WorldWideScience

Sample records for central pacific fisheries

  1. The deepwater fishery along the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, Central America

    OpenAIRE

    Ingo S Wehrtmann; Nielsen Muñoz, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    artículo (arbitrado) -- Universidad de Costa Rica. Centro de Investigación en Ciencias del Mar y Limonología (CIMAR), 2009 Global catches of marine fishery resources declined during the last decades; however, there has been a trend of increasing exploitation of deepwater resources that are especially vulnerable to depletion. Such a tendency was noticeable in Pacific Latin America, too.In Costa Rica, the vast majority of the commercial fishing activities are concentrated on the Pacific coas...

  2. 75 FR 8674 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Spatial Planning, coral reef ecosystem threats, truth in science, Western and Central Pacific Fisheries.... NOAA Draft Catch Shares Policy E. National Ocean Policy and Marine Spatial Planning F. Local, National... the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Director 5. Program Planning A. ACLs...

  3. 75 FR 17070 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; Fishery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 665 RIN 0648-XU60 Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; Fishery Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ]...

  4. Optimising fisheries management in relation to tuna catches in the western central Pacific Ocean : a review of research priorities and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, K.; Young, J. W.; Nicol, S.; Kolody, D.; Allain, V.; Bell, J.; Brown, J. N.; Ganachaud, Alexandre; Hobday, A.J.; Hunt, B.; Innes, J; Sen Gupta, A.; van Sebille, E.; Kloser, R; Patterson, T.

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most important development goals for the countries and territories of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) involve the sustainable management of their fisheries in light of environmental, economic and social uncertainties. The responses of fish populations to variability in the marine environment have implications for decision making processes associated with resource management. There is still considerable uncertainty in estimating the responses of tuna populations to sho...

  5. 78 FR 65887 - International Fisheries; Pacific Tuna Fisheries; 2013 Bigeye Tuna Longline Fishery Closure in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 300 RIN 0648-XC922 International Fisheries; Pacific Tuna Fisheries; 2013 Bigeye Tuna Longline Fishery Closure in the Eastern Pacific Ocean AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA),...

  6. 75 FR 13731 - National Marine Fisheries Service, Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); April 9...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... Fisheries Service Report 2. Fishery Management Plan Amendment 2 - Annual Catch Limits and Accountability... Groundfish Fisheries 3. National Marine Fisheries Service Report 4. Part I of Management Measures for 2011... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XV42 National Marine Fisheries Service, Pacific...

  7. 75 FR 1023 - International Fisheries Regulations; Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Pelagic Fisheries; Hawaii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... CFR Part 665 [Docket No. 080225267-91393-03] RIN 0648-AW49 International Fisheries Regulations; Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Pelagic Fisheries; Hawaii-based Shallow-set Longline Fishery; Correction AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  8. 78 FR 43125 - Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial, Limited Entry Pacific Coast... Groundfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP). This action proposes to implement trailing actions for the program... time, the Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) and NMFS have been addressing...

  9. Comparative analysis of depth distribution for seventeen large pelagic fish species captured in a longline fishery in the central-eastern Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangfeng Zhu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate depth distribution of pelagic species captured in a longline fishery and to evaluate the difference in depth distribution among species. We estimated depth distribution for 17 frequently captured species based on a Chinese longline fishing trip targeting bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus in the central-eastern Pacific Ocean in February-November 2006. The depth distributions of 13 bycatch species were significantly different from that of bigeye tuna. Although most of the bycatch species were found to be distributed in water depths shallower than bigeye tuna (i.e. increasing hook depths can decrease catch rates of these species, the rates of catch rates declined with increasing hook depths may be different. The depth distributions were found to be not significantly different between genders for 7 species. There was no significant correlation between fish sizes and capture depths. The information derived from this study can play an important role in reducing bycatch in pelagic tuna longline fisheries in the central-eastern Pacific Ocean.

  10. 78 FR 68764 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial, Limited Entry Pacific Coast... fixed gear sectors managed under the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP). This action... catcher/processor trawl fleets (whiting only). Since that time, the Pacific Fishery Management...

  11. 76 FR 20959 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... Pacific mackerel stock assessment for 2011, in order to inform fisheries management decisions for the 2011... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA366 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  12. 75 FR 22070 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Guided Sport Charter Vessel Fishery for Halibut; Recordkeeping and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... requirements for the Pacific halibut guided sport fishery in International Pacific Halibut Commission...; Guided Sport Charter Vessel Fishery for Halibut; Recordkeeping and Reporting AGENCY: National Marine... would revise federal requirements regarding the location and time period for submission of Alaska...

  13. 50 CFR 660.324 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. 660.324 Section 660.324 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West...

  14. 50 CFR 660.50 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. 660.50 Section 660.50 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West...

  15. Power Europe: EU and the illegal, unreported and unregulated tuna fisheries regulation in the West and Central Pacific Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, A.M.M.; Bush, S.R.; Mol, A.P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing activities are widely considered a main cause of unsustainable fisheries across the globe. The EU has taken a leading role in the fight against IUU fishing, using both its market and normative power to advance its EU IUU Regulation (no. 1005/2008) an

  16. Power Europe: EU and the illegal, unreported and unregulated tuna fisheries regulation in the West and Central Pacific Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, A.M.M.; Bush, S.R.; Mol, A.P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing activities are widely considered a main cause of unsustainable fisheries across the globe. The EU has taken a leading role in the fight against IUU fishing, using both its market and normative power to advance its EU IUU Regulation (no. 1005/2008)

  17. 76 FR 70420 - Fisheries of the Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA801 Fisheries of the Pacific Region AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce..., (Sebastes alutus), which is managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council, is in an overfished...

  18. 75 FR 54092 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ...-XY69 North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service... meeting. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Scallop Plan Team will meet September 28th, 2010 at the Anchorage Hilton Hotel. DATES: The meeting will be held on September 28, 2010...

  19. The deepwater fishery along the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, Central America Pesca en aguas profundas a lo largo de la costa Pacífica de Costa Rica, América Central

    OpenAIRE

    Ingo S Wehrtmann; Vanessa Nielsen-Muñoz

    2009-01-01

    Global catches of marine fishery resources declined during the last decades; however, there has been a trend of increasing exploitation of deepwater resources that are especially vulnerable to depletion. Such a tendency was noticeable in Pacific Latin América, too. In Costa Rica, the vast majority of the commercial fishing activities are concentrated on the Pacific coast. The target species for the deepwater fishery in Costa Rica are the two pandalids Heterocarpus affinis and H. vicarius as w...

  20. 78 FR 56641 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial Groundfish Fishery Management... Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP) by liberalizing RCA boundaries in order to improve... specifications and management measures in a proposed and final rule, 77 FR 67974, November 14, 2012 and 78 FR...

  1. 75 FR 3416 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Pelagic Fisheries; Vessel Identification Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 665 RIN 0648-AX38 Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Pelagic Fisheries; Vessel Identification Requirements AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service... INFORMATION CONTACT: Jarad Makaiau, Sustainable Fisheries, NMFS PIR, 808-944-2108. SUPPLEMENTARY...

  2. Can Cooperative Management of Tuna Fisheries in the Western Pacific Solve the Growth Overfishing Problem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, M.L.; Rashid Sumaila, U.; Martell, S.J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Tuna fisheries in the western and central Pacific Ocean are important globally for both food and economic security. Yellowfin and bigeye tuna stocks in this region are declining, in part due to the juvenile bycatch of these species by the purse seine fishery using floating objects and fish aggregati

  3. Can Cooperative Management of Tuna Fisheries in the Western Pacific Solve the Growth Overfishing Problem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, M.L.; Rashid Sumaila, U.; Martell, S.J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Tuna fisheries in the western and central Pacific Ocean are important globally for both food and economic security. Yellowfin and bigeye tuna stocks in this region are declining, in part due to the juvenile bycatch of these species by the purse seine fishery using floating objects and fish aggregati

  4. Pacific Albacore Troll and Pole-and-line Fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The North Pacific and South Pacific Albacore Troll and Pole-and-line Fisheries project contains landings, logbooks, and size composition data from U.S.A. troll and...

  5. 75 FR 27989 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... and fishery overlap; review Pacific cod assessment model run proposals (SSC only); review Council... - initial/final action. 10. Staff Tasking: Review Committees and tasking. 11. Other Business The SSC agenda... Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-S...

  6. 77 FR 53179 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... total catch accounting, recruitment and retrospective analyses, a review of the economic stock... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC195 North Pacific Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery...

  7. 75 FR 11118 - Fisheries of the Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XU49 Fisheries of the Pacific Region AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce... Region, the petrale sole stock has been determined to be in an overfished condition. The Pacific...

  8. 78 FR 59657 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC890 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council... Watertown Hotel Seattle, 4242 Roosevelt Way NE., Seattle, WA 98105; telephone: (206) 826-4242. Council...

  9. 77 FR 6786 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA979 Western Pacific Fishery Management Council... Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) announces changes in the dates that the Merizo community and..., Guam and the Guam REAC will be held at the Guam Hilton Hotel, Tumon Bay, Guam. For specific times and...

  10. 78 FR 78824 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XD055 North Pacific Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: The North Pacific Fishery Management Council (NPFMC) will hold a Crab Modeling Workshop. SUMMARY: The workshop will be held January 14-17 at the Hilton Hotel, 500 West Third...

  11. 78 FR 48861 - Western Pacific Fisheries; Approval of a Marine Conservation Plan for Pacific Insular Areas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... sustainable fisheries management of pelagic fisheries in the PRIA. Objective 3. Promote regional cooperation... technologies and methods to achieve the most effective level of monitoring, control, and surveillance, and to... Marine Conservation Plan for Pacific Insular Areas; Western Pacific Sustainable Fisheries Fund AGENCY...

  12. 75 FR 60867 - Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Amendments 20...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... catch accounting. Response. Appendix H to the EIS for Amendment 20, the ``Regulatory Impact Review and... Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Amendments 20 and 21; Trawl... Part 902 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-AY68 Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

  13. 76 FR 28422 - Fisheries of the Pacific Region; Western Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notification of determination of overfishing or an overfished condition... Fishery Management Council (Western Pacific Council), is subject to overfishing. NMFS notifies the appropriate fishery management council (Council) whenever it determines that; overfishing is occurring,...

  14. International Regulation of Central Arctic Ocean Fisheries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Due in particular to the impacts of climate change, the adequacy of the international regulation of Central Arctic Ocean fisheries has come under increasing scrutiny in recent years. As shown in this article, however, international regulation of Central Arctic Ocean fisheries is by no means entirely

  15. 76 FR 2083 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA137 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public.... ADDRESSES: The Joint Canada-U.S. Review Panel for Pacific hake/whiting will be held at the Hotel Deca, 4507... Management Council (Pacific Council), 7700 NE Ambassador Place, Suite 101, Portland, OR 97220-1384. FOR...

  16. 76 FR 56734 - Permanent Advisory Committee To Advise the U.S. Commissioners to the Western and Central Pacific...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Central Pacific Fisheries Convention. The PAC supports the work of the U.S. National Section, which is...: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce... INFORMATION: In accordance with the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Convention Implementation Act...

  17. 78 FR 61840 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-04

    ... Methodology Review Process and Preliminary Topic Selection 5. Pacific Sardine Stock Assessment and Management... 0648-XC914 Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); Public Meetings AGENCY: National... Pacific Council will meet as late as necessary each day to complete its scheduled business. ADDRESSES...

  18. 78 FR 70283 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Online Webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... Webinar AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of online webinar. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council's... webinar to review a final draft of the 2013 cowcod rebuilding analysis, data-poor overfishing limit...

  19. 78 FR 6810 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... Management Council (Council) will hold the 112th meeting of its Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC473 Western Pacific Fishery Management Council..., 2013 7. Pelagic Fisheries. A. Action Item. 1. Management Options for American Samoa South...

  20. 75 FR 38758 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Limited Access for Guided Sport Charter Vessels in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... for Guided Sport Charter Vessels in Alaska AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... guided sport fishery for Pacific halibut in the waters of International Pacific Halibut Commission... the halibut fishery management goals of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council. DATES:...

  1. 76 FR 13604 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA286 Western Pacific Fishery Management Council... Management Council (Council) will hold a Western Pacific Stock Assessment Review (WPSAR). DATES: The meeting... will be held at the Ilima Room, Ala Moana Hotel, 410 Atkinson Drive, Honolulu, HI 96814, telephone...

  2. 75 FR 52478 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Reallocation of Pacific Cod in the Bering...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the reallocation of Pacific cod specified from trawl.... Carrie Selberg, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries...

  3. Stomach content analyses of the threadfin anglerfish Lophiodes spilurus (Lophiiformes: Lophiidae associated with deepwater shrimp fisheries from the central Pacific of Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Espinoza

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge of deepwater ecosystems along the Pacific of Central America is extremely limited. We analyzed the diet composition of 200 adult specimens of Lophiodes spilurus ranging in size from 7.8 to 17.8 cm total length (TL. Samples were obtained from deep bottom trawls (depth: 105-238 m along the central Pacific of Costa Rica. We calculated the percentage of number (% N, weight (% W, and occurrence (% O of each food item encountered in the stomachs; based on this information, the Index of Relative Importance (IR was calculated. Moreover, we estimated diet overlap for three different size classes (15.1 cm TL. The results revealed exclusively two groups of benthic prey items: crustaceans (30% and teleost fish (70% in their diet. The most frequent preys were pandalid shrimps Plesionika trispinus (% O = 17 and the fathom mora Physiculus rastrelliger (% O = 12. The greatest diversity and frequency of abundance of food items was observed in intermediate-sized individuals (10.1-15.0 cm TL. Small-sized L. spilurus ( 15.0 cm TL preyed on large-sized stomatopods and teleost fish. There was a clear diet overlap between small and intermediate-sized L. spilurus (p 0.05. Our results suggest that L. spilurus feeds exclusively on crustaceans (Decapoda and Stomatopoda and benthic teleost fish along the Pacific of Costa Rica. While small and large-sized individuals showed a more pronounced selectivity for certain prey items, the high diversity of benthic prey items observed in intermediate-sized specimens suggest a more opportunistic foraging behavior. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (4: 1959-1970. Epub 2008 December 12.Nuestro conocimiento de los ecosistemas marinos de profundidad a lo largo de la costa centroamericana es muy limitado. En el presente estudio se analizó la composición alimenticia de 200 especimenes adultos de Lophiodes spilurus que medían entre 7.8 y 17.8 cm longitud total (LT. Las muestras fueron obtenidas de arrastres camaroneros (profundidad: 105

  4. 77 FR 59901 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... potential management measures, using the status quo management measures of one fish less than 45 inches or... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC259 North Pacific Fishery Management Council... Management Council (Council) Charter Management Implementation Committee will convene via a conference...

  5. 78 FR 70018 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... fish with a maximum size limit; and (4) Status quo management of one fish less than 45 inches or greater than 68 inches. For Regulatory Area 3A: (1) Status quo management of a bag limit of two fish, with... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC990 North Pacific Fishery Management...

  6. 75 FR 35443 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX01 North Pacific Fishery Management Council... Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC), and Groundfish Plan Team members will hold a... determining annual catch limits (ACLs) for Tier 6 groundfish stocks. See SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. DATES:...

  7. 75 FR 6636 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... the Western Pacific Fishery Management Council undertake the process to recommend definitions and.... March 12, 2010, Tinian, CNMI. From 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Tinian Elementary School. San Jose Village... Management Act (Magnuson-Stevens Act), those issues may not be the subject of formal action during...

  8. 78 FR 57841 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... Endangered or Threatened under the ESA 2. Green Turtle Status Review 3. North Pacific Humpback Whale Petition.... Draft 2013 Marine Mammal Stock Assessment Reports F. False Killer Whale Take Reduction Plan Research... Projects, Activities and Issues 1. Community Development Program Multi-fishery Proposal 2. Report on...

  9. 78 FR 16660 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ...; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Hilton Hotel, Dillingham/Katmai Room, 500 West 3rd Avenue, Anchorage, AK. Council address: North Pacific... CONTACT: Diana Evans, Council staff, telephone: (907) 271-2809. ] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The...

  10. Eastern Pacific Ocean Purse-seine Fishery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vessel logbook and landings data sets from U.S.A.-flagged purse-seine vessels fishing in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (EPO). These purse seiners...

  11. 75 FR 26702 - Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Amendments 20...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Register's Website at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Background information and documents are available at the Pacific Fishery Management Council's website at http://www.pcouncil.org/ . The Magnuson..., create individual economic stability, provide full utilization of the trawl sector allocation,...

  12. Comparative Resilience in Five North Pacific Regional Salmon Fisheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xanthippe Augerot

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past century, regional fisheries for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp. have been managed primarily for their provisioning function, not for ecological support and cultural significance. We examine the resilience of the regional salmon fisheries of Japan, the Russian Far East, Alaska, British Columbia, and Washington-Oregon-California (WOC in terms of their provisioning function. Using the three dimensions of the adaptive cycle - capital, connectedness, and resilience - we infer the resilience of the five fisheries based on a qualitative assessment of capital accumulation and connectedness at the regional scale. In our assessment, we evaluate natural capital and connectedness and constructed capital and connectedness. The Russian Far East fishery is the most resilient, followed by Alaska, British Columbia, Japan, and WOC. Adaptive capacity in the fisheries is contingent upon high levels of natural capital and connectedness and moderate levels of constructed capital and connectedness. Cross-scale interactions and global market demand are significant factors in reduced resilience. Greater attention to ecological functioning and cultural signification has the potential to increase resilience in Pacific salmon ecosystems.

  13. The deepwater fishery along the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, Central America Pesca en aguas profundas a lo largo de la costa Pacífica de Costa Rica, América Central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo S Wehrtmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Global catches of marine fishery resources declined during the last decades; however, there has been a trend of increasing exploitation of deepwater resources that are especially vulnerable to depletion. Such a tendency was noticeable in Pacific Latin América, too. In Costa Rica, the vast majority of the commercial fishing activities are concentrated on the Pacific coast. The target species for the deepwater fishery in Costa Rica are the two pandalids Heterocarpus affinis and H. vicarius as well as Solenocera agassizii, the latter one being the most important in terms of annual landings. Here we compile the information available from Costa Rica about each of the three target species. Furthermore, we describe research activities related to the Costa Rican deepwater resources and present available data about by-catch and discards in this fishery. Finally, the current situation of the administration and management of these resources in Costa Rica is described. Strengthening collaboration between governmental agencies, the fishery sector, non-governmental organizations, and the academic sector is recommended to avoid an uncontrolled overfishing of these valuable deepwater resources along the Pacific coast of Costa Rica.Las capturas globales de los recursos marinos pesqueros disminuyeron durante las últimas décadas. Sin embargo, se ha observado una tendencia de aumento en la explotación de los recursos de aguas profundas, los cuales son especialmente vulnerables a la extracción. Esta tendencia ha sido notable también en la pesca a lo largo del Pacífico de Latino América. En Costa Rica, la mayoría de las actividades pesqueras comerciales se concentran en la costa del Pacífico. Las especies objetivo de la pesca de aguas profundas en Costa Rica son los dos pandálidos Heterocarpus affinis y H vicarius así como Solenocera agassizii, siendo esta última la más importante respecto a las capturas anuales. Se compila la información disponible

  14. 76 FR 52888 - Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; American Samoa Longline Gear Modifications To Reduce Turtle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... definition of ``Western Pacific pelagic management unit species'' remove the entries for ``northern bluefin... Pacific green sea turtles. This final rule also makes administrative clarifications to the names of... Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) prepared Amendment 5 to the Fishery Ecosystem Plan for...

  15. 76 FR 57715 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Proposed Information Collection; Seabird-Fisheries Interaction Recovery.../or continuing information collections, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. ]...

  16. 76 FR 54739 - Pacific Halibut Fishery; Guideline Harvest Levels for the Guided Sport Fishery for Pacific...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... NMFS' authority to take action at any time to limit the guided sport angler catch to the GHL (74 FR... the guided sport halibut fishery in Areas 2C and 3A on January 5, 2010 (75 FR 554). As of February 1... guided sport and commercial fisheries in Areas 2C and 3A (76 FR 44156). If approved by the Secretary...

  17. Ecologically Important Areas for Pacific Fishery Management Council's June 2005 Preferred Alternative, Groundfish EFH Final EIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — These data depict ecologically important areas that were developed through a collaborative process involving Oceana; groundfish trawl fishermen, organized by the...

  18. 76 FR 17808 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and Accountability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and Accountability Measures AGENCY: National Marine... specifying annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs) for western Pacific fisheries. The... specific areas, changing bag limits, or otherwise restricting effort or catch. Any inseason...

  19. The fish species composition and variation of catch from the small-scale gillnet fishery before, during and after the 1997-1998 ENSO event, central Mexican Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A Rojo-Vázquez

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In the tropical and subtropical coastal zone, were highly diverse fish communities occur, it is important to study the small scale fisheries exploiting these communities. For this study, 219 fishing days were carried out in Bahia de Navidad, Jalisco, Mexico. Four gillnets with different mesh sizes (76.2, 88.9, 101.6 and 114.3 mm were used for the fishing operations, from April 1994 to March 1995 and from January 1998 to December 2000. A total of 26126 organisms weighting 11680 kg were caught. One hundred and eighty three species belonging to 57 families and 19 orders were identified. Ten species accumulated more than 60% of the total abundance and biomass, the remaining species (173 individually contributed with less than 2% of the total abundance and biomass. The most important species in the catch were Microlepidotus brevipinnis, Caranx caballus, Haemulon flaviguttatum, Scomberomorus sierra, C. caninus, C. sexfasciatus, Lutjanus guttatus and L. argentiventris. The catch per unit of effort showed a large variation during the study, both in number and biomass. On average, 110 fishes and 48.5 kg fishing day-1 were caught. The maximum values were recorded during January and October 1998 (250 fishes and 100 kg fishing day-1, and the minimum values were recorded during September and November 1994 (25 org. and 10 kg fishing day-1. The total abundance and biomass was lower during the 1994-95 period (F=6.16, 8.32, PSe llevaron a cabo 219 días de pesca experimental en la Bahía de Navidad, Jalisco, México. Se utilizaron cuatro redes de enmalle de diferente luz de malla (76.2, 88.9, 101.6 and 114.3 mm de luz de malla, de abril de 1994 a marzo de 1995 y de enero de 1998 a diciembre de 2000. En total se capturaron 26126 organismos que pesaron 11680 kg. Fueron identificadas 183 especies pertenecientes a 57 familias y 19 órdenes. Diez especies acumularon más del 60% de la abundancia y biomasa total, el resto de las especies (173 individualmente aportaron

  20. 78 FR 23683 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the directed fishing closure of Pacific cod for C/Ps..., Acting Deputy Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING...

  1. 75 FR 8840 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the closure of Pacific cod by pot..., Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-S...

  2. 77 FR 73969 - International Fisheries; Pacific Tuna Fisheries; Fishing Restrictions in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    .... The IATTC has maintained a scientific research and fishery monitoring program for many years, and.... Current IATTC membership includes: Belize, Canada, China, Chinese Taipei (Taiwan), Colombia, Costa Rica... bluefin tuna resource. Future conservation measures should be based in part on development of future...

  3. Livelihoods and Fisheries Governance in a Contemporary Pacific Island Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulu, Reuben J; Eriksson, Hampus; Schwarz, Anne-Maree; Andrew, Neil L; Orirana, Grace; Sukulu, Meshach; Oeta, Janet; Harohau, Daykin; Sibiti, Stephen; Toritela, Andrew; Beare, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Inshore marine resources play an important role in the livelihoods of Pacific Island coastal communities. However, such reliance can be detrimental to inshore marine ecosystems. Understanding the livelihoods of coastal communities is important for devising relevant and effective fisheries management strategies. Semi-structured household interviews were conducted with householders in Langalanga Lagoon, Solomon Islands, to understand household livelihoods and resource governance in fishing-dependent communities. Households were engaged in a diverse range of livelihoods. Fishing, shell money production and gardening were the most important livelihoods. Proximity to an urban centre influenced how households accessed some livelihoods. Perceptions of management rules varied and different reasons were cited for why rules were broken, the most common reason being to meet livelihood needs. Current models of inshore small-scale fisheries management that are based on the notion of community-based resource management may not work in locations where customary management systems are weak and livelihoods are heavily reliant on marine resources. An important step for fisheries management in such locations should include elucidating community priorities through participatory development planning, taking into consideration livelihoods as well as governance and development aspirations.

  4. 78 FR 23539 - National Marine Fisheries Service, Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); May 6...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ..., electronic monitoring, allocation review process, Department of Commerce Office of the Inspector General... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Pacific Council will host a meeting of...

  5. Post-breeding season distribution of black-footed and Laysan albatrosses satellite-tagged in Alaska: Inter-specific differences in spatial overlap with North Pacific fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, K.N.; Suryan, R.M.; Roby, D.D.; Balogh, G.R.

    2009-01-01

    We integrated satellite-tracking data from black-footed albatrosses (Phoebastria nigripes; n = 7) and Laysan albatrosses captured in Alaska (Phoebastria immutabilis; n = 18) with data on fishing effort and distribution from commercial fisheries in the North Pacific in order to assess potential risk from bycatch. Albatrosses were satellite-tagged at-sea in the Central Aleutian Islands, Alaska, and tracked during the post-breeding season, July-October 2005 and 2006. In Alaskan waters, fishing effort occurred almost exclusively within continental shelf and slope waters. Potential fishery interaction for black-footed albatrosses, which most often frequented shelf-slope waters, was greatest with sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) longline and pot fisheries and with the Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepsis) longline fishery. In contrast, Laysan albatrosses spent as much time over oceanic waters beyond the continental shelf and slope, thereby overlapping less with fisheries in Alaska than black-footed albatrosses. Regionally, Laysan albatrosses had the greatest potential fishery interaction with the Atka mackerel (Pleurogrammus monopterygius) trawl fishery in the Western Aleutian Islands and the sablefish pot fishery in the Central Aleutian Islands. Black-footed albatrosses ranged further beyond Alaskan waters than Laysan albatrosses, overlapping west coast Canada fisheries and pelagic longline fisheries in the subarctic transition domain; Laysan albatrosses remained north of these pelagic fisheries. Due to inter-specific differences in oceanic distribution and habitat use, the overlap of fisheries with the post-breeding distribution of black-footed albatrosses is greater than that for Laysan albatrosses, highlighting inter-specific differences in potential vulnerability to bycatch and risk of population-level impacts from fisheries. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. 77 FR 58526 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting; Work Session To Review Proposed Salmon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council's Salmon Technical Team (STT), Scientific...-emergency issues not contained in the meeting agenda may come before the STT, SSC Salmon Subcommittee, and...

  7. Tuna longline fishing around West and Central Pacific seamounts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo Morato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Seamounts have been identified as aggregating locations for pelagic biodiversity including tuna; however the topography and prevailing oceanography differ between seamounts and not all are important for tuna. Although a relatively common feature in oceanic ecosystems, little information is available that identifies those that are biologically important. Improved knowledge offers opportunities for unique management of these areas, which may advance the sustainable management of oceanic resources. In this study, we evaluate the existence of an association between seamounts and tuna longline fisheries at the ocean basin scale, identify significant seamounts for tuna in the western and central Pacific Ocean, and quantify the seamount contribution to the tuna longline catch. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use data collected for the Western and Central Pacific Ocean for bigeye, yellowfin, and albacore tuna at the ocean basin scale. GLMs were applied to a coupled dataset of longline fisheries catch and effort, and seamount location information. The analyses show that seamounts may be associated with an annual longline combined catch of 35 thousand tonnes, with higher catch apparent for yellowfin, bigeye, and albacore tuna on 17%, 14%, and 14% of seamounts respectively. In contrast 14%, 18%, and 20% of seamounts had significantly lower catches for yellowfin, bigeye and albacore tuna respectively. Studying catch data in relation to seamount positions presents several challenges such as bias in location of seamounts, or lack of spatial resolution of fisheries data. Whilst we recognize these limitations the criteria used for detecting significant seamounts were conservative and the error in identification is likely to be low albeit unknown. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Seamounts throughout the study area were found to either enhance or reduce tuna catch. This indicates that management of seamounts is important Pacific-wide, but management

  8. 78 FR 29332 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... Fisheries i. Offshore fisheries ii. Coastal fisheries 5. Break 6. Agency Perspectives on climate change and...; Public Meetings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Program 8. Status of Endangered Species Act (ESA) Listings 9. Marine Conservation Plan Updates...

  9. 78 FR 9660 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... incidental catch in the salmon troll fishery that is allocated 15 percent of the commercial allocation. The...), incidental halibut catch in the salmon troll fishery, adjust the months for the incidental take fishery from...), and paragraph (7) of section 11, an incidental catch fishery is authorized during salmon troll...

  10. 75 FR 53606 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; 2010-11 Main...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... the Western Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council), 1164 Bishop St., Suite 1400, Honolulu, HI... significant impact (FONSI). Copies of the EA and FONSI are available from www.regulations.gov , or Michael D... preamble to the proposed specification published on August 2, 2010 (75 FR 45085), and is not repeated...

  11. 77 FR 11412 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... a timely fashion and would delay the directed fishing closure of Pacific cod for CVs using trawl... Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-P...

  12. 78 FR 64892 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch in the Bering Sea and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the closure of the Pacific ocean perch...: October 25, 2013. Kelly Denit, Acting Deputy Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National...

  13. 77 FR 8177 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Pot Gear in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... a timely fashion and would delay the directed fishing closure of Pacific cod for vessels using pot... Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-P...

  14. 78 FR 18528 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... a timely fashion and would delay the directed fishing closure of Pacific cod for CVs using trawl... Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-P...

  15. 78 FR 64891 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch in the Bering Sea and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the closure of the Pacific ocean perch...: October 25, 2013. Kelly Denit, Acting Deputy Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National...

  16. 78 FR 55228 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Reallocation of Pacific Cod in the Western...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the reallocation of Pacific cod specified from trawl C/Ps...: September 5, 2013. James P. Burgess, Acting Deputy Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries,...

  17. 78 FR 32624 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... A. Age-Structured Model of False Killer Whales B. Papahanaumokuakea Associated Cetacean Ecology... Nation's Fisheries 3rd Meeting K. Recreational Fisheries Update L. Education and Outreach M. Asian...

  18. 76 FR 63904 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... Species Management Measures for 2012 G. Habitat Current Habitat Issues H. Ecosystem Based Management 1. Northwest Fisheries Science Center Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Report 2. Development of a Council Ecosystem Fishery Management Plan I. Highly Migratory Species Management 1. Council Recommendations...

  19. 77 FR 73987 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings and Hearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... (STT) will meet at the Pacific Council office in a public work session to draft ``Review of 2012 Ocean... salmon fisheries. February 19-22, 2013: The STT will meet at the Pacific Council office in a public work... 95501, telephone 707-445-0844. Although nonemergency issues not contained in the STT meeting agendas may...

  20. 78 FR 73850 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings and Hearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... Technical Team (STT) will meet at the Pacific Council office in a public work session to draft ``Review of... the 2014 ocean salmon fisheries. February 18-21, 2014: The STT will meet at the Pacific Council office...-emergency issues not contained in the STT meeting agendas may come before the STT for discussion, those...

  1. 76 FR 37285 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and Accountability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and Accountability Measures AGENCY: National Marine... (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs) for western Pacific fisheries. The final rule is intended to... will be restricted through one or more inseason accountability measures to ensure that the ACL is...

  2. 77 FR 5473 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... incidental catch in the salmon troll fishery that is allocated 15 percent of the commercial allocation. The... troll seasons in Area 2A in accordance with regulations promulgated by NMFS. This fishery will occur... the salmon troll fishery (316 licenses in 2011); and the charterboat fleet (141 licenses in 2011)....

  3. 76 FR 2871 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... catch in the salmon troll fishery that is allocated 15 percent of the commercial allocation. The... is authorized during salmon troll seasons in Area 2A in accordance with regulations promulgated by... sablefish fishery; incidental halibut caught in the salmon troll fishery (233 licenses in 2010); and...

  4. 75 FR 13024 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... fishery during the salmon troll fishery specified in paragraph (3) of section 8. (5) A license issued in... incidental commercial fishery during the salmon troll season in Area 2A must have its ``Application for... salmon troll seasons in Area 2A in accordance with regulations promulgated by NMFS. (4) The...

  5. Area West of the 700 fathom Depth Contour for Pacific Fishery Management Council's June 2005 Preferred Alternative, Groundfish EFH Final EIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — These data depict area within the West Coast Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) that is west of the 700 fathom isobath. This area was designated by the Pacific Fishery...

  6. 75 FR 19942 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... rank MET proposals 6. Discussion and wrap-up Wednesday, May 5, 2010, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 7. Review CDPP... proposals 9. Discussion and wrap-up ] 10. Advisor Discussion and Recommendations 11. Other business The... Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-S...

  7. 76 FR 30107 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... Enforcement 3. NOAA General Counsel for Enforcement and Litigation E. NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program F... Catch (ABC) Analysis for Coral Reef Fin-fish Fisheries Annual Catch Limits (ACLs) a. Hawaii b. American... Catch Limit Analysis for Coral Reef Fin-Fish Fisheries (Action Item) B. Offshore Aquaculture 1....

  8. 76 FR 50183 - Western Pacific Fisheries; Approval of a Marine Conservation Plan for the Northern Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... CONTACT: Jarad Makaiau, Sustainable Fisheries, NMFS Pacific Islands Regional Office, 808-944-2108.... Objective 6. Promote responsible domestic fisheries development to provide long term economic growth and... quota utilization program to facilitate responsible fisheries. (c) Development of a fish marketing...

  9. 78 FR 11628 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Agenda for 156th Council Meeting 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesday, March 12, 2013 1. Opening Ceremony 2... College Rose Atoll Study H. Cook Islands Satellite Fisheries Office I. Education and Outreach...

  10. 76 FR 23964 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Pelagic Fisheries; Purse Seine Prohibited Areas Around American...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... more recent purse seine fishery information exists and more recent troll and longline fishery... information would not change the Council's analyses or management objectives. More recent troll and longline... fishing grounds accessible to the small-scale troll and longline fleets. Reductions in fish density...

  11. 76 FR 71321 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... Operations and Procedures (SOPPs) review/approval and update on workshop with International Pacific Halibut... Service Report; Protected Species Report (including Steller Sea Lion (SSL) Center of Independent...

  12. 76 FR 2084 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... discussion paper and TRAWLEX report). Alaska Department of Fish & Game Report. International Pacific Halibut... Species Report (including update on Steller Sea Lion (SSL); Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed...

  13. 76 FR 54216 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council); Work Session To Review Proposed Salmon Methodology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council's Salmon Technical Team (STT), Scientific and... the STT and SSC Salmon Subcommittee on proposed changes to methods and standards used to manage ocean... contained in the meeting agenda may come before the STT, SSC Salmon Subcommittee, and MEW for discussion...

  14. 76 FR 78904 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings and Hearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... January 17-20, 2012: The Salmon Technical Team (STT) will meet at the Pacific Council office in a public... methodology issues pertinent to the 2012 ocean salmon fisheries. February 21-24, 2012: The STT will meet at... contained in the STT meeting agendas may come before the STT for discussion, those issues may not be the...

  15. 77 FR 10466 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... Pacific Coast groundfish FMP fisheries on Chinook salmon (Puget Sound, Snake River spring/summer, Snake... (Snake River, Ozette Lake), and steelhead (upper, middle and lower Columbia River, Snake River Basin... non-salmonid listed species (marine mammals, sea birds, and turtles). NMFS will be completing a...

  16. 75 FR 54044 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Community Development Program Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ...), which is available from the Western Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council), 1164 Bishop St., Suite... in this final rule may be submitted to NMFS, attention Michael D. Tosatto, 1601 Kapiolani ] Blvd.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This document is also accessible at www.gpoaccess.gov/fr . Section 305(i)(2) of...

  17. 76 FR 16618 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... Mandates A. Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) i. Overview of CMSP ii. Community CMSP Workshop... A. Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) i. Overview of CMSP ii. Community CMSP Workshop Plans... Initiatives A. Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning i. Pacific Islands Regional Office ii. Pacific...

  18. 76 FR 74725 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Trawl...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... seasonally to slow bycatch in the whiting fishery. In addition to closed areas to protect habitat from trawl... it will strive to the best of its ability to conduct site inspections in a timely fashion, not...

  19. 76 FR 60004 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... Spatial Planning. 1. Regional Initiatives. 2. Report on Coastal Marine Spatial Planning Workshop. ] 3... Islands Fisheries Science Center Director. 5. Program Planning. A. Specification of Acceptable Biological... a.m.-1 p.m. 6. Program Planning and Research. A. Specification of Acceptable Biological...

  20. 77 FR 2039 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    ... Pribilof Blue King Crab Rebuilding Plan, action as necessary; BSAI Crab Model Workshop Report. (SSC only... (IFQs) proposals and provide direction. 8. Other Business The SSC agenda will include the following...: January 10, 2012. Tracey L. Thompson, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National...

  1. 75 FR 32372 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Longline Limited Entry Program Modifications (Action) D. Territory Fisheries Development (Action) E.... Protected Species A. False Killer Whale Take Reduction Team Meeting Report B. Cetacean Survey Methodology C... Killer Whale) D. American Samoa Longline Amendment Consultation E. Public Comment F. SSC Discussion...

  2. 78 FR 16423 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    .... Regulations at Sec. 300.65(c)(1) specify the GHLs based on the total constant exploitation yield (CEY... Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife ] (ODFW... Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), Alaska Wildlife Troopers (AWT), United States Coast Guard (USCG),...

  3. 77 FR 59902 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    .... Report on First Stewarts Meeting. a. Video Flyover. 2. Third Managing Our Nations Fisheries Conference.... Legislative Report. 1. CNMI. 2. Guam. C. Enforcement Issues. 1. CNMI. 2. Guam. D. Status of Guam Indigenous... meetings are physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language...

  4. 77 FR 14350 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ...; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Hilton Hotel, 500 West 3rd Avenue, King Salmon/Illiamna Room, Anchorage, AK. Council address: North... INFORMATION CONTACT: Jane DiCosimo, Council staff; telephone: (907) 271-2809. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  5. 78 FR 20616 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ...) Annual Catch Target (ACT) Monitoring ii. Market Delay Amendment E. National Marine Fisheries Service... Sustainable Yield (MSY) B. New black coral research to support ACL re-specification C. Discussions 6. Data..., and Hawaii. 31. Age and growth of tropical boney fishes. Age at length relationship (e.g.,...

  6. 77 FR 16740 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... factors, including timing of halibut migration and spawning, marketing for seasonal holidays, and interest... Alaska. (7) Section 24 applies to Aboriginal groups fishing for food, social and ceremonial purposes in...; Federal, State, United States treaty Indian, and Provincial fishery officials; and the media. 6...

  7. 76 FR 6403 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... and AP meetings will be held at Sadie's by the Sea Hotel, Pago Pago, American Samoa; telephone: (684... Fishery Circle Hook Study ] D. Mariana Archipelago Green Turtle Workshop Report E. Better science needed... American Samoa Longline Circle-hook Study C. Mariana Archipelago Green Sea Turtle Workshop Report D. SSC...

  8. 77 FR 56611 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ...). 2. Halibut Fisheries Issues: ADF&G report on final 2011 sport halibut removals; Final action on... Right of First Refusal (ROFR); Initial Review of BSAI Crab active participation requirements; Discussion...) Use and Requirements; Review the Bering Sea Habitat Conservation Area Boundary; Discussion paper on...

  9. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX). Design document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    The Earth`s climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27{degree}C, but never 31{degree}C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  10. 75 FR 42069 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... meeting to develop a draft assessment of the factors triggering an overfishing concern for SRFC. The... consecutive years, an overfishing concern is triggered according to the terms of the Pacific Coast Salmon...

  11. 75 FR 20566 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should... models to be considered for inclusion in the GOA and BSAI Pacific cod assessments. DATES:...

  12. 78 FR 49259 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... (Pacific Council) will convene a meeting of the Salmon Technical Team (STT), the Salmon Advisory Subpanel... may not be the subject of formal SAS, STT, or MEW action during this meeting. Action will be...

  13. 77 FR 67633 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... (including Aleutian Island Risk Assessment) United State Fish & Wildlife (USFWL) Report International Pacific... restrictions; discussion paper on retention of 4A halibut in sablefish pots. 5. Steller Sea Lion...

  14. 75 FR 78343 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Amendments 20...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... allocations of quota under the new program do not differ significantly from status quo allocations made... group or groups. An allocation need not preserve the status quo in the fishery to qualify as fair and... consequences with those of alternative allocation schemes, including the status quo.'' Thus, the Councils...

  15. 75 FR 53379 - Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Amendments 20...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... Confidential Business Information or otherwise sensitive or protected information. NMFS will accept anonymous... recognized that each observer's roles and responsibilities would differ between each fishery and may change... support, deployment limitations and logistics and communication in this rule. The requirements are...

  16. 78 FR 7371 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery; Trawl Rationalization Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... accepted in Microsoft Word, Excel, or Adobe PDF file formats only. Written comments regarding the burden... either participate in or are familiar with requirements for Alaska fisheries, so use of this formula... formula: (DPC/V) x 100, where V is the total ex-vessel value of all groundfish species from the...

  17. 75 FR 67032 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Amendments 20...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... INFORMATION: Background On October 1, 2010, NMFS published a final rule (75 FR 32994, 100212086-0354-04) that..., 2010, initial issuance final rule (75 FR 32994). The correction to the trip limit tables in the limited... commercial fisheries off Washington, Oregon, and California, and reductions to daily trip limits (DTL)...

  18. 75 FR 32993 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Amendments 20...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... quality product for the consumer. 8. Increase safety in the fishery. Because OY on healthy stocks is... ability and result in changes to fishing behavior, which include a reduction in the bycatch rate of...; freezing, cooking, smoking, or drying groundfish; packaging that groundfish for resale into 100 pound units...

  19. 76 FR 6567 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Guided Sport Charter Vessel Fishery for Halibut; Recordkeeping and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... the requirement, in Sec. 300.65(d)(2)(iv)(B)(1), to record the sport fishing operator business license...; Guided Sport Charter Vessel Fishery for Halibut; Recordkeeping and Reporting AGENCY: National Marine... rule. SUMMARY: NMFS issues regulations to amend the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for the...

  20. 78 FR 17885 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 50...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ... a timely fashion and would delay the closure of directed fishing for Pacific cod by CVs less than 50...: March 20, 2013. Kara Meckley, Acting Deputy Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National...

  1. 700 fathom Depth Contour for Pacific Fishery Management Council's June 2005 Preferred Alternative, Groundfish EFH Final EIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — These data depict the primary 700 fathom isobath within the West Coast Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). The area to the west of this depth contour was designated by...

  2. 75 FR 28564 - Fisheries of the Northeast Region; Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notification of determination of overfishing or an overfished condition... windowpane and Northwestern Atlantic Coast witch flounder are subject to overfishing and are in an overfished... overfishing and Georges Bank winter flounder is in an overfished condition. In addition, in the Pacific...

  3. 76 FR 30308 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... petrale sole, work with the Stock Assessment Teams to make necessary revisions, and produce a STAR Panel... sole stock assessments will hold a work session that is open to the public. DATES: The STAR Panel for... role will be development of recommendations and reports for consideration by the Pacific Council at...

  4. 75 FR 20985 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ..., Girdwood, AK, Room Columbia A - May 10-13 and Portage Board Room - May 14. Council address: North Pacific... presentations on patterns of larval snow crab and a snow crab spatial model, review draft stock assessments and... revised Annual Catch Limits and Snow crab rebuilding plan analysis and provide recommendations;...

  5. 78 FR 47675 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... (Pacific Council) Ad Hoc Groundfish Electronic Monitoring Committee and Ad Hoc Trawl Groundfish Electronic... for electronic monitoring (EM) for vessels participating in the West Coast groundfish trawl catch...

  6. 76 FR 542 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Council (Pacific Council) will convene a meeting of the Ecosystem Plan Development Team (EPDT) which is.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Please note, this is not a public hearing; it is a work session for the primary... that may benefit from a coordinated overarching EFMP framework. A draft version of an EPDT...

  7. 76 FR 42684 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The groundfish project team responsible... project team meeting will be held Tuesday, August 16, 2011, from 1 p.m. until business for the day is completed. ADDRESSES: The project team meeting will be held in Portland, Oregon at the Pacific...

  8. Fisheries Management of Mexican and Central American Estuaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amezcua-Martinez, Felipe; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2014-09-14

    The contributed papers in this book provide research undertaken in estuarine systems of Mexico and Central America that aim to provide a scientific basis for proper estuarine management. The book is divided in three parts that cover topics associated with fisheries management and regulations: physicochemical studies, ecological studies and socioeconomic studies. This introduction outlines the contents of this book in relation to the management of coastal ecosystems, which have a high socioeconomic importance for a large proportion of the population in this area of the world. Rather than be a definitive suite of papers for the regulation of these habitats, the goal of this book is to outline the urgent need to continue research of threatened coastal ecosystems of Mexico and Central America.

  9. 76 FR 54715 - Western Pacific Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; 2011-12 Main Hawaiian Islands Deep...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... Statement are available from the Western Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council), 1164 Bishop St... from http://www.regulations.gov , or Michael D. Tosatto, Regional Administrator, NMFS Pacific Islands... published proposed specifications that are finalized here, and a request for public comments (76 FR...

  10. Synthesis of underreported small-scale fisheries catch in Pacific island waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, D.; Harper, S.; Zylich, K.; Pauly, D.

    2015-03-01

    We synthesize fisheries catch reconstruction studies for 25 Pacific island countries, states and territories, which compare estimates of total domestic catches with officially reported catch data. We exclude data for the large-scale tuna fleets, which have largely foreign beneficial ownership, even when flying Pacific flags. However, we recognize the considerable financial contributions derived from foreign access or charter fees for Pacific host countries. The reconstructions for the 25 entities from 1950 to 2010 suggested that total domestic catches were 2.5 times the data reported to FAO. This discrepancy was largest in early periods (1950: 6.4 times), while for 2010, total catches were 1.7 times the reported data. There was a significant difference in trend between reported and reconstructed catches since 2000, with reconstructed catches declining strongly since their peak in 2000. Total catches increased from 110,000 t yr-1 in 1950 (of which 17,400 t were reported) to a peak of over 250,000 t yr-1 in 2000, before declining to around 200,000 t yr-1 by 2010. This decrease is driven by a declining artisanal (small-scale commercial) catch, which was not compensated for by increasing domestic industrial (large-scale commercial) catches. The artisanal fisheries appear to be declining from a peak of 97,000 t yr-1 in 1992 to less than 50,000 t yr-1 by 2010. However, total catches were dominated by subsistence (small-scale, non-commercial) fisheries, which accounted for 69 % of total catches, with the majority missing from the reported data. Artisanal catches accounted for 22 %, while truly domestic industrial fisheries accounted for only 6 % of total catches. The smallest component is the recreational (small-scale, non-commercial and largely for leisure) sector (2 %), which, although small in catch, is likely of economic importance in some areas due to its direct link to tourism income.

  11. Dynamics of the Central American Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieytez, Begonia; Marrero-Díaz, Ángeles; José Machín, Francisco; José Gavidia, Francisco; Castro, Mi

    2014-05-01

    The Central American Pacific (CAP) is the area located in front of the Central America coast, within the Eastern Tropical Pacific region (ETP). The CAP dynamic is strongly influenced by the NE and SE trade winds, also this area is characterized by the presence of coastal wind jets at Gulf of Papagayo and Gulf of Panama, which are product of wind pulses blowing through the mountain gaps of the central cordillera, generating important eddies as the cyclonic eddy of Costa Rica Dome (CRD). Nevertheless, the implications of the topography of the continental margin of Central America in the determination of the dynamic processes in the area related to the action of winds and currents are still unknown. Between November and December 2010 (dry season), onboard the R/V Miguel Oliver, oceanographic parameters were measured in the CAP area, which despite its importance, has been poorly investigated until date. Available oceanographic information was processed in order to describe the dynamic along the Pacific coast of Central America, which is notable for its particularly strong stratification in the water column and the distribution of properties, as response to the presence of areas with high temperatures (above 28° C) and other areas with salinity minimum (less than 24). In this study was possible to distinguish three hydrographic zones: PM, south, in the adjacent region to Gulf of Panama, PY, in the center, in the adjacent region to Gulf of Papagayo, and FC, to the north, in the adjacent region to Gulf of Fonseca. The surface transformations of the water bodies, from south to north, observed in these zones could be indicting the presence of Costa Rica current. The prevailing wind system is the main force of variations in the surface distribution of the temperature in the area, and they are responsible of important structures as the anticyclonic eddy in front Gulf of Fonseca, eddies derived from the wind pulses of Gulf of Papagayo, and the relatively low temperatures in

  12. 中西太平洋金枪鱼延绳钓主要渔获物垂直结构的初步研究%Vertical distribution of main species captured by tuna longline fishery in the Western and Central Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾松鹤; 戴小杰; 田思泉; 张艳波

    2015-01-01

    根据2012年7~11月金枪鱼科学观察员在中西太平洋采集的钩位深度以及渔获物的钓获钩位数据,分析了各钩位的上浮率和钓获鱼种的垂直分布结构,并比较了不同鱼种垂直分布的差异性。结果表明:(1)钓钩绝对上浮率变化范围为0.49~44.73 m,相对上浮率的变化范围为0.65%~16.69%,平均绝对上浮率为23.29 m,平均相对上浮率为8.87%。(2)12种主要渔获钓获深度范围差异很大,大'(Lampris guttatus)的平均钓获深度最浅,为75.92 m,蓝枪鱼(Makaira nigricans)的平均钓获深度最深,为228.19 m。聚类分析显示12种主要渔获物可以分成3种垂直分布结构。(3)11种主要兼捕渔获钓获深度均与长鳍金枪鱼(Thunnus alalunga)钓获深度呈显著性差异。%Albacore(Thunnus alalunga),one of the main target species of commercial tuna fishery,has great economic value and a long history of scientific research.However,studies on vertical distribution of pelagic species are rare in China,and this is the first time to study the vertical distribution of pelagic species in the Western and Central Pacific at home and abroad.Information of vertical distribution of pelagic species is important for the development of effective measures to mitigate bycatch, and very helpful for better understanding of the oceanic ecosystem structure and implementation of ecosystem-based fisheries management.Learning this relationship will have a significant impact on both commercial fishing and sustainable development of resource.Data were collected by scientific observer in the Western and Central Pacific from July to December 2012.The operating range was from 06°50′S to 18°00′S,and from 160°48′W to 173°08′W,near the sea of Solomon Islands.There were 98 sets altogether in this area.The catch data contained catch species,fork length,set locations and fishing gear information like length of float

  13. 75 FR 8841 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... from responding to the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the sideboard..., 2010. James P. Burgess, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine...

  14. 75 FR 8839 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... it would prevent NMFS from responding to the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would.... Burgess, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING...

  15. 75 FR 5541 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... it would prevent NMFS from responding to the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would.... Menashes, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING...

  16. Fishery-induced changes in the subtropical Pacific pelagic ecosystem size structure: observations and theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Polovina

    Full Text Available We analyzed a 16-year (1996-2011 time series of catch and effort data for 23 species with mean weights ranging from 0.8 kg to 224 kg, recorded by observers in the Hawaii-based deep-set longline fishery. Over this time period, domestic fishing effort, as numbers of hooks set in the core Hawaii-based fishing ground, has increased fourfold. The standardized aggregated annual catch rate for 9 small (15 kg it decreased about 50% over the 16-year period. A size-based ecosystem model for the subtropical Pacific captures this pattern well as a response to increased fishing effort. Further, the model projects a decline in the abundance of fishes larger than 15 kg results in an increase in abundance of animals from 0.1 to 15 kg but with minimal subsequent cascade to sizes smaller than 0.1 kg. These results suggest that size-based predation plays a key role in structuring the subtropical ecosystem. These changes in ecosystem size structure show up in the fishery in various ways. The non-commercial species lancetfish (mean weight 7 kg has now surpassed the target species, bigeye tuna, as the species with the highest annual catch rate. Based on the increase in snake mackerel (mean weight 0.8 kg and lancetfish catches, the discards in the fishery are estimated to have increased from 30 to 40% of the total catch.

  17. The artisanal elasmobranch fishery of the Pacific coast of Baja California Sur, Mexico, management implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio R. Ramirez-Amaro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Artisanal fisheries in Mexico account for approximately 40% of the total national catch. In 2009, Baja California Sur (BCS had the second largest catch of elasmobranchs on the Mexican Pacific coast. This paper characterizes and describes the artisanal elasmobranch fishery of Pacific coast of BCS from 2000 to 2010. Sixty artisanal camps were documented, of which 45 targeted elasmobranchs, using primarily gillnets and longlines. We identified 52 elasmobranch species. Gillnetting accounted for 73.5% of the fishing effort and most frequently captured Rhinobatos productus, Mustelus henlei and Myliobatis californica. Longline fishing accounted for 26.5% of effort, most frequently capturing Prionace glauca and Isurus oxyrinchus. The prevalence of juveniles of several species (e.g., Cephaloscyllium ventriosum, Galeorhinus galeus, Isurus oxyrinchus, and Myliobatis californica within landings suggests that fishing effort may be opportunistically directed at breeding or nursery areas. Despite the dominance of species with wide distributions, we observed a significant biogeographic pattern in the abundance of some species relative to Bahia Magdalena. Results of the present study will be useful to detect changes in the structure of commercially exploited elasmobranch populations, and to provide useful indications for management purposes.

  18. Effects of Ocean Acidification on Temperate Coastal Marine Ecosystems and Fisheries in the Northeast Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Rowan; Ianson, Debby; Holt, Carrie A.; Neate, Holly E.; Edwards, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    As the oceans absorb anthropogenic CO2 they become more acidic, a problem termed ocean acidification (OA). Since this increase in CO2 is occurring rapidly, OA may have profound implications for marine ecosystems. In the temperate northeast Pacific, fisheries play key economic and cultural roles and provide significant employment, especially in rural areas. In British Columbia (BC), sport (recreational) fishing generates more income than commercial fishing (including the expanding aquaculture industry). Salmon (fished recreationally and farmed) and Pacific Halibut are responsible for the majority of fishery-related income. This region naturally has relatively acidic (low pH) waters due to ocean circulation, and so may be particularly vulnerable to OA. We have analyzed available data to provide a current description of the marine ecosystem, focusing on vertical distributions of commercially harvested groups in BC in the context of local carbon and pH conditions. We then evaluated the potential impact of OA on this temperate marine system using currently available studies. Our results highlight significant knowledge gaps. Above trophic levels 2–3 (where most local fishery-income is generated), little is known about the direct impact of OA, and more importantly about the combined impact of multi-stressors, like temperature, that are also changing as our climate changes. There is evidence that OA may have indirect negative impacts on finfish through changes at lower trophic levels and in habitats. In particular, OA may lead to increased fish-killing algal blooms that can affect the lucrative salmon aquaculture industry. On the other hand, some species of locally farmed shellfish have been well-studied and exhibit significant negative direct impacts associated with OA, especially at the larval stage. We summarize the direct and indirect impacts of OA on all groups of marine organisms in this region and provide conclusions, ordered by immediacy and certainty. PMID

  19. Effects of ocean acidification on temperate coastal marine ecosystems and fisheries in the northeast Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Rowan; Ianson, Debby; Holt, Carrie A; Neate, Holly E; Edwards, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    As the oceans absorb anthropogenic CO2 they become more acidic, a problem termed ocean acidification (OA). Since this increase in CO2 is occurring rapidly, OA may have profound implications for marine ecosystems. In the temperate northeast Pacific, fisheries play key economic and cultural roles and provide significant employment, especially in rural areas. In British Columbia (BC), sport (recreational) fishing generates more income than commercial fishing (including the expanding aquaculture industry). Salmon (fished recreationally and farmed) and Pacific Halibut are responsible for the majority of fishery-related income. This region naturally has relatively acidic (low pH) waters due to ocean circulation, and so may be particularly vulnerable to OA. We have analyzed available data to provide a current description of the marine ecosystem, focusing on vertical distributions of commercially harvested groups in BC in the context of local carbon and pH conditions. We then evaluated the potential impact of OA on this temperate marine system using currently available studies. Our results highlight significant knowledge gaps. Above trophic levels 2-3 (where most local fishery-income is generated), little is known about the direct impact of OA, and more importantly about the combined impact of multi-stressors, like temperature, that are also changing as our climate changes. There is evidence that OA may have indirect negative impacts on finfish through changes at lower trophic levels and in habitats. In particular, OA may lead to increased fish-killing algal blooms that can affect the lucrative salmon aquaculture industry. On the other hand, some species of locally farmed shellfish have been well-studied and exhibit significant negative direct impacts associated with OA, especially at the larval stage. We summarize the direct and indirect impacts of OA on all groups of marine organisms in this region and provide conclusions, ordered by immediacy and certainty.

  20. Effects of ocean acidification on temperate coastal marine ecosystems and fisheries in the northeast Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowan Haigh

    Full Text Available As the oceans absorb anthropogenic CO2 they become more acidic, a problem termed ocean acidification (OA. Since this increase in CO2 is occurring rapidly, OA may have profound implications for marine ecosystems. In the temperate northeast Pacific, fisheries play key economic and cultural roles and provide significant employment, especially in rural areas. In British Columbia (BC, sport (recreational fishing generates more income than commercial fishing (including the expanding aquaculture industry. Salmon (fished recreationally and farmed and Pacific Halibut are responsible for the majority of fishery-related income. This region naturally has relatively acidic (low pH waters due to ocean circulation, and so may be particularly vulnerable to OA. We have analyzed available data to provide a current description of the marine ecosystem, focusing on vertical distributions of commercially harvested groups in BC in the context of local carbon and pH conditions. We then evaluated the potential impact of OA on this temperate marine system using currently available studies. Our results highlight significant knowledge gaps. Above trophic levels 2-3 (where most local fishery-income is generated, little is known about the direct impact of OA, and more importantly about the combined impact of multi-stressors, like temperature, that are also changing as our climate changes. There is evidence that OA may have indirect negative impacts on finfish through changes at lower trophic levels and in habitats. In particular, OA may lead to increased fish-killing algal blooms that can affect the lucrative salmon aquaculture industry. On the other hand, some species of locally farmed shellfish have been well-studied and exhibit significant negative direct impacts associated with OA, especially at the larval stage. We summarize the direct and indirect impacts of OA on all groups of marine organisms in this region and provide conclusions, ordered by immediacy and certainty.

  1. Shark fisheries in the Southeast Pacific: A 61-year analysis from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Pestana, Adriana; Kouri J, Carlos; Velez-Zuazo, Ximena

    2014-01-01

    Peruvian waters exhibit high conservation value for sharks. This contrasts with a lag in initiatives for their management and a lack of studies about their biology, ecology and fishery. We investigated the dynamics of Peruvian shark fishery and its legal framework identifying information gaps for recommending actions to improve management. Further, we investigated the importance of the Peruvian shark fishery from a regional perspective. From 1950 to 2010, 372,015 tons of sharks were landed in Peru. From 1950 to 1969, we detected a significant increase in landings; but from 2000 to 2011 there was a significant decrease in landings, estimated at 3.5% per year. Six species represented 94% of landings: blue shark ( Prionace glauca), shortfin mako ( Isurus oxyrinchus), smooth hammerhead ( Sphyrna zygaena), common thresher ( Alopias vulpinus), smooth-hound ( Mustelus whitneyi) and angel shark ( Squatina californica). Of these, the angel shark exhibits a strong and significant decrease in landings: 18.9% per year from 2000 to 2010. Peru reports the highest accumulated historical landings in the Pacific Ocean; but its contribution to annual landings has decreased since 1968. Still, Peru is among the top 12 countries exporting shark fins to the Hong Kong market. Although the government collects total weight by species, the number of specimens landed as well as population parameters (e.g. sex, size and weight) are not reported. Further, for some genera, species-level identification is deficient and so overestimates the biomass landed by species and underestimates the species diversity. Recently, regional efforts to regulate shark fishery have been implemented to support the conservation of sharks but in Peru work remains to be done.

  2. Shark fisheries in the Southeast Pacific: A 61-year analysis from Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Pestana, Adriana; Kouri J., Carlos; Velez-Zuazo, Ximena

    2016-01-01

    Peruvian waters exhibit high conservation value for sharks. This contrasts with a lag in initiatives for their management and a lack of studies about their biology, ecology and fishery. We investigated the dynamics of Peruvian shark fishery and its legal framework identifying information gaps for recommending actions to improve management. Further, we investigated the importance of the Peruvian shark fishery from a regional perspective. From 1950 to 2010, 372,015 tons of sharks were landed in Peru. From 1950 to 1969, we detected a significant increase in landings; but from 2000 to 2011 there was a significant decrease in landings, estimated at 3.5% per year. Six species represented 94% of landings: blue shark ( Prionace glauca), shortfin mako ( Isurus oxyrinchus), smooth hammerhead ( Sphyrna zygaena), common thresher ( Alopias vulpinus), smooth-hound ( Mustelus whitneyi) and angel shark ( Squatina californica). Of these, the angel shark exhibits a strong and significant decrease in landings: 18.9% per year from 2000 to 2010. Peru reports the highest accumulated historical landings in the Pacific Ocean; but its contribution to annual landings has decreased since 1968. Still, Peru is among the top 12 countries exporting shark fins to the Hong Kong market. Although the government collects total weight by species, the number of specimens landed as well as population parameters (e.g. sex, size and weight) are not reported. Further, for some genera, species-level identification is deficient and so overestimates the biomass landed by species and underestimates the species diversity. Recently, regional efforts to regulate shark fishery have been implemented to support the conservation of sharks but in Peru work remains to be done. PMID:27635216

  3. 76 FR 44699 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod Allocations in the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ..., Central, and Eastern) in the GOA. TP26JY11.002 After accounting for the State GHL fisheries, the remaining... are restricted to their collective historical landings in most GOA groundfish fisheries, as described... weather conditions, difficulty finding fish in State waters, and high operating costs contributed to...

  4. 76 FR 74670 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod Allocations in the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    .... Amendment 83 was adopted by the Council in December 2009 to supersede the current inshore/offshore... waters or in the non-parallel-State ] waters Pacific cod fishery to avoid NMFS observer, VMS, and...; Requires vessel monitoring systems (VMS) on all vessels engaged in mothership activity in the Western and...

  5. 78 FR 79388 - Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; Catch and Effort Limits for the U.S. Participating Territories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... comments. Mail: Send written comments to Michael D. Tosatto, Regional Administrator, NMFS Pacific Islands....regulations.gov or the Council, 1164 Bishop St., Suite 1400, Honolulu, HI 96813, tel 808-522-8220, fax 808-522... (December 7, 2009, 74 FR 63999). This limit applied only to the Hawaii-based longline fisheries or...

  6. 77 FR 62464 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Pot Gear in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Pot Gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf... for Pacific cod by vessels using pot gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA... vessels using pot gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the GOA. DATES: Effective 1200 hrs, Alaska...

  7. 78 FR 10102 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Pot Gear in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Pot Gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf... for Pacific cod by vessels using pot gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA... allowable catch apportioned to vessels using pot gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the GOA....

  8. 77 FR 14305 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Jig Gear in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Jig Gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf... for Pacific cod by vessels using jig gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA... allowable catch apportioned to vessels using jig gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the GOA....

  9. 77 FR 65640 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Pot Gear in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Pot Gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf... directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels using pot gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf of...) apportioned to vessels using pot gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the GOA. DATES: Effective 1200...

  10. 77 FR 67580 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Jig Gear in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Jig Gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf... directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels using jig gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf of...) apportioned to vessels using jig gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the GOA. DATES: Effective 1200...

  11. 77 FR 19605 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... each area. In the East Area, the FMP delegates management of the commercial troll salmon fishery to the... commercial troll fishery, and the sport fishery. Amendment 12 In December 2011, the Council voted unanimously... caught in the East Area commercial troll fishery, the only commercial fishery authorized under the...

  12. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  13. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5 m cell size) of the shelf and slope environments of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  14. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  15. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  16. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in netCDF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf, and slope environments of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific....

  17. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Isand Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom coverage...

  18. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  19. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (20 m cell size) of the shelf and slope environments of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  20. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (20 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  1. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (20 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  2. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (20 m cell size) of the shelf and slope environments of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  3. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  4. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom coverage...

  5. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  6. CRED 40 m Gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  7. CRED 40 m Gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  8. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (20 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  9. CRED 40 m Gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  10. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5 m cell size) of the shelf and slope environments of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  11. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  12. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in GeoTIFF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf, and slope environments of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific....

  13. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in GeoTIFF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Howland Atoll, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific. These...

  14. CRED 40 m Gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  15. The Nourishing Sea: Partnered Guardianship of Fishery and Seabed Mineral Resources for the Economic Viability of Small Pacific Island Nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D'Arcy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available While island biogeography and modern economics portray Pacific island nations as isolated, ecologically fragile, resource poor and barely viable economies forever dependent on foreign aid, Pacific island history and culture conceives of their islands as intimately inter-linked to the surrounding ocean and of that ocean as an avenue to expanded resource bases, both terrestrial and aquatic. Pacific Islanders live in the most aquatic human zone on Earth, with the highest territorial ratios of sea to land. Recent studies are revealing the continuity and success of traditional near-shore guardianship of maritime resources in a number of Pacific islands. Sustainable development of seabed minerals and pelagic fisheries may offer enhanced income potential for small island nations with limited terrestrial resources. As offshore ecosystems are poorly policed, sustainable development is best realized through comprehensive planning centred on partnerships between local communities, their governments, marine scientists and commercial enterprises. The success or failure of Pacific Islanders in reasserting their maritime guardianship is now a matter of global significance given the decimation of most fisheries beyond the Pacific and the vast, but uncertain, medicinal, mineral and food resource potential of this huge area of the planet.

  16. 77 FR 21716 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... in each area. In the East Area, the FMP delegates management of the commercial troll salmon fishery... commercial troll fishery, and the sport fishery. Amendment 12 In December 2011, the Council voted unanimously... the East Area commercial troll fishery have State of Alaska limited entry permits. According to...

  17. The Fisheries of Hawaii and U.S.-associated Pacific Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Boehlert , George W.

    1993-01-01

    In the late 1980's and early 1990's, significant changes occurred in the fisheries of Hawaii. Expansion and diversification of pelagic fisheries and growth (including industrialization) of fisheries that, in at least some cases, had been largely recreational or artisanall ed to fear of overfishing and problems in allocation among fishery sectors. Combined with establishment of limited entry programs in Hawaii fisheries (bottomfish, longline, and lobster), this led to anticipation that simi...

  18. Assessment of the dolphinfish Coryphaena hippurus (Perciformes: Coryphaenidae) fishery in Pacific Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Héctor M; Díaz-Ferguson, Edgardo; Vega, Angel J; Robles, Yolany A

    2015-09-01

    The dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippunis) is a highly migratory pelagic species commercially exploited by industrial, artisanal and recreational fisheries in tropical and subtropical areas of the world's oceans. Herein, we evaluated the dolphinfish industrial fishery in Pacific Panama for the first time generating a growth model and examining fluctuations in annual total catch and in catch per unit effort (CPUE) over a four-year period (2006-2009). Annual and monthly catch values and biological parameters of 14913 individuals were obtained onboard industrial vessels, landing sites and records from processing plants. Size frequency for industrial vessels showed a normal distribution between 353 and 1,715 mm (average, 1010.85 mm; n = 10,459). Fish weight averaged 4.94 kg (SD). Sex ratio was slightly biased toward females. More than 90% of the analyzed fish were sexually mature. The length-weight relationship was positive and significant, reflecting allometric growth. Growth parameters using the von Bertalanffy equation revealed a growth efficiency of θ = 4.61, which is within the reported range for Coryphaena hippurus (3.95-4.70). The largest fish were between age classes 2 and 3 (700 - 1400 mm). Total catch per year and catch per unit effort (CPUE) per year fluctuated, with the highest values recorded between 2008 and 2009. Catch values reported herein are preliminary and appear to be below those recorded elsewhere in the region and cautiously may represent an indicator of sustainable use of this marine resource even considering the absence of management actions in Panama.

  19. AFSC/REFM: Community Profiles for North Pacific Fisheries, Alaska 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2005, the Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) compiled baseline socioeconomic information about 136 Alaska communities most involved in commercial fisheries....

  20. 75 FR 1597 - Western Pacific Crustacean Fisheries; 2010 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lobster Harvest Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lobster Harvest Guideline AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notification of lobster harvest guideline. SUMMARY: NMFS announces that the annual harvest guideline for the commercial lobster fishery...

  1. 78 FR 75843 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... by charter vessel anglers on board the vessel on which the operator's GAF permit and the assigned... assigned charter halibut permit on board the vessel on which charter vessel anglers retain GAF, and to..., the GHL did not allow the charter halibut fishery to fully benefit from this increase. Section...

  2. 76 FR 18709 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... fisheries, where tribal fisheries will deliver shoreside for processing or to a mothership for at-sea... groundfish FMP fisheries on Chinook salmon (Puget Sound, Snake River spring/summer, Snake River fall, upper... California coastal), chum salmon (Hood Canal summer, Columbia River), sockeye salmon (Snake River, Ozette...

  3. 75 FR 28540 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Community Development Program Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... CONTACT: Jarad Makaiau, NMFS PIR Sustainable Fisheries, 808-944-2108. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This..., processing or marketing capability sufficient to support substantial participation in fisheries in the area...: May 17, 2010. James P. Burgess, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National...

  4. 75 FR 3335 - International Fisheries; Western and Central Pacific Fisheries for Highly Migratory Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... Endorsements. This is because of the importance under the Convention of a vessel's international radio call... accordance with the NOAA Finance Handbook to recover the administrative costs of administering the permit... business. Response: The referenced requirement applies in the case that the vessel owner and operator have...

  5. 77 FR 51709 - International Fisheries; Western and Central Pacific Fisheries for Highly Migratory Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... the Eighth Regular Session of the WCPFC due to a power outage in the host country, CMM 2011-01 was not.... Participating Territories could potentially cause public confusion and result in unnecessary costs in the... Act and other applicable laws. Administrative Procedure Act There is good cause under 5 U.S.C....

  6. 78 FR 30773 - International Fisheries; Western and Central Pacific Fisheries for Highly Migratory Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... jurisdiction of a single foreign nation, in that situation, the foreign nation might have its own observer... used for fishing for highly migratory species in the Convention Area in areas under the jurisdiction of... recognized by the United States. All dates used in this section are in Universal Coordinated Time, also...

  7. 78 FR 36496 - International Fisheries; Western and Central Pacific Fisheries for Highly Migratory Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... the next most profitable fishing opportunity (which might be not fishing at all). Revenues from that... described above because ceasing fishing would not necessarily be the most profitable opportunity in the... delivering the fish to the Hawaii market. Vessel repair and maintenance is another possibility. A study by...

  8. 76 FR 82180 - International Fisheries; Western and Central Pacific Fisheries for Highly Migratory Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... comments (enter ``N/A'' in the relevant required fields if you wish to remain anonymous). Attachments to... January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2011; (4) a prohibition, which went into effect June 14, 2010, and..., through December 31, 2011, that U.S. purse seine vessels carry a WCPFC observer on all trips in...

  9. 77 FR 8759 - International Fisheries; Western and Central Pacific Fisheries for Highly Migratory Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... contributes to illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing activities. The term transshipment, as... Convention Implementation Act (WCPFC Implementation Act) to implement requirements for U.S. fishing vessels used for commercial fishing that offload or receive transshipments of highly migratory species (HMS), U...

  10. 77 FR 71501 - International Fisheries; Western and Central Pacific Fisheries for Highly Migratory Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... coverage requirements for troll vessels transshipping on the high seas would likely be covered. However, if a troll vessel wants to transship on the high seas to a carrier that is not already active in the... that may well fall on the troll or pole-and- line vessels, and should at least be factored into...

  11. 77 FR 8758 - International Fisheries; Western and Central Pacific Fisheries for Highly Migratory Species; High...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    .... NMFS data indicate that U.S. albacore troll vessels operating in the Convention Area conduct at-sea.... albacore troll vessels in the area of application of the Convention. It is likely that all of these transshipments took place on the high seas. The available data indicate that no U.S. albacore troll vessel...

  12. 78 FR 14755 - International Fisheries; Western and Central Pacific Fisheries for Highly Migratory Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... trips in the Convention Area, except fishing trips that occur entirely outside the area bounded by 20.... However, there is considerable inter- annual variation in the fleet's spatial distribution of fishing... outside the area bounded by 20 North and 20 South latitude. The proposed requirements are...

  13. 78 FR 58240 - International Fisheries; Western and Central Pacific Fisheries for Highly Migratory Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: NMFS issues regulations under..., 2013, NMFS published a proposed rule in the Federal Register (78 FR 36496) to revise regulations at 50... has a legal and moral mandate to reduce bigeye tuna mortality immediately. Response: As stated in...

  14. Catch, effort and bycatch of longline fishery in central Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Ayala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study is to report some characteristics of fishing trips, effort, catches, fishing areas and bycatch through observations on board and logbooks. 85% of sets were in the first 574 Km of distance from the coast (309 nautical miles. Farthest set was located at 1320 Km (712 nautical miles. A total of 382000 hooks were used to catch Mahi mahi, in 224 sets and 29 fishing trips, 94.6% of catch was Mahi mahi, 2.7% blue shark (Prionace glauca y 1,3% mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus. Also, 103790 hooks were used to catch sharks, in 109 sets y 12 trips, 81.9% of catch was blue sharks and 16.8% mako sharks. Catch per Unit of Effort (CPUE for Mahi mahi shows significative difference among seasons; with a peak from November to January. CPUE for shark shows significative difference among seasons, with peaks in September and October. The Green turtle Chelonia mydas agassizii was the most caugth species and two of three were juveniles. All Loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta, caught were juveniles. A petrel is reported as bycatch and, probably, mammal bycatch is scarce. Considering the huge effort of this fishery, it is important to monitor it and establish management actions.

  15. Floating Marine Debris in waters of the Mexican Central Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Torres, Evelyn R; Ortega-Ortiz, Christian D; Silva-Iñiguez, Lidia; Nene-Preciado, Alejandro; Orozco, Ernesto Torres

    2017-02-15

    The presence of marine debris has been reported recently in several oceans basins; there is very little information available for Mexican Pacific coasts, however. This research examined the composition, possible sources, distribution, and density of Floating Marine Debris (FMD) during nine research surveys conducted during 2010-2012 in the Mexican Central Pacific (MCP). Of 1820 floating objects recorded, 80% were plastic items. Sources of FMD were determined using key objects, which indicated that the most were related to the presence of the industrial harbor and of a growing fishing industry in the study area. Densities were relatively high, ranging from 40 to 2440objects/km(2); the highest densities were recorded in autumn. FMD were distributed near coastal regions, mainly in Jalisco, influenced by river outflow and surface currents. Our results seem to follow worldwide trends and highlight the need for further studies on potential ecological impacts within coastal waters of the MCP.

  16. 78 FR 77413 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Change to Start of Pacific...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... will remain as specified in the FMP; as would the current quota roll-over provisions. The purpose of... Microsoft Word, Excel, or Adobe PDF file formats only. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joshua Lindsay... timing of stock assessments. The process for setting the annual Pacific sardine quotas begins with...

  17. 78 FR 48075 - Western Pacific Fisheries; 2013 Annual Catch Limits and Accountability Measures; Correcting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... Catch Limits and Accountability Measures; Correcting Amendment AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...- season accountability measures upon attainment of the annual catch limit. Accordingly, in the...

  18. Marine pollution originating from purse seine and longline fishing vessel operations in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean, 2003-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Kelsey; Haynes, David; Talouli, Anthony; Donoghue, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Fisheries observer data recorded between 2003 and 2015 on-board purse seine and longline vessels operating in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean reported more than 10 000 pollution incidents within the exclusive economic zones (EEZs) of 25 Pacific countries and territories, and in international waters. A majority of the reported purse seine pollution incidents related to dumping of plastics waste. Other common pollution incidents related to oil spillages and to abandoned, lost or dumped fishing gear. Data analysis highlighted the need for increased monitoring, reporting, and enforcement of pollution violations by all types of fishing vessels operating in the Pacific region; a regional outreach and compliance assistance programme on marine pollution prevention and improvements in Pacific port waste reception facilities.

  19. NOAA/NMFS/CRED Deep CTD profiles from 15 cruises near islands, atolls and shoals in the central tropical Pacific 1999-2012 (NODC Accession 0115299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coral Reef Ecosystem Division of the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, part of the National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  20. NOAA/NMFS/CRED Deep CTD profiles from 15 cruises near islands, atolls and shoals in the central tropical Pacific 1999-2012 (NODC Accession 0115299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coral Reef Ecosystem Division of the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, part of the National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  1. 78 FR 7385 - Western Pacific Fisheries; Fishing in the Marianas Trench, Pacific Remote Islands, and Rose Atoll...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ...; Fishing in the Marianas Trench, Pacific Remote Islands, and Rose Atoll Marine National Monuments AGENCY... Marianas Trench, Pacific Remote Islands, and Rose Atoll Marine National Monuments. DATES: NMFS must receive... record and will generally be posted for public viewing on www.regulations.gov without change....

  2. Contrasting Effects of Central Pacific and Eastern Pacific El Nino on Stratospheric Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.; Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Oman, Luke D.; Waugh, Darryn W.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted experiments with a comprehensive chemistry-climate model are used to demonstrate that seasonality and the location of the peak warming of sea surface temperatures dictate the response of stratospheric water vapor to El Nino. In spring, El Nino events in which sea surface temperature anomalies peak in the eastern Pacific lead to a warming at the tropopause above the warm pool region, and subsequently to more stratospheric water vapor (consistent with previous work). However, in fall and in early winter, and also during El Nino events in which the sea surface temperature anomaly is found mainly in the central Pacific, the response is qualitatively different: temperature changes in the warm pool region are nonuniform and less water vapor enters the stratosphere. The difference in water vapor in the lower stratosphere between the two variants of El Nino approaches 0.3 ppmv, while the difference between the winter and spring responses exceeds 0.5 ppmv.

  3. Marketing Remote Sensing Data for North Pacific Fisheries Development and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Fish poaching, drug trafficking, ocean dumping, and other illegal activities are important problems on the high seas and in national economic zones. The primary thrust of the EOCAP II project, "Marketing Remote Sensing Data for North Pacific Fisheries Development and Management", was to use space-based sensors to improve the effectiveness of marine monitoring, control, and surveillance (MCS). Our initial objectives were to concentrate on the development of MCS tools using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometry (AVHRR) and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. Although we have successfully completed development of an initial version of our SAR-based monitoring tool (OmniVision), project activity has resulted in a much broader application of space-based assets to marine applications. Based in part on work commenced within EOCAP II, a new company, Ocean and Coastal Environmental Sensing, Inc. (OCENS), has been launched and the development of several new software products outside of the MCS arena initiated. One of those products, SeaStation, is near completion with a Fall, 1995 release date. Equity investment in OCENS now totals $70,000-with an additional amount being sought in the first round of financing. One of the pre-eminent objectives of EOCAP II is to make contributions to the US economy and job growth through the expansion of commercial uses of remotely sensed data. OCENS and the software products it is introducing into marine and coastal zone markets responds to this primary object*e. EOCAP II funding leveraged the market and technical know-how of OCENS founders into smart products that benefit marine and coastal zone users. Although technical difficulties and geopolitical shifts damaged the commercial feasibility of initial project objectives, the flexibility of the EOCAP II program now permits long-term business success. This in no small part stems from the fact that the EOCAP program recognizes the realities of small and start-up businesses and does not

  4. AFSC/NMML: Shore-based counts of the Eastern North Pacific gray whale stock from central California, 1967 - 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has conducted shore-based counts of the Eastern North Pacific stock of gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) 26 years from...

  5. Fishery of the Green Jack Caranx caballus (Osteichytes: Carangidae in Las Perlas Archipelago, Pacific Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Mair

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Green Jacks, Caranx caballus, are distributed along the Eastern Pacific coast. In Panama, C. caballus was heavily fished around Las Perlas Archipelago to sustain local markets until 2007, when the archipelago was declared a marine protected area. This first study in Panama, analyzed a sample of 4 990 individuals from Las Perlas, obtained monthly from June 2005 to June 2006, from landings at the central fish market. Average total length was 36.1±6.4cm and optimum length 38.9cm. Approximately 68% of fish lengths were within ±10% of the optimal length but only six (15% were considered mega-spawners. The von Bertalanffy parameters describe a long-lived and fast growing species, while mortality rates revealed that C. caballus is under high fishing pressure. Standard length at which half of the population is mature was 38.8cm, and the size at which individuals matured massively, 33cm. Only 10-13% of the fish were immature. C. caballus reproduces two to three times per year, with peaks in December, April, and probably September, and recruits to the population at least twice per year. Catch per unit effort (CPUE was best predicted by minimum annual values of the Multivariate ENSO/ LNSO Index (MEI (R²=0.54. Results show that C. caballus in Pacific Panama is overfished. We recommend the raising of the minimum capture/landing size of this species in order to increase the proportion of megaspawners in the population and guarantee the sustainability of this resource.

  6. 76 FR 29718 - Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; American Samoa Longline Gear Modifications To Reduce Turtle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... bigeye tunas. The fishery also takes wahoo, oilfish, blue marlin, blue sharks, and other pelagic fish... turtles (Chelonia mydas), which are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Most of...

  7. 78 FR 32628 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    .... Fishery Community Engagement i. Hawaii High School Summer Course ii. Engagement with communities a... Resource Adaptation 7. Law and Policy for Climate Change Impacts 8. Other Business A. First...

  8. Mechanisms for the cooling of the central eastern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunlei; Allan, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The sea surface temperature variation over the Central Eastern Pacific (CEP) controls the global mean surface temperature variation (Kosaka and Xie, 2013). The regional cooling over CEP is directly linked to the surface warming slowdown in last twenty years. It is important to understand the mechanisms of the CEP cooling in the warming climate in order to have a robust prediction of the future climate change. Previous studies showed the CEP cooling is related to the pronounced strengthening in Pacific trade winds over the past two decades, which is sufficient to account for the cooling of the CEP and a substantial slowdown in surface warming through increased subsurface ocean heat uptake in the Pacific shallow overturning cells and equatorial upwelling in the CEP (England et al., 2014). By analysing the cloud data, Zhou et al. (2016) showed the increase of the lower cloud cover (LCC) over the CEP area contributed to the cooling, resulting in positive local feedback and negative global feedback. Using the data from observations, ERA-Interim reanalysis and atmospheric climate simulations, our study shows that the increasing Latent Heat (LH) also plays an important role in the CEP cooling (Liu et al., 2015). After the sensitivity test using the bulk formula, it showed that both wind and total column water vapour content contribute to the cooling trends of the SST in CEP. The observed trends of the wind and LH in CEP also confirmed this. England et al. (2014) Recent intensification of wind-driven circulation in the Pacific and the ongoing warming hiatus, Nat. Clim. Change, 4, 222-227, doi:10.1038/nclimate2106. Kosaka, Y., and S. P. Xie (2013), Recent global-warming hiatus tied to equatorial Pacific surface cooling, Nature, 501, 403-407, doi:10.1038/nature12534. Liu et al. (2015) Combining satellite observations and reanalysis energy transports to estimate global net surface energy fluxes 1985-2012. J. Geophys. Res. , Atmospheres. ISSN 2169-8996 doi: 10.1002/2015JD

  9. Long-term ecosystem change in the western North Pacific inferred from commercial fisheries and top predator diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezaki, Shiroh; Kiyota, Masashi; Okamura, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Assessment of the current status of marine ecosystems is necessary for the sustainable utilization of ecosystem services through fisheries and other human activities under changing environmental conditions. Understanding of historical changes in marine ecosystems can help us to assess their current status. In this study, we analyzed Japanese commercial fishery catch data and scientific survey data of the diet of northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus, NFS) to investigate potential long-term ecosystem changes in the western North Pacific Ocean off northeastern Japan over the past 60 years. Total commercial catches experienced peaks around 1960 and during the 1980s, decreasing to low levels around 1970 and after 1990. Catches were substantively impacted by the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in 2011. Species composition of the commercial catch changed over time, resulting in changes in the mean trophic level (MTL) of the catches. Trends in observed commercial catches were affected by many factors, including species population fluctuations potentially related to large-scale environmental shifts, migration and distribution patterns of species related to local oceanography, changes in fishing technology, and the introduction of fishery management frameworks. The composition of NFS diet also changed over time: although overall changes were small, MTL derived from NFS stomach contents declined from the early 1970s to the late 1980s. This fall in the MTL of the diet of NFS is suggestive of a shift in pelagic fish fauna from a "mackerel-dominant regime" to a "sardine-dominant regime". Inconsistencies between changes in species composition and MTLs of the commercial catch and NFS diet resulted from differences in commercial fishing targeting and NFS foraging behavior strategies. Although commercial catch is a valuable source of information for investigating historical changes in fisheries, biological resources, and ecosystems, catch data should be interpreted carefully and

  10. 75 FR 80041 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings and Hearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    .... Meetings and Hearings January 18-21, 2011: The Salmon Technical Team (STT) will meet at the Pacific Council..., 2011: The STT will meet at the Pacific Council office in a public work session to draft ``Preseason... contained in the STT meeting agendas may come before the STT for discussion, those issues may not be the...

  11. Evaluation of the Contribution of Fall Chinook Salmon Reared at Columbia River Hatcheries to the Pacific Salmon Fisheries, 1989 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vreeland, Robert R.

    1989-10-01

    In 1979 this study was initiated to determine the distribution, contribution, and value of artificially propagated fall chinook salmon from the Columbia River. Coded wire tagging (CWT) of hatchery fall chinook salmon began in 1979 with the 1978 brood and was completed in 1982 with the 1981 brood of fish at rearing facilities on the Columbia River system. From 18 to 20 rearing facilities were involved in the study each brood year. Nearly 14 million tagged fish, about 4% of the production, were released as part of this study over the four years, 1979 through 1982. Sampling for recoveries of these tagged fish occurred from 1980 through 1986 in the sport and commercial marine fisheries from Alaska through California, Columbia River fisheries, and returns to hatcheries and adjacent streams. The National Marine Fisheries Service coordinated this study among three fishery agencies: US Fish and Wildfire Service, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fisheries. The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution, fishery contribution, survival, and value of the production of fall chinook salmon from each rearing facility on the Columbia River system to Pacific coast salmon fisheries. To achieve these objectives fish from each hatchery were given a distinctive CWT. 81 refs., 20 figs., 68 tabs.

  12. 77 FR 58813 - Western Pacific Fisheries; Approval of a Marine Conservation Plan for American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... bottomfish fleet; 13. Promoting American Samoa as a premier sport fishing destination by holding annual sport... abundance surveys in Pala lagoon; 24. Assessing the health and quality of juvenile reef fish habitat; 25. Assessing the health and quality of mangrove habitat in Nuuuli and Leone; and 26. Enhancing fisheries GIS...

  13. 78 FR 49258 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Special Coral Reef Ecosystem Fishing Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... Coral Reef Ecosystem Fishing Permit AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic... assessment; request for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS proposes to issue a Special Coral Reef Ecosystem Fishing Permit that would authorize Kampachi Farms, LLC, to culture and harvest a coral reef ecosystem management...

  14. 78 FR 66683 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Special Coral Reef Ecosystem Fishing Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... Coral Reef Ecosystem Fishing Permit AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic... assessment and finding of no significant impact for the issuance of a special coral reef ecosystem fishing permit. SUMMARY: NMFS issued a Special Coral Reef Ecosystem Fishing Permit that authorizes Kampachi Farms...

  15. 75 FR 51741 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Halibut and Sablefish Individual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... CFR Part 679 Docket No. 0906041011-91012-01 RIN 0648-AX91 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off... efficient use of these species as supported by National Standard 5. The intended effect is to promote the... March 15, 1995. The IFQ Program is designed to maintain the social character and economic benefits...

  16. 76 FR 39858 - Western Pacific Fisheries; Approval of a Marine Conservation Plan for Guam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ..., including support for long-term habitat assessment and monitoring of Guam coral reef flat communities... Marine Conservation Plan for Guam AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... approval of a marine conservation plan for Guam. DATES: This agency decision is effective from June...

  17. 75 FR 8820 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... changes to trip limits implemented for sablefish during 2009 and analysis of the effects that changes to... sensitive or protected information. NMFS will accept anonymous comments (enter N/A in the required fields..., recommend inseason adjustments to commercial fisheries to liberalize trip limits in order to allow...

  18. 76 FR 11381 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... will remain in effect for the start of the 2011 fisheries (e.g., January-February 2010 trip limits... information. NMFS will accept anonymous comments (enter N/A in the required fields, if you wish to remain... are in effect at the end of the previous biennial fishing period will remain in effect until they...

  19. 75 FR 56903 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Limited Access for Guided Sport Charter Vessels in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... charter vessels in IPHC Areas 2C and 3A. The intent of the program was to curtail growth of fishing... to NMFS for improving the process of developing fisheries management regulations. These comments did... number of angler endorsements assigned to a charter halibut permit reduces the potential for profit from...

  20. 77 FR 60637 - Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; Revised Limits on Sea Turtle Interactions in the Hawaii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... may be to provide positive benefits to non-target stocks. For example, the reduction in regulatory.... NMFS must consider the negative economic impacts on the fishery to increased levels of sea turtle take... could be taken advantage of quite easily if requirements or punishment were lacking. Response:...

  1. 75 FR 554 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Limited Access for Guided Sport Charter Vessels in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... A comprehensive history of management of the guided sport fishery for halibut was presented in the... IPHC regulations at section 25 of the annual management measures specify the legal gear for sport... IPHC regulations at section 28 of the annual management measures establish sport fishing rules...

  2. 77 FR 75570 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... implemented, and recent years' escapement data for each stock. It also includes summary statistics documenting... the Alaska Board of Fisheries (Board) process is based on the ``best available politics,'' is ad hoc... to the regional economy. The Council and NMFS determined that Amendment 12 will not change the...

  3. 78 FR 17884 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Greater Than...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ... from responding to the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the closure of... Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-P...

  4. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific with 1 meter resolution in GeoTIFF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf, and slope environments of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific....

  5. CRED Simrad em300 multibeam backscatter data of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in GeoTIFF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Jarvis Atoll, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific. These...

  6. CRED Simrad em300 multibeam backscatter data from shelf and slope environments at Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in netCDF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. These data provide coverage between...

  7. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data from the lagoon and shelf environments at Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in GeoTIFF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the lagoon and shelf environments at Kingman Reef, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific. These...

  8. CRED Simrad em300 multibeam backscatter data of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in netCDF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific. These...

  9. CRED Simrad em300 multibeam backscatter data from Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in netCDF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf, and slope environments of Kingman Reef, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific....

  10. Subtropical Air-Sea Interaction and Development of Central Pacific El Ni(n)o

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ruihuang; HUANG Fei; REN Hongli

    2013-01-01

    The standard deviation of the central Pacific sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) during the period from October to February shows that the central Pacific SSTA variation is primarily due to the occurrence of the Central Pacific El Ni(n)o (CP-El Ni(n)o)and has a connection with the subtropical air-sea interaction in the northeastern Pacific.After removing the influence of the Eastern Pacific El Ni(n)o,an S-EOF analysis is conducted and the leading mode shows a clear seasonal SSTA evolving from the subtropical northeastern Pacific to the tropical central Pacific with a quasi-biennial period.The initial subtropical SSTA is generated by the wind speed decrease and surface heat flux increase due to a north Pacific anomalous cyclone.Such subtropical SSTA can further influence the establishment of the SSTA in the tropical central Pacific via the wind-evaporation-SST (WES) feedback.After established,the central equatorial Pacific SSTA can be strengthened by the zonal advective feedback and thermocline feedback,and develop into CP-El Ni(n)o.However,as the thermocline feedback increases the SSTA cooling after the mature phase,the heat flux loss and the reversed zonal advective feedback can cause the phase transition of CP-El Ni(n)o.Along with the wind stress variability,the recharge (discharge) process occurs in the central (eastern) equatorial Pacific and such a process causes the phase consistency between the thermocline depth and SST anomalies,which presents a contrast to the original recharge/discharge theory.

  11. Postrelease survival, vertical and horizontal movements, and thermal habitats of five species of pelagic sharks in the central Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musyl, Michael K.; Brill, Richard W.; Curran, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    and the current study (n=78 reporting PSATs) indicated that the summary effect of postrelease mortality for blue sharks was 15% (95% CI, 8.5-25.1%) and suggested that catch-and-release in longline fisheries can be a viable management tool to protect parental biomass in shark populations. Pelagic sharks displayed......]) in the central Pacific Ocean to determine speciesspecific movement patterns and survival rates after release from longline fishing gear. Only a single postrelease mortality could be unequivocally documented: a male blue shark which succumbed seven days after release. Meta-analysis of published reports...... species-specific depth and temperature ranges, although with significant individual temporal and spatial variability in vertical movement patterns, which were also punctuated by stochastic events (e.g., El Nino-Southern Oscillation). Pelagic species can be separated into three broad groups based...

  12. Postrelease survival, vertical and horizontal movements, and thermal habitats of five species of pelagic sharks in the central Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musyl, Michael K.; Brill, Richard W.; Curran, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    From 2001 to 2006, 71 pop-up satellite archival tags (PSATs) were deployed on five species of pelagic shark (blue shark [Prionace glauca]; shortfin mako [Isurus oxyrinchus]; silky shark [Carcharhinus falciformis]; oceanic whitetip shark [C. longimanus]; and bigeye thresher [Alopias superciliosus......]) in the central Pacific Ocean to determine speciesspecific movement patterns and survival rates after release from longline fishing gear. Only a single postrelease mortality could be unequivocally documented: a male blue shark which succumbed seven days after release. Meta-analysis of published reports...... and the current study (n=78 reporting PSATs) indicated that the summary effect of postrelease mortality for blue sharks was 15% (95% CI, 8.5-25.1%) and suggested that catch-and-release in longline fisheries can be a viable management tool to protect parental biomass in shark populations. Pelagic sharks displayed...

  13. 77 FR 65837 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Reallocation of Pacific Cod in the Bering...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... from responding to the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the reallocation.... Lindsay Fullenkamp, Acting Deputy Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine...

  14. An ecosystem services perspective for the oceanic eastern tropical Pacific: commercial fisheries, carbon storage, recreational fishing, and biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer Lynn Martin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The ocean provides ecosystem services (ES that support humanity. Traditional single-issue management largely failed to protect the full suite of ES. Ecosystem-based management (EBM promotes resilient social-ecological systems that provide ES. To implement EBM, an ES approach is useful: 1 characterize major ES provided (magnitude, geographic extent, monetary value, trends, and stakeholders, 2 identify trade-offs, 3 determine desired outcomes, and 4 manage anthropogenic activities accordingly. Here we apply the ES approach (steps 1-2 to an open ocean ecosystem, the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP, an area of 21 million km2 that includes waters of 12 nations and the oceanic commons, using 35 years (1975-2010 of fisheries and economic data, and 20 years (1986-2006 of ship-based survey data. We examined commercial fisheries, carbon storage, biodiversity, and recreational fishing as the major provisioning, regulating, supporting, and cultural ES, respectively. Average catch value (using U.S. import prices for fish for the 10 most commercially fished species was $2.7 billion yr-1. The value of carbon export to the deep ocean was $12.9 billion yr-1 (using average European carbon market prices. For two fisheries-depleted dolphin populations, the potential value of rebuilding carbon stores was $1.6 million (cumulative; for exploited fish stocks it was also $1.6 million (an estimated reduction of 544,000 mt. Sport fishing expenditures totaled $1.2 billion yr-1, from studies of three popular destinations. These initial, conservative estimates do not represent a complete summary of ETP ES values. We produced species richness maps for cetaceans, seabirds, and ichthyoplankton, and a sightings density map for marine turtles. Over 1/3 of cetacean, seabird, and marine turtle species occur in the ETP, and diversity (or density hotspots are widespread. This study fills several gaps in the assessment of marine and coastal ES by focusing on an oceanic habitat

  15. Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The North Pacific Fishery Management Council adopted the Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Program (Rockfish Program) on June 14, 2010, to replace the expiring Pilot...

  16. Growth and mortality rates of yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares (Perciformes: Scombridae, in the eastern and central Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoping Zhu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Age and growth parameters were estimated for the yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares (Bonnaterre, 1788. Atotal of 443 individuals were sampled from China longline fisheries in the eastern and central Pacific Ocean from February to November 2006. The von Bertalanffy growth parameters were estimated at L∞ = 175.9 cm fork length, k = 0.52 year-1, and t0 = 0.19 year. The total mortality rate (Z was estimated to be from 1.19 to 1.93 year-1, the fishing mortality (F and the natural mortality (M were calculated to be 0.91 year-1 and 0.65 year-1, respectively. The rate of exploitation (U was estimated to be 0.46. This study provides estimates of growth and mortality rate for yellowfin tuna in the eastern and central Pacific Ocean, which may be used as biological input parameters in future stock assessments for the oceanic region. However, age analysis with other techniques, additional validation of the size composition and stock structure are also needed.

  17. 76 FR 14367 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and Accountability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and Accountability Measures AGENCY: National Marine... ecosystem plans (FEPs) to establish a mechanism for specifying annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability... would apply to determine an acceptable biological catch limit. These control rules would account...

  18. 77 FR 23654 - Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; Modification of American Samoa Large Vessel Prohibited Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ...-Rulemaking Portal www.regulations.gov ; or Mail: Michael D. Tosatto, Regional Administrator, NMFS, Pacific... or the Council, 1164 Bishop St., Suite 1400, Honolulu, HI 96813, tel 808-522-8220, fax 808-522-8226... Swain's Island and one around Tutuila, the Manua Islands, and Rose Atoll (67 FR 4369, January 30,...

  19. 75 FR 52921 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish; Management Measures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... ; or Mail: Mail written comments to Michael D. Tosatto, Acting Regional Administrator, NMFS, Pacific... information, and is available from www.regulations.gov and from the Council, 1164 Bishop St., Suite 1400...: This document is also available at www.gpoaccess.gov/fr . Fishing for pelagic armorhead is...

  20. 75 FR 51237 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish; Management Measures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... to Michael D. Tosatto, Acting Regional Administrator, NMFS, Pacific Islands Region (PIR), 1601..., 1164 Bishop St., Suite 1400, Honolulu, HI 96813, tel 808- 522-8220, fax 808-522-8226, or web site www.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This document is also available at www.gpoaccess.gov/fr . Fishing for...

  1. Implications of new economic policy instruments for tuna management in the Western and Central Pacific

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeeting, A.D.; Bush, S.R.; Ram-Bidesi, V.; Bailey, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Tuna management in the Western and Central Pacific is complicated by the conflicting interests of countries and agents exploiting tuna resources in the region. Historically, regulatory attempts by Pacific Island Countries to control fishing effort within their Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) have me

  2. Distribution characteristics of co-rich manganese deposits on a seamount in the central Pacific Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Yamazaki, T.; Sharma, R.

    Distribution characteristics of cobalt-rich manganese deposits were evaluated from stereo photographs and video data on a seamount in the central Pacific Ocean by image analysis, photogrammetric technique, and visual observations. The results show...

  3. CRED 1 meter resolution Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Wake Island, West Central Pacific, 2007.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.These data provide coverage between 0 and 200m meters. The...

  4. CRED 10 m Gridded multibeam bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry shelf, bank and slope environments of Wake Island, West Central Pacific, under joint management of the United States Dept. of Interior and Air...

  5. CRED 60 m Gridded multibeam bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry shelf, bank and slope environments of Wake Island, West Central Pacific, under joint management of the United States Dept. of Interior and Air...

  6. Constant harvest rate for the Pacific sardine (Sardinops caeruleus) fishery in the Gulf of California based on catchability-at-length estimations

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Constant harvest rate as a management strategy for the Pacific sardine (Sardinops caeruleus) fishery in the Gulf of California is supported by an analysis of variations in the catchability coefficient (q), stock abundance and commercial catch. Catchability was analyzed based on population length-structured data standard length (SL), expressed as CPUE, for 26 fishing seasons (1972-1973 to 1997-1998). We used a deterministic model of catchability to estimate the catchability-at-length assuming ...

  7. Helium isotopes in ferromanganese crusts from the central Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S.; Stuart, F.M.; Klemm, V.; Korschinek, G.; Knie, K.; Hein, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Helium isotopes have been measured in samples of two ferromanganese crusts (VA13/2 and CD29-2) from the central Pacific Ocean. With the exception of the deepest part of crust CD29-2 the data can be explained by a mixture of implanted solar- and galactic cosmic ray-produced (GCR) He, in extraterrestrial grains, and radiogenic He in wind-borne continental dust grains. 4He concentrations are invariant and require retention of less than 12% of the in situ He produced since crust formation. Loss has occurred by recoil and diffusion. High 4He in CD29-2 samples older than 42 Ma are correlated with phosphatization and can be explained by retention of up to 12% of the in situ-produced 4He. 3He/4He of VA13/2 samples varies from 18.5 to 1852 Ra due almost entirely to variation in the extraterrestrial He contribution. The highest 3He/4He is comparable to the highest values measured in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and micrometeorites (MMs). Helium concentrations are orders of magnitude lower than in oceanic sediments reflecting the low trapping efficiency for in-falling terrestrial and extraterrestrial grains of Fe-Mn crusts. The extraterrestrial 3He concentration of the crusts rules out whole, undegassed 4–40 μm diameter IDPs as the host. Instead it requires that the extraterrestrial He inventory is carried by numerous particles with significantly lower He concentrations, and occasional high concentration GCR-He-bearing particles.

  8. Satellite remote sensing of chlorophyll a concentration in the north Pacific Fishery%卫星遥感北太平洋渔场叶绿素a浓度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛志华; 朱乾坤; 龚芳

    2005-01-01

    Chlorophyll a concentration (Chla.) is a key to understand global biogeochemical cycles and to estimate ocean primary production which is the index of the fish food. The ocean regions with high Chla. provide the food condition of the convergence of the fish to become the candidate of the fishery centers. Chla. mainly decides the ocean optical properties in Case 1 waters and the satellite can measure the ocean radiances which are in a good relationship with Chla.. It has been proved that the ocean color satellites can really measure the Chla. of the ocean on the global scale. The Chla. distribution images are produced from satellite data and the accuracy of Chla. depends on inversion algorithms. The algorithms based on blue-green bands ratio are suitable to be used as operational algorithms to retrieve Chla. from the normalized water-leaving radiances for Case 1 waters. Two inversion models of Chla. are established on thousands of global in situ measurement data. The average relative errors of the Chla. retrievals of the two models are 36.4% and 38.5% respectively. Many factors can affect the accuracy of Chla. retrievals, including the conditions of atmosphere, ocean and instruments. Since the blue-green ratio algorithms are the localized algorithms which are based on a large amount of in situ measurements, a lot of measurements should be taken in the north Pacific Fishery regions to improve the accuracy of the algorithms. The algorithms are seriously affected by the in situ data, both the ocean optical parameters and the Chla. should be carefully measured with some nice instruments. A Chla. distribution map was generated from a month of Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) data by the fusion techniques. The average of satellite-measured Chla. is 0.192 mg·m-3 in the whole north Pacific Fishery which is higher than ship-measured value with the average of 0.13 mg·m-3. The difference is mainly caused by th edifferent regions for the satellite measures of

  9. Fossil Overlapping Spreading Centre in the Central Pacific at the Trace of the Pacific-Cocos-Nazca Triple Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschede, M.; Barckhausen, U.; Weinrebe, W.; Engels, M.

    2005-12-01

    The Central Pacific region between 125° W/5° N and 110° W/10° S which contains the "plate tectonic mirror image" to the region of the Cocos plate currently being subducted beneath Central America has been the target of an investigation using multibeam bathymetry, magnetics and gravity. One of the main points of interest was the formation of the triple junction of Pacific, Cocos and Nacza plates in the Late Oligocene/Early Miocene (around 24 Myrs). This event indicates the breakup of the Farallon plate on the eastern side of the East-Pacific-Rise into Cocos and Nazca plates. At this time the first Cocos-Nazca spreading centre (CNS-1) a precursor of the currently active spreading centre (CNS-3) between Cocos and Nazca plates was initiated. The breakup process is a result of changing spreading directions caused by global changes in plate movement directions. This is documented in the area of investigation in the Central Pacific in changes in the strike direction of magnetic lineations from north to south and morphological structures of the seafloor. Irregularities in the magnetic lineation pattern in a small area in the centre of the investigation area and curved morphological structures on the oceanic seafloor are interpreted in terms of remnants of a fossil overlapping spreading centre. The overlapping spreading centre was formed as a consequence of shiftings in the spreading axis which subsequently are straightened out by processes like the one described.

  10. 78 FR 73110 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch in the Bering Sea...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    .... Mail: Submit written comments to Glenn Merrill, Assistant Regional Administrator, Sustainable Fisheries.... Fax: Address written comments to Glenn Merrill, Assistant Regional Administrator, Sustainable... from responding to the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the opening...

  11. Investigation of plastic debris ingestion by four species of sea turtles collected as bycatch in pelagic Pacific longline fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clukey, Katherine E.; Lepczyk, Christopher A.; Balazs, George H.; Work, Thierry M.; Lynch, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    Ingestion of marine debris is an established threat to sea turtles. The amount, type, color and location of ingested plastics in the gastrointestinal tracts of 55 sea turtles from Pacific longline fisheries from 2012 to 2016 were quantified, and compared across species, turtle length, body condition, sex, capture location, season and year. Six approaches for quantifying amounts of ingested plastic strongly correlated with one another and included: number of pieces, mass, volume and surface area of plastics, ratio of plastic mass to body mass, and percentage of the mass of gut contents consisting of plastic. All olive ridley (n = 37), 90% of green (n = 10), 80% of loggerhead (n = 5) and 0% of leatherback (n = 3) turtles had ingested plastic; green turtles ingested significantly more than olive ridleys. Most debris was in the large intestines. No adverse health impacts (intestinal lesions, blockage, or poor body condition) due directly to plastic ingestion were noted.

  12. 76 FR 17811 - Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; Prohibiting Purse Seine Fishing in the U.S. EEZ Around Guam...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... troll fishery is vulnerable to potential catch competition and gear conflicts with the growing CNMI... this proposed rule. Although more recent troll, longline, and purse seine fishery information has... the CNMI pelagic fishery. CNMI's troll fleet consists primarily of vessels shorter than 24 ft (7.3...

  13. Vertical structure variability and equatorial waves during central Pacific and eastern Pacific El Ninos in a coupled general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewitte, B.; Thual, S. [LEGOS/IRD, Toulouse (France); Choi, J.; An, S.I. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Recent studies report that two types of El Nino events have been observed. One is the cold tongue El Nino or Eastern Pacific El Nino (EP El Nino), which is characterized by relatively large sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the eastern Pacific, and the other is the warm pool El Nino (a.k.a. 'Central Pacific El Nino' (CP El Nino) or 'El Nino Modoki'), in which SST anomalies are confined to the central Pacific. Here the vertical structure variability of the periods during EP and CP is investigated based on the GFDL{sub C}M2.1 model in order to explain the difference in equatorial wave dynamics and associated negative feedback mechanisms. It is shown that the mean stratification in the vicinity of the thermocline of the central Pacific is reduced during CP El Nino, which favours the contribution of the gravest baroclinic mode relatively to the higher-order slower baroclinic mode. Energetic Kelvin and first-meridional Rossby wave are evidenced during the CP El Nino with distinctive amplitude and propagating characteristics according to their vertical structure (mostly first and second baroclinic modes). In particular, the first baroclinic mode during CP El Nino is associated to the ocean basin mode and participates to the recharge process during the whole El Nino cycle, whereas the second baroclinic mode is mostly driving the discharge process through the delayed oscillator mechanism. This may explain that the phase transition from warm to neutral/cold conditions during the CP El Nino is delayed and/or disrupted compared to the EP El Nino. Our results have implications for the interpretation of the variability during periods of high CP El Nino occurrence like the last decade. (orig.)

  14. The Role of the Halted Baroclinic Mode at the Central Equatorial Pacific in El Ni(n)o Event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The role of halted "baroclinic modes" in the central equatorial Pacific is analyzed. It is found that dominant anomaly signals corresponding to "baroclinic modes" occur in the upper layer of the equatorial Pacific, in a two-and-a-half layer oceanic model, in assimilated results of a simple OGCM and in the ADCP observation of TAO. A second "baroclinic mode" is halted in the central equatorial Pacific corresponding to a positive SST anomaly while the first "baroclinic mode" propagates eastwards in the eastern equatorial Pacific. The role of the halted second "baroclinic mode" in the central equatorial Pacific is explained by a staged ocean-atmosphere interaction mechanism in the formation of El Ni(n)o: the westerly bursts in boreal winter over the western equatorial Pacific generate the halted second "baroclinic mode" in the central equatorial Pacific, leading to the increase of heat content and temperature in the upper layer of the central Pacific which induces the shift of convection from over the western equatorial Pacific to the central equatorial Pacific; another wider, westerly anomaly burst is induced over the western region of convection above the central equatorial Pacific and the westerly anomaly burst generates the first "baroclinic mode"propagating to the eastern equatorial Pacific, resulting in a warm event in the eastern equatorial Pacific.The mechanism presented in this paper reveals that the central equatorial Pacific is a key region in detecting the possibility of ENSO and, by analyzing TAO observation data of ocean currents and temperature in the central equatorial Pacific, in predicting the coming of an El Ni(n)o several months ahead.

  15. On the Impact of Local Feedbacks in the Central Pacific on the ENSO Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Gerrit; van Oldenborgh, Geert Jan

    2003-07-01

    While sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the eastern equatorial Pacific are dominated by the thermocline feedback, in the central equatorial Pacific local wind effects, such as zonal advection, are important as well. El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) simulations with a linear model improve markedly if these effects are included as a local wind stress feedback on SST. An atmosphere model that reacts both to eastern and central Pacific SST anomalies is needed for producing a realistic ENSO cycle.First, simulations are studied of a linear 1.5-layer reduced-gravity ocean model and a linear SST anomaly equation, forced by observed monthly wind stress. If only the thermocline feedback is present in the SST equation, SST can be simulated well in the eastern Pacific, but, contrary to observations, central Pacific SST is out of phase with the eastern Pacific. If a wind stress feedback is added in the SST equation, as a term proportional to the zonal wind stress, correlations between observed and simulated SST are above 0.8 in both the central and eastern Pacific, and the correlation between the Niño-3 (5°S-5°N, 90°-150°W) and Niño-4 (5°S-5°N, 150°W-160°E) indexes is close to the observed value of 0.75.Next, a statistical atmosphere is added to the ocean module that is based on a regression of observed wind stress to the observed Niño-3 and Niño-4 indexes. The coupled system is driven by noise that is inferred from the residues of the fit and has a red component. The observed Niño-3-Niño-4 index correlation can be reproduced only with a wind stress feedback in the central Pacific. Also, the level of SST variability rises and the ENSO period increases to more realistic values.The interplay between the local wind stress and the thermocline feedbacks, therefore, is an important factor in the structure of ENSO in the coupled linear model. In the eastern Pacific, the thermocline feedback dominates SST anomalies; in the central Pacific, the local wind

  16. Parasites as valuable stock markers for fisheries in Australasia, East Asia and the Pacific Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, R J G; Moore, B R

    2015-01-01

    Over 30 studies in Australasia, East Asia and the Pacific Islands region have collected and analysed parasite data to determine the ranges of individual fish, many leading to conclusions about stock delineation. Parasites used as biological tags have included both those known to have long residence times in the fish and those thought to be relatively transient. In many cases the parasitological conclusions have been supported by other methods especially analysis of the chemical constituents of otoliths, and to a lesser extent, genetic data. In analysing parasite data, authors have applied multiple different statistical methodologies, including summary statistics, and univariate and multivariate approaches. Recently, a growing number of researchers have found non-parametric methods, such as analysis of similarities and cluster analysis, to be valuable. Future studies into the residence times, life cycles and geographical distributions of parasites together with more robust analytical methods will yield much important information to clarify stock structures in the area.

  17. The morphology and structure of the Hannibal Bank fisheries management zone, Pacific Panama using acoustic seabed mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Sarah; Guzman, Hector M; Bates, Richard

    2013-12-01

    The Hannibal Bank sits within the Coiba UNESCO World Heritage Site in Pacific Panama and is also a fisheries management zone. Despite the protected status of the area and the importance of the Bank for commercial fish species such as snapper and tuna, the seamount has received no detailed survey except some collection of organisms. This study mapped the major topographic features and complexity of the Hannibal Bank seamount using acoustic remote sensing. A survey area of around 125 km2 was defined using existing charts and side-scan sonar data were collected during July 2008. A bathymetric output was imported to ArcGIS where a digital bathymetric model and slope map were created. The Benthic Terrain Modeler (BTM) extension for ArcGIS was used to calculate bathymetric position index and rugosity, and used to create a map of zones representing the various seabed morphology zones. The Hannibal bank is an elongated, triangular guyot (flat topped seamount), which ranges in depth from 53m to 416m, covers an area of 76 km2 and is 14.4 km long and 7.1 km wide. Hannibal bank is composed of steep slopes, more gentle slopes, top of the seamount, crests (elevated ridges at the top of the pinnacles), rugose areas (on crests, top of seamount and slope), gullies and pinnacles. The bank is asymmetric in nature with the Northerly side having a relatively gentle slope with gullies across the surface compared to the SouthWest side which is far steeper and more rugose. There are two pinnacles to the North and South East of the bank that range in depth from 180 to 333 m. Rocky substrate makes up 22.6 km2 of the bank and sediment 37.8 km2. The bank and its steeply sided, rugose areas and pinnacles provide upright structures which can disrupt and topographically enhance currents, increasing productivity. The rugose areas of Hannibal Bank should be primary targets for further research efforts as they may contain corals and their rugosity indicates that these should be some of the highest

  18. 50 CFR 665.600 - PRIA bottomfish fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PRIA bottomfish fisheries. 665.600 Section 665.600 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Pacific Remote Island...

  19. 50 CFR 665.640 - PRIA crustacean fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PRIA crustacean fisheries. 665.640 Section 665.640 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Pacific Remote Island...

  20. 50 CFR 665.660 - PRIA precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PRIA precious coral fisheries. 665.660 Section 665.660 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Pacific...

  1. Pacific Decadal Variability and Central Pacific Warming El Niño in a Changing Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Lorenzo, Emanuele [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-02-27

    This research aimed at understanding the dynamics controlling decadal variability in the Pacific Ocean and its interactions with global-scale climate change. The first goal was to assess how the dynamics and statistics of the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the modes of Pacific decadal variability are represented in global climate models used in the IPCC. The second goal was to quantify how decadal dynamics are projected to change under continued greenhouse forcing, and determine their significance in the context of paleo-proxy reconstruction of long-term climate.

  2. Identifying Pelagic Habitat Hotspots of Neon Flying Squid in the Temperate Waters of the Central North Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene D Alabia

    Full Text Available We identified the pelagic habitat hotspots of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii in the central North Pacific from May to July and characterized the spatial patterns of squid aggregations in relation to oceanographic features such as mesoscale oceanic eddies and the Transition Zone Chlorophyll-a Front (TZCF. The data used for the habitat model construction and analyses were squid fishery information, remotely-sensed and numerical model-derived environmental data from May to July 1999-2010. Squid habitat hotspots were deduced from the monthly Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt models and were identified as regions of persistent high suitable habitat across the 12-year period. The distribution of predicted squid habitat hotspots in central North Pacific revealed interesting spatial and temporal patterns likely linked with the presence and dynamics of oceanographic features in squid's putative foraging grounds from late spring to summer. From May to June, the inferred patches of squid habitat hotspots developed within the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition zone (KOTZ; 37-40°N and further expanded north towards the subarctic frontal zone (SAFZ; 40-44°N in July. The squid habitat hotspots within the KOTZ and areas west of the dateline (160°W-180° were likely influenced and associated with the highly dynamic and transient oceanic eddies and could possibly account for lower squid suitable habitat persistence obtained from these regions. However, predicted squid habitat hotspots located in regions east of the dateline (180°-160°W from June to July, showed predominantly higher squid habitat persistence presumably due to their proximity to the mean position of the seasonally-shifting TZCF and consequent utilization of the highly productive waters of the SAFZ.

  3. Liberalisation Reform, 'Neo-centralism', and Black Market: The Political Diseconomy of Lake Nasser Fishery Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Béné

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite its relatively modest importance, and the current difficulties faced by the government in implementing liberalisation in the rest of the country, the Egyptian governement decided to embark on a reform of the Lake Nasser fishery in the early 2000s. The objective of this article is to analyse the evolution of this reform from a political economy perspective. The paper looks retrospectively at the general context of the reform, describes the different institutional and economic changes that have resulted from its realisation, identifies how the distribution of power between the different actors has altered the course of its implementation, and finally assesses the outcomes of the reform. The analysis shows that, while some major institutional changes have taken place, those changes have had little to do with a 'liberalisation' as conventionally understood in neo-classical literature. Instead, the new status quo turns out to be one where the central government and its different parastatal agencies have managed to maintain their existing advantages. The failure to reform more thoroughly the system also led fishers and fish traders to engage in a large-scale black market activity in which a substantial amount of fish is smuggled through unofficial trade channels.

  4. Temporal and spatial trends in prey composition of wahoo Acanthocybium solandri: a diet analysis from the central North Pacific Ocean using visual and DNA bar-coding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyafuso, Z S; Toonen, R J; Franklin, E C

    2016-04-01

    A diet analysis was conducted on 444 wahoo Acanthocybium solandri caught in the central North Pacific Ocean longline fishery and a nearshore troll fishery surrounding the Hawaiian Islands from June to December 2014. In addition to traditional observational methods of stomach contents, a DNA bar-coding approach was integrated into the analysis by sequencing the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) region of the mtDNA genome to taxonomically identify individual prey items that could not be classified visually to species. For nearshore-caught A. solandri, juvenile pre-settlement reef fish species from various families dominated the prey composition during the summer months, followed primarily by Carangidae in autumn months. Gempylidae, Echeneidae and Scombridae were dominant prey taxa from the offshore fishery. Molidae was a common prey family found in stomachs collected north-east of the Hawaiian Archipelago while tetraodontiform reef fishes, known to have extended pelagic stages, were prominent prey items south-west of the Hawaiian Islands. The diet composition of A. solandri was indicative of an adaptive feeder and thus revealed dominant geographic and seasonal abundances of certain taxa from various ecosystems in the marine environment. The addition of molecular bar-coding to the traditional visual method of prey identifications allowed for a more comprehensive range of the prey field of A. solandri to be identified and should be used as a standard component in future diet studies.

  5. Add-on conservation benefits of marine territorial user rights fishery policies in central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelcich, Stefan; Godoy, Natalio; Prado, Luis; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2008-01-01

    To combine the rational use of marine benthic resources and economic development of small-scale fishers, Chile passed legislation in 1991 establishing a comanagement policy that grants exclusive territorial user rights for fisheries (TURFs) to artisanal fisher organizations in well-defined inshore coastal areas, known as Management and Exploitation Areas for Benthic Resources (MEABRs). In general the policy has been proclaimed a management and economic success because benthic resource abundances have increased inside MEABRs in comparison with open-access areas. However, there is a lack of studies assessing the impact of this management policy on nontargeted subtidal species and community assemblages and the policy's implications for biodiversity and conservation. This study starts to fill this gap and links the allocation of TURFs for benthic resources with add-on conservation benefits for species that are not directly linked with the fishery policy. Comparative subtidal surveys inside vs. outside MEABRs were used to assess the effects of three MEABRs on managed targeted benthic species, biodiversity (species richness), and community assemblages in central Chile. Surveys focused exclusively on subtidal kelp forest habitats dominated by Lessonia trabeculata, spanning 4-12 m in depth and with similar levels of habitat complexity. The study comprised: (1) quantification of kelp forest complexity, (2) understory survey of sessile species, (3) quantification of conspicuous benthic macroinvertebrates, including those under management, and (4) quantification of reef-fish species inside the kelp habitat. Results showed population enhancement of target-managed invertebrates inside MEABRs. Moreover, reef-fish species were significantly more diverse and abundant inside MEABRs, and community assemblages of nontarget benthic invertebrates and reef fish were significantly different inside vs. outside MEABRs. The comanagement of inshore benthic resources in Chile, through MEABRs

  6. Modeling a habitat suitability index for the eastern fall cohort of Ommastrephes bartramii in the central North Pacific Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xinjun; TIAN Siquan; LIU Bilin; CHEN Yong

    2011-01-01

    The eastern fall cohort of the neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii, has been commercially exploited by the Chinese squid jigging fleet in the central North Pacific Ocean since the late 1990s. To understand and identify their optimal habitat, we have developed a habitat suitability index (HSI) model using two potential important environmental variables - sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) - and fishery data from the main fishing ground (165°-180°E) during June and July of 1999-2003. A geometric mean model (GMM), minimum model (MM) and arithmetic weighted model (AWM) with different weights were compared and the best HSI model was selected using Akaike's information criterion (AIC). The performance of the developed HSI model was evaluated using fishery data for 2004. This study suggests that the highest catch per unit effort (CPUE) and fishing effort are closely related to SST and SSHA. The best SST- and SSHA-based suitability index (SI) regression models were SISST-bsed = 0.7SIeffort-SST + 0.3 SICPUE-SST, and SISSHA-based = 0.5SIeffon-SSHA + 0.5SICP,UE-SSHA,respectively, showing that fishing effort is more important than CPUE in the estimation of SI. The bestHSI model was the AWM, defined as HSI=0.3SISST-based+ 0.7SISSHA-based, indicating that SSHA is moreimportant than SST in estimating the HSI of squid. In 2004, monthly HSI values greater than 0.6 coincidedwith the distribution of productive fishing ground and high CPUE in June and July, suggesting that themodels perform well. The proposed model provides an important tool in our efforts to develop forecastingcapacity of squid spatial dynamics.

  7. Spatiotemporal variability in bigeye tuna ( Thunnus obesus) dive behavior in the central North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Evan A.; Hawn, Donald R.; Polovina, Jeffrey J.

    2010-07-01

    Data from 29 pop-up archival transmission (PAT) tags deployed on commercial-size bigeye tuna ( Thunnus obesus) in the central North Pacific Ocean from 4°N to 32°N were analyzed to describe variability in their dive behavior across space and time. During the day, bigeye tuna generally spent time in the 0-50 m and 300-400 m depth ranges, with spatial and temporal variability in the deep mode. At night, bigeye tuna generally inhabited the 0-100 m depth range. Three daily dive types were defined based on the percentage of time tuna spent in specific depth layers during the day. These three types were defined as shallow, intermediate, and deep and represented 24.4%, 18.8%, and 56.8% of the total number of days in the study, respectively. More shallow and intermediate dive-type behavior was found in the first half of the year, and in latitudes from 14°N to 16°N and north of 28°N. A greater amount of deep-dive behavior was found in the regions south of 10°N and between 18°N and 28°N during the third and fourth quarters of the year. Dive-type behavior also varied with oceanographic conditions, with more shallow and intermediate behavior found in colder surface waters. Intermediate and deep-dive types were pooled to reflect the depths where bigeye tuna may have potential interactions with fishing gear. A Generalized Additive Model was used to quantify the effects of time, space, and sea surface temperature on this pooled dive type. Results from the model showed that while latitude and quarter of the year were important parameters, sea surface temperature had the most significant effect on the pooled intermediate and deep-dive behavior. Model predictions indicated that the largest percentage of potential interaction would occur in the fourth quarter in the region from 18°N-20°N, which corresponds to the time and place of the highest bigeye tuna catch rates by the Hawaii-based long-line fishery. These results suggest that a model framework using these three

  8. [Species and size composition of fishes in Barra de Navidad lagoon, Mexican central Pacific].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sansón, Gaspar; Aguilar-Betancourt, Consuelo; Kosonoy-Aceves, Daniel; Lucano-Ramírez, Gabriela; Ruiz-Ramírez, Salvador; Flores-Ortega, Juan Ramón; Hinojosa-Larios, Angel; de Asís Silva-Bátiz, Francisco

    2014-03-01

    State, and it also constitutes the more complete reference on the detailed size composition of a set of dominant species in a coastal lagoon in the central Mexican Pacific.

  9. Distribution of dissolved zinc in the western and central subarctic North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Obata, H.; Gamo, T.

    2016-02-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient for bacteria and phytoplankton in the ocean as it plays an important role in numerous enzyme systems involved in various metabolic processes. However, large-scale distributions of total dissolved Zn in the subarctic North Pacific have not been investigated yet. In this study, we investigated the distributions of total dissolved Zn to understand biogeochemical cycling of Zn in the western and central subarctic North Pacific as a Japanese GEOTRACES project. Seawater samples were collected during the R/V Hakuho-maru KH-12-4 GEOTRACES GP 02 cruise (from August to October 2012), by using acid-cleaned Teflon-coated X-type Niskin samplers. Total dissolved Zn in seawater was determined using cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) after UV-digestion. In this study, total dissolved Zn concentrations in the western and central subarctic North Pacific commonly showed Zn increase from surface to approximately 400-500 m, just above the oxygen minimum layer. However, in the western subarctic North Pacific, relatively higher Zn concentrations have also been observed at intermediate depths (800-1200 m), in comparison with those observed in deep waters. The relationship between Zn and Si in the western subarctic North Pacific showed that Zn is slightly enriched at intermediate depths. These results may indicate that there are additional sources of Zn to intermediate water of the western subarctic North Pacific.

  10. 75 FR 52478 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... comments to Sue Salveson, Assistant Regional Administrator, Sustainable Fisheries Division, Alaska Region... it would prevent NMFS from responding to the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would...: 16 U.S.C. 1801 et seq. Dated: August 23, 2010. Carrie Selberg, Acting Director, Office of...

  11. 75 FR 42610 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XX54 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine...

  12. 76 FR 58720 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XA709 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine is limited...

  13. 76 FR 40836 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XA554 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine...

  14. 75 FR 59156 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XY79 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine is limited...

  15. 77 FR 50952 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XC166 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine...

  16. 78 FR 51097 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XC783 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine...

  17. Definition and characterization of data needs to describe the potential effects of increased atmospheric CO2 on marine fisheries from the northeast Pacific Ocean. [Theragra chalcogramma; Clupea harengus pallasi; Pandalus borealis; Limanda aspera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickland, R.M.; Grosse, D.J.; Stubin, A.I.; Ostrander, G.K.; Sibley, T.H.

    1985-12-01

    Four northeast Pacific region case study species were studied to determine individual fishery responses to climate change. These fishes (Alaska pollock, Theragra chalcogramma; Pacific herring, Clupea harengus pallasi; pink shrimp, Pandalus borealis; and yellowfin sole, Limanda aspera) represent a spectrum of habitats and life cycles among commercially important species, and the northeast Pacific (including the eastern Bering Sea) is relatively well-studied and representative of subpolar continental shelf areas that also are important in the North Atlantic. In addition to the general effects of climate, these fisheries have specific climate-related environmental sensitivities: (a) pollock sensitivity to ice extent, cannibalism, and bird and mammal predation in the Bering Sea, and to coastal currents in the Gulf of Alaska; (b) sensitivity of herring to waves, dessication, and probably currents in the immediate vicinity of discrete spawning beaches along the British Columbia coast; (c) the relative insensitivity of bottom-dwelling shrimp to temperature changes; and (d) the probable sensitivity of yellowfin sole to ice extent and to associated changes in food supply caused by alterations in plankton species composition. It is difficult to extrapolate from the results of the present case studies to other fisheries. These results are particularly inapplicable to other major categories of fisheries, including open-ocean, upwelling, and tropical and subtropical shelf fisheries. Such fisheries should be the focus of additional case studies. Possible temperature effects on the incidence of disease and parasitism in fish also should be investigated.

  18. 78 FR 32181 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; 5-Year Extension of Moratorium on Harvest of Gold Corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    .... Pacific Islands through June 30, 2018. NMFS intends this final rule to prevent overfishing and to... biology and prevent overfishing. Subsequent research found that gold corals in the U.S. Pacific...

  19. Impact of Low-Level Southerly Surges on Mixed Rossby Gravity Waves over the Central Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutomi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    This study examines dynamical impacts of lower-tropospheric southerly wind surges originating in midlatitudes of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) on the development of mixed Rossby gravity (MRG) waves over the central Pacific during June-August 1979-2012, through the statistical analysis of the JRA-55 products and NOAA outgoing long wave radiation data. The central Pacific MRG waves are identified by an extended EOF (EEOF) analysis on 2-8-day filtered daily 850-hPa meridional wind anomalies during June-August 1979-2012. Composite analysis based on the leading EEOF time coefficients is able to capture the development of the MRG waves associated with a southerly surge originating in the SH extratropics. As a weak clockwise gyre as a part of an off-equatorial easterly wavetrain moves eastward and southeastward from the off-equatorial eastern Pacific into the equatorial central Pacific, the southerly surge penetrates into the equatorial tropics at around 150W. Then, the clockwise gyre develops into a MRG-type gyre over the central Pacific. A transition from an easterly wave-type gyre into a MRG-type gyre occurs associated with the southerly surge. The southerly surge forms a cross-equatorial flow on the western flank of the MRG-type gyre. The gyre is amplified when the southerly surge reaches the equatorial tropics. At the same time, convection coupled with the MRG-type gyre is enhanced. The southerly surges are originated in the midlatitude South Pacific, and they are induced by synoptic-scale baroclinic disturbances propagating along the SH midlatitude westerly jet. An eddy vorticity budget analysis indicates that the southerly surge plays an important role in spinning up the MRG-type gyre through transient advection of absolute vorticiy. A case study of a MRG-wave event in mid-July 2006 also illustrates development of a MRG wave associated with the southerly surge and an easterly wave-to-MRG wave transition.

  20. Shark fisheries in the Southeast Pacific: A 61-year analysis from Peru [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Gonzalez-Pestana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Peruvian waters exhibit high conservation value for sharks. This contrasts with a lag in initiatives for their management and a lack of studies about their biology, ecology and fishery. We investigated the dynamics of Peruvian shark fishery and its legal framework identifying information gaps for recommending actions to improve management. Further, we investigated the importance of the Peruvian shark fishery from a regional perspective. From 1950 to 2010, 372,015 tons of sharks were landed in Peru. From 1950 to 1969, we detected a significant increase in landings; but from 2000 to 2011 there was a significant decrease in landings, estimated at 3.5% per year. Six species represented 94% of landings: blue shark (Prionace glauca, shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus, smooth hammerhead (Sphyrna zygaena, common thresher (Alopias vulpinus, smooth-hound (Mustelus whitneyi and angel shark (Squatina californica. Of these, the angel shark exhibits a strong and significant decrease in landings: 18.9% per year from 2000 to 2010. Peru reports the highest accumulated historical landings in the Pacific Ocean; but its contribution to annual landings has decreased since 1968. Still, Peru is among the top 12 countries exporting shark fins to the Hong Kong market. Although the government collects total weight by species, the number of specimens landed as well as population parameters (e.g. sex, size and weight are not reported. Further, for some genera, species-level identification is deficient and so overestimates the biomass landed by species and underestimates the species diversity. Recently, regional efforts to regulate shark fishery have been implemented to support the conservation of sharks but in Peru work remains to be done.

  1. Simple dynamical models capturing the key features of the Central Pacific El Niño.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Majda, Andrew J

    2016-10-18

    The Central Pacific El Niño (CP El Niño) has been frequently observed in recent decades. The phenomenon is characterized by an anomalous warm sea surface temperature (SST) confined to the central Pacific and has different teleconnections from the traditional El Niño. Here, simple models are developed and shown to capture the key mechanisms of the CP El Niño. The starting model involves coupled atmosphere-ocean processes that are deterministic, linear, and stable. Then, systematic strategies are developed for incorporating several major mechanisms of the CP El Niño into the coupled system. First, simple nonlinear zonal advection with no ad hoc parameterization of the background SST gradient is introduced that creates coupled nonlinear advective modes of the SST. Secondly, due to the recent multidecadal strengthening of the easterly trade wind, a stochastic parameterization of the wind bursts including a mean easterly trade wind anomaly is coupled to the simple atmosphere-ocean processes. Effective stochastic noise in the wind burst model facilitates the intermittent occurrence of the CP El Niño with realistic amplitude and duration. In addition to the anomalous warm SST in the central Pacific, other major features of the CP El Niño such as the rising branch of the anomalous Walker circulation being shifted to the central Pacific and the eastern Pacific cooling with a shallow thermocline are all captured by this simple coupled model. Importantly, the coupled model succeeds in simulating a series of CP El Niño that lasts for 5 y, which resembles the two CP El Niño episodes during 1990-1995 and 2002-2006.

  2. 78 FR 1837 - Nominations for the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ..., on behalf of the Secretary of Commerce, is seeking nominations for the advisory committee established... committee nominations''. Email comments, with or without attachments, are limited to 5 megabytes. Mail or... committee will serve for a term of two years and is eligible for reappointment. This request for...

  3. Linking fisheries, trophic interactions and climate: threshold dynamics drive herring Clupea harengus growth in the central Baltic Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Casini, M.; Bartolino, V.; Molinero, Juan Carlos; Kornilovs, G.

    2010-01-01

    How multiple stressors influence fish stock dynamics is a crucial question in ecology in general and in fisheries science in particular. Using time-series covering a 30 yr period, we show that the body growth of the central Baltic Sea herring Clupea harengus, both in terms of condition and weight-at-age (WAA), has shifted from being mainly driven by hydro-climatic forces to an inter-specific density-dependent control. The shift in the mechanisms of regulation of herring growth is triggered by...

  4. Contrasting the eastern Pacific El Niño and the central Pacific El Niño: process-based feedback attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoming; Yang, Song; Cai, Ming

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines the roles of radiative and non-radiative air-sea coupled thermodynamic processes in modifying sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies driven by (air-sea coupled) oceanic dynamic processes, focusing on their contributions to the key differences between the eastern Pacific (EP) El Niño and the central Pacific (CP) El Niño. The attribution is achieved by decomposing SST anomalies into partial temperature anomalies due to individual processes using a coupled atmosphere-surface climate feedback-response analysis method. Oceanic processes induce warming from the central to the eastern equatorial Pacific and cooling over the western basin with a maximum warming center in the central Pacific for both types of El Niño. The processes that act to oppose the oceanic process-induced SST anomalies are surface latent heat flux, sensible heat flux, cloud, and atmospheric dynamic feedbacks, referred to as negative-feedback processes. The cooling due to each of the four negative-feedback processes is the strongest in the region where the initial warming due to oceanic processes is the largest. Water-vapor feedback is the sole process that acts to enhance the initial warming induced by oceanic processes. The increase in atmospheric water vapor over the eastern Pacific is much stronger for the EP El Niño than for the CP El Niño. It is the strong water-vapor feedback over the eastern Pacific and the strong negative feedbacks over the central equatorial Pacific that help to relocate the maximum warming center from the central Pacific to the eastern basin for the EP El Niño.

  5. Wave climate and trends in the Pacific region off Mexico and Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Nava, Héctor; Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.

    2017-04-01

    Proper planning of maritime activities strongly depends on the prior knowledge of wave characteristics. In particular, knowledge of wave climate and its variability is essential for offshore and coastal operations and engineering projects. This work describes the wave climate and its variability in the Pacific region off Mexico and Central America (PMCA) based on a 19 years wave hindcast. It is found that the variability of the wave height is dominated by changes of the swell arriving from the North Pacific and of the waves generated in the Gulfs of Tehuantepec and Papagayo. The highest waves in PMCA region are associated with the occurrence of tropical storms however; tropical storms are so sparse in time and space that have little influence in the long-term mean. An analysis of the correlation of the monthly anomaly of wave height with several climate indices suggests that the major source of variability in PMCA region is El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). It is also suggested that, through the Pacific-North America teleconnection, ENSO modifies the storms characteristics over the North Pacific and causes changes in the waves arriving into PMCA region. In PMCA region wave height exhibits a negative trend almost everywhere. Notwithstanding, trends are only statistically significant in regions dominated by swell from the North Pacific, with decreasing rates between -1 to -3 cm.yr-1. This study suggests that the variability of the waves conditions over the North Pacific are related to changes of the strength and position of the Aleutian Low which are evidenced by the behaviour of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. If this is the case, the observed negative trends are expected to be part of a multi-decadal oscillation rather than a long-term behaviour.

  6. 78 FR 7280 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Pot Gear in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Pot Gear in the Western Regulatory Area of the Gulf... for Pacific cod by vessels using pot gear in the Western Regulatory Area of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA... allowable catch apportioned to vessels using pot gear in the Western Regulatory Area of the GOA....

  7. 77 FR 6683 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Pot Gear in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Using Pot Gear in the Western Regulatory Area of the Gulf... for Pacific cod by vessels using pot gear in the Western Regulatory Area of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA... allowable catch apportioned to vessels using pot gear in the Western Regulatory Area of the GOA....

  8. 76 FR 66655 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod and Octopus in the Bering Sea...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod and Octopus in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area... necessary to limit incidental catch of octopus by vessels using pot gear to fish for Pacific cod the BSAI... Act requires that conservation and management measures prevent overfishing. The 2011...

  9. 76 FR 13330 - Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; Prohibiting Purse Seine Fishing in the U.S. EEZ Around Guam...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... (troll, longline and purse seine) in the Mariana Archipelago. In addition, this action is intended to... potential impacts if purse seine fishing effort shifts to areas fished by domestic troll and longline... impacts to the CNMI troll fishery. If the number of CNMI-based longline vessels increases and move...

  10. Fishery of the short-necked clam Paphia undulata in Southern Negros Occidental, Central Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Villarta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study documents the fishery of the short-necked clam Paphia undulata in coastal waters of southern Negros Occidental. Catch and effort estimates were determined based on daily records of compressor divers gathered between February-July 2008 in Himamaylan City and July 2008-May 2009 in the town of Hinigaran. Fishing and marketing practices in both areas were also documented and population biology information noted.Compared to earlier conditions, present fishing patterns show a worsened stage of overexploitation primarily characterized by collection of predominantly small and immature (mostly <45 mm shell lengths sizes. Intensity/duration and location of fishing also varied due to both abundance and demand factors.The difference in sizes of clams and the varying fishing durations in each area suggest a non-uniform pattern of settlement resulting most likely from differential larval recruitment, the likely factors causing the local boom and bust fishery. The larger and long term extent of the effect of these factors can only be further investigated by parallel 2-3 year fishery-dependent and -independent surveys

  11. 78 FR 15677 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... include cost, revenue, ownership, and employment data the North Pacific Fishery Management Council...: Notice of availability of fishery management plan amendment; request for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS announces that the North Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) has submitted Amendment 42 to...

  12. 50 CFR 665.240 - Hawaii crustacean fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii crustacean fisheries. 665.240 Section 665.240 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC...

  13. 50 CFR 665.440 - Mariana crustacean fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mariana crustacean fisheries. 665.440 Section 665.440 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC...

  14. 50 CFR 665.260 - Hawaii precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii precious coral fisheries. 665.260 Section 665.260 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC...

  15. 50 CFR 665.460 - Mariana precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mariana precious coral fisheries. 665.460 Section 665.460 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC...

  16. 50 CFR 665.400 - Mariana bottomfish fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mariana bottomfish fisheries. 665.400 Section 665.400 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC...

  17. 50 CFR 665.100 - American Samoa bottomfish fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false American Samoa bottomfish fisheries. 665.100 Section 665.100 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC American...

  18. 50 CFR 665.140 - American Samoa Crustacean Fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false American Samoa Crustacean Fisheries. 665.140 Section 665.140 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC American...

  19. Tropic dynamics of albatrosses associated with squid and large-mesh driftnet fisheries in the North Pacific Ocean

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Diets of Laysan (LAA) and Black-footed albatrosses (BFA) killed in squid and large-mesh driftnets in the transitional zone of the North Pacific Ocean were...

  20. Trophic position increases with thermocline depth in yellowfin and bigeye tuna across the Western and Central Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssard, Patrick; Lorrain, Anne; Tremblay-Boyer, Laura; Allain, Valérie; Graham, Brittany S.; Menkes, Christophe E.; Pethybridge, Heidi; Couturier, Lydie I. E.; Point, David; Leroy, Bruno; Receveur, Aurore; Hunt, Brian P. V.; Vourey, Elodie; Bonnet, Sophie; Rodier, Martine; Raimbault, Patrick; Feunteun, Eric; Kuhnert, Petra M.; Munaron, Jean-Marie; Lebreton, Benoit; Otake, Tsuguo; Letourneur, Yves

    2017-05-01

    Estimates of trophic position are used to validate ecosystem models and understand food web structure. A consumer's trophic position can be estimated by the stable nitrogen isotope values (δ15N) of its tissue, once the baseline isotopic variability has been accounted for. Our study established the first data-driven baseline δ15N isoscape for the Western and Central Pacific Ocean using particulate organic matter. Bulk δ15N analysis on 1039 muscle tissue of bigeye and yellowfin tuna were conducted together with amino acid compound-specific δ15N analysis (AA-CSIA) on a subset of 21 samples. Both particulate organic matter and tuna bulk δ15N values varied by more than 10‰ across the study area. Fine-scaled trophic position maps were constructed and revealed higher tuna trophic position (by ∼1) in the southern latitudes compared to the equator. AA-CSIA confirmed these spatial patterns for bigeye and, to a lesser extent, yellowfin tuna. Using generalized additive models, spatial variations of tuna trophic positions were mainly related to the depth of the 20°C isotherm, a proxy for the thermocline behavior, with higher tuna trophic position estimates at greater thermocline depths. We hypothesized that a deeper thermocline would increase tuna vertical habitat and access to mesopelagic prey of higher trophic position. Archival tagging data further suggested that the vertical habitat of bigeye tuna was deeper in the southern latitudes than at the equator. These results suggest the importance of thermocline depth in influencing tropical tuna diet, which affects their vulnerability to fisheries, and may be altered by climate change.

  1. Conflicts between river dolphins (Cetacea: Odontoceti and fisheries in the Central Amazon: a path toward tragedy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pinto de Sá Alves

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dolphin interactions with fishermen have increased significantly and pose potential risks to the boto, Inia geoffrensis (Blainville, 1817, and the tucuxi, Sotalia fluviatilis (Gervais & Deville, 1853. The main objective of the present paper was to describe the existing conflicts between river dolphins and fishermen in the municipality of Manacapuru region. Sixteen fishermen were interviewed in Manacapuru, state of Amazonas, Brazil who described a situation of ongoing conflict that may be unsustainable. Two merchants from Manacapuru made unconfirmed reports on a boto carcass trade. Data collection for this study occurred between April 20th and April 25th, 2009, but the first author had been conducting research on river dolphins and fisheries in Manacapuru and nearby cities since the beginning of 2008, in order to gain the trust of the fishermen interviewed. The hunting and deliberate killing of the species is probably more threatening to botos than their incidental capture in fishing gears in the Manacapuru region. This practice may result from the fact that dolphins are prone to damaging fishing equipment, and stealing (and possibly damaging fish from the nets. They are portrayed negatively in numerous myths and superstitions of traditional Amazonian folklore, making them extremely undesired or even hated, seen as pests, and used in the piracatinga, Calophysus macropterus (Lichtenstein, 1819 fishery as bait. For tucuxis, incidental capture still represents the major threat to their conservation in the region evaluated here.

  2. Robust contribution of decadal anomalies to the frequency of central-Pacific El Niño

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Arnold; Luo, Jing-Jia; Hirst, Anthony C.; Bi, Daohua; Cai, Wenju; He, Jinhai

    2016-12-01

    During year-to-year El Niño events in recent decades, major sea surface warming has occurred frequently in the central Pacific. This is distinct from the eastern Pacific warming pattern during canonical El Niño events. Accordingly, the central-Pacific El Niño exerts distinct impacts on ecosystems, climate and hurricanes worldwide. The increased frequency of the new type of El Niño presents a challenge not only for the understanding of El Niño dynamics and its change but also for the prediction of El Niño and its global impacts at present and future climate. Previous studies have proposed different indices to represent the two types of El Niño for better understanding, prediction and impact assessment. Here, we find that all popularly used indices for the central-Pacific El Niño show a dominant spectral peak at a decadal period with comparatively weak variance at interannual timescales. Our results suggest that decadal anomalies have an important contribution to the occurrence of the central-Pacific El Niño over past decades. Removing the decadal component leads to a significant reduction in the frequency of the central-Pacific El Niño in observations and in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 simulations of preindustrial, historical and future climate.

  3. 77 FR 34331 - Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; Revised Swordfish Trip Limits in the Hawaii Deep-Set Longline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ...-Rulemaking Portal www.regulations.gov ; or Mail: Michael D. Tosatto, Regional Administrator, NMFS, Pacific... Bishop St., Suite 1400, Honolulu, HI 96813, tel 808-522-8220, fax 808-522-8226, www.wpcouncil.org . FOR... NMFS on March 19, 2012 (77 FR 15973). That final rule implemented similar limits on the possession...

  4. 北太平洋柔鱼渔业生物学研究进展%Review of fisheries biology of neon flying squid(Ommastrephes bartramii) in the North Pacific Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马金; 陈新军; 刘必林; 田思泉; 李思亮; 曹杰

    2011-01-01

    柔鱼是重要的大洋性经济头足类,是我国远洋鱿钓渔船的主要捕捞对象。对北太平洋柔鱼的种群结构、洄游、年龄与生长、繁殖、摄食等生物学研究进展做了初步总结和归纳,并提出需要进一步深入研究的方向,供今后研究参考。柔鱼可分为4个季节性地理种群,即秋生东部群体、秋生中部群体、冬春生西部群体和冬春生中东部群体,但还需要在分子生物学角度得到进一步的确认;柔鱼随季节做南北洄游,其中向北索饵洄游模式研究较为深入,而向南产卵洄游模式尚不清楚,其产卵场空间分布及产卵期需要进一步调查;对柔鱼繁殖习性研究相对不足,尤其是产卵至孵化以及%Ommastrephes bartramii is an important economic cephalopod and also one of main fishing targets for Chinese squid jigging fleets.The knowledge of fishery biology is a basic condition for sustainable exploitation and utilization.The literature of population structure,migration,age and growth,spawning,feeding of O.bartramii has been reviewed,and comments and suggestion are provided in this paper.O.bartramii in the North Pacific Ocean can be sorted into four seasonal geographic cohorts,i.e.eastern stock of the fall cohort,central stock of the fall cohort,western stock of the winter-spring cohort and central-eastern stock of the winter-spring cohort.This classification need to be confirmed by the method of molecular biology.Generally,the squid made north-southward migration,the northward migration during the feeding period has been studied extensively;however the southward migration during spawning period was not clearly investigated,so the investigation on the temporal and spatial distribution of spawning ground is needed.Moreover,it is proposed that the spawning behavior of O.bartramii should be further studied,especially on the biologic process from spawning to hatching and paralarvae.The living environment of O.bartramii between west and

  5. The Megafaunal Communities of Mn-crusted Guyots in the Central and Western Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, C.; France, S.; Gerringer, M.; Pomponi, S. A.; Amon, D.; Mundy, B.; Molodtsova, T.; Matsumoto, A. K.; Watling, L.; Baco-Taylor, A.

    2016-12-01

    The NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) recently completed the second year of its 3 year CAPSTONE initiative to explore the deep waters of the U.S Pacific Monuments. At the preparation of this abstract, six ROV cruises were completed in the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument (PMNM), the Mariana Trench Marine National Monument (MTMNM) and the Johnston Atoll unit of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument (PRIMNM). A seventh ROV cruise is scheduled for July 27 through August 9 in the Wake unit of PRIMNM. Manganese (Mn)-crusted guyots have been one of the priorities of these cruises. Sixteen guyots have been surveyed to date with 11 more targeted for the dives around Wake. A major science objective has been to gain a better understanding of the megafaunal communities on this type of seamount because interest is building in mining manganese crusts in the Central and Western Pacific, an area referred to as the Prime Crust Zone (PCZ). These surveys revealed the presence of unique animals and in some locations, high density communities of deepwater corals and sponges living on Mn crusts that could be severely impacted by deep sea mining operations. This presentation will summarize the initial findings from the surveys on all 27 guyots and will hopefully raise awareness of the need for cautious and responsible development of the deep sea mining industry.

  6. 50 CFR 665.120 - American Samoa coral reef ecosystem fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false American Samoa coral reef ecosystem fisheries. 665.120 Section 665.120 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... PACIFIC American Samoa Fisheries § 665.120 American Samoa coral reef ecosystem fisheries....

  7. Impacts of enhanced central Pacific ENSO on wave climate and headland-bay beach morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, Thomas R.; Goodwin, Ian D.

    2016-06-01

    Wave climate and Pacific basin coastal behaviour associated with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is understood at a reconnaissance level, but the coastal response to different central Pacific (CP) versus eastern Pacific (EP) flavours of ENSO is unknown. We show that CP ENSO events produce different patterns of directional wave power to EP ENSO along the southeast Australian shelf and southwest Pacific region, because of significant variability in trade-wind wave generation. The modulation of the trade wind wave climate during CP ENSO has thus far been neglected in existing coastal process studies. We also show that coastal change between CP and EP ENSO cannot be inferred from shifts in the deepwater wave climate. This is because variability in trade wind wave generation is masked in deepwater by the persistence of high power extra-tropical waves that have reduced impact on nearshore processes due to high wave refraction. Morphodynamic modelling in a headland-bay beach indicates that CP ENSO leads to higher coastal erosion potential and slower post-storm recovery than EP ENSO during an El Niño/La Niña cycle. We show that the alongshore variability in beach morphological type can be used to model the static equilibrium planform response for each ENSO phase. Results indicate that shoreline response to ENSO in most headland-bay beach coasts is not as simple as the existing paradigm that (anti-) clockwise rotation occurs during El Niño (La Niña). Our methods provide a second-order approach to project coastal response and predict the discrete shoreline rotations for ENSO flavours.

  8. The Pacific-Atlantic Dipole: A Climate Index with Effects on Trade Wind Strength and Central American Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, M.; Moore, K.; Cowling, S.

    2009-05-01

    The interaction of moist easterly trade winds and high Central American topography creates tropical rainforests in the mountains of Central America. Understanding changes in precipitation in this region is important because these rain forests host a wealth of biodiversity and are sensitive to changes in precipitation. This study focuses on causes of interannual variability in Central American precipitation. Specifically, we find that the relative phases of the Atlantic Nino and Pacific El Nino Southern Oscillation are related to the strength of the trade winds and precipitation over Central America. These relative phases are quantified through the creation of the Pacific Atlantic Dipole index, which is the difference between the Atlantic Nino and the El Nino Southern Oscillation indices. An index of moisture transport over Central America is also created. We find that the Pacific- Atlantic dipole is positively correlated to both the moisture transport index and to a new Central American precipitation station data set, comprised of 43 stations and spanning the period 1961-2000. Composites of years of high and low Pacific-Atlantic dipole index reveal the spatial pattern associated with its variability. These showed that when the PAD is low (high), there is a strengthening (weakening) of the subtropical high and a decrease (increase) in pressure over the eastern equatorial Pacific. This causes an increase (decrease) in the trade wind strength and subsequently a decrease (increase) in Central American precipitation. We conclude that the PAD index represents a dipole in sea surface temperature and sea level pressure between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. In the future, this could be used to predict interannual changes in trade wind strength and precipitation in Central America. With current changes in climate, a further understanding of this relationship may be important for the sensitive ecology in the region.

  9. Inland capture fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcomme, Robin L; Cowx, Ian G; Coates, David; Béné, Christophe; Funge-Smith, Simon; Halls, Ashley; Lorenzen, Kai

    2010-09-27

    The reported annual yield from inland capture fisheries in 2008 was over 10 million tonnes, although real catches are probably considerably higher than this. Inland fisheries are extremely complex, and in many cases poorly understood. The numerous water bodies and small rivers are inhabited by a wide range of species and several types of fisher community with diversified livelihood strategies for whom inland fisheries are extremely important. Many drivers affect the fisheries, including internal fisheries management practices. There are also many drivers from outside the fishery that influence the state and functioning of the environment as well as the social and economic framework within which the fishery is pursued. The drivers affecting the various types of inland water, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands may differ, particularly with regard to ecosystem function. Many of these depend on land-use practices and demand for water which conflict with the sustainability of the fishery. Climate change is also exacerbating many of these factors. The future of inland fisheries varies between continents. In Asia and Africa the resources are very intensely exploited and there is probably little room for expansion; it is here that resources are most at risk. Inland fisheries are less heavily exploited in South and Central America, and in the North and South temperate zones inland fisheries are mostly oriented to recreation rather than food production.

  10. Petroleum geology of Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America, from Guatemala to Ecuador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrutton, M.E.; Escalante, G.F.

    1986-07-01

    Exploration for hydrocarbons along the Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America has been limited and spasmodic. Less than 100 exploration wells have been drilled, with nearly 50 of these being in the Santa Elena, Progreso, and Guayas basins in Ecuador. Shows have been reported in some wells, and a few oil seeps are known. The only commercial production established to date has been from the Santa Elena Peninsula in Ecuador in the extreme south of the study area. Understanding of the geology in this part of the continental margin is incomplete at best. This paper reviews present-day knowledge in an attempt to define the sedimentary basins better, to characterize their structure and stratigraphy, and to assess their petroleum prospects. The area of continental margin reviewed is to the north, located northwest of the trench system where oceanic crust of the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, and to the south, where the northern part of the Nazca plate collides with the South American plate. This plate tectonic setting forms the framework on which local structural and sedimentary events have created a series of relatively small trench-slope and forearc basins in what is now the coastal plain and adjacent offshore area of Central and South America, south or west of a line of mountain ranges with active volcanism. Sedimentary fill is generally of Tertiary age. The basins and subbasins recognized and described include: in Ecuador - Guayas, Santa Elena, Progreso, Valdivia, Bajo Grande, Manta, Muisne-Esmeraldas, and Borbon; in Colombia - Choco-Pacific; in Panama - Gulf of Panama basin complex (Santiago, Tonosi, Sambu), and Burica-Chiriqui; in Costa Rica - Terraba and Coronado/Tempisque; in Nicaragua - San Juan del Sur; and in the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala - the Pacific coastal basin.

  11. WATER TEMPERATURE and DEPTH - SENSOR collected from NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE in Hawaii EEZ, central North Pacific Ocean, and others from 2010-01-22 to 2010-02-06 (NCEI Accession 0155913)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected during a Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center's Cetacean Research Program's shipboard cetacean survey (Cruise ID SE 10-01). XBT casts...

  12. WATER TEMPERATURE and DEPTH - SENSOR collected from NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE in Hawaii EEZ, central North Pacific Ocean, and others from 2010-04-20 to 2010-04-30 (NCEI Accession 0155915)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected during a Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center's Cetacean Research Program's shipboard cetacean survey (Cruise ID: SE 10-04). XBT casts...

  13. Shore-based counts of the Eastern North Pacific gray whale stock from central California conducted from 1967-12-18 to 2007-02-22 (NCEI Accession 0138007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has conducted shore-based counts of the Eastern North Pacific stock of gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) 26 years from...

  14. WATER TEMPERATURE, DISSOLVED OXYGEN, and others collected from NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE in Central Pacific Ocean, American Samoa EEZ, and others from 2006-03-06 to 2006-03-26 (NCEI Accession 0156427)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD data were collected during a Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center's Cetacean Research Program's shipboard cetacean survey (Cruise ID OES 06-03). CTD casts...

  15. Shark tooth weapons from the 19th Century reflect shifting baselines in Central Pacific predator assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Drew

    Full Text Available The reefs surrounding the Gilbert Islands (Republic of Kiribati, Central Pacific, like many throughout the world, have undergone a period of rapid and intensive environmental perturbation over the past 100 years. A byproduct of this perturbation has been a reduction of the number of shark species present in their waters, even though sharks play an important in the economy and culture of the Gilbertese. Here we examine how shark communities changed over time periods that predate the written record in order to understand the magnitude of ecosystem changes in the Central Pacific. Using a novel data source, the shark tooth weapons of the Gilbertese Islanders housed in natural history museums, we show that two species of shark, the Spot-tail (Carcharhinus sorrah and the Dusky (C. obscurus, were present in the islands during the last half of the 19(th century but not reported in any historical literature or contemporary ichthyological surveys of the region. Given the importance of these species to the ecology of the Gilbert Island reefs and to the culture of the Gilbertese people, documenting these shifts in baseline fauna represents an important step toward restoring the vivid splendor of both ecological and cultural diversity.

  16. Shark Tooth Weapons from the 19th Century Reflect Shifting Baselines in Central Pacific Predator Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Joshua; Philipp, Christopher; Westneat, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    The reefs surrounding the Gilbert Islands (Republic of Kiribati, Central Pacific), like many throughout the world, have undergone a period of rapid and intensive environmental perturbation over the past 100 years. A byproduct of this perturbation has been a reduction of the number of shark species present in their waters, even though sharks play an important in the economy and culture of the Gilbertese. Here we examine how shark communities changed over time periods that predate the written record in order to understand the magnitude of ecosystem changes in the Central Pacific. Using a novel data source, the shark tooth weapons of the Gilbertese Islanders housed in natural history museums, we show that two species of shark, the Spot-tail (Carcharhinus sorrah) and the Dusky (C. obscurus), were present in the islands during the last half of the 19th century but not reported in any historical literature or contemporary ichthyological surveys of the region. Given the importance of these species to the ecology of the Gilbert Island reefs and to the culture of the Gilbertese people, documenting these shifts in baseline fauna represents an important step toward restoring the vivid splendor of both ecological and cultural diversity. PMID:23573214

  17. Shark tooth weapons from the 19th Century reflect shifting baselines in Central Pacific predator assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Joshua; Philipp, Christopher; Westneat, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    The reefs surrounding the Gilbert Islands (Republic of Kiribati, Central Pacific), like many throughout the world, have undergone a period of rapid and intensive environmental perturbation over the past 100 years. A byproduct of this perturbation has been a reduction of the number of shark species present in their waters, even though sharks play an important in the economy and culture of the Gilbertese. Here we examine how shark communities changed over time periods that predate the written record in order to understand the magnitude of ecosystem changes in the Central Pacific. Using a novel data source, the shark tooth weapons of the Gilbertese Islanders housed in natural history museums, we show that two species of shark, the Spot-tail (Carcharhinus sorrah) and the Dusky (C. obscurus), were present in the islands during the last half of the 19(th) century but not reported in any historical literature or contemporary ichthyological surveys of the region. Given the importance of these species to the ecology of the Gilbert Island reefs and to the culture of the Gilbertese people, documenting these shifts in baseline fauna represents an important step toward restoring the vivid splendor of both ecological and cultural diversity.

  18. Multi-scale analysis of hermatypic coral assemblages at Mexican Central Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joicye Hernández-Zulueta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Mexican Central Pacific is located in a zone of oceanographic transition between two biogeographic provinces with particular conditions that affect the associated fauna. The objective of this study was to evaluate the variation of hermatypic coral assemblages in this region and to determine their relationship with the heterogeneity of the benthonic habitat and spatial variables. A total of 156 transects were carried out at 41 sites in the years 2010 and 2011. The sampling effort returned 96.7% of the coral richness expected for the area, with a total of 15 species recorded. The results showed that richness, diversity and cover of corals varied only at the site and state scales. However, the composition and coverage of all coral species, as well as the benthonic habitat structure, differed significantly across the study scales (i.e. sites, zones and states. Canonical redundancy analysis showed that variation in the richness, diversity and assemblages of corals was explained by the cover of live corals, articulated calcareous algae, sandy substrate, sponges and fleshy macroalgae. This study suggests that local scale (i.e. site variation in the coral assemblages of the Mexican Central Pacific is the result of the heterogeneity of the benthonic habitat, while geomorphological and oceanographic characteristics play a greater role at regional scale.

  19. La variabilidad climática y las pesquerías en el Pacifico suroriental Climate variability and fisheries in the southeastern Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Espino

    2012-09-01

    áximos beneficios en los diferentes momentos ambientales.The southeastern Pacific Ocean is one of the most productive areas of the planet due to its intense oceanic circulation dynamics, whose most important manifestation from the point of view and biological oceanography is the coastal upwelling. This manifestation generates a high primary and secondary production which support important fish stocks that are the basis of the fishing economy of the region. However in this region, variability is a common event that meets regulatory standards of macro-scale such as seasonal, inter-annual, periodical and secular as processes of short, medium, long and very long term. In this scenario appear as environmental factors or manifestations of variability, ENSO (El Nino Southern Oscillation, PDO (Pacific Decadal Oscillation and PSV (Pacific Secular Variability as the most conspicuous. Naturally, the temporality and variability factors affect the ecosystem and within it, the resources and its fisheries. These changes are referred to time, space, populations and fisheries. That is, the processes of population dynamics of marine resources, such as recruitment, growth, natural and fishing mortality, are being affected permanently, a different scalar intensities and frequencies. This situation would induce a response in the dynamic populations, which in turn produce states population against each of the moments or environmental scenarios prevailing. This paper presents an analysis of standard patterns and variability factors using environmental variables, biological and fisheries, and identifies scenarios that could explain changes in populations and its fisheries, facilitating the adoption of management measures for each environmental condition. This will allow planning of fisheries to prevent socio-economic and financial collapse, as well as maximize the benefits in different environmental moments.

  20. Impacts of decaying eastern and central Pacific El Niños on tropical cyclone activities over the western North Pacific in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxing; Xie, Ruihuang; Wang, Faming; Huang, Fei

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the influences of the decaying eastern Pacific El Niño (EP-El Niño) and central Pacific El Niño (CP-El Niño) on tropical cyclone (TC) activities in the western North Pacific (WNP) during July, August, and September (JAS). During this period, TC geneses and tracks are reduced in the central and eastern WNP. However, TC tracks reaching the Philippines increase, and more TC geneses appear west of 145°E during EP-El Niño. During CP-El Niño, tracks reaching the South China Sea (SCS) and southeast coast of China increase, and positive anomalies of TC genesis are found in the southern part of the central WNP and southern SCS. It is possible that the different variations of the anomalous anticyclone over east of the Philippines in the WNP induced by El Niños are instrumental to the different TC variations in the two types of decaying El Niños during JAS. Compared with EP-El Niño, strengthening and northward expansion of the anomalous anticyclone during CP-El Niño cause a westward shift of the western Pacific subtropical high in summer, which is responsible for more westward TC tracks over the SCS and southeast coast of China. This northward expansion can cause the center of suppressed TC geneses in the central WNP to migrate further north during CP-El Niño. A decreased magnitude of vertical shear dominates the southern part of the central WNP and southern SCS, which enhances TC formation in these regions during CP-El Niño.

  1. Decoupling of Pacific subduction zone guided waves beneath central Japan: Evidence for thin slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhy, Simanchal; Furumura, Takashi; Maeda, Takuto

    2014-11-01

    The fine-scale seismic structure of the northeast Japan subduction zone is studied based on waveform analyses of moderate-sized (M4.5-6), deep-focus earthquakes (h >350 km) and the finite difference method (FDM) simulation of high-frequency (up to 8 Hz) wave propagation. Strong regional S wave attenuation anomalies for specific source-receiver paths connecting the cluster of events occurring in central part of the Sea of Japan recorded at fore arc stations in northern and central Japanese Islands (Honshu) are used to model the deeper structure of the subducting Pacific Plate, where recent teleseismic tomography has shown evidence for a possible slab tear westward beneath the Sea of Japan. The character of the observed anomalous S wave attenuation and the following high-frequency coda can be captured with the two-dimensional (2-D) FDM simulation of seismic waves in heterogeneous plate model, incorporating the thinning of the plate at depth, which is also compared with other possible causes of dramatic attenuation of high-frequency S wave due to low-Q or much weaker heterogeneities in the slab. The results of simulation clearly demonstrate that the dramatic loss of high-frequency S wavefield from the plate into the surrounding mantle occurred due to the variation in the plate geometry (i.e., thinning of the plate) at depth near the source rather than due to variation in physical properties, such as due to the lowered-Q and weaker heterogeneities in the plate. The presence of such a thin zone defocuses the high-frequency slab-guided S wave energy from the subducting plate into the surrounding mantle and acts as a geometric antiwaveguide. Based on the sequence of simulation results obtained, we propose thinning of Pacific Plate at depth subducting beneath northeastern Japan, localized to central part of Honshu, in agreement with the observations.

  2. On the source of cross-grain lineations in the central Pacific gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdoo, David C.; Sandwell, David T.

    1989-07-01

    Subtle lineations in the marine gravity field of the central Pacific derived from Seasat altimeter data were observed by Haxby and Weissel (1986). They suggested that these "cross-grain" lineations were evidence of small-scale convection beneath the Pacific plate. We have examined these features by comparing multiple, collinear gravity and bathymetry profiles in the Fourier transform domain. Our nine gravity profiles were each obtained by stacking (averaging) three or more individual, repeat Geosat/ERM altimeter passes. Prior to stacking, the individual Geosat passes were fit to a cubic spline and then differentiated along track to produce along-track deflections of the vertical (or horizontal gravity). Corresponding bathymetric profiles were produced by projecting, onto Geosat ground tracks, bathymetric observations from six R/V Thomas Washington legs and three R/V Conrad legs that virtually coincide with these Geosat tracks. After Fourier transforming the resulting gravity and bathymetry profiles, we estimate admittances of gravity to bathymetry. These admittances are generally low; they also tend to be negative at very short wavelengths (λ<50 km). They are consistent with models of flexural isostatic compensation by a very thin lithosphere (approximately 2 km). They are not consistent with models of dynamic compensation. We suggest, therefore, that either (1) these cross-grain lineations began to form very near the East Pacific Rise or (2) they formed on older, anomalously weak lithosphere. We also suggest that the gravity lineations result primarily from loads beneath the seafloor in combination with, secondarily, loads on the seafloor. Depths of these subseafloor loads appear not to exceed significantly typical Moho depths.

  3. Shallow-water zoantharians (Cnidaria, Hexacorallia from the Central Indo-Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Reimer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the Central Indo-Pacific (CIP and the Indonesian Archipelago being a well-known region of coral reef biodiversity, particularly in the ‘Coral Triangle’, little published information is available on its zoantharians (Cnidaria: Hexacorallia: Zoantharia. In order to provide a basis for future research on the Indo-Pacific zoantharian fauna and facilitate comparisons between more well-studied regions such as Japan and the Great Barrier Reef, this report deals with CIP zoantharian specimens in the Naturalis collection in Leiden, the Netherlands; 106 specimens were placed into 24 morpho-species and were supplemented with 88 in situ photographic records from Indonesia, the Philippines, and Papua New Guinea. At least nine morpho-species are likely to be undescribed species, indicating that the region needs more research in order to properly understand zoantharian diversity within the CIP. The Naturalis’ zoantharian specimens are listed by species, as well as all relevant collection information, and in situ images are provided to aid in future studies on zoantharians in the CIP.

  4. Fisheries economics and fisheries management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peder

    2013-01-01

    spent too much time on fundamentals in fisheries economics at the expense of the development of applicable models for fisheries managers? Of course, this question is relevant only IF fisheries economics and fisheries economists have a role to play in fisheries management.......Professor Rögnvaldur Hannesson's influence on the development and history of fisheries economics is unquestionable. Also, he has strongly pointed out the potential gains from a more active use of fisheries economics in fisheries management. In light of this, one may ask if fisheries economists have...

  5. Molecular phylogeny of Babesia poelea from brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabsley, Michael J.; Work, Thierry M.; Rameyer, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationship of avian Babesia with other piroplasms remains unclear, mainly because of a lack of objective criteria such as molecular phylogenetics. In this study, our objective was to sequence the entire 18S, ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 regions of the rRNA gene and partial ß-tubulin gene of B. poelea, first described from brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from the central Pacific, and compare them to those of other piroplasms. Phylogenetic analyses of the entire 18S rRNA gene sequence revealed that B. poelea belonged to the clade of piroplasms previously detected in humans, domestic dogs, and wild ungulates in the western United States. The entire ITS-1, 5.8S, ITS-2, and partial ß-tubulin gene sequence shared conserved regions with previously described Babesia and Theileria species. The intron of the ß-tubulin gene was 45 bp. This is the first molecular characterization of an avian piroplasm.

  6. Molecular phylogeny of Babesia poelea from brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabsley, Michael J.; Work, Thierry M.; Rameyer, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationship of avian Babesia with other piroplasms remains unclear, mainly because of a lack of objective criteria such as molecular phylogenetics. In this study, our objective was to sequence the entire 18S, ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 regions of the rRNA gene and partial β-tubulin gene of B. poelea, first described from brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from the central Pacific, and compare them to those of other piroplasms. Phylogenetic analyses of the entire 18S rRNA gene sequence revealed that B. poelea belonged to the clade of piroplasms previously detected in humans, domestic dogs, and wild ungulates in the western United States. The entire ITS-1, 5.8S, ITS-2, and partial β-tubulin gene sequence shared conserved regions with previously described Babesia and Theileria species. The intron of the β-tubulin gene was 45 bp. This is the first molecular characterization of an avian piroplasm.

  7. First record of the Central Indo-Pacific reef coral Oulastrea crispata in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. HOEKSEMA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A live colony of a non-indigenous zooxanthellate scleractinian coral was found in shallow water at the west coast of Corsica, western Mediterranean. Its diameter of 6 cm suggests that it has already survived for some years. It was identified as Oulastrea crispata, a species native on near-shore coral reefs in the central Indo-Pacific with a high tolerance for low water temperatures at high latitudes. Based on its morphology it can be distinguished from other zooxanthellate colonial scleractinians in the Mediterranean. O. crispata has a reputation of being a successful colonizer because it is able to settle on a wide variety of substrata and because it utilizes various reproductive strategies as simultaneous hermaphrodite and producer of asexually derived planulae. Owing to its original distribution range in temperate and subtropical waters, it is likely that it will be able to meet a suitable temperature regime in the Mediterranean for further range expansion.

  8. Climatic evolution of the central equatorial Pacific since the Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Inah; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Yong Il; Yoo, Chan Min; Hyeong, Kiseong

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates paleoceanographic changes at a central equatorial Pacific site (6°40'N, 177°28'W) since the last glacial maximum using planktic foraminifera assemblages, together with the oxygen isotope (δ18O) and Mg/Ca compositions of three species (Globigerinoides sacculifer, Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, and Globorotalia tumida) that dwell in the mixed layer, upper thermocline, and lower thermocline, respectively. While the Mg/Ca-derived temperatures of the mixed layer and lower thermocline varied within a narrow range from 18 ka onward, the upper thermocline temperature increased by as much as 3°C during the last deglaciation (18-12 ka) with a simultaneous decrease of δ18O. These changes are best explained by an enhanced mixing of the upper ocean and a reduced habitat depth separation between P. obliquiloculata and G. sacculifer during the 18-12 ka interval. The planktic foraminifera assemblage during the same period resembles modern composition at subtropical central Pacific sites that are strongly influenced by the northeasterly Trades and North Equatorial Current (NEC). We suggest that the study site, presently under the control of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ)-North Equatorial Countercurrent, had been influenced by the northeasterly Trades and NEC during the 18-12 ka interval. This interpretation is consistent with previous documentation of a more southerly location of the ITCZ during two Northern Hemisphere cooling events; the Heinrich Stadial 1 and the Younger Dryas, and implies that the mean annual position of the ITCZ was located south of the study site, by at least 2° of latitude.

  9. Neutral carbohydrate geochemistry of particulate material in the central equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernes, Peter J.; Hedges, John I.; Peterson, Michael L.; Wakeham, Stuart G.; Lee, Cindy

    Neutral carbohydrate compositions were determined for particulate samples from plankton net tows, shallow floating sediment traps, mid-depth and deep moored sediment traps, and sediment cores collected along a north-south transect in the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during the U.S. JGOFS EqPac program. Total neutral carbohydrate depth profiles and patterns along the transect follow essentially the same trends as bulk and organic carbon (OC) fluxes—attenuating with depth, high near the equator and decreasing poleward. OC-normalized total aldose (TCH 2,O) yields along the transect and with depth do not show any consitent patterns. Relative to a planktonic source, neutral carbohydrate compositions in sediment trap and sediment core samples reflect preferential loss of ribose and storage carbohydrates rich in glucose, and preferential preservation of structural carbohydrates rich in rhamnose, xylose, fucose, and mannose. There is also evidence for an intermediately labile component rich in galactose. It appears that compositional signatures of neutral carbohydrates in sediments are more dependent upon their planktonic source than on any particular diagenetic pathway. Relative to other types of organic matter, neutral carbohydrates are better preserved in calcareous oozes from 12°S to 5°N than in red clays at 9°N based on OC-normalized TCH 2O yields, due to either differing sources or sorption characteristics. Weight per cent glucose generally decreases with increased degradation of organic material in the central equatorial Pacific region. Based on weight per cent glucose, comparisons of samples between Survey I (El Niõn) and Survey II (non-El Niño) indicate that during Survey I, organic material in the epipelagic zone in the northern hemisphere may have undergone more degradation than organic material in the southern hemisphere.

  10. Estimation of the marine boundary layer height over the central North Pacific using GPS radio occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winning, Thomas E.; Chen, Yi-Leng; Xie, Feiqin

    2017-01-01

    Global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) refractivity data obtained from the first Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) for the years 2007 to 2012 were used to estimate an overall climatology for the height of the marine boundary layer (MBL) over the central North Pacific Ocean including the Hawaiian Island region (10°N-45°N; 125°W-175°W). The trade wind days are identified based on the six-year National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) global analysis for the same period. About 87% of the RO soundings in summer (June-July-August, JJA) and 47% in winter (December-January-February, DJF) are under trade wind conditions. The MBL height climatology under trade wind conditions is derived and compared to the overall climatology. In general, MBL heights are lowest adjacent to the southern coast of California and gradually increase to the south and west. During the summer (JJA) when the northeasterly trade winds are the dominant surface flow, the median MBL height decreases from 2.0 km over Kauai to 1.9 km over the Big Island with an approximate 2 km maximum that progresses from southwest to northeast throughout the year. If the surface flow is restricted to trade winds only, the maximum MBL heights are located over the same areas, but they increase to a median height of 1.8 km during DJF and 2.1 km during JJA. For the first time, the GPS RO technique allows the depiction of the spatial variations of the MBL height climatology over the central North Pacific.

  11. Growth ages of ferromanganese crusts from the western and central Pacific: Comparison between nannofossil analysis and 10Be dating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zhenbo; SHI Fengdeng; M.Hiroyuki; SHI Xuefa; WU Yonghua; SU Xin; LI Xiaoyan; WANG Kunshan; YANG Yongliang; GE Shulan; JU Xiaohua

    2006-01-01

    Based on results of nannofossil analysis and 10Be dating in ferromanganese crusts M1-1 and A1-1 (no nannofossils were found in it), from the western and central Pacific respectively, it is found that the crust growth ages from nannofossil biostratigraphy agree well with those based on 10Be isotope analysis. Both crusts have three growth layers, and the oldest layer was deposited in Miocene at about 12.80 Ma. The maximum, minimum, and average growth rates of crust A1-1 (from the central Pacific)are 8.11, 1.92 and 3.47 mm/Ma, and those of crust M1-1 (from the western Pacific) are 2.93, 0.47, and0.94 mm/Ma.

  12. Scarlet Macaw, Ara macao, (Psittaciformes: Psittacidae diet in Central Pacific Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Vaughan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available From 1993 to 1997, we observed Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao feeding behavior in Central Pacific Costa Rica. Feeding data acquired in this study were not collected systematically, but opportunistically whenever macaws were observed feeding. To supplement feeding observations, we conducted interviews with local residents. Scarlet Macaws fed on seeds, fruits, leaves, flowers and/or bark of 43 plant species. Various plant parts eaten by macaws from several tree species contain secondary compounds toxic to humans, and additional species included in their diet are nonnative, introduced for agricultural purposes. Important macaw feeding tree species are Ceiba pentandra, Schizolobium parahybum, and Hura crepitans; these species are also crucial to this macaw population because of nest cavities they provide. The results of this study contribute to the conservation of Scarlet Macaws in Central Pacific Costa Rica through promoting protection of individual trees, and through local elementary school reforestation programs focusing on tree species that macaws use for feeding and/or nesting. Scarlet Macaw conservation is extremely important, as numerous population pressures have caused significant declines in macaw numbers in Costa Rica. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (3: 919-926. Epub 2006 Sept. 29.Entre 1993-97, observamos el comportamiento de alimentación de la lapa roja (Ara macao en el Pacifico Central de Costa Rica. La lapa roja se alimentó de semillas, frutas, hojas, flores y corteza de 43 especies de plantas. Varias partes de las plantas comidas por las lapas contienen compuestos secundarios tóxicos al ser humano, y especies adicionales incluidas en la dieta son exóticas; introducidas por razones agrícolas, forestales o estéticas. Especies de árboles importantes como alimento de la lapa roja incluyen: Ceiba pentandra, Schizolobium parahybum, y Hura crepitans; también son criticas para la población de la lapa roja debido a proveen cavidades para anidaci

  13. A comparative study of Taiwan's short-term medical missions to the South Pacific and Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Ya-Wen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taiwan has been dispatching an increasing number of short-term medical missions (STMMs to its allied nations to provide humanitarian health care; however, overall evaluations to help policy makers strengthen the impact of such missions are lacking. Our primary objective is to identify useful strategies by comparing STMMs to the South Pacific and Central America. Methods The data for the evaluation come from two main sources: the official reports of 46 missions to 11 countries in Central America and 25 missions to 8 countries in the South Pacific, and questionnaires completed by health professionals who had participated in the above missions. In Central America, STMMs were staffed by volunteer health professionals from multiple institutions. In the South Pacific, STMMs were staffed by volunteer health professionals from single institutions. Results In comparison to STMMs to Central America, STMMs to the South Pacific accomplished more educational training for local health providers, including providing heath-care knowledge and skills (p Conclusions Health-care services provided by personnel from multiple institutions are as efficient as those from single institutions. Proficiency in the native language and provision of education for local health-care workers are essential for conducting a successful STMM. Our data provide implications for integrating evidence into the deployment of STMMs.

  14. Species composition and diversity of pelagic fishes based on a longline fishery catch in the North Pacific Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jiangfeng; DAI Xiaojie; CHEN Yong

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of spatial-temporal variability of species composition and diversity in oceanic ecosystems is not easy because it is usually difficult to obtain sufficient data quantifying such variability.In this study, we examined pelagic species diversity indicators, species richness, Shannon-Wiener index of diversity and Hurlbert's species evenness, for fish assemblages from two areas (north and south) in the North Pacific Ocean (2°-12°N, 178°E-165°W) during May-July 2008. The assemblages were based on data collected by an onboard scientific observer during a commercial longline fishing trip. The species richness and Shannon-Wiener diversity index of fish assemblages in the northern area were slightly higher than those in the southern area, although these differences were not significant (t test,P>0.05). Non-parametric multidimensional scaling and analysis of similarities indicated that there were significant differences in fish assemblages between the two areas (P<0.01).

  15. Diversity and Abundance of a Tropical Fishery on the Pacific Shelf of Michoacán, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, J.; Sánchez, P.; Ruiz, A.

    1997-10-01

    This study was undertaken on the Pacific coast of Mexico. Some 22 523 individual fish were sampled, representing two classes, 154 genera, 64 families and 257 species in a total area of 50 km 2. The species Lutjanus guttatus, Scomberomorus sierra, Cynoscion reticulatus, Sphyrna lewini, Arius platypogonand Caranx caninuswere the most numerically abundant, amounting to 53·2% of the whole sample. Two models for sample size analysis and richness prediction were used. From these, the forecast for a theoretical doubling of the level of sampling effort (90 days) was 297 and 331. The Shannon diversity indexes in summer (June-August) and winter (December-February) were significantly different (paired t-test, P<0·0005). Of four families compared, three gave significant differences in the summer and winter periods (the Carangidae, the Haemulidae and the Sciaenidae). The classification (Euclidean Distance and UPGMA) indicated two climatic periods and three species assemblages. In addition, the nodal fidelity analysis agreed with the importance of the winter season in the study area. Two El Niño/southern oscillation incidences from 1986-87 and 1991-93 occurred during the sampling period.

  16. Final Report for UW-Madison Portion of DE-SC0005301, "Collaborative Project: Pacific Decadal Variability and Central Pacific Warming El Niño in a Changing Climate"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimont, Daniel [University of Wisconsin - Madison

    2014-06-13

    This project funded two efforts at understanding the interactions between Central Pacific ENSO events, the mid-latitude atmosphere, and decadal variability in the Pacific. The first was an investigation of conditions that lead to Central Pacific (CP) and East Pacific (EP) ENSO events through the use of linear inverse modeling with defined norms. The second effort was a modeling study that combined output from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model (CAM4) with the Battisti (1988) intermediate coupled model. The intent of the second activity was to investigate the relationship between the atmospheric North Pacific Oscillation (NPO), the Pacific Meridional Mode (PMM), and ENSO. These two activities are described herein.

  17. 75 FR 73981 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Big Skate in the Central Regulatory Area of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... it would prevent NMFS from responding to the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would... et seq. Dated: November 24, 2010. Emily H. Menashes, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable...

  18. Fish assemblages in central and southern California using fish catch and effort data from the Recreational Fisheries Information Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset was provided by the Recreational Fisheries Information Network (RecFIN), and contained GPS coordinates for 680 CPFV trips during 1999 and 2001 at depths...

  19. Fish diversity in central and southern California using fish catch and effort data from the Recreational Fisheries Information Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset was provided by the Recreational Fisheries Information Network (RecFIN), and contained GPS coordinates for 680 CPFV trips during 1999 and 2001 at depths...

  20. [Nesting habitat characterization for Amazona oratrix (Psittaciformes: Psittacidae) in the Central Pacific, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrubio-Rico, Tiberio C; Álvarez-Jara, Margarito; Tellez-Garcia, Loreno; Tena-Morelos, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    The nesting requirements of the Yellow-headed Parrot (Amazona oratrix) are poorly understood, despite their broad historical distribution, high demand for pet trade and current endangered status. Information concerning their nesting requirements is required in order to design specific restoration and conser- vation actions. To assess this, we studied their nesting ecology in the Central Pacific, Michoacan, Mexico during a ten year period. The analyzed variables ranged from local scale nest site characteristics such as nesting tree species, dimensions, geographic positions, diet and nesting forest patches structure, to large scale features such as vegetation use and climatic variables associated to the nesting tree distributions by an ecological niche model using Maxent. We also evaluated the parrot tolerance to land management regimes, and compared the Pacific nest trees with 18 nest trees recorded in an intensively managed private ranch in Tamaulipas, Gulf of Mexico. Parrots nested in tall trees with canopy level cavities in 92 nest-trees recorded from 11 tree species. The 72.8% of nesting occurred in trees of Astronium graveolens, and Enterolobium cyclocarpum which qualified as key- stone trees. The forests where the parrots nested, presented a maximum of 54 tree species, 50% of which were identified as food source; besides, these areas also had a high abundance of trees used as food supply. The lowest number of tree species and trees to forage occurred in an active cattle ranch, whereas the highest species rich- ness was observed in areas with natural recovery. The nesting cavity entrance height from above ground of the Pacific nesting trees resulted higher than those found in the Gulf of Mexico. We hypothesize that the differences may be attributed to Parrot behavioral differences adapting to differential poaching pressure and cavity avail- ability. Nesting trees were found in six vegetation types; however the parrots preferred conserved and riparian semi

  1. Exploitation rates of two benthic resources across management regimes in central Chile: Evidence of illegal fishing in artisanal fisheries operating in open access areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Cazenave, Miguel; Subida, Maria Dulce; Fernandez, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    There is an urgent need to quantify the impacts of artisanal fisheries and define management practices that allow for the recovery and conservation of exploited stocks. The extent of illegal catch is particularly critical as a driver of overexploitation in artisanal fisheries. However, the lack of data at proper spatial scales limits the evaluation of illegal fishing and effectiveness of management practices. We used a catch curve analysis to estimate total instantaneous mortality as a proxy of fishing pressure in the artisanal benthic fishery in central Chile. We compared the patterns of total mortality in fishing grounds under the well-studied territorial use rights for fisheries system (TURF) immersed in a landscape of open access areas (OAA; no access restriction), and from these patterns determined the extent of illegal fishing in open access areas focusing on the two most frequently extracted resources: locos (Concholepas concholepas) and keyhole limpets (Fissurella spp.). The beauty of this seascape is the presence of the no-take (NT) area of Las Cruces as control (no fishing), allowing us to estimate natural mortality. Loco exploitation is banned in OAAs. However, loco mortality in OAAs was 92% higher than in the NT, and 42% higher than in TURFs. Keyhole limpet mortality was similar between TURFs and the NT, but doubled in OAAs. We also found strong differences in mortality among fishing grounds with the same level of protection (i.e. TURFs), and over time. Our results highlight (a) the high level of illegal fishing that may occur in artisanal fisheries under traditional management regimes, and (b) that TURFs can be effective to reduce fishing mortality. However, large variability among TURFs suggests the need for a deeper understanding of the drivers of success of TURFs.

  2. Localized double-array stacking analysis of PcP: D″ and ULVZ structure beneath the Cocos plate, Mexico, central Pacific, and north Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutko, Alexander R.; Lay, Thorne; Revenaugh, Justin

    2009-01-01

    A large, high quality P-wave data set comprising short-period and broadband signals sampling four separate regions in the lowermost mantle beneath the Cocos plate, Mexico, the central Pacific, and the north Pacific is analyzed using regional one-dimensional double-array stacking and modelling with reflectivity synthetics. A data-screening criterion retains only events with stable PcP energy in the final data stacks used for modelling and interpretation. This significantly improves the signal stacks relative to including unscreened observations, allows confident alignment on the PcP arrival and allows tight bounds to be placed on P-wave velocity structure above the core–mantle boundary (CMB). The PcP reflections under the Cocos plate are well modelled without any ultra-low velocity zone from 5 to 20°N. At latitudes from 15 to 20°N, we find evidence for two P-wave velocity discontinuities in the D″ region. The first is ∼182 km above the CMB with a δln Vp of +1.5%, near the same depth as a weaker discontinuity (PcP images that are well matched with the simple IASP91 structure, contradicting previous inferences of ULVZ presence in this region. These particular data are not very sensitive to any D″ discontinuities, and simply bound them to be PcP arrivals are compatible with only weak ULVZ (δln Vp ∼ 0 to −3%), and there is a weak D″ reflector with δln Vp = 0.5%, near 314 km above the CMB. These results indicate localized occurrence of detectable ULVZ structures rather than ubiquitous ULVZ structure and emphasize the distinctiveness between the large low shear velocity province under the central Pacific and circum-Pacific regions.

  3. Predicting connectivity of green turtles at Palmyra Atoll, central Pacific: a focus on mtDNA and dispersal modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naro-Maciel, Eugenia; Gaughran, Stephen J; Putman, Nathan F; Amato, George; Arengo, Felicity; Dutton, Peter H; McFadden, Katherine W; Vintinner, Erin C; Sterling, Eleanor J

    2014-04-06

    Population connectivity and spatial distribution are fundamentally related to ecology, evolution and behaviour. Here, we combined powerful genetic analysis with simulations of particle dispersal in a high-resolution ocean circulation model to investigate the distribution of green turtles foraging at the remote Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, central Pacific. We analysed mitochondrial sequences from turtles (n = 349) collected there over 5 years (2008-2012). Genetic analysis assigned natal origins almost exclusively (approx. 97%) to the West Central and South Central Pacific combined Regional Management Units. Further, our modelling results indicated that turtles could potentially drift from rookeries to Palmyra Atoll via surface currents along a near-Equatorial swathe traversing the Pacific. Comparing findings from genetics and modelling highlighted the complex impacts of ocean currents and behaviour on natal origins. Although the Palmyra feeding ground was highly differentiated genetically from others in the Indo-Pacific, there was no significant differentiation among years, sexes or stage-classes at the Refuge. Understanding the distribution of this foraging population advances knowledge of green turtles and contributes to effective conservation planning for this threatened species.

  4. Predicting connectivity of green turtles at Palmyra Atoll, central Pacific: a focus on mtDNA and dispersal modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naro-Maciel, Eugenia; Gaughran, Stephen J.; Putman, Nathan F.; Amato, George; Arengo, Felicity; Dutton, Peter H.; McFadden, Katherine W.; Vintinner, Erin C.; Sterling, Eleanor J.

    2014-01-01

    Population connectivity and spatial distribution are fundamentally related to ecology, evolution and behaviour. Here, we combined powerful genetic analysis with simulations of particle dispersal in a high-resolution ocean circulation model to investigate the distribution of green turtles foraging at the remote Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, central Pacific. We analysed mitochondrial sequences from turtles (n = 349) collected there over 5 years (2008–2012). Genetic analysis assigned natal origins almost exclusively (approx. 97%) to the West Central and South Central Pacific combined Regional Management Units. Further, our modelling results indicated that turtles could potentially drift from rookeries to Palmyra Atoll via surface currents along a near-Equatorial swathe traversing the Pacific. Comparing findings from genetics and modelling highlighted the complex impacts of ocean currents and behaviour on natal origins. Although the Palmyra feeding ground was highly differentiated genetically from others in the Indo-Pacific, there was no significant differentiation among years, sexes or stage-classes at the Refuge. Understanding the distribution of this foraging population advances knowledge of green turtles and contributes to effective conservation planning for this threatened species.

  5. Relationship between Precipitating Convection and Easterly Wave Dynamics in the Western Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    The main proposed goal of this research was a synthesis of radiosonde and radar time series from the TRMM validation experiment KWAJEX (Jul. 23 - Sep. 14 1999) with satellite datasets and forecast model based analyses, in order to characterize synoptic-scale disturbances passing through the Kwajalein (9 deg N 168 deg W) region on the north edge of the central Pacific ITCZ. The Sobel et al. paper summarizes our methodology and findings. A classic paper of Reed and Recker had documented the steady pulse of easterly waves modulating meridional wind, clouds and precipitation in and west of this region in a set of observations in boreal fall. Our study found easterly waves were much less organized and intense during KWAJEX, and only weakly correlated with daily area-averaged radar-derived precipitation and IR brightness temperature. Instead, we focused on three disturbances associated with the highest daily-averaged rainfall amounts during the period. We found by looking at NCEP reanalyses that only one was an easterly wave, while the other two corresponded to an equatorial Kelvin wave and a mixed Rossby-gravity wave, respectively. The contrast with Reed and Recker may be sampling variability, but the timing of KWAJEX, earlier in the year, and during suppressed (weak La Nina) conditions may also contribute to our different conclusions.

  6. Gross and microscopic morphology of lesions in Cnidaria from Palmyra Atoll, Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gareth J.; Work, Thierry M.; Aeby, Greta S.; Knapp, Ingrid S.; Davy, Simon K.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted gross and microscopic characterizations of lesions in Cnidaria from Palmyra Atoll, Central Pacific. We found growth anomalies (GA) to be the most commonly encountered lesion. Cases of discoloration and tissue loss were rare. GAs had a focal or multi-focal distribution and were predominantly nodular, exophytic, and umbonate. In scleractinians, the majority of GAs manifested as hyperplasia of the basal body wall (52% of cases), with an associated absence or reduction of polyp structure (mesenteries and filaments, actinopharynx and tentacles), and depletion of zooxanthellae in the gastrodermis of the upper body wall. In the soft corals Sinularia sp. and Lobophytum sp., GAs exclusively manifested as prominent hyperplasia of the coenenchyme with an increased density of solenia. In contrast to scleractinians, soft coral GAs displayed an inflammatory and necrotizing component with marked edema of the mesoglea, accompanied by infiltrates of variably-sized granular amoebocytes. Fungi, algae, sponges, and Crustacea were present in some scleractinian GAs, but absent in soft coral GAs. Fragmentation of tissues was a common finding in Acropora acuminata and Montipora cf. dilatata colonies with tissue loss, although no obvious causative agents were seen. Discoloration in the zoanthid, Palythoa tuberculosa, was found to be the result of necrosis, while in Lobophytum sp. discoloration was the result of zooxanthellar depletion (bleaching). Soft corals with discoloration or tissue loss showed a marked inflammatory response, however no obvious causative organisms were seen. Lesions that appeared similar at the gross level were revealed to be distinct by microscopy, emphasizing the importance of histopathology.

  7. Detection of nonylphenol and persistent organic pollutants in fish from the North Pacific Central Gyre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassel, Margy; Harwani, Suhash; Park, June-Soo; Jahn, Andrew

    2013-08-15

    Despite scientific and public concern, research on food web contamination from chemicals in plastic is limited, and distinguishing plastic sources from prey remains a challenge. We analyzed juvenile yellowtail (Seriola lalandi) from the North Pacific Central Gyre for plastic ingestion and tissue concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and nonionic surfactants to investigate potential contamination from plastic exposure. Ingestion of synthetic debris occurred in ~10% of the sample population. PCBs and DDTs were 352±240 (mean±SD) and 1425±1118 ng/g lw, respectively. PBDEs were 9.08±10.6 ng/g lw, with BDEs-47, 99, and 209 representing 90% of PBDEs. Nonylphenol (NP) was detected in one-third of the yellowtail with a mean of 52.8±88.5 ng/g ww overall and 167±72.3 ng/g ww excluding non-detects. Because environmental NP is strongly associated with wastewater treatment effluents, long-range transport is unlikely, and NP was previously measured in gyre plastic, we concluded that plastic-mediated exposure best explained our findings of NP in yellowtail.

  8. Os isotope dating and growth hiatuses of Co-rich crust from central Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Up to now, accurate determination of the growth age and hiatuses of the Co-rich crust is still a difficult work, which constrains the researches on the genesis, growth process, controlling factors, regional tectonics, paleo-oceanographic background, etc. of the Co-rich crust. This paper describes our work in determining the initial growth age of the Co-rich crust to be of the late Cretaceous Campanian Stage (about 75-80 Ma), by selecting the Co-rich crust with clear multi-layer structures in a central Pacific seamount for layer-by-layer sample analysis and using a number of chronological methods, such as Co flux dating, dating by correlation with 187Os/188Os evolution curves of seawater, and stratigraphic divi- sion by calcareous nannofossils. We have also discovered growth hiatuses with different time intervals in the early Paleocene, middle Eocene, late Eocene and early-middle Miocene, respectively. These re- sults have provided an important age background for further researches on the Co-rich crust growth process and the paleo-oceanographic environment evolution thereby revealed in the said region.

  9. Toward a classification of the Central Pacific El Niño

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascolini-Campbell, M.; Zanchettin, D.; Bothe, O.; Timmreck, C.; Matei, D.; Jungclaus, J. H.; Graf, H.-F.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the various methods currently available for distinguishing between the Central Pacific (CP) El Niño (or "El Niño Modoki") and the canonical El Niño by considering 10 different methods and 5 sea surface temperature (SST) datasets from 1880 to 2010. Years which are classified as CP El Niños with the greatest convergence between method and SST dataset are considered to provide a more robust identification of these events. The results identify 13 yr which are classified the most consistently as CP events: 1885/1886, 1914/1915, 1940/1941, 1958/1959, 1963/1964, 1968/1969, 1977/1978, 1986/1987, 1991/1992, 2002/2003, 2003/2004, 2004/2005 and 2009/2010. Our findings also indicate the persistence of CP events throughout the time period investigated, inciting the role of multidecadal natural climate variability in generating CP El Niños.

  10. Toward a classification of the Central Pacific El Niño

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pascolini-Campbell

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the various methods currently available for distinguishing between the Central Pacific (CP El Niño (or "El Niño Modoki" and the canonical El Niño by considering 10 different methods and 5 sea surface temperature (SST datasets from 1880 to 2010. Years which are classified as CP El Niños with the greatest convergence between method and SST dataset are considered to provide a more robust identification of these events. The results identify 13 yr which are classified the most consistently as CP events: 1885/1886, 1914/1915, 1940/1941, 1958/1959, 1963/1964, 1968/1969, 1977/1978, 1986/1987, 1991/1992, 2002/2003, 2003/2004, 2004/2005 and 2009/2010. Our findings also indicate the persistence of CP events throughout the time period investigated, inciting the role of multidecadal natural climate variability in generating CP El Niños.

  11. Potential impacts of historical disturbance on green turtle health in the unique & protected marine ecosystem of Palmyra Atoll (Central Pacific).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Katherine W; Gómez, Andrés; Sterling, Eleanor J; Naro-Maciel, Eugenia

    2014-12-15

    Palmyra Atoll, in the Central Pacific, is a unique marine ecosystem because of its remarkably intact food web and limited anthropogenic stressors. However during World War II the atoll was structurally reconfigured into a military installation and questions remain whether this may have impacted the health of the atoll's ecosystems and species. To address the issue we assessed green sea turtle (n=157) health and exposure to contaminants at this foraging ground from 2008 to 2012. Physical exams were performed and blood was sampled for testosterone analysis, plasma biochemistry analysis, hematology and heavy metal exposure. Hematological and plasma chemistries were consistent with concentrations reported for healthy green turtles. Heavy metal screenings revealed low concentrations of most metals, except for high concentrations of iron and aluminum. Body condition indices showed that turtles had poor body condition. In this study, we provide the first published blood values for a markedly healthy sea turtle population at a remote Central Pacific Atoll. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Modelling the effects of climate change, species interactions and fisheries - towards Ecosystem-based Fisheries Management in the Central Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Martin

    aim of this thesis is to develop a decision-support tool fit for achieving EBFM in the Central Baltic Sea, an ecosystem heavily impacted by overfishing and climate change. To that end, a theoretical approach for modelling multispecies population dynamics was combined with advanced statistical methods...

  13. The combined influence of Pacific decadal oscillation and Atlantic multidecadal oscillation on central Mexico since the early 1600s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungjae; Byrne, Roger; Böhnel, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Periodic droughts have been one of the most serious environmental issues in central Mexico since the earliest times. The impacts of future droughts are likely to become even more severe as the current global warming trend increases potential evaporation and moisture deficits. A full understanding of the mechanism underlying climate variability is imperative to narrow the uncertainty about future droughts and predict water availability. The climatic complexity generated by the combined influence of both Atlantic and Pacific forcings, however, causes considerable difficulty in interpreting central Mexican climate records. Also, the lack of high-resolution information regarding the climate in the recent past makes it difficult to clearly understand current drought mechanisms. Our new high-resolution δ18 O record from Hoya Rincon de Parangueo in central Mexico provides useful information on climate variations since the early 1600s. According to our results, the central Mexican climate has been predominantly controlled by the combined influence of the 20-year Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the 70-year Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). However, the AMO probably lost much of its influence in central Mexico in the early 20th century and the PDO has mostly driven climate change since. Marked dryness was mostly associated with co-occurrence of highly positive PDO and negative AMO between ∼1600 and 1900.

  14. The diverse crustal structure and magmatic evolution of the Manihiki Plateau, central Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hochmuth

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Manihiki Plateau is a Large Igneous Province (LIP in the central Pacific. It was emplaced as part of the "Super-LIP" Ontong Java Nui and experienced fragmentation into three sub-plateaus, possibly during the break-up of Ontong Java Nui. The Manihiki Plateau is presumably the centerpiece of this "Super-LIP" and its investigation can therefore decipher the break-up mechanisms as well as the evolution of the plateau after its initial emplacement. By analyzing two seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiles crossing the two largest sub-plateaus of the Manihiki Plateau, the High Plateau and the Western Plateaus, we give new insights into their crustal structure and magmatic evolution. The High Plateau shows a crustal structure of 20 km thickness and a seismic P wave velocity distribution, which is comparable to other LIPs. The High Plateau experienced a strong secondary volcanism, which can be seen in relicts of seamount chain volcanism. The Western Plateaus on the other hand show no extensive secondary volcanism and are mainly structured by fault systems and sedimentary basins. A constant decrease in Moho depth (9–17 km is a further indicator of crustal stretching on the Western Plateaus. Those findings lead to the conclusion, that the two sub-plateaus of the Manihiki Plateau experienced a different magmatic and tectonic history. Whereas the High Plateau experienced a secondary volcanism, the Western Plateaus underwent crustal stretching during and after the break-up of Ontong Java Nui. This indicates, that the sub-plateaus of the Manihiki Plateau play an individual part in the break-up history of Ontong Java Nui.

  15. Classification of seamount morphology and its evaluating significance of ferromanganese crust in the central Pacific Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Fengyou; SUN Guosheng; MA Weilin; LI Shoujun; QIAN Xinyan; ZHAO Hongqiao

    2006-01-01

    Using the SeaBeam technology, the morphology of seamount and its relation to the formation of cobalt-rich crust in the central Pacific Ocean were surveyed during the cruise in 2003 for marine mineral resources. The result shows that seamounts can be divided morphologically into the spire seamount and the flat topped seamount. These two types of seamount bear great differences in their landform, lithology and cobalt-rich crust. On the upper portion of the flat topped seamount, the flat top and the sharp escarpments are unfavorable to the growth of crust, and, consequently, the crusts here are mostly laminar or gravelly, their thicknesses generally show great variations, and the consecutive ore body often develops in its deep water region. On the spire topped seamount, however, the flat area is small, and its gradient is constant without large variation from the top to the bottom. This favors the growth of cobalt-rich crust and often leads to consecutive tabular ore body of medium thickness, occurring on the spire topped seamount from the shallow water region to the deep water region. The cobalt-rich crust on the spire topped seamount is much better than that on the flat topped seamount for the crust abundance, crust coverage and number of ore-occurrences within unit area. Furthermore, the crust on the spire topped seamount is rich in cobalt, nickel, manganese elements of high economic value. Because the crust with high quality ore often occurs in the shallow water region on the spire topped seamount, it can be mined and use more easily in the future.

  16. Seafloor geomorphology and geology of the Kingman Reef-Palmyra Atoll region, Central Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakins, Barry; Barth, Ginger; Scheirer, Dan; Mosher, Dave; Armstrong, Andy

    2017-04-01

    Kingman Reef and Palmyra Atoll are the exposed summits of two seamounts within the Line Islands Volcanic Chain in the Central Pacific Ocean. Both are U.S. Territories, and the Exclusive Economic Zone around the islands was partially surveyed in 1991 with GLORIA sidescan sonar and seismic reflection profiling. New multibeam swath sonar surveys were conducted in 2010, 2015, and 2016 around the islands, in support of U.S. Extended Continental Shelf investigations. Numerous transits through the region by research vessels have collected additional multibeam swath sonar data. We present new, detailed maps of bathymetry, sidescan sonar imagery, geology, and sediment isopachs of the seafloor surrounding the islands, and how these have informed our understanding of the islands' margins. The islands are the last subaerial remnants of a complex, horse-shoe-shaped volcanic platform spanning roughly 200 km in diameter. The elevated platform from which the seamounts arise comprises at least 10 individual volcanic centers that have heights exceeding 3000m above the nearby abyssal plains. Gravity modeling suggests that the elevated platform is compensated by thickened crust. Strong carbonate caps and voluminous sediment accumulations flanking the platform indicate that the volcanoes were once shallow-water or emergent systems. These systems produced vast quantities of carbonate sediment that were shed to a deep interior basin to the east of Palmyra Atoll, and to nearby abyssal plains. The identification of mass failures, sediment reworking and bedforms, and channel networks provide evidence for extensive sedimentary processes around these volcanic centers. Analysis of the seamounts atop the elevated platform and in the seamount province to the northwest shows that flat-topped seamounts ("guyots") are principally found at depths shallower than 1300 meters, while peaked seamounts are almost exclusively found at greater depths. This constrains the amount of regional subsidence that

  17. Intraspecific variability in the life histories of endemic coral-reef fishes between photic and mesophotic depths across the Central Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, M. S.; Taylor, B. M.; Franklin, E. C.

    2017-06-01

    Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) represent the lowest depth distribution inhabited by many coral reef-associated organisms. Research on fishes associated with MCEs is sparse, leading to a critical lack of knowledge of how reef fish found at mesophotic depths may vary from their shallow reef conspecifics. We investigated intraspecific variability in body condition and growth of three Hawaiian endemics collected from shallow, photic reefs (5-33 m deep) and MCEs (40-75 m) throughout the Hawaiian Archipelago and Johnston Atoll: the detritivorous goldring surgeonfish, Ctenochaetus strigosus, and the planktivorous threespot chromis, Chromis verater, and Hawaiian dascyllus, Dascyllus albisella. Estimates of body condition and size-at-age varied between shallow and mesophotic depths; however, these demographic differences were outweighed by the magnitude of variability found across the latitudinal gradient of locations sampled within the Central Pacific. Body condition and maximum body size were lowest in samples collected from shallow and mesophotic Johnston Atoll sites, with no difference occurring between depths. Samples from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands tended to have the highest body condition and reached the largest body sizes, with differences between shallow and mesophotic sites highly variable among species. The findings of this study support newly emerging research demonstrating intraspecific variability in the life history of coral-reef fish species whose distributions span shallow and mesophotic reefs. This suggests not only that the conservation and fisheries management should take into consideration differences in the life histories of reef-fish populations across spatial scales, but also that information derived from studies of shallow fishes be applied with caution to conspecific populations in mesophotic coral environments.

  18. Population structure and phylogeography reveal pathways of colonization by a migratory marine reptile (Chelonia mydas) in the central and eastern Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Peter H; Jensen, Michael P; Frey, Amy; LaCasella, Erin; Balazs, George H; Zárate, Patricia; Chassin-Noria, Omar; Sarti-Martinez, Adriana Laura; Velez, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Climate, behavior, ecology, and oceanography shape patterns of biodiversity in marine faunas in the absence of obvious geographic barriers. Marine turtles are an example of highly migratory creatures with deep evolutionary lineages and complex life histories that span both terrestrial and marine environments. Previous studies have focused on the deep isolation of evolutionary lineages (>3 mya) through vicariance; however, little attention has been given to the pathways of colonization of the eastern Pacific and the processes that have shaped diversity within the most recent evolutionary time. We sequenced 770 bp of the mtDNA control region to examine the stock structure and phylogeography of 545 green turtles from eight different rookeries in the central and eastern Pacific. We found significant differentiation between the geographically separated nesting populations and identified five distinct stocks (F ST = 0.08-0.44, P Chelonia mydas form a monophyletic group containing 3 subclades, with Hawaii more closely related to the eastern Pacific than western Pacific populations. The split between sampled central/eastern and western Pacific haplotypes was estimated at around 0.34 mya, suggesting that the Pacific region west of Hawaii has been a more formidable barrier to gene flow in C. mydas than the East Pacific Barrier. Our results suggest that the eastern Pacific was colonized from the western Pacific via the Central North Pacific and that the Revillagigedos Islands provided a stepping-stone for radiation of green turtles from the Hawaiian Archipelago to the eastern Pacific. Our results fit with a broader paradigm that has been described for marine biodiversity, where oceanic islands, such as Hawaii and Revillagigedo, rather than being peripheral evolutionary "graveyards", serve as sources and recipients of diversity and provide a mechanism for further radiation.

  19. 78 FR 72586 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries off West Coast States; Biennial Specifications and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... specifications and management measures for most species of the Pacific Coast groundfish ] fishery (77 FR 67974... species of the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery was published on January 3, 2013 (78 FR 580). The Council... Sablefish Daily Trip Limit (DTL) Fishery Management Measures Limited Entry Fixed Gear and Open...

  20. 78 FR 49190 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Biennial Specifications and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... specifications and management measures for most species of the Pacific Coast groundfish fishery (77 FR 67974... species of the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery was published on January 3, 2013 (78 FR 580). The Council... Entry Fixed Gear (LEFG) and Open Access (OA) Sablefish Daily Trip Limit (DTL) Fisheries North of 36...

  1. Shifting from marine reserves to maritime zoning for conservation of Pacific bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibert, John; Senina, Inna; Lehodey, Patrick; Hampton, John

    2012-10-30

    Over 50% of the total bigeye tuna (BET) landed in the Western Central Pacific Ocean is caught incidentally in the purse seine fishery and sold for canning at prices less than US$2/kg. The remainder is landed in longline fisheries directed at BET and sold as fresh or frozen tuna at prices greater than US$10/kg. The combined fishing mortality by all gears will soon reduce the BET biomass in the Pacific Ocean to less than that capable of producing maximum sustainable yield. Closure of the high-seas enclaves in 2009 was hailed as a conservation measure, but was not scientifically evaluated before implementation and appears to have had no beneficial effect on the BET stock. A spatially explicit age-structured ecosystem model, SEAPODYM, is used to simulate alternative area-based fishery management policies to conserve bigeye tuna in the Western Central Pacific Ocean. Closing the high-seas enclaves to purse seine fishing has negligible effect on the BET biomass. Fishery management policies that control mortality on both juveniles and adults, through prohibition of fish aggregation devices in the purse seine fishery and restrictions on longline fishing in spawning areas, are the most efficient conservation policies. Large-scale benefits from bigeye conservation measures will become apparent only in the 2030s, assuming timely implementation and minimal effects of climate change.

  2. Nitrous oxide distribution and its origin in the central and eastern South Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Charpentier

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The biogeochemical mechanism of bacterial N2O production in the ocean has been the subject of many discussions in recent years. New isotopomeric tools can help further knowledge on N2O sources in natural environments. This research shows and compares hydrographic, nitrous oxide concentration, and N2O isotopic and isotopomeric data from three stations across the South Pacific Ocean, from the center of the subtropical oligotrophic gyre (~26° S; 114° W to the upwelling zone along the central Chilean coast (~34° S. Althought AOU/N2O and NO3 trends support the idea that most of N2O source (mainly from intermediate water (200–1000 m come from nitrification, N2O isotopomeric composition (intramolecular distribution of 15N isotopes in N2O reveals an abrupt change in the mechanism of nitrous oxide production, always observed through lower SP (site preference of 15N, at a high – stability layer, where particles could act as microsites and N2O would be produced by nitrifier denitrification (reduction of nitrite to nitrous oxide mediated by primary nitrifiers. There, nitrifier denitrification can account for 40% and 50% (center and east border of the gyre, respectively of the nitrous oxide produced in this specific layer. This process could be associated with the deceleration of sinking organic particles in highly stable layers of the water column. In constrast, coastal upwelling system is characterized by oxygen deficient condition and some N deficit in a eutrophic system. Here, nitrous oxide accumulates up to 480% saturation, and isotopic and isotopomer signal show highly complex nitrous oxide production processes, which presumably reflect both the effect of nitrification and denitrification at low oxygen levels on N2O production, but non N2O consumption by denitrification was observed.

  3. Environmental history of mangrove vegetation in Pacific west-central Mexico during the last 1300 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Lorena Figueroa-Rangel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMangroves are a highly threatened ecosystem due to climate change and human activity, which increases coastal vulnerability. Knowledge about the ecological dynamics of mangroves on a centennial timescale can reveal the different responses in vegetation, which is useful for implementing basic actions for mangrove restoration, conservation and management. A mangrove ecosystem in the Cuyutlán Lagoon area along the Pacific coast of west-central Mexico is significantly altered as a result of industrialization, salt extraction, and road construction. The long-term dynamics of the mangrove ecosystem has also been controlled by Holocene climatic variability. This study reconstructs the environmental history of mangrove vegetation around the Cuyutlán Lagoon during the last ~1300 years in response to periods of human activity and climate change. The reconstruction was performed using paleoecological techniques in sediment cores that include the use of fossil pollen as a proxy for vegetation and magnetic susceptibility and geochemical data (determined by loss-on-ignition and X-ray fluorescence as a proxy for past environmental changes. The chronology was determined using 14C dating and the age-depth model was constructed by linear interpolation. Redundancy analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS were used to discern patterns of distribution of the different proxies. Results revealed that the mangrove pollen assemblage of the Cuyutlán Lagoon was dominated by the arboreal taxa Rhizophora mangle, Euphorbiaceae, Moraceae and Pinaceae, herbaceous taxa like Poaceae, Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae, and aquatics such as Typhaceae and Cyperaceae. NMDS showed a clear separation between two events of human activity—the Spanish Occupation of Colima (~AD 1523-1524 and the opening of the Manzanillo port (~AD 1824-1825. Climate change events such as the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA (~AD 800-1200 and the Little Ice Age (LIA (~AD 1350-1850 were

  4. Nitrous oxide distribution and its origin in the central and eastern South Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Charpentier

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of microbial nitrous oxide (N2O production in the ocean have been the subject of many discussions in recent years. New isotopomeric tools can further refine our knowledge of N2O sources in natural environments. This study compares hydrographic, N2O concentration, and N2O isotopic and isotopomeric data from three stations along a coast-perpendicular transect in the South Pacific Ocean, extending from the center (Sts. GYR and EGY of the subtropical oligotrophic gyre (~26° S; 114° W to the upwelling zone (St. UPX off the central Chilean coast (~34° S. Although AOU/N2O and NO3 trends support the idea that most of the N2O (mainly from intermediate water (200–600 m comes from nitrification, N2O isotopomeric composition (intramolecular distribution of 15N isotopes expressed as SP (site preference of 15N shows low values (10 to 12permil that could be attributed to the production through of microbial nitrifier denitrification (reduction of nitrite to N2O mediated by ammonium oxidizers. The coincidence of this SP signal with high – stability layer, where sinking organic particles can accumulate, suggests that N2O could be produced by nitrifier denitrification inside particles. It is postulated that deceleration of particles in the pycnocline can modify the advection - diffusion balance inside particles, allowing the accumulation of nitrite and O2 depletion suitable for nitrifier denitrication. As lateral advection seems to be relatively insignificant in the gyre, in situ nitrifier denitrification could account for 40–50% of the N2O produced in this layer. In contrast, coastal upwelling system is characterized by O2 deficient condition and some N deficit in a eutrophic system. Here, N2O accumulates up to 480% saturation, and isotopic and

  5. An Empty Donut Hole: the Great Collapse of a North American Fishery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Bailey

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma is North America's most abundant and lucrative natural fishery, and is the world's largest fishery for human food. The little-known demise of the "Donut Hole" stock of pollock in the Aleutian Basin of the central Bering Sea during the 1980s is the most spectacular fishery collapse in North American history, dwarfing the famous crashes of the northern cod and Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax. This collapse has received scant recognition and became evident only in 1993 when fishing was banned by an international moratorium; nearly 20 years later it has not recovered. The history of fishing in the North Pacific Ocean after World War II offers some insights into how the Donut Hole pollock fishery developed, and the societal and economic pressures behind it that so influenced the stock's fate. Overfishing was, without a doubt, the greatest contributor to the collapse of the Aleutian Basin pollock fishery, but a lack of knowledge about population biocomplexity added to the confusion of how to best manage the harvest. Unfortunately, the big scientific questions regarding the relationship of Donut Hole fish to other stocks are still unanswered.

  6. Paleomagnetism of the Tertiary Clarno Formation of central Oregon and its significance for the tectonic history of the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromme, C. Sherman; Beck, Myrl E., Jr.; Wells, Ray E.; Engebretson, David C.

    1986-12-01

    The Clarno Formation, a mostly Eocene and partly early Oligocene sequence of andesitic lavas and volcaniclastic rocks, is the oldest Tertiary formation exposed in north central Oregon. Remanent magnetization directions at 46 sites in the lavas provide a paleomagnetic pole at 84°N, 278°E with a 95% confidence cone of 7°. Comparison of this pole with the North American reference pole for Eocene time indicates that the Clarno Formation has rotated 16° clockwise with an uncertainty of 10° but has undergone no significant latitudinal displacement. Further comparison with paleomagnetic data from the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group and Steens Basalt shows that large-scale block rotations in the eastern Columbia Embayment ceased sometime between 38 m.y. and 15 m.y. A paleogeographic reconstruction for 38 m.y. is offered which is consistent with the observed rotation of the Clarno and with the other paleomagnetic data from the Pacific Northwest, which are briefly reviewed. This reconstruction shows that it is possible to account for virtually all of the paleomagnetically indicated rotations in pre-Miocene Tertiary rocks of the Pacific Northwest by an extensional tectonic model. As a consequence, only part of the rotations in the pre-Tertiary rocks of the eastern Columbia Embayment need to be the result of accretionary tectonics. The initiation of magmatism in the eastern Columbia Embayment that is represented by the Clarno Formation itself may have been contemporaneous with the beginning of crustal extension in the Pacific Northwest.

  7. 76 FR 11969 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... decrease the future stock of the species, as well as harvest limits, thereby reducing future potential... States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... this species on July 1, 2011. Vessels with Pacific sardine catch must be at shore and in the process...

  8. Re-evaluating the health of coral reef communities: baselines and evidence for human impacts across the central Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer E; Brainard, Rusty; Carter, Amanda; Grillo, Saray; Edwards, Clinton; Harris, Jill; Lewis, Levi; Obura, David; Rohwer, Forest; Sala, Enric; Vroom, Peter S; Sandin, Stuart

    2016-01-13

    Numerous studies have documented declines in the abundance of reef-building corals over the last several decades and in some but not all cases, phase shifts to dominance by macroalgae have occurred. These assessments, however, often ignore the remainder of the benthos and thus provide limited information on the present-day structure and function of coral reef communities. Here, using an unprecedentedly large dataset collected within the last 10 years across 56 islands spanning five archipelagos in the central Pacific, we examine how benthic reef communities differ in the presence and absence of human populations. Using islands as replicates, we examine whether benthic community structure is associated with human habitation within and among archipelagos and across latitude. While there was no evidence for coral to macroalgal phase shifts across our dataset we did find that the majority of reefs on inhabited islands were dominated by fleshy non-reef-building organisms (turf algae, fleshy macroalgae and non-calcifying invertebrates). By contrast, benthic communities from uninhabited islands were more variable but in general supported more calcifiers and active reef builders (stony corals and crustose coralline algae). Our results suggest that cumulative human impacts across the central Pacific may be causing a reduction in the abundance of reef builders resulting in island scale phase shifts to dominance by fleshy organisms. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. 2005 Joint U.S.-Canada Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Survey of Pacific Hake (Merluccius productus) (MF0509, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists from the Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring (FRAM) division at the NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) and the Pacific region...

  10. 2007 Joint U.S.-Canada Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Survey of Pacific Hake (Merluccius productus) (MF0710, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists from the Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring (FRAM) division at the NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) and the Pacific region...

  11. 2009 Joint U.S.-Canada Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Survey of Pacific Hake (Merluccius productus) (MF0903, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists from the Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring (FRAM) division at the NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) and the Pacific region...

  12. 2011 Joint U.S.-Canada Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Survey of Pacific Hake (Merluccius productus) (SH1103, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists from the Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring (FRAM) division at the NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) and the Pacific region...

  13. Impacts of extensive driftnet fishery and late 1990s climate regime shift on dominant epipelagic nekton in the Transition Region and Subtropical Frontal Zone: Implications for fishery management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichii, T.; Nishikawa, H.; Igarashi, H.; Okamura, H.; Mahapatra, K.; Sakai, M.; Wakabayashi, T.; Inagake, D.; Okada, Y.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the impacts of extensive anthropogenic (high seas driftnet squid fishery) and natural (late 1990s major climate regime shift) events on dominant epipelagic fish, squid, and shark in the central North Pacific Transition Region based on a driftnet survey covering the years 1979-2006. Fishing was conducted by Japan, Korea and Taiwan to target neon flying squid in the period 1979-1992, resulting in a decline in stocks of the target species and non-target species (Pacific pomfret and juvenile blue shark), which were by-catch of this fishery. The catch was found to be at the maximum sustainable yield (MSY) level for neon flying squid, the underfished level for juvenile blue shark, but the overfished level for Pacific pomfret. The MSY of Pacific pomfret indicated that this species is more susceptible to exploitation than previously considered. In response to the late 1990s regime shift, neon flying squid and Pacific saury showed low stock levels in 1999-2002 and 1998-2002, respectively, as a result of reduced productivity in their nursery grounds (the Subtropical Frontal Zone and Kuroshio Extension Bifurcation Region, respectively). On the other hand, Pacific pomfret showed no decreasing trend in stock during the low- and intermediate-productivity regimes because of the high productivity of their main spawning/nursery ground (Transition Zone Chlorophyll Front), which was independent of the regime shifts. Thus, squid and saury appear to be more susceptible to the regime shift than pomfret. We discuss the implications for stock management of the species-specific responses to the fishery and the regime shift.

  14. Nutrients, temperature, and salinity from bottle cats in the North Pacific Ocean by the Pacific Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography from 27 August 1950 to 17 November 1997 (NODC Accession 0000843)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nutrients, temperature, and salinity data were collected using bottle casts in the North Pacific Ocean from 27 August 1950 to 17 November 1997. Data were submitted...

  15. North pacific right whale surveys conducted in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 2007-08-01 to 2011-09-10 (NCEI Accession 0133935)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The North Pacific right whale (NPRW) was heavily hunted between the 17th and the 20th centuries. Protection was supposedly afforded by international treaties in the...

  16. Decadal variability in the occurrence of wintertime haze in central eastern China tied to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sen; Li, Jianping; Sun, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Haze is a serious issue in China with increasing concerns, and understanding the factors driving decadal-scale variations in haze occurrence is relevant for government policymaking. Using a comprehensive observational haze dataset, we demonstrate notable decadal fluctuations in the number of haze days (HD) during winter in central eastern China, showing a decline since the mid-1980s. The leading mode of the wintertime HD features an increasing trend for 1959-2012 in eastern China, highly correlated with China’s gross domestic product (GDP) that represents increasing trend of pollutant emissions, and to a lesser extent meteorological factors. The second mode shows decadal variations in central eastern China associated with Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Observations and numerical simulations suggest that Mongolia High and corresponding descending motion tend to be enhanced (weakened) in central eastern China during the positive (negative) phase of PDO. With PDO shifting towards a negative phase, the weakened Mongolia High and ascending anomalies make the air unstable and conduce to the spread of pollutants, leading to the decline in the wintertime HD over central eastern China since the mid-1980s. Based on above physical mechanisms, a linear model based on PDO and GDP metrics provided a good fit to the observed HD.

  17. Decadal variability in the occurrence of wintertime haze in central eastern China tied to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sen; Li, Jianping; Sun, Cheng

    2016-06-10

    Haze is a serious issue in China with increasing concerns, and understanding the factors driving decadal-scale variations in haze occurrence is relevant for government policymaking. Using a comprehensive observational haze dataset, we demonstrate notable decadal fluctuations in the number of haze days (HD) during winter in central eastern China, showing a decline since the mid-1980s. The leading mode of the wintertime HD features an increasing trend for 1959-2012 in eastern China, highly correlated with China's gross domestic product (GDP) that represents increasing trend of pollutant emissions, and to a lesser extent meteorological factors. The second mode shows decadal variations in central eastern China associated with Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Observations and numerical simulations suggest that Mongolia High and corresponding descending motion tend to be enhanced (weakened) in central eastern China during the positive (negative) phase of PDO. With PDO shifting towards a negative phase, the weakened Mongolia High and ascending anomalies make the air unstable and conduce to the spread of pollutants, leading to the decline in the wintertime HD over central eastern China since the mid-1980s. Based on above physical mechanisms, a linear model based on PDO and GDP metrics provided a good fit to the observed HD.

  18. An estimate of equatorial wave energy flux at 9- to 90-day periods in the Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Charles C.; Richman, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Deep fluctuations in current along the equator in the Central Pacific are dominated by coherent structures which correspond closely to narrow-band propagating equatorial waves. Currents were measured roughly at 1500 and 3000 m depths at five moorings between 144 and 148 deg W from January 1981 to March 1983, as part of the Pacific Equatorial Ocean Dynamics program. In each frequency band resolved, a single complex empirical orthogonal function accounts for half to three quarters of the observed variance in either zonal or meridional current. Dispersion for equatorial first meridional Rossby and Rossby gravity waves is consistent with the observed vertical-zonal coherence structure. The observations indicate that energy flux is westward and downward in long first meridional mode Rossby waves at periods 45 days and longer, and eastward and downward in short first meridional mode Rossby waves and Rossby-gravity waves at periods 30 days and shorter. A local minimum in energy flux occurs at periods corresponding to a maximum in upper-ocean meridional current energy contributed by tropical instability waves. Total vertical flux across the 9- to 90-day period range is 2.5 kW/m.

  19. Floristic account of the marine benthic algae from Jarvis Island and Kingman Reef, Line Islands, Central Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vroom, P.S.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The marine benthic algae from Jarvis Island and Kingman Reef were identified from collections obtained from the Whippoorwill Expedition in 1924, the Itasca Expedition in 1935, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Taney in 1938, the Smithsonian Institution’s Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program in 1964 and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (RAMP in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004 and 2006. A total of 124 species, representing 8 Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae, 82 Rhodophyta (red algae, 6 Heterokontophyta (brown algae and 28 Chlorophyta (green algae, are reported from both islands. Seventy-nine and 95 species of marine benthic algae are recorded from Jarvis Island and Kingman Reef, respectively. Of the 124 species, 77 species or 62% (4 blue-green algae, 57 red algae, 2 brown algae and 14 green algae have never before been reported from the 11 remote reefs, atolls and low islands comprising the Line Islands in the Central Pacific.

  20. Climate-related response of dust flux to the central equatorial Pacific over the past 150 kyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobel, A. W.; McManus, J. F.; Anderson, R. F.; Winckler, G.

    2017-01-01

    High resolution paleoclimate records from low latitudes are critical for understanding the role of the tropics in transmitting and generating feedbacks for high-latitude climate change on glacial-interglacial and millennial timescales. Here we present three new records of 230Thxs,0-normalized 232Th-derived dust fluxes from the central equatorial Pacific spanning the last 150 kyr at millennial-resolution. All three dust flux records share the "sawtooth" pattern characteristic of glacial-interglacial cycles in ice volume, confirming a coherent response to global climate forcing on long timescales. These records permit a detailed examination of millennial variability in tropical dust fluxes related to abrupt perturbations in oceanic and atmospheric circulation. Increases in dust flux in association with at least six of the longest Greenland stadials provide evidence that abrupt, high-latitude climate oscillations influenced the atmospheric aerosol load in the equatorial Pacific, with implications for both direct and indirect effects on the tropical energy balance. Our latitudinal transect of cores captures shifts in the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in response to variations in the interhemispheric thermal gradient associated with cooling in Greenland and bipolar seesaw warming in Antarctica. These observations demonstrate that changes in the energy and hydrologic balance of the tropics were repeated features of the penultimate deglaciation, last glacial inception and last glacial cycle, and highlight the role of the tropical atmosphere as a dynamic and responsive component of Earth's climate system.

  1. Food web and fish stock changes in central Chile: comparing the roles of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) predation, the environment, and fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, Sergio; Arancibia, Hugo

    2013-10-01

    We analyzed recent food web and fish stock changes in the central Chile marine ecosystem, comparing the roles of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) as predator, the environment, and fishing. To accomplish this we used food web modeling and the Ecopath with Ecosim software (EwE). The principal fish stocks have experienced wide decadal fluctuations in the past 30 years, including stock collapses of horse mackerel (Trachurus murphyi) and hake (Merluccius gayi), and there was a large influx of jumbo squid during the mid-2000s. We used two EwE models representing the food web off central Chile to test the hypothesis that predation by jumbo squid has been significant in explaining the dynamics of the main fishing resources and other species in the study area. Results indicate that predation by jumbo squid on fish stocks is lower than that of other predators (e.g. hake) and the fishery. Long-term fluctuations (1978-2004) in the biomass of the main fish stocks (as well as other components of the food web) seem to be related to fishing and to variation in primary production, rather than to predation by jumbo squid alone. Jumbo squid seems to play a role as predator rather than prey in the system, but its impacts are low when compared with the impacts of other predators and fishing. Therefore, we conclude that jumbo squid predation on its prey was not the primary force behind the collapse of important fish stocks off central Chile. Future efforts should be directed to better understanding factors that trigger sudden increases in jumbo squid abundance off central Chile, as well as modeling its trophic impacts.

  2. A comparison of fishery biology of jumbo flying squid, Dosidicus gigas outside three Exclusive Economic Zones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bilin; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian

    2013-05-01

    Although many studies on the fishery biology of jumbo flying squid, Dosidicus gigas, have been conducted in the coastal areas within Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) of various countries due to its commercial and ecological importance, limited biological information is available from waters outside these EEZs. In this paper, we examined D. gigas fishery biology from waters outside Chilean, Peruvian and Costa Rican EEZs, based on the fishery data collected by Chinese jigging vessels during 2006 to 2010. The dominant mantle lengths of D. gigas were 350-450 mm, 250-400 mm and 250-350 mm outside Chilean, Peruvian and Costa Rican EEZs, respectively. Size structure analysis show that a medium-sized group existed mostly in the waters outside the Chilean and Peruvian EEZs, whereas a small-sized group occurred mainly in the waters outside the Costa Rican EEZ. The longevity of the squid outside the Costa Rican EEZ was less than 10 months, while most of those outside Chilean and Peruvian EEZs were about 1-1.5 years and very few large individuals were 1.5-2 years old. A higher percentage of mature individuals existed outside Costa Rican EEZ implying the region as a potential spawning ground, while lower proportions of mature squid outside the Peruvian and Chilean EEZs indicated that spawning may be occurring outside our study area. Spatial differences in sizes at maturity of the squid are thought to be result from different environmental factors especially different temperature and nutrition among the three areas. Stomach-content analysis showed that cannibalism was important in the diet of D. gigas. Stress generated by jigging may increase the incidence of cannibalism.

  3. A comparison of fishery biology of jumbo flying squid,Dosidicus gigas outside three Exclusive Economic Zones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bilin; CHEN Xinjun; YI Qian

    2013-01-01

    Although many studies on the fishery biology of jumbo flying squid,Dosidicus gigas,have been conducted in the coastal areas within Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) of various countries due to its commercial and ecological importance,limited biological information is available from waters outside these EEZs.In this paper,we examined D.gigas fishery biology from waters outside Chilean,Peruvian and Costa Rican EEZs,based on the fishery data collected by Chinese jigging vessels during 2006 to 2010.The dominant mantle lengths of D.gigas were 350-450 mm,250-400 mm and 250-350 mm outside Chilean,Peruvian and Costa Rican EEZs,respectively.Size structure analysis show that a medium-sized group existed mostly in the waters outside the Chilean and Peruvian EEZs,whereas a small-sized group occurred mainly in the waters outside the Costa Rican EEZ.The longevity of the squid outside the Costa Rican EEZ was less than 10 months,while most of those outside Chilean and Peruvian EEZs were about 1-1.5 years and very few large individuals were 1.5-2 years old.A higher percentage of mature individuals existed outside Costa Rican EEZ implying the region as a potential spawning ground,while lower proportions of mature squid outside the Peruvian and Chilean EEZs indicated that spawning may be occurring outside our study area.Spatial differences in sizes at maturity of the squid are thought to be result from different environmental factors especially different temperature and nutrition among the three areas.Stomach-content analysis showed that cannibalism was important in the diet of D.gigas.Stress generated by jigging may increase the incidence of cannibalism.

  4. Fisheries Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Fisheries districts data layer is part of a larger dataset that contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset...

  5. Genetic differentiation in blue shark, Prionace glauca, from the central Pacific Ocean, as inferred by mitochondrial cytochrome b region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwen; Dai, Xiaojie; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Tian, Siquan; He, Shan; Wu, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Six hundred and ninety-seven base pairs of cytochrome b gene of mtDNA was sequenced and analyzed for 78 blue shark Prionace glauca individuals from three sampled locations in the central Pacific Ocean (CPO). In total, three polymorphic sites were detected which defined four haplotypes. The haplotype diversity (h) ranged from 0.517 to 0.768, and nucleotide diversity (π) was between 0.0007 and 0.0011. Analysis of molecular variance indicated a non-significant differentiation among subpopulations. Furthermore, pairwise FST score analysis revealed a non-significant differentiation among three sampled regions. Generally, low genetic differences were found between different geographic locations in the CPO. This study suggests a single panmictic population of P. glauca in the CPO.

  6. Anthropogenic contaminants in Indo-Pacific humpback and Australian snubfin dolphins from the central and southern Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnazzi, Daniele; Fossi, Maria Cristina; Parra, Guido J; Harrison, Peter L; Maltese, Silvia; Coppola, Daniele; Soccodato, Alice; Bent, Michael; Marsili, Letizia

    2013-11-01

    We present the first evidence of accumulation of organochlorine compounds (DDTs, PCBs, HCB) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Indo-Pacific humpback and Australian snubfin dolphins from the central and southern Great Barrier Reef. These dolphins are considered by the Great Barrier Marine Park Authority to be high priority species for management. Analyses of biopsy samples, collected from free ranging individuals, showed PAHs levels comparable to those reported from highly industrialized countries. DDTs and HCB were found at low levels, while in some individuals, PCBs were above thresholds over which immunosuppression and reproductive anomalies occur. These results highlight the need for ongoing monitoring of these and other contaminants, and their potential adverse effects on dolphins and other marine fauna. This is particularly important given the current strategic assessment of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area being undertaken by the Australian Government and the Queensland Government.

  7. There's no place like home: crown-of-thorns outbreaks in the central pacific are regionally derived and independent events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Molly A; Bird, Christopher E; Skillings, Derek J; Smouse, Peter E; Toonen, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    One of the most significant biological disturbances on a tropical coral reef is a population outbreak of the fecund, corallivorous crown-of-thorns sea star, Acanthaster planci. Although the factors that trigger an initial outbreak may vary, successive outbreaks within and across regions are assumed to spread via the planktonic larvae released from a primary outbreak. This secondary outbreak hypothesis is predominantly based on the high dispersal potential of A. planci and the assertion that outbreak populations (a rogue subset of the larger population) are genetically more similar to each other than they are to low-density non-outbreak populations. Here we use molecular techniques to evaluate the spatial scale at which A. planci outbreaks can propagate via larval dispersal in the central Pacific Ocean by inferring the location and severity of gene flow restrictions from the analysis of mtDNA control region sequence (656 specimens, 17 non-outbreak and six outbreak locations, six archipelagos, and three regions). Substantial regional, archipelagic, and subarchipelagic-scale genetic structuring of A. planci populations indicate that larvae rarely realize their dispersal potential and outbreaks in the central Pacific do not spread across the expanses of open ocean. On a finer scale, genetic partitioning was detected within two of three islands with multiple sampling sites. The finest spatial structure was detected at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, between the lagoon and forereef habitats (<10 km). Despite using a genetic marker capable of revealing subtle partitioning, we found no evidence that outbreaks were a rogue genetic subset of a greater population. Overall, outbreaks that occur at similar times across population partitions are genetically independent and likely due to nutrient inputs and similar climatic and ecological conditions that conspire to fuel plankton blooms.

  8. There's no place like home: crown-of-thorns outbreaks in the central pacific are regionally derived and independent events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly A Timmers

    Full Text Available One of the most significant biological disturbances on a tropical coral reef is a population outbreak of the fecund, corallivorous crown-of-thorns sea star, Acanthaster planci. Although the factors that trigger an initial outbreak may vary, successive outbreaks within and across regions are assumed to spread via the planktonic larvae released from a primary outbreak. This secondary outbreak hypothesis is predominantly based on the high dispersal potential of A. planci and the assertion that outbreak populations (a rogue subset of the larger population are genetically more similar to each other than they are to low-density non-outbreak populations. Here we use molecular techniques to evaluate the spatial scale at which A. planci outbreaks can propagate via larval dispersal in the central Pacific Ocean by inferring the location and severity of gene flow restrictions from the analysis of mtDNA control region sequence (656 specimens, 17 non-outbreak and six outbreak locations, six archipelagos, and three regions. Substantial regional, archipelagic, and subarchipelagic-scale genetic structuring of A. planci populations indicate that larvae rarely realize their dispersal potential and outbreaks in the central Pacific do not spread across the expanses of open ocean. On a finer scale, genetic partitioning was detected within two of three islands with multiple sampling sites. The finest spatial structure was detected at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, between the lagoon and forereef habitats (<10 km. Despite using a genetic marker capable of revealing subtle partitioning, we found no evidence that outbreaks were a rogue genetic subset of a greater population. Overall, outbreaks that occur at similar times across population partitions are genetically independent and likely due to nutrient inputs and similar climatic and ecological conditions that conspire to fuel plankton blooms.

  9. Archives and Manuscripts, Libraries, and Librarianship in the South and Central Pacific: Survey and a Bibliography of English-Language Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Robert

    Two hundred eighty-three sources are included in this bibliography dealing with libraries, archives, and librarianship in the islands of the South and Central Pacific. Twenty-six island nations are covered, with brief narrative summaries of the library situation given in some cases: (1) American Samoa, (2) Belau, (3) Cook Islands, (4) Easter…

  10. Biología reproductiva del pargo Lutjanus inermis (Perciformes: Lutjanidae, en el Pacífico central mexicano Reproductive biology of the Golden snapper Lutjanus inermis (Perciformes: Lutjanidae in the central Mexican Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Lucano-Ramírez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Debido a los escasos antecedentes del efecto de las pesquerías y manejo del pargo Lutjanus inermis, es importante conocer la época reproductiva para el establecimiento de temporadas de veda, ya que la biomasa de los peces en fase de reproducción, es usada como punto de referencia para evaluar la condición del stock explotado y para establecer futuros niveles de captura. Por ello, el objetivo de este trabajo fue analizar algunos aspectos reproductivos como proporción sexual, época reproductiva, talla de madurez de L. inermis en las costas de Jalisco, México. Durante 1999-2008, se llevaron a cabo muestreos mensuales de los ejemplares capturados por la pesca artesanal en las bahías de Navidad, Tenacatita y Chamela (Jalisco, México. Se recolectaron 311 (53.1% hembras y 275 (46.9% machos y, la proporción de sexos (1:0.88 no presentó diferencia significativa. El intervalo de longitud total fue 14.4 a 37.0cm y el peso total de 48 a 575g. L. inermis presentó los máximos valores del IGS en dos periodos, febrero-abril y septiembre-noviembre, también en estos periodos se presentaron los mayores porcentajes de organismos en estadio de maduración. El ovario presentó el tipo de desarrollo asincrónico y se reconocieron siete fases del desarrollo de los ovocitos. En los testículos se observó el tipo de desarrollo lobular, se observaron espermatozoides en el centro de los cistos y en el conducto recolector. La talla de madurez (L50 fue de 23.9cm LT para hembras y 23.6cm LT para machos. Considerando el periodo de muestreo de este estudio, los antecedentes descritos podrían ser de utilidad en la formulación de planes o estrategias de manejo de esta especie.Reproductive biology of the Golden snapper Lutjanus inermis (Perciformes: Lutjanidae in the central Mexican Pacific. Reproductive aspects and information on the effect of fishery activities over this species stock are scarce, despite the imperative need of effective protection and resource

  11. Predicting bycatch hotspots for endangered leatherback turtles on longlines in the Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, John H; Morreale, Stephen J; Paladino, Frank V; Shillinger, George L; Benson, Scott R; Eckert, Scott A; Bailey, Helen; Tomillo, Pilar Santidrián; Bograd, Steven J; Eguchi, Tomoharu; Dutton, Peter H; Seminoff, Jeffrey A; Block, Barbara A; Spotila, James R

    2014-02-22

    Fisheries bycatch is a critical source of mortality for rapidly declining populations of leatherback turtles, Dermochelys coriacea. We integrated use-intensity distributions for 135 satellite-tracked adult turtles with longline fishing effort to estimate predicted bycatch risk over space and time in the Pacific Ocean. Areas of predicted bycatch risk did not overlap for eastern and western Pacific nesting populations, warranting their consideration as distinct management units with respect to fisheries bycatch. For western Pacific nesting populations, we identified several areas of high risk in the north and central Pacific, but greatest risk was adjacent to primary nesting beaches in tropical seas of Indo-Pacific islands, largely confined to several exclusive economic zones under the jurisdiction of national authorities. For eastern Pacific nesting populations, we identified moderate risk associated with migrations to nesting beaches, but the greatest risk was in the South Pacific Gyre, a broad pelagic zone outside national waters where management is currently lacking and may prove difficult to implement. Efforts should focus on these predicted hotspots to develop more targeted management approaches to alleviate leatherback bycatch.

  12. Crustacean fauna (Stomatopoda: Decapoda) associated with the deepwater fishery of Heterocarpus vicarius (Decapoda: Pandalidae) along the Pacific coast of Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    S. Wehrtmann - Silvia Echeverría-Sáenz, Ingo

    2005-01-01

    Commercial bottom trawling is a successful and commonly used method to catch marine shrimps. However, the shrimp fishing gears are poorly selective, and in addition to the target species they catch and retain large quantities of non-target species (bycatch). This study presents data concerning species composition and depth distribution of the crustacean fauna (stomatopods and decapods) associated with Heterocarpus vicarius catches from Pacific Costa Rica. A total of 74 samples (three to five ...

  13. The 2011 Joint U.S.-Canada Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Survey of Pacific Hake (Merluccius productus) (SH1103, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists from the Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring (FRAM) division at the NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) and the Pacific region...

  14. The 2003 Joint U.S.-Canada Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Survey of Pacific Hake (Merluccius productus) (MF0316, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists from the Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring (FRAM) division at the NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) and the Pacific region...

  15. The 2005 Joint U.S.-Canada Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Survey of Pacific Hake (Merluccius productus) (MF0509, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists from the Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring (FRAM) division at the NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) and the Pacific region...

  16. The 2007 Joint U.S.-Canada Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Survey of Pacific Hake (Merluccius productus) (MF0710, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists from the Fishery Resource Analysis and Monitoring (FRAM) division at the NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) and the Pacific region...

  17. Climate Prediction Center (CPC)Area-averaged 850-hPa Central Pacific Trade Wind Anomalies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is one of the CPC?s Monthly Atmospheric and SST Indices. It is the 850-hPa trade wind anomalies averaged over the area 5oN ? 5oS, 175oW-140oW (central...

  18. Human, oceanographic and habitat drivers of central and western Pacific coral reef fish assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivor D Williams

    Full Text Available Coral reefs around US- and US-affiliated Pacific islands and atolls span wide oceanographic gradients and levels of human impact. Here we examine the relative influence of these factors on coral reef fish biomass, using data from a consistent large-scale ecosystem monitoring program conducted by scientific divers over the course of >2,000 hours of underwater observation at 1,934 sites, across ~40 islands and atolls. Consistent with previous smaller-scale studies, our results show sharp declines in reef fish biomass at relatively low human population density, followed by more gradual declines as human population density increased further. Adjusting for other factors, the highest levels of oceanic productivity among our study locations were associated with more than double the biomass of reef fishes (including ~4 times the biomass of planktivores and piscivores compared to islands with lowest oceanic productivity. Our results emphasize that coral reef areas do not all have equal ability to sustain large reef fish stocks, and that what is natural varies significantly amongst locations. Comparisons of biomass estimates derived from visual surveys with predicted biomass in the absence of humans indicated that total reef fish biomass was depleted by 61% to 69% at populated islands in the Mariana Archipelago; by 20% to 78% in the Main Hawaiian islands; and by 21% to 56% in American Samoa.

  19. In search of traditional bio-ecological knowledge useful for fisheries co-management: the case of jaraquis Semaprochilodus spp. (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae) in Central Amazon, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Vandick S; Lima, Liane G

    2010-06-03

    The jaraquis (Semaprochilodus spp.) are the most abundant group in the fishing landing in Manaus. However, just command and control management strategies have been used by the fishery governmental agency in the region without the power to enforce centralized decisions. The fishermen and their culture represent a source of information on dynamics of the resources and aquatic environments, fundamental in making possible the co-management of the fishing resources. The present study aims to contribute to management through identification of common information available in scientific and traditional knowledge about the jaraquis' bio-ecology. There were 57 semi-structured interviews recorded with fishermen of Manaus and rural areas of Manacapuru in 2002 concerning biological and ecological aspects. Similarity was observed between scientific and traditional knowledge in the following items: size of first sexual maturation, spawning type, parental care, trophic relationships and migratory behavior, as well as in some aspects of the mortality and growth of the species. However, there was less ethnoicthyological information on fecundity and the determination of the age and growth of adult fish. Common information would be used preferably by agencies to start an effective and technical dialogue with commercial and riverine fishermen to design management plans in a decentralized strategy.

  20. In search of traditional bio-ecological knowledge useful for fisheries co-management: the case of jaraquis Semaprochilodus spp. (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae in Central Amazon, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Liane G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The jaraquis (Semaprochilodus spp. are the most abundant group in the fishing landing in Manaus. However, just command and control management strategies have been used by the fishery governmental agency in the region without the power to enforce centralized decisions. The fishermen and their culture represent a source of information on dynamics of the resources and aquatic environments, fundamental in making possible the co-management of the fishing resources. The present study aims to contribute to management through identification of common information available in scientific and traditional knowledge about the jaraquis' bio-ecology. There were 57 semi-structured interviews recorded with fishermen of Manaus and rural areas of Manacapuru in 2002 concerning biological and ecological aspects. Similarity was observed between scientific and traditional knowledge in the following items: size of first sexual maturation, spawning type, parental care, trophic relationships and migratory behavior, as well as in some aspects of the mortality and growth of the species. However, there was less ethnoicthyological information on fecundity and the determination of the age and growth of adult fish. Common information would be used preferably by agencies to start an effective and technical dialogue with commercial and riverine fishermen to design management plans in a decentralized strategy.

  1. Interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean through predator-prey relationship studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Allain

    Full Text Available The Western and Central Pacific Ocean sustains the highest tuna production in the world. This province is also characterized by many islands and a complex bathymetry that induces specific current circulation patterns with the potential to create a high degree of interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems. Based on a large dataset of oceanic predator stomach contents, our study used generalized linear models to explore the coastal-oceanic system interaction by analyzing predator-prey relationship. We show that reef organisms are a frequent prey of oceanic predators. Predator species such as albacore (Thunnus alalunga and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares frequently consume reef prey with higher probability of consumption closer to land and in the western part of the Pacific Ocean. For surface-caught-predators consuming reef prey, this prey type represents about one third of the diet of predators smaller than 50 cm. The proportion decreases with increasing fish size. For predators caught at depth and consuming reef prey, the proportion varies with predator species but generally represents less than 10%. The annual consumption of reef prey by the yellowfin tuna population was estimated at 0.8 ± 0.40 CV million tonnes or 2.17 × 10(12± 0.40 CV individuals. This represents 6.1% ± 0.17 CV in weight of their diet. Our analyses identify some of the patterns of coastal-oceanic ecosystem interactions at a large scale and provides an estimate of annual consumption of reef prey by oceanic predators.

  2. Prolonged monsoon droughts and links to Indo-Pacific warm pool: A Holocene record from Lonar Lake, central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sushma; Anoop, A.; Riedel, N.; Sarkar, S.; Menzel, P.; Basavaiah, N.; Krishnan, R.; Fuller, D.; Plessen, B.; Gaye, B.; Röhl, U.; Wilkes, H.; Sachse, D.; Sawant, R.; Wiesner, M. G.; Stebich, M.

    2014-04-01

    Concerns about the regional impact of global climate change in a warming scenario have highlighted the gaps in our understanding of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM, also referred to as the Indian Ocean summer monsoon) and the absence of long term palaeoclimate data from the central Indian core monsoon zone (CMZ). Here we present the first high resolution, well-dated, multiproxy reconstruction of Holocene palaeoclimate from a 10 m long sediment core raised from the Lonar Lake in central India. We show that while the early Holocene onset of intensified monsoon in the CMZ is similar to that reported from other ISM records, the Lonar data shows two prolonged droughts (PD, multidecadal to centennial periods of weaker monsoon) between 4.6-3.9 and 2-0.6 cal ka. A comparison of our record with available data from other ISM influenced sites shows that the impact of these PD was observed in varying degrees throughout the ISM realm and coincides with intervals of higher solar irradiance. We demonstrate that (i) the regional warming in the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP) plays an important role in causing ISM PD through changes in meridional overturning circulation and position of the anomalous Walker cell; (ii) the long term influence of conditions like El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on the ISM began only ca. 2 cal ka BP and is coincident with the warming of the southern IPWP; (iii) the first settlements in central India coincided with the onset of the first PD and agricultural populations flourished between the two PD, highlighting the significance of natural climate variability and PD as major environmental factors affecting human settlements.

  3. 77 FR 56191 - Permanent Advisory Committee to Advise the U.S. Commissioners to the Western and Central Pacific...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA... (WCPFC) on October 25--October 26, 2012. Meeting topics are provided under the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... Hotel, 1775 Ala Moana Boulevard, Honolulu, HI, 96815. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Oriana...

  4. Ferromanganese oxide deposits from the Central Pacific Ocean, II. Nodules and associated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, Andrew C.; Cronan, David S.

    1985-02-01

    Bulk chemical, mineralogical and selective leach analyses have been made on a suite of abyssal ferromanganese nodules and associated sediments from the S.W. equatorial Pacific Ocean. Compositional relations between nodules, sediment oxyhydroxides and nearby ferromanganese encrustations are drawn assuming that the crusts represent purely hydrogenetic ferromanganese material. Crusts, δMnO 2-rich nodules and sediment oxyhydroxides are compositionally similar and distinct from diagenetic todorokitebearing nodules. Compared to Fe-Mn crusts, sediment oxyhydroxides are however slightly enriched, relative to Mn and Ni, in Fe, Cu, Zn, Ti and Al, and depleted in Co and Pb, reflecting processes of non-hydrogenous element supply and diagenesis. δMnO 2 nodules exhibit compositions intermediate between Fe-Mn crusts and sediment oxyhydroxides and thus are considered to accrete oxides from both the water column and associated sediments. Deep ocean vertical element fluxes associated with large organic aggregates, biogenic calcite, silica and soft parts have been calculated for the study area. Fluxes associated with organic aggregates are one to three orders of magnitude greater than those associated with the other phases considered, are in good agreement with element accumulation rates in sediments, and are up to four orders of magnitude greater than element accumulation rates in nodules. Metal release from labile biogenic material in surface sediments can qualitatively explain the differences between the composition of Fe-Mn crusts and sediment oxyhydroxides. Todorokite-rich diagenetic nodules are confined to an eastwards widening equatorial wedge. It is proposed that todorokite precipitates directly from interstitial waters. Since the transition metal chemistry of interstitial waters is controlled dominantly by reactions involving the breakdown of organic carbon, the supply and degradation rate of organic material is a critical factor in the formation of diagenetic nodules. The

  5. A new species of eagle ray Aetobatus narutobiei from the Northwest Pacific: an example of the critical role taxonomy plays in fisheries and ecological sciences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T White

    Full Text Available Recent taxonomic and molecular work on the eagle rays (Family Myliobatidae revealed a cryptic species in the northwest Pacific. This species is formally described as Aetobatus narutobiei sp. nov. and compared to its congeners. Aetobatus narutobiei is found in eastern Vietnam, Hong Kong, China, Korea and southern Japan. It was previously considered to be conspecific with Aetobatus flagellum, but these species differ in size, structure of the NADH2 and CO1 genes, some morphological and meristic characters and colouration. Aetobatus narutobiei is particularly abundant in Ariake Bay in southern Japan where it is considered a pest species that predates heavily on farmed bivalve stocks and is culled annually as part of a 'predator control' program. The discovery of A. narutobiei highlights the paucity of detailed taxonomic research on this group of rays. This discovery impacts on current conservation assessments of A. flagellum and these need to be revised based on the findings of this study.

  6. Potatoes and Trout: Maintaining Robust Agriculture and a Healthy Trout Fishery in the Central Sands of Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienen, M. N.; Bradbury, K. R.; Kniffin, M.; Barlow, P. M.; Krause, J.; Westenbroek, S.; Leaf, A.

    2015-12-01

    The well-drained sandy soil in the Wisconsin Central Sands is ideal for growing potatoes, corn, and other vegetables. A shallow sand and gravel aquifer provides abundant water for agricultural irrigation but also supplies critical base flow to cold-water trout streams. These needs compete with one another, and stakeholders from various perspectives are collaborating to seek solutions. Stakeholders were engaged in providing and verifying data to guide construction of a groundwater flow model which was used with linear and sequential linear programming to evaluate optimal tradeoffs between agricultural pumping and ecologically based minimum base flow values. The connection between individual irrigation wells as well as industrial and municipal supply and streamflow depletion can be evaluated using the model. Rather than addressing 1000s of wells individually, a variety of well management groups were established through k-means clustering. These groups are based on location, potential impact, water-use categories, depletion potential, and other factors. Through optimization, pumping rates were reduced to attain mandated minimum base flows. This formalization enables exploration of possible solutions for the stakeholders, and provides a tool which is transparent and forms a basis for discussion and negotiation.

  7. Direct observation of 134Cs and 137Cs in surface seawater in the western and central North Pacific after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kaeriyama

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium (Cs derived from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FNPP in the North Pacific is still unclear due to the limitation of direct measurement of the seawater in the open ocean. We present the result of direct observation of radioactive Cs in surface seawater collected from a broad area in the western and central North Pacific in July 2011, October 2011 and July 2012. We also conducted a simple particle tracking experiment to estimate the qualitative spatial distribution of radioactive Cs in the North Pacific. 134Cs was detected at 94 stations out of 123 stations, and 137Cs was detected at all stations. High 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations more than 10 m Bq kg−1 were observed in the area of the northern part of Kuroshio Extension at 144° E and 155° E in July 2011, in the area 147–175° E around 40° N in October 2011, and the northern part of Kuroshio Extension at 155° E and 175°30´ E in July 2012. Combining the result of direct observations and particle tracking experiment, the radioactive Cs derived from the FNPP had been dispersed eastward to the central North Pacific during 2011. It was considered from the horizontal distribution that radioactive Cs was dispersed not only eastward but also north- and southward in the central North Pacific. Pronounced dilution process of radioactive Cs from the FNPP during study period is suggested from temporal change in the activity ratio of 134Cs / 137Cs, which was decay-corrected on 6 April 2011, and relationships between radioactive Cs and temperature.

  8. Direct observation of 134Cs and 137Cs in surface seawater in the western and central North Pacific after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nakatsuka

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium (Cs derived from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP in the North Pacific is still unclear due to the limitation of direct measurement of the seawater in the open ocean. We present the result of direct observation of radioactive Cs in surface seawater collected from broad area in the western and central North Pacific in July, October 2011 and July 2012. We also conducted a simple particle tracking experiment to estimate the qualitative spatial distribution of radioactive Cs in the North Pacific. 134Cs were detected at 94 stations out of 123 stations and 137Cs was detected at all stations. The high 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations more than 10 mBq kg−1 were observed in the area where the northern part of Kuroshio extension at 144° E and 155° E in July 2011, in the area 147° E–175° E around 40° N in October 2011, and the northern part of Kuroshio extension at 155° E and 175° 30´ E in July 2012. Combining the result of direct observations and particle tracking experiment, the radioactive Cs derived from FNPP had been dispersed eastward to the central North Pacific during 2011. It was considered from the horizontal distribution that radioactive Cs was dispersed not only eastward but also north- and southward in the central North Pacific. Pronounced dilution process of radioactive Cs from FNPP during study period is suggested from temporal change in the activity ratio of 134Cs/137Cs which was decay corrected at 6 April 2011, and relationships between radioactive Cs and temperature.

  9. Dracograllus trukensis sp. nov. (Draconematidae: Nematoda) from a seagrass bed ( Zostera spp.) in Chuuk Islands, Micronesia, Central Western Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wongi; Kim, Dongsung; Decraemer, Wilfrida; Rho, Hyun Soo

    2016-09-01

    A new species of free-living marine draconematid nematode, Dracograllus trukensis sp. nov., is described based on the specimens collected from the sediments of a intertidal seagrass bed from Chuuk Islands, Micronesia. Dracograllus trukensis sp. nov. differs from other species of the genus by the combination of the following characteristics: the presence of numerous minute spiny ornamented body cuticular annules in both sexes, eight cephalic adhesion tubes inserted on the head capsule in both sexes, the presence of stiff posteriorly directed setae anterior to posterior adhesion tubes in both sexes, the shape (large, elongated, open loop-shaped in male and large, elongated, closed loop-shaped in female) and position (longer ventral arm extending to the first body annule in male) of amphideal fovea, shorter spicule length (34-42 μm), the presence of sexual dimorphism in shape and length of the non-annulated tail terminus, and number of posterior sublateral adhesion tubes (10 in male and 13-15 in female) and posterior subventral adhesion tubes (8-10 in male and 9-11 in female). A comparative table on the biogeographical and ecological characteristics of the species of Dracograllus is presented. This is the first taxonomic report on the genus Dracograllus from Chuuk Islands, Micronesia, central western Pacific Ocean.

  10. The history of mammal eradications in Hawai`i and the United States associated islands of the Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, S.C.; Jacobi, J.D.; Veitch, C.R.; Clout, M.N.; Townsend, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Many eradications of mammal taxa have been accomplished on United States associated islands of the Central Pacific, beginning in 1910. Commonly eradicated species are rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), rats (Rattus spp.), feral cats (Felis catus), and several feral ungulates from smaller islands and fenced natural areas on larger Hawaiian Islands. Vegetation and avifauna have demonstrated dramatic recovery as a direct result of eradications. Techniques of worldwide significance, including the Judas goat method, were refined during these actions. The land area from which ungulates have been eradicated on large Hawaiian Islands is now greater than the total land area of some smaller Hawaiian Islands. Large multi-tenure islands present the greatest challenge to eradication because of conflicting societal interests regarding introduced mammals, mainly sustained-yield hunting. The difficulty of preventing reinvasion poses a persistent threat after eradication, particularly for feral pigs (Sus scrofa) on multi-tenure islands. Larger areas and more challenging species are now under consideration for eradication. The recovery of endangered Hawaiian birds may depend on the creation of large predator-proof exclosures on some of the larger islands. Large scale eradications of small Indian mongooses (Herpestes auropunctatus) would be beneficial to ground-nesting birds such as nēnē (Branta sandvicensis), but this has been achieved only in small exclosures.

  11. Constraints on the magnitude of the deglacial migration of the ITCZ in the Central Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimi, Maria A.; Marcantonio, Franco

    2016-11-01

    Accurate paleo-latitudinal reconstructions of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) are necessary for understanding tropical hydroclimate and atmospheric circulation. Paleoclimate models and records suggest that as global temperatures increase, the ITCZ should migrate towards the warmer hemisphere. Many uncertainties remain regarding the magnitude of this migration, and few studies have focused on the Central Equatorial Pacific (CEP). Here, we use eolian dust records recovered from three locations in the CEP to address changes in dust provenance across the paleo ITCZ since the last glacial maximum (LGM). Radiogenic isotope compositions of Nd and Pb show that dust delivered to the CEP was sourced mainly from two regions: East Asia and South America. From these data we deduced that since Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 2 (MIS2) the ITCZ has migrated north to its modern position, being displaced by as much as 7°, to as little as 2.5°. We find that the ITCZ migrated further north during the early Holocene (∼9 kyr), reaching its position furthest north during the mid-Holocene warm interval (∼7 kyr), based on an increase in South American dust at the northernmost sites.

  12. Description and epizootiology of Babesia poelea n. sp. in brown boobies (Sula leucogaster (Boddaert)) on Sand Island, Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, T.M.; Rameyer, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a new species of piroplasm from brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) on Sand Island, Johnston Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, central Pacific. Mean parasitemia in adults and chicks was less than 1%, with the parasitemia in chicks significantly greater than in adults. There was no significant relation between the age of chicks and the degree of parasitemia. Parasitized red cells and red cell nuclei were significantly smaller than those of unparasitized cells, and infected birds appeared clinically normal. Prevalence of the parasite in chicks (54%) was significantly greater than in adults (13%), and the geographic distribution of parasitized chicks was skewed toward the eastern end of Sand Island. On the basis of morphologic characteristics, we named it Babesia poelea. The specific name is a concatenation of the Hawaiian names for dark (po'ele) and booby ('a). This is the second documentation of an endemic avian hemoparasite in seabirds from the central Pacific.

  13. Application of multiplex PCR approaches for shark molecular identification: feasibility and applications for fisheries management and conservation in the Eastern Tropical Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, S; Cardeñosa, D; Soler, G; Hyde, J

    2012-03-01

    Here we describe the application of new and existing multiplex PCR methodologies for shark species molecular identification. Four multiplex systems (group ID, thresher sharks, hammerhead sharks and miscellaneous shark) were employed with primers previously described and some designed in this study, which allow for species identification after running PCR products through an agarose gel. This system was implemented for samples (bodies and fins) collected from unidentified sharks landed in the port of Buenaventura and from confiscated tissues obtained from illegal fishing around the Malpelo Island Marine Protected Area, Pacific Coast of Colombia. This method has allowed reliable identification, to date, of 407 samples to the genus and/or species levels, most of them (380) identified as the pelagic thresher shark (Alopias pelagicus). Another seven samples were identified as scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna lewini). This is an easy-to-implement and reliable identification method that could even be used locally to monitor shark captures in the main fishing ports of developed and developing countries.

  14. 76 FR 21705 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Catch Accounting in the Longline Catcher...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... Alaska; Catch Accounting in the Longline Catcher/Processor Pacific Cod Fishery AGENCY: National Marine... Islands to support different catch accounting methods for Pacific cod catch. NMFS is considering...

  15. Coastal Deformation Patterns Along the Nicoya Seismic Gap, Pacific Coast, Costa Rica, Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. S.; Khaw, F.; Parra, J. G.; Annis, L. K.; Protti, M.

    2004-12-01

    sharp contrasts in the roughness, thickness, and dip of the subducting Cocos plate. While the northern peninsula overrides the subducting Cocos plate's "smooth domain", the peninsula's southern tip overrides seamounts of the "rough domain". These contrasting coastal segments may deform independently in response to rupture of different subduction zone asperities (Central Nicoya and Cabo Blanco). Based on historical seismicity data, estimated slip per event, and a rapid convergence rate (9 cm/yr), the recurrence interval for large Nicoya earthquakes is estimated at 50-100 years. While these frequent events may produce meter-scale coseismic uplift along the Nicoya coast, a significant fraction of this is likely recovered during interseismic subsidence. The net result is gradual coastal uplift during the Quaternary at rates ranging from 0.1 to 6.0 m/k.y.

  16. Visualizing the Food-Web Effects of Fishing for Tunas in the Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson T. Hinke

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We use food-web models to develop visualizations to compare and evaluate the interactions of tuna fisheries with their supporting food webs in the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP and the central north Pacific (CNP Oceans. In the ETP and CNP models, individual fisheries use slightly different food webs that are defined by the assemblage of targeted tuna species. Distinct energy pathways are required to support different tuna species and, consequently, the specific fisheries that target different tuna assemblages. These simulations suggest that catches of tunas, sharks, and billfishes have lowered the biomass of the upper trophic levels in both systems, whereas increases in intermediate and lower trophic level animals have accompanied the decline of top predators. Trade-offs between fishing and predation mortality rates that occur when multiple fisheries interact with their respective food webs may lead to smaller changes in biomass than if only the effect of a single fishery is considered. Historical simulations and hypothetical management scenarios further demonstrate that the effects of longline and purse seine fisheries have been strongest in upper trophic levels, but that lower trophic levels may respond more strongly to purse-seine fisheries. The apex predator guild has responded most strongly to longlining. Simulations of alternative management strategies that attempt to rebuild shark and billfish populations in each ecosystem reveal that (1 changes in longlining more effectively recover top predator populations than do changes in purse seining and (2 restrictions on both shallow-set longline gear and shark finning may do more to recover top predators than do simple reductions in fishing effort.

  17. Introduction to fisheries oceanography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan

    Fisheries oceanography can be applied to fisheries ecology, fisheries management and practical fishing. Physico-chemical parameters of the environment (temperature, currents, waves, light, oxygen and salinity) have profound effect on fish...

  18. Shrimp Trap Report data collected by NOAA research vessel Townsend Cromwell from 1980 to 1989 in the Central and Western Pacific Ocean and chartered fishing vessel Pesquedot in 1984 in waters off Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shrimp trapping operations were conducted by NOAA research vessel Townsend Cromwell from 1980 to 1989 in the Central and Western Pacific Ocean to determine...

  19. Temperature, salinity, nutrients, oxygen and other data profiles from CTD and bottle casts from NOAA/NMFS cruises of NOAA Ship Townsend Cromwell in the central north Pacific, 1997-2002 (NODC Accession 0100295)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains measurements from CTD hydrocast stations from seven cruises of NOAA Ship Townsend Cromwell in the central north Pacific from 1997 to 2002...

  20. Handline Fishing Log data collected by NOAA research vessel Townsend Cromwell from 1982 to 1984 in the Central and Western Pacific Ocean and NOAA research vessel Oscar E Sette in 2009 in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bottomfish handline operations were conducted by NOAA research vessel Townsend Cromwell from 1982 to 1994 in the Central and Western Pacific Ocean to determine...

  1. Abundance variation of Porichthys margaritatus (Pisces: Batrachoididae throughout thermic and bathymetric gradients in the central Mexican Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Godínez-Domínguez

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Three cruises, one in cach of the main stream patterns in the area, were made on the central Mexican Pacific continental slope (May-June 1995, November 1995, and March 1996. Seven trawl sampling sites were defined per cruise, and in each site four bathymetric levels were sampled (20, 40, 60, and 80 m. During the warmest seasons, the highest abundance of Porichthys margaritatus was at 60 m. When the temperature of the bottom water was lower, in March 1996, the highest abundance of P. margaritatus moved towards 40 m. The depths with greatest abundance fluctuated between 18 and 21°C, indicating a narrow temperature preference range. A Gaussian model was used to explain the relation between abundance and temperatura.Se analizaron tres cruceros de pesca demersal, uno por cada pauta principal de circulación marina en la zona (mayo-junio de 1995, noviembre de 1995, y marzo de 1996. Se determinaron siete sitios de muestreo en cada crucero y en cada sitio se muestrearon cuatro estratos batimétricos (20,40, 60 y 80 m. Durante la época cálida, las mayores abundancias de Porychthys nwrgaritatus se encontraron en 60 m. Cuando la temperatura de fondo fue mínima durante marzo de 1996, las mayores abundancias se desplazaron a 40 m de profundidad. La temperatura de máximas abundancias fluctuaron entre 18 y 21 °C, lo cual indica un estrecho rango de preferencia térmica. Se propone un modelo Gaussiano para explicar la relación entre la abundancia y la temperatura.

  2. Abyssal fauna of the UK-1 polymetallic nodule exploration area, Clarion-Clipperton Zone, central Pacific Ocean: Cnidaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund, Helena; Rabone, Muriel; Amon, Diva J; Ikebe, Chiho; Watling, Les; Smith, Craig R; Glover, Adrian G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background We present data from a DNA taxonomy register of the abyssal Cnidaria collected as part of the Abyssal Baseline (ABYSSLINE) environmental survey cruise ‘AB01’ to the UK Seabed Resources Ltd (UKSRL) polymetallic-nodule exploration area ‘UK-1’ in the eastern Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ), central Pacific Ocean abyssal plain. This is the second paper in a series to provide regional taxonomic data for a region that is undergoing intense deep-sea mineral exploration for high-grade polymetallic nodules. Data were collected from the UK-1 exploration area following the methods described in Glover et al. (2015b). New information Morphological and genetic data are presented for 10 species and 18 records identified by a combination of morphological and genetic data, including molecular phylogenetic analyses. These included 2 primnoid octocorals, 2 isidid octocorals, 1 anemone, 4 hydroids (including 2 pelagic siphonophores accidentally caught) and a scyphozoan jellyfish (in the benthic stage of the life cycle). Two taxa matched previously published genetic sequences (pelagic siphonophores), two taxa matched published morphological descriptions (abyssal primnoids described from the same locality in 2015) and the remaining 6 taxa are potentially new species, for which we make the raw data, imagery and vouchers available for future taxonomic study. We have used a precautionary approach in taxon assignments to avoid over-estimating species ranges. The Clarion-Clipperton Zone is a region undergoing intense exploration for potential deep-sea mineral extraction. We present these data to facilitate future taxonomic and environmental impact study by making both data and voucher materials available through curated and accessible biological collections. For some of the specimens we also provide image data collected at the seabed by ROV, wich may facilitate more accurate taxon designation in coming ROV or AUV surveys. PMID:27660533

  3. [Analysis of diet composition and overlap in four species of the genus Diplectrum (Perciformes: Serranidae) in the Mexican Central Pacific].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Palomino, Bernabé; González Sansón, Gaspar

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of diet composition and overlap in four species of the genus Diplectrum (Perciformes: Serranidae) in the Mexican Central Pacific. The information of trophic interactions among species is essential to understand ecosystem function. To assess this in four Diplectrum species, we analyzed the stomach contents of 397 individuals caught using shrimp trawling nets off the coasts of Jalisco and Colima, Mexico. Main food component of D. eumelum were fish of the Order Pleuronectiformes, followed by shrimps (Metapenaeopsis spp). D. euryplectrum feeds mainly on crustaceans, with stomatopods (Squilla mantoidea) as main food items followed by shrimps and brachyurans. Fish and polychaetes had a low representation in the diet of this species. D. labarum feeds mainly on crustaceans, mollusks and fish. The stomatopod Eurysquilla veleronis contributed to with a high diet percentage by weight, followed by shrimps (mostly Solenoceraflorae) and brachyurans, as well as the squid Lolliguncula diomedae. Fishes (Ophidion spp.) were also an important component of the diet of this species. The most common preys of D. rostrum were crustaceans, mollusks, polychaetes and fish. The squid Lolliguncula diomedae and fishes of genus Ophidion were also well represented in the diet. Diet breadth index yielded significant differences between species. The number of diet items varied from 16 in D. euryplectrum to 6 in D. eumelum. The average value of overlap (0.247) was not significantly different (p = 0.118) from the expected one for a null model (0.174). The observed variance of the overlap index (0.071) was significantly higher (V = 0.025, p = 0.0004) than the value expected for a null model.

  4. 50 CFR Table 1 to Subpart H of... - Pacific Salmon EFH Identified by USGS Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Salmon EFH Identified by USGS Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) 1 Table 1 to Subpart H of Part 660 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... 660—Pacific Salmon EFH Identified by USGS Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) USGS HUC State(s) Hydrologic Unit...

  5. FISHERIES POLICY OF ICELAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Treer

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fisheries has recently been very exploited area in the Croatian media, either regarding the EU accession negotiations or regarding the interrelationships of the involved parties within Croatia. Iceland is one of the strongest fishery nations in the world that passed through some heavy struggles to protect its fishery grounds (so called “fishery or cod wars”. Therefore its experience in fisheries can be useful when creating Croatian fishery policy. So, the aim of this article is to present the Statement on Responsible Fisheries in Iceland signed by all the parties involved in the Icelandic fishery industry.

  6. Genealogical approaches to the temporal origins of the Central American Gap: speciation and divergence in pacific Chthamalus (Sessilia: Chthamalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Meredith K; Pankey, M Sabrina; Wares, John P

    2013-03-01

    A large section of the tropical Eastern Pacific coastline is nearly devoid of reef or consolidated habitat, and is known as the Central American Gap as it is associated with a biogeographic transition in fish and invertebrate species. We analyze phylogeographic data for intertidal barnacles (Chthamalus) to identify relevant temporal patterns that describe the origins of this biogeographic transition (the Mexican-Panamic Transition Zone). These contrasts of populations on either side of the transition zone include two pairs of closely related species (C. panamensis and C. hedgecocki; C. southwardorum and a Southern form of C. southwardorum), as well as gene flow data within one species (C. panamensis) that currently is found on both sides of the boundary between provinces. Using sequence data from a prior phylogenetic study, we used traditional (net nucleotide divergence) measures as well as coalescent analyses that incorporate the isolation-migration model to identify the likely time of separation between Northern and Southern taxa in two species pairs. A total of 67 individuals were sequenced at two mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase I, 16S) and one nuclear (elongation factor 1-alpha) gene regions. Our analyses indicate that the regional isolation of these intertidal barnacles occurred approximately 315-400kya, with subsequent expansion of C. panamensis from the Southern region into the North much more recently. There are insufficient survey data to conclusively document the absence of species from this group within the Central American Gap region near the Gulf of Tehuantepec. However, appropriate habitat is quite sparse in this region and other environmental factors, including upwelling and water temperature, are likely to be associated with isolation of many species in the Mexican and Panamic provinces sensu stricto. Some taxa may maintain gene flow across this region, but very few genetic studies have been completed on such taxa. Until further work is done

  7. Genealogical approaches to the temporal origins of the Central American gap: Speciation and divergence in Pacific Chthamalus (Sessilia: Chthamalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith K. Meyers

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A large section of the tropical Eastern Pacific coastline is nearly devoid of reef or consolidated habitat, and is known as the Central American Gap as it is associated with a biogeographic transition in fish and invertebrate species. We analyze phylogeographic data for intertidal barnacles (Chthamalus to identify relevant temporal patterns that describe the origins of this biogeographic transition (the Mexican-Panamic Transition Zone. These contrasts of populations on either side of the transition zone include two pairs of closely related species (C. panamensis and C. hedgecocki; C. southwardorum and a Southern form of C. southwardorum, as well as gene flow data within one species (C. panamensis that currently is found on both sides of the boundary between provinces. Using sequence data from a prior phylogenetic study, we used traditional (net nucleotide divergence measures as well as coalescent analyses that incorporate the isolation-migration model to identify the likely time of separation between Northern and Southern taxa in two species pairs. A total of 67 individuals were sequenced at two mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase I, 16S and one nuclear (elongation factor 1-alpha gene regions. Our analyses indicate that the regional isolation of these intertidal barnacles occurred approximately 315-400kya, with subsequent expansion of C. panamensis from the Southern region into the North much more recently. There are insufficient survey data to conclusively document the absence of species from this group within the Central American Gap region near the Gulf of Tehuantepec. However, appropriate habitat is quite sparse in this region and other environmental factors, including upwelling and water temperature, are likely to be associated with isolation of many species in the Mexican and Panamic provinces sensu stricto. Some taxa may maintain gene flow across this region, but very few genetic studies have been completed on such taxa. Until further

  8. Pelagic Fish and Seabird Inter-Relationships in the Central Tropical Pacific: Methods and Approaches to Study and Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In conjunction with the NOAA Pacific Islands Regional Office, Marine Conservation Instituteconducted a three‐day expert workshop in Honolulu, HI to set a framework...

  9. Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program Rapid Ecological Assessment Quadrat Surveys of Corals around the Marianas Islands from 2003 to 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (Pacific RAMP), established by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Program (CREP) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries...

  10. 50 CFR Table 3 to Part 679 - Product Recovery Rates for Groundfish Species and Conversion Rates for Pacific Halibut

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Product Recovery Rates for Groundfish Species and Conversion Rates for Pacific Halibut 3 Table 3 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY...) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 3 Table 3 to Part 679—Product...

  11. Coping with commitment: Projecting future thermal stress on coral reefs worldwide and the potential importance of the Central Equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, S. D.

    2009-05-01

    Sea surface temperatures of only 1-2°C greater than the usual summer maximum can cause mass coral bleaching, a paling of the reef-building animals caused by a breakdown of the symbiosis with the colourful dinoflagellates Symbiodinium. A range of recent studies have concluded that anthropogenic climate change may rapidly increase the frequency of mass coral bleaching events, leading to declines in coral cover, shifts in the composition of corals and other reef-dwelling organisms, and stress on the human populations that depend on coral reef ecosystems for food, income and shoreline protection. Recent analysis with AVHRR observed sea surface temperatures and the results of two global climate models (GFDL CM2.0 and CM2.1) shows physical warming commitment from current accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will cause over half of the world's coral reefs to experience harmfully frequent (p > 0.2 year-1) severe thermal stress events (DHM > 2°C/month) by 2080. An additional "societal" warming commitment, caused by the time required to shift from a "business-as-usual" emissions trajectory to a 550 ppm CO2 stabilization trajectory, may cause over 80 percent of the world's coral reefs to experience harmfully frequent events by 2030. Thermal adaptation or acclimation of 1.5°C - whether accomplished via biological mechanisms, coral community shifts and/or management interventions - would postpone the forecast by 50-80 years, possibly providing time for the world to shift from the business-as-usual emissions trajectory to a stabilization trajectory which could protect the majority of reefs from harmfully frequent thermal stress events. Sensitivity analysis using historical sea surface temperatures, bleaching reports and coral cover observations indicates that coral reefs in regions which experience high year-to-year SST variability, in particular the atolls of the central equatorial Pacific, may possess higher thermal stress thresholds and greater resistance to

  12. 76 FR 13593 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... directly regulated entities would be expected to benefit from this action relative to the status quo.... ACTION: Notice of availability of a proposed amendment to a fishery management plan; request for comments. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery Management Council submitted Amendment 34 to the Fishery...

  13. 76 FR 25295 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands King and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... relatively volatile reproductive potential of crab stocks, the cooperative management structure of the FMP... of availability of fishery management plan amendments; request for comments. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery Management Council submitted Amendments 38 and 39 to the Fishery Management Plan...

  14. 78 FR 13161 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Final 2013 and 2014 Harvest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... in the Southeast Outside (SEO) District. The Pacific cod TACs are set to accommodate the State of... commercial fishery (84 percent) and the sport fishery (16 percent) after deductions were made for anticipated... and 48 mt to the sport fishery. The State deducts estimates of incidental catch of DSR in...

  15. AFSC/RACE/GAP/Conrath: Delayed discard mortality of the North Pacific giant octopus

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The majority of octopus bycatch occurs in Pacific cod pot fisheries and recent data collected by North Pacific Groundfish Observers indicate that immediate mortality...

  16. 77 FR 19991 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... as to minimize the targeting of Pacific sardine. In the event that an incidental set-aside is.... Whether this will occur will depend somewhat on market forces within the fishery, and on the regional... change in the market rate and/or the potential lack of availability of the resource to the fleets...

  17. 76 FR 4854 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... as monitored stocks (jack mackerel, northern anchovy, and market squid). During public meetings each... sardine are landed with other CPS so as to minimize the targeting of Pacific sardine. In the event that an... greatly on market forces within the fishery, and on the regional availability of the resource to...

  18. 78 FR 6794 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... will be accepted in Microsoft Word, Excel, or Adobe PDF file formats only. Copies of the report... biomass estimate from 2012, the result of the HG formula is approximately 40,000 mt less than the 2012 HG... NMFS to set an annual HG for the Pacific sardine fishery based on the harvest formula in the FMP....

  19. 77 FR 47318 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... biomass for Pacific sardine to the Council's CPS Management Team (Team), the Council's CPS Advisory... preventing overfishing and managing the fishery at a level that will achieve optimum yield while allowing all... the FRACTION parameter of the HG rule. Recent work has shown that the strength of the...

  20. Acoustic telemetry and fisheries management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossin, Glenn T.; Heupel, Michelle R.; Holbrook, Christopher; Hussey, Nigel E.; Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan K; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Raby, Graham D.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of acoustic telemetry as a tool for addressing issues in fisheries management, and serves as the lead to the special Feature Issue of Ecological Applications titled “Acoustic Telemetry and Fisheries Management”. Specifically, we provide an overview of the ways in which acoustic telemetry can be used to inform issues central to the ecology, conservation, and management of exploited and/or imperiled fish species. Despite great strides in this area in recent years, there are comparatively few examples where data have been applied directly to influence fisheries management and policy. We review the literature on this issue, identify the strengths and weaknesses of work done to date, and highlight knowledge gaps and difficulties in applying empirical fish telemetry studies to fisheries policy and practice. We then highlight the key areas of management and policy addressed, as well as the challenges that needed to be overcome to do this. We conclude with a set of recommendations about how researchers can, in consultation with stock assessment scientists and managers, formulate testable scientific questions to address and design future studies to generate data that can be used in a meaningful way by fisheries management and conservation practitioners. We also urge the involvement of relevant stakeholders (managers, fishers, conservation societies, etc.) early on in the process (i.e. in the co-creation of research projects), so that all priority questions and issues can be addressed effectively.

  1. The interdecadal trend and shift of dry/wet over the central part of North China and their relationship to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA ZhuGuo

    2007-01-01

    Based on monthly precipitation and monthly mean surface air temperature (SAT), the dry/wet trends and shift of the central part of North China and their relationship to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) from 1951 to 2005 have been analyzed through calculating surface wetness index (SWI). The results indicate that there was a prominent drying trend and an abrupt change in the analysis period. A persistent warming period with less precipitation from the mid and late 1970s to present was found, and a shift process exists from the wet to the dry in the central part of North China during 1951-2005. The transition is located in the mid to late 1970s, which should be related to the shift variation of large-scale climate background. The correlation analysis has brought about a finding of significant correlativity between PDO index (PDOI) and SAT, precipitation and SWI in this region. The correlation exhibits that the positive phase of PDOI (warm PDO phase) matches warming, less precipitation and the drought period, and the negative PDOI phase corresponds to low SAT, more precipitation and the wet period. The duration of various phases is more than 25 years. The decadal variation of sea surface temperature (SST) in the North Pacific Ocean is one of the possible causes in forming the decadal dry/wet trend and shift of the central part of North China.

  2. The 2015/16 El Niño Event as Recorded in Central Tropical Pacific Corals: Temperature, Hydrology, and Ocean Circulation Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, G.; Cobb, K. M.; Sayani, H. R.; Grothe, P. R.; Atwood, A. R.; Stevenson, S.; Hitt, N. T.; Lynch-Stieglitz, J.

    2016-12-01

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) of 2015/2016 was a record-breaking event in the central Pacific, driving profound changes in the properties of the ocean and atmosphere. Prolonged ocean warming of up to 3°C translated into a large-scale coral bleaching and mortality event on Christmas Island (2°N, 157°W) that very few individuals escaped unscathed. As part of a long-term, interdisciplinary monitoring effort underway since August 2014, we present results documenting the timing and magnitude of environmental changes on the Christmas Island reefs. In particular, we present the first coral geochemical time series spanning the last several years, using cores that were drilled from rare living coral colonies during a field expedition in April 2016, at the tail end of the event. These geochemical indicators are sensitive to both ocean temperature, salinity, and water mass properties and have been used to quantitatively reconstruct ENSO extremes of the recent [Nurhati et al., 2011] and distant [Cobb et al., 2013] past. By analyzing multiple cores from both open ocean and lagoonal settings, we are able to undertake a quantitative comparison of this event with past very strong El Niño events contained in the coral archive - including the 1940/41, 1972/73, and 1997/98 events. For the most recent event, we compare our coral geochemistry records with a rich suite of in situ environmental data, including physical and geochemical parameters collected as part of the NOAA rapid response campaign in the central tropical Pacific. This unique dataset not only provides physical context interpreting coral geochemical records from the central tropical Pacific, but allows us to assess why the 2015/2016 El Niño event was so devastating to coral reef ecosystems in this region.

  3. Global Sushi: The Political Economy of the Mediterranian Bluefin Tuna Fishery in the Modern Era

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano B. Longo

    2015-01-01

    The bluefin tuna fishery in the Mediterranean has a long history of human interaction. In recent times, this fishery has become the central source of bluefin tuna for core nations, particularly Japan. This process was set off in large part by the growth of global fish markets, driven by the valuable sushi and sashimi market, and overfishing of other bluefin stocks in other parts of the world. The transformation of this fishery from an artisanal trap fishery to a globalized industrial fishery ...

  4. 234Th, 210Pb, 210Po and stable Pb in the central equatorial Pacific: Tracers for particle cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James W.; Paul, Barbara; Dunne, John P.; Chapin, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    Samples were collected during the 1992 US JGOFS EqPac Survey I and II cruises from 12°N to 12°S at 140°W in the central equatorial Pacific for water column profiles of dissolved, particulate and total 234Th, 210Pb and 210Po and total acid soluble stable Pb and sediment trap fluxes of 234Th, 210Pb and 210Po. Survey I occurred in February/March with moderate El Nino conditions while Survey II was conducted in September/October when there was a well developed cold-tongue. 234Th, 210Pb and 210Po are all particle reactive yet they partition differently between dissolved and particulate phases. Fractionation factors (the ratios of the distribution coefficients) show that the selectivity for suspended and sediment trap particles follows Th>Po>Pb. Scavenging residence times ( τ) for 234Th, 210Pb and 210Po ranged from 25 to 100 d, 3 to 8 years and 100 to 500 d, respectively. These particle reactive tracers have very different distributions in the water column, which reflect differences in their sources and sinks. The deficiency of 234Th relative to 238U was fairly uniformly distributed meridionally, though deficiencies were higher during Survey II when there was higher new production. Excess 210Pb relative to 226Ra was very asymmetrical with much higher excess values north of the equator. The distributions were similar for Surveys I and II. The deficiency of 210Po relative to 210Pb had a symmetrical distribution about the equator for both Survey I and II but the deficiencies were larger during Survey I when upwelling was smaller. Stable Pb was generally higher at the surface than at 250 m and there was no meridional trend from 12°N to 12°S. A mass balance for 210Pb was used to determine the atmospheric input of 210Pb. The average values for Surveys I and II were 0.12 and 0.32 dpm cm -2 year -1, respectively. There was no general increase in atmospheric input of 210Pb north of the equator but there was a strong maximum at 2-3°N during Survey I coincident with the

  5. Effects of the 1991-92 El Niño on scleractinian corals of the Costa Rican central Pacific coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, C; Cortés, J

    2001-12-01

    Coral communities on the central Pacific coast of Costa Rica were affected during the 1991-92 El Niño warming event. More than 57% of all observed colonies at three localities (Parque Nacional Manuel Antonio, Punta Cambutal, and Parque Marino Ballena) were bleached. Mortality during this El Niño was much lower (approximately 9%) than in previous events. Psammocora spp. accounted for approximately 66% of dead corals, while massive (Porites lobota, Pavona spp.) and branching (Pocillopora spp.) for approximately 34%. Our results suggest that the observed bleaching in P. lobata was related to zooxanthellar densities and not to changes in pigment concentrations: only chlorophyll a varied between normally pigmented and bleached colonies at one locality (Ballena). Site differences in zooxanthellar densities or their pigment concentrations, may not be the result of the bleaching event itself, because a percentage of dead corals and zooxanthellar densities of bleached colonies seems to follow a trend with the exposure to tidal regimes and currents at each site. Local oceanographic conditions can be influencing the zooxanthellar densities and their response to the warming, together with intrinsic differences between colonies as well. The impact of this event can be considered serious given the short period of time that elapsed between El Niño related mortalities and the slow reefs recovery, the mode of reproduction of reef building species, and the anthropogenic-originated disturbances which affect the coral communities and reefs of the Costa Rican central Pacific coast.

  6. Differences in Reef Fish Assemblages between Populated and Remote Reefs Spanning Multiple Archipelagos Across the Central and Western Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivor D. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparable information on the status of natural resources across large geographic and human impact scales provides invaluable context to ecosystem-based management and insights into processes driving differences among areas. Data on fish assemblages at 39 US flag coral reef-areas distributed across the Pacific are presented. Total reef fish biomass varied by more than an order of magnitude: lowest at densely-populated islands and highest on reefs distant from human populations. Remote reefs (<50 people within 100 km averaged ~4 times the biomass of “all fishes” and 15 times the biomass of piscivores compared to reefs near populated areas. Greatest within-archipelagic differences were found in Hawaiian and Mariana Archipelagos, where differences were consistent with, but likely not exclusively driven by, higher fishing pressure around populated areas. Results highlight the importance of the extremely remote reefs now contained within the system of Pacific Marine National Monuments as ecological reference areas.

  7. Genealogical approaches to the temporal origins of the Central American gap: Speciation and divergence in Pacific Chthamalus (Sessilia: Chthamalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith K. Meyers

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A large section of the tropical Eastern Pacific coastline is nearly devoid of reef or consolidated habitat, and is known as the Central American Gap as it is associated with a biogeographic transition in fish and invertebrate species. We analyze phylogeographic data for intertidal barnacles (Chthamalus to identify relevant temporal patterns that describe the origins of this biogeographic transition (the Mexican-Panamic Transition Zone. These contrasts of populations on either side of the transition zone include two pairs of closely related species (C. panamensis and C. hedgecocki; C. southwardorum and a Southern form of C. southwardorum, as well as gene flow data within one species (C. panamensis that currently is found on both sides of the boundary between provinces. Using sequence data from a prior phylogenetic study, we used traditional (net nucleotide divergence measures as well as coalescent analyses that incorporate the isolation-migration model to identify the likely time of separation between Northern and Southern taxa in two species pairs. A total of 67 individuals were sequenced at two mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase I, 16S and one nuclear (elongation factor 1-alpha gene regions. Our analyses indicate that the regional isolation of these intertidal barnacles occurred approximately 315-400kya, with subsequent expansion of C. panamensis from the Southern region into the North much more recently. There are insufficient survey data to conclusively document the absence of species from this group within the Central American Gap region near the Gulf of Tehuantepec. However, appropriate habitat is quite sparse in this region and other environmental factors, including upwelling and water temperature, are likely to be associated with isolation of many species in the Mexican and Panamic provinces sensu stricto. Some taxa may maintain gene flow across this region, but very few genetic studies have been completed on such taxa. Until further

  8. Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program Rapid Ecological Assessment Quadrat Surveys of Corals around the Marianas Islands from 2003-08-22 to 2007-06-08 (NCEI Accession 0129066)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (Pacific RAMP), established by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science...

  9. Marine Stewardship Council certification of fisheries in Russia: a current status and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Liudvigovich Lajus

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Russia supports the sixth largest fisheries worldwide, which grew 25% during the last decade and is forecasted to grow 40% more up to 2020. Such voluminous and fast growing fisheries cause challenges for their sustainability. Marine Stewardship Council (MSC voluntary certification is now the most recognized system aimed to achieve sustainability of fisheries through informed choice of consumers. The certified fisheries benefit through recognition of MSC logo by consumers. The certificate is awarded to fisheries with a good status of target species and limited impact to structure and function of ecosystems, and to protected species. The recent research showed that MSC certified fisheries in average refer to healthier stocks than non-certified ones. Russia entered the program in the second half of the 2000s, and the first certificate was awarded in 2009. Now the MSC process in Russia is very intensive and currently involves thirteen fisheries, seven of them already are certified. The certified fisheries can be subdivided into three groups: (i set net Pacific salmon fisheries of the Far East, (ii bottom trawl codfish fisheries in the Barents Sea, and (iii pelagic trawl Alaska pollock fisheries in the Sea of Okhotsk. The total catch of fisheries involved in the MSC program now is about one-third for Pacific salmon, most of codfish and about a half for Alaska pollock. Process of MSC certifications in Russia faces various problems, caused by differences between western and Russian traditions of fishery management, difficulties of access to scientific information, insufficient support from governmental institutions, illegal fishing, insufficient independent observance, influence of hatcheries on salmon wild stocks and others. We believe that to improve sustainability of Russian fisheries, it is needed to demonstrate economical benefits of certification for those fisheries which are not involved in the program, to involve new fisheries in the process

  10. Fishery Performance Indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Performance indicators for landings, effort, revenue and distribution of revenue are collected for various fisheries nation-wide. The fisheries include catch and...

  11. Mortality of seabirds in the Japanese high seas salmon mothership fishery, 1981-1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual mortality of over 160,000 seabirds in the Japanese mothership fishery is apparently not causing significant harm to seabird populations in the North Pacific....

  12. Primer registro de Harriota raleighiana (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Rhinochimaeridae en la costa del Pacífico central de México First record of Harriota raleighiana (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Rhinochimaeridae in the central Pacific coast of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Castro-Aguirre

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Este es el primer registro de la quimera narizona, Harriota raleighiana Goode y Bean 1895, en el litoral del Pacífico central de México, con base en una hembra moribunda, recolectada en la superficie del océano sobre agua muy profunda cerca de Manzanillo, Colima. También constituye el segundo registro de su existencia en el océano Pacífico oriental, lo que podría comprobar su patrón distribucional que la calificaría como cosmopolita. Se proporcionan sus medidas y algunos datos biológicos.This is the first record in Mexican central Pacific of the "longnosed chimaera" Harriota raleighiana Goode and Bean 1895, based on a nearly dead female specimen collected at sea surface over very deep water of Manzanillo, Colima. Also, it is the second published report on the occurrence of this species in the eastern Pacific ocean, and seems to support its geographical distribution pattern, which has been classified as cosmopolitan-like type. Morphometric and some biological data are also offered.

  13. Sockeye Salmon Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for SOCKEYE SALMON contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear...

  14. Fall Chinook Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for FALL CHINOOK contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear event...

  15. Chum Salmon Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for CHUM SALMON contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear event...

  16. Summer Steelhead Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for SUMMER STEELHEAD contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear...

  17. Redband Trout Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for REDBAND TROUT contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear...

  18. Bull Trout Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for BULL TROUT contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear event...

  19. Westslope Cutthroat Trout Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for WESTSLOPE CUTTHROAT TROUT contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on...

  20. Coho Salmon Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for COHO SALMON contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear event...

  1. Summer Chinook Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for SUMMER CHINOOK contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear...

  2. White Sturgeon Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for WHITE STURGEON contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear...

  3. Spring Chinook Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for SPRING CHINOOK contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear...

  4. Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for YELLOWSTONE CUTTHROAT TROUT contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based...

  5. Lahontan Cutthroat Trout Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for LAHONTAN CUTTHROAT TROUT contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on...

  6. Pink Salmon Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for PINK SALMON contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear event...

  7. Winter Steelhead Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for WINTER STEELHEAD contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear...

  8. Rainbow Trout Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for RAINBOW TROUT contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear...

  9. Brook Trout Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for BROOK TROUT contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear event...

  10. Brown Trout Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for BROWN TROUT contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear event...

  11. NOAA CRED Shallow CTD Profiles 2011-2012 from the American Samoa and Pacific Reef and Assessment Monitoring Programs on NOAA Ship Hi'ialakai (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coral Reef Ecosystem Division of the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, part of the National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  12. 77 FR 59053 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Monitoring and Enforcement Requirements in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Monitoring and Enforcement Requirements in the Bering Sea and... sampled, or carry one observer and use a motion-compensated scale to weigh Pacific cod before it is....S. groundfish fisheries of the exclusive economic zone off Alaska under the Fishery Management...

  13. A new species of Paramunida Baba, 1988 from the Central Pacific Ocean and a new genus to accommodate P. granulata (Henderson, 1885)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, Patricia; Macpherson, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The genus Paramunida belongs to the most diverse family of galatheoids and it is commonly reported from the continental slope across the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Examination of material collected by the NOAA RV Townsend Cromwell Cruise near Christmas (Kiritimati) Island, Kiribati, revealed the existence of a new species of Paramunida (P. haigae), which represents the fourth record of the genus for the Central Pacific. Furthermore, recent efforts to unravel phylogenetic relationships and diversification patterns in Paramunida revealed P. granulata (Henderson, 1885) to be the most basally diverging taxon within the genus. This species is clearly distinguished from other species of Paramunida by the spinulation of the carapace and the length of the distomesial spine of the second antennal peduncle article, which in combination with a high level of genetic divergence suggest that this species represents a separate monotypic lineage. A new genus, Hendersonida gen. n., is proposed to accommodate this species based on morphological and molecular evidence. An updated dichotomous identification key for all species of Paramunida is presented. PMID:25147446

  14. A new species of the genus Petrolisthes Stimpson (Crustacea, Decapoda, Porcellanidae) from the Central Pacific, with remarks and new records for P. aegyptiacus Werding & Hiller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Alexandra; Werding, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Petrolisthes paulayi sp. n. is described from specimens collected in French Polynesia. The new species belongs to an assemblage of morphologically similar Indo-West Pacific (IWP) species, here designated as the “mesobranchial-spine group”. All species in the group bear carapace spines, including one or more mesobranchial spines, and transverse, piliferous striations on the dorsal surface of carapace and chelipeds. Petrolisthes paulayi sp. n. is distinguishable from all species in the group by its forwardly produced, trilobate front, and a characteristic combination of carapace spines. We also report on the range extension and live coloration of Petrolisthes aegyptiacus Werding & Hiller, another species of the mesobranchial-spine group, so far considered a Red Sea endemic. Specimens from the Mascaréne Islands confirm that the geographic range of the species extends to the southern Indian Ocean. While specimens morphologically similar to Petrolisthes aegyptiacus, and collected in the Line and Society Islands, suggest a large range extension to the Central Pacific, it is probable that these individuals represent an undescribed species closely related to Petrolisthes aegyptiacus. PMID:27667952

  15. A new species of Paramunida Baba, 1988 from the Central Pacific Ocean and a new genus to accommodate P. granulata (Henderson, 1885

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Cabezas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The genus Paramunida belongs to the most diverse family of galatheoids and it is commonly reported from the continental slope across the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Examination of material collected by the NOAA RV Townsend Cromwell Cruise near Christmas (Kiritimati Island, Kiribati, revealed the existence of a new species of Paramunida (P. haigae, which represents the fourth record of the genus for the Central Pacific. Furthermore, recent efforts to unravel phylogenetic relationships and diversification patterns in Paramunida revealed P. granulata (Henderson, 1885 to be the most basally diverging taxon within the genus. This species is clearly distinguished from other species of Paramunida by the spinulation of the carapace and the length of the distomesial spine of the second antennal peduncle article, which in combination with a high level of genetic divergence suggest that this species represents a separate monotypic lineage. A new genus, Hendersonida gen. n., is proposed to accommodate this species based on morphological and molecular evidence. An updated dichotomous identification key for all species of Paramunida is presented.

  16. Characteristics of the shark fisheries of Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaus, Kerstin B. J.; Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; White, William T.; Brunnschweiler, Juerg M.

    2015-12-01

    Limited information is available on artisanal and subsistence shark fisheries across the Pacific. The aim of this study was to investigate Fiji’s inshore fisheries which catch sharks. In January and February 2013, 253 semi-directive interviews were conducted in 117 villages and at local harbours on Viti Levu, Vanua Levu, Taveuni, Ovalau and a number of islands of the Mamanuca and Yasawa archipelagos. Of the 253 interviewees, 81.4% reported to presently catch sharks, and 17.4% declared that they did not presently catch any sharks. Of the 206 fishers that reported to catch sharks, 18.4% targeted sharks and 81.6% caught sharks as bycatch. When targeted, primary use of sharks was for consumption or for sale. Sharks caught as bycatch were frequently released (69.6%), consumed (64.9%) or shared amongst the community (26.8%). Fishers’ identification based on an identification poster and DNA barcoding revealed that at least 12 species of elasmobranchs, 11 shark and one ray species (Rhynchobatus australiae) were caught. This study, which is the first focused exploration of the shark catch in Fiji’s inshore fisheries, suggests that the country’s artisanal shark fisheries are small but have the potential to develop into larger and possibly more targeted fisheries.

  17. Characteristics of the shark fisheries of Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaus, Kerstin B J; Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; White, William T; Brunnschweiler, Juerg M

    2015-12-02

    Limited information is available on artisanal and subsistence shark fisheries across the Pacific. The aim of this study was to investigate Fiji's inshore fisheries which catch sharks. In January and February 2013, 253 semi-directive interviews were conducted in 117 villages and at local harbours on Viti Levu, Vanua Levu, Taveuni, Ovalau and a number of islands of the Mamanuca and Yasawa archipelagos. Of the 253 interviewees, 81.4% reported to presently catch sharks, and 17.4% declared that they did not presently catch any sharks. Of the 206 fishers that reported to catch sharks, 18.4% targeted sharks and 81.6% caught sharks as bycatch. When targeted, primary use of sharks was for consumption or for sale. Sharks caught as bycatch were frequently released (69.6%), consumed (64.9%) or shared amongst the community (26.8%). Fishers' identification based on an identification poster and DNA barcoding revealed that at least 12 species of elasmobranchs, 11 shark and one ray species (Rhynchobatus australiae) were caught. This study, which is the first focused exploration of the shark catch in Fiji's inshore fisheries, suggests that the country's artisanal shark fisheries are small but have the potential to develop into larger and possibly more targeted fisheries.

  18. Temperature profile and other data collected using bottle and CTD casts from the A. AGASSIZ and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the California Cooperative Fisheries Investigation (CALCOFI) project, 25 July 1954 to 19 December 1966 (NODC Accession 6900651)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data, temperature, and other data were collected using CTD and bottle casts from A. AGASSIZ and other platforms in the Pacific ocean from July...

  19. Descarte de peixes na pesca comercial em Tefé, médio Solimões, Amazônia Central = Discarded catches from commercial fisheries in the middle Solimões river, Central Amazon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandick da Silva Batista

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Descartes são comuns na pesca comercial, sendo avaliados para apoiar o manejo da pesca na região. Por meio de acompanhamentos diários das pescarias da frota comercial de Tefé, foi descrito o descarte de pescado no médio Solimões. Utilizando análises de correlação e covariância, foram avaliados fatores que determinam o descarte com três modalidades distintas de pesca. Os pescadores selecionaram o pescado no momento da captura por espécie e tamanho. As espécies de pescados mais descartados foram jaraquis, tucunarés e branquinhas, porém os mais freqüentes, no descarte, foram espécies dos Siluriformes. Os apetrechos de pesca analisados apresentaram diferenças nas características de seu descarte. O descarte foi menor na enchente-cheia (5-17% da captura, conforme apetrecho que durante a vazante-seca (20-62%, conforme apetrecho. Discards are common in commercial fishery, and are evaluated in order to support fisheries management in the region. Fish discards in themiddle Solimões River were described through daily monitoring of fishing activities by the commercial fleet of the town of Tefé. By making use of analyses of correlation and covariance, determinant factors for discards in three different types of fisheries wereevaluated. The crew selected the fish at the moment of capture, by species and size. Among the most discarded fish species were jaraquis Semaprochilodus spp., tucunarés Cichla spp. and branquinhas Curimatidae; however, the most frequently discarded were Siluriform species. The fishing gear analyzed featured differences in their discarding characteristics. Discard was lower during the flood period (5-17% of catches, depending on gear than during the dry season (20-62% of catches, depending on gear.

  20. Using indicators and models for an ecosystem approach to fisheries and aquaculture management: the anchovy fishery and Pacific oyster culture in Chile: case studies Aplicación de indicadores y modelos para un enfoque ecosistémico de la pesca y la acuicultura: pesquería de anchoveta y cultivo de ostra del Pacífico en Chile: casos de estudio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Silva

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study illustrate the use of indicators and models to support the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries and Aquaculture management using two case studies in Chile: prediction of environmental variability effects upon anchovy (Engraulis ringens fishery of northern Chile and prediction of suitable sites and carrying capacity of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas culture using FARM and geographic information system (GIS models in the Valdivia estuary. A three stage approach was applied: Stage 1 considers spatiotemporal ecosystem indicators (fisheries, aquaculture, environmental, and regulatory, Stage 2 uses statistical relationships between indicators, GIS, and other simulation models (e.g., artificial neural networks and FARM of environment-resources interaction, and Stage 3 is the analysis and validation of models outputs. The methodology illustrates how indicators and models may be used to assist decision-makers in developing an ecosystem approach to fisheries and aquaculture. The application of these approaches provides an integrative methodology for abundance prediction of anchovy and site selection for shellfish aquaculture, despite limitations in the available data.Este trabajo muestra el uso de indicadores y modelos para apoyar la aplicación del enfoque ecosistémico en la gestión de la pesca y la acuicultura, mediante dos casos de estudios en Chile: predicción de los efectos de la variabilidad ambiental en la pesquería de anchoveta (Engraulis ringens en la zona norte de Chile y la predicción de sitios aptos y capacidad de carga para el cultivo de la ostra del Pacífico (Crassostrea gigas en el estuario de Valdivia. Se aplicó un enfoque metodológico de tres etapas: etapa 1 considera indicadores espacio-temporales del ecosistema (pesca, acuicultura, medio ambiente y legislación; etapa 2 utiliza relaciones estadísticas entre los indicadores, funciones de SIG (Sistemas de Información Geográfica, y otros modelos de simulación (Redes

  1. 77 FR 38738 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-BB35 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for the Southern New England Skate Bait Trawl Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  2. 77 FR 25117 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-BB35 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for the Southern New England Skate Bait Trawl Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  3. 77 FR 64305 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-BC50 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for the Cape Cod Spiny Dogfish Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  4. Water-column cooling and sea surface salinity increase in the upwelling region off central-south Chile driven by a poleward displacement of the South Pacific High

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Wolfgang; Donoso, David; Garcés-Vargas, José; Escribano, Rubén

    2017-02-01

    Here we present results of direct observations of seawater temperature and salinity over the continental shelf off central-south Chile that shows an unprecedented cooling of the entire water column and an increase in upper layer salinity during 2002 to 2013. We provide evidence that this phenomenon is related to the intensification but mostly to a recent southward displacement of the South Pacific High over the same period, from 2007 on. This in turn has accelerated alongshore, equatorward, subtropical coastal upwelling favorable winds, particularly during winter, injecting colder water from below into the upper water column. Consequently, the environmental conditions on the shelf off central-south Chile shifted from a warmer (fresher) to a cooler (saltier) phase; water column temperature dropped from 11.7 °C (2003-2006) to 11.3 °C (2007-2012) and upper layer salinity rose by 0.25; water column stratification gradually decreased. The biological impacts of such abrupt cooling are apparently already happening in this coastal ecosystem, as recent evidence shows substantial changes in the plankton community and negative trends in zooplankton biomass over the same period.

  5. Microtektites and Associated Minerals in the Iridium-Rich Layer of Marine Clay From the Central North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, I. S.

    2014-12-01

    Our study is based on a sample derived from a deep sea core (GPC3) from the mid-Pacific Ocean floor north of the Hawaiian Islands, provided by Jim Broda, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The 65 Ma K/T boundary layer was identified by measurements of magnetic susceptibility (Doh, 1987) and Ir anomaly (Kyte et al., 1995) which peaked at a down-hole depth of 2055-2056 cm. Our sample of red clay was about 5 cubic cm in size. After wet-sieving for the size fraction greater than 38 microns, we hand-picked grains of interest under a binocular microscope. We found 40 microtektites (glass spherules, mostly devitrified), 12 olive-green aggregates composed of talc/magnetite, and 3 green and blue crystals of silicon carbide (SiC). There are many quartz grains having decorated deformation lamellae or mosaic structures. The olive-green talc/magnetite particles have textures and composition similar to materials found in chondritic meteorites, whereas, SiC crystals are known to occur in carbonaceous chondrites. These particles seem to implicate an affinity to meteorites. Ir-rich deposits world-wide are believed to have settled from dust produced by the Chicxulub Impact, but what object from space created the impact crater is rather uncertain. Our results reported here cannot rule out the possiblilty of impact by comets, because the nature of cometary dust particles are not very well known.

  6. Effect of Chlorophyll-a Spatial Distribution on Upper Ocean Temperature in the Central and Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Pengfei; LIU Hailong; ZHANG Xuehong

    2008-01-01

    Effect of the spatial distributions of chlorophyll-a concentration on upper ocean temperature and currents in the equatorial Pacific is investigated through a set of numerical experiments by using an ocean general circulation model. This study indicates that enhanced meridional gradient of chlorophylloa between the equator and off-equatorial regions can strengthen zonal circulation and lead to a decrease in equatorial sea surface temperature (SST). However, the circulation changes by themselves are not effective enough to affect SST in the equatorial cold tongue (CT) region. The comparison between the experiments indicates that the CT SST are more sensitive to chlorophyll-a distribution away from the equator. The off-equatorial chlorophyll-a traps more solar radiation in the mixed layer, therefore, the temperature in the thermocline decreases. The cold water can then be transported to the equator by the meridional circulation within the mixed layer. Furthermore, the relation among CT SST, the surface heat flux, and the equatorial upwelling are discussed. The study implies the simulation biases of temperature on the equator are not only related to the local ocean dynamics but also related to some deficiency in simulating off-equatorial processes.

  7. High resolution Osmium isotopes in deep-sea ferromanganese crusts reveal a large meteorite impact in the Central Pacific at 12 ± 4 ka (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Chen, C.; Jackson, B. P.; Abouchami, W.

    2009-12-01

    Ferromanganese crusts grow by incorporating metals from ambient seawater and are shown to be faithful recorders of ocean paleochemistry. We studied a well-dated crust (VA 13/2) from the Central Pacific with the aim to provide a high resolution record of glacial-interglacial variations in the seawater Os isotope composition. The uppermost 1.5 mm section of the crust was sampled at every 50 μ m with an 8 mm diameter drill-bit that was mounted on a high precision lathe. This corresponds to a time resolution of 4 ka for the first 550 μ m and of 8 ka for the rest on the basis of 230Thexcess dating. Surprisingly, the Os contents and isotope ratios in the crust appear to be compromised between 50 and 100 μ m by contact with a source that is highly enriched in Os but with low 187Os\\188Os ratio. The depth corresponds to an age of 12 ± 4 ka and in comparison to a background seawater isotope ratio of 0.93-1.02, at this time the crust shows an isotope ratio of 0.24 suggesting input of meteorite derived Os. We prepared a thick-section of the crust to investigate whether the Os signal is associated with the presence of extraterrestrial (ET) particles. We found using optical microscopy and LA-ICP-MS that there are no large ET particles and that the Os enrichment of the crust is confined to within 100 μ m of the surface. This suggests that the crust received meteorite-derived Os as extremely small particles. Investigations of surface scrapes of other crusts in the vicinity of VA 13/2 helped us define a large area in the Pacific with 187Os\\188Os ratios lower than that estimated for the ambient seawater. We infer that the Central Pacific was a site of deposition of Os resulting from dust cloud following a meteorite impact at 12 ± 4 ka that suppressed the 187Os\\188Os ratios of the crusts. Using the distribution of the Fe-Mn crusts whose surface-scrapes display 187Os\\188Os ratios much less than ambient seawater (0.9 or less) we find that the meteorite could be up to 100 m in

  8. Cesium-134 and 137 activities in the central North Pacific Ocean after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kameník

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface seawater 134Cs and 137Cs samples were collected in the central and western North Pacific Ocean during the 1.5 yr after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident to monitor dispersion patterns of these radioisotopes towards the Hawaiian Islands. In the absence of other recent sources and due to its short half-life only those parts of the Pacific Ocean would have detectable 134Cs that were impacted by Fukushima releases. Between March and May 2011, 134Cs was not detected around the Hawaiian Islands and Guam. Here, most 137Cs activities (1.2–1.5 Bq m−3 were in the range of expected preexisting levels. Some samples north of the Hawaiian Islands (1.6–1.8 Bq m−3 were elevated above the 18-month baseline established in surface seawater in Hawaii indicating that those might carry atmospheric fallout. The 18-month time-series analysis of surface seawater from Hawaii did not reveal any seasonal variability or trends, with an average activity of 1.46 ± 0.06 Bq m−3 (Station Aloha, 17 values. In contrast, samples collected between Japan and Hawaii contained 134Cs activities in the range of 1–4 Bq m−3 and 137Cs levels were about 2–3 times above the preexisting activities. We found that the southern boundary of the Kuroshio and Kuroshio extension currents represented a boundary for radiation dispersion with higher activities detected within and north of the major currents. The radiation plume has not been detected over the past 1.5 yr at the main Hawaiian Islands due to the transport patterns across the Kuroshio and Kuroshio extension currents.

  9. Cesium-134 and 137 activities in the central North Pacific Ocean after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kameník

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface seawater 134Cs and 137Cs samples were collected in the central and western North Pacific Ocean during the 2 yr after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident to monitor dispersion patterns of these radioisotopes towards the Hawaiian Islands. In the absence of other recent sources and due to its short half-life, only those parts of the Pacific Ocean would have detectable 134Cs values that were impacted by Fukushima releases. Between March and May 2011, 134Cs was not detected around the Hawaiian Islands and Guam. Here, most 137Cs activities (1.2–1.5 Bq m–3 were in the range of expected preexisting levels. Some samples north of the Hawaiian Islands (1.6–1.8 Bq m–3 were elevated above the 23-month baseline established in surface seawater in Hawaii indicating that those might carry atmospheric fallout. The 23-month time-series analysis of surface seawater from Hawaii did not reveal any seasonal variability or trends, with an average activity of 1.46 ± 0.06 Bq m–3 (Station Aloha, 18 values. In contrast, samples collected between Japan and Hawaii contained 134Cs activities in the range of 1–4 Bq m–3, and 137Cs levels were about 2–3 times above the preexisting activities. We found that the southern boundary of the Kuroshio and Kuroshio extension currents represented a boundary for radiation dispersion with higher activities detected within and north of the major currents. The radiation plume has not been detected over the past 2 yr at the main Hawaiian Islands due to the transport patterns across the Kuroshio and Kuroshio extension currents.

  10. Cesium-134 and 137 activities in the central North Pacific Ocean after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameník, J.; Dulaiova, H.; Buesseler, K. O.; Pike, S. M.; Št'astná, K.

    2013-09-01

    Surface seawater 134Cs and 137Cs samples were collected in the central and western North Pacific Ocean during the 2 yr after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident to monitor dispersion patterns of these radioisotopes towards the Hawaiian Islands. In the absence of other recent sources and due to its short half-life, only those parts of the Pacific Ocean would have detectable 134Cs values that were impacted by Fukushima releases. Between March and May 2011, 134Cs was not detected around the Hawaiian Islands and Guam. Here, most 137Cs activities (1.2-1.5 Bq m-3) were in the range of expected preexisting levels. Some samples north of the Hawaiian Islands (1.6-1.8 Bq m-3) were elevated above the 23-month baseline established in surface seawater in Hawaii indicating that those might carry atmospheric fallout. The 23-month time-series analysis of surface seawater from Hawaii did not reveal any seasonal variability or trends, with an average activity of 1.46 ± 0.06 Bq m-3 (Station Aloha, 18 values). In contrast, samples collected between Japan and Hawaii contained 134Cs activities in the range of 1-4 Bq m-3, and 137Cs levels were about 2-3 times above the preexisting activities. We found that the southern boundary of the Kuroshio and Kuroshio extension currents represented a boundary for radiation dispersion with higher activities detected within and north of the major currents. The radiation plume has not been detected over the past 2 yr at the main Hawaiian Islands due to the transport patterns across the Kuroshio and Kuroshio extension currents.

  11. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Northwest). Pacific Herring

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    recently of developing aquacultural Americans may be developed in Port Gamble interest, is spawn-on-kelp. As the name Bay, Washington (Dwane Day...fishermen, of a more Pacific herring. They remained convinced, reliably available product through aquacultural however, that efforts should be made to...below 7 C on- seaweed fishery." Unfortunately, this fishery but not above that temperature. ended in 1977 because of silt contamination of the product (J

  12. Molecular identification of Anisakis and Hysterothylacium larvae in marine fishes from the East China Sea and the Pacific coast of central Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qingming; Fan, Lanfen; Zhang, Junhe; Akao, Nobuaki; Dong, Kewei; Lou, Di; Ding, Jianzu; Tong, Qunbo; Zheng, Bin; Chen, Rui; Ohta, Nobuo; Lu, Shaohong

    2015-04-16

    Anisakiasis is a human disease caused by the accidental ingestion of larvae belonging to the family Anisakidae. Three fish species, the small yellow croaker Pseudosciaena polyactis, the mackerel Pneumatophorus japonicus and the hairtail Trichiurus haumela are important source for food products in the East China Sea. The prevalence and the identification of Anisakidae larvae in these fishes will benefit the prevention and control of anisakiasis. In this study, fish samples were obtained from fish markers in the East China Sea and the Pacific coast of central Japan during April 2011 and July 2013. For species identification, the PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the entire ITS region (ITS1, 5.8 S and ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was performed. In total, 2004 larvae were collected from 80 hairtail fish, 20 small yellow croaker, and 27 mackerel from the East China Sea and the Pacific coast of central Japan. High prevalence of Anisakidae larvae infection (116/122, 95.1%) was detected in the East China Sea. Seven species were identified belonging to the genera Anisakis (Nematoda: Anisakidae) and Hysterothylacium (Nematoda: Anisakidae). Anisakis pegreffii was the predominant species accounting for 84.8% of all larvae examined in East China Sea, while all Anisakidae larvae isolated from Japan were identified as Anisakis simplex sensu stricto (s.s.). In the East China Sea, A. simplex s.s. and Anisakis typica were 0.6% (4/619) and 1.5% (9/619) of the identified nematodes, respectively. Interestingly, one larva was identified as a recombinant genotype of A. simplex s.s. and A. pegreffii. In addition, four species of the genus Hysterothylacium, namely, Hysterothylacium amoyense (31/619, 5.0%), Hysterothylacium aduncum (10/619, 1.6%), Hysterothylacium fabri (21/619, 3.4%) and Hysterothylacium spp. (18/619, 2.9%) were also identified in the present study. This is a comprehensive epidemiological dataset for the family Anisakidae in

  13. 78 FR 18323 - Pacific Halibut Fishery; Guideline Harvest Levels for the Guided Sport Fishery for Pacific...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... time to limit the guided sport angler catch to the GHL (74 FR 21194, May 6, 2009). Regulations at Sec... published in the 2013 IPHC annual management measures (78 FR 16423, March 15, 2013). DATES: The GHLs are.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background In 2003, NMFS implemented a final rule (68 FR 47256, August 8, 2003)...

  14. 76 FR 60790 - International Fisheries; Pacific Tuna Fisheries; Fishing Restrictions in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    .... meridian. The members of the IATTC are Belize, Canada, China, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador... weather forecasting, tsunami warnings, search and rescue efforts, and research of the marine environment... entangled fishing gear with as little damage to the data buoy as possible. If a scientific research program...

  15. 78 FR 33240 - International Fisheries; Pacific Tuna Fisheries; Fishing Restrictions in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    .... and 50 S. parallels, and the 150 W. meridian. The IATTC has maintained a scientific research and..., Canada, China, Chinese Taipei (Taiwan), Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, the European Union...

  16. 76 FR 68332 - International Fisheries; Pacific Tuna Fisheries; Fishing Restrictions in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... loss of data critical to weather forecasting, tsunami warnings, search and rescue efforts, and research... does not apply if the fishing vessel is operating as part of a scientific research program that.... (e.g., American Samoa) or foreign (e.g., Ecuador, Mexico, Colombia, Costa Rica) ports. Skipjack and...

  17. Profile data collected from CTDs aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Elton Sette in the South Pacific Ocean near American Samoa from 2004-03-03 to 2004-03-15 (NCEI Accession 0014889)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ecosystems and Oceanography Division of the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  18. 78 FR 4835 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plan for the North Pacific Right Whale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... Plan for the North Pacific Right Whale AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and... Plan (Plan) for the North Pacific right whale (Eubalaena japonica). NMFS is soliciting review and... West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Attn: North Pacific Right Whale Recovery Plan. Instructions:...

  19. 50 CFR 229.31 - Pacific Offshore Cetacean Take Reduction Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Offshore Cetacean Take Reduction... Regulations § 229.31 Pacific Offshore Cetacean Take Reduction Plan. (a) Purpose and scope. The purpose of this section is to implement the Pacific Offshore Cetacean Take Reduction Plan. Paragraphs (b) through (d)...

  20. Predicting overfishing and extinction threats in multispecies fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Matthew G; Polasky, Stephen; Tilman, David

    2013-10-01

    Threats to species from commercial fishing are rarely identified until species have suffered large population declines, by which time remedial actions can have severe economic consequences, such as closure of fisheries. Many of the species most threatened by fishing are caught in multispecies fisheries, which can remain profitable even as populations of some species collapse. Here we show for multispecies fisheries that the biological and socioeconomic conditions that would eventually cause species to be severely depleted or even driven extinct can be identified decades before those species experience high harvest rates or marked population declines. Because fishing effort imposes a common source of mortality on all species in a fishery, the long-term impact of a fishery on a species is predicted by measuring its loss rate relative to that of species that influence the fishery's maximal effort. We tested our approach on eight Pacific tuna and billfish populations, four of which have been identified recently as in decline and threatened with overfishing. The severe depletion of all four populations could have been predicted in the 1950s, using our approach. Our results demonstrate that species threatened by human harvesting can be identified much earlier, providing time for adjustments in harvesting practices before consequences become severe and fishery closures or other socioeconomically disruptive interventions are required to protect species.