mechanisms contributing to heightened pain sensitivity in young women with moderate and severe menstrual pain. These data highlight the need for innovative management approaches to attenuate the negative impact of severe menstrual pain in young women. PMID:26262827

  3. An update on pathophysiological mechanisms related to idiopathic oro-facial pain conditions with implications for management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forssell, H; Jääskeläinen, S; List, T; Svensson, P; Baad-Hansen, L

    2015-04-01

    Chronic oro-facial pain conditions such as persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP), atypical odontalgia (AO) and burning mouth syndrome (BMS), usually grouped together under the concept of idiopathic oro-facial pain, remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Lack of understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of these pain conditions is one of the important reasons behind the problems in diagnostic and management. During the last two decades, neurophysiological, psychophysical, brain imaging and neuropathological methods have been systematically applied to study the trigeminal system in idiopathic oro-facial pain. The findings in these studies have provided evidence for neuropathic involvement in the pathophysiology of PIFP, AO and BMS. The present qualitative review is a joint effort of a group of oro-facial pain specialists and researchers to appraise the literature on idiopathic oro-facial pain with special focus on the currently available studies on their pathophysiological mechanisms. The implications of the findings of these studies for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic oro-facial pain conditions are discussed. PMID:25483941

  4. Long-term experience with implanted intrathecal drug administration systems for failed back syndrome and chronic mechanical low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treharne GJ

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous intrathecal drug delivery has been shown in open studies to improve pain and quality of life in those with intractable back pain who have had spinal surgery. There is limited data on long term effects and and even less for patients with mechanical back pain without prior spinal surgery. Methods We have investigated spinal drug administration systems for patients with failed back syndrome and chronic mechanical low back pain by patient questionnaire study of the efficacy of this therapy and a case notes review. Results 36 patients (97% of 37 approached completed questionnaires, 24 with failed back syndrome and 12 with chronic mechanical low back pain. Recalled pre-treatment levels with current post-treatment levels of pain and a range of quality of life measures (recorded on 11-point numerical rating scales were compared. Pain improved significantly in both groups (Wilcoxan signed ranks test, p 0.005, Wilcoxan signed ranks test with Bonferroni correction. Diamorphine was used in all 37 patients, bupivacaine in 32, clonidine in 27 and baclofen in 3. The mean dose of diamorphine increased for the first 2 years but did not change 2–6 years post implant, averaging 4.5 mg/day. Revision surgery was required in 24% of cases, but reduced to 12% in the later years of our experience. Conclusions We conclude that spinal drug administration systems appear to be of benefit in alleviating pain in the failed back syndrome and chronic mechanical low back pain but need to be examined prospectively.

  5. New Mechanism of Bone Cancer Pain: Tumor Tissue-Derived Endogenous Formaldehyde Induced Bone Cancer Pain via TRPV1 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, You

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, our serial investigations focused on the role of cancer cells-derived endogenous formaldehyde in bone cancer pain. We found that cancer cells produced formaldehyde through demethylation process by serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT1 and SHMT2) and lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1). When the cancer cells metastasized into bone marrow, the elevated endogenous formaldehyde induced bone cancer pain through activation on the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1) in the peripheral nerve fibers. More interestingly, TRPV1 expressions in the peripheral fibers were upregulated by the local insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) produced by the activated osteoblasts. In conclusion, tumor tissue-derived endogenous formaldehyde induced bone cancer pain via TRPV1 activation. PMID:26900062

  6. [Labor pain from the viewpoint of the modern knowledge of pain physiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, R; Mundt, A

    1986-01-01

    The valuation and treatment of labor pains require complete morphological and anatomical informations about the neuronal systems concerned. A review is given about modern model conceptions in perception, modulation and transmission of pain, based on the latest knowledges in the pain research. The identification of central control- and modulation systems is very important for the actual theory of pain. Pains and also labor pains are caused as a result of complicated nerval connective principles with slim relation to endocrinological system and are also connected with a lot of individual psychical influences. Essentially, four functional stages are passed from the place of nociceptive perception to the registration in the telencephalon. These are depicted in consideration of numerous afferent and efferent, biochemical and hormonal, stimulated and inhibited modulation effects. Various pain inhibitory mechanisms, such as biogenic amines and endogenous opioids are discussed by reference to interesting aspects in new therapeutical possibilities in treatment of pain and also of labor pains.

  7. Delineating inflammatory and mechanical sub-types of low back pain: a pilot survey of fifty low back pain patients in a chiropractic setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riksman Janine S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An instrument known as the Mechanical and Inflammatory Low Back Pain (MAIL Scale was drafted using the results of a previous expert opinion study. A pilot survey was conducted to test the feasibility of a larger study designed to determine the MAIL Scale's ability to distinguish two potential subgroups of low back pain: inflammatory and mechanical. Methods Patients with a primary complaint of low back pain (LBP presenting to chiropractic clinics in Perth, Western Australia were asked to fill out the MAIL Scale questionnaire. The instrument's ability to separate patients into inflammatory and mechanical subgroups of LBP was examined using the mean score of each notional subgroup as an arbitrary cut-off point. Results Data were collected from 50 patients. The MAIL Scale did not appear to separate cases of LBP into the two notionally distinct groups of inflammatory (n = 6 or mechanical (n = 5. A larger "mixed symptom" group (n = 39 was revealed. Conclusions In this pilot study the MAIL Scale was unable to clearly discriminate between what is thought to be mechanical and inflammatory LBP in 50 cases seen in a chiropractic setting. However, the small sample size means any conclusions must be viewed with caution. Further research within a larger study population may be warranted and feasible.

  8. [Pain and fear in animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, K

    1993-02-01

    Pain and fear are feelings of reluctance, which result in a behaviour of avoidance. They are protective mechanisms and are only partly approachable to the quantification with natural scientific methods. It will pointed to the central role of the diencephalon, limbic system and the cerebral cortex concerning the processing and valuation of mental state. The recognition of clinical symptoms and precise behavioural observations are an essential aid to assess the state of pain and fear in animals.

  9. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Dustin; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen; Hargreaves, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids . Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain. PMID:27411353

  10. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical and thermal allodynia after burn injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Dustin P; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids. Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain. PMID:27411353

  11. Treatment of neuropathic pain: a new method, transdermic route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Iorno

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The therapy of neuropathic pain is difficult due to the lack of reliable classification. This pain can be defined as peripheral, central, mixed or based on the underlying mechanisms. Following this last criterium, we selected 44 patients affected by peripheral neuropathic pain. The not invasive care consisted in giving a pharmacological cocktail by a transdermal hydroelectrophoretic technique. 34% of all patients showed a pain relief between 70 and 99% (good results, while 9% had a complete resolution of pain (very good results. We concluded suggesting the transdermic hydroelectrophoretic techniques as useful and efficient in drugs administration to patients with peripheral neuropathic pain.

  12. Pain Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction Types of Pain Pain Assessment Pain Treatments Integrative Pain Therapy Pain Management Recommendations References September 04, 2016 Pain Assessment Effective pain management begins with a comprehensive ...

  13. Muscle function and origin of pain in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, R M; Jacobsen, Søren

    1994-01-01

    It may be concluded that both peripheral and central mechanisms may operate in the pathophysiology of both impaired muscle function and pain in FM. These mechanisms may in part be attributable to physical deconditioning and disuse of muscle secondary to the characteristic pain and fatigue so ofte...

  14. La estimulación eléctrica de la corteza motora para el tratamiento del dolor central y dolor periférico por desaferentización Electrical stimulation of the motor cortex for the management of central pain and peripheral pain caused by desafferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Pesudo

    2004-09-01

    published on the matter. Currently, its major indications are central pain, mainly thalamic, and trigeminal pain caused by desafferentation. The response to barbiturates without response to opiates, the relative preservation of motor and sensitive pathways and the response to transcranial magnetic stimulation predict a good result. Several methods are used to determine the area that has to be stimulated: SSEP, intraoperatory stimulation, neuronavegation, functional MRI. The stimulation parameters recommended vary according to the author. Its mechanism of action is still not well understood, but the most accepted theories are the activation of areas that modulate pain and the inhibition of the transmission of nociceptive stimuli at the medullar level.

  15. Sensory stimulation (TENS): effects of parameter manipulation on mechanical pain thresholds in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterton, Linda S; Barlas, Panos; Foster, Nadine E; Lundeberg, Thomas; Wright, Christine C; Baxter, G David

    2002-09-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a popular form of electrostimulation. Despite an extensive research base, there remains no consensus regarding the parameter selection required to achieve maximal hypoalgesic effects. The aim of this double blind, sham-controlled study was to investigate the relative hypoalgesic effects of different TENS parameters (frequency, intensity and stimulation site) upon experimentally induced mechanical pain. Two hundred and forty participants were recruited in order to provide statistical analysis with 80% power at alpha = 0.05. Subjects were randomised to one of the six TENS groups, a control, and a sham TENS group (n = 30, 15 males, 15 females, per group). TENS groups differed in their combinations of stimulation; frequency (4 or 110 Hz), intensity ('to tolerance' or 'strong but comfortable') and stimulation site (segmental--over the distribution of the radial nerve or, extrasegmental--over acupuncture point 'gall bladder 34', or a combination of both segmental and extrasegmental). Pulse duration was fixed at 200 micros. Stimulation was delivered for 30 min and subjects were then monitored for a further 30 min. Mechanical pain threshold (MPT) was measured using a pressure algometer and taken from the first dorsal interosseous muscle of the dominant hand, ipsilateral to the stimulation site. MPT measures were taken, at baseline, and at 10-min intervals for 60 min. Difference scores were analysed using repeated measures and one-way ANOVA and relevant post hoc tests. Low frequency, high intensity, extrasegmental stimulation produced a rapid onset hypoalgesic effect, which increased during the stimulation period (P < 0.0005 control and sham) and was sustained for 30 min post-stimulation (P < 0.0005(control), P = 0.024(sham)). Whilst high frequency, 'strong but comfortable' intensity, segmental stimulation produced comparable hypoalgesic levels during stimulation, this effect was not sustained post

  16. Basolateral amygdala lesion inhibits the development of pain chronicity in neuropathic pain rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronicity of pain is one of the most interesting questions in chronic pain study. Clinical and experimental data suggest that supraspinal areas responsible for negative emotions such as depression and anxiety contribute to the chronicity of pain. The amygdala is suspected to be a potential structure for the pain chronicity due to its critical role in processing negative emotions and pain information. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate whether amygdala or its subregions, the basolateral amygdala (BLA and the central medial amygdala (CeA, contributes to the pain chronicity in the spared nerve injury (SNI-induced neuropathic pain model of rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1 Before the establishment of the SNI-induced neuropathic pain model of rats, lesion of the amygdaloid complex with stereotaxic injection of ibotenic acid (IBO alleviated mechanical allodynia significantly at days 7 and 14, even no mechanical allodynia at day 28 after SNI; Lesion of the BLA, but not the CeA had similar effects; (2 however, 7 days after SNI when the neuropathic pain model was established, lesion of the amygdala complex or the BLA or the CeA, mechanical allodynia was not affected. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that BLA activities in the early stage after nerve injury might be crucial to the development of pain chronicity, and amygdala-related negative emotions and pain-related memories could promote pain chronicity.

  17. Palmitoylethanolamide Is a Disease-Modifying Agent in Peripheral Neuropathy: Pain Relief and Neuroprotection Share a PPAR-Alpha-Mediated Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Di Cesare Mannelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic syndromes which are evoked by lesions to the peripheral or central nervous system are extremely difficult to treat, and available drugs rarely joint an antihyperalgesic with a neurorestorative effect. N-Palmitoylethanolamine (PEA exerts antinociceptive effects in several animal models and inhibits peripheral inflammation in rodents. Aimed to evaluate the antineuropathic properties of PEA, a damage of the sciatic nerve was induced in mice by chronic constriction injury (CCI and a subcutaneous daily treatment with 30 mg kg−1 PEA was performed. On the day 14, PEA prevented pain threshold alterations. Histological studies highlighted that CCI induced oedema and an important infiltrate of CD86 positive cells in the sciatic nerve. Moreover, osmicated preparations revealed a decrease in axon diameter and myelin thickness. Repeated treatments with PEA reduced the presence of oedema and macrophage infiltrate, and a significant higher myelin sheath, axonal diameter, and a number of fibers were observable. In PPAR-α null mice PEA treatment failed to induce pain relief as well as to rescue the peripheral nerve from inflammation and structural derangement. These results strongly suggest that PEA, via a PPAR-α-mediated mechanism, can directly intervene in the nervous tissue alterations responsible for pain, starting to prevent macrophage infiltration.

  18. Are There Abnormalities in Peripheral and Central Components of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puta, Christian; Franz, Marcel; Blume, Kathrin R.; Gabriel, Holger H. W.; Miltner, Wolfgang H. R.; Weiss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) was shown to be associated with longer reflex response latencies of trunk muscles during external upper limb perturbations. One theoretical, but rarely investigated possibility for longer reflex latencies might be related to modulated somatosensory information processing. Therefore, the present study investigated somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) to median nerve stimulation in CLBP patients and healthy controls (HC). Latencies of the peripheral N9 SEP component were used as the primary outcome. In addition, latencies and amplitudes of the central N20 SEP component, sensory thresholds, motor thresholds and nerve conduction velocity were also analyzed in CLBP patients and HC. There is a trend for the CLBP patients to exhibit longer N9 latencies at the ipsilateral Erb’s point compared to HC. This trend is substantiated by significantly longer N9 latencies in CLBP patients compared to normative data. None of the other parameters showed any significant difference between CLBP patients and HC. Overall, our data indicate small differences of the peripheral N9 SEP component; however, these differences cannot explain the reflex delay observed in CLBP patients. While it was important to rule out the contribution of early somatosensory processing and to elucidate its contribution to the delayed reflex responses in CLBP patients, further research is needed to find the primary source(s) of time-delayed reflexes in CLBP. PMID:27799904

  19. Mechanisms of low back pain: a guide for diagnosis and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegri, Massimo; Montella, Silvana; Salici, Fabiana; Valente, Adriana; Marchesini, Maurizio; Compagnone, Christian; Baciarello, Marco; Manferdini, Maria Elena; Fanelli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a chronic pain syndrome in the lower back region, lasting for at least 3 months. CLBP represents the second leading cause of disability worldwide being a major welfare and economic problem. The prevalence of CLBP in adults has increased more than 100% in the last decade and continues to increase dramatically in the aging population, affecting both men and women in all ethnic groups, with a significant impact on functional capacity and occupational activities. It can also be influenced by psychological factors, such as stress, depression and/or anxiety. Given this complexity, the diagnostic evaluation of patients with CLBP can be very challenging and requires complex clinical decision-making. Answering the question “what is the pain generator” among the several structures potentially involved in CLBP is a key factor in the management of these patients, since a mis-diagnosis can generate therapeutical mistakes. Traditionally, the notion that the etiology of 80% to 90% of LBP cases is unknown has been mistaken perpetuated across decades. In most cases, low back pain can be attributed to specific pain generator, with its own characteristics and with different therapeutical opportunity. Here we discuss about radicular pain, facet Joint pain, sacro-iliac pain, pain related to lumbar stenosis, discogenic pain. Our article aims to offer to the clinicians a simple guidance to identify pain generators in a safer and faster way, relying a correct diagnosis and further therapeutical approach.

  20. Mechanisms of low back pain: a guide for diagnosis and therapy [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Allegri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (CLBP is a chronic pain syndrome in the lower back region, lasting for at least 3 months. CLBP represents the second leading cause of disability worldwide being a major welfare and economic problem. The prevalence of CLBP in adults has increased more than 100% in the last decade and continues to increase dramatically in the aging population, affecting both men and women in all ethnic groups, with a significant impact on functional capacity and occupational activities. It can also be influenced by psychological factors, such as stress, depression and/or anxiety. Given this complexity, the diagnostic evaluation of patients with CLBP can be very challenging and requires complex clinical decision-making. Answering the question “what is the pain generator” among the several structures potentially involved in CLBP is a key factor in the management of these patients, since a mis-diagnosis can generate therapeutical mistakes. Traditionally, the notion that the etiology of 80% to 90% of LBP cases is unknown has been mistaken perpetuated across decades. In most cases, low back pain can be attributed to specific pain generator, with its own characteristics and with different therapeutical opportunity. Here we discuss about radicular pain, facet Joint pain, sacro-iliac pain, pain related to lumbar stenosis, discogenic pain. Our article aims to offer to the clinicians a simple guidance to identify pain generators in a safer and faster way, relying a correct diagnosis and further therapeutical approach.

  1. Involvement of medullary GABAergic system in extraterritorial neuropathic pain mechanisms associated with inferior alveolar nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Nakaya, Yuka; Imamura, Yoshiki; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Shinoda, Masamichi; Kita, Kozue; Sessle, Barry J; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-05-01

    In order to determine if the functional changes in the GABAergic system in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) are involved in the mechanisms underlying extraterritorial neuropathic pain in the orofacial region following inferior alveolar nerve transection (IANX), mechanical noxious behavior, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) immunohistochemistry and single neuronal activity were analyzed in vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-VenusA rats expressing fluorescent protein and the VGAT in Vc neurons. The number of VGAT-VenusA positive neurons was significantly reduced in IANX rats than naive and sham rats at 7days after nerve transection. The number of VGAT-VenusA positive pERK-immunoreactive (IR) cells was significantly increased in IANX rats at 21days after IAN transection compared with naive and sham rats. The background activity and mechanical-evoked responses of Vc nociceptive neurons were significantly depressed after intrathecal application of the GABA receptor agonist muscimol in sham rats but not in IANX rats. Furthermore, the expression of potassium-chloride co-transporter 2 (KCC2) in the Vc was significantly reduced in IANX rats compared with sham rats. The head-withdrawal threshold (HWT) to mechanical stimulation of the whisker pad skin was significantly decreased in IANX rats compared with sham rats on days 7 and 21 after IANX. The significant reduction of the HWT and significant increase in the number of VGAT-VenusA negative pERK-IR cells were observed in KCC2 blocker R-DIOA-injected rats compared with vehicle-injected rats on day 21 after sham treatment. These findings revealed that GABAergic Vc neurons might be reduced in their number at the early period after IANX and the functional changes might occur in GABAergic neurons from inhibitory to excitatory at the late period after IANX, suggesting that the neuroplastic changes occur in the GABAergic neuronal network in the Vc due to morphological and functional changes at

  2. TNFα secretion of monocytes exposed to pulsed radiofrequency treatment: a possible working mechanism of PRF chronic pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maretto, Fabio; Vennik, Marco; Albers, Kim I; van Duijn, Bert

    2014-06-01

    Pulsed radiofrequency treatment (PRF) is a promising new technique increasingly used in treatment of chronic pain. The molecular working mechanism of PRF is not exactly known and is currently being investigated. This study investigates a possible role of PRF-induced modulation of TNFα secretion by differentiated monocytes in chronic pain management. The results show no significant PRF-induced change in TNFα secretion of lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated monocytes. However, PRF does significantly increase TNFα secretion of differentiated monocytes that have not been stimulated with LPS. This may indicate a possible role of PRF treatment in increasing TNFα production of nonstimulated monocytes. More research is needed to determine whether this is truly a part of the working mechanism of PRF in chronic pain management and which other factors are involved.

  3. The Neurobiology of Orofacial Pain and Sleep and Their Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, G J; Sessle, B J

    2016-09-01

    This article provides an overview of the neurobiology of orofacial pain as well as the neural processes underlying sleep, with a particular focus on the mechanisms that underlie pain and sleep interactions including sleep disorders. Acute pain is part of a hypervigilance system that alerts the individual to injury or potential injury of tissues. It can also disturb sleep. Disrupted sleep is often associated with chronic pain states, including those that occur in the orofacial region. The article presents many insights that have been gained in the last few decades into the peripheral and central mechanisms involved in orofacial pain and its modulation, as well as the circuits and processes in the central nervous system that underlie sleep. Although it has become clear that sleep is essential to preserve and maintain health, it has also been found that pain, particularly chronic pain, is commonly associated with disturbed sleep. In the presence of chronic pain, a circular relationship may prevail, with mutual deleterious influences causing an increase in pain and a disruption of sleep. This article also reviews findings that indicate that reducing orofacial pain and improving sleep need to be targeted together in the management of acute to chronic orofacial pain states in order to improve an orofacial pain patient's quality of life, to prevent mood alterations or exacerbation of sleep disorder (e.g., insomnia, sleep-disordered breathing) that can negatively affect their pain, and to promote healing and optimize their health. PMID:27154736

  4. Neuropathic pain therapy: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backonja, Miroslav Misha

    2012-07-01

    Neuropathic pain is a result of complex interactions between peripheral and central mechanisms with multiple potential therapeutic targets. However, the complexity of these mechanisms and relative youth of translational pain research, which is in its infancy, have prevented translation of successful basic bench research to human therapy. Most of the clinically available neuropathic pain treatments are borrowed from other therapeutic areas, such as antidepressants and antiepileptics, or involve application of older therapy, such as opioids. Exceptions are ziconotide, tapentadol, and the high-concentration capsaicin patch. Similar to all other analgesic agents, these provide only partial pain relief in subsets of patients. The standard of care for patients with chronic neuropathic pain is multimodal and multidisciplinary. For most patients to achieve and maintain satisfactory pain relief a combination of therapeutic agents is necessary, providing the empiric basis for rational polypharmacy, which has become a standard approach as well. PMID:23117951

  5. Proteomic Identification of Altered Cerebral Proteins in the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Francis Sahngun Nahm; Zee-Yong Park; Sang-Soep Nahm; Yong Chul Kim; Pyung Bok Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder. Although the exact pathophysiology of CRPS is not fully understood, central and peripheral mechanisms might be involved in the development of this disorder. To reveal the central mechanism of CRPS, we conducted a proteomic analysis of rat cerebrum using the chronic postischemia pain (CPIP) model, a novel experimental model of CRPS. Materials and Methods. After generating the CPIP animal model, we perfo...

  6. Mechanical pain sensitivity of deep tissues in children - possible development of myofascial trigger points in children

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    Han Ting-I

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is still unclear when latent myofascial trigger points (MTrPs develop during early life. This study is designed to investigate the mechanical pain sensitivity of deep tissues in children in order to see the possible timing of the development of latent MTrPs and attachment trigger points (A-TrPs in school children. Methods Five hundreds and five healthy school children (age 4- 11 years were investigated. A pressure algometer was used to measure the pressure pain threshold (PPT at three different sites in the brachioradialis muscle: the lateral epicondyle at elbow (site A, assumed to be the A-TrP site, the mid-point of the muscle belly (site B, assumed to be the MTrP site, and the muscle-tendon junction as a control site (site C. Results The results showed that, for all children in this study, the mean PPT values was significantly lower (p p Conclusions It is concluded that a child had increased sensitivity at the tendon attachment site and the muscle belly (endplate zone after age of 4 years. Therefore, it is likely that a child may develop an A-Trp and a latent MTrP at the brachioradialis muscle after the age of 4 years. The changes in sensitivity, or the development for these trigger points, may not be related to the activity level of children aged 7-11 years. Further investigation is still required to indentify the exact timing of the initial occurrence of a-Trps and latent MTrPs.

  7. Experimental human pain models in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and unexplained chest pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asbj(φ)rn Mohr Drewes; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Peter Funch-Jensen; Hans Gregersen

    2006-01-01

    Methods related to experimental human pain research aim at activating different nociceptors, evoke pain from different organs and activate specific pathways and mechanisms. The different possibilities for using mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical methods in visceral pain research are discussed with emphasis of combinations (e.g., the multimodal approach). The methods have been used widely in assessment of pain mechanisms in the esophagus and have contributed to our understanding of the symptoms reported in these patients. Hence abnormal activation and plastic changes of central pain pathways seem to play a major role in the symptoms in some patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in patients with functional chest pain of esophageal origin. These findings may lead to an alternative approach for treatment in patients that does not respond to conventional medical or surgical therapy.

  8. Fluid mechanics in dentinal microtubules provides mechanistic insights into the difference between hot and cold dental pain.

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    Min Lin

    Full Text Available Dental thermal pain is a significant health problem in daily life and dentistry. There is a long-standing question regarding the phenomenon that cold stimulation evokes sharper and more shooting pain sensations than hot stimulation. This phenomenon, however, outlives the well-known hydrodynamic theory used to explain dental thermal pain mechanism. Here, we present a mathematical model based on the hypothesis that hot or cold stimulation-induced different directions of dentinal fluid flow and the corresponding odontoblast movements in dentinal microtubules contribute to different dental pain responses. We coupled a computational fluid dynamics model, describing the fluid mechanics in dentinal microtubules, with a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model, describing the discharge behavior of intradental neuron. The simulated results agreed well with existing experimental measurements. We thence demonstrated theoretically that intradental mechano-sensitive nociceptors are not "equally sensitive" to inward (into the pulp and outward (away from the pulp fluid flows, providing mechanistic insights into the difference between hot and cold dental pain. The model developed here could enable better diagnosis in endodontics which requires an understanding of pulpal histology, neurology and physiology, as well as their dynamic response to the thermal stimulation used in dental practices.

  9. Fluid Mechanics in Dentinal Microtubules Provides Mechanistic Insights into the Difference between Hot and Cold Dental Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Min; Luo, Zheng Yuan; Bai, Bo Feng; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2011-01-01

    Dental thermal pain is a significant health problem in daily life and dentistry. There is a long-standing question regarding the phenomenon that cold stimulation evokes sharper and more shooting pain sensations than hot stimulation. This phenomenon, however, outlives the well-known hydrodynamic theory used to explain dental thermal pain mechanism. Here, we present a mathematical model based on the hypothesis that hot or cold stimulation-induced different directions of dentinal fluid flow and the corresponding odontoblast movements in dentinal microtubules contribute to different dental pain responses. We coupled a computational fluid dynamics model, describing the fluid mechanics in dentinal microtubules, with a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model, describing the discharge behavior of intradental neuron. The simulated results agreed well with existing experimental measurements. We thence demonstrated theoretically that intradental mechano-sensitive nociceptors are not “equally sensitive” to inward (into the pulp) and outward (away from the pulp) fluid flows, providing mechanistic insights into the difference between hot and cold dental pain. The model developed here could enable better diagnosis in endodontics which requires an understanding of pulpal histology, neurology and physiology, as well as their dynamic response to the thermal stimulation used in dental practices. PMID:21448459

  10. The Evaluation of Satisfaction Level of Stability Training Exercises in the Patients with Mechanical Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain

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    N. Karimi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: There is limited evidence on chronic low back patients' perception and satisfaction of the treatment with spinal stabilization exercises and their overall experience of the treatment program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the satisfaction level of patients with mechanical nonspecific chronic low back pain after participating in a stability training program. Materials & Methods: At first, a methodological study was designed to develop a satisfaction questionnaire, and then content validity and test-retest reliability of it were determined. All patients (n=43 participated in a stability training program within a randomized controlled trial. Finally they filled in satisfaction questionnaire. Results: Distribution of demographic variables were normal (P>0.43. 53.5% of the patients had solitary type occupations. 58.1% had history of sport activities. Also, pain location and extension in 46.5% and 65.2% were in lumbar region only. After stability training program, pain decreased (p<0.001 and functional ability as Oswestry and Quebec scales scores increased (p<0.002 significantly. Overall score of satisfaction questionnaire was 16±4.07.Conclusion: Patients with chronic mechanical low back pain were satisfied after participation in stability training program. Pain reduction and better functional ability may be two factors contributing to the satisfaction of these patients.

  11. Stodder: Mechanisms and Trends in the Decline of the Costanoan Indian Population of Central California

    OpenAIRE

    Milliken, Randall

    1987-01-01

    Mechanisms and Trends in the Decline of the Costanoan Indian population of Central California Ann Lucy Wiener Stodder. Salinas: Coyote Press Archives of California Prehistory No. 4, 1986, vi+ 78 pp., 5 figures, 11 tables, bibliography, $4.95 (paper).

  12. Spinal mechanical load as a risk factor for low back pain: A systematic review of prospective cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W.P. Bakker; A.P. Verhagen; E. van Trijffel; C. Lucas; B.W. Koes

    2009-01-01

    Study Design. Systematic review. Objective. To review and critically evaluate the past literature for spinal mechanical load as risk factor for low back pain (LBP). Summary of Background Data. LBP is a costly health problem worldwide, and treatments are often unsuccessful. Therefore, prevention migh

  13. Alcohol-induced headaches: Evidence for a central mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panconesi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic drinks (ADs) have been reported as a migraine trigger in about one-third of the migraine patients in retrospective studies. Some studies found that ADs trigger also other primary headaches. The studies concerning the role of ADs in triggering various types of primary headaches published after the International Headache Society classification criteria of 1988 were reviewed, and the pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. Many studies show that ADs are a trigger of migraine without aura (MO), migraine with aura (MA), cluster headache (CH), and tension-type headache (TH). While data on MO and CH are well delineated, those in MA and TH are discordant. There are sparse reports that ADs are also triggers of less frequent types of primary headache such as familial hemiplegic migraine, hemicrania continua, and paroxysmal hemicrania. However, in some countries, the occurrence of alcohol as headache trigger is negligible, perhaps determined by alcohol habits. The frequency estimates vary widely based on the study approach and population. In fact, prospective studies report a limited importance of ADs as migraine trigger. If ADs are capable of triggering practically all primary headaches, they should act at a common pathogenetic level. The mechanisms of alcohol-provoking headache were discussed in relationship to the principal pathogenetic theories of primary headaches. The conclusion was that vasodilatation is hardly compatible with ADs trigger activity of all primary headaches and a common pathogenetic mechanism at cortical, or more likely at subcortical/brainstem, level is more plausible.

  14. Alcohol-induced headaches: Evidence for a central mechanism?

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    Alessandro Panconesi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic drinks (ADs have been reported as a migraine trigger in about one-third of the migraine patients in retrospective studies. Some studies found that ADs trigger also other primary headaches. The studies concerning the role of ADs in triggering various types of primary headaches published after the International Headache Society classification criteria of 1988 were reviewed, and the pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. Many studies show that ADs are a trigger of migraine without aura (MO, migraine with aura (MA, cluster headache (CH, and tension-type headache (TH. While data on MO and CH are well delineated, those in MA and TH are discordant. There are sparse reports that ADs are also triggers of less frequent types of primary headache such as familial hemiplegic migraine, hemicrania continua, and paroxysmal hemicrania. However, in some countries, the occurrence of alcohol as headache trigger is negligible, perhaps determined by alcohol habits. The frequency estimates vary widely based on the study approach and population. In fact, prospective studies report a limited importance of ADs as migraine trigger. If ADs are capable of triggering practically all primary headaches, they should act at a common pathogenetic level. The mechanisms of alcohol-provoking headache were discussed in relationship to the principal pathogenetic theories of primary headaches. The conclusion was that vasodilatation is hardly compatible with ADs trigger activity of all primary headaches and a common pathogenetic mechanism at cortical, or more likely at subcortical/brainstem, level is more plausible.

  15. Neurophysiological mechanisms in acceptance and commitment therapy in opioid-addicted patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Rachel F; Potter, Jennifer S; Robin, Donald A

    2016-04-30

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has been effectively utilized to treat both chronic pain and substance use disorder independently. Given these results and the vital need to treat the comorbidity of the two disorders, a pilot ACT treatment was implemented in individuals with comorbid chronic pain and opioid addiction. This pilot study supported using neurophysiology to characterize treatment effects and revealed that, following ACT, participants with this comorbidity exhibited reductions in brain activation due to painful stimulus and in connectivity at rest.

  16. The influence of a series of five dry cupping treatments on pain and mechanical thresholds in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain - a randomised controlled pilot study

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    Dobos Gustav J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this preliminary trial we investigated the effects of dry cupping, an ancient method for treating pain syndromes, on patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Sensory mechanical thresholds and the participants' self-reported outcome measures of pain and quality of life were evaluated. Methods Fifty patients (50.5 ± 11.9 years were randomised to a treatment group (TG or a waiting-list control group (WL. Patients in the TG received a series of 5 cupping treatments over a period of 2 weeks; the control group did not. Self-reported outcome measures before and after the cupping series included the following: Pain at rest (PR and maximal pain related to movement (PM on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS, pain diary (PD data on a 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS, Neck Disability Index (NDI, and health-related quality of life (SF-36. In addition, the mechanical-detection thresholds (MDT, vibration-detection thresholds (VDT, and pressure-pain thresholds (PPT were determined at pain-related and control areas. Results Patients of the TG had significantly less pain after cupping therapy than patients of the WL group (PR: Δ-22.5 mm, p = 0.00002; PM: Δ-17.8 mm, p = 0.01. Pain diaries (PD revealed that neck pain decreased gradually in the TG patients and that pain reported by the two groups differed significantly after the fifth cupping session (Δ-1.1, p = 0.001. There were also significant differences in the SF-36 subscales for bodily pain (Δ13.8, p = 0.006 and vitality (Δ10.2, p = 0.006. Group differences in PPT were significant at pain-related and control areas (all p Conclusions A series of five dry cupping treatments appeared to be effective in relieving chronic non-specific neck pain. Not only subjective measures improved, but also mechanical pain sensitivity differed significantly between the two groups, suggesting that cupping has an influence on functional pain processing. Trial registration The trial was registered at

  17. A clinical genetic method to identify mechanisms by which pain causes depression and anxiety

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    Pao Maryland

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain patients are often depressed and anxious, and benefit less from psychotropic drugs than pain-free patients. We hypothesize that this partial resistance is due to the unique neurochemical contribution to mood by afferent pain projections through the spino-parabrachial-hypothalamic-amygdalar systems and their projections to other mood-mediating systems. New psychotropic drugs for pain patients might target molecules in such brain systems. We propose a method to prioritize molecular targets by studying polymorphic genes in cohorts of patients undergoing surgical procedures associated with a variable pain relief response. We seek molecules that show a significant statistical interaction between (1 the amount of surgical pain relief, and (2 the alleles of the gene, on depression and anxiety during the first postoperative year. Results We collected DNA from 280 patients with sciatica due to a lumbar disc herniation, 162 treated surgically and 118 non-surgically, who had been followed for 10 years in the Maine Lumbar Spine Study, a large, prospective, observational study. In patients whose pain was reduced >25% by surgery, symptoms of depression and anxiety, assessed with the SF-36 Mental Health Scale, improved briskly at the first postoperative measurement. In patients with little or no surgical pain reduction, mood scores stayed about the same on average. There was large inter-individual variability at each level of residual pain. Polymorphisms in three pre-specified pain-mood candidate genes, catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT, serotonin transporter, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF were not associated with late postoperative mood or with a pain-gene interaction on mood. Although the sample size did not provide enough power to persuasively search through a larger number of genes, an exploratory survey of 25 other genes provides illustrations of pain-gene interactions on postoperative mood – the mu opioid

  18. Efficacy of two cannabis based medicinal extracts for relief of central neuropathic pain from brachial plexus avulsion: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jonathan S; Symonds, Catherine; Birch, Rolfe

    2004-12-01

    The objective was to investigate the effectiveness of cannabis-based medicines for treatment of chronic pain associated with brachial plexus root avulsion. This condition is an excellent human model of central neuropathic pain as it represents an unusually homogenous group in terms of anatomical location of injury, pain descriptions and patient demographics. Forty-eight patients with at least one avulsed root and baseline pain score of four or more on an 11-point ordinate scale participated in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three period crossover study. All patients had intractable symptoms regardless of current analgesic therapy. Patients entered a baseline period of 2 weeks, followed by three, 2-week treatment periods during each of which they received one of three oromucosal spray preparations. These were placebo and two whole plant extracts of Cannabis sativa L.: GW-1000-02 (Sativex), containing Delta(9)tetrahydrocannabinol (THC):cannabidiol (CBD) in an approximate 1:1 ratio and GW-2000-02, containing primarily THC. The primary outcome measure was the mean pain severity score during the last 7 days of treatment. Secondary outcome measures included pain related quality of life assessments. The primary outcome measure failed to fall by the two points defined in our hypothesis. However, both this measure and measures of sleep showed statistically significant improvements. The study medications were generally well tolerated with the majority of adverse events, including intoxication type reactions, being mild to moderate in severity and resolving spontaneously. Studies of longer duration in neuropathic pain are required to confirm a clinically relevant, improvement in the treatment of this condition. PMID:15561385

  19. The central mechanisms of secretin in regulating multiple behaviors

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    Li eZhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Secretin (SCT was firstly discovered as a gut peptide hormone in stimulating pancreatic secretion, while its novel neuropeptide role has drawn substantial research interests in recent years. SCT and its receptor (SCTR are widely expressed in different brain regions, where they exert multiple cellular functions including neurotransmission, gene expression regulation, neurogenesis and neural protection. As all these neural functions ultimately can affect behaviors, it is hypothesized that SCT controls multiple behavioral paradigms. Current findings support this hypothesis as SCT-SCTR axis participates in modulating social interaction, spatial learning, water and food intake, motor coordination and motor learning behaviors. This mini-review focuses on various aspects of SCT and SCTR in hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum including distribution profiles, cellular functions and behavioral phenotypes to elucidate the link between cellular mechanisms and behavioral control.

  20. Evaluation of milnacipran, in comparison with amitriptyline, on cold and mechanical allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocoso, Esther; Mico, Juan-Antonio; Vitton, Olivier; Ladure, Philippe; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Depoortère, Ronan; Bardin, Laurent

    2011-03-25

    Milnacipran, a serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), has shown efficacy against several chronic pain conditions, including fibromyalgia. Here, we evaluated, in rats, its anti-allodynic effects following acute or sub-chronic treatment in a model of neuropathic pain (chronic constriction injury, CCI, of the sciatic nerve). Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant active pre-clinically and clinically against neuropathic pains, was added as a comparison compound. Upon acute i.p. administration, milnacipran was potently efficacious in the CCI model. It significantly reduced thermal allodynia in the cold (4°C) plate test (MED=2.5mg/kg), and attenuated mechanical allodynia in the von Frey filaments test (MED=10mg/kg). Given sub-chronically (7day, b.i.d.), milnacipran was effective at 10mg/kgi.p. in both tests. Acute amitriptyline (10mg/kgi.p.) was efficacious against mechanical, but less so against cold allodynia; under sub-chronic conditions, it was only active against mechanical allodynia. These data show that milnacipran is as efficacious as the reference compound amitriptyline in a pre-clinical model of injury-induced neuropathy, and demonstrate for the first time that it is active acutely and sub-chronically against cold allodynia. They also suggest that milnacipran has the potential to alleviate allodynia associated with nerve compression-induced neuropathic pain in the clinic (for example following discal hernia, avulsion or cancer-induced tissue damage). PMID:21277295

  1. Comparing Physical Therapy Accompanying Exercise with Only Exercise Treatments in Patients with Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain

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    Özlem Yılmaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Investigating and comparing the effects of exercise and physical therapy accompanying exercise treatments in patients with chronic low back pain. Materials and Methods: Twenty three patients with mechanical type low back existing more than 3 months were included one of the exercise or the physical therapy+exercise groups according to their application sequence. Both of the groups performed lumbar flexion and extension exercises, strengthening of the lumbar and abdominal muscle exercises and iliopsoas, hamstring and quadriceps stretching exercises two times a day for 14 days. The physical therapy group was given hot pack+therapeutic ultrasound+ interferential current for 10 days additionally. Degree of the low back pain was evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS, range of joint motion was evaluated with hand finger floor distance (HFFD and Modified Schober test, functional status was evaluated with Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale and quality of life was evaluated with Short form-36 (SF-36 before and a month after the treatments. Results: In both groups (exercise group: average age 59 years, 21 females, 2 males; physical therapy group: average age 60 years, 20 females, 3 males pain intensity and HFFD decreased and Modified Schober increased, functionality recovered, pain and physical functions of SF-36 improved after the treatments. SF-36-physical role difficulty also improved in the exercise group. Decrease in pain, increase in HFFD andimproving of the functional status were all significantly more in the physical therapy group. There were no difference between the groups in terms of Modified Schober measurement and changes of the quality of life. Conclusions: Exercises and exercise+physical therapy are both effective in chronic low back pain. Successful results can be taken by addition of the physical therapy in patients who do not benefit sufficiently from exercise therapy. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2015;21: 73-8

  2. Pavlovian conditioning of opioid and nonopioid pain inhibitory mechanisms in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor, Herta; Birbaumer, Niels; Schulz, Robin; Grüsser, Sabine M; Mucha, Ronald F

    2002-01-01

    Learning processes such as respondent or Pavlovian conditioning are believed to play an important role in the development of chronic pain, however, their influence on the inhibition of pain has so far not been assessed in humans. The purpose of this study was the demonstration of Pavlovian conditioning of stress-induced analgesia in humans and the determination of its opioid mediation. In a differential classical conditioning paradigm two different auditory stimuli served as conditioned stimuli and mental arithmetic plus white noise as unconditioned stimulus. Subsequent to four conditioning trials naloxone or placebo was applied in a double-blind fashion on two test days. Both pain threshold and pain tolerance showed conditioned stress-induced analgesia. Pain tolerance was affected by naloxone whereas pain threshold was not. The data of this study show that stress analgesia can be conditioned in humans and that it is at least partially mediated by the endogenous opioid system. Learning processes also influence pain inhibitory processes in humans and this effect might play a role in the development of chronic pain.

  3. ANALYSIS OF THE PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS OF CHRONIC JOINT PAIN IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

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    E. S. Filatova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal neurogenic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic pain syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and knee osteoarthritis (OA in order to develop individualized pharmacotherapy.Subjects and methods. One hundred and eighty-three patients with RA and 80 with knee OA were examined. By using the neuropathic pain diagnostic questionnaire (DN4, all the patients were divided into 2 groups with and without a neuropathic pain component (NPC.Results. NPC was found in 43% of the patients with RA and it was connected with involvement of the peripheral somatosensory system. In RA, NPC was common in older patients with longer disease duration, higher X-ray stage, and severe functional insufficiency. 30% of patients with knee OA also had NPC, however the signs of nervous system involvement were absent. In OA, NPC was associated with hyperalgesia, higher pain intensity, more marked joint dysfunction on the WOMAC, and anxiety.Discussion. This investigation revealed a mixed pattern of chronic pain syndrome in patients with RA and knee OA; some patients were found to have a NPC in the presence of predominantly a nociceptive component

  4. Utility of Stellate Ganglion Block in Atypical Facial Pain: A Case Report and Consideration of Its Possible Mechanisms

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    Harsha Shanthanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present this report of a young patient with chronic severe atypical facial pain who was successfully controlled with stellate ganglion block under ultrasound guidance. The patient had a history of severe disabling, unilateral, facial neuropathic pain with minimal response to analgesic medications. Upon assessment the patient had features suggestive of trigeminal neuralgia, although postherpetic neuralgia could not be ruled out. As a diagnostic test intervention, stellate ganglion block was tried under ultrasound guidance. The patient showed significant improvement in pain control and functional disability lasting beyond 10 weeks. Subsequent blocks reinforced the analgesia. Atypical facial pain has several differential diagnoses. The involvement of sympathetic system in its causation or sustenance is uncertain. Stellate ganglion block achieves sympathetic block of cervicofacial structures, and its blockade has been shown to affect chronic pain conditions. Although its mechanism is not clear, one has to consider its possible role in conditions of stress apart from directly controlling the sympathetic activity. There is certainly a role in exploring the potential benefits of stellate ganglion block in such clinical conditions. The technique of stellate block under ultrasound is also described, as it influences the safety and precision of the block.

  5. Utility of stellate ganglion block in atypical facial pain: a case report and consideration of its possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanthanna, Harsha

    2013-01-01

    We present this report of a young patient with chronic severe atypical facial pain who was successfully controlled with stellate ganglion block under ultrasound guidance. The patient had a history of severe disabling, unilateral, facial neuropathic pain with minimal response to analgesic medications. Upon assessment the patient had features suggestive of trigeminal neuralgia, although postherpetic neuralgia could not be ruled out. As a diagnostic test intervention, stellate ganglion block was tried under ultrasound guidance. The patient showed significant improvement in pain control and functional disability lasting beyond 10 weeks. Subsequent blocks reinforced the analgesia. Atypical facial pain has several differential diagnoses. The involvement of sympathetic system in its causation or sustenance is uncertain. Stellate ganglion block achieves sympathetic block of cervicofacial structures, and its blockade has been shown to affect chronic pain conditions. Although its mechanism is not clear, one has to consider its possible role in conditions of stress apart from directly controlling the sympathetic activity. There is certainly a role in exploring the potential benefits of stellate ganglion block in such clinical conditions. The technique of stellate block under ultrasound is also described, as it influences the safety and precision of the block. PMID:24065993

  6. Autoantibody pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    As autoantibodies bind to target tissues, Fc-region dependent inflammation can induce pain via mediators exciting nociceptors. But recently another possibility has emerged, where autoantibody binding to nociceptors can directly cause pain, without inflammation. This is thought to occur as a result of Fab-region mediated modification of nerve transduction, transmission, or neuropeptide release. In three conditions, complex regional pain syndrome, anti-voltage gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity, and chronic fatigue syndrome, all associated with no or only little inflammation, initial laboratory-, and clinical trial-results have suggested a potential role for autoantibody-mediated mechanisms. More research assessing the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies in these and other chronic pain conditions is required. The concept of autoantibody-mediated pain offers hope for the development of novel therapies for currently intractable pains. PMID:26883460

  7. Restoration of vagal tone: a possible mechanism for functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowder, Erik; Gevirtz, Richard; Shapiro, Warren; Ebert, Crystal

    2010-09-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) causes disruption of daily activities/missed school days, over utilization of healthcare, unnecessary surgeries, and anxiety in 10-15% of children. Its etiology is not clearly understood, however the success of several clinical protocols suggests that autonomic dysregulation is a factor. In this study autonomic activity, including heart rate variability (HRV), was compared between children with FAP and a comparison group. Twenty children with FAP and 10 children without FAP between the ages of 5 and 17 years old were compared on autonomic regulation using an ambulatory system at baseline and 8 weeks later. Children with FAP participated in 6 sessions of HRV biofeedback aimed at normalizing autonomic balance. At baseline, children with FAP appear to have more autonomic dysregulation than children without FAP. After completing HRV biofeedback, the FAP group was able to significantly reduce their symptoms in relation to significantly increasing their autonomic balance. In a sample of children with FAP, it appears that HRV biofeedback treatment improved their symptoms and that a change in vagal tone was a potential mediator for this improvement. The present study appears to point to excessive vagal withdrawal as an underlying mechanism of FAP. PMID:20229150

  8. 神经病理性疼痛的机制分类与治疗策略%Pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic options of neuropathic pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雪梅; 许今; 王祥瑞

    2013-01-01

    Background Being an intractable and chronic syndrome that may arise from injury to somatosensory system,neuropathic pain (NP) seriously affects the life quality of patients.Objective This review presents recent progress in the pathophysiological mechanisms,diagnosis and therapeutic options for NP.Content Five aspects of maladaptive changes in the peripheral,central and autonomic nervous system are focused to illustrate the pathophysiological mechanisms:sensitization of nociceptors,abnormal ectopic excitability of affected neurons and disinhibition of nociception in the spinal inhibitory network,pronociceptive facilitation of the spinal dorsal horn,sympathetically maintained pain,as well as central nervous systerm reorganization processes.Recent progress of diagnosis,pharmacologic treatment and nonpharmacologic treatment of NP are also discussed.Trend A better understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of NP will leads to a more effective and specific mechanism-based treatment approach.%背景 神经病理性疼痛(neuropathic pain,NP)是由于躯体感觉系统受损或病变而导致的顽固性疼痛,是严重影响患者生活质量的疾病. 目的 综述NP的发病机制、诊断与治疗的最新进展. 内容 从伤害感受器的敏感性增加、传入神经的异常电活动及中枢失抑制、脊髓背角变化促进伤害性感觉、交感系统对于伤害性感觉的维持和中枢重构5个方面阐述NP的发病机制,简介诊断方法,并从药物与非药物治疗的角度介绍现有的治疗方法. 趋向 根据发病机制的不同进行分类并采取相应的治疗措施将成为未来NP的防治方向,为患者提供更有效和精准的治疗策略.

  9. Dental restoration induced orofacial pain and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuxin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental procedure induced pain may develop into a chronic condition that accompanied with functional or neuropathy changes in the nerve system. In this case, severe persistent pain gradually developed after repeatedly placing a subgingival amalgam restoration in the right second molar. Hyperalgesia and allodynia were present at the affected region. A provisional diagnosis of chronic orofacial pain with peripheral and central sensitization was considered. After re-contouring, local debridement and occlusal adjustment the pain disappeared. The underlying mechanism in this case is neuronal sensitization and peripheral Aβ-fiber mechanoreceptor activation. Its diagnosis and management depend on identification and treatment of the cause for pain generation and sensitization.

  10. THE CRUCIAL ROLE OF CENTRAL BANK TRANSPARENCY IN ASSESSING THE MONETARY POLICY COMMITTEE MECHANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumiter Florin Cornel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past, central banks used to be very reserved regarding their activities, strategies and monetary policy decisions and actions. As central banks become more and more independent, transparency gained importance based upon accountability arguments. An important fact for adopting an increasing central bank transparency lies in its importance of influencing the development of expectations. The concept of central bank transparency has emerged in the economic literature relatively later than some other key concepts. The widespread agreement of an inflation targeting regime and a more transparent central bank is desired by the most central banks around the world in the context of the need of the public disclosure of macroeconomic models, the quarterly time series for indicators like: inflation, output, budgetary deficit, public debt, interest rate, inflation expectations, the public announcement of the monetary policy decisions, objectives and targets, the publication of some key monetary tools like: inflation report, financial stability report, monetary policy committee report, annual report. These are all key issues in the construction of a more transparent and independent central bank in the context of a good global governance. Moreover, for the fruitful success of the central bank, latum sensu, and monetary policy, stricto sensu, it must be encompassed a complex monetary policy committee mechanism. This complex mechanism must by edowed with the collegial approach of the monetary policy committee, structure of the voting mechanism within the committee, the importance of the person which announces the changes within the interest rates and the public disclosure of these information’s enriched in a communication strategy. This communication strategy is very important for assessing and public understanding of the central bank’s actions but also for communicating the objectives, targets and forward looking approaches of the monetary

  11. TMD and chronic pain: A current view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno D'Aurea Furquim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review aims at presenting a current view on the physiopathologic mechanisms associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs. While joint pain is characterized by a well-defined inflammatory process mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin, chronic muscle pain presents with enigmatic physiopathologic mechanisms, being considered a functional pain syndrome similar to fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, interstitial cystitis and chronic fatigue syndrome. Central sensitization is the common factor unifying these conditions, and may be influenced by the autonomic nervous system and genetic polymorphisms. Thus, TMDs symptoms should be understood as a complex response which might get worse or improve depending on an individual's adaptation.

  12. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1β was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1β was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1β. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1β expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  13. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Wei [Department of Out-Patient, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing [Department of Anatomy and K. K. Leung Brain Research Centre, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Ren, Ning [Comprehensive Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wu, Sheng-Xi, E-mail: shengxi@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy and K. K. Leung Brain Research Centre, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Li, Yong-Qi, E-mail: devneuro@fmmu.edu.cn [Comprehensive Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2010-05-14

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1{beta} was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1{beta} was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1{beta}. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1{beta} expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  14. Pain and Nociception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2014-01-01

    therapies are often only partially effective. Until recently, knowledge of cancer pain mechanisms was poor compared with understanding of neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. We now view cancer-induced bone pain as a complex pain state involving components of both inflammatory and neuropathic pain......Cancer pain, especially pain caused by metastasis to bone, is a severe type of pain, and unless the cause and consequences can be resolved, the pain will become chronic. As detection and survival among patients with cancer have improved, pain has become an increasing challenge, because traditional...... but also exhibiting elements that seem unique to cancer pain. In addition, the pain state is often unpredictable, and the intensity of the pain is highly variable, making it difficult to manage. The establishment of translational animal models has started to reveal some of the molecular components involved...

  15. Neurophysiological mechanisms in acceptance and commitment therapy in opioid-addicted patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Rachel F; Potter, Jennifer S; Robin, Donald A

    2016-04-30

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has been effectively utilized to treat both chronic pain and substance use disorder independently. Given these results and the vital need to treat the comorbidity of the two disorders, a pilot ACT treatment was implemented in individuals with comorbid chronic pain and opioid addiction. This pilot study supported using neurophysiology to characterize treatment effects and revealed that, following ACT, participants with this comorbidity exhibited reductions in brain activation due to painful stimulus and in connectivity at rest. PMID:27107155

  16. Hypersensitivity to mechanical and intra-articular electrical stimuli in persons with painful temporomandibular joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayesh, Emad; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Svensson, P

    2007-01-01

    This study tested whether persons with TMJ arthralgia have a modality-specific and site-specific hypersensitivity to somatosensory stimuli assessed by quantitative sensory tests (QST). Forty-three healthy persons and 20 with TMJ arthralgia participated. The QST consisted of: sensory and pain...... detection thresholds and summation threshold to intra-articular electrical stimulation, tactile and pin-prick sensitivity in the TMJ area, pressure-pain threshold and tolerance on the lateral side of the TMJ and on the finger. Persons with TMJ arthralgia had lower pain detection and summation thresholds (P...

  17. Altered pain perception in children with chronic tension-type headache: Is this a sign of central sensitisation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soee, AL; Thomsen, LL; Kreiner, S;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate if children (7-17 years) with frequent episodic tension-type headache (FETTH) or chronic TTH (CTTH) have an altered pain perception compared to healthy controls....

  18. Glial involvement in trigeminal central sensitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-feng XIE

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that trigeminal neurons exhibit central sensitization, an increase in the excitability of neurons within the central nervous system to the extent that a normally innocuous stimulus begins to produce pain after inflamma-tion or injury, and that glial activities play a vital role in this central sensitization. The involvement of glial cells in trigeminal central sensitization contains multiple mechanisms, including interaction with glutamatergic and purinergic receptors. A better understanding of the trigeminal central sensitization mediated by glial cells will help to find potential therapeutic targets and lead to developing new analge-sics for orofacial-specific pain with higher efficiency and fewer side-effects.

  19. The influence of repetitive painful stimulation on peripheral and trigeminal pain thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkwinkel, Monika; Gralow, Ingrid; Colak-Ekici, Reyhan; Wolowski, Anne; Marziniak, Martin; Evers, Stefan

    2008-10-15

    We were interested in how continuous painful stimulation which is performed as inurement exercises in some Asian martial arts influences sensory and pain perception. Therefore, we examined 15 Kung Fu disciples before and after a 14 day period with repetitive inurement exercises and measured sensory and pain thresholds and intensities in both the trigeminal and the peripheral (peroneal nerve) region. The results of the probands were compared to those of 15 healthy control subjects who were performing sports without painful stimulation during this period. The probands showed a significantly decreased trigeminal pain intensity after repetitive electrical stimulation whereas the control subjects did not show any changes of sensory or pain perception during the study period. This suggests a change of central sensitisation and inhibitory control mechanisms in the nociceptive spinal or cerebral pathways by inurement exercises. In addition, pain thresholds showed an (not significant) increase after the study period whereas the control subjects showed a significant decrease of pain thresholds. In summary, our pilot study suggests that inurement exercises, i.e. repetitive painful stimulation, over a period of 14 days might induce changes of pain perception resulting in trigeminal pain habituation and higher pain thresholds.

  20. Tissue Injury and Related Mediators of Pain Exacerbation

    OpenAIRE

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Izumi, Yuta; Matsuda, Megumi; Sasaki, Mika

    2013-01-01

    Tissue injury and inflammation result in release of various mediators that promote ongoing pain or pain hypersensitivity against mechanical, thermal and chemical stimuli. Pro-nociceptive mediators activate primary afferent neurons directly or indirectly to enhance nociceptive signal transmission to the central nervous system. Excitation of primary afferents by peripherally originating mediators, so-called “peripheral sensitization”, is a hallmark of tissue injury-related pain. Many kinds of p...

  1. Mechanisms of Intervertebral Disk Degeneration/Injury and Pain: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Keita; Creemers, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disk and its treatments are currently intensely investigated topics. Back pain is a condition whose chronic and debilitating nature combined with its prevalence make it a major health issue of substantial socioeconomic importance. Although researchers, and even sometimes clinicians, focus on the degenerated disk as the problem, to most patients, pain is the factor that limits their function and impacts their well-being. The purpose of this review is to delin...

  2. Pain and modulation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffarpoor M

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Pain is one of the most important and sometimes difficult problems, that patients and physicians are encountered. It may be clinically acute or chronic, acute pain has usually definite cause and favourable response to treatment. On the other hand there are difficulties in diagnosis and management of chronic pain. Peripheral and cranial nerves convey pain impulses toward central nervous system, and modulations take place at several levels. Diagnosis of different pains, including nociceptive, nerve trunk pain and deafferentation types is essential to acceptable management. In this article we review pain pathway, neurotransmitters and modulation.

  3. A Simple fMRI Compatible Robotic Stimulator to Study the Neural Mechanisms of Touch and Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riillo, F; Bagnato, C; Allievi, A G; Takagi, A; Fabrizi, L; Saggio, G; Arichi, T; Burdet, E

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a simple device for the investigation of the human somatosensory system with functional magnetic imaging (fMRI). PC-controlled pneumatic actuation is employed to produce innocuous or noxious mechanical stimulation of the skin. Stimulation patterns are synchronized with fMRI and other relevant physiological measurements like electroencephalographic activity and vital physiological parameters. The system allows adjustable regulation of stimulation parameters and provides consistent patterns of stimulation. A validation experiment demonstrates that the system safely and reliably identifies clusters of functional activity in brain regions involved in the processing of pain. This new device is inexpensive, portable, easy-to-assemble and customizable to suit different experimental requirements. It provides robust and consistent somatosensory stimulation, which is of crucial importance to investigating the mechanisms of pain and its strong connection with the sense of touch. PMID:26833039

  4. The Pronociceptive Effect of Paradoxical Sleep Deprivation in Rats: Evidence for a Role of Descending Pain Modulation Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomim, Dabna H; Pontarolla, Felipe M; Bertolini, Jessica F; Arase, Mauricio; Tobaldini, Glaucia; Lima, Marcelo M S; Fischer, Luana

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying the pronociceptive effect of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) are not known. In this study, we asked whether PSD increases tonic nociception in the formalin test, decreases the antinociceptive effect of morphine administered into the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), and disrupts endogenous descending pain modulation. PSD for either 24 or 48 h significantly increased formalin-induced nociception and decreased mechanical nociceptive paw withdrawal threshold. The maximal antinociceptive effect induced by morphine (0.9-9 nmol, intra-PAG) was significantly decreased by PSD. The administration of a low dose of the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline (30-300 pmol, intra-PAG), decreased nociception in control rats, but not in paradoxical-sleep-deprived ones. Furthermore, the administration of the cholecystokinin (CCK) 2 receptor antagonist, YM022 (0.5-2 pmol) in the rostral ventral medulla (RVM), decreased nociception in paradoxical-sleep-deprived rats but not in control ones. While a dose of the CCK 2 receptor agonist, CCK-8 (8-24 pmol intra-RVM), increased nociception in control rats, but not in paradoxical-sleep-deprived ones. In addition, the injection of lidocaine (QX-314, 2%, intra-RVM) decreased nociception in sleep-deprived rats, but not in control rats, while the lesion of the dorsolateral funiculus prevented the pronociceptive effect of PSD. Finally, PSD significantly increased c-Fos expression in the RVM. Therefore, PSD increases pain independently of its duration or of the characteristic of the nociceptive stimulus and decreases morphine analgesia at the PAG. PSD appears to increase pain by decreasing descending pain inhibitory activity and by increasing descending pain facilitatory activity. PMID:25707915

  5. The update study of the initiation mechanism and drug therapies of cancer pain%癌痛的发生机制及其相关药物治疗的研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王妙苗

    2011-01-01

    Cancer pain is a unique and complex kind of chronic pain. The animal model of cancer pain shows hyperalgesia, hypersensitivity and pain-related behavior, and unique neurochemical changes occur in the corresponding spinal cord segment. Cancer pain is related to peripheral afferent sensitization and central sensitization. At the early stage of cancer pain, the tumor cells, inflammatory cells of induced pain substance, and the continued activation of osteoclasts induced sensitization of primary afferent-based. At the late stage, nerve compression caused by tumor growth and damage involved in the genesis of cancer pain. The treatment drugs for cancer pain includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( NSAIDs) , opioids, bisphosphonates and other drugs under development in medicine. The research on the internal mechanisms of cancer pain and the development of related drugs would provide important theoretical basis and direction for the clinical practice of cancer pain management.%癌痛是一种机制独特而复杂的慢性疼痛,在动物模型中表现出对痛觉过敏、超敏等疼痛相关行为,其相应的脊髓节段内发生独特的神经化学改变.癌痛的发生与外周传入神经敏化和中枢敏化有关,在癌痛早期,以肿瘤细胞、炎症细胞产生的致痛物质以及破骨细胞的持续活化所致的初级传人神经敏化为主;在癌痛后期,肿瘤生长引起的神经压迫与损伤参与了癌痛的发生过程.癌痛的治疗药物包括非类固醇类抗炎药(NSAIDs)、阿片类药物、双膦酸盐类药物和其他尚在开发中的药物等.研究癌痛产生的内在机制及其相关药物治疗将为临床肿瘤患者疼痛治疗提供重要的理论依据和方向指导.

  6. Perception of pain and distress in intubated and mechanically ventilated newborn infants by parents and health professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Tannous Elias, Luciana Sabatini Doto; dos Santos, Amélia Miyashiro Nunes; Guinsburg, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Background An understanding of perceptions of parents and health caregivers who assist critically ill neonates is necessary to comprehend their actions and demands. Therefore this study aim to analyze the agreement among parents, nurse technicians and pediatricians regarding the presence and intensity of pain and distress in mechanically ventilated and intubated newborn infants. Methods Cross-sectional study comprising 52 infants and 52 trios of adults composed of one parent, one nurse techni...

  7. Antinociceptive effects of fisetin against diabetic neuropathic pain in mice: Engagement of antioxidant mechanisms and spinal GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Li, Xin-Lin; Liu, Xin; Wang, Chuang; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Hu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral painful neuropathy is one of the most common complications in diabetes and necessitates improved treatment. Fisetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effect in previous studies. As antidepressant drugs are employed clinically to treat neuropathic pain, this work aimed to investigate whether fisetin possess beneficial effect on diabetic neuropathic pain and explore the mechanism(s). We subjected mice to diabetes by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (200mg/kg), and von Frey test or Hargreaves test was used to assess mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesia, respectively. Chronic treatment of diabetic mice with fisetin not only ameliorated the established symptoms of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but also arrested the development of neuropathic pain when given at low doses. Although chronic fisetin administration did not impact on the symptom of hyperglycemia in diabetic mice, it reduced exacerbated oxidative stress in tissues of spinal cord, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and sciatic verve. Furthermore, the analgesic actions of fisetin were abolished by repetitive co-treatment with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) donor tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), but potentiated by the ROS scavenger phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN). Finally, acute blockade of spinal GABAA receptors by bicuculline totally counteracted such fisetin analgesia. These findings indicate that chronic fisetin treatment can delay or correct neuropathic hyperalgesia and allodynia in mice with type 1 diabetes. Mechanistically, the present fisetin analgesia may be associated with its antioxidant activity, and spinal GABAA receptors are likely rendered as downstream targets. PMID:26520392

  8. Flow confirmation study for central venous port in oncologic outpatient undergoing chemotherapy: Evaluation of suspected system-related mechanical complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofue, Keitaro, E-mail: ksofue@ncc.go.jp [Divisions of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kobe University, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Arai, Yasuaki; Takeuchi, Yoshito [Divisions of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and outcome of a flow confirmation study (FCS) in oncologic outpatients undergoing chemotherapy suspected of a central venous port (CVP) system-related mechanical complication. Materials and methods: A total of 66 patients (27 men, 39 women; mean age, 60 years) received FCS for the following reasons: prolonged infusion time during chemotherapy (n = 32), inability to inject saline fluid (n = 15), lateral neck and/or back pain (n = 6), subcutaneous extravasation of anticancer drug (n = 5), arm swelling (n = 4), and inability to puncture the port (n = 4). FCS consisted of examining the position of CVP, potential secondary shifts or fractures, and integrity of the system using contrast material through the port. Results: Of the 66 patients, 43 had an abnormal finding uncovered by FCS. The most frequent abnormal findings was catheter kinking (n = 22). Explantation and reimplantation of the CVP system was required in 21 of the 66 patients. Remaining 45 patients were able continue using the CVP system after the FCS without any system malfunction. Conclusion: FCS was effective for evaluating CVP system-related mechanical complications and was useful for deciding whether CVP system explantation and reimplantation was required.

  9. Flow confirmation study for central venous port in oncologic outpatient undergoing chemotherapy: Evaluation of suspected system-related mechanical complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and outcome of a flow confirmation study (FCS) in oncologic outpatients undergoing chemotherapy suspected of a central venous port (CVP) system-related mechanical complication. Materials and methods: A total of 66 patients (27 men, 39 women; mean age, 60 years) received FCS for the following reasons: prolonged infusion time during chemotherapy (n = 32), inability to inject saline fluid (n = 15), lateral neck and/or back pain (n = 6), subcutaneous extravasation of anticancer drug (n = 5), arm swelling (n = 4), and inability to puncture the port (n = 4). FCS consisted of examining the position of CVP, potential secondary shifts or fractures, and integrity of the system using contrast material through the port. Results: Of the 66 patients, 43 had an abnormal finding uncovered by FCS. The most frequent abnormal findings was catheter kinking (n = 22). Explantation and reimplantation of the CVP system was required in 21 of the 66 patients. Remaining 45 patients were able continue using the CVP system after the FCS without any system malfunction. Conclusion: FCS was effective for evaluating CVP system-related mechanical complications and was useful for deciding whether CVP system explantation and reimplantation was required

  10. Chronic pain: Model of psychosomatic disorder (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernus N.P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a detailed review on epidemiology, pathogenesis and interrelation of serotonin neuromedia-tor metabolism in the central nervous system in state of chronic pain and depression. It has been demonstrated that neurophysiological conditions serve as psychological defense of an individual. That mechanism has been proved to «transform» serious emotions onto the inner level (body and it assists in the development of psychosomatic disorders — chronic pain syndrome

  11. Disfunción sexual asociada al uso de gabapentina en el tratamiento del dolor central Associated sexual dysfunction to the use of gabapentin in the treatment of the central pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Calderón

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available El dolor neuropático de origen central es uno de los síndromes dolorosos más complejos, su tratamiento es difícil y, en general, poco satisfactorio. Gabapentina (GBP es un anticonvulsivante usado en el tratamiento de la epilepsia, dolor neuropático, desórdenes bipolares, y es generalmente bien tolerado. Los anticonvulsivantes de segunda generación cuentan entre sus ventajas con una menor incidencia de efectos secundarios. No obstante, estamos hablando de fármacos relativamente nuevos, sobre todo para su utilización al margen de los trastornos no epilépticos, como es el caso del dolor neuropático, por lo que es necesario un estudio y seguimiento más completo de sus posibles efectos secundarios. Presentamos 2 casos de disfunción sexual en hombre y mujer en relación con la administración de gabapentina para control del dolor de origen central. El aumento de la concentración de serotonina podría ser la causa de las alteraciones sexuales relacionadas con el tratamiento con GBP a las dosis utilizadas en nuestros pacientes, superiores a 1.800 mg/día. Este efecto es dosis-dependiente y el tratamiento consiste en disminuir o ajustar la dosis para maximizar el intervalo de tiempo entre la toma previa y el acto sexual.The neuropathic central pain, is one of the more complex painful syndromes, its treatment is difficult and, in general, little satisfactory. Gabapentin (GBP, it is a anticon-vulsant used in the treatment of the epilepsy, neuropathic pain, disorder bipolar, and it is generally well tolerated The anticonvulsants of second generation count between their advantages with a smaller incidence of secondary effects. However, we are considering of relatively new drugs, mainly for its use to the margin of epilepsy, as it is the case of the neuropathic pain. For this reason it is necessary a study and more complete pursuit of its possible secondary effects. We presented 2 cases of sexual dysfunction in a man and a woman in relation to

  12. [Possible role of positive reinforcement zones in the mechanisms of pain regulation and their relation to the endogenous opiate system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, Iu V; Viglinskaia, I V; Zhukov, V N

    1987-05-01

    The consequences of self-stimulation reaction (RSS) to pain threshold in tail withdrawal test (55 degrees C) and naloxone effect have been investigated in tests, using male rats with chronically implanted electrodes into the hypothalamus (AP = 1.5, L = 1.5, H = 8.5) and suture dorsal nucleus (AP = 7.0, L = 0, H = 7.0) (coordinates according to Fifková atlas). It was established that right after RSS, pain threshold in both zones increased 2-2.5-fold and 30 min later reached the initial level. Naloxone injected before RSS increased pain thresholds and decreased RSS frequency from hypothalamus but failed to change these RSS parameters from suture dorsal nucleus. However, naloxone did not affect the increase in pain thresholds caused by RSS from both zones. Taking into account the fact that analgesia appearing after RSS from the anterior hypothalamus as well as from suture dorsal nucleus is not reversed by naloxone, it is suggested that positive reward zones activation partially realized by opioidergic mechanisms or having no connection with them may lead to the development of non-opiate type analgesia.

  13. Contemporary views on inflammatory pain mechanisms: TRPing over innate and microglial pathways [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui Guan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tissue injury, whether by trauma, surgical intervention, metabolic dysfunction, ischemia, or infection, evokes a complex cellular response (inflammation that is associated with painful hyperalgesic states. Although in the acute stages it is necessary for protective reflexes and wound healing, inflammation may persist well beyond the need for tissue repair or survival. Prolonged inflammation may well represent the greatest challenge mammalian organisms face, as it can lead to chronic painful conditions, organ dysfunction, morbidity, and death. The complexity of the inflammatory response reflects not only the inciting event (infection, trauma, surgery, cancer, or autoimmune but also the involvement of heterogeneous cell types including neuronal (primary afferents, sensory ganglion, and spinal cord, non-neuronal (endothelial, keratinocytes, epithelial, and fibroblasts, and immune cells. In this commentary, we will examine 1. the expression and regulation of two members of the transient receptor potential family in primary afferent nociceptors and their activation/regulation by products of inflammation, 2. the role of innate immune pathways that drive inflammation, and 3. the central nervous system’s response to injury with a focus on the activation of spinal microglia driving painful hyperalgesic states.

  14. Pain. Part 2a: Trigeminal Anatomy Related to Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Tara; Egbuniwe, Obi

    2015-04-01

    In order to understand the underlying principles of orofacial pain it is important to understand the corresponding anatomy and mechanisms. Paper 1 of this series explains the central nervous and peripheral nervous systems relating to pain. The trigeminal nerve is the 'great protector' of the most important region of our body. It is the largest sensory nerve of the body and over half of the sensory cortex is responsive to any stimulation within this system. This nerve is the main sensory system of the branchial arches and underpins the protection of the brain, sight, smell, airway, hearing and taste, underpinning our very existence. The brain reaction to pain within the trigeminal system has a significant and larger reaction to the threat of, and actual, pain compared with other sensory nerves. We are physiologically wired to run when threatened with pain in the trigeminal region and it is a 'miracle' that patients volunteer to sit in a dental chair and undergo dental treatment. Clinical Relevance: This paper aims to provide the dental and medical teams with a review of the trigeminal anatomy of pain and the principles of pain assessment.

  15. How effective is tetracaine 4% gel, before a peripherally inserted central catheter, in reducing procedural pain in infants: a randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial [ISRCTN75884221

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchard Colline

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Procedural pain relief is sub-optimal in infants, especially small and vulnerable ones. Tetracaine gel 4% (Ametop®, Smith-Nephew provides pain relief in children and larger infants, but its efficacy in smaller infants and for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC remains uncertain. The objective of this trial was to assess the safety and efficacy of tetracaine gel on the pain response of very low birth weight (VLBW infants during insertion of a PICC. Methods Medically stable infants greater than or equal to 24 weeks gestation, requiring a non-urgent PICC, were included. Following randomization and double blinding, 1.1 g of tetracaine or placebo was applied to the skin for 30 minutes. The PICC was inserted according to a standard protocol. Pain was assessed using the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP. A 3-point change in the pain score was considered clinically significant, leading to a sample size of 54 infants, with 90% statistical power. Local skin reactions and immediate adverse cardiorespiratory events were noted. The primary outcome, PIPP score at 1 minute, was analysed using an independent Student's t-test. Results Fifty-four infants were included, 27 +/- 2 weeks gestation, 916 +/- 292 grams and 6.5 +/- 3.2 days of age. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. The mean PIPP score in the first minute was 10.88 in the treatment group as compared to 11.74 in the placebo group (difference 0.86, 95% CI -1.86, 3.58. Median duration of crying in non-intubated infants was 181 seconds in the tetracaine group compared to 68 seconds in the placebo group (difference -78, 95% CI -539, 117. Local skin erythema was observed transiently in 4 infants (3 in the treatment and 1 in the placebo group. No serious harms were observed. Conclusion Tetracaine 4% when applied for 30 minutes was not beneficial in decreasing procedural pain associated with a PICC in very small infants.

  16. [Mechanisms of muscle pain : significance of trigger points and tender points].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinschek, H-P

    2008-12-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) belong to the group of chronic non-inflammatory pain syndromes affecting muscles and tendinous insertions. Important criteria in the diagnosis of both diseases are the presence of "tender points" and "trigger points". According to ACR criteria FMS is characterized by the presence of tender points whereas trigger points are typically found in MPS.The main difference is that until now tender points could only be defined in terms of their localization, whereas trigger points can be found upon palpation which may cause a specific referred pain pattern. In addition, analysis of trigger points by microdialysis demonstrated elevated levels of pro-inflammatory substances at these sites. Moreover, local treatment of trigger points either by manipulative therapy or injection appears to be most effective for prompt relief of symptoms.

  17. Effect of electroacupuncture on P2X3 receptor regulation in the peripheral and central nervous systems of rats with visceral pain caused by irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Z. J.; L. Y. Wu; Zhou, C. L.; Dou, C. Z.; Shi, Y; H. R. Liu; Wu, H. G.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the purinergic receptor P2X3 in the peripheral and central nervous systems during acupuncture treatment for the visceral pain of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A total of 24 8-day-old Sprague–Dawley (SD) neonatal male rats (SPF grade) were stimulated using colorectal distention (CRD) when the rats were awake. The modeling lasted for 2 weeks with one stimulation per day. After 6 weeks, the rats were randomly divided into three groups of eigh...

  18. EFFICACY OF ACTIVE STRETCHING OVER PASSIVE STRETCHING ON THE FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME AMONG PATIENTS WITH MECHANICAL LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvis Luke Fernandez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low back pain has a significant impact on the individual’s family, socio-economic status, occupation, health system, community. Stretching is included as a part of treatment regimen for low back pain. Much controversy exists on the type of stretching technique and parameters which would prove beneficial to improve flexibility. Aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of active stretching over passive stretching, on the functional performance among patients with low back pain. Materials and method: 52 subjects with mechanical low back pains in the age group of 20-50 were enrolled for the study. Flexibility measurement and Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index was used as the primary outcome measure. Flexibility of Iliopsoas was measured using the modified Thomas test; Flexibility of Hamstring was measured using the active knee extension test. The subjects underwent 7 days of therapy sessions, after 7 days of therapy the individuals where re-assessed for flexibility and they were asked to fill the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire. Results: 52 subjects were enrolled in the study, of which 36 subjects completed the study, among them 18 subjects in the control group and 18 subjects in intervention group. For independent groups paired t-test was used. Using the paired sample t-test significant difference was measured between the pre and post of the intervention group and control groups a significant difference of .001 was achieved in both the groups (P=.001. Discussion: The results of the present study prove that both active and passive stretching is beneficial in improving the flexibility of tight muscles in the lower limbs. Also both active stretching and passive stretching has a profound effect on the functional aspect in patients suffering with low back pain. Conclusion: The result of present study conveys that both active and passive stretch is helpful in improving the flexibility in the major muscle groups of

  19. Cost-effectiveness of minimal interventional procedures for chronic mechanical low back pain: design of four randomised controlled trials with an economic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maas Esther T

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minimal interventional procedures are frequently applied in patients with mechanical low back pain which is defined as pain presumably resulting from single sources: facet, disc, sacroiliac joint or a combination of these. Usually, these minimal interventional procedures are an integral part of a multidisciplinary pain programme. A recent systematic review issued by the Dutch Health Insurance Council showed that the effectiveness of these procedures for the total group of patients with chronic low back pain is yet unclear and cost-effectiveness unknown. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether a multidisciplinary pain programme with minimal interventional procedures is cost-effective compared to the multidisciplinary pain programme alone for patients with chronic mechanical low back pain who did not respond to conservative primary care and were referred to a pain clinic. Methods All patients with chronic low back pain who are referred to one of the 13 participating pain clinics will be asked to participate in an observational study. Patients with a suspected diagnosis of facet, disc or sacroiliac joint problems will receive a diagnostic block to confirm this diagnosis. If confirmed, they will be asked to participate in a Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT. For each single source a separate RCT will be conducted. Patients with a combination of facet, disc or sacroiliac joint problems will be invited for participation in a RCT as well. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective will be performed alongside these four RCTs. Patients will complete questionnaires at baseline, 3 and 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after start of the treatment. Costs will be collected using self-completed cost questionnaires. Discussion No trials are yet available which have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of minimal interventional procedures in patients with chronic mechanical low back pain, which emphasizes the importance of this study

  20. Invited Commentary: Understanding Brain Mechanisms of Pain Processing in Adolescents' Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Elizabeth; Bosk, Abigail; Pao, Maryland

    2010-01-01

    Whereas non-suicidal self injury (NSSI) is reported in 13-23% of adolescents and is an increasingly studied topic, there has been little investigation into the pathophysiology behind self-injury. This commentary examines recent research into pain and emotional distress to discuss implications for the manner we should understand, research, and…

  1. MECHANISM OF ANALGESIC EFFECTS OF PROPOFOL ON INCISIONAL PAIN: A RAT MODEL STUDY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhi-hua; SONG Xiao-xing; HU Jiong; YU Bu-wei

    2009-01-01

    Objective To clarify the role of propofol in controlling incisional pain and its potential effects on the spinal opioid receptor expression.Methods A postoperative model of nociception was established in male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250 g. A total of 96 rats were randomly divided into 8 groups. All drugs were administered intravenously either 5min pre-operation or 5min post-operation. The analgesic effects of systemic propofol were demonstrated by the measurement of a cumulative pain score (CPS). After that, the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord was removed to evaluate the mRNA level of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and δ-opioid receptor (DOR) by RT-PCR.Results CPS and DOR mRNA expressions significantly increased after the operation. Both propofol post-treatment and propofol pre-treatment groups showed significant suppression of the increased CPS and the expression of DOR mRNA evoked by pain stimulation. Interestingly, propofol pre-treatment had a more pronounced effect in decreasing CPS and the expression of DOR mRNA. Furthermore, these observations were dose-dependent. MOR mRNA expression significantly increased after operation in all animals and propofol treatment had no impact on it.Conclusion Based on these findings, we suggest that propofol can serve as a valuable adjunct in acute postoperative pain management. Systemic propofol induces an analgesic effect on acute incisional pain in a dose-dependant manner, and this effect is mediated in the spinal cord and may be associated with the spinal DOR.

  2. Chronic pain after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsborg, B.; Nikolajsen, L.; Kehlet, H.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a well-known adverse effect of surgery, but the risk of chronic pain after gynaecological surgery is less established. METHOD: This review summarizes studies on chronic pain following hysterectomy. The underlying mechanisms and risk factors for the development of chronic...... post-hysterectomy pain are discussed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Chronic pain is reported by 5-32% of women after hysterectomy. A guideline is proposed for future prospective studies Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  3. Chronic pain after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsborg, B; Nikolajsen, L; Kehlet, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a well-known adverse effect of surgery, but the risk of chronic pain after gynaecological surgery is less established. METHOD: This review summarizes studies on chronic pain following hysterectomy. The underlying mechanisms and risk factors for the development of chronic...... post-hysterectomy pain are discussed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Chronic pain is reported by 5-32% of women after hysterectomy. A guideline is proposed for future prospective studies. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar...

  4. On the molecular mechanisms driving pain perception and emergent collective behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Patti, F.; Fanelli, D.

    2010-05-01

    A stochastic model to investigate the microscopic processes which trigger the sensation of pain is considered. The model, presented in Di Patti and Fanelli [Di Patti F, Fanelli D. Can a microscopic stochastic model explain the emergence of pain cycles in patients? J Stat Mech 2009. doi:10.1088/1742-5468/2009/01/P01004], accounts for the action of analgesic drug and introduces an effect of competition with the inactive species populating the bloodstream. Regular oscillations in the amount of bound receptors are detected, following a resonant amplification of the stochastic component intrinsic to the system. The condition for such oscillations to occur are here studied, resorting to combined numerical and analytical techniques. Extended and connected patches of the admissible parameters space are detected which do correspond to the oscillatory behaviors. These findings are discussed with reference to the existing literature on patients' response to the analgesic treatment.

  5. Lumbar Thrust Manipulation and Exercise for the Treatment of Mechanical Low Back Pain in Adolescents: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, Zachary; Yake, Dale

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Case series. Background Low back pain (LBP) is an increasing problem in health care. The evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy to treat pediatric patients with LBP is minimal. The treatment of pediatrics with manual therapy, particularly spinal manipulation, is controversial within the medical community, primarily with respect to adverse events. The purpose of this case series was to illustrate the feasibility and safety of lumbar manipulation plus exercise in the adolescent population with mechanical LBP. Case Description Three patients-a 13-year-old adolescent girl, 15-year-old adolescent girl, and 13-year-old adolescent boy-were treated in an outpatient physical therapy setting for mechanical LBP. All 3 patients were assessed using a lumbar manipulation clinical prediction rule and treated with sidelying lumbar manipulation and exercise. Outcomes Patients were treated for a total of 10 to 14 visits over a course of 8 to 9 weeks. Pain (measured by a numeric pain-rating scale) and disability (measured by the modified Oswestry Disability Index) improved to 0/10 and 0%, respectively, in each patient. No adverse reactions to manipulation were reported. Discussion The results of this case series describe the use of lumbar thrust manipulation and exercise for the treatment of mechanical LBP in adolescents. The positive results indicate that lumbar manipulation may be a safe adjunct therapy. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, are needed to determine effectiveness. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(5):391-398. Epub 6 Apr 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6366.

  6. Mechanism of relation among heart meridian, referred cardiac pain and heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG; Peijing(荣培晶); ZHU; Bing(朱兵)

    2002-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that an important clinical phenomenon often associated with visceral diseases is the referred pain to somatic structures, especially to the body areaof homo-segmental innervation. It is interesting that the somatic foci of cardiac referred pain wereoften and mainly distributed along the heart meridian (HM), whereas the acupoints of HM havebeen applied to treat cardiac disease since ancient times. The purpose of this study was to inves-tigate the neural relationship between the cardiac referred pain and the heart meridian.Fluorescent triple-labeling was injected into the pericardium, some acupoints of HM and lung me-ridian (LM, for control). The responses of the left cardiac sympathetic nerve and of the EMG in left HM and LM were electrophysiologically studied, when the electrical stimuli were applied to the acupoints of left HM and to the left cardiac sympathetic nerve. More double-labeled neurons in HM-heart, not in LM-heart, were observed in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia of the spinal segments C8-T3. Electric stimulation of the acupoints of left HM was able to elicit more responses of left cardiac sympathetic nerve than that of the LM-acupoints. Electric stimulation of the left cardiac sympathetic nerve resulted in stronger activities of EMG-response in the acupoints of left HM than in LM-acupoints. We conclude that double-labeling study has provided direct evidence for the existence of dichotomizing afferent fibers that supply both the pericardium and HM. Electrophysiological results show that HM is more closely related functionally to heart. These findings provide a possible morphological and physiological explanation for the referred cardiac pain and HM-heart interrelation.

  7. Integrating evidence into practice: use of McKenzie-based treatment for mechanical low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke S.; Dunsford A; Kumar S

    2011-01-01

    Angela Dunsford1, Saravana Kumar1,2, Sarah Clarke1 1International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, 2School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia Abstract: Low back pain (LBP) is a major health issue with significant socioeconomic implications in most Western countries. Many forms of treatment have been proposed and investigated in the past, with exercise being a commonly prescribed intervention. Within allied health, in particular physiothe...

  8. TAFA4, a chemokine-like protein, modulates injury-induced mechanical and chemical pain hypersensitivity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfini, Marie-Claire; Mantilleri, Annabelle; Gaillard, Stéphane; Hao, Jizhe; Reynders, Ana; Malapert, Pascale; Alonso, Serge; François, Amaury; Barrere, Christian; Seal, Rebecca; Landry, Marc; Eschallier, Alain; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Delmas, Patrick; Le Feuvre, Yves; Moqrich, Aziz

    2013-10-31

    C-low-threshold mechanoreceptors (C-LTMRs) are unique among C-unmyelinated primary sensory neurons. These neurons convey two opposite aspects of touch sensation: a sensation of pleasantness, and a sensation of injury-induced mechanical pain. Here, we show that TAFA4 is a specific marker of C-LTMRs. Genetic labeling in combination with electrophysiological recordings show that TAFA4+ neurons have intrinsic properties of mechano-nociceptors. TAFA4-null mice exhibit enhanced mechanical and chemical hypersensitivity following inflammation and nerve injury as well as increased excitability of spinal cord lamina IIi neurons, which could be reversed by intrathecal or bath application of recombinant TAFA4 protein. In wild-type C57/Bl6 mice, intrathecal administration of TAFA4 strongly reversed carrageenan-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, suggesting a potent analgesic role of TAFA4 in pain relief. Our data provide insights into how C-LTMR-derived TAFA4 modulates neuronal excitability and controls the threshold of somatic sensation.

  9. TAFA4, a Chemokine-like Protein, Modulates Injury-Induced Mechanical and Chemical Pain Hypersensitivity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claire Delfini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available C-low-threshold mechanoreceptors (C-LTMRs are unique among C-unmyelinated primary sensory neurons. These neurons convey two opposite aspects of touch sensation: a sensation of pleasantness, and a sensation of injury-induced mechanical pain. Here, we show that TAFA4 is a specific marker of C-LTMRs. Genetic labeling in combination with electrophysiological recordings show that TAFA4+ neurons have intrinsic properties of mechano-nociceptors. TAFA4-null mice exhibit enhanced mechanical and chemical hypersensitivity following inflammation and nerve injury as well as increased excitability of spinal cord lamina IIi neurons, which could be reversed by intrathecal or bath application of recombinant TAFA4 protein. In wild-type C57/Bl6 mice, intrathecal administration of TAFA4 strongly reversed carrageenan-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, suggesting a potent analgesic role of TAFA4 in pain relief. Our data provide insights into how C-LTMR-derived TAFA4 modulates neuronal excitability and controls the threshold of somatic sensation.

  10. FORMATION MECHANISM AND SPATIAL PATTERN OF URBAN AGGLOMERATION IN CENTRAL JILIN OF CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Gan; ZHANG Ping-yu; JIAO Bin

    2006-01-01

    Urban agglomeration is made up of cities with different sizes to be linked by traffic network in a given area, and it is an inevitable result when urbanization reaches a certain level. Taking urban agglomerationin central Jilin(UACJ) as an example, this article analyzes the formation mechanism and spatial pattern of urban agglomeration in the less-developed area. First, the dynamics of UACJ has been analyzed from the aspects of geographical condition, economic foundation, policy background, and traffic condition. Then the development process is divided into three stages-single city, city group and city cluster. Secondly, the central cities are identified from the aspects of city centrality, and the development axes are classified based on economic communication capacity. Finally, the urban agglomeration is divided into five urban economic regions in order to establish the reasonable distribution of industries.

  11. Gamma oscillations as a neuronal correlate of the attentional effects of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemann, Laura; Schulz, Enrico; Gross, Joachim; Ploner, Markus

    2010-08-01

    Successful behavior requires the attentional selection and preferred processing of behaviorally relevant sensory information. Painful stimuli are of utmost behavioral relevance and can therefore involuntarily affect attentional resources and interfere with ongoing behavior. However, the neuronal mechanisms which subserve the involuntary attentional effects of pain are largely unknown yet. Here, we therefore investigated the neuronal mechanisms of the attentional effects of pain by using electroencephalography during a visual attention task with the concurrent presentation of painful stimuli. Our results confirm that painful and visual stimuli induce gamma oscillations over central and occipital areas, respectively. Pain-induced gamma oscillations were correlated with pain-induced changes in visual gamma oscillations. Behaviorally, we observed variable effects of pain on visual reaction times, yielding an increase of reaction times for some subjects, as well as a decrease of reaction times for others. Most importantly, however, these changes in visual task performance were significantly related to pain-induced changes of visual gamma oscillations. These findings demonstrate that the variable attentional effects of pain are closely related to changes in neuronal gamma oscillations in the human brain. In the hypervigilant state of chronic pain, maladaptive changes in the attentional effects of pain may be associated with abnormal changes in neuronal gamma oscillations. Our findings may thus contribute to the understanding of the neuronal substrates of pain in health and may open a new window towards the understanding of pathological alterations of the pain experience in chronic pain syndromes.

  12. Chronic widespread pain in spondyloarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The pain associated with spondyloarthritis (SpA can be intense, persistent and disabling. It frequently has a multifactorial, simultaneously central and peripheral origin, and may be due to currently active inflammation, or joint damage and tissue destruction arising from a previous inflammatory condition. Inflammatory pain symptoms can be reduced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but many patients continue to experience moderate pain due to alterations in the mechanisms that regulate central pain, as in the case of the chronic widespread pain (CWP that characterises fibromyalgia (FM. The importance of distinguishing SpA and FM is underlined by the fact that SpA is currently treated with costly drugs such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF inhibitors, and direct costs are higher in patients with concomitant CWP or FM than in those with FM or SpA alone. Optimal treatment needs to take into account symptoms such as fatigue, mood, sleep, and the overall quality of life, and is based on the use of tricyclic antidepressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine, rather than adjustments in the dose of anti-TNF agents or disease-modifying drugs.

  13. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Salim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described.

  14. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of statins in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Amelia J; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Arora, Devinder S; Grant, Gary D; McDermott, Catherine M; Perkins, Anthony V; Davey, Andrew K

    2014-11-10

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, commonly referred to as statins, are widely used in the treatment of dyslipidaemia, in addition to providing primary and secondary prevention against cardiovascular disease and stroke. Statins' effects on the central nervous system (CNS), particularly on cognition and neurological disorders such as stroke and multiple sclerosis, have received increasing attention in recent years, both within the scientific community and in the media. Current understanding of statins' effects is limited by a lack of mechanism-based studies, as well as the assumption that all statins have the same pharmacological effect in the central nervous system. This review aims to provide an updated discussion on the molecular mechanisms contributing to statins' possible effects on cognitive function, neurodegenerative disease, and various neurological disorders such as stroke, epilepsy, depression and CNS cancers. Additionally, the pharmacokinetic differences between statins and how these may result in statin-specific neurological effects are also discussed.

  15. Effect of electroacupuncture on P2X3 receptor regulation in the peripheral and central nervous systems of rats with visceral pain caused by irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Z J; Wu, L Y; Zhou, C L; Dou, C Z; Shi, Y; Liu, H R; Wu, H G

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the purinergic receptor P2X3 in the peripheral and central nervous systems during acupuncture treatment for the visceral pain of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A total of 24 8-day-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) neonatal male rats (SPF grade) were stimulated using colorectal distention (CRD) when the rats were awake. The modeling lasted for 2 weeks with one stimulation per day. After 6 weeks, the rats were randomly divided into three groups of eight each: (1) the normal group (NG, n = 8); (2) the model group (MG, n = 8); and (3) the model + electroacupuncture group (EA, n = 8) that received electroacupuncture at a needling depth of 5 mm at the Shangjuxu (ST37, bilateral) and Tianshu (ST25, bilateral) acupoints. The parameters of the Han's acupoint nerve stimulator (HANS) were as follows: sparse-dense wave with a frequency of 2/100 Hz, current of 2 mA, 20 min/stimulation, and one stimulation per day; the treatment was provided for seven consecutive days. At the sixth week after the treatment, the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) score was determined; immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry were used to measure the expression of the P2X3 receptor in myenteric plexus neurons, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex; and, a real-time PCR assay was performed to measure the expression of P2X3 messenger RNA (mRNA) in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord. After stimulation with CRD, the expression levels of the P2X3 receptor in the inter-colonic myenteric plexus, DRG, spinal cord, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex were upregulated, and the sensitivity of the rats to IBS visceral pain was increased. Electroacupuncture (EA) could downregulate the expression of the P2X3 receptor and ease the sensitivity to visceral pain. The P2X3 receptor plays an important role in IBS visceral pain. The different levels of P2X3 in the peripheral enteric nervous system and central nervous system mediate the

  16. Adding Security to Web Services : An Automatic, Verifiable, and Centralized Mechanism for Web Services Input Validation

    OpenAIRE

    Brekken, Lars Arne; Åsprang, Rune Frøysa

    2006-01-01

    Accepting unvalidated input is considered today's greatest web security threat. This master's thesis addresses that threat by proposing an automatic and centralized mechanism for validating web services input. By building on existing web services standards, the proposed solution intercepts incoming web service requests and validates them against a security policy. A major design goal for this work was to realize web services input validation without modifying existing functionality. That is,...

  17. [The phenomenon of pain in the history of music – observations of neurobiological mechanisms of pain and its expressions in western music].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasenzer, E R; Neugebauer, E A M

    2014-12-01

    Purpose of this essay is to provide a historical overview how music has dealt with the emotion and sensation of pain, as well as an overview over the more recent medical research into the relationship of music and pain. Since the beginnings of western music humans have put their emotions into musical sounds. During the baroque era, composers developed musical styles that expressed human emotions and our experiences of nature. In some compositions, like in operas, we find musical representations of pain. During Romanticism artists began to intrude into the soul of their audience. New expressive harmonies and styles touch the soul and the consciousness of the listener. With the inception of atonality dissonant sounds where experienced as a physical pain.The physiology of deep brain structures (like thalamus, hypothalamus or limbic system) and the physiology of the acoustic pathway process consonant and dissonant sound and musical perceptions in ways, that are similar to the perception of pain. In the thalamus and in the limbic system music and pain meet.The relationships of music and pain is a wide open research field with such interesting questions as the role of dopamine in the perception of consonant or dissonant music, or the processing of pain during music listening. Musicology has not yet embarked on a general investigation of how musical compositions express pain and how that has developed or changed over the centuries. Music therapy, neuro-musicology and the performing arts medicine are scientific fields that offer a lot of ideas for medical and musical research projects.

  18. [The phenomenon of pain in the history of music – observations of neurobiological mechanisms of pain and its expressions in western music].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasenzer, E R; Neugebauer, E A M

    2014-12-01

    Purpose of this essay is to provide a historical overview how music has dealt with the emotion and sensation of pain, as well as an overview over the more recent medical research into the relationship of music and pain. Since the beginnings of western music humans have put their emotions into musical sounds. During the baroque era, composers developed musical styles that expressed human emotions and our experiences of nature. In some compositions, like in operas, we find musical representations of pain. During Romanticism artists began to intrude into the soul of their audience. New expressive harmonies and styles touch the soul and the consciousness of the listener. With the inception of atonality dissonant sounds where experienced as a physical pain.The physiology of deep brain structures (like thalamus, hypothalamus or limbic system) and the physiology of the acoustic pathway process consonant and dissonant sound and musical perceptions in ways, that are similar to the perception of pain. In the thalamus and in the limbic system music and pain meet.The relationships of music and pain is a wide open research field with such interesting questions as the role of dopamine in the perception of consonant or dissonant music, or the processing of pain during music listening. Musicology has not yet embarked on a general investigation of how musical compositions express pain and how that has developed or changed over the centuries. Music therapy, neuro-musicology and the performing arts medicine are scientific fields that offer a lot of ideas for medical and musical research projects. PMID:25490753

  19. Involvement of peripheral artemin signaling in tongue pain: possible mechanism in burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Takeda, Mamoru; Honda, Kuniya; Maruno, Mitsuru; Katagiri, Ayano; Satoh-Kuriwada, Shizuko; Shoji, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by altered sensory qualities, namely tongue pain hypersensitivity. We found that the mRNA expression of Artemin (Artn) in the tongue mucosa of patients with burning mouth syndrome was significantly higher than that of control subjects, and we developed a mouse model of burning mouth syndrome by application of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) diluted with 50% ethanol to the dorsum of the tongue. TNBS treatment to the tongue induced persistent, week-long, noninflammatory tongue pain and a significant increase in Artn expression in the tongue mucosa and marked tongue heat hyperalgesia. Following TNBS treatment, the successive administration of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist SB366791 or neutralizing anti-Artn antibody completely inhibited the heat hyperalgesia. The number of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α3 (GFRα3)-positive and TRPV1-positive trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the tongue significantly increased following TNBS treatment and was significantly reduced by successive administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody. The capsaicin-induced current in TG neurons innervating the tongue was enhanced following TNBS treatment and was inhibited by local administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody to the tongue. These results suggest that the overexpression of Artn in the TNBS-treated tongue increases the membrane excitability of TG neurons innervating the tongue by increasing TRPV1 sensitivity, which causes heat hyperalgesia. This model may be useful for the study of tongue pain hypersensitivity associated with burning mouth syndrome. PMID:26270588

  20. Involvement of peripheral artemin signaling in tongue pain: possible mechanism in burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Takeda, Mamoru; Honda, Kuniya; Maruno, Mitsuru; Katagiri, Ayano; Satoh-Kuriwada, Shizuko; Shoji, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by altered sensory qualities, namely tongue pain hypersensitivity. We found that the mRNA expression of Artemin (Artn) in the tongue mucosa of patients with burning mouth syndrome was significantly higher than that of control subjects, and we developed a mouse model of burning mouth syndrome by application of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) diluted with 50% ethanol to the dorsum of the tongue. TNBS treatment to the tongue induced persistent, week-long, noninflammatory tongue pain and a significant increase in Artn expression in the tongue mucosa and marked tongue heat hyperalgesia. Following TNBS treatment, the successive administration of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist SB366791 or neutralizing anti-Artn antibody completely inhibited the heat hyperalgesia. The number of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α3 (GFRα3)-positive and TRPV1-positive trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the tongue significantly increased following TNBS treatment and was significantly reduced by successive administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody. The capsaicin-induced current in TG neurons innervating the tongue was enhanced following TNBS treatment and was inhibited by local administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody to the tongue. These results suggest that the overexpression of Artn in the TNBS-treated tongue increases the membrane excitability of TG neurons innervating the tongue by increasing TRPV1 sensitivity, which causes heat hyperalgesia. This model may be useful for the study of tongue pain hypersensitivity associated with burning mouth syndrome.

  1. Is the Experience of Thermal Pain Genetics Dependent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Horjales-Araujo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested that genetic variations explain a significant portion of the variability in pain perception; therefore, increased understanding of pain-related genetic influences may identify new targets for therapies and treatments. The relative contribution of the different genes to the variance in clinical and experimental pain responses remains unknown. It is suggested that the genetic contributions to pain perception vary across pain modalities. For example, it has been suggested that more than 60% of the variance in cold pressor responses can be explained by genetic factors; in comparison, only 26% of the variance in heat pain responses is explained by these variations. Thus, the selection of pain model might markedly influence the magnitude of the association between the pain phenotype and genetic variability. Thermal pain sensation is complex with multiple molecular and cellular mechanisms operating alone and in combination within the peripheral and central nervous system. It is thus highly probable that the thermal pain experience is affected by genetic variants in one or more of the pathways involved in the thermal pain signaling. This review aims to present and discuss some of the genetic variations that have previously been associated with different experimental thermal pain models.

  2. Chronic post-thoracotomy pain: a critical review of pathogenic mechanisms and strategies for prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildgaard, Kim; Ravn, Jesper; Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    the methodology and systematics of the studies on the post-thoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) after lung cancer surgery in adults, in order to clarify the relative role of possible pathogenic factors and to define future strategies for prevention. Literature published from 2000 to 2008 together with studies...... as preventive and treatment strategies. However, intercostal nerve injury seems to be the most important pathogenic factor. Since there is a general agreement on the clinical relevance of PTPS, a proposal for design of future trials is presented....

  3. [Neuropathic pain: pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, C

    2013-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by lesions in the somatosensory system. Characteristic but not exclusive features are spontaneous burning pain, electrifying and shooting pain, hyperalgesia, and allodynia. The basic concept of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is the combination of peripheral and central sensitization. Knowledge on the molecular mechanisms has grown exponentially in recent years. The problem lies in identifying the individual mechanisms and in determining a comprehensive concept. Progress has also been made in assessment, e.g., methods for detecting dysfunction of nociceptors have significantly improved. In addition, there are many more therapeutic options available than 15 years ago. The drugs available include antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, and topical medications. Data from controlled trials and recommendations from guidelines are available. PMID:24217854

  4. Central activation by histamine-induced itch: analogies to pain processing: a correlational analysis of O-15 H2O positron emission tomography studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzezga, A; Darsow, U; Treede, R D; Siebner, H; Frisch, M; Munz, F; Weilke, F; Ring, J; Schwaiger, M; Bartenstein, P

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the functional cerebral network involved in the central processing of itch and to detect analogies and differences to previously identified cerebral activation patterns triggered by painful noxious stimuli. Repeated positron emission tomography regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurements using O15-labeled water were performed in six healthy right-handed male subjects (mean age 32 +/- 2 years). Each subject underwent 12 sequential rCBF measurements. In all subjects a standardized skin prick test was performed on the right forearm 2 min before each rCBF measurement. For activation, histamine was applied in nine tests in logarithmically increasing concentrations from 0.03 to 8%. Three tests were performed with isotonic saline solution serving as a control condition. Itch intensity and unpleasantness were registered with a visual analogue scale during each test. Subtraction analysis between activation and control conditions as well as correlation analysis with covariates were performed. Itch induced a significant activation in the predominantly contralateral somatosensory cortex and in the ipsilateral and contralateral motor areas (supplementary motor area (SMA), premotor cortex, primary motor cortex). Additional significant activations were found in the prefrontal cortex and the cingulate gyrus, but not in subcortical structures nor in the secondary somatosensory cortex. In correlation analyses, several cortical areas showed a graded increase in rCBF with the logarithm of the histamine concentration (bilateral sensorimotor areas and cingulate cortex; contralateral insula, superior temporal cortex and prefrontal cortex) and with itch unpleasantness (contralateral sensorimotor cortex, prefrontal cortex and posterior insula; ipsilateral SMA). Induction of itch results in the activation of a distributed cerebral network. Itch and pain seem to share common pathways (a medial and a lateral processing pathway and a strong projection

  5. Phospholipase D-mediated hypersensitivity at central synapses is associated with abnormal behaviours and pain sensitivity in rats exposed to prenatal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liting; Gooding, Hayley L; Brunton, Paula J; Russell, John A; Mitchell, Rory; Fleetwood-Walker, Sue

    2013-11-01

    Adverse events at critical stages of development can lead to lasting dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS). To seek potential underlying changes in synaptic function, we used a newly developed protocol to measure alterations in receptor-mediated Ca(2+) fluorescence responses of synaptoneurosomes, freshly isolated from selected regions of the CNS concerned with emotionality and pain processing. We compared adult male controls and offspring of rats exposed to social stress in late pregnancy (prenatal stress, PS), which showed programmed behavioural changes indicating anxiety, anhedonia and pain hypersensitivity. We found corresponding increases, in PS rats compared with normal controls, in responsiveness of synaptoneurosomes from frontal cortex to a glutamate receptor (GluR) agonist, and from spinal cord to activators of nociceptive afferents. Through a combined pharmacological and biochemical strategy, we found evidence for a role of phospholipase D1 (PLD1)-mediated signalling, that may involve 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR) activation, at both levels of the nervous system. These changes might participate in underpinning the enduring alterations in behaviour induced by PS. PMID:23932932

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF MUSCLE STRETCHING IN OCCUPATION RELATED CHRONIC MECHANICAL LOW BACK PAIN IN COMMUNITY NURSES –A SINGLE BLIND STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khwairakpam Zhimina Devi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Stretching of Lower Back Muscle, Hamstring and Tensor Fasciae Latae have an immediate effect on Chronic Lower Back Pain. Hence the purpose is to find the short term effect of stretching of Lower Back Muscle, Hamstring and Tensor Fasciae Latae on intensity of low back pain, flexibility and functional disability in occupation related Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain in Community Nurses. Method: Single blind experimental study design, 40 subjects with Chronic mechanical low back pain randomized 20 subjects into each Study and Control group. Control group received placebo stretching while Study group received stretching of Lower Back Muscle, Hamstring and Tensor Fasciae Latae for 7 sessions for a period of one week and followed up after one week post intervention where no intervention was given during follow up week. Results: Analysis using RMANOVA found that there was a statistically significant (p<0.05 greater percentage of improvement in outcomes measures means of VAS, ODI score and FFD after one week of intervention in Study group when compared with Control Group. During follow-up there is statistically significant greater percentage of maintenance of improvements were found in study group than control group. Conclusion: It is concluded that stretching of Lower Back Muscle, Hamstring and Tensor Fasciae Latae statistically and clinically shown significant short term effect on improving pain, flexibility and functional disability in occupation related Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain in Community Nurses.

  7. Isometric knee extensor fatigue following a Wingate test: peripheral and central mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-del-Olmo, M; Rodriguez, F A; Marquez, G; Iglesias, X; Marina, M; Benitez, A; Vallejo, L; Acero, R M

    2013-02-01

    Central and peripheral fatigue have been explored during and after running or cycling exercises. However, the fatigue mechanisms associated with a short maximal cycling exercise (30 s Wingate test) have not been investigated. In this study, 10 volunteer subjects performed several isometric voluntary contractions using the leg muscle extensors before and after two bouts of cycling at 25% of maximal power output and two bouts of Wingate tests. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical motor nerve stimulation (NM) were applied at rest and during the voluntary contractions. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), twitch amplitude evoked by electrical nerve stimulation, M wave and motor potential evoked by TMS (MEP) were recorded. MVC, VA and twitch amplitude evoked at rest by NM decreased significantly after the first and second Wingate tests, indicating central and peripheral fatigue. MVC and VA, but not the twitch amplitude evoked by NM, recovered before the second Wingate test. These results suggest that the Wingate test results in a decrease in MVC associated with peripheral and central fatigue. While the peripheral fatigue is associated with an intramuscular impairment, the central fatigue seems to be the main reason for the Wingate test-induced impairment of MVC.

  8. Integrating evidence into practice: use of McKenzie-based treatment for mechanical low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Angela Dunsford1, Saravana Kumar1,2, Sarah Clarke1 1International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, 2School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia Abstract: Low back pain (LBP is a major health issue with significant socioeconomic implications in most Western countries. Many forms of treatment have been proposed and investigated in the past, with exercise being a commonly prescribed intervention. Within allied health, in particular physiotherapy, there has been a growing movement that recognizes the role of the McKenzie method in treating LBP. Within the McKenzie framework, directional preference (DP exercises are one such intervention, with preliminary data demonstrating its effectiveness in the management of LBP. In this paper, we aim to integrate the evidence from current research, identified using a systematic review, and utilize a practical real-life case scenario to outline how evidence from the literature can be implemented in clinical practice. The findings from the systematic review indicate that DP exercises may have positive effects in the management of LBP. While the body of evidence to support this is limited (only four studies and therefore modest at best, it does provide some emerging evidence to support the use of DP exercises in clinical practice. Despite this, gaps also persist in the literature on DP exercises, and this relates to the exercise parameters and the compliance rates. Recognizing this dichotomy (modest evidence in some areas and evidence gaps in other areas, which is likely to confront health practitioners, using a practical approach with a real-life clinical scenario, we outline how the evidence from the systematic review can be implemented in clinical practice. This approach builds on the philosophy of evidence-based practice of integrating research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. Keywords: low back pain, McKenzie method, directional

  9. Tapentadol extended-release for treatment of chronic pain: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadivelu N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Nalini Vadivelu1, Alexander Timchenko1, Yili Huang2, Raymond Sinatra11Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT; 2Internal Medicine, North Shore-LIJ Plainview Hospital, Plainview, NY, USAAbstract: Tapentadol is a centrally acting analgesic with a dual mechanism of action of mu receptor agonism and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition. Tapentadol immediate-release is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the management of moderate-to-severe acute pain. It was developed to decrease the intolerability issue associated with opioids. Tapentadol extended-release has a 12-hour duration of effect, and has recently been evaluated for pain in patients with chronic osteoarthritis, low back pain, and pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Tapentadol extended-release was found to provide safe and highly effective analgesia for the treatment of chronic pain conditions, including moderate-to-severe chronic osteoarthritis pain and low back pain. Initial trials demonstrating efficacy in neuropathic pain suggest that tapentadol has comparable analgesic effectiveness and better gastrointestinal tolerability than opioid comparators, and demonstrates effectiveness in settings of inflammatory, somatic, and neuropathic pain. Gastrointestinal intolerance and central nervous system effects were the major adverse events noted. Tapentadol will need to be rigorously tested in chronic neuropathic pain, cancer-related pain, and cancer-related neuropathic pain.Keywords: osteoarthritis, neuropathic pain, analgesic, opioids, norepinephrine

  10. The psychometric properties of the Roland Morris disability questionnaire for patients with chronic mechanical low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Buchanan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Functional status measures are currently not widelyused in South Africa to facilitate clinical decision-making or document treatment outcomes for patients with low back pain (LBP. This study investigated the internal consistency and clinical utility of a back-specific functional status measure, the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ, and determined its ability to confirm the need for spinal fusion surgery. Method: Aretrospective, descriptive design was used with 42 patients with chronic mechanical low back pain who consulted a private Orthopaedic surgeon in Cape Town over a one year  period. All patients completed the RMDQ prior to their consultation. On completion of the medical examination, a rating for surgery was determined for each patient. The completed questionnaires were analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS. Results: The mean RMDQ score was 8.6 (N=42; median=9.0; range=2-21. Cronbach’s alpha showed a high internal consistency between items (.92. A categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA identified two distinct dimensions in the RMDQ. Item reduction improved the internal consistency and thus the construct validity of the RMDQ. There was a low correlation between the surgeon’s rating for surgery and RMDQ scores (r=.40; P<.01. Conclusion: The RMDQ shows some good psychometric properties but some adjustments could improve it. The RMDQ cannot be used to predict the need for spinal fusion surgery.

  11. Quercetin Inhibits Peripheral and Spinal Cord Nociceptive Mechanisms to Reduce Intense Acute Swimming-Induced Muscle Pain in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Sergio M.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Fattori, Victor; Bussmann, Allan J. C.; Vignoli, Josiane A.; Camilios-Neto, Doumit; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the flavonoid quercetin (3,3´,4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) in a mice model of intense acute swimming-induced muscle pain, which resembles delayed onset muscle soreness. Quercetin intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment dose-dependently reduced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia. Quercetin inhibited myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D- glucosaminidase (NAG) activities, cytokine production, oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and gp91phox mRNA expression and muscle injury (creatinine kinase [CK] blood levels and myoblast determination protein [MyoD] mRNA expression) as well as inhibited NFκB activation and induced Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNA expression in the soleus muscle. Beyond inhibiting those peripheral effects, quercetin also inhibited spinal cord cytokine production, oxidative stress and glial cells activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP] and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 [Iba-1] mRNA expression). Concluding, the present data demonstrate that quercetin is a potential molecule for the treatment of muscle pain conditions related to unaccustomed exercise. PMID:27583449

  12. Clinical biopsychosocial physiotherapy assessment of patients with chronic pain: The first step in pain neuroscience education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijma, Amarins J; van Wilgen, C Paul; Meeus, Mira; Nijs, Jo

    2016-07-01

    Pain neuroscience education (PNE) is increasingly used as part of a physical therapy treatment in patients with chronic pain. A thorough clinical biopsychosocial assessment is recommended prior to PNE to allow proper explanation of the neurophysiology of pain and the biopsychosocial interactions in an interactive and patient-centered manner. However, without clear guidelines, clinicians are left wondering how a biopsychosocial assessment should be administered. Therefore, we provided a practical guide, based on scientific research and clinical experience, for the biopsychosocial assessment of patients with chronic pain in physiotherapy practice. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of the Pain - Somatic factors - Cognitive factors - Emotional factors - Behavioral factors - Social factors - Motivation - model (PSCEBSM-model) during the intake, as well as a pain analysis sheet. This model attempts to clearly establish what the dominant pain mechanism is (predominant nociceptive, neuropathic, or non-neuropathic central sensitization pain), as well as to assess the provoking and perpetuating biopsychosocial factors in patients with chronic pain. Using this approach allows the clinician to specifically classify patients and tailor the plan of care, including PNE, to individual patients. PMID:27351769

  13. Clinical biopsychosocial physiotherapy assessment of patients with chronic pain: The first step in pain neuroscience education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijma, Amarins J; van Wilgen, C Paul; Meeus, Mira; Nijs, Jo

    2016-07-01

    Pain neuroscience education (PNE) is increasingly used as part of a physical therapy treatment in patients with chronic pain. A thorough clinical biopsychosocial assessment is recommended prior to PNE to allow proper explanation of the neurophysiology of pain and the biopsychosocial interactions in an interactive and patient-centered manner. However, without clear guidelines, clinicians are left wondering how a biopsychosocial assessment should be administered. Therefore, we provided a practical guide, based on scientific research and clinical experience, for the biopsychosocial assessment of patients with chronic pain in physiotherapy practice. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of the Pain - Somatic factors - Cognitive factors - Emotional factors - Behavioral factors - Social factors - Motivation - model (PSCEBSM-model) during the intake, as well as a pain analysis sheet. This model attempts to clearly establish what the dominant pain mechanism is (predominant nociceptive, neuropathic, or non-neuropathic central sensitization pain), as well as to assess the provoking and perpetuating biopsychosocial factors in patients with chronic pain. Using this approach allows the clinician to specifically classify patients and tailor the plan of care, including PNE, to individual patients.

  14. FORMATIVE MECHANISM OF AKAISHI MOUNTAINS AND ENREI BASIN IN CENTRAL JAPAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasu'uchi KUBOTA; Takao YANO

    2001-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction It is common in mobile belts that uplifting mountains are neighbored by synchronously subsiding basins.The coupling mechanism of such subsidence and uplift is an important target to clarify the dynamics of mobile belts.We investigate the coupled mountain uplift and basin subsidence in the Central Japan highland,the junction of three island arcs (the Northeast Japan,the Southwest Japan and the Izu-Ogasawara arcs).The highland over 3 000 m in height is composed of mountain ranges,plateaus and intramountain basins (Fig.1).

  15. FORMATIVE MECHANISM OF AKAISHI MOUNTAINS AND ENREI BASIN IN CENTRAL JAPAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasu'uchi; KUBOTA; Takao; YANO

    2001-01-01

    1 Introduction  It is common in mobile belts that uplifting mountains are neighbored by synchronously subsiding basins.The coupling mechanism of such subsidence and uplift is an important target to clarify the dynamics of mobile belts.We investigate the coupled mountain uplift and basin subsidence in the Central Japan highland,the junction of three island arcs (the Northeast Japan,the Southwest Japan and the Izu-Ogasawara arcs).The highland over 3 000 m in height is composed of mountain ranges,plateaus and intramountain basins (Fig.1).……

  16. Scratching the surface: the processing of pain from deep tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikandar, Shafaq; Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2016-04-01

    Although most pain research focuses on skin, muscles, joints and viscerae are major sources of pain. We discuss the mechanisms of deep pains arising from somatic and visceral structures and how this can lead to widespread manifestations and chronification. We include how both altered peripheral and central sensory neurotransmission lead to deep pain states and comment on key areas such as top-down modulation where little is known. It is vital that the clinical characterization of deep pain in patients is improved to allow for back translation to preclinical models so that the missing links can be ascertained. The contribution of deeper somatic and visceral tissues to various chronic pain syndromes is common but there is much we need to know. PMID:26974398

  17. The immune system: a new look at pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-hua; HUANG Yu-guang

    2006-01-01

    Objective To review the relationship between the immune system and the mechanism of pain.Data sources Related researches published in the period of 1987-2005 were systematically reviewed.Study selection Articles about the immune system and pain were selected.Data extraction Data were mainly extracted from 74 articles which are listed in the reference section of this review.Results Pain was classically viewed as being mediated solely by neurons. However, growing evidence has showed the possible relationships between the immune system and the central nervous system. In this article, we reviewed the role of the immune system in the development of pain, together with the importance of the glia in this process. These findings suggest a novel approach to pain control in the future.Conclusions The immune system plays a potential but important role in the development of pain.

  18. Pain research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In addition to investigating the anatomy,neurochemistry and neurophysiology of pain pathways,Chinese researchers have extended their work into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of sensory afferent transmission at the spinal cord level as well as cognitive processing in the brain.The mechanism underlying acupuncture analgesia remains a subject of special interest for Chinese pain researchers,with the aim of combining clinical practice with the understanding of pain transmission and analgesic mechanism.

  19. Neuroscience education in addition to trigger point dry needling for the management of patients with mechanical chronic low back pain: A preliminary clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez-García, Mario; de-la-Llave-Rincón, Ana I; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Palacios-Ceña, Maria; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine the short-term effects of trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) alone or combined with neuroscience education on pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical low back pain (LBP). Twelve patients with LBP were randomly assigned to receive either TrP-DN (TrP-DN) or TrP-DN plus neuroscience education (TrP-DN + EDU). Pain intensity (Numerical Pain Rating Scale, 0-10), disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire-RMQ-, Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index-ODI), kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-TSK), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, transverse process of L3 vertebra, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscle were collected at baseline and 1-week after the intervention. Patients treated with TrP-DN + EDU experienced a significantly greater reduction of kinesiophobia (P = 0.008) and greater increases in PPT over the transverse process of L3 (P = 0.049) than those patients treated only with TrP-DN. Both groups experienced similar decreases in pain, ODI and RMQ, and similar increases in PPT over the C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior after the intervention (all, P > 0.05). The results suggest that TrP-DN was effective for improving pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical LBP at short-term. The inclusion of a neuroscience educational program resulted in a greater improvement in kinesiophobia. PMID:26118519

  20. Pain in Down's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Federica Mafrica; Daniela Schifilliti; Vincenzo Fodale

    2006-01-01

    Pain is a homeostatic mechanism that intervenes to protect the organism from harmful stimuli that could damage its integrity. It is made up of two components: the sensory-discriminative component, which identifies the provenance and characteristics of the type of pain; and the affective-motivational component, on which emotional reflexes, following the painful sensation, depend.There is a system for pain control at an encephalic and spinal level, principally made up of the periaqueductal grey...

  1. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Brenda Golianu; Ann Ming Yeh; Meredith Brooks

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex re...

  2. Immune mediators of chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Stephen F; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-05-01

    The cause of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) has yet to be established. Since the late 1980s, cytokine, chemokine, and immunological classification studies using human samples have focused on identifying biomarkers for CPPS, but no diagnostically beneficial biomarkers have been identified, and these studies have done little to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic prostatic pain. Given the large number of men thought to be affected by this condition and the ineffective nature of current treatments, there is a pressing need to elucidate these mechanisms. Prostatitis types IIIa and IIIb are classified according to the presence of pain without concurrent presence of bacteria; however, it is becoming more evident that, although levels of bacteria are not directly associated with levels of pain, the presence of bacteria might act as the initiating factor that drives primary activation of mast-cell-mediated inflammation in the prostate. Mast cell activation is also known to suppress regulatory T cell (Treg) control of self-tolerance and also activate neural sensitization. This combination of established autoimmunity coupled with peripheral and central neural sensitization can result in the development of multiple symptoms, including pelvic pain and bladder irritation. Identifying these mechanisms as central mediators in CPPS offers new insight into the prospective treatment of the disease. PMID:24686526

  3. Chronic central administration of Ghrelin increases bone mass through a mechanism independent of appetite regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Jin Choi

    Full Text Available Leptin plays a critical role in the central regulation of bone mass. Ghrelin counteracts leptin. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic intracerebroventricular administration of ghrelin on bone mass in Sprague-Dawley rats (1.5 μg/day for 21 days. Rats were divided into control, ghrelin ad libitum-fed (ghrelin ad lib-fed, and ghrelin pair-fed groups. Ghrelin intracerebroventricular infusion significantly increased body weight in ghrelin ad lib-fed rats but not in ghrelin pair-fed rats, as compared with control rats. Chronic intracerebroventricular ghrelin infusion significantly increased bone mass in the ghrelin pair-fed group compared with control as indicated by increased bone volume percentage, trabecular thickness, trabecular number and volumetric bone mineral density in tibia trabecular bone. There was no significant difference in trabecular bone mass between the control group and the ghrelin ad-lib fed group. Chronic intracerebroventricular ghrelin infusion significantly increased the mineral apposition rate in the ghrelin pair-fed group as compared with control. In conclusion, chronic central administration of ghrelin increases bone mass through a mechanism that is independent of body weight, suggesting that ghrelin may have a bone anabolic effect through the central nervous system.

  4. Pathogens penetrating the central nervous system: infection pathways and the cellular and molecular mechanisms of invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Samantha J; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Norton, Robert; Currie, Bart J; St John, James A; Ekberg, Jenny A K; Batzloff, Michael; Ulett, Glen C; Beacham, Ifor R

    2014-10-01

    The brain is well protected against microbial invasion by cellular barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). In addition, cells within the central nervous system (CNS) are capable of producing an immune response against invading pathogens. Nonetheless, a range of pathogenic microbes make their way to the CNS, and the resulting infections can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Bacteria, amoebae, fungi, and viruses are capable of CNS invasion, with the latter using axonal transport as a common route of infection. In this review, we compare the mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens reach the CNS and infect the brain. In particular, we focus on recent data regarding mechanisms of bacterial translocation from the nasal mucosa to the brain, which represents a little explored pathway of bacterial invasion but has been proposed as being particularly important in explaining how infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei can result in melioidosis encephalomyelitis.

  5. Some Aspects of Quantum Mechanics of Particle Motion in Static Centrally Symmetric Gravitational Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbatenko, M V; Popov, E Yu

    2015-01-01

    The domain of wave functions and effective potentials of the Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations for quantum-mechanical particles in static centrally symmetric gravitational fields are analyzed by taking into account the Hilbert causality condition. For all the explored metrics, assuming existence of event horizons, the conditions of a "fall" of a particle to the appropriate event horizons are implemented. The exclusion is one of the solutions for the Reissner-Nordstroem extreme field with the single event horizon. In this case, while fulfilling the condition found by V.I.Dokuchaev, Yu.N.Yeroshenko, the normalization integral is convergent and the wave functions become zero on the event horizon. This corresponds to the Hilbert causality condition. In our paper, due to the analysis of the effective potential for the Reissner-Nordstroem extreme field with real radial wave functions of the Dirac equation, the impossibility is demonstrated for the bound stationary state existence of quantum-mechanical particles, wit...

  6. Central mechanisms mediating the hypophagic effects of oleoylethanolamide and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines: different lipid signals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele eRomano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The spread of ‘obesity epidemic’ and the poor efficacy of many anti-obesity therapies in the long-term highlight the need to develop novel efficacious therapy. This necessity stimulates a large research effort to find novel mechanisms controlling feeding and energy balance. Among these mechanisms a great deal of attention has been attracted by a family of phospholipid-derived signaling molecules that play an important role in the regulation of food-intake. They include N-acylethanolamines (NAEs and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs. NAPEs have been considered for a long time simply as phospholipid precursors of the lipid mediator NAEs, but increasing body of evidence suggest a role in many physiological processes including the regulation of feeding behavior. Several observations demonstrated that among NAEs, oleoylethanolamide (OEA acts as a satiety signal, which is generated in the intestine, upon the ingestion of fat, and signals to the central nervous system. At this level different neuronal pathways, including oxytocinergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic neurons, seem to mediate its hypophagic action. Similarly to NAEs, NAPEs (with particular reference to the N16:0 species levels were shown to be regulated by the fed state and this finding was initially interpreted as fluctuations of NAE precursors. However, the observation that exogenously administered NAPEs are able to inhibit food intake, not only in normal rats and mice but also in mice lacking the enzyme that converts NAPEs into NAEs, supported the hypothesis of a role of NAPE in the regulation of feeding behavior. Indirect observations suggest that the hypophagic action of NAPEs might involve central mechanisms, although the molecular target remains unknown. The present paper reviews the role that OEA and NAPEs play in the mechanisms that control food intake, further supporting this group of phospholipids as optimal candidate for the development of novel anti

  7. Anorexic response to rapamycin does not appear to involve a central mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toklu, Hale Z; Bruce, Erin B; Sakarya, Yasemin; Carter, Christy S; Morgan, Drake; Matheny, Michael K; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Scarpace, Philip J; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-09-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that a low and intermittent peripheral dose of rapamycin (1 mg/kg three times/week) to rats inhibited mTORC1 signalling, but avoided the hyperlipidemia and diabetes-like syndrome associated with higher doses of rapamycin. The dosing regimen reduced food intake, body weight, adiposity, serum leptin and triglycerides. mTORC1 signalling was inhibited in both liver and hypothalamus, suggesting some of the actions, in particular the decrease in food intake, may be the results of a central mechanism. To test this hypothesis, rapamycin (30 μg/day for 4 weeks) was infused into 23-25-month-old F344xBN rats by intracerebroventricular (icv) mini pumps. Our results demonstrated that central infusion did not alter food intake or body weight, although there was a tendency for a decrease in body weight towards the end of the study. mTORC1 signalling, evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of S6 protein at end of 4 weeks, was not activated in liver, hypothalamus or hindbrain. Fat and lean mass, sum of white adipose tissues, brown adipose tissue, serum glucose, insulin and leptin levels remained unchanged. Thus, these data suggest that the anorexic and body weight responses evident with peripheral rapamycin are not the result of direct central action. The tendency for decreased body weight towards the end of study, suggests that there is either a slow transport of centrally administered rapamycin into the periphery, or that there is delayed action of rapamycin at sites in the brain. PMID:27232670

  8. Neural mechanism of central inhibition during physical fatigue: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ishii, Akira; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Central inhibition plays an important role in physical performance during physical fatigue. We tried to clarify the neural mechanism of central inhibition during physical fatigue using the magnetoencephalography (MEG) and a classical conditioning technique. Twelve right-handed volunteers participated in this study. Participants underwent MEG recording during the imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by metronome sounds for 10 min. Thereafter, fatigue-inducing maximum handgrip trials were performed for 10 min; the metronome sounds were started 5 min after the beginning of the handgrip trials. We used metronome sounds as conditioned stimuli and maximum handgrip trials as unconditioned stimuli to cause central inhibition. The next day, MEG recording during the imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by metronome sounds were measured for 10 min. Levels of the fatigue sensation in the right hand and sympathetic nerve activity on the second day were significantly higher than those on the first day. In the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 46), the alpha-band event-related desynchronization (ERD) of the second MEG session relative to the first session with the time window of 200 to 300 ms after the onset of handgrip cue sounds was identified. The ERD level in this brain region was positively associated with the change in subjective level of right hand fatigue after the conditioning session and was negatively associated with that of the sympathetic nerve activity. We demonstrated that the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is involved in the neural substrates of central inhibition during physical fatigue.

  9. 神经病理性疼痛中脊髓小胶质细胞活化的分子机制%Activation mechanism of spinal cord microglia in neuropathic pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢波; 肖纯; 孙建良

    2013-01-01

    Background Considerable studies have demonstrated that activation of spinal cord microglia plays a critical role in the modulation of neuronal functions.In addition,activated microglia affects the spinal processing of nociceptive signaling,and is also involved in the regulation of central sensitization,which underlying neural mechanism of neuropathic pain (NP).Objective To explore the activation mechanism of spinal cord microglia in the development of NP.Content This article reviewed the research advances in the mechanisms of spinal microglia activation.It focuses on the extracellular and intracellular signal transduction for microglia activation under NP condition.Trend The role of microglia in NP continues to be the focus of pain research.Studying the role and mechanisms of spinal cord microglia may lead to more effective management of NP.%背景 研究表明脊髓小胶质细胞活化对神经元功能调控起重要作用,并可影响脊髓背角伤害性信号的传递进而参与调控神经病理性疼痛(neuropathic pain,NP)的中枢敏化过程. 目的 探讨NP状态下脊髓小胶质细胞活化的分子机制. 内容 分别从脊髓小胶质细胞活化的胞外分子机制和胞内分子机制两方面就与此相关的研究进展作一综述. 趋向 小胶质细胞在NP中的作用将继续成为疼痛研究的热点,对小胶质细胞的深入研究可能使NP得到更为有效的治疗.

  10. The measurement of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, C L; Hughes-Webb, P

    2011-08-01

    Pain has been studied in depth for decades, yet the pain associated with cancer is still frequently under treated. The measurement of pain in patients with terminal cancer is imperative, because failure to carry it out is recognised as an important reason for inadequate treatment. Although pain is characterised as a symptom, it is a subjective personal experience or a perception. This perception is influenced by both nociceptive transmission and central nervous system modulation; and psychological, social and other environmental factors. It is a complex issue most simply described by the phrase 'Pain is whatever the experiencing person says it is, existing whenever he says it does'. With such complex interplays between pathophysiological and biopsychosocial factors, it is unsurprising that an objective assessment of pain remains elusive. Despite this, many subjective measures of pain have been developed that produce consistent and reliable results when used properly and appropriately. PMID:21571514

  11. Chemical Interventions for Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronoff, Gerald M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews properties and pharmacological effects of medications for pain, including peripherally acting analgesics, centrally acting narcotics, and adjuvant analgesics including antidepressants. Discusses the role of the endogenous opioid system in pain and depression. Explores clinical management issues in both inpatient and outpatient settings,…

  12. Evaluation of mechanisms of hot and cold days in climate models over Central Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in intensity, frequency, and location of temperature extreme events are a focus for many studies that often rely on simulations from climate models to assess changes in temperature extremes. Given the use of climate models for attributing such events to human and natural influences and for projecting future changes, an assessment of the capability of climate models to properly simulate the mechanisms associated with temperature extreme events is necessary. In this study, known mechanisms and relevant meteorological variables are explored in a composite analysis to identify and quantify a climatology of synoptic weather patterns related to hot and cold seasonal temperature extreme events over Central Europe. The analysis is based on extremes that recur once or several times per season for better sampling. Weather patterns from a selection of CMIP5 models are compared with patterns derived from the ERA interim reanalysis. The results indicate that climate models simulate mechanisms associated with temperature extreme events reasonably well, in particular circulation-based mechanisms. The amplitude and average length of events is assessed, where in some cases significant deviations from ERA interim are found. In three cases, the models have on average significantly more days per season with extreme events than ERA interim. Quantitative analyses of physical links between extreme temperature and circulation, relative humidity, and radiation reveal that the strength of the link between the temperature and the variables does not vary greatly from model to model and ERA interim. (letter)

  13. New concepts on functional chronic pelvic and perineal pain: pathophysiology and multidisciplinary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploteau, Stéphane; Labat, Jean Jacques; Riant, Thibault; Levesque, Amélie; Robert, Roger; Nizard, Julien

    2015-03-01

    The management of chronic pelvic and perineal pain has been improved by a better understanding of the mechanisms of this pain and an optimized integrated multidisciplinary approach to the patient. The concept of organic lesions responsible for a persistent nociceptive factor has gradually been replaced by that of dysregulation of nociceptive messages derived from the pelvis and perineum. In this setting, painful diseases identified by organ specialists are usually also involved and share several common denominators (triggering factors, predisposing clinical context). These diseases include painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, vulvodynia, and chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The painful symptoms vary from one individual to another and according to his or her capacity to activate pain inhibition/control processes. Although the patient often attributes chronic pain to a particular organ (with the corollary that pain will persist until the organ has been treated), this pain is generally no longer derived from the organ but is expressed via this organ. Several types of clinical presentation of complex pelvic pain have therefore been pragmatically identified to facilitate the management of treatment failures resulting from a purely organ-based approach, which can also reinforce the patient's impression of incurability. These subtypes correspond to neuropathic pain, central sensitization (fibromyalgia), complex regional pain syndrome, and emotional components similar to those observed in post-traumatic stress disorder. These various components are also often associated and self-perpetuating. Consequently, when pelvic pain cannot be explained by an organ disease, this model, using each of these four components associated with their specific mechanisms, can be used to propose personalized treatment options and also to identify patients at high risk of postoperative pelvic pain (multi-operated patients, central sensitization, post-traumatic stress disorder, etc

  14. Distinct quantitative sensory testing profiles in nonspecific chronic back pain subjects with and without psychological trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesarz, Jonas; Gerhardt, Andreas; Leisner, Sabine; Janke, Susanne; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Eich, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Psychological trauma is associated with an increased risk for chronification of nonspecific chronic back pain (nsCLBP) independent of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the mechanisms underlying the role of psychological trauma in nsCLBP are less clear than in PTSD. Therefore, this study considered whether psychological trauma exposure (TE) is accompanied by specific alterations in pain perception. The study included 56 participants with nsCLBP and TE (nsCLBP-TE), 93 participants with nsCLBP without TE (nsCLBP-W-TE), and 31 pain-free controls. All participants underwent a thorough clinical evaluation. The standardized quantitative sensory testing protocol of the "German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain" was used to obtain comprehensive profiles on somatosensory functions in painful (back) and non-painful areas (hand). The protocol consisted of thermal and mechanical detection as well as pain thresholds, vibration thresholds, and pain sensitivity to sharp and blunt mechanical stimuli. Psychological trauma was validated by structured clinical interview. Trauma-associated symptom severity, anxiety, and depressive symptomatology were assessed by self-report questionnaires. Differences in somatosensory function were seen only for pressure pain thresholds. Compared with controls, nsCLBP-TE revealed hyperalgesia generalized in space with lower thresholds in painful and non-painful areas, whereas nsCLBP-W-TE demonstrated localized alterations with decreased thresholds only in the pain-affected area of the back (P ≤ 0.006). Our findings suggest an augmented central pain processing in nsCLBP-TE (alterations in painful and non-painful areas), whereas nsCLBP-W-TE show only local changes (alterations only in the painful area) suggesting regional sensitization processes. This finding might explain why TE without PTSD is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic pain. PMID:25790450

  15. A Centralized Auction Mechanism for the Disability and Survivors Insurance in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes H., Gonzalo

    As part of the pension reform recently approved in Chile, the government introduced a centralized auction mechanism to provide the Disability and Survivors (D&S) Insurance that covers recent contributors among the more than 8 million participants in the mandatory private pension system. This paper is intended as a case study presenting the main distortions found in the decentralized operation of the system that led to this reform and the challenges faced when designing a competitive auction mechanism to be implemented jointly by the Pension Fund Managers (AFP). In a typical bilateral contract the AFP retained much of the risk and the Insurance Company acted in practice as a reinsurer. The process to hire this contract was not competitive and colligated companies ended up providing the service. Several distortions affected competition in the market through incentives to cream-skim members by AFPs (since they bear most of the risk) or efforts to block disability claims. Since the price of this insurance is hidden in the fees charged by AFPs for the administration of individual accounts and pension funds there was lack of price transparency. Since new AFPs have no history of members’ disability and mortality profile the insurance contract acted as a barrier to entry in the market of AFP services, especially when D&S insurance costs reached 50% of total costs. Cross-subsidies between members of the same AFP, inefficient risk pooling (due to pooling occurring at the AFP rather than at the system level) and regulatory arbitrage, since AFPs provided insurance not being regulated as an insurance company, were also present. A centralized auction mechanism solves these market failures, but also gives raise to new challenges, such as how to design a competitive auction that attracts participation and deters collusion. Design features that were incorporated in the regulation to tackle these issues, such as dividing coverage into predefined percentage blocks, are presented

  16. Does mechanical massage of the abdominal wall after colectomy reduce postoperative pain and shorten the duration of ileus? Results of a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Blanc-Louvry, Isabelle; Costaglioli, Bruno; Boulon, Catherine; Leroi, Anne-Marie; Ducrotte, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of mechanical abdominal massage on postoperative pain and ileus after colectomy. We hypothesized that parietal abdominal stimulation could counteract induced pain and postoperative ileus, through common spinal-sensitive pathways, with nociceptive visceral messages. After preoperative randomization, 25 patients (age 52 +/- 5 years) underwent active mechanical massage by intermittent negative pressure on the abdominal wall resulting in aspiration (Cellu M50 device, LPG, Valence, France), and 25 patients (age 60 +/- 6 years) did not receive active mechanical massage (placebo group). Massage sessions began the first day after colectomy and were performed daily until the seventh postoperative day. In the active-massage group, amplitude and frequency were used, which have been shown to be effective in reducing muscular pain, whereas in the placebo group, ineffective parameters were used. Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores, doses of analgesics (propacetamol), and delay between surgery and the time to first passage of flatus were assessed. Types and dosages of the anesthetic drugs and the duration of the surgical procedure did not differ between groups. From the second and third postoperative days, respectively, VAS pain scores (P < 0.001) and doses of analgesics (P < 0.05) were significantly lower in patients receiving active massage compared to the placebo group. Time to first passage of flatus was also significantly shorter in the active-massage group (1.8 +/- 0.3 days vs. 3.6 +/- 0.4 days, P < 0.01). No adverse effects were observed. These results suggest that mechanical massage of the abdominal wall may decrease postoperative pain and ileus after colectomy. PMID:11986017

  17. Myofascial pain, fibromyalgia or fibrositis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J M S

    2004-01-01

    The terms myofascial pain, fibromyalgia and fibrositis are critically examined. They constitute diagnostic labels for non-specific musculoskeletal aches and pains. Analysis of the evidence shows that none of these labels is substantiated by hard physical signs or by laboratory evidence of consistent pathological or biochemical abnormality. What is the objective evidence for disorder(s) of muscle, fascia or fibrous tissues, so clearly indicated by these diagnostic names? Alternative terms such as 'regional pain syndrome' or 'chronic pain syndrome' merely redefine the clinical problem without providing a mechanism or basis for diagnosis. Despite different diagnostic criteria, these conditions, along with chronic fatigue syndrome, have many demographic and clinical similarities, most notably tender trigger points. Indeed, the terms are often used interchangeably. There are few differences in the symptoms, physical findings, laboratory tests, functional status, psychosocial features and psychiatric disorders. This paper seeks not to deny the existence of aches and pains, but to critically examine the utility of these terms. The only claimed physical sign is the presence of tender trigger points over muscles or muscle attachments. Research suggests that tender points are a measure of general distress related to pain complaints but separately associated with fatigue and depression. They are present in some normal subjects and are variable in occurrence in time in the same individual. They reflect no demonstrable pathology. It is therefore argued that none of these commonly used diagnoses represent distinct disease entities. A possible but unproven alternative hypothesis is that such symptoms relate to neural pain with both peripheral and central components, and in some instances psychological or wilful embellishment.

  18. Endometriosis and pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Orlandini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In some patients endometriosis causes persistent or chronic pain and is a specialistic algologic problem. Considering various possible pathogenic pain mechanisms, when pain therapy of endometriosis cannot be etiologic, far from be only symptomatic, it is based on a pathogenetic criterion. We must consider that in endometriosis can be a pain due to activation of nociceptors sensibilized by endometriosic tissues (tissutal nociceptive pain unresponding to NSAIDs and opioids or a pain due to the nerve damage by nerve compression from endometriosic cistis or by involvement of nerve structures in scar tissue (neuropathic pain unresponding to antinociceptive therapy but responding, at least partially, to some neuropathic specific pain drugs and to electrostimulation of the nerve system.

  19. Cancer Pain Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; Bannister, Kirsty; Dickenson, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    reorganization within segments of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord receiving nociceptive input from the bone are discussed. Changes in certain neurotransmitters implicated in brain modulation of spinal function are also altered with implications for the affective components of cancer pain. Treatments......Mechanisms of inflammatory and neuropathic pains have been elucidated and translated to patient care by the use of animal models of these pain states. Cancer pain has lagged behind since early animal models of cancer-induced bone pain were based on the systemic injection of carcinoma cells....... This precluded systematic investigation of specific neuronal and pharmacological alterations that occur in cancer-induced bone pain. In 1999, Schwei et al. described a murine model of cancer-induced bone pain that paralleled the clinical condition in terms of pain development and bone destruction, confined...

  20. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Golianu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed.

  1. A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, cross over study to evaluate the analgesic activity of Boswellia serrata in healthy volunteers using mechanical pain model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Prabhavathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Experimental pain models in human healthy volunteers are advantageous for early evaluation of analgesics. All efforts to develop nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs which are devoid of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular system effects are still far from achieving a breakthrough. Hence we evaluated the analgesic activity of an ayurvedic drug, Boswellia serrata by using validated human pain models which has shown its analgesic activity both in-vitro and preclinical studies to evaluate the analgesic activity of single oral dose (125 mg, 2 capsules of Boswellia serrata compared to placebo using mechanical pain model in healthy human subjects. Materials and Methods: After taking written informed consent, twelve healthy subjects were randomized (1:1 to receive single oral dose of Boswellia serrata (Shallaki® 125 mg, 2 capsules or identical placebo in a crossover design. Mechanical pain was assessed using Ugo basile analgesymeter (by Randall Selitto test at baseline and at 1 hr, 2 hrs and 3 hrs after test drug administration. Pain Threshold force and time and Pain Tolerance force and time were evaluated. Statistical analysis was done by paired t-test. Results : Twelve healthy volunteers have completed the study. Mean percentage change from baseline in Pain Threshold force and time with Boswellia serrata when compared to placebo had significantly increased [Force: 9.7 ± 11.0 vs 2.9 ± 3.4 (P = 0.05 and time: 9.7 ± 10.7 vs 2.8 ± 3.4 (P = 0.04] at third hr. Mean Percentage change from baseline in Pain Tolerance force and time with Boswellia serrata when compared to placebo had significantly (P ≤ 0.01 increased at 1 hr, 2 hrs and 3 hrs. Conclusion : In the present study, Boswellia serrata significantly increased the Pain Threshold and Pain Tolerance force and time compared to placebo. Both study medications were well tolerated. Further multiple dose studies may be needed to establish the analgesic efficacy of the drug.

  2. Patellofemoral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Kay M; Callaghan, Michael J; van Linschoten, Robbart

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain refers to pain behind or around the patella (also known as patellofemoral pain syndrome, anterior knee pain, runner's knee, and, formerly, chondromalacia patellae). Patellofemoral pain is common, accounting for 11-17% of all knee pain presentations to general practice.(1 2) While it typically occurs in physically active people aged Patellofemoral pain can be diagnosed in the clinic, and evidence based treatments can reduce pain and improve function, allowing patients to maintain a physically active lifestyle. PMID:26834209

  3. Progesterone stimulates respiration through a central nervous system steroid receptor-mediated mechanism in cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Gallman, E A; Cidlowski, J A

    1987-11-01

    We have examined the effect on respiration of the steroid hormone progesterone, administered either intravenously or directly into the medulla oblongata in anesthetized and paralyzed male and female cats. The carotid sinus and vagus nerves were cut, and end-tidal PCO2 and temperature were kept constant with servo-controllers. Phrenic nerve activity was used to quantitate central respiratory activity. Repeated doses of progesterone (from 0.1 to 2.0 micrograms/kg, cumulative) caused a sustained (greater than 45 min) facilitation of phrenic nerve activity in female and male cats; however, the response was much more variable in females. Progesterone injected into the region of nucleus tractus solitarii, a respiratory-related area in the medulla oblongata, also caused a prolonged stimulation of respiration. Progesterone administration at high concentration by both routes also caused a substantial hypotension. Identical i.v. doses of other classes of steroid hormones (17 beta-estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) did not elicit the same respiratory effect. Pretreatment with RU 486, a progesterone-receptor antagonist, blocked the facilitatory effect of progesterone. We conclude that progesterone acts centrally through a steroid receptor-mediated mechanism to facilitate respiration. PMID:3478727

  4. Insulin hormone: Mechanism and effects on the body and relationship with central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zuhal Altunkaynak

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the most common andchronic disease all over the world. It is characterized witheither insulin deficiency or insulin resistance. Insulin is ahormone which is secreted by beta cells in the LangerhansIslets of pancreas and playing a role in carbohydratemetabolism regulation in association with glucagon. Regardingthe insulin’s effects on carbohydrates, almost inall tissues (except brain insulin increases the facilitateddiffusion of glucose into cells and shows and an effect toreduce the blood glucose levels. In other words, it haveregulator role on blood sugar level; insulin secretion isknown to be associated with an increase in the amountof energy. Insulin secretion is related with increasing glucoselevel. It has been shown that it is closely relatedwith intracellular enzymes and has a stimulating effecton transcription of glucokinase, pyruvate kinase, phosphofructokinase and fructose-2,6 biphosphatase thatare glicolytic and an inhibitory effect on transcription ofphosphophenolpyruvate carboxykinase that is gluconeogenetic.Besides being the primary regulator of carbohydratemetabolism, insulin also has an important effect onlipid and protein metabolisms that are interrelated withcarbohydrate metabolism. For the basis of diabetes effectson Central Nervous system (CNS two mechanismsare emphasized; first is the oxidative stress developeddue to metabolic changes and the second is damagesof calcium ion metabolism. In this review, it was intendedto reach detailed information by reviewing insulin’s basiceffect mechanism, its reflection on cellular level and itsrelationship with central nervous system.

  5. Endocannabinoids are involved in male vertebrate reproduction: regulatory mechanisms at central and gonadal level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia eBovolin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids are natural lipids regulating a large array of physiological functions and behaviors in vertebrates. The endocannabinoid system is highly conserved in evolution and comprises several specific receptors (type-1 and type-2 cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (e.g. anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and a number of biosynthetic and degradative enzymes. In the last few years, endocannabinoids have been described as critical signals in the control of male and female reproduction at multiple levels: centrally, by targeting hypothalamic Gonadotropin-Releasing-Hormone secreting neurons and pituitary, and locally, with direct effects on the gonads. These functions are supported by the extensive localization of cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes at different levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in mammals, as well as bonyfish and amphibians. In vivo and in vitro studies indicate that endocannabinoids centrally regulate gonadal functions by modulating the Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone-gonadotropin-steroid network through direct and indirect mechanisms. Several proofs of local endocannabinoid regulation have been found in the testis and male genital tracts, since endocannabinoids control Sertoli and Leydig cells activity, germ cell progression, as well as the acquisition of sperm functions. A comparative approach usually is a key step in the study of physiological events leading to the building of a general model. Thus, in this review we summarize the action of endocannabinoids at different levels of the male reproductive axis, with special emphasis, where appropriate, on data from non-mammalian vertebrates.

  6. Stress accumulation process in and around the Atotsugawa fault, central Japan, estimated from focal mechanism analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Youichiro; Katsumata, Kei; Katao, Hiroshi; Kosuga, Masahiro; Iio, Yoshihisa; Sagiya, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    We estimated 275 focal mechanisms from P-wave first-motion polarities of small earthquakes obtained in an extensive seismic survey during 2004-2008 in and around the Atotsugawa fault, central Japan, where ongoing dextral shear strain concentration has been observed. Along the fault trace, the azimuth direction of P-axes is oriented WNW-ESE, which agrees well with previous studies. The regional stress disturbance is detected by stress inversion analysis. The azimuth of the maximum principal stress axis systematically rotates counterclockwise as the distance from the fault trace decreases. The regional stress disturbance is explained by a cumulative slip deficit in the shallower portion of the Atotsugawa fault relative to the surrounding fault surface (i.e., the eastern, western, and deeper extensions of the fault plane).

  7. Mechanisms Contributing to Suppressed Precipitation in Mt. Hua of Central China, Part I: Mountain Valley Circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yan; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Zhao, Chun; Li, Zhanqing; Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2016-02-15

    Significant reduction in precipitation in the past decades has been documented over many mountain ranges such as those in central and eastern China. Consistent with the increase of air pollution in these regions, it has been argued that the precipitation trend is linked to aerosol microphysical effect on suppressing warm rain. Rigorous quantitative investigations on the reasons responsible for the precipitation reduction are lacking. Here in this study, we employed an improved Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with online coupled chemistry (WRF-Chem) and conducted simulations at the convection-permitting scale to explore the major mechanisms governing changes in precipitation from orographic clouds in the Mountain (Mt.) Hua area in Central China. We find that anthropogenic pollution contributes to a ~ 40% reduction of precipitation over Mt. Hua during the one-month summer time period. The reduction is mainly associated with precipitation events associated with valleymountain circulation and a mesoscale cold front event. In this Part I paper, we scrutinize the mechanism leading to significant reduction for the cases associated with valley-mountain circulation. We find that the valley breeze is weakened by aerosols due to absorbing aerosol induced warming aloft and cooling near the surface as a result of aerosol-radiation interaction (ARI). The weakened valley breeze along with reduced water vapor in the valley due to reduced evapotranspiration as a result of surface cooling significantly reduce the transport of water vapor from the valley to mountain and the relative humidity over the mountain, thus suppressing convection and precipitation in the mountain.

  8. The Relationship Between The Level Of Knowledge The Mechanics Of The Body Of Patients With Lumbar Disc Herniation And Pain Intensity

    OpenAIRE

    AKCA, Nazan Kılıç; Editörden; AYDIN, Gökçen; GÜMÜŞ, Kenan

    2013-01-01

    This study of patients with lumbar disc herniation level of knowledge about the mechanics of the body was carried out to determine the effect on pain intensity. This cross-sectional descriptive study inpatient physical therapy and rehabilitation was conducted in nine monthly period among patients previously diagnosed with lumbar disc hernia (n=63). For collecting research data; socio-demographic data for and the form of information about body mechanics and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were used....

  9. Short term influence of mechanical factors on regional musculoskeletal pain: a study of new workers from 12 occupational groups

    OpenAIRE

    Nahit, E; Macfarlane, G; Pritchard, C; Cherry, N; Silman, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the influence of short term exposure to mechanical factors on regional musculoskeletal pain.
METHODS—Full time newly employed workers were recruited from 12 occupational groups and information collected by questionnaire. Subjects indicated on a blank body manikin any low back, shoulder, wrist or forearm or both, or knee pain which had occurred during the past month and had lasted more than 1 day. Data were also collected with a previously validated questionnaire on wor...

  10. Mechanisms and clinical management of myofascial pain syndrome%肌筋膜疼痛综合征的基础与临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁宏杰; 杜诗斌

    2015-01-01

    肌筋膜疼痛综合征是激痛点引起的疼痛性疾病,其发病率非常高,而治疗相对困难.本文对肌筋膜疼痛综合征的机理、诊断以及治疗作一综述.%Myofascial pain syndrome is a kind of painful disease caused by trigger points.It has extremely high prevalence and is refractory to medical therapy.So the mechanisms,diagnosis and treatment principles are reviewed in this article.

  11. The Pain of Labour

    OpenAIRE

    Labor, Simona; Maguire, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Labour is an emotional experience and involves both physiological and psychological mechanisms.The pain of labour is severe but despite this its memory diminishes with time.Labour pain has two components: visceral pain which occurs during the early first stage and the second stage of childbirth, and somatic pain which occurs during the late first stage and the second stage.The pain of labour in the first stage is mediated by T10 to L1 spinal segments, whereas that in the second stage is carri...

  12. Mechanically strong geopolymers offer new possibilities in treatment of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämstorp, Erik; Forsgren, Johan; Bredenberg, Susanne; Engqvist, Håkan; Strømme, Maria

    2010-09-15

    We propose that a clay derived class of materials, known as geopolymers, may solve the problem of finding materials for controlled release with the right combination of properties necessary for a safe and sustained oral delivery of highly potent opioids. We show that the opioid Fentanyl, and its structurally similar sedative Zolpidem, can be embedded into metakaolin based geopolymer pellets to provide prolonged release dosage forms with mechanical strengths of the same order of magnitude as that of human teeth. The results presented in the current work may open up new opportunities for future development of drug delivery for high potency drugs employing high-strength and variable-pore-structure geopolymers and materials alike.

  13. Etiopathogenetic mechanisms of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.H. Gracely

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a common chronic condition of widespread pain with causal mechanisms that are largely unknown. It is characterized by moderate to severe musculoskel - etal pain and allodynia, but its pathogenesis appears confined to the nociceptive structures of the central nervous system. From a pathogenetic point of view, indeed, no clear muscle pathology has been demonstrated in FMS (1, 2, while increasing evidence suggests a disturbance in pain perception that is genetically conditioned. In our review we will consider five “keypoints” that we think determine the origin and maintenance of the pain syndrome that we define as fibromyalgia...

  14. Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ethan B

    2008-02-01

    This article reviews recent research on cannabinoid analgesia via the endocannabinoid system and non-receptor mechanisms, as well as randomized clinical trials employing cannabinoids in pain treatment. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, Marinol((R))) and nabilone (Cesamet((R))) are currently approved in the United States and other countries, but not for pain indications. Other synthetic cannabinoids, such as ajulemic acid, are in development. Crude herbal cannabis remains illegal in most jurisdictions but is also under investigation. Sativex((R)), a cannabis derived oromucosal spray containing equal proportions of THC (partial CB(1) receptor agonist ) and cannabidiol (CBD, a non-euphoriant, anti-inflammatory analgesic with CB(1) receptor antagonist and endocannabinoid modulating effects) was approved in Canada in 2005 for treatment of central neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis, and in 2007 for intractable cancer pain. Numerous randomized clinical trials have demonstrated safety and efficacy for Sativex in central and peripheral neuropathic pain, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer pain. An Investigational New Drug application to conduct advanced clinical trials for cancer pain was approved by the US FDA in January 2006. Cannabinoid analgesics have generally been well tolerated in clinical trials with acceptable adverse event profiles. Their adjunctive addition to the pharmacological armamentarium for treatment of pain shows great promise. PMID:18728714

  15. The McKenzie method compared with manipulation when used adjunctive to information and advice in low back pain patients presenting with centralization or peripheralization. A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tom; Larsen, Kristian; Nordsteen, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    a structured exercise programme tailored to the individual patient as well as manual therapy for the treatment of persistent low back pain. There is presently insufficient evidence to recommend the use of specific decision methods tailoring specific therapies to clinical subgroups of patients in primary care.......Methods. A total of 350 patients suffering from low back pain with a duration of more than 6 weeks who presented with centralization or peripheralization of symptoms with or without signs of nerve root involvement, were enrolled in the trial. Main outcome was number of patients with treatment success defined...... 0.2 to 2.9, P = 0.030 respectively). There was also a significant difference of 13% in number of patients reporting global perceived effect at end of treatment (P = 0.016). None of the other secondary outcomes showed statically significant differences.Conclusion. In patients with low back pain...

  16. Neonatal pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Bhalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The past 2-3 decades have seen dramatic changes in the approach to pain management in the neonate. These practices started with refuting previously held misconceptions regarding nociception in preterm infants. Although neonates were initially thought to have limited response to painful stimuli, it was demonstrated that the developmental immaturity of the central nervous system makes the neonate more likely to feel pain. It was further demonstrated that untreated pain can have long-lasting physiologic and neurodevelopmental consequences. These concerns have resulted in a significant emphasis on improving and optimizing the techniques of analgesia for neonates and infants. The following article will review techniques for pain assessment, prevention, and treatment in this population with a specific focus on acute pain related to medical and surgical conditions.

  17. Dor neuropática central após lesão medular traumática: capacidade funcional e aspectos sociais Dolor neuropático central después de lesión medular traumática: capacidad funcional y aspectos sociales Central neuropathic pain after traumatic spinal cord injury: functional capacity and social aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Vall

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudo de caso comparativo com o objetivo de avaliar a capacidade funcional e os aspectos sociais de dois pacientes, ambos com lesão medular traumática, sem e com dor neuropática central associada, respectivamente. Para avaliar a capacidade funcional, foi utilizado como instrumento o Functional Independence Measure ou Escala de Independência Funcional. E para avaliar os aspectos sociais foi construído o ecomapa de cada paciente, preconizado pelo modelo Calgary de avaliação de famílias. Ambos foram aplicados no domicílio do paciente. Os resultados mostraram que o paciente com dor neuropática central secundária à lesão medular possui baixa capacidade funcional e precária rede social de apoio, quando comparado com o paciente com as mesmas condições, porém sem dor associada.Estudio de caso comparativo con el objetivo de evaluar la capacidad funcional y los aspectos sociales de dos paciente, ambos con lesión medular traumática, sin y con el dolor neuropático central, respectivamente. Para evaluar la capacidad funcional, se usó como instrumento la Escala de Independencia Funcional. Y para evaluar los aspectos sociales, el ecomapa de cada paciente fue construido, preconizado por el modelo Calgary de evaluación de familias. Los dos furon aplicados en la casa del paciente. Los resultados mostraron que el paciente con dolor neuropatico central secundario a la lesión medular posee capacidad funcional baja y precaria red social de apoyo, cuando comparado con el paciente con las mismas condiciones, pero sin el dolor asociado.Comparative study of case with the aim of evaluating the functional capacity and social aspects of two patients, both with traumatic spinal cord injury, without and with central neuropathic pain associated, respectively. To evaluate the functional capacity it was used as instrument Functional Independence Measure. And to evaluate the social aspects the ecomap of each patient one it was built, extolled by the model

  18. Successful use of stellate ganglion block and a new centrally acting analgesic with dual mode of action in a resistant temporomandibular joint pain

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Gareth Peter; Tripathi, Shiva Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Stellate ganglion blocks have been shown to provide effective pain relief in a number of different conditions involving the upper body. This was demonstrated in a 65-year-old woman who had experienced severe debilitating pain in her left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the surrounding area of her face for over 10 years. The pain was unresponsive to indomethacin, carbamazepine, sodium valproate, gabapentin, lithium, melatonin and amitriptyline. She had also had four surgical procedures to th...

  19. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients and the mitigating effects of gabapentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Russell, Daric; Weidner, Greg; Durda, Michael; Joseph, Nicholas C; Yu, Jeffrey; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain patients receiving opioid drugs are at risk for opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), wherein opioid pain medication leads to a paradoxical pain state. OIH involves central sensitization of primary and secondary afferent neurons in the dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion, similar to neuropathic pain. Gabapentin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog anticonvulsant used to treat neuropathic pain, has been shown in animal models to reduce fentanyl hyperalgesia without compromising analgesic effect. Chronic pain patients have also exhibited lower opioid consumption and improved pain response when given gabapentin. However, few human studies investigating gabapentin use in OIH have been performed in recent years. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie OIH and provide a critical overview of interventional therapeutic strategies, especially the clinically-successful drug gabapentin, which may reduce OIH.

  20. Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia in Chronic Pain Patients and the Mitigating Effects of Gabapentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta eStoicea

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain patients receiving opioid drugs are at risk for opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH, wherein opioid pain medication leads to a paradoxical pain state. OIH involves central sensitization of primary and secondary afferent neurons in the dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion, similar to neuropathic pain. Gabapentin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA analogue anticonvulsant used to treat neuropathic pain, has been shown in animal models to reduce fentanyl hyperalgesia without compromising analgesic effect. Chronic pain patients have also exhibited lower opioid consumption and improved pain response when given gabapentin. However, few human studies investigating gabapentin use in OIH have been performed in recent years. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie OIH and provide a critical overview of interventional therapeutic strategies, especially the clinically-successful drug gabapentin, which may reduce OIH.

  1. Electrophysiology as a tool to unravel the origin of pancreatic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lelic, Dina; Olesen, Søren Schou; Graversen, Carina;

    2014-01-01

    Intense abdominal pain is the most common symptom in chronic pancreatitis, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood and pain management remains a significant clinical challenge. The focus of pain origin in chronic pancreatitis traditionally has been on the pancreatic gland......, assuming pain to originate in the pancreas or its surrounding organs. However, research in the last decade points to abnormal central nervous system pain processing. For this reason, electroencephalography has been receiving increasing attention. In contrast to imaging methods such as functional magnetic...... for generation of evoked potentials and hence to study brain reorganization due to pain in chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the current methods and findings in electroencephalography as a tool to unravel the origin of pancreatic pain....

  2. Inflammation and nerve fiber interaction in endometriotic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Brett D; Bertschi, Dominic; Bersinger, Nick A; Mueller, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is an extremely prevalent estrogen-dependent condition characterized by the growth of ectopic endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity, and is often presented with severe pain. Although the relationship between lesion and pain remains unclear, nerve fibers found in close proximity to endometriotic lesions may be related to pain. Also, women with endometriosis pain develop central sensitization. Endometriosis creates an inflammatory environment and recent research is beginning to elucidate the role of inflammation in stimulating peripheral nerve sensitization. In this review, we discuss endometriosis-associated inflammation, peripheral nerve fibers, and assess their potential mechanism of interaction. We propose that an interaction between lesions and nerve fibers, mediated by inflammation, may be important in endometriosis-associated pain. PMID:25465987

  3. The local effect of octreotide on mechanical pain sensitivity is more sensitive in DA rats than DA.1U rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fan-Rong; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Guo, Yuan; Zhao, Yan

    2016-02-01

    A recent study by the authors indicated that major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are associated with the differences in basal pain sensitivity and in formalin model between Dark-Agouti (DA) and novel congenic DA.1U rats, which have the same genetic background as DA rats except for the u alleles of MHC. The objective of the present study is to investigate whether there is a difference in the pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model and local analgesic effect of octreotide (OCT) between DA and DA.1U rats. The hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and heat withdrawal latency (HWL) were observed. The C unit firings of the tibial nerve evoked by non-noxious and noxious toe movements were recorded by electrophysiological methods in normal and PIA models in DA and DA.1U rats before and after local OCT administration. The expression of somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A) was observed by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrate that DA rats have a higher mechanical sensitivity than DA.1U rats after PIA. Local OCT administration significantly elevated MWT in DA rats under normal and PIA sate, but not in DA.1U rats. The electrophysiological experiments showed OCT significantly attenuated the firings of C units evoked by non-noxious and noxious stimulation in DA rats more than those in DA.1U rats both in normal and PIA states. In addition, the expression of SSTR2A in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord was significantly higher in DA than in DA.1U rats. All of the findings suggest a higher local analgesic effect of OCT in DA rats than DA.1U rats, which might be associated with the MHC genes.

  4. On the mutual effects of pain and emotion: facial pain expressions enhance pain perception and vice versa are perceived as more arousing when feeling pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reicherts, Philipp; Gerdes, Antje B M; Pauli, Paul; Wieser, Matthias J

    2013-06-01

    Perception of emotional stimuli alters the perception of pain. Although facial expressions are powerful emotional cues - the expression of pain especially plays a crucial role for the experience and communication of pain - research on their influence on pain perception is scarce. In addition, the opposite effect of pain on the processing of emotion has been elucidated even less. To further scrutinize mutual influences of emotion and pain, 22 participants were administered painful and nonpainful thermal stimuli while watching dynamic facial expressions depicting joy, fear, pain, and a neutral expression. As a control condition of low visual complexity, a central fixation cross was presented. Participants rated the intensity of the thermal stimuli and evaluated valence and arousal of the facial expressions. In addition, facial electromyography was recorded as an index of emotion and pain perception. Results show that faces per se, compared to the low-level control condition, decreased pain, suggesting a general attention modulation of pain by complex (social) stimuli. The facial response to painful stimulation revealed a significant correlation with pain intensity ratings. Most important, painful thermal stimuli increased the arousal of simultaneously presented pain expressions, and in turn, pain expressions resulted in higher pain ratings compared to all other facial expressions. These findings demonstrate that the modulation of pain and emotion is bidirectional with pain faces being mostly prone to having mutual influences, and support the view of interconnections between pain and emotion. Furthermore, the special relevance of pain faces for the processing of pain was demonstrated.

  5. On the mutual effects of pain and emotion: facial pain expressions enhance pain perception and vice versa are perceived as more arousing when feeling pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reicherts, Philipp; Gerdes, Antje B M; Pauli, Paul; Wieser, Matthias J

    2013-06-01

    Perception of emotional stimuli alters the perception of pain. Although facial expressions are powerful emotional cues - the expression of pain especially plays a crucial role for the experience and communication of pain - research on their influence on pain perception is scarce. In addition, the opposite effect of pain on the processing of emotion has been elucidated even less. To further scrutinize mutual influences of emotion and pain, 22 participants were administered painful and nonpainful thermal stimuli while watching dynamic facial expressions depicting joy, fear, pain, and a neutral expression. As a control condition of low visual complexity, a central fixation cross was presented. Participants rated the intensity of the thermal stimuli and evaluated valence and arousal of the facial expressions. In addition, facial electromyography was recorded as an index of emotion and pain perception. Results show that faces per se, compared to the low-level control condition, decreased pain, suggesting a general attention modulation of pain by complex (social) stimuli. The facial response to painful stimulation revealed a significant correlation with pain intensity ratings. Most important, painful thermal stimuli increased the arousal of simultaneously presented pain expressions, and in turn, pain expressions resulted in higher pain ratings compared to all other facial expressions. These findings demonstrate that the modulation of pain and emotion is bidirectional with pain faces being mostly prone to having mutual influences, and support the view of interconnections between pain and emotion. Furthermore, the special relevance of pain faces for the processing of pain was demonstrated. PMID:23541426

  6. Remifentanilo vs. bloqueo central epidural para control del dolor postoperatorio en cirugía vascular de urgencias Remifentanyl versus epidural central blockade for the management of postoperative pain in emergency vascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Quirante

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available El correcto tratamiento del dolor postoperatorio constituye una prioridad dentro de los objetivos del anestesiólogo. En pacientes con patología vascular severa quirúrgica, el tratamiento analgésico efectivo se suele realizar mediante bloqueo continuo epidural. Sin embargo, la administración de analgésicos, tanto opiáceos como no opiáceos, por vía intravenosa, es una alternativa a la vía epidural cuando esta es desestimada. Caso clínico: Presentamos el caso de un paciente varón de 63 años portador de un bypass fémoro-poplíteo a primera porción en miembro inferior izquierdo, el cual es intervenido quirúrgicamente y con carácter urgente tras el diagnóstico de falso aneurisma séptico de arteria iliaca izquierda con rotura de anastomosis fémoro-poplítea. Se optó por una anestesia general basada en la analgesia con remifentanilo frente a bloqueo central epidural dado el carácter urgente de la cirugía y la ingesta habitual de antiagregantes plaquetarios. Se planificó como estrategia analgésica postoperatoria la administración de remifentanilo a dosis sedoanalgésicas (Introduction: The appropriate management of postoperative pain is a priority among the objectives of the anesthesiologist. In patients with severe surgical vascular pathology, an effective analgesic treatment is usually provided with epidural continuous blockade. However, the intravenous administration of analgesics, either opiates or non opiates, is an alternative to the epidural route when this has to be dismissed. Clinical case: We present the case of a 63-years old male patient carrying a femoro-popliteus bypass in the first portion of the left lower limb that underwent emergency surgery after being diagnosed of a false septic aneurysm in the left iliac artery with breakage of the femoro-popliteus anastomosis. General anesthesia based on remifentanyl was decided instead of epidural central blockade due to the urgent nature of the surgery and the regular

  7. Studies on experimental and neuropathic orofacial pain, and low-dose ketamine as a probe for NMDA receptor function

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The NMDA-receptor is known to play a central role in the development of acute andchronic pain. Ketamine is a clinically available NMDA-receptor inhibitor. We examined the role of the NMDA-receptor in acute experimental and chronic neuropathic orofacial pain in humans by using ketamine as a probe. We also examined pathophysiological mechanisms in patients suffering from orofacial neuropathic pain by use of quantitative sensory-testing. In a double-blind study we compared the effects of low...

  8. Mas-related gene (Mrg) C receptors inhibit mechanical allodynia and spinal microglia activation in the early phase of neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Xue, Yaping; Chen, Yajuan; Ruan, Liqin; Hong, Yanguo

    2016-04-01

    Mas-related gene (Mrg) C receptors are exclusively expressed in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). However, their functional roles are poorly understood. This study was aimed to determine the effect of MrgC receptors on pain hypersensitivity in the early phase of neuropathic pain and its underlying mechanisms. Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of the selective MrgC receptor agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (BAM8-22) at 1 or 10nmol attenuated mechanical allodynia one day after L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) surgery. I.t. BAM8-22 (10 nmol) inhibited SNL-induced microglia activation in the spinal dorsal horn on day 2 post-SNL. The BAM8-22 treatment also abolished SNL-induced upregulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthesis (nNOS) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). On the other hand, SNL, but not sham, surgery reduced the expression of MrgC receptor mRNA in the injured L5 DRG without changing thier levels in the adjacent uninjured L4 or L6 DRG on day 2 following the surgery. These results suggest that the activation of MrgC receptors can relieve pain hypersensitivity by the inhibition of nNOS increase in DRG neurons and microglia activation in the spinal dorsal horn in the early time following peripheral nerve injury. This study provides evidence that MrgC receptors could be targeted as a novel therapy for neuropathic pain with limited unwanted effects.

  9. Elucidation of pathophysiology and treatment of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranken, Jan H

    2012-12-01

    Neuropathic pain, pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system, is relatively common, occurring in about 1% of the population. Studies in animal models describe a number of peripheral and central pathophysiological processes after nerve injury that would be the basis of underlying neuropathic pain mechanism. Additionally, neuro-imaging (positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging) provides insights in brain mechanisms corresponding with mechanistic processes including allodynia, hyperalgesia, altered sensation, and spontaneous pain. A change in function, chemistry, and structures of neurons (neural plasticity) underlie the production of the altered sensitivity characteristics of neuropathic pain. Peripheral processes in neuropathic pain involve production of mediators (cytokines, protons, nerve growth factor), alterations in calcium channels, sodium channels, hyperpolarisation-activated nucleotide-gated ion channels, and potassium channels, phenotypic switches and sprouting of nerves endings, and involvement of the sympathetic nervous system. Stimulation of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor, activation of microglia, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes, increased production of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor together with loss of spinal inhibitory control are responsible for central neuron hyperexcitability and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Recent advances, including functional imaging techniques, in identification of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms related to nervous system injury have increased potential for affecting pain research from both diagnostic as well as therapeutic view. Key brain regions involved in generating pharmacologically induced analgesia may be identified. Despite the progress in pain research, neuropathic pain is challenge to manage. Although numerous treatment options are available for relieving neuropathic pain, there is no

  10. 纤维肌痛综合征疼痛机制的研究进展%The progress on the pain mechanism of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张维; 刘传圣

    2009-01-01

    纤维肌痛综合征(FMS)是风湿病门诊中的常见病,其疼痛的病因、发病机制尚未完全阐明.最新的研究热点集中于中枢神经系统疼痛传导通路的异常,如中枢致敏和疼痛抑制不充分等.外周组织伤害性传入刺激也作为相关因素引发和/或维持中枢致敏状态,同时神经内分泌和应激反应异常在FMS发病中也起重要作朋.%Fibromyalgia Syndrome(FMS) is a common disease in the rheumatison out-patient clinics Its patho-genesis is poorly understood. The latest studies have concentrated on the role of central nervous systerm pain processing abnormalities in FMS, including central sensitization and inadequate pain inhibition. The afference nociceptive stimulus from peripheral tissu as relevant contributor might either initiate or maintain central sensiti-zation, or both. Meanwhile, abnormalities of neuroendocrine and stress reaction also significantly affect the pathogenesis of FMS.

  11. An Integrative Review of the Influence of Expectancies on Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerdeman, Kaya J.; van Laarhoven, Antoinette I. M.; Peters, Madelon L.; Evers, Andrea W. M.

    2016-01-01

    Expectancies can shape pain experiences. Attention for the influence of expectancies on pain has increased particularly due to research on placebo effects, of which expectancy is believed to be the core mechanism. In the current review, we provide a brief overview of the literature on the influence of expectancies on pain. We first discuss the central role of expectancy in the major psychological learning theories. Based on these theories, different kinds of expectancies can be distinguished. Pain experiences are influenced particularly by response expectancies directly pertaining to the pain experience itself, but can also be affected by self-efficacy expectancies regarding one’s ability to cope with pain, and possibly by stimulus expectancies regarding external events. These different kinds of expectancies might interact with each other, and related emotions and cognitions, as reflected by various multifaceted constructs in which expectancies are incorporated. Optimism and pain catastrophizing, in particular, but also hope, trust, worry, and neuroticism have been found to be associated with pain outcomes. We conclude with recommendations for further advancing research on the influence of expectancies on pain and for harnessing expectancy effects in clinical practice. PMID:27602013

  12. An Integrative Review of the Influence of Expectancies on Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerdeman, Kaya J; van Laarhoven, Antoinette I M; Peters, Madelon L; Evers, Andrea W M

    2016-01-01

    Expectancies can shape pain experiences. Attention for the influence of expectancies on pain has increased particularly due to research on placebo effects, of which expectancy is believed to be the core mechanism. In the current review, we provide a brief overview of the literature on the influence of expectancies on pain. We first discuss the central role of expectancy in the major psychological learning theories. Based on these theories, different kinds of expectancies can be distinguished. Pain experiences are influenced particularly by response expectancies directly pertaining to the pain experience itself, but can also be affected by self-efficacy expectancies regarding one's ability to cope with pain, and possibly by stimulus expectancies regarding external events. These different kinds of expectancies might interact with each other, and related emotions and cognitions, as reflected by various multifaceted constructs in which expectancies are incorporated. Optimism and pain catastrophizing, in particular, but also hope, trust, worry, and neuroticism have been found to be associated with pain outcomes. We conclude with recommendations for further advancing research on the influence of expectancies on pain and for harnessing expectancy effects in clinical practice. PMID:27602013

  13. Central nervous mechanism of bruxism%磨牙症的中枢神经机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄黄; 刘伟才

    2014-01-01

    The causes of bruxism are divided into peripheral factors and central factors, occlusal factors are known to only play a minor role. Bruxism is associated with sleep micro-arousal and appears to be modulated by various neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. These neurotransmitters may be disturbed the balance between the direct and indirect pathways of the basal ganglia which are involved in the coordination of movements of masticatory muscle in bruxers. L-dopa, bromocriptine and propranolol can inhibit bruxism activity, botulinum toxin injections can reduce the frequency of bruxism events and decrease bruxism-induced pain levels, clonidine can inhibits the rapid eye movement(REM) of bruxism patients and the levels of catecholamines are higher in bruxers. Some authors think that bruxism patients with lower sleep efficiency, but some think that bruxism patients have normal sleep structure and quality; some people think that bruxism occurred more frequently in stage 2 and REM, some think bruxism episodes are equally distributed between non-rapid eye movement(NREM) and REM sleep, but some also think bruxism are mainly occurred in light sleep and seldom occurred in REM, moreover some think that bruxism is a abnormal oral activities that secondary to sleep micro-arousal. Psychological factors like personality and anxiety are also frequently mentioned in relation to bruxism. Bruxism patients have higher life stress and anxiety, the person that severe bruxism, their work and life pressure is more heavier. In this paper, A central factors of bruxism is reviewed in detail concerning their pathophysiological and psychosocial aspects.%磨牙症的病因分为外周神经因素和中枢神经因素,(牙合)因素在磨牙症中只起一小部分作用。磨牙症与睡眠觉醒有关并受多种中枢神经化学递质的影响。中枢神经化学递质可能打乱了基底神经节的直接和间接输出通道的平衡,从而打乱咀嚼肌协调运动,引

  14. Peripheral and Central Mechanisms Involved in the Hormonal Control of Male and Female Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, L M; Bentley, G E; Calandra, R S; Paredes, A H; Tesone, M; Wu, T J; Micevych, P E

    2016-07-01

    research in these areas, focusing on recent findings concerning the molecular mechanisms involved in the central and peripheral hormonal control of reproduction. PMID:27329133

  15. [On factors that effect the variability of central mechanisms of bilingualism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruchinina, O V; Gal'perina, E I; Kats, E É; Shepoval'nikov, A N

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses the probable role of many factors that determine the individual variety of neurophysiological mechanisms, which provide the opportunity to learn and free use two or more languages. The formation of a speech functions is affected by both the general factors for bilinguals and monolinguals, as well as the specific characteristic of the situation of bilingualism. The general factors include genetic and environmental impact of explaining the diversity of individual options for the development of morphofunctional organization of speech functions. A bilinguals, obviously, have even more wide variance of the central maintenance of speech activity, due to the combination of different conditions that influence the language environment, which include the age of the second language acquisition, the language proficiency, linguistic closeness of the languages, the method of their acquisition, intensity of use and the scope of application of each of the languages. The influence of these factors can mediates in different ways by the individual characteristics of the bilingual's brain. Being exposed to two languages from the first days of life, the child uses for the development of speech skills of the unique features of the brain, which are available only in the initial stages of postnatal ontogenesis. In older age mastering a second language requires much more effort, when, as maturation, the brain acquires new additional possibilities, but permanently lose that special "bonus", which nature gives a small child only in the first months of life. Large individual variability patterns of activation of the cortex when verbal activity in late bilingual" compared with the "early", allows to assume, that the brain of "late bilingual", mastering a new language, forced to operate a large number of backup mechanisms, and this is reflected in the increase of variation in the cerebral processes, responsible for providing of speech functions. In addition, there is

  16. PEMBERIAN TEKNIK MULLIGAN DAN SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION LEBIH BAIK DARIPADA HANYA SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION DALAM MENINGKATKAN LINGKUP GERAK SENDI EKSTENSI, ROTASI, LATERAL FLEKSI CERVICAL PADA MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sudaryanto -

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical neck pain has the same high prevalence with low back pain, and commonly found in many of physiotherapy practice. Combination of Mulligan technique and Soft Tissue Mobilization are one of manual therapy technique highly effective and efficient to care the case of mechanical neck pain but still very rarely used by physiotherapist in fields of practice. This study aimed to know the effectiveness between Mulligan technique – Soft Tissue Mobilization and only Soft Tissue Mobilization to the increasing range of motion extension, rotation and side flexion cervical on the mechanical neck pain. The study design was a pre test – post test control group design using two group of samples are control groups that given intervention Soft Tissue Mobilization and treatment groups that given a combination of Mulligan technique and Soft Tissue Mobilization. Measuring instrument used for data collection was goniometer, that the goniometer was used to measure the range of motion extension, rotation and lateral flexion of the cervical either before the intervention and after the intervention. Sample of this study was 32 people who divided into 2 groups of samples were 16 people in the control group and 16 people in the treatment group. Samples in the control group had a mean age of 35,69 with male of 7 people (43,8% and female of 9 people (56,2% as well as limitations of the right direction were 12 people (75% and left direction were 4 people (25%. Whereas in the treatment group had e mean age of 35,94 with male of 10 people (62,5% and female of 6 people (37,5% as well as limitations of the right direction were 11 people (62,5% and left direction were 5 people (31,2%. The results of hypothesis testing using independent sampel t-test showed a significant difference between the mean post-intervention ROM extension, rotation, lateral flexion of the control groups and the mean post-intervention ROM extension, rotation, lateral flexion of the treatment

  17. Pain in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, J; Choinère, M

    1995-08-01

    While severe pain is a constant component of the burn injury, inadequate pain management has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Pain-generating mechanisms in burns include nociception, primary and secondary hyperalgesia and neuropathy. The clinical studies of burn pain characteristics reveal very clear-cut differences between continuous pain and pain due to therapeutic procedures which have to be treated separately. Some of the main features of burn pain are: (1) its long-lasting course, often exceeding healing time, (2) the repetition of highly nociceptive procedures which can lead to severe psychological disturbances if pain control is inappropriate. Pharmaco-therapy with opioids is the mainstay for analgesia in burned patients, but non-pharmacological techniques may be useful adjuncts. Routine pain evaluation is mandatory for efficient and safe analgesia. Special attention must be given to pain in burned children which remains too often underestimated and undertreated. More educational efforts from physicians and nursing staff are necessary to improve pain management in burned patients.

  18. Utility of Stellate Ganglion Block in Atypical Facial Pain: A Case Report and Consideration of Its Possible Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Harsha Shanthanna

    2013-01-01

    We present this report of a young patient with chronic severe atypical facial pain who was successfully controlled with stellate ganglion block under ultrasound guidance. The patient had a history of severe disabling, unilateral, facial neuropathic pain with minimal response to analgesic medications. Upon assessment the patient had features suggestive of trigeminal neuralgia, although postherpetic neuralgia could not be ruled out. As a diagnostic test intervention, stellate ganglion block was...

  19. Groin pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... groin pain in men. The terms "groin" and "testicle" are sometimes used interchangeably. But what causes pain ... hernia. It may also involve pain in the testicles. Hernia : This problem occurs when there is a ...

  20. Eye pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  1. Wrist pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  2. Elbow pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  3. Heel pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. Rarely, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: When the tendon that connects the back ...

  4. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  5. Postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Dahl, J B

    1993-01-01

    also modify various aspects of the surgical stress response, and nociceptive blockade by regional anesthetic techniques has been demonstrated to improve various parameters of postoperative outcome. It is therefore stressed that effective control of postoperative pain, combined with a high degree......Treatment of postoperative pain has not received sufficient attention by the surgical profession. Recent developments concerned with acute pain physiology and improved techniques for postoperative pain relief should result in more satisfactory treatment of postoperative pain. Such pain relief may...

  6. Central nervous system mechanisms contributing to the cachexia-anorexia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plata-Salamán, C R

    2000-10-01

    The cachexia-anorexia syndrome occurs in chronic pathophysiologic processes including cancer, infection with human immunodeficiency virus, bacterial and parasitic diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disease, obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. Cachexia makes an organism susceptible to secondary pathologies and can result in death. Cachexia-anorexia may result from pain, depression or anxiety, hypogeusia and hyposmia, taste and food aversions, chronic nausea, vomiting, early satiety, malfunction of the gastrointestinal system (delayed digestion, malabsorption, gastric stasis and associated delayed emptying, and/or atrophic changes of the mucosa), metabolic shifts, cytokine action, production of substances by tumor cells, and/or iatrogenic causes such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The cachexia-anorexia syndrome also involves metabolic and immune changes (mediated by either the pathophysiologic process, i.e., tumor, or host-derived chemical factors, e.g., peptides, neurotransmitters, cytokines, and lipid-mobilizing factors) and is associated with hypertriacylglycerolemia, lipolysis, and acceleration of protein turnover. These changes result in the loss of fat mass and body protein. Increased resting energy expenditure in weight-losing cachectic patients can occur despite the reduced dietary intake, indicating a systemic dysregulation of host metabolism. During cachexia, the organism is maintained in a constant negative energy balance. This can rarely be explained by the actual energy and substrate demands by tumors in patients with cancer. Overall, the cachectic profile is significantly different than that observed during starvation. Cachexia may result not only from anorexia and a decreased caloric intake but also from malabsorption and losses from the body (ulcers, hemorrhage, effusions). In any case, the major deficit of a cachectic organism is a negative energy balance. Cytokines are proposed to participate

  7. Ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli in Central Greece: mechanisms of resistance and molecular identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavroidi Angeliki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli isolates, that are also resistant to other classes of antibiotics, is a significant challenge to antibiotic treatment and infection control policies. In Central Greece a significant increase of ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli has occurred during 2011, indicating the need for further analysis. Methods A total of 106 ciprofloxacin-resistant out of 505 E. coli isolates consecutively collected during an eight months period in a tertiary Greek hospital of Central Greece were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and mechanisms of resistance to quinolones were assessed, whereas selected isolates were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing and β-lactamase content. Results Sequence analysis of the quinolone-resistance determining region of the gyrA and parC genes has revealed that 63% of the ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli harbored a distinct amino acid substitution pattern (GyrA:S83L + D87N; ParC:S80I + E84V, while 34% and 3% carried the patterns GyrA:S83L + D87N; ParC:S80I and GyrA:S83L + D87N; ParC:S80I + E84G respectively. The aac (6’-1b-cr plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant was also detected; none of the isolates was found to carry the qnrA, qnrB and qnrS. Genotyping of a subset of 35 selected ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli by multilocus sequence typing has revealed the presence of nine sequence types; ST131 and ST410 were the most prevalent and were exclusively correlated with hospital and health care associated infections, while strains belonging to STs 393, 361 and 162 were associated with community acquired infections. The GyrA:S83L + D87N; ParC:S80I + E84V substitution pattern was found exclusively among ST131 ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive ST131 ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates produced CTX-M-type enzymes; eight the CTX-M-15 and one the CTX-M-3 variant. CTX-M-1 like and KPC-2 enzymes were detected

  8. Psychosocial factors and childhood recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, Christopher Chiong-Meng; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2002-12-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain in children is not a single condition but a description of a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, some of which fit into a definite pattern, such as the irritable bowel syndrome, while others do not. Organic disorders may be present, but in the majority of children they cannot be detected. Although children with recurrent abdominal pain do not generally have psychological or psychiatric illness, there is a growing body of evidence to suggest that psychosocial stress plays an important role in this condition. This review will look into some of this evidence. The precise pathophysiology that results in abdominal pain is still not clearly understood, but the current belief is that visceral hypersensitivity or hyperalgesia and changes in the brain-gut axis linking the central and enteric nervous systems are important mechanisms. PMID:12423267

  9. Subgroups of musculoskeletal pain patients and their psychobiological patterns – The LOGIN study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhardt Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain conditions of the musculoskeletal system are very common and have tremendous socioeconomic impact. Despite its high prevalence, musculoskeletal pain remains poorly understood and predominantly non-specifically and insufficiently treated. The group of chronic musculoskeletal pain patients is supposed to be heterogeneous, due to a multitude of mechanisms involved in chronic pain. Psychological variables, psychophysiological processes, and neuroendocrine alterations are expected to be involved. Thus far, studies on musculoskeletal pain have predominantly focused on the general aspects of pain processing, thus neglecting the heterogeneity of patients with musculoskeletal pain. Consequently, there is a need for studies that comprise a multitude of mechanisms that are potentially involved in the chronicity and spread of pain. This need might foster research and facilitate a better pathophysiological understanding of the condition, thereby promoting the development of specific mechanism-based treatments for chronic pain. Therefore, the objectives of this study are as follows: 1 identify and describe subgroups of patients with musculoskeletal pain with regard to clinical manifestations (including mental co-morbidity and 2 investigate whether distinct sensory profiles or 3 distinct plasma levels of pain-related parameters due to different underlying mechanisms can be distinguished in various subgroups of pain patients. Methods/Design We will examine a population-based chronic pain sample (n = 100, a clinical tertiary care sample (n = 100 and pain-free patients with depression or post-traumatic stress disorder and pain-free healthy controls (each n = 30, respectively. The samples will be pain localisation matched by sex and age to the population-based sample. Patients will undergo physical examination and thorough assessments of mental co-morbidity (including psychological trauma, perceptual and central sensitisation

  10. Mechanisms in the PVN mediating local and central sodium-induced hypertension in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Alexander; Leenen, Frans H H

    2009-03-01

    Sympathoexcitatory and hypertensive responses to central infusion of Na(+)-rich artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) are enhanced by aldosterone and mediated by mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and benzamil-blockable Na(+) influx, leading to "ouabain" release and ANG II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor stimulation. The present study evaluated the functional role of these mechanisms in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). In conscious Wistar rats, Na(+)-rich aCSF was infused either directly into the PVN or intracerebroventricularly preceded by aldosterone and blockers. Infusion of Na(+)-rich aCSF in the PVN caused gradual increases in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Aldosterone and a subpressor dose of ouabain in the PVN alone did not affect BP and HR but enhanced responses to Na(+). Eplerenone, benzamil, and "ouabain"-binding Fab fragments only blocked the enhancement by aldosterone, whereas losartan blocked all responses to Na(+)-rich aCSF in the PVN. Increases in BP and HR by intracerebroventricular infusion of Na(+)-rich aCSF were enhanced by aldosterone infused intracerebroventricularly, but not in the PVN. Telmisartan in the PVN again blocked all responses. In contrast, both eplerenone and benzamil in the PVN did not change the pressor responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of aldosterone and Na(+)-rich aCSF. These findings indicate that AT(1) receptors in the PVN mediate the responses to Na(+)-rich aCSF and their enhancement by aldosterone, both locally in the PVN or in the general CSF. MRs, benzamil-blockable Na(+) channels or transporters, and "ouabain" can be functionally active in the PVN, but in Wistar rats appear not to contribute to the pressor responses to short-term increases in CSF [Na(+)].

  11. Understanding Central Mechanisms of Acupuncture Analgesia Using Dynamic Quantitative Sensory Testing: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang-Ti Kong; Schnyer, Rosa N; Johnson, Kevin A.; Sean Mackey

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the emerging translational tools for the study of acupuncture analgesia with a focus on psychophysical methods. The gap between animal mechanistic studies and human clinical trials of acupuncture analgesia calls for effective translational tools that bridge neurophysiological data with meaningful clinical outcomes. Temporal summation (TS) and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) are two promising tools yet to be widely utilized. These psychophysical measures capture the state of the a...

  12. Intracerebroventricular Pain Treatment with Analgesic Mixtures including Ziconotide for Intractable Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staquet, Héléne; Dupoiron, Denis; Nader, Edmond; Menei, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of opioids for control of intractable cancer pain has been used since 1982. We present here our experience of intracerebroventricular administration of pain treatments including ziconotide associated with morphine and ropivacaine for patients resistant to a conventional approach, with nociceptive, neuropathic, or mixed pain. These clinical cases were conducted with patients suffering from refractory pain, more than 6/10 on a numerical pain rating scale (NPRS) while on high-dose medical treatment and/or intolerance with significant side effects from oral medication. The baseline study visit included a physical examination and an assessment of pain intensity on a NPRS. Under general anesthesia, a neuronavigation device was used to place the catheter on the floor of the third ventricle, supported by an endoscope. Then, drugs were injected in the cerebroventricular system, through a pump (external or subcutaneous). The primary objective was to measure pain evaluation with ICV treatment after a complete withdrawal of other medications.Four patients were enrolled: 3 with intractable cancer pain and one with central neuropathic pain. The median NPRS at baseline was 9.5 [8.5; 19]. The mean NPRS after one month was 3.5 [3; 4.5]. Ziconotide was initiated at 0.48 µg/d and up to a median of 1.2 µg/d [1.0; 1.56]. The median dose of morphine and ropivacaine used initially was respectively 0.36 mg/d [0.24; 0.66] up to 0.6 mg/d [0.45; 4.63] and 1.2 mg/d [0; 2.4] up to 2.23 mg/d [1.2; 3.35]. Minor side effects were initially observed but transiently. One psychiatric agitation required discontinuation of ziconotide infusion. For intractable pain, using ziconotide by intracerebroventricular infusion seems safe and efficient, specifically for chronic neoplastic pain of cervicocephalic, thoracic, or diffuse origin and also for pain arising from a central neuropathic mechanism. PMID:27454282

  13. Management of chronic visceral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne E; Farmer, Adam D; Olesen, Søren S;

    2016-01-01

    Despite marked differences in underlying pathophysiology, the current management of visceral pain largely follows the guidelines derived from the somatic pain literature. The effective management of patients with chronic visceral pain should be multifaceted, including both pharmacological......' symptoms, adopting an empathic approach and taking time to educate patients. To optimize treatment and outcomes in chronic visceral pain we need to move away from approaches exclusively based on dealing with peripheral nociceptive input toward more holistic strategies, taking into account alterations...... in central pain processing....

  14. Pelvic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  15. Shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  16. The Gate Theory of Pain Revisited: Modeling Different Pain Conditions with a Parsimonious Neurocomputational Model

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Javier Ropero Peláez; Shirley Taniguchi

    2016-01-01

    The gate control theory of pain proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 is revisited through two mechanisms of neuronal regulation: NMDA synaptic plasticity and intrinsic plasticity. The Melzack and Wall circuit was slightly modified by using strictly excitatory nociceptive afferents (in the original arrangement, nociceptive afferents were considered excitatory when they project to central transmission neurons and inhibitory when projecting to substantia gelatinosa). The results of our neurocomp...

  17. Dust emission mechanisms in the central Sahara: new insights from remote field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C.; Washington, R.; Engelstaedter, S.

    2013-12-01

    North Africa is the world's largest source of mineral aerosol (dust). The Fennec Project, an international consortium led by the University of Oxford, is the first project to systematically instrument the remote central Sahara Desert. These observations have, among others, provided new insights into the atmospheric mechanisms of dust emission. Bordj Badji Mokhtar, in south-west Algeria, is within kilometres of the centre of the global mean summer dust maximum. The site, operated by Fennec partners ONM Algerie, has been heavily instrumented since summer 2011. During the Intensive Observation Period (IOP) in June 2011, four main emission mechanisms were observed and documented: cold pool outflows, low level jets (LLJs), monsoon surges and dry convective plumes. Establishing the relative importance of dust emission mechanisms has been a long-standing research goal. A detailed partitioning exercise of dust events during the IOP shows that 45% of the dust over BBM was generated by local emission in cold pool outflows, 14% by LLJs and only 2% by dry convective plumes. 27% of the dust was advected to the site rather than locally emitted and 12% of the dust was residual or ';background' dust. The work shows the primacy of cold pool outflows for dust emission in the region and also the important contribution of dust advection. In accordance with long-held ideas, the cube of wind speed is strongly correlated with dust emission. Surprisingly however, particles in long-range advection (>500km) were found to be larger than locally emitted dust. Although a clear LLJ wind structure is evident in the mean diurnal cycle during the IOP (12m/s peak winds at 935hPa between 04-05h), LLJs are only responsible for a relatively small amount of dust emission. There is significant daily variability in LLJ strength; the strongest winds are produced by a relatively small number of events. The position and strength of the Saharan Heat Low is strongly associated with the development (or

  18. Pain Sensitisation in Women with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vladimirova, Nora; Jespersen, Anders; Bartels, Else Marie;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. In some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, joint pain persists without signs of inflammation. This indicates that central pain sensitisation may play a role in the generation of chronic pain in a subgroup of RA. Our aim was to assess the degree of peripheral and central pain...

  19. Pain Symptoms in Fibromyalgia Patients with and without Provoked Vulvodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ghizzani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the study was to compare the pain symptoms of fibromyalgia patients exhibiting (FMS+PVD and not exhibiting (FMS comorbidity with provoked vulvodynia. Study Design. The case control study was performed in 39 patients who had been diagnosed with FMS and accepted to undergo gynaecological examination and in 36 healthy women (C. All patients completed standardized questionnaires for pain intensity, pain area, and psychological functioning. The gynaecological examination included vulvar pain pressure reactivity (Q-tip, pelvic tone assessment (Kegel manoeuver, and a semistructured interview collecting detailed information about pelvic symptoms and sexual function. Results. FMS+PVD patients displayed a higher number of associated symptoms than FMS patients. The vulvar excitability was significantly higher in FMS+PVD than in FMS and in both groups than in Controls. Half of FMS+PVD patients were positive to Kegel manoeuver and displayed higher scores in widespread pain intensity, STAI-Y2, and CESD levels than Kegel negative patients. Conclusions. The study reveals that increased vulvar pain excitability may occur in FMS patients independently of the presence of coital pain. Results suggest that coital pain develops in patients with higher FMS symptoms severity due to the cooperative effects of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms.

  20. Pain Symptoms in Fibromyalgia Patients with and without Provoked Vulvodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghizzani, Anna; Di Sabatino, Valentina; Suman, Anna Lisa; Biasi, Giovanni; Santarcangelo, Enrica Laura; Carli, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to compare the pain symptoms of fibromyalgia patients exhibiting (FMS+PVD) and not exhibiting (FMS) comorbidity with provoked vulvodynia. Study Design. The case control study was performed in 39 patients who had been diagnosed with FMS and accepted to undergo gynaecological examination and in 36 healthy women (C). All patients completed standardized questionnaires for pain intensity, pain area, and psychological functioning. The gynaecological examination included vulvar pain pressure reactivity (Q-tip), pelvic tone assessment (Kegel manoeuver), and a semistructured interview collecting detailed information about pelvic symptoms and sexual function. Results. FMS+PVD patients displayed a higher number of associated symptoms than FMS patients. The vulvar excitability was significantly higher in FMS+PVD than in FMS and in both groups than in Controls. Half of FMS+PVD patients were positive to Kegel manoeuver and displayed higher scores in widespread pain intensity, STAI-Y2, and CESD levels than Kegel negative patients. Conclusions. The study reveals that increased vulvar pain excitability may occur in FMS patients independently of the presence of coital pain. Results suggest that coital pain develops in patients with higher FMS symptoms severity due to the cooperative effects of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms. PMID:24624294

  1. COGNITIVE MECHANISMS OF CHANGE IN MULTIDISCIPLINARY TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC WIDESPREAD PAIN : A PROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Aleid; de Boer, Michiel R.; van der Leeden, Marike; Roorda, Leo D.; Steultjens, Martijn P. M.; Dekker, Joost

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the contribution of improvement in negative emotional cognitions, active cognitive coping, and control and chronicity beliefs to the outcome of multidisciplinary treatment in patients with chronic widespread pain. Design: Prospective cohort study. Patients: A total of 120 subj

  2. Satellite glial cell P2Y12 receptor in the trigeminal ganglion is involved in lingual neuropathic pain mechanisms in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katagiri Ayano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R is involved in satellite glial cells (SGCs activation, indicating that P2Y12R expressed in SGCs may play functional roles in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms. However, the involvement of P2Y12R in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms is still unknown. We therefore studied the reflex to noxious mechanical or heat stimulation of the tongue, P2Y12R and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP immunohistochemistries in the trigeminal ganglion (TG in a rat model of unilateral lingual nerve crush (LNC to evaluate role of P2Y12R in SGC in lingual neuropathic pain. Results The head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the lateral tongue were significantly decreased in LNC-rats compared to sham-rats. These nocifensive effects were apparent on day 1 after LNC and lasted for 17 days. On days 3, 9, 15 and 21 after LNC, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-immunoreactive (IR cells significantly increased in the ophthalmic, maxillary and mandibular branch regions of TG. On day 3 after LNC, P2Y12R expression occurred in GFAP-IR cells but not neuronal nuclei (NeuN-IR cells (i.e. neurons in TG. After 3 days of successive administration of the P2Y12R antagonist MRS2395 into TG in LNC-rats, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-IR cells was significantly decreased coincident with a significant reversal of the lowered head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the tongue compared to vehicle-injected rats. Furthermore, after 3 days of successive administration of the P2YR agonist 2-MeSADP into the TG in naïve rats, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-IR cells was significantly increased and head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the tongue were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared to vehicle-injected rats

  3. Zinc and water intake in rats: investigation of adrenergic and opiatergic central mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Fregoneze

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that central administration of zinc in minute amounts induces a significant antidipsogenic action in dehydrated rats as well as in rats under central cholinergic and angiotensinergic stimulation. Here we show that acute third ventricle injections of zinc also block water intake induced by central ß-adrenergic stimulation in Wistar rats (190-250 g. Central inhibition of opioid pathways by naloxone reverses the zinc-induced antidipsogenic effect in dehydrated rats. After 120 min, rats receiving third ventricle injections of isoproterenol (160 nmol/rat exhibited a significant increase in water intake (5.78 ± 0.54 ml/100 g body weight compared to saline-treated controls (0.15 ± 0.07 ml/100 g body weight. Pretreatment with zinc (3.0, 30.0 and 300.0 pmol/rat, 45 min before isoproterenol injection blocked water intake in a dose-dependent way. At the highest dose employed a complete blockade was demonstrable (0.54 ± 0.2 ml/100 g body weight. After 120 min, control (NaAc-treated dehydrated rats, as expected, exhibited a high water intake (7.36 ± 0.39 ml/100 g body weight. Central administration of zinc blocked this response (2.5 ± 0.77 ml/100 g body weight. Naloxone pretreatment (82.5 nmol/rat, 30 min before zinc administration reverted the water intake to the high levels observed in zinc-free dehydrated animals (7.04 ± 0.56 ml/100 g body weight. These data indicate that zinc is able to block water intake induced by central ß-adrenergic stimulation and that zinc-induced blockade of water intake in dehydrated rats may be, at least in part, due to stimulation of central opioid peptides.

  4. The Gate Theory of Pain Revisited: Modeling Different Pain Conditions with a Parsimonious Neurocomputational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropero Peláez, Francisco Javier; Taniguchi, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    The gate control theory of pain proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 is revisited through two mechanisms of neuronal regulation: NMDA synaptic plasticity and intrinsic plasticity. The Melzack and Wall circuit was slightly modified by using strictly excitatory nociceptive afferents (in the original arrangement, nociceptive afferents were considered excitatory when they project to central transmission neurons and inhibitory when projecting to substantia gelatinosa). The results of our neurocomputational model are consistent with biological ones in that nociceptive signals are blocked on their way to the brain every time a tactile stimulus is given at the same locus where the pain was produced. In the computational model, the whole set of parameters, independently of their initialization, always converge to the correct values to allow the correct computation of the circuit. To test the model, other painful conditions were analyzed: phantom limb pain, wind-up and wind-down pain, breakthrough pain, and demyelinating syndromes like Guillain-Barré and multiple sclerosis. PMID:27088014

  5. The Gate Theory of Pain Revisited: Modeling Different Pain Conditions with a Parsimonious Neurocomputational Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Ropero Peláez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The gate control theory of pain proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 is revisited through two mechanisms of neuronal regulation: NMDA synaptic plasticity and intrinsic plasticity. The Melzack and Wall circuit was slightly modified by using strictly excitatory nociceptive afferents (in the original arrangement, nociceptive afferents were considered excitatory when they project to central transmission neurons and inhibitory when projecting to substantia gelatinosa. The results of our neurocomputational model are consistent with biological ones in that nociceptive signals are blocked on their way to the brain every time a tactile stimulus is given at the same locus where the pain was produced. In the computational model, the whole set of parameters, independently of their initialization, always converge to the correct values to allow the correct computation of the circuit. To test the model, other painful conditions were analyzed: phantom limb pain, wind-up and wind-down pain, breakthrough pain, and demyelinating syndromes like Guillain-Barré and multiple sclerosis.

  6. Pain: A Culturally Informed Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ng

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available I was raised in North America - a culture and society in which the education emphasizes knowledge about science, its methods and its principles. The scientific method of understanding, coupled with the rudimentary knowledge that I was taught in high school biology, resulted in my conceptualization of pain as an objective truth. Pain, as I believed for a long time, was a bodily sensation with an expression that was more or less universal; to me, pain was simply the sensation that the brain experiences as a response to noxious stimuli. The pain sensation protects us from things that can hurt us; it is a warning sign that something in us is physically amiss. Thus, everybody physically reacts to the touch of a flame or experiences abdominal pain when there is appendicitis. Even now, in medical school, the pain education that I have received so far has only involved the physiology or mechanics of pain. Pain, as a physiological condition, operates independent of cultural context. However, in considering the experience of pain that my grandmother has endured, I realize that pain is much more than a mechanical bodily sensation effected by the nervous system in response to stimulus. Pain is a human experience, and as such, it is highly individualized and subjective. The proper diagnosis, care and treatment of pain necessitate a holistic understanding of pain, its physiology and its context (1.

  7. Role of central histaminergic mechanism in behavioural depression (swimming despair) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, C; Gulati, A; Dhawan, K N; Gupta, G P

    1988-01-01

    The role of the central histaminergic system in depression was studied by using swimming despair test in mice - a behavioural model of depression. In this test, immobility of mice reflects a state of depression. Intracerebral (ic) injection of histamine (50-200 micrograms) increased significantly the immobility. The H1-receptor blocker mepyramine (2.5-20 mg/kg ip) had no effect while H2-receptor blocker cimetidine (100-200 micrograms ic) caused a significant decrease in immobility. The histamine induced facilitation was blocked completely by cimetidine and antidepressant drugs-imipramine and desipramine, but remained unaffected in mice pretreated with mepyramine or atropine. The H2 agonist impromidine (20-40 micrograms ic) also enhanced significantly, the immobility which was blocked by cimetidine and antidepressant drugs. It has been concluded that central H2-receptors facilitate depression and antidepressant drugs block central H2-receptors.

  8. Feedback from central black holes in elliptical galaxies. I: models with either radiative or mechanical feedback but not both

    OpenAIRE

    Ciotti, L.; Ostriker, J.P.; Proga, D.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of the radiative feedback from SMBHs at the centers of elliptical galaxies is not in doubt, given the well established relations among electromagnetic output, black hole mass and galaxy optical luminosity. In addition, feedback due to mechanical and thermal deposition of energy from jets and winds emitted by the accretion disk around the central SMBH is also expected to occur. In this paper we improve and extend the accretion and feedback physics explored in our previous papers...

  9. Ziconotide for treatment of severe chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtko, Achim; Lötsch, Jörn; Freynhagen, Rainer; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2010-05-01

    Pharmacological management of severe chronic pain is difficult to achieve with currently available analgesic drugs, and remains a large unmet therapeutic need. The synthetic peptide ziconotide has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for intrathecal treatment of patients with severe chronic pain that is refractory to other treatment modalities. Ziconotide is the first member in the new drug class of selective N-type voltage-sensitive calcium-channel blockers. The ziconotide-induced blockade of N-type calcium channels in the spinal cord inhibits release of pain-relevant neurotransmitters from central terminals of primary afferent neurons. By this mechanism, ziconotide can effectively reduce pain. However, ziconotide has a narrow therapeutic window because of substantial CNS side-effects, and thus treatment with ziconotide is appropriate for only a small subset of patients with severe chronic pain. We provide an overview of the benefits and limitations of intrathecal ziconotide treatment and review potential future developments in this new drug class. PMID:20413151

  10. A streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathic pain model for static or dynamic mechanical allodynia and vulvodynia: validation using topical and systemic gabapentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Gowhar; Subhan, Fazal; Abbas, Muzaffar; Zeb, Jehan; Shahid, Muhammad; Sewell, Robert D E

    2015-11-01

    Neuropathic vulvodynia is a state of vulval discomfort characterized by a burning sensation, diffuse pain, pruritus or rawness with an acute or chronic onset. Diabetes mellitus may cause this type of vulvar pain in several ways, so this study was conducted to evaluate streptozotocin-induced diabetes as a neuropathic pain model for vulvodynia in female rats. The presence of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg i.p.)-induced diabetes was initially verified by disclosure of pancreatic tissue degeneration, blood glucose elevation and body weight loss 5-29 days after a single treatment. Dynamic (shortened paw withdrawal latency to light brushing) and static (diminished von Frey filament threshold pressure) mechanical allodynia was then confirmed on the plantar foot surface. Subsequently, both static and dynamic vulvodynia was detected by application of the paradigm to the vulval region. Systemic gabapentin (75 mg/kg, i.p.) and topical gabapentin (10 % gel) were finally tested against allodynia and vulvodynia. Topical gabapentin and the control gel vehicle significantly increased paw withdrawal threshold in the case of the static allodynia model and also paw withdrawal latency in the model for dynamic allodynia when compared with the streptozotocin-pretreated group. Likewise, in the case of static and dynamic vulvodynia, there was a significant antivulvodynia effect of systemic and topical gabapentin treatment. These outcomes substantiate the value of this model not only for allodynia but also for vulvodynia, and this was corroborated by the findings not only with systemic but also with topical gabapentin.

  11. The role of purinergic receptors in cancer-induced bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; Uldall, Maria; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-induced bone pain severely compromises the quality of life of many patients suffering from bone metastasis, as current therapies leave some patients with inadequate pain relief. The recent development of specific animal models has increased the understanding of the molecular and cellular...... mechanisms underlying cancer-induced bone pain including the involvement of ATP and the purinergic receptors in the progression of the pain state. In nociception, ATP acts as an extracellular messenger to transmit sensory information both at the peripheral site of tissue damage and in the spinal cord....... Several of the purinergic receptors have been shown to be important for the development and maintenance of neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and studies have demonstrated the importance of both peripheral and central mechanisms. We here provide an overview of the current literature on the role...

  12. Regulation of peripheral blood flow in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: clinical implication for symptomatic relief and pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coderre Terence J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS, impaired microcirculation is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the ischemia and pain in chronic cold CPRS. Discussion The diminished blood flow may be caused by either sympathetic dysfunction, hypersensitivity to circulating catecholamines, or endothelial dysfunction. The pain may be of neuropathic, inflammatory, nociceptive, or functional nature, or of mixed origin. Summary The origin of the pain should be the basis of the symptomatic therapy. Since the difference in temperature between both hands fluctuates over time in cold CRPS, when in doubt, the clinician should prioritize the patient's report of a persistent cold extremity over clinical tests that show no difference. Future research should focus on developing easily applied methods for clinical use to differentiate between central and peripheral blood flow regulation disorders in individual patients.

  13. 椎间盘源性疼痛的机制及其治疗进展%The mechanism of discogenic pain and its progress in clinical treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋红梅; 吴春根; 程永德

    2012-01-01

    椎间盘源性疼痛的机制及其治疗是近年来的研究热点之一.研究表明疼痛的发生涉及到椎间盘变性、神经纤维的异常增殖、生物化学因素,甚至包括生理、情绪以及遗传因素的影响;有关椎间盘源性疼痛的治疗,除了保守治疗及传统的外科手术外,各种经皮微创介入技术因其操作简单,创伤小,并发症少,术后恢复期短等优势,已在临床上广泛应用.此外,各种新型的治疗方法目前也逐渐发展起来,但是其临床疗效尚需进一步的研究加以证实.%The mechanism and treatment of discogenic pain has been one of the hot research topics in recent years. Many studies have indicated that discogenic pain is closely associated with the degeneration of disc, abnormal proliferation of nerve fibers, some biological chemical factors, etc. Even physiological, emotional and genetic factors can affect the pain severity. In respect of its treatment, besides conservative measures and traditional surgery, there are many kinds of percutaneous minimally - invasive interventional techniques, which have been widely employed in clinical practice nowadays as these operations are simply-manipulated and minimally - invasive with fewer complications. Moreover, lots of kinds of new therapies for discogenic pain have gradually developed, although their clinical effects need to be confirmed with more studies.

  14. Efficacy of segmental stabilization exercise for lumbar segmental instability in patients with mechanical low back pain: A randomized placebo controlled crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar segmental stability is an important biomechanical component that influences symptoms amongst patients with Mechanical low back pain. Aims: To compare the efficacy of segmental stabilization exercises utilizing multifidus and transversus abdominis muscles versus a placebo treatment in patients with lumbar segmental instability. Materials and methods: The study was an observer-blinded randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study of 18 adults (12 men, 6 women, of mean age 22.5 ± 1.09 yrs who scored 7/13 in subjective aspects and 8/14 in objective aspects of Delphi criteria for lumbar segmental instability. The selected subjects were then randomized to receive either placebo-control (prone lying or experimental (lumbar segmental stabilization as a first treatment. Each treatment was followed by a wash-out period of 24 hours. Outcomes were measured four times- pre- and post- first intervention, pre- and post- second intervention. The outcome measures used were pain on Visual analogue scale, Pressure pain threshold and Joint play grading scale (0-6 scale on that level. Results: Two-way analysis of variance and post-hoc analysis using Bonferonni test were used with level of significance set at p<.05 using Statistical package for social sciences version 12.0.1 for Windows. Visual analogue scale changed significantly in both the periods of intervention- in control (P =.016 and experimental (P =.000 periods. However this improvement was more significant in the experimental period. The Joint play grading scale scores improved only in the experimental condition compared to the control condition significantly. The Pressure pain threshold also improved significantly in the experimental condition (P =.000 while the changes in control condition was not statistically significant (P=.816. Conclusion: Segmental stabilization exercise was more effective than placebo intervention in symptomatic lumbar segmental instability.

  15. Evaluation of analgesic effect of tapentadol, a central novel analgesic versus tramadol, a widely used opioid analgesic in treatment of low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki Anwar Zaman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of the study was to compare efficacy and tolerability (safety of tapentadol with tramadol in the treatment of low back pain. Methods: The study was a prospective, randomized, single blinded, total 102 patients are recruited for study in which 44 patients are prescribed (50mgtwice daily tapentadol and 58 patients prescribed (50mg twice daily tramadol for 4 weeks. Follow-up was done on days 7, 14, 28 and 4 week after stoppage of treatment. Assessment of improvement were performed by Indian Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (Indian HAQDI, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Numerical Rating Scale (NRS and measurement of Pain Relief Rate (PRR. Adverse events were recorded. Results: Scores in Indian HAQDI, VAS and NRS improved significantly in both groups in the last visit but more so with tapentadol. PRR was reasonably higher with tapentadol [27(n=4461.36%] patients experiencing significant to complete pain relief at the end of the study, compared to tramadol [25(n=58 43.10%]. Adverse effects was less in tapentadol group [15(n=4434.09%] versus 33(n=5856.89%], p<0.05]. Conclusion: Tapentadol has better sustained efficacy and tolerability than tramadol in low back pain. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(4.000: 392-396

  16. Central de ventiladores mecânicos: organização, segurança e qualidade Central of mechanical fan: organization, safety and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranildes de Abreu Batista

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A central de ventiladores mecânicos é a unidade do hospital com finalidade de organizar recursos de ventilação, promovendo controle e manutenção preventiva e organizacional destes equipamentos. O objetivo deste estudo foi elaborar uma proposta de implantação de uma central de ventiladores mecânicos em hospital universitário, subsidiado pela identificação do conhecimento técnico científico dos enfermeiros sobre o tema ventilação mecânica e pela detecção de problemas oriundos do gerenciamento descentralizado dos ventiladores. MÉTODO: Trata-se de estudo descritivo exploratório com abordagem quantitativa, realizado com 13 enfermeiros de unidades de terapia intensiva. As informações foram coletadas através de entrevistas estruturadas e submetidas a análise descritiva do conteúdo. RESULTADOS: Revelaram que os enfermeiros possuem dúvidas diversas, fato evidenciado por 100% dos entrevistados que mencionaram a necessidade de cursos de capacitação voltados para a assistência de enfermagem ao paciente em ventilação mecânica. As situações descritas pelos enfermeiros no cotidiano, demonstraram que a descentralização do gerenciamento dos ventiladores mecânicos mostraram-se ineficaz quanto à organização, segurança e qualidade. A proposta de implantação de uma central de ventiladores aponta para melhorias na assistência, na formação de recursos humanos e na produção do conhecimento. CONCLUSÕES: O perfil atual pode ser mudado através do rompimento de paradigmas institucionais e da instituição de práticas inovadoras que reforçarão o propósito de um hospital de grande porte voltado para o ensino, a pesquisa e a extensão.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The headquarters of mechanical fans is the unit of the hospital with purpose of organizing ventilation resources promoting control and preventive maintenance and organizational of these equipments. The objective of this study was to

  17. Dorsal root ganglion compression as an animal model of sciatica and low back pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yu Lin; Jing Yang; Hui-Ming Li; San-Jue Hu; Jun-Ling Xing

    2012-01-01

    As sciatica and low back pain are among the most common medical complaints,many studies have duplicated these conditions in animals.Chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) is one of these models.The surgery is simple:after exposing the L4/L5 intervertebral foramina,stainless steel rods are implanted unilaterally,one rod for each vertebra,to chronically compress the lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG).Then,CCD can be used to simulate the clinical conditions caused by stenosis,such as a laterally herniated disc or foraminal stenosis.As the intraforaminal implantation of a rod results in neuronal somal hyperexcitability and spontaneous action potentials associated with hyperalgesia,spontaneous pain,and mechanical allodynia,CCD provides an animal model that mimics radicular pain in humans.This review concerns the mechanisms of neuronal hyperexcitability,focusing on various patterns of spontaneous discharge including one possible pain signal for mechanical allodynia-evoked bursting.Also,new data regarding its significant property of maintaining peripheral input are also discussed.Investigations using this animal model will enhance our understanding of the neural mechanisms for low back pain and sciatica.Furthermore,the peripheral location of the DRG facilitates its use as a locus for controlling pain with minimal central effects,in the hope of ultimately uncovering analgesics that block neuropathic pain without influencing physiological pain.

  18. Pain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... opiates such as morphine could relieve pain and chemist Felix Hoffmann developed aspirin from a substance in ... sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage.” TODAY Pain affects more Americans than ...

  19. [Oral pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benslama, Lotfi

    2002-02-15

    Pain, a major symptom of stomatological disease, usually leads to a specialist consultation. Most commonly it is caused by dental caries and differs in nature and in intensity according to the stage of disease: dentinitis, pulpitis, desmodontitis and dental abscess. Added to this is peridental pain and the pre- and post-operative pains related to these diseases. Almost all oral-maxillary pathology is painful, be it boney such as in osteomyelitis and fractures, mucosal in gingivo-stomatitis and aphthous ulcers, or tumourous. However, besides the "multidisciplinary" facial pains such as facial neuralgia and vascular pain, two pain syndromes are specific to stomatology: pain of the tempero-mandibular joint associated with problems of the bite and glossodynia, a very common somatic expression of psychological problems.

  20. Habituating pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajslev, Jeppe Zielinski Nguyen; Lund, Henrik Lambrecht; Møller, Jeppe Lykke;

    2013-01-01

    the industry reproduce physical strain and the habituation of pain as unquestioned conditions in construction work. The understanding of this mutual reinforcement of the necessity of physically straining, painful, high-paced construction work provides fruitful perspectives on the overrepresentation...

  1. Testicle pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain include: Injury Infection or swelling of the sperm ducts ( epididymitis ) or testicles ( orchitis ) Twisting of the ... Cyst in the epididymis that often contains dead sperm cells ( spermatocele ) Fluid surrounding the testicle ( hydrocele ) Pain ...

  2. Breast pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  3. A positron emission tomography study of wind-up pain in chronic postherniotomy pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Lonsdale, Markus Georg; Aasvang, Eske Kvanner;

    2011-01-01

    -induced wind-up pain in neuropathic pain patients. We therefore used positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate the cerebral response pattern of mechanical wind-up pain in a homogenous group of 10 neuropathic pain patients with long-standing postherniotomy pain in the groin area. Patients were scanned......) and the brain stem. A direct comparison between wind-up pain and pressure pain revealed that both activated a largely overlapping network. Since no de novo brain areas were activated by wind-up pain, our data suggest that the processes specific to wind-up pain do not occur at the cerebral level....

  4. Centralized cancer pain cognition situation in basic medical staff from China%我国西南地区基层医务人员癌痛认知现状调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘婧; 王静; 贾钰铭; 雷开键; 张瑶; 江健; 郭菁菁; 贾凤琴

    2013-01-01

    目的:了解我国西南地区基层医务人员的癌痛认知状况,为提高基层癌痛控制水平提供依据。方法:选择我国西南地区四川省宜宾市宜宾县横江镇及所辖部分村级医务人员,进行集中式癌痛问卷调查并进行癌痛知识宣教。结果:横江镇医务人员认为仅有17%(8/46)的癌痛患者得到治疗;70%(32/46)医务人员不注重对患者进行癌痛治疗宣教;64%(40/46)医务人员对规范癌痛控制知识不了解;87%(40/46)医务人员认为麻醉止痛药不能满足患者需要;70%(32/46)的医务人员要求增加癌痛培训次数。结论:横江镇医务人员癌痛认知状况较差,需要更多适应基层的癌痛知识培训,建议将癌痛控制纳入社区慢性病肿瘤的具体管理之中。%Objective:To understand the recognition status of cancer pain in basic medical staff from small towns to provide the basis for the improvement of cancer pain management in these areas. Methods:The medical staff of Hengjiang Town and subordinate villages was selected. The study area is situated in southwest China. Centralized questionnaires regarding cancer pain were collected and analyzed. A program and education of cancer pain were provided for these medical workers. Results: The medical staff from Hengjiang asserted that only 17%of cancer pain patients receive treatments. Approximately 70%of the medical staff did not consider the popularization and explanation of cancer pain treatment in their patients. Approximately 64%of the medical staff was not familiar with standardized cancer pain control, 87%did not believe that narcotics could suffice the need of patients, and 44%did not participate in the training for cancer pain control. Conclusion: The medical staff in Hengjiang possesses less knowledge on the importance of cancer pain. Hence, further training is necessary. The specific management of cancer pain as a part of community chronic diseases is

  5. Urination Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more often bad-smelling, bloody, or discolored urine (pee) fever or chills decreased appetite or activity irritability nausea or vomiting lower back pain or abdominal (belly) pain wetting accidents (in potty-trained kids) What to Do Call the doctor if your child has pain while urinating or can't ...

  6. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relaxation. Guided imagery for abdominal pain About self-hypnosis and kids See YourChild : Pain and Your Child or Teen for more detail ... how to help your baby cope with the pain of medical procedures, circumcision, and teething. ... Helping Kids YourChild : A Look at Biofeedback YourChild : ...

  7. Pain management in veterinary patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Vedpathak

    Full Text Available The veterinary practitioner has an ethical obligation to help alleviate animal pain. Although most veterinarians accept the fact that animals feel pain, still, postoperative pain relief is not a routine practice in all veterinary hospitals and clinics today. Nociception is a physiological process which involves transduction, transmission, modulation and perception of the noxious stimuli. Chemical mediators are important components of the nociceptive reflex and offer a target of pharmacologic modulation. Assessment of pain in animals is the most important step in the successful management of pain. Choosing appropriate method of pain control would depend upon the type of procedure followed, severity of pain and economic considerations for each individual circumstance. Our understanding of the pain in its manifestation, mechanisms, assessment and alleviation in animals is still although improving, limited. [Vet World 2009; 2(9.000: 360-363

  8. Progesterone stimulates respiration through a central nervous system steroid receptor-mediated mechanism in cat.

    OpenAIRE

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Gallman, E A; Cidlowski, J A

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the effect on respiration of the steroid hormone progesterone, administered either intravenously or directly into the medulla oblongata in anesthetized and paralyzed male and female cats. The carotid sinus and vagus nerves were cut, and end-tidal PCO2 and temperature were kept constant with servo-controllers. Phrenic nerve activity was used to quantitate central respiratory activity. Repeated doses of progesterone (from 0.1 to 2.0 micrograms/kg, cumulative) caused a sustained...

  9. CHARACTERIZATION AND FORMATION MECHANISM OF THE CENTRAL UPLIFT OF THE QIANGTANG BASIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Fuguang

    2004-01-01

    The Qiangtang basin is located between Kekexili-Jingshajiang suture belt and Bangong-Lujiang suture belt, and is divided into the north part and south part by the central uplift that has no crop out of Mesozoic strata. When the Jinshajiang Ocean was closed, the subducting plate was subducted southward. In the central part of the Qiangtang basin, the cushioning effect of the asthenosphere resulted in the thermal doming of the mantle and subsequent large-scale anatexis. Mantle source materials and antectic materials were upwelled and extruded into the middle crust, leading to the thickening of the middle crust and the heating and weakening of the middle to upper crust, and resulting in the rapid deformation (detachment) and tectonic erosion, and in the isostatic uplifting and the formation of metamorphic core complex. The upwelling of anatectic materials would further enhance the buoyant repercussion, which would combine with the side stress due from extrusion in resulting in the formation of an extensional stress field. The extensional structure and detachment fault are formed under the influence of the losing stabilized gravitation. In the deformation area in both the upper part and the lower part, an extensional deposition area would be formed, and this is the generation of a new basin.The metamorphic core complex of the central uplift is comprised of gneiss, which is itself overlain by non-metamorphic to weakly metamorphic covering strata intersected by faults.

  10. Pain catastrophizing: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartana, Phillip J; Campbell, Claudia M; Edwards, Robert R

    2009-05-01

    Pain catastrophizing is conceptualized as a negative cognitive-affective response to anticipated or actual pain and has been associated with a number of important pain-related outcomes. In the present review, we first focus our efforts on the conceptualization of pain catastrophizing, highlighting its conceptual history and potential problem areas. We then focus our discussion on a number of theoretical mechanisms of action: appraisal theory, attention bias/information processing, communal coping, CNS pain processing mechanisms, psychophysiological pathways and neural pathways. We then offer evidence to suggest that pain catastrophizing represents an important process factor in pain treatment. We conclude by offering what we believe represents an integrated heuristic model for use by researchers over the next 5 years; a model we believe will advance the field most expediently. PMID:19402782

  11. High levels of endogenous lipid mediators (N-acylethanolamines) in women with chronic widespread pain during acute tissue trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri, Bijar; Ghafouri, Nazdar; Gerdle, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Although chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain is a significant health problem, the molecular mechanisms involved in developing and maintaining chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain are poorly understood. Central sensitization mechanisms maintained by stimuli from peripheral tissues such as muscle have been suggested. Lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory characteristics such as endogenous ligands of peroxisome proliferator activating receptor-α, oleoylethanolamide, and palmitoylethanolamide are suggested to regulate nociceptive transmission from peripheral locations on route towards the central nervous system. This case–control study investigates the levels of anti-inflammatory lipids in microdialysis samples collected during the first 2 h after microdialysis probe insertion and explores the association of these lipids with different pain characteristics in women with chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain (n = 17) and female healthy controls (n = 19). The levels of oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide, and stearoylethanolamide were determined. During sampling of dialysate, pain ratings were conducted using a numeric rating scale. Pain thresholds were registered from upper and lower parts of the body. Oleoylethanolamide and stearoylethanolamide levels were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) in chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain at all time points. Numeric rating scale correlated with levels of stearoylethanolamide in chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain. Higher levels of lipid mediators could reflect an altered tissue reactivity in response to microdialysis probe insertion in chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain. PMID:27531672

  12. High levels of endogenous lipid mediators (N-acylethanolamines) in women with chronic widespread pain during acute tissue trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensson, Niclas; Ghafouri, Bijar; Ghafouri, Nazdar; Gerdle, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Although chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain is a significant health problem, the molecular mechanisms involved in developing and maintaining chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain are poorly understood. Central sensitization mechanisms maintained by stimuli from peripheral tissues such as muscle have been suggested. Lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory characteristics such as endogenous ligands of peroxisome proliferator activating receptor-α, oleoylethanolamide, and palmitoylethanolamide are suggested to regulate nociceptive transmission from peripheral locations on route towards the central nervous system. This case-control study investigates the levels of anti-inflammatory lipids in microdialysis samples collected during the first 2 h after microdialysis probe insertion and explores the association of these lipids with different pain characteristics in women with chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain (n = 17) and female healthy controls (n = 19). The levels of oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide, and stearoylethanolamide were determined. During sampling of dialysate, pain ratings were conducted using a numeric rating scale. Pain thresholds were registered from upper and lower parts of the body. Oleoylethanolamide and stearoylethanolamide levels were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) in chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain at all time points. Numeric rating scale correlated with levels of stearoylethanolamide in chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain. Higher levels of lipid mediators could reflect an altered tissue reactivity in response to microdialysis probe insertion in chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain. PMID:27531672

  13. Contextual modulation of pain in masochists: involvement of the parietal operculum and insula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamping, Sandra; Andoh, Jamila; Bomba, Isabelle C; Diers, Martin; Diesch, Eugen; Flor, Herta

    2016-02-01

    Pain can be modulated by contextual stimuli, such as emotions, social factors, or specific bodily perceptions. We presented painful laser stimuli together with body-related masochistic visual stimuli to persons with and without preferred masochistic sexual behavior and used neutral, positive, and negative pictures with and without painful stimuli as control. Masochists reported substantially reduced pain intensity and unpleasantness in the masochistic context compared with controls but had unaltered pain perception in the other conditions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed that masochists activated brain areas involved in sensory-discriminative processing rather than affective pain processing when they received painful stimuli on a masochistic background. The masochists compared with the controls displayed attenuated functional connectivity of the parietal operculum with the left and right insulae, the central operculum, and the supramarginal gyrus. Masochists additionally showed negative correlations between the duration of interest in masochistic activities and activation of areas involved in motor activity and affective processing. We propose that the parietal operculum serves as an important relay station that attenuates the affective-motivational aspects of pain in masochists. This novel mechanism of pain modulation might be related to multisensory integration and has important implications for the assessment and treatment of pain. PMID:26808014

  14. [The effect of combination epidural anesthesia techniques in upper abdominal surgery on the stress reaction, pain control and respiratory mechanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, B; Leibe, S; Kätzel, R; Grube, U; Landgraf, R; Bierwolf, B

    1991-11-01

    Twenty-eight patients undergoing upper abdominal operations (mainly selective proximal vagotomy [SPV]) were referred for assessment of the hormonal metabolic reaction (adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH], arginine vasopressin [AVP], cortisol, and glucose), the postoperative pain reaction, and respiration according to the method of anesthesia (group 1: neuroleptanesthesia [NLA], group 2: NLA in combination with epidural opiate analgesia, group 3: NLA in combination with local anesthesia). To alleviate postoperative pain piritramide was systematically administered in group 1, whereas in groups 2 and 3 a thoracic epidural catheter was injected with morphine or bupivacaine. Postoperative analgesia was better in patients with epidural administration than in those with systemic application. On the 1st and 2nd postoperative days the vital capacity was statistically significantly higher by 10%-15% in groups 2 and 3 than in group 1. As expected, the neurohormonal and metabolic stress response was highest in all patients in the intraoperative and immediate postoperative phases: ACTH, AVP, and glucose levels were in most cases significantly higher compared with the initial values. However, cortisol levels decreased intraoperatively, probably as a result of the generally used induction agent etomidate. Comparison of the three methods of anesthesia revealed that all mean hormone levels analyzed in group 2 patients were lower both intraoperatively and 2 h postoperatively, which implies that epidurally administered morphine reduces the stress reaction, probably indirectly through additional selective alleviation of pain at the spinal cord level. The various differences in hormonal reactions of patients in groups 1 and 3 gave no clear evidence, however, of possible mitigation of the stress reaction by epidural local anesthetics in upper abdominal operations.

  15. Cladistics of some rattans (Calamus spp. from Central Sulawesi based on physical and mechanical characteristic of stems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDI TANRA TELLU

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The research of the physical and mechanical characteristic of rattans stem of 10 species of the genus Calamus from Bancea Nature Reserve and Lore Lindu National Park in Central Sulawesi had been conducted. The aims of this research were to describe phylogenetic relationship of those species based on physical and mechanical characteristic with cladistic approach (cladogram. The research had been used descriptive method, i.e. specific gravity, parallel attracting firmness of fiber, firmness stress parallels of flex firmness, and fiber/static curve. It was reconciled with standard of ASTM D no 143-52 with a few which has modified. The data was analyzed by ANOVA. The result indicated that the mechanical and physical characteristic of Calamus rattan can be made as distinguishing evidences. It can be compiled by a new classification in the form of cladistic (classification of numeric as complement of previous classification.

  16. Feedback from central black holes in elliptical galaxies. I: models with either radiative or mechanical feedback but not both

    CERN Document Server

    Ciotti, L; Proga, D

    2009-01-01

    The importance of the radiative feedback from SMBHs at the centers of elliptical galaxies is not in doubt, given the well established relations among electromagnetic output, black hole mass and galaxy optical luminosity. In addition, feedback due to mechanical and thermal deposition of energy from jets and winds emitted by the accretion disk around the central SMBH is also expected to occur. In this paper we improve and extend the accretion and feedback physics explored in our previous papers to include also a physically motivated mechanical feedback. We study the evolution of an isolated elliptical galaxy with the aid of a high-resolution 1-D hydrodynamical code, where the cooling and heating functions include photoionization and Compton effects, and restricting to models which include only radiative or only mechanical feedback. We confirm that for Eddington ratios above 0.01 both the accretion and radiative output are forced by feedback effects to be in burst mode, so that strong intermittencies are expecte...

  17. Chronic pain: the burden of disease and treatment innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, S; Caporali, R

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are the most frequent cause of chronic pain and affect around 1 in 5 adults in Europe. When chronic pain occurs, it becomes disease itself, with substantial clinical, social and economic impact. Efficacy and tolerability problems are encountered with all therapeutic strategies available to treat musculoskeletal pain. This often limits effective analgesia and patients' long term compliance, with the result that chronic pain is persistently underestimated and undertreated. Tapentadol is a novel, centrally acting analgesic that has been recently commercialized for the treatment of chronic pain. This new molecule, by combining two distinct mechanisms of action, μ-opioid receptor agonism (MOR) and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition (NRI), introduces a new pharmacological class called MOR-NRI. Several studies demonstrated promising results in the management of both nociceptive and neuropathic pain and good tolerability profile, particularly concerning side effects, compared to traditional opioids. This novel analgesic represents a possible therapeutic option also in the rheumatologic field, particularly in the treatment of osteoarthritis and low back pain. PMID:26492961

  18. Chronic pain: the burden of disease and treatment innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Monti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal conditions are the most frequent cause of chronic pain and affect around 1 in 5 adults in Europe. When chronic pain occurs, it becomes disease itself, with substantial clinical, social and economic impact. Effi cacy and tolerability problems are encountered with all therapeutic strategies available to treat musculoskeletal pain. This often limits effective analgesia and patients’ long term compliance, with the result that chronic pain is persistently underestimated and undertreated. Tapentadol is a novel, centrally acting analgesic that has been recently commercialized for the treatment of chronic pain. This new molecule, by combining two distinct mechanisms of action, μ-opioid receptor agonism (MOR and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition (NRI, introduces a new pharmacological class called MOR-NRI. Several studies demonstrated promising results in the management of both nociceptive and neuropathic pain and good tolerability profi le, particularly concerning side effects, compared to traditional opioids. This novel analgesic represents a possible therapeutic option also in the rheumatologic fi eld, particularly in the treatment of osteoarthritis and low back pain.

  19. 神经营养素在椎间盘源性腰痛机制中的作用研究进展%Reasearch on mechanism of neurotrophins in discogenic low back pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾治伟; 张宝库; 阮狄克

    2012-01-01

    椎间盘源性腰痛是慢性腰痛常见的类型,然而,其疼痛机制尚不明确.越来越多的证据表明,神经营养素在椎间盘源性腰痛机制中具有重要地位.本文从神经营养素在椎间盘、脊根神经节和脊髓后角等疼痛传递通路中的作用,对其在椎间盘源性腰痛机制中的研究进展进行综述.通过调控神经营养素及其受体来改变疼痛信息传递,为椎间盘源性腰痛的治疗提供新思路.%Discogenic low back pain is the common type of chronic Sow back pain. However,its mechanism has not been completely clarified. Considerable evidence shows that neurotrophins play an important role in discogenic low back pain. The paper summarizes the mechanism of neurotrophins on discogenic low back pain according to the pain transfer pathway of neurotrophins in intervertebral disc,dorsal horn ganglia and spinal trigeminal nucleus. Changing the pain transmission by regulating neurotrophins and its receptor will provide a new way for the treatment of discogenic low back pain.

  20. Temporomandibular pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, H R; Kalavathi, S D

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  1. Pain in fibromyalgia and related conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassisi, G; Sarzi-Puttini, P; Casale, R; Cazzola, M; Boccassini, L; Atzeni, F; Stisi, S

    2014-06-06

    Pain is the hallmark symptom of fibromyalgia (FM) and other related syndromes, but quite different from that of other rheumatic diseases, which depends on the degree of damage or inflammation in peripheral tissues. Sufferers are often defined as patients with chronic pain without an underlying mechanistic cause, and these syndromes and their symptoms are most appropriately described as "central pain", "neuropathic pain", "nonnociceptive pain" or "central sensitivity syndromes". The pain is particular, regional or widespread, and mainly relates to the musculoskeletal system; hyperalgesia or allodynia are typical. Its origin is currently considered to be distorted pain or sensory processing, rather than a local or regional abnormality. FM is probably the most important and extensively described central pain syndrome, but the characteristics and features of FM-related pain are similar in other disorders of particular interest for rheumatologists, such as myofascial pain syndromes and temporo-mandibular joint disorders, and there is also an intriguing overlap between FM and benign joint hypermobility syndrome. This suggests that the distinctive aspects of pain in these idiopathic or functional conditions is caused by central nervous system hypersensitivity and abnormalities. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies have been suggested for the treatment of these conditions, but a multidisciplinary approach is required in order to reduce the abnormal cycle of pain amplification and the related maladaptive and self-limiting behaviours.

  2. The Relationship between Mechanical Hyperalgesia Assessed by Manual Tender Point Examination and Disease Severity in Patients with Chronic Widespread Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstine Amris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical utility of tender point (TP examination in patients reporting chronic widespread pain (CWP is the subject of contemporary debate. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between mechanical hyperalgesia assessed by manual TP examination and clinical disease severity. 271 women with CWP were recruited from a clinical setting. Data collection included patient-reported symptoms, health-related quality of life variables, and observation-based measures of functional ability, muscle strength, 6-minute walk, and pressure pain thresholds measured by cuff algometry. TP examination was conducted according to ACR-guidelines. Relationships between disease variables and TP count (TPC were analyzed with logistic regression in a continuum model, allowing the TPC to depend on the included disease variables and two regression models carried out for a TPC threshold level, varying between 1 and 17. The threshold analyses indicated a TPC threshold at 8, above which a large number of disease variables became consistently significant explanatory factors, whereas none of the disease variables reached a significance level in the continuum model. These results support the premise that the presence of mechanical hyperalgesia influences symptomatology in CWP and that the severity of clinical expression is related to a threshold of TPs, rather than being part of a continuum.

  3. Evaluation of analgesic effect of tapentadol, a central novel analgesic versus tramadol, a widely used opioid analgesic in treatment of low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki Anwar Zaman; Deepak Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objective of the study was to compare efficacy and tolerability (safety) of tapentadol with tramadol in the treatment of low back pain. Methods: The study was a prospective, randomized, single blinded, total 102 patients are recruited for study in which 44 patients are prescribed (50mgtwice daily) tapentadol and 58 patients prescribed (50mg twice daily) tramadol for 4 weeks. Follow-up was done on days 7, 14, 28 and 4 week after stoppage of treatment. Assessment of improvement ...

  4. Hypnosis and pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chantal; Bioy, Antoine

    2008-04-01

    The development of studies on neuroimaging applied to hypnosis and to the study of pain not only helps to validate the existence of a hypnotic state but also to ratify its therapeutic effects. These studies also enable us to understand how hypnosis is effective on the cortical level. It also helps us see, from another perspective, the mechanisms of pain leading perhaps to a different definition of pain. This article develops the latest knowledge in the domain of hypnosis and pain, and approaches the clinical practices and their applications in the management of pain in children. PMID:18243640

  5. Cardamonin, a Novel Antagonist of hTRPA1 Cation Channel, Reveals Therapeutic Mechanism of Pathological Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for safe and effective treatments of chronic pain has promoted the investigation of novel analgesic drugs. Some herbals have been known to be able to relieve pain, while the chemical basis and target involved in this process remained to be clarified. The current study aimed to find anti-nociceptive candidates targeting transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1, a receptor that implicates in hyperalgesia and neurogenic inflammation. In the current study, 156 chemicals were tested for blocking HEK293/TRPA1 ion channel by calcium-influx assay. Docking study was conducted to predict the binding modes of hit compound with TRPA1 using Discovery Studio. Cytotoxicity in HEK293 was conducted by Cell Titer-Glo assay. Additionally, cardiotoxicity was assessed via xCELLigence RTCA system. We uncovered that cardamonin selectively blocked TRPA1 activation while did not interact with TRPV1 nor TRPV4 channel. A concentration-dependent inhibitory effect was observed with IC50 of 454 nM. Docking analysis of cardamonin demonstrated a compatible interaction with A-967079-binding site of TRPA1. Meanwhile, cardamonin did not significantly reduce HEK293 cell viability, nor did it impair cardiomyocyte constriction. Our data suggest that cardamonin is a selective TRPA1 antagonist, providing novel insight into the target of its anti-nociceptive activity.

  6. A Framework for Understanding the Relationship between Descending Pain Modulation, Motor Corticospinal, and Neuroplasticity Regulation Systems in Chronic Myofascial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Leonardo M; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Rozisky, Joanna R; Brietzke, Aline P; Torres, Iraci L S; Deitos, Alicia; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a leading cause of chronic musculoskeletal pain. However, its neurobiological mechanisms are not entirely elucidated. Given the complex interaction between the networks involved in pain process, our approach, to providing insights into the neural mechanisms of pain, was to investigate the relationship between neurophysiological, neurochemical and clinical outcomes such as corticospinal excitability. Recent evidence has demonstrated that three neural systems are affected in chronic pain: (i) motor corticospinal system; (ii) internal descending pain modulation system; and (iii) the system regulating neuroplasticity. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to examine the relationship between these three central systems in patients with chronic MPS of whom do/do not respond to the Conditioned Pain Modulation Task (CPM-task). The CPM-task was to immerse her non-dominant hand in cold water (0-1°C) to produce a heterotopic nociceptive stimulus. Corticospinal excitability was the primary outcome; specifically, the motor evoked potential (MEP) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) as assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Secondary outcomes were the cortical excitability parameters [current silent period (CSP) and short intracortical inhibition (SICI)], serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), heat pain threshold (HPT), and the disability related to pain (DRP). We included 33 women, (18-65 years old). The MANCOVA model using Bonferroni's Multiple Comparison Test revealed that non-responders (n = 10) compared to responders (n = 23) presented increased intracortical facilitation (ICF; mean ± SD) 1.43 (0.3) vs. 1.11 (0.12), greater motor-evoked potential amplitude (μV) 1.93 (0.54) vs. 1.40 (0.27), as well a higher serum BDNF (pg/Ml) 32.56 (9.95) vs. 25.59 (10.24), (P < 0.05 for all). Also, non-responders presented a higher level of DRP and decreased HPT (P < 0.05 for all). These findings suggest that the loss of net

  7. A Framework for Understanding the Relationship between Descending Pain Modulation, Motor Corticospinal, and Neuroplasticity Regulation Systems in Chronic Myofascial Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Leonardo M.; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Rozisky, Joanna R.; Brietzke, Aline P.; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Deitos, Alicia; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a leading cause of chronic musculoskeletal pain. However, its neurobiological mechanisms are not entirely elucidated. Given the complex interaction between the networks involved in pain process, our approach, to providing insights into the neural mechanisms of pain, was to investigate the relationship between neurophysiological, neurochemical and clinical outcomes such as corticospinal excitability. Recent evidence has demonstrated that three neural systems are affected in chronic pain: (i) motor corticospinal system; (ii) internal descending pain modulation system; and (iii) the system regulating neuroplasticity. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to examine the relationship between these three central systems in patients with chronic MPS of whom do/do not respond to the Conditioned Pain Modulation Task (CPM-task). The CPM-task was to immerse her non-dominant hand in cold water (0−1°C) to produce a heterotopic nociceptive stimulus. Corticospinal excitability was the primary outcome; specifically, the motor evoked potential (MEP) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) as assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Secondary outcomes were the cortical excitability parameters [current silent period (CSP) and short intracortical inhibition (SICI)], serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), heat pain threshold (HPT), and the disability related to pain (DRP). We included 33 women, (18–65 years old). The MANCOVA model using Bonferroni's Multiple Comparison Test revealed that non-responders (n = 10) compared to responders (n = 23) presented increased intracortical facilitation (ICF; mean ± SD) 1.43 (0.3) vs. 1.11 (0.12), greater motor-evoked potential amplitude (μV) 1.93 (0.54) vs. 1.40 (0.27), as well a higher serum BDNF (pg/Ml) 32.56 (9.95) vs. 25.59 (10.24), (P pain inhibition was associated with an increase in ICF, serum BDNF levels, and DRP. We propose a framework to explain the relationship and potential

  8. A Framework for Understanding the Relationship between Descending Pain Modulation, Motor Corticospinal, and Neuroplasticity Regulation Systems in Chronic Myofascial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Leonardo M; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Rozisky, Joanna R; Brietzke, Aline P; Torres, Iraci L S; Deitos, Alicia; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a leading cause of chronic musculoskeletal pain. However, its neurobiological mechanisms are not entirely elucidated. Given the complex interaction between the networks involved in pain process, our approach, to providing insights into the neural mechanisms of pain, was to investigate the relationship between neurophysiological, neurochemical and clinical outcomes such as corticospinal excitability. Recent evidence has demonstrated that three neural systems are affected in chronic pain: (i) motor corticospinal system; (ii) internal descending pain modulation system; and (iii) the system regulating neuroplasticity. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to examine the relationship between these three central systems in patients with chronic MPS of whom do/do not respond to the Conditioned Pain Modulation Task (CPM-task). The CPM-task was to immerse her non-dominant hand in cold water (0-1°C) to produce a heterotopic nociceptive stimulus. Corticospinal excitability was the primary outcome; specifically, the motor evoked potential (MEP) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) as assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Secondary outcomes were the cortical excitability parameters [current silent period (CSP) and short intracortical inhibition (SICI)], serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), heat pain threshold (HPT), and the disability related to pain (DRP). We included 33 women, (18-65 years old). The MANCOVA model using Bonferroni's Multiple Comparison Test revealed that non-responders (n = 10) compared to responders (n = 23) presented increased intracortical facilitation (ICF; mean ± SD) 1.43 (0.3) vs. 1.11 (0.12), greater motor-evoked potential amplitude (μV) 1.93 (0.54) vs. 1.40 (0.27), as well a higher serum BDNF (pg/Ml) 32.56 (9.95) vs. 25.59 (10.24), (P pain inhibition was associated with an increase in ICF, serum BDNF levels, and DRP. We propose a framework to explain the relationship and potential

  9. Is it time to turn our attention towards central mechanisms for post-exertional recovery strategies and performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eRattray

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Post-exercise recovery has largely focused on peripheral mechanisms of fatigue, but there is growing acceptance that fatigue is also contributed to through central mechanisms which demands that attention should be paid to optimising recovery of the brain. In this narrative review we assemble evidence for the role that many currently utilised recovery strategies may have on the brain, as well as potential mechanisms for their action. The review provides discussion of how common nutritional strategies as well as physical modalities and methods to reduce mental fatigue are likely to interact with the brain, and offer an opportunity for subsequent improved performance. We aim to highlight the fact that many recovery strategies have been designed with the periphery in mind, and that refinement of current methods are likely to provide improvements in minimising central fatigue. Whilst we offer a number of recommendations, it is evident that there are many opportunities for improving the research, and practical guidelines in this area.

  10. Blunted sympathoinhibitory responses in obesity-related hypertension are due to aberrant central but not peripheral signalling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Jackie M Y; Wardak, Suhail A; Ameer, Shaik I; Davey, Rachel A; Sartor, Daniela M

    2014-04-01

    The gut hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) acts at subdiaphragmatic vagal afferents to induce renal and splanchnic sympathoinhibition and vasodilatation, via reflex inhibition of a subclass of cardiovascular-controlling neurons in the rostroventrolateral medulla (RVLM). These sympathoinhibitory and vasodilator responses are blunted in obese, hypertensive rats and our aim in the present study was to determine whether this is attributable to (i) altered sensitivity of presympathetic vasomotor RVLM neurons, and (ii) aberrant peripheral or central signalling mechanisms. Using a diet-induced obesity model, male Sprague-Dawley rats exhibited either an obesity-prone (OP) or obesity-resistant (OR) phenotype when placed on a medium high fat diet for 13-15 weeks; control animals were placed on a low fat diet. OP animals had elevated resting arterial pressure compared to OR/control animals (P obesity-related hypertension are due to alterations in RVLM neuronal responses, resulting from aberrant central but not peripheral signalling mechanisms. In obesity, blunted sympathoinhibitory mechanisms may lead to increased regional vascular resistance and contribute to the development of hypertension.

  11. Unexperienced mechanical effects of muscular fatigue can be predicted by the Central Nervous System as revealed by anticipatory postural adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjo, Florian; Forestier, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    Muscular fatigue effects have been shown to be compensated by the implementation of adaptive compensatory neuromuscular strategies, resulting in modifications of the initial motion coordination. However, no studies have focused on the efficiency of the feedforward motor commands when muscular fatigue occurs for the first time during a particular movement. This study included 18 healthy subjects who had to perform arm-raising movements in a standing posture at a maximal velocity before and after a fatiguing procedure involving focal muscles. The arm-raising task implies the generation of predictive processes of control, namely Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APAs), whose temporal and quantitative features have been shown to be dependent on the kinematics of the upcoming arm-raising movement. By altering significantly the kinematic profile of the focal movement with a fatiguing procedure, we sought to find out whether APAs scaled to the lower mechanical disturbance. APAs were measured using surface electromyography. Following the fatiguing procedure, acceleration peaks of the arm movement decreased by ~27%. APAs scaled to this lower fatigue-related disturbance during the very first trial post-fatigue, suggesting that the Central Nervous System can predict unexperienced mechanical effects of muscle fatigue. It is suggested that these results are accounted for by prediction processes in which the central integration of the groups III and IV afferents leads to an update of the internal model by remapping the relationship between focal motor command magnitude and the actual mechanical output.

  12. The influence of experimental pain intensity in the local and referred pain area on somatosensory perception in the area of referred pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, Eva; Hansson, Per

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of experimental pain intensity in the local and referred pain area on somatosensory perception thresholds in the area of referred pain. Pain was induced by intramuscular electrical stimulation of the left infraspinatus muscle in 12 healthy individuals. The stimulation corresponded to the local pain threshold ("mild local pain"), the referred pain threshold ("mild referred pain"), and a pain intensity corresponding to 2 on a 10-point category scale in the referred pain area ("moderate referred pain"). Quantitative sensory testing was performed to assess perception thresholds in the referred pain area and the homologous contralateral area before and during stimulation. Perception thresholds to light touch (LTTs), pressure pain (PPTs), and to innocuous as well as noxious warmth and cold were assessed. During stimulation the LTTs increased in the referred pain area compared to baseline, uninfluenced by pain intensity. Perception thresholds to innocuous cold and warmth increased bilaterally during the stimulation, without relation to pain intensity. Heat pain thresholds were not affected. Compared to baseline, PPTs increased bilaterally during stimulation corresponding to "mild local pain" and "mild referred pain", respectively, and a further increase was seen during "moderate referred pain". The decreased sensitivity to innocuous cold, warmth, and pressure pain was bilateral, indicating activation of endogenous net inhibitory mechanisms interacting bilaterally. We found no influence of pain intensity on somatosensory thresholds restricted to the referred pain area and light touch was the only affected modality in the referred pain area only.

  13. Selective Cathepsin S Inhibition with MIV-247 Attenuates Mechanical Allodynia and Enhances the Antiallodynic Effects of Gabapentin and Pregabalin in a Mouse Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Ellen; Pitcher, Thomas; Rizoska, Biljana; Tunblad, Karin; Henderson, Ian; Sahlberg, Britt-Louise; Grabowska, Urszula; Classon, Björn; Edenius, Charlotte; Malcangio, Marzia; Lindström, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Cathepsin S inhibitors attenuate mechanical allodynia in preclinical neuropathic pain models. The current study evaluated the effects when combining the selective cathepsin S inhibitor MIV-247 with gabapentin or pregabalin in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Mice were rendered neuropathic by partial sciatic nerve ligation. MIV-247, gabapentin, or pregabalin were administered alone or in combination via oral gavage. Mechanical allodynia was assessed using von Frey hairs. Neurobehavioral side effects were evaluated by assessing beam walking. MIV-247, gabapentin, and pregabalin concentrations in various tissues were measured. Oral administration of MIV-247 (100-200 µmol/kg) dose-dependently attenuated mechanical allodynia by up to approximately 50% reversal when given as a single dose or when given twice daily for 5 days. No behavioral deficits were observed at any dose of MIV-247 tested. Gabapentin (58-350 µmol/kg) and pregabalin (63-377 µmol/kg) also inhibited mechanical allodynia with virtually complete reversal at the highest doses tested. The minimum effective dose of MIV-247 (100 µmol/kg) in combination with the minimum effective dose of pregabalin (75 µmol/kg) or gabapentin (146 µmol/kg) resulted in enhanced antiallodynic efficacy without augmenting side effects. A subeffective dose of MIV-247 (50 µmol/kg) in combination with a subeffective dose of pregabalin (38 µmol/kg) or gabapentin (73 µmol/kg) also resulted in substantial efficacy. Plasma levels of MIV-247, gabapentin, and pregabalin were similar when given in combination as to when given alone. Cathepsin S inhibition with MIV-247 exerts significant antiallodynic efficacy alone, and also enhances the effect of gabapentin and pregabalin without increasing side effects or inducing pharmacokinetic interactions.

  14. A review on alcohol: from the central action mechanism to chemical dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Victor Vezali Costardi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available SummaryIntroduction:alcohol is a psychotropic depressant of the central nervous system (CNS that promotes simultaneous changes in several neuronal pathways, exerting a profound neurological impact that leads to various behavioral and biological alterations.Objectives:to describe the effects of alcohol on the CNS, identifying the signaling pathways that are modified and the biological effects resulting from its consumption.Methods:a literature review was conducted and articles published in different languages over the last 15 years were retrieved.Results:the studies reviewed describe the direct effect of alcohol on several neurotransmitter receptors (gamma-aminobutyric acid [GABA], glutamate, endocannabinoids AEA and 2-AG, among others, the indirect effect of alcohol on the limbic and opioid systems, and the effect on calcium and potassium channels and on proteins regulated by GABA in the hippocampus.Discussion and conclusion:the multiple actions of alcohol on the CNS result in a general effect of psychomotor depression, difficulties in information storage and logical reasoning and motor incoordination, in addition to stimulating the reward system, a fact that may explain the development of addiction. Knowledge on the neuronal signaling pathways that are altered by alcohol allows the identification of effectors which could reduce its central action, thus, offering new therapeutic perspectives for the rehabilitation of alcohol addicts.

  15. Evidence for a common central-engine mechanism in all extragalactic radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extragalactic radio sources produce radio waves and narrow emission lines by very different physical processes: synchrotron radio emission arises from lobes filled with magnetized plasma extending over scales of kiloparsecs to megaparsecs, fed by the total kinetic power, Q, of jets driven by a central engine, whereas narrow-lines luminosity LNLR arises from gas, typically concentrated in the inner few kiloparsecs, that has been photoionized by a nuclear source. We report here the discovery of a close relationship between Q and LNLR - an approximate proportionality which extends over four orders of magnitude from low-Q radio sources with relaxed structures to high-Q, radio-luminous classical double-lobe radio galaxies. Objects with broad Balmer lines follow the same trend as those without, showing that quasar-like photoionizing sources are ubiquitous but not always obvious. Moreover, all radio-source central engines channel at least as much power into the jets as is radiated by accretion: this high efficiency implies that the engine is a massive spinning black hole which both powers the jets and controls the accretion rate. (author)

  16. A comparative review on local government: Ander pressure of central goverment and market mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Özel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Neoliberal policies after 1980 aimed at reforming public administration, especially owing to financial budget deficit, in terms of both central and local administrations. In this study,  local administration reforms in Turkey, Germany and France have been studied comperatively taking method of change together into consideration. The comparison focuses on similarities and distinctness of the above-mentioned countries from two aspects, namely, the first one is functional change between central and local governments (with the help of vertical point of view and the second one is regulation of the relations between local governments and market or third sector (with the help of horizontal point of view. The second reconsideration surely positions evoluation from “local government” to “local governence” which is in the process of reform into the center of the discussion. The purpose of the study is to reveal comperatively the institutional and functional changes emerging during process of decentralisation and gaining a place in the market in the countries where neoliberal policies  are implemented.

  17. Tolerance effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs microinjected into central amygdala, periaqueductal grey, and nucleus raphe Possible cellular mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Merab G. Tsagareli; Nana Tsiklauri; Ivliane Nozadze; Gulnaz Gurtskaia

    2012-01-01

    Pain is a sensation related to potential or actual damage in some tissue of the body. The mainstay of medical pain therapy remains drugs that have been around for decades, like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or opiates. However, adverse effects of opiates, particularly tolerance, limit their clinical use. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic (intraperitoneal) administration of NSAIDs induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. In this review, we report that repeated microinjection of NSAIDs analgin, clodifen, ketorolac and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala, the midbrain periaqueductal grey matter and nucleus raphe magnus in the following 4 days result in progressively less antinociception compared to the saline control testing in the tail-flick reflex and hot plate latency tests. Hence, tolerance develops to these drugs and cross-tolerance to morphine in male rats. These findings strongly support the suggestion of endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain-control system. Moreover, the periaqueductal grey-rostral ventro-medial part of medulla circuit should be viewed as a pain-modulation system. These data are important for human medicine. In particular, cross-tolerance between non-opioid and opioid analgesics should be important in the clinical setting.

  18. Focal Mechanisms for Deep Crustal Earthquakes in the Central Foothills and Near Yosemite National Park in the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Frassetto, A.; Hurd, O.; Zandt, G.; Gilbert, H.; Owens, T.; Jones, C.

    2008-12-01

    Past studies have observed seismicity occurring to depths near 40 km beneath the central Sierra Nevada in eastern California, but the cause of this unusual activity remains largely unknown. We use seismograms from a recent deployment of the Sierra Nevada EarthScope Project (SNEP) broadband array and interspersed USArray TA stations to study this deep crustal earthquake activity. From June of 2005 to May of 2006, we recorded 126 earthquakes in the central western flank of the Sierra Nevada that relocated in the depth range from 1.0 to 47.6 km. These earthquakes have small magnitudes (M more compact north-south band extending from the southern edge of Yosemite National Park to the San Joaquin River. These events have focal depths from near surface to 30 km, and are located above occasional deep, long-period (LP) events (Pitt, et al., SRL, 2002). We use P- and S-wave polarity picks and P/SH amplitude ratios to construct focal mechanisms for 23 of the larger, well-recorded earthquakes, 14 in the Foothills Cluster and 9 in the Yosemite Cluster. The focal mechanisms show dominantly near vertical and subhorizontal nodal planes, although several events do show clear normal or reverse mechanisms. Although there is some scatter, a majority of the mechanisms from the Foothills Cluster have S-to-SW steeply dipping T-axes. The majority of earthquakes in the Yosemite Cluster have P-axes moderately dipping to the SW and T-axes moderately dipping to the NE, similar to focal mechanisms of earthquakes associated with the recent magma intrusion event under Lake Tahoe (von Seggern, et al., BSSA, 2008). We suggest that the earthquakes in the Foothills Cluster are occurring in response to the downward pull of an attached piece of dense ultramafic batholith residue and the events in the Yosemite Cluster are related to post-delamination crustal magmatic processes.

  19. Central and peripheral mechanisms of the NPY system in the regulation of bone and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan-Chuan; Baldock, Paul A

    2012-02-01

    Skeletal research is currently undergoing a period of marked expansion. The boundaries of "bone" research are being re-evaluated and with this, a growing recognition of a more complex and interconnected biology than previously considered. One aspect that has become the focus of particular attention is the relationship between bone and fat homeostasis. Evidence from a number of avenues indicates that bone and adipose regulation are both related and interdependent. This review examines the neuropeptide Y (NPY) system, known to exert powerful control over both bone and fat tissue. The actions of this system are characterized by signaling both within specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and also the target tissues, mediated predominantly through two G-protein coupled receptors (Y1 and Y2). In bone tissue, elevated NPY levels act consistently to repress osteoblast activity. Moreover, both central Y2 receptor and osteoblastic Y1 receptor signaling act similarly to repress bone formation. Conversely, loss of NPY expression or receptor signaling induces increased osteoblast activity and bone mass in both cortical and cancellous envelopes. In fat tissue, NPY action is more complex. Energy homeostasis is powerfully altered by elevations in hypothalamic NPY, resulting in increases in fat accretion and body-wide energy conservation, through the action of locally expressed Y1 receptors, while local Y2 receptors act to inhibit NPY-ergic tone. Loss of central NPY expression has a markedly reduced effect, consistent with a physiological drive to promote fat accretion. In fat tissue, NPY and Y1 receptors act to promote lipogenesis, consistent with their roles in the brain. Y2 receptors expressed in adipocytes also act in this manner, showing an opposing action to their role in the hypothalamus. While direct investigation of these processes has yet to be completed, these responses appear to be interrelated to some degree. The starvation-based signal of elevated central NPY inducing

  20. A fracture mechanics analysis of bonded repaired skin/stiffener structures with inclined central crack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Ki Hyun; Yang, Won Ho; Kim, Cheol; Heo, Sung Pil [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Myung Hoon [Daelim College, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Composite patch repair of cracked aircraft structures has been accepted as one of improving fatigue life and attaining better structural integrity. Analysis for the stress intensity factor at the skin/stiffener structure with inclined central crack repaired by composite stiffened panels are developed. A numerical investigation was conducted to characterize the fracture behavior and crack growth behavior. In order to investigate the crack growth direction, Maximum Tangential Stress(MTS) criteria is used. The main objective of this research is the validation of the inclined crack patching design. In this paper, the reduction of stresses intensity factors at the crack-tip and prediction of crack growth direction are determined to evaluate the effects of various non-dimensional design parameter including; composite patch thickness and stiffener distance. The research on cracked structure subjected to mixed mode loading is accomplished and it is evident that more work using different approaches is necessary.

  1. Pain Management in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Vigano, Antonio; Bruera, Eduardo

    1995-01-01

    Pain is a common feature in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). An abnormally low visceral sensory threshold, as well as a number of central, spinal and peripheral pain-modulating abnormalities, have been proposed for this syndrome. Clinical aspects of pain associated with irritable esophagus, functional dyspepsia, biliary dysmotility, inflammatory bowel syndrome and proctalgia fugax are reviewed. Because of its unclear pathophysiology, pain expression is the main target for the suc...

  2. Central autonomic control of the heart, angina, and pathogenic mechanisms of post-myocardial infarction depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, GJ

    1999-01-01

    Depression can develop in 20% of the patients with a myocardial infarction (MI). Pathobiological mechanisms underlying the development of mood disorders in these patients are unknown. Since post-MI depression has been associated with increased risk of mortality we hypothesized that dysfunction of li

  3. REM sleep pathways and anticholinesterase intoxication: A mechanism for nerve agent-induced, central respiratory failure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kok

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism of death following exposure to anticholinesterases, such as the highly toxic nerve agents soman and VX, and other organophosphate anticholinesterases such as the insecticide parathion, remains unclear, although evidence from nerve agent research suggests that death occurs by an atropin

  4. Chronic pain resolution after a lucid dream: a case for neural plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappaterra, Mauro; Jim, Lysander; Pangarkar, Sanjog

    2014-03-01

    Chronic pain is often managed using a multidisciplinary, biopsychosocial approach. Interventions targeting the biological, psychological, and social aspects of both the patient and the pain have been demonstrated to provide objective and subjective improvement in chronic pain symptoms. The mechanism by which pain attenuation occurs after these interventions remains to be elucidated. While there is a relatively large body of empirical literature suggesting that functional and structural changes in the peripheral and central nervous systems are key in the development and maintenance of chronic pain states, less is known about changes that take place in the nervous system as a whole after biopsychosocial interventions. Using as a model the unique case of Mr. S, a patient suffering with chronic pain for 22 years who experienced a complete resolution of pain after a lucid dream following 2 years of biopsychosocial treatments, we postulate that central nervous system (CNS) reorganization (i.e., neural plasticity) serves as a possible mechanism for the therapeutic benefit of multidisciplinary treatments, and may set a neural framework for healing, in this case via a lucid dream.

  5. Chronic pain resolution after a lucid dream: a case for neural plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappaterra, Mauro; Jim, Lysander; Pangarkar, Sanjog

    2014-03-01

    Chronic pain is often managed using a multidisciplinary, biopsychosocial approach. Interventions targeting the biological, psychological, and social aspects of both the patient and the pain have been demonstrated to provide objective and subjective improvement in chronic pain symptoms. The mechanism by which pain attenuation occurs after these interventions remains to be elucidated. While there is a relatively large body of empirical literature suggesting that functional and structural changes in the peripheral and central nervous systems are key in the development and maintenance of chronic pain states, less is known about changes that take place in the nervous system as a whole after biopsychosocial interventions. Using as a model the unique case of Mr. S, a patient suffering with chronic pain for 22 years who experienced a complete resolution of pain after a lucid dream following 2 years of biopsychosocial treatments, we postulate that central nervous system (CNS) reorganization (i.e., neural plasticity) serves as a possible mechanism for the therapeutic benefit of multidisciplinary treatments, and may set a neural framework for healing, in this case via a lucid dream. PMID:24398162

  6. Recent Advances in Postoperative Pain Management

    OpenAIRE

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Mitra, Sukanya; Narayan, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Good pain control after surgery is important to prevent negative outcomes such as tachycardia, hypertension, myocardial ischemia, decrease in alveolar ventilation, and poor wound healing. Exacerbations of acute pain can lead to neural sensitization and release of mediators both peripherally and centrally. Clinical wind up occurs from the processes of N-Methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA) activation, wind up central sensitization, long-term potentiation of pain (LTP), and transcription-dependent sensiti...

  7. Low back pain - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause ...

  8. Reversal of phantom pain and hand-to-face remapping after brachial plexus avulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jack W; Finn, Sacha B; Miller, Matthew E

    2016-06-01

    Following left brachial plexus avulsion, a 20-year-old man had phantom limb pain and remapping of sensation from his paralyzed hand onto his face. Mirror therapy (15 min daily, 5 days/week) led immediately to good movement of the phantom limb with decreased pain. Within 2 weeks following nerve graft surgery, remapping of hand sensation onto the face disappeared along with resolution of phantom limb pain. Mirror therapy coupled with nerve grafting may relieve phantom limb pain due to brachial plexus avulsion and reverse hand-to-face remapping, suggesting that both peripheral and central mechanisms mediate development of phantom limb pain and cortical reorganization/neuroplasticity after brachial plexus avulsion. PMID:27547774

  9. SIRT1-related inhibition of pro-inflammatory responses and oxidative stress are involved in the mechanism of nonspecific low back pain relief after exercise through modulation of Toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Kao, Chung-Lan; Ma, Hsin-I; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Chin-Tien; Liu, Ding-Hao; Chen, Po-Yin; Tsai, Kun-Ling

    2015-10-01

    Low back pain is a common clinical problem that causes disability and impaired quality of life. While the reason behind low back pain was largely considered to be of musculoskeletal origin, the contribution of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress could never be overlooked. Exercise has been proven to be an effective approach to treat low back pain. However, the mechanism of the exercise effect on the inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress is still largely unknown. In this study, we revealed that exercise intervention reduces Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) pathway and enhances Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) expression in low back pain patients. We also confirmed that exercise up-regulates the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, PPAR-γ coactivator-1 and FoxOs family proteins and also increases the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in patients with low back pain. Furthermore, we found that exercise intervention attenuates the oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations and p53 expression in patients with low back pain. This study demonstrates that exercise intervention improves low back pain symptoms through regulation of the SIRT1 axis with repression of oxidative stress and TLR-4 inhibition.

  10. Neural mechanisms mediating positive and negative treatment expectations in visceral pain: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study on placebo and nocebo effects in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Julia; Theysohn, Nina; Gaß, Florian; Benson, Sven; Gramsch, Carolin; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R; Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2013-11-01

    To elucidate placebo and nocebo effects in visceral pain, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study to analyze effects of positive and negative treatment expectations in a rectal pain model. In 36 healthy volunteers, painful rectal distensions were delivered after intravenous application of an inert substance combined with either positive instructions of pain relief (placebo group) or negative instructions of pain increase (nocebo group), each compared to neutral instructions. Neural activation during cued-pain anticipation and pain was analyzed along with expected and perceived pain intensity. Expected and perceived pain intensity were significantly increased in the nocebo group and significantly decreased in the placebo group. In the placebo group, positive expectations significantly reduced activation of the somatosensory cortex during anticipation and of the insula, somatosensory cortex, and amygdala during pain delivery when compared to neutral expectations. Within the nocebo group, negative expectations led to significantly increased insula activation during painful stimulation. Direct group contrasts during expectation modulation revealed significantly increased distension-induced activation within the somatosensory cortex in the nocebo group. In conclusion, the experience and neural processing of visceral pain can be increased or decreased by drug-specific expectations. This first brain imaging study on nocebo effects in visceral pain has implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of patients with chronic abdominal complaints such as irritable bowel syndrome.

  11. Orofacial pain management: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals