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Sample records for central nucleus icc

  1. Classifiers for centrality determination in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Altsybeev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Centrality, as a geometrical property of the collision, is crucial for the physical interpretation of nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus experimental data. However, it cannot be directly accessed in event-by-event data analysis. Common methods for centrality estimation in A-A and p-A collisions usually rely on a single detector (either on the signal in zero-degree calorimeters or on the multiplicity in some semi-central rapidity range). In the present work, we made an attempt to develop an approach for centrality determination that is based on machine-learning techniques and utilizes information from several detector subsystems simultaneously. Different event classifiers are suggested and evaluated for their selectivity power in terms of the number of nucleons-participants and the impact parameter of the collision. Finer centrality resolution may allow to reduce impact from so-called volume fluctuations on physical observables being studied in heavy-ion experiments like ALICE at the LHC and fixed target exper...

  2. Projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huazheng; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2015-01-01

    The mouse precuneiform nucleus has been proposed as the midbrain locomotion center, a function ascribed to its caudal neighbor, cuneiform nucleus, in the rat, cat and other species. The present study investigated the projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus in the mouse using retrograde tracer injections (fluoro-gold) into the precuneiform nucleus and anterograde tracer injections (biotinylated dextran amine) into the central amygdaloid nucleus. The entire central amygdaloid nucleus except the rostral pole had retrogradely labeled neurons, especially in the middle portion where labeled neurons were densely packed. Anterogradely labeled amygdaloid fibers approached the precuneiform nucleus from the area ventrolateral to it and terminated in the entire precuneiform nucleus. Labeled fibers were also found in laminae 5 and 6 in the upper cervical cord on the ipsilateral side. The present study is the first demonstration of projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus. This projection may underpin the role of the precuneiform nucleus in the modulation of the cardiovascular activity.

  3. Centrality Dependence of Flow in High-Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红艳; 周代翠; 杨纯斌; 蔡勖

    2002-01-01

    Directed flow and elliptic flow of final state particles in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions in the EMU01 experiment have been studied. The dependences of directed flow and elliptic flow on incident energy and impact centrality of outgoing particles are presented. The results exhibit strong dependence of flow on centrality and energy. We also suggest a more reliable way to determine the event plane resolution here.

  4. Coexistence of central nucleus, cores, and rods: Diagnostic relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinakaran, Sathiyabama; Kumar, Rashmi Santhosh; Thakkar, Ravindra; Narayanappa, Gayathri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital myopathies (CMs) though considered distinct disorders, simultaneous occurrence of central nucleus, nemaline rods, and cores in the same biopsy are scarcely reported. Objective: A retrospective reassessment of cases diagnosed as CMs to look for multiple pathologies missed, if any, during the initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Enzyme histochemical, and immunohistochemical-stained slides from 125 cases diagnosed as congenital myopathy were reassessed. Results: The study revealed 15 cases (12%) of congenital myopathy with more than one morphological feature. Central nucleus with cores (n = 11), central nucleus, nemaline rods and cores (n = 3), and nemaline rods with cores (n = 1). 4/11 cases were diagnosed as centronuclear myopathy (CNM) in the first instance; in addition, cores were revealed on reassessment. Discussion: The prevalence of CMs of all neuromuscular disorders is approximately 6 in 100,000 live births, with regional variations. Three main defined CMs include centro nuclear myopathy (CNM), nemaline rod myopathy (NRM), and central core disease (CCD). However, they are more diverse with overlapping clinical and histopathological features, thus broadening the spectra within each category of congenital myopathy. Conclusion: Identification of cases with overlap of pathological features has diagnostic relevance. PMID:27293330

  5. ICC Oversteps Its Boundary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The International Criminal Court should hand over the Darfur case to Sudanese courts International Criminal Court(ICC) Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo charged Sudanese President Omar al- Bashir with sponsoring war crimes and crimes against humanity in Darfur on July 14.The prosecutor is also expected to seek

  6. The Double Nucleus and Central Black Hole of M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John; Bender, Ralf

    1999-09-01

    New spectroscopy of M31 supports Tremaine's model in which both nuclei are parts of a single eccentric disk of stars orbiting the black hole (BH). The kinematics and Hubble Space Telescope photometry are used to measure the offset of the BH from the center of mass. This confirms that the BH mass is ~3×107 Msolar by a technique that is nearly independent of stellar-dynamical models. We present spectroscopy of the nucleus of M31 obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and Subarcsecond Imaging Spectrograph. Spectra at the Ca infrared triplet lines (seeing σ*=0.27") are used to measure the stellar kinematics, and spectra at the Mg I b lines (σ*=0.31") are used to measure metallicities. We also measure nonparametric line-of-sight velocity distributions (LOSVDs). All spectra confirm the steep rotation and velocity dispersion gradients that imply that M31 contains a 3.3×107 Msolar central dark object. At σ*=0.27", the maximum bulge-subtracted rotation velocity of the nucleus is 233+/-4 km s-1 on the P2 side, and the maximum velocity dispersion is 287+/-9 km s-1. The dispersion peak is displaced by 0.20"+/-0.03" from the velocity center in the direction opposite to P1, confirming a result by Bacon and coworkers. The higher surface brightness nucleus, P1, is colder than the bulge, with σ~=100 km s-1 at r~=1''. Cold light from P1 contributes at the velocity center; this explains part of the σ(r) asymmetry. The nucleus is cold at r>~1'' on both sides of the center. Our results are used to test Tremaine's model in which the double nucleus is a single eccentric disk of stars orbiting the BH. (1) The model predicts that the velocity center of the nucleus is displaced by 0.2" from P2 toward P1. Our observations show a displacement of 0.08"+/-0.01" before bulge subtraction and 0.10"+/-0.01" after bulge subtraction. (2) The model predicts a minimum σ~=135 km s-1 at P1. We observe σ=123+/-2 km s-1. Observations (1) and (2) may be reconciled with the model if its

  7. Consolidation of altered associability information by amygdala central nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffino, Felipe L; Holland, Peter C

    2016-09-01

    The surprising omission of a reinforcer can enhance the associability of the stimuli that were present when the reward prediction error was induced, so that they more readily enter into new associations in the future. Previous research from this laboratory identified brain circuit elements critical to the enhancement of stimulus associability by the omission of an expected event and to the subsequent expression of that altered associability in more rapid learning. These elements include the amygdala, the midbrain substantia nigra, the basal forebrain substantia innominata, the dorsolateral striatum, the secondary visual cortex, and the posterior parietal cortex. Here, we found that consolidation of a surprise-enhanced associability memory in a serial prediction task depends on processing in the amygdala central nucleus (CeA) after completion of sessions that included the surprising omission of an expected event. Post-surprise infusions of anisomycin, lidocaine, or muscimol prevented subsequent display of surprise-enhanced associability. Because previous studies indicated that CeA function is unnecessary for the expression of associability enhancements that were induced previously when CeA function was intact (Holland & Gallagher, 2006), we interpreted these results as indicating that post-surprise activity of CeA ("surprise replay") is necessary for the consolidation of altered associability memories elsewhere in the brain, such as the posterior parietal cortex (Schiffino et al., 2014a).

  8. Rodent anxiety and kindling of the central amygdala and nucleus basalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamec, R; Shallow, T

    We studied lasting behavioral effects of kindling of three parts of the central nucleus of the amygdala and the anterior nucleus basalis in the right hemisphere of male Wistar rats. Kindling lastingly changed two measures of anxiety in the elevated plus-maze. The nature of the change depended on the location of the kindled focus. Kindling of the posterior central nucleus decreased both open-arm exploration and frequency of risk assessment in the elevated plus-maze 1 week after the fourth stage 5 seizure. Kindling of the middle parts of the central nucleus was without behavioral effects. Kindling of the anterior central nucleus and the anterior nucleus basalis increased risk assessment, which was interpreted as an anxiolytic effect. Changes in risk assessment produced by kindling of the central nucleus were dependent on open-arm avoidance, whereas the effects of nucleus basalis kindling were independent of open-arm avoidance. Analysis of covariance and factor analysis support the view that control of risk assessment is by circuitry, which is independent of that which controls open-arm avoidance. Moreover, part of this circuitry appears to involve the anterior nucleus basalis. Changes in plus-maze behavior were independent of changes in exploration or activity in either the plus-maze or hole board. These findings add to a growing body of evidence that suggests that subtle differences in location of a kindled focus within the rat amygdala lead to different behavioral outcomes.

  9. Hacia la mejora del servicio al cliente: Lecciones sobre la creación y consolidación de la Central Única de Atención al Cliente ITE (ICC)

    OpenAIRE

    Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID)

    2009-01-01

    En medio de un cambio institucional de grandes proporciones, el Departamento de Tecnología de la Información (ITE) del BID asumió el reto de mejorar la eficacia y eficiencia de sus servicios informáticos y técnicos, consolidándolos en lo que hoy se conoce como Central Única de Atención al Cliente de ITE (ICC). Esta experiencia ha dejado varias enseñanzas relevantes para el Banco que se comparten en esta nota.

  10. FY97 ICCS prototype specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, J.

    1997-02-20

    The ICCS software team will implement and test two iterations of their software product during FY97. The first of these iterations will concentrate on construction of selected framework components; the subsequent iteration will extend the product and perform measurements of performance based on emulated FEP devices. This document specifies the products to be delivered in that first prototype and projects the direction that the second prototype will take. Detailed specification of the later iteration will be written when the results of the first iteration are complete. The selection of frameworks to be implemented early is made on a basis of risk analysis from the point of view of future development in the ICCS project. The prototype will address risks in integration of object- oriented components, in refining our development process, and in emulation testing for FEP devices. This document is a specification that identifies products and processes to undertake for resolving these risks. The goals of this activity are to exercise our development process at a modest scale and to probe our architecture plan for fundamental limits and failure modes. The product of the iterations will be the framework software which will be useful in future ICCS code. Thus the FY97 products are intended for internal usage by the ICCS team and for demonstration to the FEP software developers of the strategy for integrating supervisory software with FEP computers. This will be the first of several expected iterations of the software development process and the performance measurements that ICCS will demonstrate, intended to support confidence in our ability to meet project RAM goals. The design of the application software is being carried out in a separate WBS 1.5.2 activity. The design activity has as its FY97 product a series of Software Design Documents that will specify the functionality of the controls software of ICCS. During the testing of this year`s prototypes, the application

  11. Centrality-dependent forward $J/\\psi$ production in high energy proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ducloué, B; Mäntysaari, H

    2016-01-01

    Forward $J/\\psi$ production and suppression in high energy proton-nucleus collisions can be an important probe of gluon saturation. In an earlier work we studied this process in the Color Glass Condensate framework and showed that using the Glauber approach to extrapolate the dipole cross section of a proton to a nucleus leads to results closer to experimental data than previous calculations in this framework. Here we investigate the centrality dependence of the nuclear suppression in this model and show a comparison of our results with recent LHC data.

  12. Color management understanding and using ICC profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Color Management serves as a comprehensive guide to the implementation of the ICC (International Color Consortium) profile specification, widely used for maintaining color fidelity across multi-media imaging devices and software. The book draws together many of the White Papers produced by the ICC to promote the use of color management and disseminate good practice; the ICC specification has become widely accepted within the color industry, and these papers have been updated, expanded and edited for this collection. Other chapters comprise material that will go on to form future ICC Whi

  13. Centrality dependence of forward J/ψ suppression in high energy proton-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducloué, B.; Lappi, T.; Mäntysaari, H.

    2016-12-01

    The production of forward J / ψ mesons in proton-nucleus collisions can provide important information on gluon saturation. In a previous work we studied this process in the Color Glass Condensate framework, describing the target using a dipole cross section fitted to HERA inclusive data and extrapolated to the case of a nuclear target using the optical Glauber model. In this work we study the centrality dependence of the nuclear suppression in this model and compare our results with recent LHC data for this observable.

  14. Partial anxiolytic action of morphine sulphate following microinjection into the central nucleus of the amygdala in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, S E; Rodgers, R J

    1979-09-01

    In the social interaction test of anxiety, bilateral microinjections of morphine sulphate (10 microgram) into the central nucleus of the amygdala counteracted the reduction in social interaction normally seen when the test arena is unfamiliar to rats. However, these injections did not counteract the decrease in social interaction that is observed as illuminance of the arena is increased. Morphine injections into the medial site depressed social interaction below the levels shown by control animals. In the open field test, morphine produced a facilitation of peripheral activity when injected into the central nucleus whilst a decrease in rearing was observed following similar injections into the medial nucleus. Overall, these data indicate a partial anxiolytic action of morphine in the central amygdaloid nucleus. Results are discussed in relation to possible differences in opioid peptide innervation of these two amygdaloid nuclei.

  15. SUNSETTING THE ICC: IS IT REALLY DEAD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D. Stone

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC was created in 1887 to regulate railroads. By the mid-1970’s it had grown into the premier independent agency in the federal government, regulating all domestic transport modes except air. But starting in the ‘70’s, the Commission began to shrink in both size and power. By 1995’s end, it disappeared, and was replaced by the Surface Transportation Board (STB that regulates only railroads, although to a lesser extent than the ICC had. There remains the question of whether the ICC is really dead or just renamed.

  16. Constructing the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: A Watchmaker’s Perspective on the Central Clockworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph eBedont

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The circadian system constrains an organism’s palette of behaviors to portions of the solar day appropriate to its ecological niche. The central light-entrained clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the mammalian circadian system has evolved a complex network of interdependent signaling mechanisms and multiple distinct oscillators to serve this crucial function. However, studies of the mechanisms controlling SCN development have greatly lagged behind our understanding of its physiological functions. We review advances in the understanding of adult SCN function, what has been described about SCN development to date, and the potential of both current and future studies of SCN development to yield important insights into master clock function.

  17. Optogenetic stimulation of the cochlear nucleus using channelrhodopsin-2 evokes activity in the central auditory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Keith N.; Slama, Michaël C. C.; Owoc, Maryanna; Kozin, Elliott; Hancock, Kenneth; Kempfle, Judith; Edge, Albert; Lacour, Stephanie; Boyden, Edward; Polley, Daniel; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics has become an important research tool and is being considered as the basis for several neural prostheses. However, few studies have applied optogenetics to the auditory brainstem. This study explored whether optical activation of the cochlear nucleus (CN) elicited responses in neurons in higher centers of the auditory pathway, and it measured the evoked response to optical stimulation. Viral-mediated gene transfer was used to express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in the mouse CN. Blue light was delivered via an optical fiber placed near the surface of the infected CN and recordings were made in higher-level centers. Optical stimulation evoked excitatory multiunit spiking activity throughout the tonotopic axis of central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (IC) and the auditory cortex (Actx). The pattern and magnitude of IC activity elicited by optical stimulation was comparable to that obtained with a 50 dB SPL acoustic click stimulus. This broad pattern of activity was consistent with histological confirmation of GFP label of cell bodies and axons throughout the CN. Increasing pulse rates up to 320 Hz did not significantly affect threshold or bandwidth of the IC responses, but rates higher than 50 Hz resulted in desynchronized activity. Optical stimulation also evoked an auditory brainstem response, which had a simpler waveform than the response to acoustic stimulation. Control cases showed no responses to optical stimulation. These data suggest that optogenetic control of central auditory neurons is feasible, but opsins with faster channel kinetics will be necessary to convey information in rates typical of many auditory signals. PMID:25481416

  18. Optogenetic stimulation of the cochlear nucleus using channelrhodopsin-2 evokes activity in the central auditory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Keith N; Slama, Michaël C C; Kozin, Elliott D; Owoc, Maryanna; Hancock, Kenneth; Kempfle, Judith; Edge, Albert; Lacour, Stephanie; Boyden, Edward; Polley, Daniel; Brown, M Christian; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-03-02

    Optogenetics has become an important research tool and is being considered as the basis for several neural prostheses. However, few studies have applied optogenetics to the auditory brainstem. This study explored whether optical activation of the cochlear nucleus (CN) elicited responses in neurons in higher centers of the auditory pathway and whether it elicited an evoked response. Viral-mediated gene transfer was used to express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in the mouse CN. Blue light was delivered via an optical fiber placed near the surface of the infected CN and recordings were made in higher-level centers. Optical stimulation evoked excitatory multiunit spiking activity throughout the tonotopic axis of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (IC) and the auditory cortex (Actx). The pattern and magnitude of IC activity elicited by optical stimulation was comparable to that obtained with a 50dB SPL acoustic click. This broad pattern of activity was consistent with histological confirmation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) label of cell bodies and axons throughout the CN. Increasing pulse rates up to 320Hz did not significantly affect threshold or bandwidth of the IC responses, but rates higher than 50Hz resulted in desynchronized activity. Optical stimulation also evoked an auditory brainstem response, which had a simpler waveform than the response to acoustic stimulation. Control cases showed no responses to optical stimulation. These data suggest that optogenetic control of central auditory neurons is feasible, but opsins with faster channel kinetics may be necessary to convey information at rates typical of many auditory signals.

  19. The role of neurotensin in positive reinforcement in the rat central nucleus of amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    László, Kristóf; Tóth, Krisztián; Kertes, Erika; Péczely, László; Lénárd, László

    2010-04-02

    In the central nervous system neurotensin (NT) acts as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. It was shown that NT has positive reinforcing effects after its direct microinjection into the ventral tegmental area. The central nucleus of amygdala (CeA), part of the limbic system, plays an important role in learning, memory, regulation of feeding, anxiety and emotional behavior. By means of immunohistochemical and radioimmune methods it was shown that the amygdaloid body is relatively rich in NT immunoreactive elements and NT receptors. The aim of our study was to examine the possible effects of NT on reinforcement and anxiety in the CeA. In conditioned place preference test male Wistar rats were microinjected bilaterally with 100 or 250 ng NT in volume of 0.4 microl or 35 ng neurotensin receptor 1 (NTS1) antagonist SR 48692 alone, or NTS1 antagonist 15 min before 100 ng NT treatment. Hundred or 250 ng NT significantly increased the time rats spent in the treatment quadrant. Prior treatment with the non-peptide NTS1 antagonist blocked the effects of NT. Antagonist itself did not influence the reinforcing effect. In elevated plus maze test we did not find differences among the groups as far as the anxiety index (time spent on the open arms) was concerned. Our results suggest that in the rat ACE NT has positive reinforcing effects. We clarified that NTS1s are involved in this action. It was also shown that NT does not influence anxiety behavior.

  20. Bar Effects on Central Star Formation and Active Galactic Nucleus Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seulhee; Oh, Kyuseok; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2012-01-01

    Galactic bars are often suspected to be channels of gas inflow to the galactic center and to trigger central star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. However, the current status on this issue based on empirical studies is unsettling, especially regarding AGNs. We investigate this question based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. From the nearby (0.01 inspection. We found 36% of them to have a bar. Bars are found to be more common in galaxies with earlier morphology. This makes sample selection critical. Parameter-based selections would miss a large fraction of barred galaxies of early morphology. Bar effects on star formation or AGNs are difficult to understand properly because multiple factors (bar frequency, stellar mass, black hole mass, gas contents, etc.) seem to contribute to them in intricate manners. In the hope of breaking these degeneracies, we inspect bar effects for fixed galaxy properties. Bar effects on central star formation seem higher in redder galaxies. Bar effects on AGNs on the other hand are higher in bluer and less massive galaxies. These effects seem more pronounced with increasing bar length. We discuss possible implications in terms of gas contents, bar strength, bar evolution, fueling timescale, and the dynamical role of supermassive black hole.

  1. Integration of stress and leptin signaling by CART producing neurons in the rodent midbrain centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, L.; Janssen, D.; Knaap, N.J.F. van der; Roubos, E.W.; Leshan, R.L.; Myers, M.G.; Gaszner, B.; Kozicz, T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin targets the brain to regulate feeding, neuroendocrine function and metabolism. The leptin receptor is present in hypothalamic centers controlling energy metabolism as well as in the centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp), a region implicated in the stress response and in various

  2. Involvement of the basolateral complex and central nucleus of amygdala in the omission effects of different magnitudes of reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judice-Daher, Danielle M; Tavares, Tatiane F; Bueno, José Lino O

    2012-07-15

    Evidence from appetitive Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning studies suggest that the amygdala is involved in modulation of responses correlated with motivational states, and therefore, to the modulation of processes probably underlying reinforcement omission effects. The present study aimed to clarify whether or not the mechanisms related to reinforcement omission effects of different magnitudes depend on basolateral complex and central nucleus of amygdala. Rats were trained on a fixed-interval 12s with limited hold 6s signaled schedule in which correct responses were always followed by one of two reinforcement magnitudes. Bilateral lesions of the basolateral complex and central nucleus were made after acquisition of stable performance. After postoperative recovery, the training was changed from 100% to 50% reinforcement schedules. The results showed that lesions of the basolateral complex and central nucleus did not eliminate or reduce, but interfere with reinforcement omission effects. The response from rats of both the basolateral complex and central nucleus lesioned group was higher relative to that of the rats of their respective sham-lesioned groups after reinforcement omission. Thus, the lesioned rats were more sensitive to the omission effect. Moreover, the basolateral complex lesions prevented the magnitude effect on reinforcement omission effects. Basolateral complex lesioned rats showed no differential performance following omission of larger and smaller reinforcement magnitude. Thus, the basolateral complex is involved in incentive processes relative to omission of different reinforcement magnitudes. Therefore, it is possible that reinforcement omission effects are modulated by brain circuitry which involves amygdala.

  3. Central and peripheral contributions to dynamic changes in nucleus accumbens glucose induced by intravenous cocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Taro Wakabayashi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of neural, physiological and behavioral effects induced by cocaine is consistent with metabolic neural activation, yet direct attempts to evaluate central metabolic effects of this drug have produced controversial results. Here, we used enzyme-based glucose sensors coupled with high-speed amperometry in freely moving rats to examine how intravenous cocaine at a behaviorally active dose affects extracellular glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc, a critical structure within the motivation-reinforcement circuit. In drug-naive rats, cocaine induced a bimodal increase in glucose, with the first, ultra-fast phasic rise appearing during the injection (latency 6-8 s; ~50 µM or ~5% of baseline followed by a larger, more prolonged tonic elevation (~100 µM or 10% of baseline, peak ~15 min. While the rapid, phasic component of the glucose response remained stable following subsequent cocaine injections, the tonic component progressively decreased. Cocaine-methiodide, cocaine’s peripherally acting analog, induced an equally rapid and strong initial glucose rise, indicating cocaine’s action on peripheral neural substrates as its cause. However, this analog did not induce increases in either locomotion or tonic glucose, suggesting direct central mediation of these cocaine effects. Under systemic pharmacological blockade of dopamine transmission, both phasic and tonic components of the cocaine-induced glucose response were only slightly reduced, suggesting a significant role of non-dopamine mechanisms in cocaine-induced accumbal glucose influx. Hence, intravenous cocaine induces rapid, strong inflow of glucose into NAc extracellular space by involving both peripheral and central, non-dopamine drug actions, thus preventing a possible deficit resulting from enhanced glucose use by brain cells.

  4. Inter-Organizational Collaborative Capacity (ICC) Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Hocevar, Susan Page; Jansen, Erik; Thomas, Gail Fann

    2012-01-01

    Effective collaboration across organizational boundaries is important for achieving governance reform. But, given the complexities of both aligning and competing interests, collaboration is often a challenge. The Inter-­‐Organizational Collaborative Capacity (ICC) model was originally developed to help public sector agencies (municipal, state, regional and federa...

  5. Positive reinforcing effects of RFamide-related peptide-1 in the rat central nucleus of amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lénárd, László; Kovács, Anita; Ollmann, Tamás; Péczely, László; Zagoracz, Olga; Gálosi, Rita; László, Kristóf

    2014-12-15

    The amygdaloid body (AMY) plays an important role in memory, learning and reward-related processes. RFamide-related peptide-1 (RFRP-1) immunoreactive fibers and NPFF1 receptors were identified in the AMY, and previously we verified that neuropeptide RFRP-1 infused into the central nucleus of AMY (CeA) caused food intake decrease. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible rewarding or aversive effects of RFRP-1 in the CeA. In conditioned place preference, test male Wistar rats were microinjected bilaterally with 50 or 100ng RFRP-1 in volume of 0.4μl. In other groups of animals, 20ng NPFF receptor antagonist RF9 was applied or the antagonist was used 15min before 50ng RFRP-1 treatment. Fifty nanograms of RFRP-1 had positive reinforcing properties, while 100ng RFRP-1 had no effect. Prior treatment with NPFF receptor antagonist RF9 could block the rewarding effects of RFRP-1, while the antagonist applied alone did not influence the behavior of rats in place preference paradigm. Our results show that RFRP-1 and NPFF-1 receptors play important roles in the amygdaloid rewarding-reinforcing mechanisms.

  6. Central amygdalar nucleus treated with orexin neuropeptides evoke differing feeding and grooming responses in the hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alò, Raffaella; Avolio, Ennio; Mele, Maria; Di Vito, Anna; Canonaco, Marcello

    2015-04-15

    Interaction of the orexinergic (ORXergic) neuronal system with the excitatory (glutamate, l-Glu) or the inhibitory (GABA) neurosignaling complexes evokes major homeostatic physiological events. In this study, effects of the two ORXergic neuropeptides (ORX-A/B) on their receptor (ORX-2R) expression changes were correlated to feeding and grooming actions of the hibernating hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Infusion of the central amygdala nucleus (CeA) with ORX-A caused hamsters to consume notable quantities of food, while ORX-B accounted for a moderate increase. Interestingly the latter neuropeptide was responsible for greater frequencies of grooming with respect to both controls and the hamsters treated with ORX-A. These distinct behavioral changes turned out to be even greater in the presence of l-Glu agonist (NMDA) while the α1 GABAA receptor agonist (zolpidem, Zol) greatly reduced ORX-A-dependent feeding bouts. Moreover, ORX-A+NMDA mainly promoted greater ORX-2R expression levels with respect to ORX-A-treated hamsters while ORX-B+Zol was instead largely responsible for a down-regulatory trend. Overall, these features point to CeA ORX-2R sites as key sensory limbic elements capable of regulating eating and grooming responses, which may provide useful insights regarding the type of molecular mechanism(s) operating during feeding bouts.

  7. Indian childhood cirrhosis (ICC) & ICC-like diseases: the changing scenario of facts versus notions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, N C; Chitale, A R

    2013-06-01

    Indian childhood cirrhosis (ICC), a disease considered to have been endemic in and unique to India has now been documented in children of non-Indian origin from other countries. More recently available findings from a large multicentre study sponsored by the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) have dispelled some of the generally accepted notions and have established several new facts on different aspects of the disease. All relevant reports on ICC and ICC-like diseases, till date, were reviewed to obtain a proper perspective on the current state of our understanding on this non-Wilsonian copper overload liver disease. A primary role of exogenous copper in causing the disease was earlier debated on the basis of studies in India but investigators abroad studying some sporadic cases and a series of endemic ICC-like diseases supported a hepatotoxic injury by ingested copper in genetically susceptible infants and children in ICC- like disease and in ICC. Epidemiologic and morphologic findings in the well controlled ICMR study based on 225 cases of ICC and 426 controls, all confirmed on liver biopsy, have however, convincingly refuted this concept. Additionally, this study revealed that unlike what has been believed earlier, older children more than 3 yr age can get the disease and that in its natural course the hepatic histology can transform between the characteristic one considered diagnostic and some other patterns, any one of which can be the morphologic manifestation at first presentation of the patient. Older children and cases with milder morphologic changes at presentation had longer survival. The overall inference from critical analysis of all available data is that ICC and ICC-like diseases clinically manifest in a child of any age though common in younger ones, and a clinical diagnosis must be made in any child with so-called 'cryptogenic cirrhosis'. Exposure to exogenous copper in food, milk and water should not be a prerequisite for this

  8. Positive reinforcing effect of oxytocin microinjection in the rat central nucleus of amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    László, K; Kovács, A; Zagoracz, O; Ollmann, T; Péczely, L; Kertes, E; Lacy, D G; Lénárd, L

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) receives increasing attention since, it plays a role in various behaviors including anxiety, drug addiction, learning, social recognition, empathy, pair bonding and decreased aggression. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), part of the limbic system, plays an important role in learning, memory, anxiety and reinforcing mechanisms. CeA was shown to be rich in OT-receptors (OTR). The aim of our study was to examine the possible effects of OT and OTR antagonist in the CeA on reinforcement using the conditioned place preference test and on anxiety using the elevated plus maze test. Male Wistar rats were microinjected bilaterally with 10 ng OT or 100 ng OT (Sigma: O6379, injected in volume of 0.4μl) or 10ng OTR antagonist (Sigma: L-2540) alone, or OTR antagonist 15 min prior 10 ng OT treatment or vehicle solution into the CeA. Rats receiving 10 ng OT spent significantly more time in the treatment quadrant during the test session, while 100 ng OT treatment produced no effect. Prior treatment with the non-peptide OTR antagonist blocked the effects of OT. The antagonist in itself did not influence the place preference. The elevated plus maze test revealed that 10 ng OT significantly increased the time spent in the open arms. OTR antagonist pre-treatment could inhibit this effect and the antagonist in itself did not affect the time spent in the open arms. Our results show that in the rat CeA OT has dose-dependent, positive reinforcing and anxiolytic effects, via OTR demonstrated by the blocking effects of selective OTR antagonist.

  9. Rethinking the fear circuit: the central nucleus of the amygdala is required for the acquisition, consolidation, and expression of Pavlovian fear conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilensky, Ann E; Schafe, Glenn E; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard;

    2006-01-01

    In the standard model of pavlovian fear learning, sensory input from neutral and aversive stimuli converge in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA), in which alterations in synaptic transmission encode the association. During fear expression, the LA is thought to engage the central nucleus...

  10. ICCS 2009 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 1: International Version of the ICCS 2009 Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brese, Falk; Jung, Michael; Mirazchiyski, Plamen; Schulz, Wolfram; Zuehlke, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    This document presents Supplement 1 of "The International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS) 2009 International Database," which includes data for all questionnaires administered as part of the ICCS 2009 assessment. This supplement contains the international version of the ICCS 2009 questionnaires in the following seven…

  11. Introducing iccMAX: new frontiers in color management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derhak, Max; Green, Phil; Lianza, Tom

    2015-01-01

    ICC has announced a preliminary specification for iccMAX, a next-generation colour management system that expands the existing ICC profile format and architecture to overcome the limitation of the fixed colorimetric Profile Connection Space and support a much wider range of functionality. New features introduced in iccMAX include spectral processing, material identification and visualization, BRDF, new data types, an improved gamut boundary descriptor and support for arbitrary and programmable transforms. The iccMAX preliminary specification is accompanied by a reference implementation, and will undergo a period of public review before being finalized.

  12. Probing gluon saturation with next-to-leading order photon production at central rapidities in proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Benic, Sanjin; Garcia-Montero, Oscar; Venugopalan, Raju

    2016-01-01

    We compute the cross section for photons emitted from sea quarks in proton-nucleus collisions at collider energies. The computation is performed within the dilute-dense kinematics of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) effective field theory. Albeit the result obtained is formally at next-to-leading order in the CGC power counting, it provides the dominant contribution for central rapidities. We observe that the inclusive photon cross section is proportional to all-twist Wilson line correlators in the nucleus. These correlators also appear in quark-pair production; unlike the latter, photon production is insensitive to hadronization uncertainties and therefore more sensitive to multi-parton correlations in the gluon saturation regime of QCD. We demonstrate that $k_\\perp$ and collinear factorized expressions for inclusive photon production are obtained as leading twist approximations to our result. In particular, the collinearly factorized expression is directly sensitive to the nuclear gluon distribution at smal...

  13. Central Administration of Insulin and Leptin Together Enhance Renal Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Fos Production in the Arcuate Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeeballah, Hamza; Alsuhaymi, Naif; Stebbing, Martin J.; Jenkins, Trisha A.; Badoer, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the central actions of insulin and leptin. Both induce sympatho-excitation. This study (i) investigated whether centrally administered leptin and insulin together elicits greater increases in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) than when given alone, and (ii) quantified the number of activated neurons in brain regions influencing SNA, to identify potential central sites of interaction. In anesthetised (urethane 1.4–1.6 g/kg iv) male Sprague-Dawley rats, RSNA, MAP, and HR were recorded following intracerebroventricular (ICV) saline (control; n = 5), leptin (7 μg; n = 5), insulin (500 mU; n = 4) and the combination of leptin and insulin; (n = 4). Following leptin or insulin alone, RSNA was significantly increased (74 and 62% respectively). MAP responses were not significantly different between the groups. Insulin alone significantly increased HR. Leptin alone also increased HR but it was significantly less than following insulin alone (P < 0.005). When leptin and insulin were combined, the RSNA increase (124%) was significantly greater than the response to either alone. There were no differences between the groups in MAP responses, however, the increase in HR induced by insulin was attenuated by leptin. Of the brain regions examined, only in the arcuate nucleus did leptin and insulin together increase the number of Fos-positive cell nuclei significantly more than leptin or insulin alone. In the lamina terminalis and rostroventrolateral medulla, leptin and insulin together increased Fos, but the effect was not greater than leptin alone. The results suggest that when central leptin and insulin levels are elevated, the sympatho-excitatory response in RSNA will be greater. The arcuate nucleus may be a common site of cardiovascular integration. PMID:28119622

  14. Shared responsibility in international criminal justice: the ICC and asylum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluiter, G.

    2012-01-01

    As a tribute to Bert Swart's academic career, this article explores the shared responsibility of states and the International Criminal Court (ICC) for witnesses who have testified at the ICC and have raised concerns for their well-being and safety in case of return to the sending state. The new phen

  15. Chair Summaries from the 2006 Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICC) Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, D.; Goldston, R.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Sovinec, C. R.; Woodruff, S.; Wurden, G.

    2007-06-01

    The goal of the ICC program within the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) is to improve magnetic and inertial fusion concepts and to advance plasma science. ICC2006 is a continuation of the ICC series, which last year met in Madison, Wisconsin. It provides a forum for an exchange of ideas through presentations and discussions on the science and status of Innovative Confinement Concepts research, and for new ideas. The meeting provides feedback from the ICC community to the DOE OFES. In addition to invited talks on these topics, contributed papers are solicited describing experimental, theoretical, or computational work presently done in the ICC program, and also papers describing new ideas for possible proposals. The contributed papers were presented as posters, which were displayed during the workshop. The program committee also selected a subset of the contributed papers for oral presentation. A "skunkworks" session is included for completely new ideas (and novel twists to old ones).

  16. The central region of M83: Massive star formation, kinematics, and the location and origin of the nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Knapen, J H; Ryder, S D; Falcon-Barroso, J; Fathi, K; Gutierrez, L

    2010-01-01

    We report new near-IR integral field spectroscopy of the central starburst region of the barred spiral galaxy M83 obtained with CIRPASS on Gemini-S, which we analyse in conjunction with GHaFaS Fabry-Perot data, an AAT IRIS2 Ks-band image, and near- and mid-IR imaging from the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes. The bulk of the current star formation activity is hidden from optical view by dust extinction, but is seen in the near- and mid-IR to the north of the nucleus. This region is being fed by inflow of gas through the bar of M83, traced by the prominent dust lane entering into the circumnuclear region from the north. An analysis of stellar ages confirms that the youngest stars are indeed in the northwest. A gradual age gradient, with older stars further to the south, characterises the well-known star-forming arc in the central region of M83. Detailed analyses of the Pa beta ionised gas kinematics and near-IR imaging confirm that the kinematic centre coincides with the photometric centre of M83, and that ...

  17. Integration of stress and leptin signaling by CART producing neurons in the rodent midbrain centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu eXu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Leptin targets the brain to regulate feeding, neuroendocrine function and metabolism. The leptin receptor is present in hypothalamic centers controlling energy metabolism as well as in the centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp, a region implicated in the stress response and in various aspects of stress-related behaviors. We hypothesized that the stress response by cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART-producing EWcp-neurons would depend on the animal’s energy state. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of changes in energy state (mimicked by low, normal and high leptin levels, which were achieved by 24h fasting, normal chow and leptin injection, respectively on the response of CART neurons in the EWcp of rats subjected or not to acute restraint stress. Our data show that leptin treatment alone significantly increases CART mRNA expression in the rat EWcp and that in leptin receptor deficient (db/db mice, the number of CART producing neurons in this nucleus is reduced. This suggests that leptin has a stimulatory effect on the production of CART in the EWcp under non-stressed condition. Under stressed condition, however, leptin blunts stress-induced activation of EWcp neurons and decreases their CART mRNA expression. Interestingly, fasting, does not influence the stress-induced activation of EWcp-neurons, and specifically EWcp-CART neurons are not activated. These results suggest that the stress response by the EWcp depends to some degree on the animal’s energy state, a mechanism that may contribute to a better understanding of the complex interplay between obesity and stress.

  18. Integration of stress and leptin signaling by CART producing neurons in the rodent midbrain centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu; Janssen, Donny; van der Knaap, Noortje; Roubos, Eric W; Leshan, Rebecca L; Myers, Martin G; Gaszner, Balázs; Kozicz, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Leptin targets the brain to regulate feeding, neuroendocrine function and metabolism. The leptin receptor is present in hypothalamic centers controlling energy metabolism as well as in the centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp), a region implicated in the stress response and in various aspects of stress-related behaviors. We hypothesized that the stress response by cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART)-producing EWcp-neurons would depend on the animal's energy state. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of changes in energy state (mimicked by low, normal and high leptin levels, which were achieved by 24 h fasting, normal chow and leptin injection, respectively) on the response of CART neurons in the EWcp of rats subjected or not to acute restraint stress. Our data show that leptin treatment alone significantly increases CART mRNA expression in the rat EWcp and that in leptin receptor deficient (db/db) mice, the number of CART producing neurons in this nucleus is reduced. This suggests that leptin has a stimulatory effect on the production of CART in the EWcp under non-stressed condition. Under stressed condition, however, leptin blunts stress-induced activation of EWcp neurons and decreases their CART mRNA expression. Interestingly, fasting, does not influence the stress-induced activation of EWcp-neurons, and specifically EWcp-CART neurons are not activated. These results suggest that the stress response by the EWcp depends to some degree on the animal's energy state, a mechanism that may contribute to a better understanding of the complex interplay between obesity and stress.

  19. Igf1r+/CD34+ immature ICC are putative adult progenitor cells, identified ultrastructurally as fibroblast-like ICC in Ws/Ws rat colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X Y; Albertí, E; White, E J

    2009-01-01

    (ICC-AP) were significantly decreased and ICC located at the submuscular plexus and intramuscular ICC were rarely observed based on immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural investigations revealed that there was no overall loss of all types of interstitial cells combined. Where...... loss of ICC was observed, a marked increase in fibroblast-like ICC (FL-ICC) was found at the level of AP. Immunoelectron microscopy proved FL-ICC to be c-Kit(-) but gap junction coupled to each other and to c-Kit(+) ICC; they were associated with enteric nerves and occupied space normally occupied...... by ICC in the wild-type rat colon, suggesting them to be immature ICC. In addition, a marked increase in immunoreactivity for insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (Igf1r) occurred, co-localized with CD34 but not with c-Kit. A significantly higher number of Igf1r(+)/CD34(+) cells were found in Ws...

  20. Make ICC Profiles with the Help of Illustrator%借助Illustrator制作ICC Profile文件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周常星

    2008-01-01

    一般而言,ICC Profile文件需要通过分光光度计测量,然后通过专业的色彩管理软件创建。但是,我们也可以不依赖测量仪器,通过Illustrator或Photoshop手工创建ICC Profile文件,而且可以通过这些软件的图像色彩调整工具来调节和编辑ICC Profile文件。

  1. The central amygdala nucleus is critical for incubation of methamphetamine craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Zeric, Tamara; Kambhampati, Sarita; Bossert, Jennifer M; Shaham, Yavin

    2015-04-01

    Cue-induced methamphetamine seeking progressively increases after withdrawal but mechanisms underlying this 'incubation of methamphetamine craving' are unknown. Here we studied the role of central amygdala (CeA), ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), brain regions implicated in incubation of cocaine and heroin craving, in incubation of methamphetamine craving. We also assessed the role of basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). We trained rats to self-administer methamphetamine (10 days; 9 h/day, 0.1 mg/kg/infusion) and tested them for cue-induced methamphetamine seeking under extinction conditions during early (2 days) or late (4-5 weeks) withdrawal. We first confirmed that 'incubation of methamphetamine craving' occurs under our experimental conditions. Next, we assessed the effect of reversible inactivation of CeA or BLA by GABAA+GABAB receptor agonists (muscimol+baclofen, 0.03+0.3 nmol) on cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during early and late withdrawal. We also assessed the effect of muscimol+baclofen reversible inactivation of vmPFC, dmPFC, and OFC on 'incubated' cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during late withdrawal. Lever presses in the cue-induced methamphetamine extinction tests were higher during late withdrawal than during early withdrawal (incubation of methamphetamine craving). Muscimol+baclofen injections into CeA but not BLA decreased cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during late but not early withdrawal. Muscimol+baclofen injections into dmPFC, vmPFC, or OFC during late withdrawal had no effect on incubated cue-induced methamphetamine seeking. Together with previous studies, results indicate that the CeA has a critical role in incubation of both drug and non-drug reward craving and demonstrate an unexpected dissociation in mechanisms of incubation of methamphetamine vs cocaine craving.

  2. Mammal-like organization of the avian midbrain central gray and a reappraisal of the intercollicular nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcy A Kingsbury

    Full Text Available In mammals, rostrocaudal columns of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG regulate diverse behavioral and physiological functions, including sexual and fight-or-flight behavior, but homologous columns have not been identified in non-mammalian species. In contrast to mammals, in which the PAG lies ventral to the superior colliculus and surrounds the cerebral aqueduct, birds exhibit a hypertrophied tectum that is displaced laterally, and thus the midbrain central gray (CG extends mediolaterally rather than dorsoventrally as in mammals. We therefore hypothesized that the avian CG is organized much like a folded open PAG. To address this hypothesis, we conducted immunohistochemical comparisons of the midbrains of mice and finches, as well as Fos studies of aggressive dominance, subordinance, non-social defense and sexual behavior in territorial and gregarious finch species. We obtained excellent support for our predictions based on the folded open model of the PAG and further showed that birds possess functional and anatomical zones that form longitudinal columns similar to those in mammals. However, distinguishing characteristics of the dorsal/dorsolateral PAG, such as a dense peptidergic innervation, a longitudinal column of neuronal nitric oxide synthase neurons, and aggression-induced Fos responses, do not lie within the classical avian CG, but in the laterally adjacent intercollicular nucleus (ICo, suggesting that much of the ICo is homologous to the dorsal PAG.

  3. Contributions of the amygdala central nucleus and ventrolateral periaqueductal grey to freezing and instrumental suppression in Pavlovian fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannald, Michael A

    2010-07-29

    In Pavlovian fear conditioning animals receive pairings of a neutral cue and an aversive stimulus such as an electric foot-shock. Through such pairings, the cue will come to elicit a central state of fear that produces a variety of autonomic and behavioral responses, among which are conditioned freezing and suppression of instrumental responding, termed conditioned suppression. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG) has been strongly implicated in the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear. However, previous work suggests different roles for the CeA and vlPAG in fear learning maybe revealed when fear is assessed with conditioned freezing or conditioned suppression. To further explore this possibility we gave rats selective lesions of either the CeA or vlPAG and trained them in Pavlovian first-order fear conditioning as well as Pavlovian second-order fear conditioning. We concurrently assessed the acquisition of conditioned freezing and conditioned suppression. We found that vlPAG and CeA lesions impaired both first- and second-order conditioned freezing. VlPAG lesions did not impair, and CeA lesions only transiently impaired, first-order conditioned suppression. However, both vlPAG and CeA lesions impaired second-order conditioned suppression. These results suggest that the CeA and vlPAG are critically important to expressing fear through conditioned freezing but play different and less critical roles in expressing fear through conditioned suppression.

  4. Desipramine and citalopram attenuate pretest swim-induced increases in prodynorphin immunoreactivity in the dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the lateral division of the central nucleus of the amygdala in the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sung; Kim, Hee Jeong; Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Sun Hye; Cho, Jin Hee; Cho, Yun Ha; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Kyung Ho

    2014-10-01

    Dynorphin in the nucleus accumbens shell plays an important role in antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test (FST), but it is unclear whether desipramine and citalopram treatments alter prodynorphin levels in other brain areas. To explore this possibility, we injected mice with desipramine and citalopram 0.5, 19, and 23 h after a 15-min pretest swim and observed changes in prodynorphin expression before the test swim, which was conducted 24 h after the pretest swim. The pretest swim increased prodynorphin immunoreactivity in the dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST) and lateral division of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeL). This increase in prodynorphin immunoreactivity in the dBNST and CeL was blocked by desipramine and citalopram treatments. Similar changes in prodynorphin mRNA levels were observed in the dBNST and CeL, but these changes did not reach significance. To understand the underlying mechanism, we assessed changes in phosphorylated CREB at Ser(133) (pCREB) immunoreactivity in the dBNST and central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Treatment with citalopram but not desipramine after the pretest swim significantly increased pCREB immunoreactivity only in the dBNST. These results suggest that regulation of prodynorphin in the dBNST and CeL before the test swim may be involved in the antidepressant-like effect of desipramine and citalopram in the FST and suggest that changes in pCREB immunoreactivity in these areas may not play an important role in the regulation of prodynorphin in the dBNST and CeA.

  5. Microinjection of glycine into the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus produces diuresis, natriuresis, and inhibition of central sympathetic outflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krowicki, Zbigniew K; Kapusta, Daniel R

    2011-04-01

    Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and glycine-immunoreactive fibers are expressed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), yet the functional significance of this innervation is unclear. Therefore, these studies examined the changes in cardiovascular and renal function and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) produced by the microinjection of glycine (5 and 50 nmol) into the PVN of conscious Sprague-Dawley rats. Microinjection of glycine into, but not outside of, the PVN dose-dependently increased urine flow rate and urinary sodium excretion and decreased RSNA. At the higher dose, PVN glycine also decreased heart rate; neither 5 nor 50 nmol PVN glycine altered mean arterial pressure. The glycine (50 nmol)-evoked diuresis and natriuresis were abolished in rats continuously infused intravenously with [Arg(8)]-vasopressin. Furthermore, chronic bilateral renal denervation prevented the bradycardia and diuresis to PVN glycine and blunted the natriuresis. In other studies, unilateral PVN pretreatment with the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine (1.6 nmol) prevented the effects of PVN glycine (50 nmol) on heart rate, RSNA, and renal excretory function. When microinjected bilaterally, PVN strychnine (1.6 nmol per site) evoked a significant increase in heart rate and RSNA without altering renal excretory function. These findings demonstrate that in conscious rats glycine acts in the PVN to enhance the renal excretion of water and sodium and decrease central sympathetic outflow to the heart and kidneys. Although endogenous PVN glycine inputs elicit a tonic control of heart rate and RSNA, the renal excretory responses to PVN glycine seem to be caused primarily by the inhibition of arginine vasopressin secretion.

  6. Inactivation of the central nucleus of the amygdala reduces the effect of punishment on cocaine self-administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, YueQiang; Steketee, Jeffery D; Sun, WenLin

    2012-03-01

    Continued cocaine use despite the negative consequences is a hallmark of cocaine addiction. One such consequence is punishment, which is often used by society to curb cocaine use. Unfortunately, we know little about the mechanism involved in regulation by punishment of cocaine use. The fact that cocaine addicts continue to use cocaine despite potentially severe punishment suggests that the mechanism may be impaired. Such impairment is expected to critically contribute to compulsive cocaine use. This study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeN) plays a critical role in such regulation. To this end, rats were trained to press a lever to self-administer cocaine under a chained schedule: a response on one lever (cocaine-seeking lever) led to access to the other lever (cocaine-taking lever), on which a response was reinforced by cocaine and cues. Thereafter, responses on the seeking lever were punished by footshock with a probability of 0.5. Cocaine self-administration (SA) was significantly suppressed by punishment in an intensity-dependent manner. Interestingly, rats trained with daily 6-h (extended access) but not 2-h (limited access) sessions showed resistance to the lower intensity of punishment. Inactivation of the CeN induced a robust anti-punishment effect in both groups. These data provided evidence that the CeN is a critical neural substrate involved in regulation by punishment of cocaine SA. Rats with a history of extended cocaine SA appeared to be less sensitive to punishment. The decreased sensitivity could result from the neuroplastic changes induced by extended cocaine SA in the CeN.

  7. ICCS 2009 Encyclopedia: Approaches to Civic and Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainley, John, Ed.; Schulz, Wolfram, Ed.; Friedman, Tim, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS) is the largest international study of civic and citizenship education ever conducted. Over 140,000 Grade 8 students, 62,000 teachers, and 5,300 school principals from 38 countries participated in this study. Among these were five from Asia, 26 from Europe, six from Latin America, and…

  8. Education of coastal engineers for the 50th ICCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    In general the problem in education is that we teach nowadays students the knowledge from five years ago, to be applied in the next 5 to 15 years (I admit, the student of today will have reached his retirement when he will participate in the 50th ICCE, the title is exaggerating reality). When one an

  9. ICCE/ICCAI 2000 Full & Short Papers (Creative Learning).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This document contains the following full and short papers on creative learning from ICCE/ICCAI 2000 (International Conference on Computers in Education/International Conference on Computer-Assisted Instruction): (1) "A Collaborative Learning Support System Based on Virtual Environment Server for Multiple Agents" (Takashi Ohno, Kenji…

  10. Neuroanatomical and cellular substrates of hypergrooming induced by microinjection of oxytocin in central nucleus of amygdala, an experimental model of compulsive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroni, S S; Nakano, F N; Gati, C D C; Oliveira, J A C; Antunes-Rodrigues, J; Garcia-Cairasco, N

    2007-12-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neurosecretory nonapeptide synthesized in hypothalamic cells that project to the neurohypophysis as well as to widely distributed sites in the central nervous system. Central OT microinjections induce a variety of cognitive, sexual, reproductive, grooming and affiliative behaviors in animals. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) includes a range of cognitive and behavioral symptoms that bear some relationship with OT. Here, we study the neuroanatomical and cellular substrates of the hypergrooming induced by administration of OT in the central nucleus of amygdala (CeA). In this context, this hypergrooming is considered as a model of compulsive behavior. Our data suggest a link between the CeA and the hypothalamic grooming area (HGA). The HGA includes parts of the paraventricular nucleus and the dorsal hypothalamic area. Our data on colocalization of OT (immunohistochemistry for peptide), OT receptor (binding assay) and its retrogradely labeled cells after Fluoro-Gold injection in the CeA suggest that CeA and connections are important substrates of the circuit underlying this OT-dependent compulsive behavioral pattern.

  11. Investigating the dynamics of the brain response to music: A central role of the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Karsten; Fritz, Thomas; Mildner, Toralf; Richter, Maxi; Schulze, Katrin; Lepsien, Jöran; Schroeter, Matthias L; Möller, Harald E

    2015-08-01

    Ventral striatal activity has been previously shown to correspond well to reward value mediated by music. Here, we investigate the dynamic brain response to music and manipulated counterparts using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Counterparts of musical excerpts were produced by either manipulating the consonance/dissonance of the musical fragments or playing them backwards (or both). Results show a greater involvement of the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens both when contrasting listening to music that is perceived as pleasant and listening to a manipulated version perceived as unpleasant (backward dissonant), as well as in a parametric analysis for increasing pleasantness. Notably, both analyses yielded a ventral striatal response that was strongest during an early phase of stimulus presentation. A hippocampal response to the musical stimuli was also observed, and was largely mediated by processing differences between listening to forward and backward music. This hippocampal involvement was again strongest during the early response to the music. Auditory cortex activity was more strongly evoked by the original (pleasant) music compared to its manipulated counterparts, but did not display a similar decline of activation over time as subcortical activity. These findings rather suggest that the ventral striatal/nucleus accumbens response during music listening is strongest in the first seconds and then declines.

  12. Tolerance effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs microinjected into central amygdala, periaqueductal grey, and nucleus raphe Possible cellular mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Merab G. Tsagareli; Nana Tsiklauri; Ivliane Nozadze; Gulnaz Gurtskaia

    2012-01-01

    Pain is a sensation related to potential or actual damage in some tissue of the body. The mainstay of medical pain therapy remains drugs that have been around for decades, like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or opiates. However, adverse effects of opiates, particularly tolerance, limit their clinical use. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic (intraperitoneal) administration of NSAIDs induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. In this review, we report that repeated microinjection of NSAIDs analgin, clodifen, ketorolac and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala, the midbrain periaqueductal grey matter and nucleus raphe magnus in the following 4 days result in progressively less antinociception compared to the saline control testing in the tail-flick reflex and hot plate latency tests. Hence, tolerance develops to these drugs and cross-tolerance to morphine in male rats. These findings strongly support the suggestion of endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain-control system. Moreover, the periaqueductal grey-rostral ventro-medial part of medulla circuit should be viewed as a pain-modulation system. These data are important for human medicine. In particular, cross-tolerance between non-opioid and opioid analgesics should be important in the clinical setting.

  13. Dissociation of attention in learning and action: Effects of lesions of the amygdala central nucleus, medial prefrontal cortex, and posterior parietal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Jean-Marie; Kerfoot, Erin C.; Chatterjee, Souvik; Holland, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Many associative learning theories assert that the predictive accuracy of events affects the allocation of attention to them. More reliable predictors of future events are usually more likely to control action based on past learning, but less reliable predictors are often more likely to capture attention when new information is acquired. Previous studies showed that a circuit that includes the amygdala central nucleus (CEA) and the cholinergic substantia innominata/nucleus basalis magnocellularis (SI/nBM) is important for both sustained attention guiding action in a five-choice serial reaction time (5CSRT) task, and for enhanced new learning about less predictive cues in a serial conditioning task. In this study, we found that lesions of the cholinergic afferents of the medial prefrontal cortex interfered with 5CSRT performance but not with surprise-induced enhancement of learning, whereas lesions of cholinergic afferents of posterior parietal cortex impaired the latter effects but did not affect 5CSRT performance. CEA lesions impaired performance in both tasks. These results are consistent with the view that CEA affects these distinct aspects of attention by influencing the activity of separate, specialized cortical regions, via its modulation of SI/nBM. PMID:17324051

  14. ICC Profile特征描述文件的制作

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘菊华

    2007-01-01

    本文先简要介绍色彩管理的必要性,然后重点介绍扫描仪ICC Profile文件、数码相机ICC Profile文件、显示器ICC Profile文件和打印机、印刷机ICC Profile文件的制作和制作时需要注意的问题,并简单介绍特征描述文件的安装方法。

  15. Behavioural Activation Produced by CRH but Not α-Helical CRH (CRH-Receptor Antagonist) when Microinfused into the Central Nucleus of the Amygdala under Stress-Free Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, A.; Baauw, A.D.; Bohus, B.; Koolhaas, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is known to be involved in the regulation of autonomic, neuroendocrine, and behavioural responses in stress situations. The CeA contains large numbers of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-containing cell bodies and terminals. In the present study we exam

  16. Inactivation of the central nucleus of the amygdala blocks classical conditioning but not conditioning-specific reflex modification of rabbit heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhans, Lauren B; Schreurs, Bernard G

    2013-02-01

    Heart rate (HR) conditioning in rabbits is a widely used model of classical conditioning of autonomic responding that is noted for being similar to the development of conditioned heart rate slowing (bradycardia) in humans. We have shown previously that in addition to HR changes to a tone conditioned stimulus (CS), the HR reflex itself can undergo associative change called conditioning-specific reflex modification (CRM) that manifests when tested in the absence of the CS. Because CRM resembles the conditioned bradycardic response to the CS, we sought to determine if HR conditioning and CRM share a common neural substrate. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a critical part of the pathway through which conditioned bradycardia is established. To test whether the CeA is also involved in the acquisition and/or expression of CRM, we inactivated the CeA with muscimol during HR conditioning or CRM testing. CeA inactivation blocked HR conditioning without completely preventing CRM acquisition or expression. These results suggest that the CeA may therefore only play a modulatory role in CRM. Theories on the biological significance of conditioned bradycardia suggest that it may represent a state of hypervigilance that facilitates the detection of new and changing contingencies in the environment. We relate these ideas to our results and discuss how they may be relevant to the hypersensitivity observed in fear conditioning disorders like post-traumatic stress.

  17. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala induces anhedonic behavior and recurrent seizures in a rat model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Wang, Helen; Zaveri, Hitten P; Tang, Amber B; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Eid, Tore; Dhaher, Roni

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of depression and suicide is increased in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE); however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Anhedonia, a core symptom of depression that is predictive of suicide, is common in patients with MTLE. Glutamine synthetase, an astrocytic enzyme that metabolizes glutamate and ammonia to glutamine, is reduced in the amygdala in patients with epilepsy and depression and in suicide victims. Here, we sought to develop a novel model of anhedonia in MTLE by testing the hypothesis that deficiency in glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) leads to epilepsy and comorbid anhedonia. Nineteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with an osmotic pump infusing either the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine [MSO (n=12)] or phosphate buffered saline [PBS (n=7)] into the right CeA. Seizure activity was monitored by video-intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings for 21days after the onset of MSO infusion. Sucrose preference, a measure of anhedonia, was assessed after 21days. Methionine sulfoximine-infused rats exhibited recurrent seizures during the monitoring period and showed decreased sucrose preference over days when compared with PBS-infused rats (pglutamine synthetase activity in the CeA is a possible common cause of anhedonia and seizures in TLE. We propose that the MSO CeA model can be used for mechanistic studies that will lead to the development and testing of novel drugs to prevent seizures, depression, and suicide in patients with TLE.

  18. Shaker-Related Potassium Channels in the Central Medial Nucleus of the Thalamus Are Important Molecular Targets for Arousal Suppression by Volatile General Anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Alexandra M.; Tanaka, Brian S.; Sokolov, Yuri; Goldin, Alan L.; Chandy, K. George; Hall, James E.; Alkire, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular targets and neural circuits that underlie general anesthesia are not fully elucidated. Here, we directly demonstrate that Kv1-family (Shaker-related) delayed rectifier K+ channels in the central medial thalamic nucleus (CMT) are important targets for volatile anesthetics. The modulation of Kv1 channels by volatiles is network specific as microinfusion of ShK, a potent inhibitor of Kv1.1, Kv1.3, and Kv1.6 channels, into the CMT awakened sevoflurane-anesthetized rodents. In heterologous expression systems, sevoflurane, isoflurane, and desflurane at subsurgical concentrations potentiated delayed rectifier Kv1 channels at low depolarizing potentials. In mouse thalamic brain slices, sevoflurane inhibited firing frequency and delayed the onset of action potentials in CMT neurons, and ShK-186, a Kv1.3-selective inhibitor, prevented these effects. Our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of delayed rectifier Kv1 channels to modulation by volatile anesthetics and highlight an arousal suppressing role of Kv1 channels in CMT neurons during the process of anesthesia. PMID:24107962

  19. Pain-related increase of excitatory transmission and decrease of inhibitory transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala are mediated by mGluR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neugebauer Volker

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroplasticity in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA, particularly its latero-capsular division (CeLC, is an important contributor to the emotional-affective aspects of pain. Previous studies showed synaptic plasticity of excitatory transmission to the CeLC in different pain models, but pain-related changes of inhibitory transmission remain to be determined. The CeLC receives convergent excitatory inputs from the parabrachial nucleus in the brainstem and from the basolateral amygdala (BLA. In addition, feedforward inhibition of CeA neurons is driven by glutamatergic projections from the BLA area to a cluster of GABAergic neurons in the intercalated cell masses (ITC. Using patch-clamp in rat brain slices we measured monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs and polysynaptic inhibitory currents (IPSCs that were evoked by electrical stimulation in the BLA. In brain slices from arthritic rats, input-output functions of excitatory synaptic transmission were enhanced whereas inhibitory synaptic transmission was decreased compared to control slices from normal untreated rats. A non-NMDA receptor antagonist (NBQX blocked the EPSCs and reduced the IPSCs, suggesting that non-NMDA receptors mediate excitatory transmission and also contribute to glutamate-driven feed-forward inhibition of CeLC neurons. IPSCs were blocked by a GABAA receptor antagonist (bicuculline. Bicuculline increased EPSCs under normal conditions but not in slices from arthritic rats, which indicates a loss of GABAergic control of excitatory transmission. A metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1 antagonist (LY367385 reversed both the increase of excitatory transmission and the decrease of inhibitory transmission in the arthritis pain model but had no effect on basal synaptic transmission in control slices from normal rats. The inhibitory effect of LY367385 on excitatory transmission was blocked by bicuculline suggesting the involvement of a GABAergic

  20. ICC density predicts bacterial overgrowth in a rat model of post-infectious IBS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sam-Ryong; Jee; Walter; Morales; Kimberly; Low; Christopher; Chang; Amy; Zhu; Venkata; Pokkunuri; Soumya; Chatterjee; Edy; Soffer; Jeffrey; L; Conklin; Mark; Pimentel

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the interstitial cells of Cajal(ICC) number using a new rat model.METHODS:Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to two groups.The first group received gavage with Campylobacter jejuni(C.jejuni) 81-176.The second group was gavaged with placebo.Three months after clearance of Campylobacter from the stool,precise segments of duodenum,jejunum,and ileum were ligated in self-contained loops of bowel that were preserved in anaerobic bags.Deep muscular plexus ICC(DMP-ICC) were quantified by two blind...

  1. Blockade of CRF1 receptors in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates the dysphoria associated with nicotine withdrawal in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W; Ford, Jenna; Rogers, Jessica A; Scheick, Stacey; Ji, Yue; Bishnoi, Mahendra; Alexander, Jon C

    2012-03-01

    The majority of smokers relapse during the acute withdrawal phase when withdrawal symptoms are most severe. The goal of the present studies was to investigate the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and noradrenergic transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in the dysphoria associated with smoking cessation. It was investigated if blockade of CRF1 receptors, blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors, or stimulation of α2-adrenergic receptors in the CeA diminishes the deficit in brain reward function associated with nicotine withdrawal in rats. Nicotine dependence was induced by implanting minipumps that delivered a nicotine solution. Withdrawal was precipitated with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine. A discrete-trial intracranial self-stimulation procedure was used to assess the negative affective aspects of nicotine withdrawal. Elevations in brain reward thresholds are indicative of a deficit in brain reward function. In all the experiments, mecamylamine elevated the brain reward thresholds of the rats chronically treated with nicotine and did not affect the brain reward thresholds of the saline-treated control rats. Intra-CeA administration of the CRF1 receptor antagonist R278995/CRA0450 completely prevented the mecamylamine-induced elevations in brain reward thresholds in the nicotine-treated rats and did not affect the brain reward thresholds of the saline-treated control rats. R278995/CRA0450 has also been shown to block sigma-1 receptors but there is no evidence that this could affect negative mood states. Intra-CeA administration of the α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin or the α2-adrenergic receptor agonist clonidine did not affect the brain reward thresholds of the nicotine or saline-treated rats. These studies suggest that CRF1 receptor antagonists may diminish the dysphoria associated with smoking cessation by blocking CRF1 receptors in the CeA.

  2. Central mechanism of the cardiovascular responses caused by L-proline microinjected into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus in unanesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Azevedo, Silvana; Busnardo, Cristiane; Corrêa, Fernando Morgan Aguiar

    2016-12-01

    Previously, we reported that microinjection of L-proline (L-Pro) into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) caused vasopressin-mediated pressor responses in unanesthetized rats. In the present study, we report on the central mechanisms involved in the mediation of the cardiovascular effects caused by the microinjection of L-Pro into the PVN. Microinjection of increasing doses of L-Pro (3-100nmol/100nL) into the PVN caused dose-related pressor and bradycardic responses. No cardiovascular responses were observed after the microinjection of equimolar doses (33nmol/100nL) of its isomer D-Proline (D-Pro) or Mannitol. The PVN pretreatment with either a selective non-NMDA (NBQX) or selective NMDA (LY235959 or DL-AP7) glutamate receptor antagonists blocked the cardiovascular response to L-Pro (33nmol/100nL). The dose-effect curve for the pretreatment with increasing doses of LY235959 was located at the left in relation to the curves for NBQX and DL-AP7, showing that LY235959 is more potent than NBQX, which is more potent than DL-AP7 in inhibiting the cardiovascular response to L-Pro. The cardiovascular response to the microinjection of L-Pro into the PVN was not affected by local pretreatment with N(ω)-Propyl-l-arginine (N-Propyl), a selective inhibitor of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), suggesting that NO does not mediate the responses to L-Pro in the PVN. In conclusion, the results suggest that ionotropic receptors in the PVN, blocked by both NMDA and non-NMDA receptor antagonists, mediate the pressor response to L-Pro that results from activation of PVN vasopressinergic magnocellular neurons and vasopressin release into the systemic circulation.

  3. NMDA receptors regulate nicotine-enhanced brain reward function and intravenous nicotine self-administration: role of the ventral tegmental area and central nucleus of the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Paul J; Chartoff, Elena; Roberto, Marisa; Carlezon, William A; Markou, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine is considered an important component of tobacco responsible for the smoking habit in humans. Nicotine increases glutamate-mediated transmission throughout brain reward circuitries. This action of nicotine could potentially contribute to its intrinsic rewarding and reward-enhancing properties, which motivate consumption of the drug. Here we show that the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist LY235959 (0.5-2.5 mg per kg) abolished nicotine-enhanced brain reward function, reflected in blockade of the lowering of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds usually observed after experimenter-administered (0.25 mg per kg) or intravenously self-administered (0.03 mg per kg per infusion) nicotine injections. The highest LY235959 dose (5 mg per kg) tested reversed the hedonic valence of nicotine from positive to negative, reflected in nicotine-induced elevations of ICSS thresholds. LY235959 doses that reversed nicotine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds also markedly decreased nicotine self-administration without altering responding for food reinforcement, whereas the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonist NBQX had no effects on nicotine intake. In addition, nicotine self-administration upregulated NMDA receptor subunit expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), suggesting important interactions between nicotine and the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, nicotine (1 microM) increased NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents in rat CeA slices, similar to its previously described effects in the VTA. Finally, infusion of LY235959 (0.1-10 ng per side) into the CeA or VTA decreased nicotine self-administration. Taken together, these data suggest that NMDA receptors, including those in the CeA and VTA, gate the magnitude and valence of the effects of nicotine on brain reward systems, thereby regulating motivation to consume the drug.

  4. Chronic stress exacerbates neuropathic pain via the integration of stress-affect-related information with nociceptive information in the central nucleus of the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Jia; Liu, Ling-Yu; Chen, Lin; Cai, Jie; Wan, You; Xing, Guo-Gang

    2017-04-01

    Exacerbation of pain by chronic stress and comorbidity of pain with stress-related psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and depression, represent significant clinical challenges. However, the underlying mechanisms still remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether chronic forced swim stress (CFSS)-induced exacerbation of neuropathic pain is mediated by the integration of stress-affect-related information with nociceptive information in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). We first demonstrated that CFSS indeed produces both depressive-like behaviors and exacerbation of spared nerve injury (SNI)-induced mechanical allodynia in rats. Moreover, we revealed that CFSS induces both sensitization of basolateral amygdala (BLA) neurons and augmentation of long-term potentiation (LTP) at the BLA-CeA synapse and meanwhile, exaggerates both SNI-induced sensitization of CeA neurons and LTP at the parabrachial (PB)-CeA synapse. In addition, we discovered that CFSS elevates SNI-induced functional up-regulation of GluN2B-containing NMDA (GluN2B-NMDA) receptors in the CeA, which is proved to be necessary for CFSS-induced augmentation of LTP at the PB-CeA synapse and exacerbation of pain hypersensitivity in SNI rats. Suppression of CFSS-elicited depressive-like behaviors by antidepressants imipramine or ifenprodil inhibits the CFSS-induced exacerbation of neuropathic pain. Collectively, our findings suggest that CFSS potentiates synaptic efficiency of the BLA-CeA pathway, leading to the activation of GluN2B-NMDA receptors and sensitization of CeA neurons, which subsequently facilitate pain-related synaptic plasticity of the PB-CeA pathway, thereby exacerbating SNI-induced neuropathic pain. We conclude that chronic stress exacerbates neuropathic pain via the integration of stress-affect-related information with nociceptive information in the CeA.

  5. Glutamatergic transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala is selectively altered in Marchigian Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats: Alcohol and CRF effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Melissa A; Varodayan, Florence P; Oleata, Christopher S; Luu, George; Kirson, Dean; Heilig, Markus; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Roberto, Marisa

    2016-03-01

    The CRF system of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is important for the processing of anxiety, stress, and effects of acute and chronic ethanol. We previously reported that ethanol decreases evoked glutamate transmission in the CeA of Sprague Dawley rats and that ethanol dependence alters glutamate release in the CeA. Here, we examined the effects of ethanol, CRF and a CRF1 receptor antagonist on spontaneous and evoked glutamatergic transmission in CeA neurons from Wistar and Marchigian Sardinian Preferring (msP) rats, a rodent line genetically selected for excessive alcohol drinking and characterized by heightened activity of the CRF1 system. Basal spontaneous and evoked glutamate transmission in CeA neurons from msP rats was increased compared to Wistar rats. Ethanol had divergent effects, either increasing or decreasing spontaneous glutamate release in the CeA of Wistar rats. This bidirectional effect was retained in msP rats, but the magnitude of the ethanol-induced increase in glutamate release was significantly smaller. The inhibitory effect of ethanol on evoked glutamatergic transmission was similar in both strains. CRF also either increased or decreased spontaneous glutamate release in CeA neurons of Wistar rats, however, in msP rats CRF only increased glutamate release. The inhibitory effect of CRF on evoked glutamatergic transmission was also lost in neurons from msP rats. A CRF1 antagonist produced only minor effects on spontaneous glutamate transmission, which were consistent across strains, and no effects on evoked glutamate transmission. These results demonstrate that the genetically altered CRF system of msP rats results in alterations in spontaneous and stimulated glutamate signaling in the CeA that may contribute to both the anxiety and drinking behavioral phenotypes.

  6. Inhibition of corticotropin releasing factor expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates stress-induced behavioral and endocrine responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah B. Callahan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF is a primary mediator of endocrine, autonomic and behavioral stress responses. Studies in both humans and animal models have implicated CRF in a wide-variety of psychiatric conditions including anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, depression, sleep disorders and addiction among others. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA, a key limbic structure with one of the highest concentrations of CRF-producing cells outside of the hypothalamus, has been implicated in anxiety-like behavior and a number of stress-induced disorders. This study investigated the specific role of CRF in the CeA on both endocrine and behavioral responses to stress. We used RNA Interference (RNAi techniques to locally and specifically knockdown CRF expression in CeA. Behavior was assessed using the elevated plus maze (EPM and open field test (OF. Knocking down CRF expression in the CeA had no significant effect on measures of anxiety-like behavior in these tests. However, it did have an effect on grooming behavior, a CRF-induced behavior. Prior exposure to a stressor sensitized an amygdalar CRF effect on stress-induced HPA activation. In these stress-challenged animals silencing CRF in the CeA significantly attenuated corticosterone responses to a subsequent behavioral stressor. Thus, it appears that while CRF projecting from the CeA does not play a significant role in the expression stress-induced anxiety-like behaviors on the EPM and OF it does play a critical role in stress-induced HPA activation.

  7. 40 CFR 180.1293 - Trichoderma gamsii strain ICC 080; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trichoderma gamsii strain ICC 080... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1293 Trichoderma gamsii strain ICC 080; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Trichoderma gamsii strain ICC 080 is exempted from the requirement...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1294 - Trichoderma asperellum strain ICC 012; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trichoderma asperellum strain ICC 012... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1294 Trichoderma asperellum strain ICC 012; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Trichoderma asperellum strain ICC 012 is exempted from...

  9. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) does not affect ethanol-reinforced responding in binge-drinking, nondependent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Angela N; Czachowski, Cristine L

    2012-03-01

    The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) has been implicated as having a significant role in mediating alcohol-drinking behavior. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been investigated as a potential pharmacotherapeutic due to its ability to attenuate ethanol intake, particularly when administered into the CeA. Previous research suggests, though the evidence is somewhat conflicting, that the efficacy of NPY is contingent upon genetic background and/or prior history of ethanol dependence in rats. However, studies looking at the effects of NPY in nonselected animals lacking a history of ethanol dependence have two factors that could impact the interpretation of the results: ethanol history/selection AND relatively low baseline ethanol intakes as compared to ethanol-dependent and/or genetically selected controls. The purpose of the present study was to generate higher baseline ethanol intakes upon which to examine the effects of NPY on ethanol and sucrose drinking in nonselected rats using a binge drinking model. Long Evans rats were trained to complete a single response requirement resulting in access to either 2% sucrose (Sucrose Group) or 2% sucrose/10% ethanol (Ethanol Group) for a 20-min drinking session. On treatment days, rats were bilaterally microinjected into the CeA with aCSF or one of three doses of NPY (0.25μg, 0.50μg, or 1.00μg/.5μL). Subjects in the Ethanol Group were consuming an average of 1.2g/kg of ethanol (yielding BELs of ~90mg%) during the 20min access period following aCSF treatments. The results revealed that NPY had no effect on either sucrose or ethanol consumption or on appetitive responding (latency to respond). Overall, the findings indicate that even a history of binge-like ethanol consumption is not sufficient to recruit CeA NPY activity, and are consistent with previous studies showing that the role of NPY in regulating ethanol reinforcement in the CeA may be contingent upon a prior history of ethanol dependence.

  10. Synaptogenesis and Myelination in the Nucleus/Tractus Solitarius: Potential Role in Apnea of Prematurity, Congenital Central Hypoventilation, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnat, Harvey B; Flores-Sarnat, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Fetuses as early as 15 weeks' gestation exhibit rhythmical respiratory movements shown by real-time ultrasonography. The nucleus/tractus solitarius is the principal brainstem respiratory center; other medullary nuclei also participate. The purpose was to determine temporal maturation of synaptogenesis. Delayed synaptic maturation may explain neurogenic apnea or hypoventilation of prematurity and some cases of sudden infant death syndrome. Sections of medulla oblongata were studied from 30 human fetal and neonatal brains 9 to 41 weeks' gestation. Synaptophysin demonstrated the immunocytochemical sequence of synaptogenesis. Other neuronal markers and myelin stain also were applied. The nucleus/tractus solitarius was similarly studied in fetuses with chromosomopathies, metabolic encephalopathies, and brain malformations. Synapse formation in the nucleus solitarius begins at about 12 weeks' gestation and matures by 15 weeks; myelination initiated at 33 weeks. Synaptogenesis was delayed in 3 fetuses with different conditions, but was not specific for only nucleus solitarius. Delayed synaptogenesis or myelination in the nucleus solitarius may play a role in neonatal hypoventilation, especially in preterm infants and in some sudden infant death syndrome cases.

  11. Neurons of human nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanović Maja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nucleus accumbens is a part of the ventral striatum also known as a drug active brain region, especially related with drug addiction. The aim of the study was to investigate the Golgi morphology of the nucleus accumbens neurons. Methods. The study was performed on the frontal and sagittal sections of 15 human brains by the Golgi Kopsch method. We classified neurons in the human nucleus accumbens according to their morphology and size into four types: type I - fusiform neurons; type II - fusiform neurons with lateral dendrite, arising from a part of the cell body; type III - pyramidal-like neuron; type IV - multipolar neuron. The medium spiny neurons, which are mostly noted regarding to the drug addictive conditions of the brain, correspond to the type IV - multipolar neurons. Results. Two regions of human nucleus accumbens could be clearly recognized on Nissl and Golgi preparations each containing different predominant neuronal types. Central part of nucleus accumbens, core region, has a low density of impregnated neurons with predominant type III, pyramidal-like neurons, with spines on secondary branches and rare type IV, multipolar neurons. Contrary to the core, peripheral region, shell of nucleus, has a high density of impregnated neurons predominantly contained of type I and type IV - multipolar neurons, which all are rich in spines on secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Conclusion. Our results indicate great morphological variability of human nucleus accumbens neurons. This requires further investigations and clarifying clinical significance of this important brain region.

  12. A Brief Discussion on the Key Factors of Developing and Implementing College Student's ICC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xi; WANG Yan-ru

    2015-01-01

    Language and culture are interrelated with each other, to learn a foreign language is not only about learning language it⁃self, but achieving a mutual understanding and appreciating of other cultures. The need for the people of intercultural communica⁃tive competence (ICC) in various work fields is consistently increasing. The development and implementation of intercultural com⁃municative competence has become the major goal of college English teaching. This paper mainly discusses the main factors in de⁃veloping and implementing ICC to find out their possible benefits and constrains in order to give some suggestions for the further development of Chinese college English teachers.

  13. An IcLL Approach to English Language Teaching to Improve Learners’ICC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    长安大学外国语学院,陕西西安710064

    2015-01-01

    Language is learned to communicate, but how to use it appropriately is far more important. Since language and culture have an inextricable link in between, to improve the students’Intercultural communicative competence (ICC), issues on integrat⁃ing an intercultural approach into ELT classroom has been long debated and studied in foreign language teaching field. This paper will start with the definition of ICC, analyze the correlation between language and culture then offer valuable suggestions on how to integrate IcLL approach into ELT in China.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide increases degradation of central monoamines: an in vivo microdialysis study in the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heesch, Floor; Prins, Jolanda; Konsman, Jan Pieter; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Westphal, Koen G C; Rybka, Joanna; Olivier, Berend; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Korte, S Mechiel

    2014-02-15

    Peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rodents induces anhedonia, i.e. the inability to experience pleasure. Recently, we reported that serotonin transporter (SERT) function is required for LPS-induced anhedonia. Less is known about the effect of LPS on the biological activity of dopamine transporters (DAT) and norepinephrine transporters (NET). Therefore, in vivo microdialysis was performed in the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex of C57BL6/J mice exposed to saline or LPS (133 µg/kg i.p.). To investigate the possible involvement of different monoamine transporters, the triple reuptake inhibitor DOV 216,303 or saline was i.p. injected 30 min before the saline/LPS injection. The dose of LPS, shown to decrease responding for brain stimulation reward in mice, significantly increased extracellular levels of monoamine metabolites (5-HIAA, DOPAC and HVA) in the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex. Remarkably, DOV 216,303 abolished LPS-induced DOPAC and HVA formation in the nucleus accumbens, suggesting that LPS increases DAT activity in this brain area. DOV 216,303 also inhibited LPS-induced DOPAC and HVA formation in the medial prefrontal cortex. Since DAT density is very low in this brain structure, reuptake of DA predominantly takes place via NET, suggesting that LPS increases DAT and NET activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, DOV 216,303 pretreatment prevented LPS-induced 5-HIAA formation only in the medial prefrontal cortex, indicating that LPS increases prefrontal SERT activity. In conclusion, the present findings suggest that peripheral LPS increases DAT activity in the nucleus accumbens and increases NET and SERT activity in the medial prefrontal cortex of mice.

  15. [Involvement of cross interaction between central cholinergic and histaminergic systems in the nucleus tractus solitarius in regulating carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li-Xun; Zhang, Guo-Xing; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Zhao, Hong-Fen; Yu, Kang-Ying; Wang, Guo-Qing

    2013-12-25

    The carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex (CSR) is an important approach for regulating arterial blood pressure homeostasis instantaneously and physiologically. Activation of the central histaminergic or cholinergic systems results in CSR functional inhibitory resetting. However, it is unclear whether two systems at the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) level display cross interaction to regulate the CSR or not. In the present study, the left or right carotid sinus region was isolated from the systemic circulation in Sprague-Dawley rats (sinus nerve was reserved) anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. Respective intubation was conducted into one side isolated carotid sinus and into the femoral artery for recording the intracarotid sinus pressure (ISP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) simultaneously with pressure transducers connection in vivo. ISP was set at the level of 0 mmHg to eliminate the effect of initial internal pressure of the carotid sinus on the CSR function. To trigger CSR, the ISP was quickly elevated from 0 mmHg to 280 mmHg in a stepwise manner (40 mmHg) which was added at every step for over 4 s, and then ISP returned to 0 mmHg in similar steps. The original data of ISP and corresponding MAP were fitted to a modified logistic equation with five parameters to obtain the ISP-MAP, ISP-Gain relationship curves and the CSR characteristic parameters, which were statistically compared and analyzed separately. Under the precondition of no influence on the basic levels of the artery blood pressure, the effects and potential regulatory mechanism of preceding microinjection with different cholinoceptor antagonists, the selective cholinergic M1 receptor antagonist, i.e., pirenzepine (PRZ), the M2 receptor antagonist, i.e., methoctramine (MTR) or the N1 receptor antagonist, i.e., hexamethonium (HEX) into the NTS on the changes in function of CSR induced by intracerebroventricular injection (i.c.v.) of histamine (HA) in rats were observed. Meanwhile, the actions and

  16. Effects of location and timing of co-activated neurons in the auditory midbrain on cortical activity: implications for a new central auditory prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Małgorzata M.; McMahon, Melissa; Markovitz, Craig D.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. An increasing number of deaf individuals are being implanted with central auditory prostheses, but their performance has generally been poorer than for cochlear implant users. The goal of this study is to investigate stimulation strategies for improving hearing performance with a new auditory midbrain implant (AMI). Previous studies have shown that repeated electrical stimulation of a single site in each isofrequency lamina of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) causes strong suppressive effects in elicited responses within the primary auditory cortex (A1). Here we investigate if improved cortical activity can be achieved by co-activating neurons with different timing and locations across an ICC lamina and if this cortical activity varies across A1. Approach. We electrically stimulated two sites at different locations across an isofrequency ICC lamina using varying delays in ketamine-anesthetized guinea pigs. We recorded and analyzed spike activity and local field potentials across different layers and locations of A1. Results. Co-activating two sites within an isofrequency lamina with short inter-pulse intervals (hearing capabilities.

  17. Involvement of ryanodine receptors in pacemaker Ca2+ oscillation in murine gastric ICC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Nian; Ohya, Susumu; Wang, Jing; Imaizumi, Yuji; Nakayama, Shinsuke

    2005-03-11

    Using a cell cluster preparation from the stomach smooth muscle tissue of mice, we measured intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in the presence of nifedipine. Pacemaker [Ca(2+)](i) activity in ICCs was significantly suppressed by caffeine application and restored after washout. Application of either ryanodine or FK-506 terminated the pacemaker [Ca(2+)](i) activity irreversibly. Immunostaining of smooth muscle tissue showed that c-Kit-immunopositive cells (that form network-like structure cells in the myenteric plexus, equivalent to ICCs) clearly express ryanodine receptors (RyR). RT-PCR revealed that ICCs (identified with c-Kit-immunoreactivity) predominantly express type 3 RyR (RyR3). Furthermore, the FK-binding proteins 12 and 12.6, both of which would interact with RyR3, were detected. In conclusion, we provide first evidence for the essential contribution of RyR to generating pacemaker activity in gastric motility. Similar mechanisms might account for spontaneous rhythmicity seen in smooth muscle tissues distributed in the autonomic nervous system.

  18. ICC Banking Commission Global Conference (spring) 2010 to Be Held in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ On March 18, China Chamber of Internation-al Commerce (CCOIC) held press conference in Beijing, releasing that Interna-tional Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Banking Commission Global Con-ference (Spring) 2010 be held from April 20 to April 23 at International Convention Center in Financial Street, Beijing.

  19. ICCE/ICCAI 2000 Full & Short Papers (Artificial Intelligence in Education).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This document contains the full and short papers on artificial intelligence in education from ICCE/ICCAI 2000 (International Conference on Computers in Education/International Conference on Computer-Assisted Instruction) covering the following topics: a computational model for learners' motivation states in individualized tutoring system; a…

  20. The Modes of Liability at the ICC: The Labels that Don't Always Stick

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksenova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The article critically analyses recent developments in the jurisprudence of the International Criminal Court. In particular, it scrutinises two convictions rendered by the Court to the date with the view of assessing the viability of the modes of liability employed by the ICC. The argument...

  1. 75 FR 9527 - Trichoderma asperellum strain ICC 012; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ... margin of safety does not apply. VII. Other Considerations A. Endocrine Disruptors The Agency has no information to suggest that Trichoderma asperellum strain ICC 012 has an effect on the endocrine system. No... reports of the organism affecting endocrine systems. Therefore, it is unlikely that this organism...

  2. 75 FR 8504 - Trichoderma gamsii strain ICC 080; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Considerations A. Endocrine Disruptors The Agency has no information to suggest that Trichoderma gamsii strain ICC 080 has an effect on the endocrine system. The submitted acute pulmonary toxicity/pathogenicity... organism in the environment and there have been no reports of the organism affecting endocrine...

  3. La evaluación de las competencias culturales: Validación del inventario ICC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEJANDRO CASTRO SOLANO

    2012-01-01

    La versión final del ICC consta de cinco dimensiones, tres correspondientes al IAC: Apertura a Experiencias Nuevas, Autonomia e Independencia, Aceptación de la Diversidad Cultural, y dos que se incluyen en este estudio: Inestabilidad Emocional y Vinculos. Participaron 334 sujetos (150 hombres y 184 mujeres que tenian en promedio 33.86 años (DE ~ 13.84 Yresidian en la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (n ~ 228, 68% Yen el Conurbano Bonaerense (n ~ 106, 32%. Los resultados obtenidos permiten afirmar que el ICC presenta propiedades psicométricas satisfactorias (fiabilidad y validez. En cuanto a su validez interna, los análisis pudieron verificar que el ICC estaba compuesto por cinco dimensiones. En cuanto a su validez externa el ICC presenta evidencias de validez convergente con el BFI (Big Five Inventory, con el CAO (Cuestionario de Apertura al Otro y con el SWLS (Satisfacción Con La Vida.

  4. Examining Gender Differences in Attitudes toward Interactive Classroom Communications Systems (ICCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Robin H.

    2009-01-01

    An interactive classroom communication system (ICCS) involves the use of remote devices that permit all students in a class to respond to multiple choice questions displayed on a LCD projector. After responses are clicked in, the results are instantly aggregated and displayed in chart form. The purpose of this study was to examine gender…

  5. Proofing the ban on ‘witness proofing': did the ICC get it right?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasiliev, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the reasons for disaccord between the ICC and the more seasoned international criminal tribunals on the issue of allowing substantive preparation of witnesses for testifying in court. The rationales behind the opposing decisions and the ensuing debate on the legitimacy and util

  6. Central CRF neurons are not created equal: Phenotypic differences in CRF-containing neurons of the rat paraventricular hypothalamus and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eDabrowska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF plays a key role in initiating many of the endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses to stress. CRF-containing neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN are classically involved in regulating endocrine function through activation of the stress axis. However, CRF is also thought to play a critical role in mediating anxiety-like responses to environmental stressors, and dysfunction of the CRF system in extra-hypothalamic brain regions, like the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST, has been linked to the etiology of many psychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. Thus, although CRF neurons of the PVN and BNST share a common neuropeptide phenotype, they may represent two functionally diverse neuronal populations. Here, we employed dual-immunofluorescence, single-cell RT-PCR, and electrophysiological techniques to further examine this question and report that CRF neurons of the PVN and BNST are fundamentally different such that PVN CRF neurons are glutamatergic, whereas BNST CRF neurons are GABAergic. Moreover, these two neuronal populations can be further distinguished based on their electrophysiological properties, their co-expression of peptide neurotransmitters such as oxytocin and arginine-vasopressin, and their cognate receptors. Our results suggest that CRF neurons in the PVN and the BNST would not only differ in their response to local neurotransmitter release, but also in their action on downstream target structures.

  7. ICCS 2009 Asian Report: Civic Knowledge and Attitudes among Lower-Secondary Students in Five Asian Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraillon, Julian; Schulz, Wolfram; Ainley, John

    2012-01-01

    This report presents findings from the Asian regional module of the International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS), sponsored by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA). ICCS studied the ways in which young people in lower-secondary schools are prepared to undertake their roles as citizens.…

  8. 小脑顶核电刺激治疗小儿中枢性协调障碍的研究%Research of fastigial nucleus electrical stimulation for central coordination disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈艳红; 赵晓冬; 洪菲; 许铖; 宋磊

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the advantages of fastigial nucleus electrical stimulation in the rehabilitation of central coordination disorder. Methods Totally 84 children with central coordination disorder were randomly divided into observation group(n=42) and control group(n=42). The control group only adopted with conventional rehabilitation comprehensive treatment , while the observation group was added with fastigial nucleus electrical stimulation based on the control group. After treatment ,the comparison was conducted between the two groups on total effective rate and developmental quotient (DQ) of Gesell developmen-tal scale. Results The total effective rate of the observation group (83.33%) was higher than that of the control group (57.14%). After treatment,the DQ score was(84.91±7.28) in the observation group and(71.97±5.74) in the control group,and the differ-ence between the two groups had statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusion Conventional rehabilitation associated with fasti-gial nucleus electrical stimulation has remarkably efficacy in treating children with central coordination disorder.%目的:探讨小脑顶核电刺激治疗在小儿中枢性协调障碍康复治疗中的优势。方法选取2012年8月至2013年7月收治的84例中枢性协调障碍患儿随机分为观察组(42例)和对照组(42例),对照组仅采用常规康复综合治疗,观察组在此基础上加用小脑顶核电刺激疗法,对两组患儿治疗后总有效率及Gesell发育量表动作能之发育商(DQ)进行比较。结果观察组显效率(83.33%)高于对照组(57.14%),治疗后DQ评分观察组[(84.91±7.28)分]明显高于对照组[(71.97±5.74)分],差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论常规康复治疗联合小脑顶核电刺激治疗小儿中枢性协调障碍疗效显著。

  9. A radial velocity survey for post-common-envelope Wolf-Rayet central stars of planetary nebulae: First results and discovery of the close binary nucleus of NGC 5189

    CERN Document Server

    Manick, Rajeev; McBride, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    The formation of Wolf-Rayet central stars of planetary nebulae ([WR] CSPNe) whose spectroscopic appearance mimics massive WR stars remains poorly understood. Least understood is the nature and frequency of binary companions to [WR] CSPNe that may explain their H-deficiency. We have conducted a systematic radial velocity (RV) study of 6 [WR] CSPNe to search for post-common-envelope (post-CE) [WR] binaries. We used a cross-correlation method to construct the RV time-series as successfully done for massive close binary WR stars. No significant RV variability was detected for the late-[WC] type nuclei of Hen 2-113, Hen 3-1333, PMR~2 and Hen 2-99. Significant, large-amplitude variability was found in the [WC4] nucleus of NGC 5315. In the [WO1] nucleus of NGC 5189 we discovered significant periodic variability that reveals a close binary with $P_\\mathrm{orb}=4.04\\pm0.1$ d. We measured a semi-amplitude of $62.3\\pm1.3$ km s$^{-1}$ that gives a companion mass of $m_2\\ge0.5$ $M_\\odot$ or $m_2=0.84$ $M_\\odot$ (assuming ...

  10. Differential modulation of arcuate nucleus and mesolimbic gene expression levels by central leptin in rats on short-term high-fat high-sugar diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, José K; Eggels, Leslie; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, A.; Adan, Roger A H; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Leptin resistance is a common hallmark of obesity. Rats on a free-choice high-fat high-sugar (fcHFHS) diet are resistant to peripherally administered leptin. The aim of this study was to investigate feeding responses to central leptin as well as the associated changes in mRNA levels in hy

  11. GABA and NMDA receptors in CRF neurons have opposing effects in fear acquisition and anxiety in central amygdala vs. bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafford, Georgette M; Ressler, Kerry J

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Beginning with Vale and Colleagues in 1981, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) also called corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) has repeatedly been identified as an important contributor to fear and anxiety behavior. These findings have proven useful to further our understanding of disorders that have significant fear-dysregulation, such as post-traumatic stress, as well as other stress- and anxiety-related disorders. Unfortunately, the data are not all in agreement. In particular the role of CRF in fear learning is controversial, with studies pointing to contradictory effects from CRF manipulation even within the same brain structure. Further, very few studies address the potentially promising role of CRF manipulation in fear extinction behavior. Here, we briefly review the role of CRF in anxiety, fear learning and extinction, focusing on recent cell-type and neurotransmitter-specific studies in the amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) that may help to synthesize the available data on the role of CRF in fear and anxiety-related behaviors.

  12. Centrally mediated ejaculatory response via sympathetic outflow in rats: role of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors in paraventricular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J-D; Chen, J; Sun, H-J; Zhou, L-H; Zhu, G-Q; Chen, Y; Dai, Y-T

    2017-01-01

    Ejaculation is mediated by a spinal generator, which integrates inputs related to the sexual activity and coordinates sympathetic, parasympathetic, and motor outflow. Previous clinical studies indicate that primary premature ejaculation is related to the hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system. In this study, we explored the roles of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors in paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) on ejaculatory responses and its potential mechanism in the rats. We found that microinjection of 0.20 nmol NMDA into the PVN reduced the latency of intromission and facilitated ejaculation during copulation. Moreover, delayed ejaculation and intromission were observed after the rats were microinjected with NMDA receptor antagonist D (-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5). However, we discovered that microinjection of NMDA into PVN significantly increased baseline lumbar splanchnic nerve activity (LSNA), and the NMDA dose was positively correlated with the increased LSNA (r = 0.875, p = 0.04). Meanwhile, the plasma norepinephrine level in rats injected with NMDA was much higher than that in rats injected with saline (1453.4 ± 136.4 pg/mL vs. 492.3 ± 36.8 pg/mL, p ejaculation through enhancing the activity of sympathetic system.

  13. Increased responsiveness and failure of habituation in neurons of the external nucleus of inferior colliculus associated with audiogenic seizures of the genetically epilepsy-prone rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, D N; Faingold, C L

    1996-10-01

    Initiation of audiogenic seizures (AGS) emanates from the inferior colliculus (IC) to other IC subnuclei in the genetically epilepsy-prone rat (GEPR). The external nucleus of IC (ICx) is a suggested site of convergence of the auditory output onto the sensorimotor integration network components for AGS in the brainstem. Neuronal firing was recorded from the ICx of the awake, freely moving GEPR and normal Sprague-Dawley rats using microwire electrodes in the present study. Auditory stimuli consisted of 12-kHz tones (100 ms, 5-ms rise-fall at rates of 1/4s, 1/2s, and 1/s). AGS incidence in the GEPR is highest at 12 kHz. In the GEPR, ICx neuronal responses to acoustic stimuli were significantly greater than those seen in normal rats. This increased ICx firing was observed at relatively high acoustic intensities (> 80 dB SPL), which are near the threshold for AGS induction. Repetition-induced response attenuation (habituation) is commonly observed in ICx neurons, which appears to be overcome in the GEPR during AGS initiation. Tonic, acoustically evoked ICx neuronal firing was observed just prior to wild running. ICx firing was suppressed during the tonic and postictal phases of AGS. Recovery of ICx responses occurred when the animal regained postural control. Abnormal, intense output has previously been observed in the GEPR IC central nucleus (ICc) neurons. The neuronal firing pattern changes observed in the ICx in the present study may result from this intense ICc output. Diminished efficacy of GABA, which has been observed in several regions of the GEPR brain, including the IC, in a number of previous studies, may be involved in the exaggerated ICx responses to acoustic stimuli in the GEPR. Participation of the ICx in the AGS neuronal network may be subserved by this acoustic hyperresponsiveness.

  14. ICC Profile文件在数码打样中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周常星

    2003-01-01

    如今国内市场上的主要数码打样软件BlackMagic,Bestcolor,Color Tune,Lab Proof,方正写真等都采用了ICC技术进行色彩管理,通过ICC Profile文件的控制,实现与印刷相匹配的打样色彩,建立印刷工艺控制过程的色彩管理标准。下面就ICC Profile在数码打样中的应用做简单的介绍。

  15. 色彩管理中的ICC Profile剖析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺菲菲; 曹伯燕

    2004-01-01

    1993年世界著名印前软件开发商Adobe、Agfa、Apple、Kodak、FOGRA、Microsoft、Sun Microsystem等公司发起并成立了国际彩色联盟(International Color Consortium),简称ICC.旨在建立、推广和鼓励公开的、跨平台的、中立性的色彩管理系统,并制定了ICC Profile规范,于2003年9月公布了最新版本File Format for Color Profiles(Version 41.0)。

  16. Dimuon enhancement in nucleus-nucleus ultrarelativistic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordalo, Paula; Abreu, M.C.; Alessandro, B.; Alexa, C.; Arnaldi, R.; Astruc, J.; Atayan, M.; Baglin, C.; Baldit, A.; Bedjidian, M.; Bellaiche, F.; Beole, S.; Bohrani, A.; Boldea, V.; Bussiere, A.; Capelli, L.; Caponi, V.; Casagrande, L.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Chaurand, B.; Chevrot, I.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalo, C.; Comets, M.P.; Constans, N.; Constantinescu, S.; Contardo, D.; Cruz, J.; De Falco, A.; De Marco, N.; Dellacasa, G.; Devaux, A.; Dita, S.; Drapier, O.; Ducroux, L.; Espagnon, B.; Fargeix, J.; Ferreira, R.; Filippov, S.N.; Fleuret, F.; Force, P.; Gallio, M.; Gavrilov, Y.K.; Gerschel, C.; Giubellino, P.; Golubeva, M.B.; Gonin, M.; Gorodetzky, P.; Grigorian, A.A.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guber, F.F.; Guichard, A.; Gulkanyan, H.; Hakobyan, R.; Haroutunian, R.; Idzik, M.; Jouan, D.; Karavitcheva, T.L.; Kluberg, L.; Kossakowski, R.; Kurepin, A.B.; Landau, G.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lourenco, C.; Luquin, L.; Macciotta, P.; Mac Cormick, M.; Mandry, R.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Monteno, M.; Mourgues, S.; Musso, A.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Petiau, P.; Piccotti, A.; Pizzi, J.R.; Prado da Silva, W.L.; Puddu, G.; Quintans, C.; Racca, C.; Ramello, L.; Ramos, S.; Rato-Mendes, P.; Riccati, L.; Romana, A.; Ropotar, I.; Saturnini, P.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Shahoyan, R.; Silva, S.; Sitta, M.; Soave, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Tarrago, X.; Topilskaya, N.S.; Usai, G.L.; Varela, J.; Vercellin, E.; Villatte, L

    1999-12-27

    The study of muon pairs in the mass region 1.5 < M{sub {mu}}{sub {mu}} < 2.5 GeV/c{sup 2} in 450 GeV/c p-A, 200 GeV/nucleon S-U and 158 GeV/nucleon Pb-Pb collisions is presented. In p-A interactions, the dimuon signal mass spectra are well described by a superposition of Drell-Yan and charmed meson semi-leptonic decay contributions, in agreement with previous experiments when considering a linear A dependence. In nucleus-nucleus reactions, taking only into account these two physical ingredients, a dimuon enhancement both with increasing A{center_dot}B and centrality is observed.

  17. Encoding of the amplitude modulation of pulsatile electrical stimulation in the feline cochlear nucleus by neurons in the inferior colliculus; effects of stimulus pulse rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreery, Douglas; Han, Martin; Pikov, Victor; Yadav, Kamal; Pannu, Satinderpall

    2013-10-01

    Objectives. Persons without a functional auditory nerve cannot benefit from cochlear implants, but some hearing can be restored by an auditory brainstem implant (ABI) with stimulating electrodes implanted on the surface of the cochlear nucleus (CN). Most users benefit from their ABI, but speech recognition tends to be poorer than for users of cochlear implants. Psychophysical studies suggest that poor modulation detection may contribute to the limited performance of ABI users. In a cat model, we determined how the pulse rate of the electrical stimulus applied within or on the CN affects temporal and rate encoding of amplitude modulation (AM) by neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). Approach. Stimulating microelectrodes were implanted chronically in and on the cats' CN, and multi-site recording microelectrodes were implanted chronically into the ICC. Encoding of AM pulse trains by neurons in the ICC was characterized as vector strength (VS), the synchrony of neural activity with the AM, and as the mean rate of neuronal action potentials (neuronal spike rate (NSR)). Main results. For intranuclear microstimulation, encoding of AM as VS was up to 3 dB greater when stimulus pulse rate was increased from 250 to 500 pps, but only for neuronal units with low best acoustic frequencies, and when the electrical stimulation was modulated at low frequencies (10-20 Hz). For stimulation on the surface of the CN, VS was similar at 250 and 500 pps, and the dynamic range of the VS was reduced for pulse rates greater than 250 pps. Modulation depth was encoded strongly as VS when the maximum stimulus amplitude was held constant across a range of modulation depth. This ‘constant maximum’ protocol allows enhancement of modulation depth while preserving overall dynamic range. However, modulation depth was not encoded as strongly as NSR. Significance. The findings have implications for improved sound processors for present and future ABIs. The performance of

  18. Restoration of quinine-stimulated Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala and gustatory cortex following reinnervation or cross-reinnervation of the lingual taste nerves in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Camille Tessitore; Garcea, Mircea; Spector, Alan C

    2014-08-01

    Remarkably, when lingual gustatory nerves are surgically rerouted to inappropriate taste fields in the tongue, some taste functions recover. We previously demonstrated that quinine-stimulated oromotor rejection reflexes and neural activity (assessed by Fos immunoreactivity) in subregions of hindbrain gustatory nuclei were restored if the posterior tongue, which contains receptor cells that respond strongly to bitter compounds, was cross-reinnervated by the chorda tympani nerve. Such functional recovery was not seen if instead, the anterior tongue, where receptor cells are less responsive to bitter compounds, was cross-reinnervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve, even though this nerve typically responds robustly to bitter substances. Thus, recovery depended more on the taste field being reinnervated than on the nerve itself. Here, the distribution of quinine-stimulated Fos-immunoreactive neurons in two taste-associated forebrain areas was examined in these same rats. In the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a rostrocaudal gradient characterized the normal quinine-stimulated Fos response, with the greatest number of labeled cells situated rostrally. Quinine-stimulated neurons were found throughout the gustatory cortex, but a "hot spot" was observed in its anterior-posterior center in subregions approximating the dysgranular/agranular layers. Fos neurons here and in the rostral CeA were highly correlated with quinine-elicited gapes. Denervation of the posterior tongue eliminated, and its reinnervation by either nerve restored, numbers of quinine-stimulated labeled cells in the rostralmost CeA and in the subregion approximating the dysgranular gustatory cortex. These results underscore the remarkable plasticity of the gustatory system and also help clarify the functional anatomy of neural circuits activated by bitter taste stimulation.

  19. Status of the National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) on the path to ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagin, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: lagin1@llnl.gov; Bettenhausen, R.C.; Bowers, G.A.; Carey, R.W.; Edwards, O.D.; Estes, C.M.; Demaret, R.D.; Ferguson, S.W.; Fisher, J.M.; Ho, J.C.; Ludwigsen, A.P.; Mathisen, D.G.; Marshall, C.D.; Matone, J.T.; McGuigan, D.L.; Sanchez, R.J.; Stout, E.A.; Tekle, E.A.; Townsend, S.L.; Van Arsdall, P.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-04-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility under construction that will contain a 192-beam, 1.8-MJ, 500-TW, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-m diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF is comprised of 24 independent bundles of eight beams each using laser hardware that is modularized into more than 6000 line replaceable units such as optical assemblies, laser amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages containing 60,000 control and diagnostic points. NIF is operated by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an architecture partitioned by bundle and distributed among over 800 front-end processors and 50 supervisory servers. NIF's automated control subsystems are built from a common object-oriented software framework based on CORBA distribution that deploys the software across the computer network and achieves interoperation between different languages and target architectures. A shot automation framework has been deployed during the past year to orchestrate and automate shots performed at the NIF using the ICCS. In December 2006, a full cluster of 48 beams of NIF was fired simultaneously, demonstrating that the independent bundle control system will scale to full scale of 192 beams. At present, 72 beams have been commissioned and have demonstrated 1.4-MJ capability of infrared light. During the next 2 years, the control system will be expanded in preparation for project completion in 2009 to include automation of target area systems including

  20. Integrating the Intercultural Communicative Competence (ICC) in a Foreign Language Program: Faculty Considerations upon Leaving the Haven of Native Speakership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimas, Héctor Manuel Serna

    2016-01-01

    This action research study presents the perspectives of two language faculty who integrated the principles of the Intercultural Communicative Competence (ICC) model in their teaching. The professors shared their understanding of intercultural communicative competence through a learning log. These reflections were mainly about the challenged notion…

  1. The Classification of Tongue Colors with Standardized Acquisition and ICC Profile Correction in Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Goal. The application of digital image processing techniques and machine learning methods in tongue image classification in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM has been widely studied nowadays. However, it is difficult for the outcomes to generalize because of lack of color reproducibility and image standardization. Our study aims at the exploration of tongue colors classification with a standardized tongue image acquisition process and color correction. Methods. Three traditional Chinese medical experts are chosen to identify the selected tongue pictures taken by the TDA-1 tongue imaging device in TIFF format through ICC profile correction. Then we compare the mean value of L*a*b* of different tongue colors and evaluate the effect of the tongue color classification by machine learning methods. Results. The L*a*b* values of the five tongue colors are statistically different. Random forest method has a better performance than SVM in classification. SMOTE algorithm can increase classification accuracy by solving the imbalance of the varied color samples. Conclusions. At the premise of standardized tongue acquisition and color reproduction, preliminary objectification of tongue color classification in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM is feasible.

  2. "We ourselves, we are part of the functioning": the ICC, victims, and civil society in the Central African Republic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasius, M.

    2009-01-01

    As a new justice institution, the International Criminal Court needs to gain legitimacy not just with states, but also in civil society, both at the global level and in the societies in which it intervenes. This article, based on interviews, NGO documents, newspaper articles, and participatory obser

  3. UNCOVERING THE NUCLEUS CANDIDATE FOR NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Camperi, J. A. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina); Agüero, M. P. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, and CONICET (Argentina); Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Schirmer, M. [Gemini Observatory, AURA (United States); Bosch, G., E-mail: gunth@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: camperi@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mpaguero@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: rdiaz@gemini.edu, E-mail: pgomez@gemini.edu, E-mail: mschirmer@gemini.edu, E-mail: guille@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (CONICET-UNLP) (Argentina)

    2015-11-15

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H{sub 2} rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  4. Uncovering the nucleus candidate for NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Günthardt, G I; Camperi, J A; Díaz, R J; Gomez, P L; Bosch, G; Schirmer, M

    2015-01-01

    NGC253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst which becomes the best candidate to study the relationship between starburst and AGN activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus. The near infrared spectroscopy could be advantageous in order to shed light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis and through the brightest infrared source. We present evidence showing that the brightest near infrared and mid infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a stellar supercluster, in fact, presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. It is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.0" of the symmetry center of the galactic bar. Moreover, our data indicate that this object i...

  5. 14th EuCheMS International Conference on Chemistry and the Environment ICCE 2013: IEC-WTC, Barcelona, Spain, 25-28 June 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Santiago V; Jover, Eric

    2014-10-01

    The 14th European Association of Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS) International Conference on Chemistry and the Environment (ICCE 2013) took place on 25-28 June 2013 at the IEC and the WTC in Barcelona, Spain. The ICCE is a well-established biannual conference organized by the Division of Chemistry and the EuCheMS.

  6. A Multiphase Flow Measurement System Comprising an Impedance Cross Correlation (ICC) Device and an Imaging Electromagnetic Flow Meter (IEF).

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Yiqing; Lucas, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Flow measurements are playing increasingly important roles in many different application areas, such as manufacturing processes and the oil & gas industry. Multiphase flow measurement in particular is becoming increasingly important to the oil industry. This project concerns the design and implementation of a two-phase flow measurement system which integrates an impedance cross correlation (ICC) flow meter - which can be utilized for measuring the local dispersed phase volume fraction distrib...

  7. Nucleus Driven Electronic Pulsation

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, H; Xue, S -S

    2014-01-01

    We derive and solve by the spectral method the equations for a neutral system of ultra-relativistic electrons that are compressed to the radius of the nucleus and subject to a driving force. This driving force can be thought of as originating from a nuclear breathing mode, a possibility we discuss in detail.

  8. Melanopsin expression in dopamine-melatonin neurons of the premammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus and seasonal reproduction in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S W; Leclerc, B; Kosonsiriluk, S; Mauro, L J; Iwasawa, A; El Halawani, M E

    2010-09-29

    Melanopsin (OPN4) is a photoreceptive molecule regulating circadian systems in mammals. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that co-localized dopamine-melatonin (DA-MEL) neurons in the hypothalamic premammillary nucleus (PMM) are putatively photosensitive and exhibit circadian rhythms in DAergic and MELergic activities. This study investigates turkey OPN4x (tOPN4x) mRNA distribution in the hypothalamus and brainstem, and characterizes its expression in PMM DA-MEL neurons, using in situ hybridization (ISH), immunocytochemistry (ICC), double-label ISH/ICC, and real time-PCR. The mRNA encoding tOPN4x was found in anatomically discrete areas in or near the hypothalamus and the brainstem, including nucleus preopticus medialis (POM), nucleus septalis lateralis (SL), PMM and the pineal gland. Double ICC, using tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate limiting enzyme in DA synthesis)-and OPN4x antibodies, confirmed the existence of OPN4x protein in DA-MEL neurons. Also, tOPN4x mRNA expression was verified with double ISH/ICC using tOPN4x mRNA and TH immunoreactivity. PMM and pineal gland tOPN4x mRNA expression levels were diurnally high during the night and low during the day. A light pulse provided to short day photosensitive hens during the photosensitive phase at night significantly down-regulated tOPN4x expression. The expression level of tOPN4x mRNA in PMM DA-MEL neurons of photorefractory hens was significantly lower as compared with that of short or long day photosensitive hens. The results implicate tOPN4x in hypothalamic PMM DA-MEL neurons as an important component of the photoreceptive system regulating reproductive activity in temperate zone birds.

  9. Loss of CD117 (c-kit)- and CD34-positive ICC and associated CD34-positive fibroblasts defines a subpopulation of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streutker, C J; Huizinga, J D; Campbell, F; Ho, J; Riddell, R H

    2003-02-01

    Chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a syndrome in which symptoms of intestinal obstruction are present in the absence of mechanical obstruction. Lack of normal pacemaker activity, usually generated by the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), could account for the apparent obstruction. ICC are normally located around and between the myenteric plexus ganglia and within muscle and also in the deep muscular plexus of the small bowel and the submuscular plexus of the large intestine, just within the circular muscle. ICC can be demonstrated immunohistochemically with CD117 (c-kit) as well as with CD34, although this is less specific. CD34 also stains a population of fibroblasts that are intimately associated with ICC. To determine whether there is a relative deficiency of ICC and CD34-positive fibroblasts in patients with chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, tissue from 30 patients of large intestine and eight patients with small intestine pseudo-obstruction was obtained. Controls (large intestinal specimens from 12 patients, small intestinal specimens from six patients) were chosen from resections for Crohn's disease and colorectal neoplasia, both with and without dilatation. Examination of pseudo-obstruction cases identified 10 patients (nine large intestinal and one small intestinal) in which both CD117 and CD34 were absent or severely reduced in all three of the examined areas. In contrast, the control cases, including those with preobstructive dilatation, showed relatively constant ICC staining. These results suggest that there is a proportion of pseudo-obstruction cases in which the ICC are markedly reduced. These results also demonstrate that, in these cases, loss of the kit immunoreactivity is correlated with the loss of CD34 staining: this indicates that both the ICC and the CD34-positive fibroblasts associated with the ICC are absent. These findings will allow surgical pathologists to identify this subpopulation of patients with CIIP

  10. Neutrino nucleus cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of our calculation which has been performed to study the nuclear effects in the quasielastic, inelastic and deep inelastic scattering of neutrinos(antineutrinos) from nuclear targets. These calculations are done in the local density approximation. We take into account the effect of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion, Coulomb effect, renormalization of weak transition strengths in the nuclear medium in the case of the quasielastic reaction. The inelastic reaction leading to production of pions is calculated in a $\\Delta $- dominance model taking into account the renormalization of $\\Delta$ properties in the nuclear medium and the final state interaction effects of the outgoing pions with the residual nucleus. We discuss the nuclear effects in the $F_{3}^{A}(x)$ structure function in the deep inelastic neutrino(antineutrino) reaction using a relativistic framework to describe the nucleon spectral function in the nucleus.

  11. Heavy flavor in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus: quenching, flow and correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, M; De Pace, A; Monteno, M; Prino, F

    2015-01-01

    We present recent results for heavy-flavor observables in nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies, obtained with the POWLANG transport setup. The initial creation of c-cbar and b-bbar pairs is simulated with a perturbative QCD approach (POWHEG+PYTHIA); their propagation in the medium (created in the nucleus-nucleus or in proton-nucleus collision) is studied with the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow parameter of the final D mesons both in nucleus-nucleus and in (for the first time, in the POWLANG setup) proton-nucleus collisions and compare our results to experimental data.

  12. Quantitation of viable Coxiella burnetii in milk using an integrated cell culture-polymerase chain reaction (ICC-PCR) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Diana; Shieh, Y-Carol; Tortorello, Mary; Kukreja, Ankush; Shazer, Arlette; Schlesser, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii has long been considered the most heat resistant pathogen in raw milk, making it the reference pathogen for determining pasteurisation conditions for milk products. New milk formulations and novel non-thermal processes require validation of effectiveness which requires a more practical method for analysis than using the currently used animal model for assessing Coxiella survival. Also, there is an interest in better characterising thermal inactivation of Coxiella in various milk formulations. To avoid the use of the guinea pig model for evaluating Coxiella survival, an Integrated Cell Culture-PCR (ICC-PCR) method was developed for determining Coxiella viability in milk. Vero cell cultures were directly infected from Coxiella-contaminated milk in duplicate 24-well plates. Viability of the Coxiella in milk was shown by a ≥ 0.5 log genome equivalent (ge)/ml increase in the quantity of IS111a gene from the baseline post-infection (day 0) level after 9-11 d propagation. Coxiella in skim, 2%, and whole milk, and half and half successfully infected Vero cells and increased in number by at least 2 logs using a 48-h infection period followed by 9-d propagation time. As few as 125 Coxiella ge/ml in whole milk was shown to infect and propagate at least 2 logs in the optimised ICC-PCR assay, though variable confirmation of propagation was shown for as low as 25 Coxiella ge/ml. Applicability of the ICC-PCR method was further proven in an MPN format to quantitate the number of viable Coxiella remaining in whole milk after 60 °C thermal treatment at 0, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min.

  13. Arcuate nucleus transcriptome profiling identifies ankyrin repeat and suppressor of cytokine signalling box-containing protein 4 as a gene regulated by fasting in central nervous system feeding circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J-Y; Kuick, R; Thompson, R C; Misek, D E; Lai, Y-M; Liu, Y-Q; Chai, B-X; Hanash, S M; Gantz, I

    2005-06-01

    The arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus is a primary site for sensing blood borne nutrients and hormonal messengers that reflect caloric status. To identify novel energy homeostatic genes, we examined RNA extracts from the microdissected arcuate nucleus of fed and 48-h fasted rats using oligonucleotide microarrays. The relative abundance of 118 mRNA transcripts was increased and 203 mRNA transcripts was decreased during fasting. One of the down-regulated mRNAs was ankyrin-repeat and suppressor of cytokine signalling box-containing protein 4 (Asb-4). The predicted structure of Asb-4 protein suggested that it might encode an intracellular regulatory protein, and therefore its mRNA expression was investigated further. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to validate down-regulation of Asb-4 mRNA in the arcuate nucleus of the fasted Sprague-Dawley rat (relative expression of Asb-4 mRNA: fed = 4.66 +/- 0.26; fasted = 3.96 +/- 0.23; n = 4, P regulation was also demonstrated in the obese fa/fa Zucker rat, another model of energy disequilibrium (relative expression of Asb-4 mRNA: lean Zucker = 3.91 +/- 0.32; fa/fa = 2.93 +/- 0.26; n = 5, P fasted state, the percentage of POMC neurones expressing Asb-4 mRNA drops to 73.2% (P fasted POMC neurone is markedly decreased. Conversely, expression of Asb-4 mRNA by NPY neurones in the fasted state is modestly increased to 52.7% (P < 0.05). Based on its differential expression, neuroanatomical distribution and colocalisation, we hypothesise that Asb-4 is a gene involved in energy homeostasis.

  14. 采用ICC-qPCR法分析渤海湾表层海水中的轮状病毒%ICC-qPCR Analysis on the infectious rotavirus in the surface seawater of Bohai Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    明红霞; 董玉波; 任莹利; 王林同; 朱琳

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is the major cause of severe gastroenteritis, especially for infants and children. Due to its long duration and low dose-response in the water environment, it is urgent to establish a rapid and effective method to quantify this pathogen. Molecular biological assays have overcome time-consuming, as well as insensitive disadvantages of traditional cell culture method. However, viral inlectivity can not be analyzed by this method. Therefore, integration of the cell culture techniques and the reverse transcription quantitative PCR (ICC-RT-qPCR) was introduced in 2010 and 2011 to identify the contamination by rotaviruses in winter seawater samples of Bohai Bay, Tianjin, China. 500-mL seawater was concentrated, cultivated for 48h, and then quantified by qPCR. ICC-qPCR revealed that 3 of 7 samples were positive for infectious rotavirus. The concentration of rotavirus was from 1.8×102 copies to 3.8×103 copies, and estimated at 1 to 39 PFU/L The result confirmed that ICC-qPCR in combination with the real-time PCR method not only reduced the detection duration, improved sensitivity, but also able to quantitate the rotavirus. Hence, it will become a practical tool for widespread studies on aquatic environmental monitoring for viral contamination.%轮状病毒是引起婴幼儿急性腹泻的重要病原体之一,在水环境中存活时间长,导致人类感染的剂量低,因此寻求一种快速高效的定量检测海水中的轮状病毒方法势在必行.传统的细胞培养技术不但耗时,而且灵敏度低,现代分子生物学技术虽然克服了上述缺点,但是其感染性的信息无从获得.因此,本文建立了细胞培养结合实时定量PCR (ICC-qPCR)的方法,并于2010年冬季对渤海湾天津近岸重点海域表层海水中具有感染性的轮状病毒进行了定量调查.500 mL海水经浓缩,4.8h细胞培养之后,用qPCR方法在7个海水样品中检测出3个样品具有感染性,其测定值范围为1.8×102 copies-3.8

  15. Nucleus-nucleus potential with shell-correction contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, V Yu

    2015-01-01

    The full relaxed-density potential between spherical nuclei is considered as a sum of the macroscopic and shell-correction contributions. The macroscopic part of the potential is related to a nucleus-nucleus potential obtained in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi approach with the Skyrme and Coulomb forces and the relaxed-density ansatz for evaluation of proton and neutron densities of interacting nuclei. A simple prescription for the shell-correction part of the total potential is discussed. The parameters of the shell-correction and macroscopic parts of the relaxed-density potential are found by fitting the empirical barrier heights of the 89 nucleus-nucleus systems as well as macroscopic potentials evaluated for 1485 nucleus-nucleus systems at 12 distances around touching points.

  16. Antineutron-nucleus annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Botta, E

    2001-01-01

    The n-nucleus annihilation process has been studied by the OBELIX experiment at the CERN Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in the (50-400) MeV/c projectile momentum range on C, Al, Cu, Ag, Sn, and Pb nuclear targets. A systematic survey of the annihilation cross- section, sigma /sub alpha /(A, p/sub n/), has been performed, obtaining information on its dependence on the target mass number and on the incoming n momentum. For the first time the mass number dependence of the (inclusive) final state composition of the process has been analyzed. Production of the rho vector meson has also been examined. (13 refs).

  17. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, H.; /Tufts U.; Garvey, G.; /Los Alamos; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  18. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  19. Source size determination in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, J.L.; Kumar, B.S.; Bennett, M.J.; Diebold, G.E.; Pope, J.K. (Yale University, A. W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8124 (United States)); Sorge, H.; Sullivan, J.P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1994-08-29

    We describe a technique whereby the freeze-out interaction volumes of nucleus-nucleus collisions are extracted from a cascade (plus coalescence) model, after comparison to measured abundances of light nuclei. We conclude that the interaction volume undergoes significant expansion before light nuclei are produced.

  20. Energy Provisions of the ICC-700, LEED for Homes, and ENERGY STAR Mapped to the 2009 IECC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, Michelle L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sullivan, Robin S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kora, Angela R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Makela, Eric J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Makela, Erin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-05-01

    This document provides the results of a comparison of building energy efficient elements of the ICC-700 National Green Building Standard, LEED for Homes, and ENERGY STAR versions 2, 2.5, and 3.0 to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (2009 IECC). This comparison will provide a tool for states and local municipalities as they consider adoption of these programs. The comparison is presented in a series of appendices. The first appendix provides a summary chart that visually represents the comprehensive comparison of the programs to the 2009 IECC topic areas. Next there are a series of individual tables (one appendix for each program) that include the specific program mapping to the 2009 IECC elements with comments that briefly discuss how well the elements mapped. Finally, a comprehensive table is included that shows all five of the programs mapped to the 2009 IECC elements to allow a detailed comparison.

  1. Recent results on (anti)nucleus and (anti)hyperon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN SPS energies

    CERN Document Server

    Melkumov, G L; Anticic, T; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Genchev, V; Georgopoulos, G; Grebieszkow, K; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kikola, D; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kliemant, M; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kornas, E; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Laszlo, A; Lacey, R; Van Leeuwen, M; Lvai, P; Litov, L; Lungwitz, B; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Mateev, M; Melkumov, G L; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczynski, S; Nicolic, V; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Petridis, A; Peryt, W; Pikna, M; Pluta, J; Prindle, D; Pühlhofer, F; Renfordt, R; Roland, C; Roland5, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Seyboth, P; Strabel, C; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpetery, I; Sziklai, J; Szuba, M; Szymanski, P; Trubnikov, V; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek11, A; Yoo, I K; Zimnyi, J; Wetzler, A

    2007-01-01

    The NA49 experiment has collected comprehensive data on particle production in nucleus-nucleus collisions over the whole SPS beam energies range, the critical energy domain where the expected phase transition to a deconfined phase is expected to occur. The latest results from Pb+Pb collisions between 20$A$ GeV and 158$A$ GeV on baryon stopping and light nuclei production as well as those for strange hyperons are presented. The measured data on $p$, $\\bar{p}$, $\\Lambda$, $\\bar{\\Lambda}$, $\\Xi^-$ and $\\bar{\\Xi}^+$ production were used to evaluate the rapidity distributions of net-baryons at SPS energies and to compare with the results from the AGS and the RHIC for central Pb+Pb (Au+Au) collisions. The dependence of the yield ratios and the inverse slope parameter of the $m_t$ spectra on the collision energy and centrality, and the mass number of the produced nuclei $^3He$, $t$, $d$ and $\\bar{d}$ are discussed within coalescence and statistical approaches. Analysis of the total multiplicity exhibits remarkable a...

  2. CASTOR: Centauro and strange object research in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelis, A.L.S.; Bartke, J.; Bogolyubsky, M.Yu.; Gadysz-Dziadus, E.; Kharlov, Yu.V.; Kurepin, A.B.; Maevskaya, A.I.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Sadovsky, S.A.; Stefanski, P.; Wodarczyk, Z

    2001-04-01

    We present a phenomenological model which describes the formation of a Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation region in nucleus-nucleus interactions in the upper atmosphere and at the LHC, and its decay to non-strange baryons and Strangelets. Strangelets are assimilated to the 'strongly penetrating component' frequently observed accompanying hadron-rich cosmic ray events. We describe the CASTOR subdetector for the ALICE experiment at the LHC. CASTOR will probe, in an event-by-event mode, the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6 {<=} {eta} {<=} 7.2 in 5.5 x A TeV central Pb + Pb collisions. It will look for events with pronounced imbalance between hadronic and photonic content and for deeply penetrating objects. We present results of simulations for the response of the CASTOR calorimeter to the passage of Strangelets.

  3. CASTOR Centauro And STrange Object Research in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wiodarczyk, Z

    2001-01-01

    We present a phenomenological model which describes the formation of a Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation region in nucleus-nucleus interactions in the upper atmosphere and at the LHC, and its decay to non-strange baryons and Strangelets. Strangelets are assimilated to the "strongly penetrating component" frequently observed accompanying hadron-rich cosmic ray events. We describe the CASTOR subdetector for the ALICE experiment at the LHC. CASTOR will probe, in an event-by-event mode, the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6< eta <7.2 in 5.5*A TeV central Pb+Pb collisions. It will look for events with pronounced imbalance between hadronic and photonic content and for deeply penetrating objects. We present results of simulations for the response of the CASTOR calorimeter to the passage of Strangelets. (15 refs).

  4. Study of Strange and Multistrange Particles in Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Vande vyvre, P; Feofilov, G; Snoeys, W; Hetland, K F; Campbell, M; Klempt, W

    2002-01-01

    % NA57\\\\ \\\\ The goal of the experiment is to study the production of strange and multi-strange particles in nucleus-nucleus collisions. This study was initiated at the OMEGA spectrometer, where three ion experiments have been performed: WA85 (S-W and p-W collisions at 200 A GeV/c), WA94 (S-S and p-S collisions at 200 A GeV/c) and WA97 (Pb-Pb, p-Pb and p-Be collisions at 160 A GeV/c).\\\\ \\\\ The experiment aims at extending the scope of WA97 by:\\\\ \\\\ - investigating the beam energy dependence of the enhancements of multi-strange particle production reported by the previous experiments, and by\\\\ \\\\\\\\ \\\\- measuring the yields of strange and multi-strange particles over an extended centrality range compared with the previous experiments.\\\\ \\\\ The apparatus consists mainly of silicon pixel detector planes.

  5. Caudal topographic nucleus isthmi and the rostral nontopographic nucleus isthmi in the turtle, Pseudemys scripta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno, M I; Ulinski, P S

    1987-07-15

    Isthmotectal projections in turtles were examined by making serial section reconstructions of axonal and dendritic arborizations that were anterogradely or retrogradely filled with HRP. Two prominent tectal-recipient isthmic nuclei--the caudal magnocellular nucleus isthmi (Imc) and the rostral magnocellular nucleus isthmi (Imr)--exhibited strikingly different patterns of organization. Imc cells have flattened, bipolar dendritic fields that cover a few percent of the area of the cell plate constituting the nucleus and they project topographically to the ipsilateral tectum without local axon branches. The topography was examined explicitly at the single-cell level by using cases with two injections at widely separated tectal loci. Each Imc axon terminates as a compact swarm of several thousand boutons placed mainly in the upper central gray and superficial gray layers. One Imc terminal spans less that 1% of the tectal surface. Imr cells, by contrast, have large, sparsely branched dendritic fields overlapped by local axon collaterals while distally, their axons nontopographically innervate not only the deeper layers of the ipsilateral tectum but also ipsilateral Imc. Imr receives a nontopographic tectal input that contrasts with the topographic tectal input to Imc. Previous work on nucleus isthmi emphasized the role of the contralateral isthmotectal projection (which originates from a third isthmic nucleus in turtles) in mediating binocular interactions in the tectum. The present results on the two different but overlapping ipsilateral tecto-isthmo-tectal circuits set up by Imc and Imr are discussed in the light of physiological evidence for selective attention effects and local-global interactions in the tectum.

  6. Heavy flavors in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardi Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step setup for heavy-flavor studies in high-energy nucleus-nucleus (AA and proton-nucleus (pA collisions is presented. The propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described in a framework provided by the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow parameter of the final Dmesons both in AA and in pA collisions and compare our results to experimental data.

  7. Heavy flavors in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Marzia

    2016-11-01

    A multi-step setup for heavy-flavor studies in high-energy nucleus-nucleus (AA) and proton-nucleus (pA) collisions is presented. The propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described in a framework provided by the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow parameter of the final Dmesons both in AA and in pA collisions and compare our results to experimental data.

  8. Charged pion anisotropy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poitou, J.; L' Hote, D.; Cavata, C.; Babinet, R.; Demoulins, M.; Fanet, H.; Gosset, J.; Lemaire, M.C.; Le Merdy, A.; Lucas, B.; Terrien, Y.; Valette, O. (CEN Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Alard, J.P.; Augerat, J.; Bastid, N.; Charmensat, P.; Dupieux, P.; Fraysse, L.; Marroncle, J.; Montarou, G.; Parizet, M.J.; Rahmani, A. (LPC Clermont-Ferrand, 63 - Aubiere (France)); Brochard, F.; Gorodetzky, P.; Racca, C. (CRN, 67 - Strasbourg (France))

    1992-01-27

    The momentum distributions with respect to the reaction plane for charged pions emitted in Ne-nucleus and Ar-nucleus collisions have been measured with the 4{pi} detector Diogene at the Saturne synchrotron. The reaction plane is estimated from the baryon momenta, using a standard technique for flow analysis. The pions exhibit a non-zero flow. For asymmetric systems, there is a preferential emission in the direction of the lighter (projectile) nucleus. Such a behaviour contradicts the predictions of INC calculations and is underestimated by QMD calculations which include mean field effects. It can be interpreted with a simple geometrical model in terms of absorption by the spectator nuclear matter. (orig.).

  9. The stellar population of the decoupled nucleus in M 31

    CERN Document Server

    Silchenko, O K; Vlasyuk, V V

    1998-01-01

    The results of a spectroscopic and photometric investigation of the central region of M 31 are presented. An analysis of absorption-index radial profiles involving magnesium, calcium, and iron lines has shown that the unresolved nucleus of M 31 is distinct by its increased metallicity; unexpectedly, among two nuclei of M 31, it is the faintest one located exactly in the dynamical center of the galaxy (and dynamically decoupled) which is chemically distinct. The Balmer absorption line H-beta has been included into the analysis to disentangle metallicity and age effects; an age difference by a factor 3 is detected between stellar populations of the nucleus and of the bulge, the nucleus being younger. The morphological analysis of CCD images has revealed the presence of a nuclear stellar-gaseous disk with a radius of some 100 pc, the gas component of which looks non-stationary, well inside the bulge of M 31.

  10. Quasielastic K-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Pace, A D; Oset, E

    1997-01-01

    Quasielastic K^+ - nucleus scattering data at q=290, 390 and 480 MeV/c are analyzed in a finite nucleus continuum random phase approximation framework, using a density-dependent particle-hole interaction. The reaction mechanism is consistently treated according to Glauber theory, keeping up to two-step inelastic processes. A good description of the data is achieved, also providing a useful constraint on the strength of the effective particle-hole interaction in the scalar-isoscalar channel at intermediate momentum transfers. We find no evidence for the increase in the effective number of nucleons participating in the reaction which has been reported in the literature.

  11. Nucleus pulposus atherectomy decompression and ozone nucleolysis combine lumbar traction in the treatment of central type lumbar disc herniation%髓核旋切臭氧牵引联合治疗腰椎间盘突出症

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏启超; 王建光; 耿海涛; 李海芳; 朱春阳; 贾艳玲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinic technique and effect of treating lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with decompressor and ozone injection combined lumbar traction after surgery.Methods 110 contained LDH patients were randomly divided into two group:decompressor and ozone group,decompressor and ozone combined lumbar traction after surgery group.Under the guidance of CT,fifty-five patients in group A were treated by disc decompression with Decompressor through poster olateral approach,then ozone was injected into the lumbar disc or out side the lumbar disc,and the other fifty-five patients in group B were treated by lumbar traction after surgery that disc decompression and ozone injection same as the group A in once a day and one week of treatment.The theraputic effect was evaluated by comparing VAS,effective rate of therapy before and after treatment.Results The VAS score of two groups at 1,3,7 days between pre-and post-treatment had singificantly different(t =2.159,2.163,2.169,2.167,2.173,2.192,all P <0.05).110 case were followed up after 6 and 12 months,The good-excellent rate of therapy in B group 12 months were better than those of A group (χ2 =74.23,75.11,all P<0.05).Conclusion Decompressor combined ozone injection and lumbar traction after surgery is an effective menthod for treatment of the central type mbar disc herniation.%目的 观察经皮穿刺髓核旋切减压与腰椎间盘臭氧注射联合术后牵引的综合治疗方案用于中央型腰椎间盘突出症的疗效.方法 110例腰椎间盘突出症患者随机分为两组,A组55例Decompressor髓核旋切器,采用经典的后外侧穿刺入路,行经皮髓核旋切腰椎间盘减压术,然后向腰椎间盘内、外注射臭氧;B组55例,在A组的治疗方案基础上,手术后当天开始行连续7d腰椎牵引.予以治疗前和治疗后VAS评分、评价两组疗效并随访观察.结果 两组治疗后1d、3d、7 d VAS评分与治疗前差异有统计学意义(t=2.159、2.163、2.169、2

  12. Fluctuations and correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions within transport approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konchakovski, Volodymyr P.

    2009-10-01

    The current thesis is devoted to a systematic study of fluctuations and correlations in heavy-ion collisions, which might be considered as probes for the phase transition and the critical point in the phase diagram, within the Hadron-String- Dynamics (HSD) microscopic transport approach. This is a powerful tool to study nucleus-nucleus collisions and allows to completely simulate experimental collisions on an event-by-event basis. Thus, the transport model has been used to study fluctuations and correlations including the influence of experimental acceptance as well as centrality, system size and collision energy. The comparison to experimental data can separate the effects induced by a phase transition since there is no phase transition in the HSD version used here. Firstly the centrality dependence of multiplicity fluctuations has been studied. Different centrality selections have been performed in the analysis in correspondence to the experimental situation. For the fixed target experiment NA49 events with fixed numbers of the projectile participants have been studied while in the collider experiment PHENIX centrality classes of events have been defined by the multiplicity in certain phase space region. A decrease of participant number fluctuations (and thus volume fluctuations) in more central collisions for both experiments has been obtained. Another area of this work addresses to transport model calculations of multiplicity fluctuations in nucleus-nucleus collisions as a function of colliding energy and system size. This study is in full correspondence to the experimental program of the NA61 Collaboration at the SPS. Central C+C, S+S, In+In, and Pb+Pb nuclear collisions at Elab = 10, 20, 30, 40, 80, 158 AGeV have been investigated. The expected enhanced fluctuations - attributed to the critical point and phase transition - can be observed experimentally on top of a monotonic and smooth 'hadronic background'. These findings should be helpful for the

  13. Degradable Starch Microspheres Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization (DSM-TACE) in Intrahepatic Cholangiocellular Carcinoma (ICC): Results from a National Multi-Center Study on Safety and Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicho, Andreas; Pereira, Philippe L.; Pützler, Manfred; Michalik, Katharina; Albrecht, Thomas; Nolte-Ernsting, Claus; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of DSM (degradable starch microspheres) as an embolic agent in transarterial chemoembolization in the treatment of intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma (ICC). Material/Methods This was a national, multi-center observational cohort study on the safety and efficacy of DSM-TACE using mitomycin, gemcitabine, cisplatin, doxorubicin, and carboplatin in palliative treatment of ICC. Recruitment period for the study was from January 2010 to June 2014. Primary endpoints were toxicity, safety, and response according to mRECIST criteria. Results Twenty-five DSM-TACE procedures in cases of advanced ICC were performed in seven patients. Nausea and vomiting occurred as adverse event (AE) in eight out of 25 treatments (32%), with seven of eight events (87.5%) associated with the use of gemcitabine. In 11 out of 25 treatments (44%) moderate, transient epigastric pain was registered as an adverse event (AE) within 24 hours of DSM-TACE. One case (1/25) of severe AE (4%) with thrombocytopenia led to discontinuation of the DSM-TACE-treatment. A total of 25 DSM-TACE procedures with complete clinical and imaging follow-up over a two-year-period were analyzed: objective response (OR) was achieved in three of 25 treatments (12%) Disease control (DC) was achieved in 44% (11/25) of treatments; progress was registered in 4% (1/25). Conclusions The use of DSM as an embolic agent for TACE is safe in the treatment of ICC. A standardized anti-emetic medication should be established, especially when using gemcitabine. Further prospective studies need to be conducted to find the most suitable, standardized DSM-TACE treatment regime. PMID:28192388

  14. Degradable Starch Microspheres Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization (DSM-TACE) in Intrahepatic Cholangiocellular Carcinoma (ICC): Results from a National Multi-Center Study on Safety and Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicho, Andreas; Pereira, Philippe L; Pützler, Manfred; Michalik, Katharina; Albrecht, Thomas; Nolte-Ernsting, Claus; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2017-02-13

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of DSM (degradable starch microspheres) as an embolic agent in transarterial chemoembolization in the treatment of intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma (ICC). MATERIAL AND METHODS This was a national, multi-center observational cohort study on the safety and efficacy of DSM-TACE using mitomycin, gemcitabine, cisplatin, doxorubicin, and carboplatin in palliative treatment of ICC. Recruitment period for the study was from January 2010 to June 2014. Primary endpoints were toxicity, safety, and response according to mRECIST criteria. RESULTS Twenty-five DSM-TACE procedures in cases of advanced ICC were performed in seven patients. Nausea and vomiting occurred as adverse event (AE) in eight out of 25 treatments (32%), with seven of eight events (87.5%) associated with the use of gemcitabine. In 11 out of 25 treatments (44%) moderate, transient epigastric pain was registered as an adverse event (AE) within 24 hours of DSM-TACE. One case (1/25) of severe AE (4%) with thrombocytopenia led to discontinuation of the DSM-TACE-treatment. A total of 25 DSM-TACE procedures with complete clinical and imaging follow-up over a two-year-period were analyzed: objective response (OR) was achieved in three of 25 treatments (12%) Disease control (DC) was achieved in 44% (11/25) of treatments; progress was registered in 4% (1/25). CONCLUSIONS The use of DSM as an embolic agent for TACE is safe in the treatment of ICC. A standardized anti-emetic medication should be established, especially when using gemcitabine. Further prospective studies need to be conducted to find the most suitable, standardized DSM-TACE treatment regime.

  15. Types and spontaneous Ca2+ waves of ICC in the bladder of guinea pig%豚鼠膀胱Cajal样间质细胞类型及其与钙离子振荡特性的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勤章; 李云飞; 丁国富; 范勇洪; 蔡志强

    2010-01-01

    Objective To discuss the types of ICC and characteristics of spontaneous Ca2+ waves of different types of ICC in the bladder of guinea pig. Methods Frozen-sections were made from the bladder of guinea pig and ICC were cultured in vitro. Cells were stained by indirect immunofluorescent method and detected by Laser scanning confocal microscope. The ICC cultured in vitro were divided randomly into 4 group: dimmer ICC,monomer ICC,dimmer ICC treated with 2-APB group and monomer ICC treated with 2-APB group according to the cell morphology and disrupted with 2-APB.The calcium concentration of ICC cultured in vitro were marked with Fluo-4 AM and disrupted by 2-aminoethoxydipheylbrate (2-APB, 100 μmol/L) in dimmer ICC treated with 2-APB group and monomer ICC treated with 2-APB group. The calcium oscillation function of ICC was observed under Laser scanning confocal microscope. Results For the monomer ICC and dimmer ICC in frozen sections and cultured in vitro,there were increased frequency (P<0.01) and amplitude (P<0.05) of spontaneous Ca2+ waves in dimmer ICC compared with the monomer monomer ICC. But after the cells disrupted by 2-APB after 15 min,There were decreased frequency (P<0.01) and amplitude (P<0.01) of spontaneous Ca2+ waves in the dimmer ICC treated with 2-ABP group compared with the dimmer ICC. The changes(P>0.05) of spontaneous Ca2+ waves was not statistical significance in monomer ICC treated with 2-ABP group compared with monomer ICC group. Conclusions The bladder of guinea pig may exist 2 different types of ICC, dimmer ICC and monomer ICC. The excitability of spontaneous Ca2+ waves of dimmer ICC could be higher than in monomer ICC. The special structure of dimmer ICC may contribute to the formation of high spontaneous Ca2+ waves.%目的 探讨豚鼠膀胱组织中Cajal样间质细胞(ICC)形态学类型特点及其与钙离子振荡特征的关系.方法 取豚鼠膀胱制作冰冻切片,体外培养膀胱ICC.免疫荧光染色激光共聚焦

  16. Heavy-ion nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, M A; Haque, S

    2003-01-01

    Heavy ion-nucleus scattering is an excellent laboratory to probe high spin phenomena, exotic nuclei and for the analysis of various exit channels. The Strong Absorption Model or the generalized diffraction models, which are semi-classical in nature, have been employed in the description of various heavy ion-nucleus scattering phenomena with reasonable success. But one needs to treat the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically in the Wave Mechanical picture for the appropriate description of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering phenomena. We have brought the mathematics for the cross-section of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering to an analytic expression taking account of the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically. sup 9 Be, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 2 sup 0 Ne and sup 3 sup 2 S heavy-ion beams elastic scattering from sup 2 sup 8 Si, sup 2 sup 4 Mg and sup 4 sup 0 Ca target nuclei at various projectile energies over the range 20-151 MeV have been analysed in terms of the 2-paramet...

  17. Immunohistochemical distribution of Calbindin D-28K immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of adult cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; LI Jin-lian; XIONG Kang-hui; LI Ji-shuo

    2002-01-01

    Objective: In order to get more information about the possible functions of Calbindin D-28K in the central nervous system of adult cat, the distribution of Calbindin D-28K in the central nervous system of adult cat was examined. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining techniques were used, and immunostained sections were observed under a light microscopy. Results: A high density of both immunoreactive perikarya and fibers were observed in the basal ganglia, amygdaloid complex, nucleus of the fields of Forel, subthalamic nucleus, paracentral nucleus, pulvinar nucleus, subthalamus, dorsal hypothalamic area, lateral hypothalamic area, anterior hypothalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, superior colliculus, inferior colliculus, oculomo-tor nucleus, superior olivary complex, marginal nucleus of the brachium conjunctivum, vestibular nuclei, the spinal trigeminal nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, cuneate nucleus, inferior olivary complex, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, the molecular layer of the cerebellum, the purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum and in the laminae Ⅱ of the spinal cord, whereas the dentate gyrus, the central medial nucleus of the thalamus, the paracentral and central lateral nucleus of the thalamus, the lateral dorsal nucleus of the thalamus,the ventrolateral complex of the thalamus, the medioventral nucleus of the thalamus, the posterior hypothalamic area, the dorsal hypothalamic area, the infundibular nucleus, the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus and the interfascicular nucleus had just a high density of immunoreactive perikarya, and no positive fibres were detected in these areas. Conclusion: The present results showed that Calbindin D-28K-like immunoreactivity was widely distributed throughout the central nervous system of adult cat and might play an important role in the activities of the neurons in the central nervous system of adult cat.

  18. Progress in research on ICCs in gastrointestinal tract and SCF/c-kit signal system%胃肠道Cajal间质细胞与干细胞因子/c-kit信号系统的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田姣

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), distributed throughout the whole gastrointestinal (GI) tract, are a special kind of mesenchymal cells. The special relationship among ICCs, enteric nervous system and smooth muscle contributes to the formation of the "neuron-ICC-smooth muscle" networks. Especially, ICC is the important coordinator in the network, and is closely related with the generation of intestinal slow waves. There is the signaling pathway which is activated by c-kit, a specific membrane receptor of ICC, binds to stem cell factor (SCF), a ligand for c-kit, and the pathway plays an important role in the development and maintenance of ICC. Therefore, through the investigation of the SCF/c-kit signaling pathway, it is expected to find a new therapy for ICCs associated gastrointestinal motility disorders.%胃肠道Cajal间质细胞(interstitial cells of Cajal,ICCs)是一类分布于消化道各个部位的特殊间质细胞,它和肠神经系统、平滑肌之间的特殊位置关系构成了“肠神经-ICCs-平滑肌细胞”的网络结构,其中ICCs是该网络重要的协调者,与肠道慢波的形成密切相关.胃肠道ICCs的特异性受体c-kit,与其配体干细胞因子(stem cell factors,SCF)结合后启动的信号途径,在ICCs的生长、发育及表型维持中起着重要作用.因此,从SCF/c-kit信号系统人手,有望拉开治疗ICCs相关性胃肠运动功能障碍性疾病的新序幕.

  19. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A., E-mail: amitabha-62@rediffmail.com; Sarkar, S. [University of North Bengal, Department of Physics (India); Singh, G. [SUNY at Fredonia, Department of Computer and Information Science (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from {sup 84}Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from {sup 28}Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  20. Transverse Energy in nucleus-nucleus collisions: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tincknell, M.

    1988-11-15

    The status of Transverse Energy (E/sub T/) in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS is reviewed. The definition of E/sub T/ and its physical significance are discussed. The basic techniques and limitations of the experimental measurements are presented. The acceptances of the major experiments to be discussed are shown, along with remarks about their idiosyncrasies. The data demonstrate that the nuclear geometry of colliding spheres primarily determines the shapes of the observed spectra. Careful account of the acceptances is crucial to comparing and interpreting results. It is concluded that nuclear stopping power is high, and that the amount of energy deposited into the interaction volume is increasing with beam energy even at SPS energies. The energy densities believed to be obtained at the SPS are close to the critical values predicted for the onset of a quark-gluon plasma. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  1. In vivo evidence for a controlled offset of melatonin synthesis at dawn by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perreau-Lenz, S; Kalsbeek, A.; Vliet, J. van der; Pevet, P.; Buijs, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    The daily rhythm of melatonin synthesis in the rat pineal gland is controlled by the central biological clock, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), via a multi-synaptic pathway involving, successively, neurones of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), sympathetic preganglio

  2. Neuropeptide Y infusion into the shell region of the rat nucleus accumbens increases extracellular levels of dopamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Wegener, Gregers; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen;

    2009-01-01

    Increases in extracellular dopamine in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens are centrally involved in mediating reinforcement of addictive drugs. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its receptors are present in the nucleus accumbens and have been implicated in addiction mechanisms. This study further...

  3. Atom as a "Dressed" Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Kalitvianski, V

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that electrostatic potential of atomic nucleus seen by a fast charged projectile at short distances is quite smeared due to nucleus motion around the atomic center of inertia. For example, the size of positive charge cloud in the Hydrogen ground state is much larger than the proper proton size. It is even bigger for the target atom in an excited state. Therefore the elastic scattering at large angles is generally weaker than the Rutherford one. In other words, the resulting elastic interaction with an atom at short distances is softer than the Colombian one due to a natural cutoff. In addition, the large angle scattering leads to the target atom excitations due to hitting the nucleus (inelastic processes). It is also shown that the Rutherford cross section is in fact the inclusive rather than the elastic one. These results are analogous to the QED ones. The difference and the value of the presented below non relativistic atomic calculations is in non perturbatively (exact) dressing that immediatel...

  4. Age-related structural and functional changes in the cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, Robert D; Walton, Joseph P

    2006-01-01

    Presbycusis - age-related hearing loss - is a key communication disorder and chronic medical condition of our aged population. The cochlear nucleus is the major site of projections from the auditory portion of the inner ear. Relative to other levels of the peripheral and central auditory systems, relatively few studies have been conducted examining age-related changes in the cochlear nucleus. The neurophysiological investigations suggest declines in glycine-mediated inhibition, reflected in increased firing rates in cochlear nucleus neurons from old animals relative to young adults. Biochemical investigations of glycine inhibition in the cochlear nucleus are consistent with the functional aging declines of this inhibitory neurotransmitter system that affect complex sound processing. Anatomical reductions in neurons of the cochlear nucleus and their output pathways can occur due to aging changes in the brain, as well as due to age-dependent plasticity of the cochlear nucleus in response to the age-related loss of inputs from the cochlea, particularly from the basal, high-frequency regions. Novel preventative and curative biomedical interventions in the future aimed at alleviating the hearing loss that comes with age, will likely emanate from increasing our knowledge and understanding of its neural and molecular bases. To the extent that this sensory deficit resides in the central auditory system, including the cochlear nucleus, future neural therapies will be able to improve hearing in the elderly.

  5. ALC 2013, , (Decision on the consequences of non-disclosure of exculpatory materials covered by Article 54(3)(e) agreements and the application to stay the prosecution of the accused, together with certain other issues raised at the Status Conference on 10 June 2008, Prosecutor v. Lubanga: case no. ICC-01/04-01/)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Vriend

    2008-01-01

    Also comment to: ICC (P.T.Ch. I). (2008, June 20), (Decision on Article 54(3)(e) Documents Identified as Potentially Exculpatory or Otherwise Material to the Defence’s Preparation for the Confirmation Hearing, Prosecutor v. Katanga and Ngudjolo Chui: case no. ICC-01/04-01/07); and to: ICC (P.T.Ch. I

  6. Formation and identification of Centauro and Strangelets in nucleus- nucleus collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z

    1999-01-01

    We present a phenomenological model for the formation and decay of a cosmic ray Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation rapidity region in nucleus-nucleus interactions. Our model naturally incorporates the $9 possibility of strangelet formation, Strangelets being conjectured to be the "strongly penetrating component" observed in hadron-rich cosmic ray events. Based on this model we have performed Monte-Carlo simulations to study the $9 Centauro and strangelet dynamic and kinematic characteristics in central Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energies, as well as their identification by the detector system CASTOR. CASTOR is being developed for the ALICE heavy ion experiment at $9 the LHC and will probe the very forward pseudorapidity region 5.6

  7. Formation and identification of Centauro and strangelets in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelis, A.L.S.; Bartke, J.; Bogolyubsky, M.Yu.; Filippov, S.N.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Kharlov, Yu.V.; Kurepin, A.B.; Maevskaya, A.I.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Sadovsky, S.A.; Stefanski, P.; Wlodarczyk, Z

    1999-03-01

    We present a phenomenological model for the formation and decay of a cosmic ray Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation rapidity region in nucleus-nucleus interactions. Our model naturally incorporates the possibility of Strangelet formation, Strangelets being conjectured to be the 'strongly penetrating component' observed in hadron-rich cosmic ray events. Based on this model we have performed Monte-Carlo simulations to study the Centauro and Strangelet dynamic and kinematic characteristics in central Pb + Pb collisions at LHC energies, as well as their identification by the detector system CASTOR. CASTOR is being developed for the ALICE heavy ion experiment at the LHC and will probe the very forward pseudorapidity region 5.6 {<=} {eta} {<=} 7.2, characterized by very high baryon density. CASTOR is optimised to search for Centauro signatures and long penetrating objects. Simulations show that CASTOR is well able to distinguish events with abnormal values of E{sub em}/E{sub had} or N{sub {gamma}}/N{sub ch}. In addition simulations of the transition curves of Strangelets traversing the CASTOR calorimeter show long penetration and many-maxima structure such as observed in cosmic ray events.

  8. Charm quarks as a probe of matter produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yasir

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Direct measurement of hadrons containing charm quark carries important information about the initial stage of the nucleus-nucleus collision at relativistic energies. The study of open charm in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS energies will be a powerful tool to investigate the production of heavy flavours and their interaction with the medium produced in such collisions. A feasibility study was initiated for the measurement of the D0 mesons (open charm by its two-body decay into pion and kaon in central Pb-Pb collision at SPS energies in NA61/SHINE experiment. To generate the physical input we used AMPT (A Multi Phase Transport Model event generator and employed GEANT4 application to describe particle transport through the NA61/SHINE experimental setup supplemented by a future vertex detector (VD that will allow for precise vertex reconstruction close to the primary interaction point. The results of the simulation shows that this measurement is feasible with a dedicated VD which allows the precise tracking close to the target.

  9. Statistical Model of the Early Stage of nucleus-nucleus collisions with exact strangeness conservation

    CERN Document Server

    Poberezhnyuk, R V; Gorenstein, M I

    2015-01-01

    The Statistical Model of the Early Stage, SMES, describes a transition between confined and deconfined phases of strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The model was formulated in the late 1990s for central Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS energies. It predicted several signals of the transition (onset of deconfinement) which were later observed by the NA49 experiment. The grand canonical ensemble was used to calculate entropy and strangeness production. This approximation is valid for reactions with mean multiplicities of particles carrying conserved charges being significantly larger than one. Recent results of NA61/SHINE on hadron production in inelastic p+p interactions suggest that the deconfinement may also take place in these reactions. However, in this case mean multiplicity of particles with non-zero strange charge is smaller than one. Thus for the modeling of p+p interactions the exact strangeness conservation has to be implemented in the SMES. This extension of the SMES ...

  10. ARGININE VASOPRESSIN GENE EXPRESSION IN SUPRAOPTIC NUCLEUS AND PARAVENTRICULAR NUCLEUS OF HYPOTHALAMOUS FOLLOWING CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA AND REPERFUSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Background. Our previous studies indicated that the increased arginine vasopressin(AVP) in ischemic brain regions of gerbils could exacerbate the ischemic brain edema. This experiments is further clarify the relation between AVP and cerebral ischemia at the molecular level. Methods. The contents of AVP, AVP mRNA, AVP immunoreactive(ir) neurons in supraoptic nucleus(SON)and paraventricular nucleus(PVN) after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion were respectively determined by radioim-munoassay(RIA), immunocytochemistry( Ⅱ C), situ hybridization and computed image pattem analysis. Results. The contents of AVP in SON, PVN were increased, and the AVP ir positive neurons in SON and PVN were also significantly increased as compared with the controls after ischemia and reperfusion. And there were very light staining of AVP ir positive neurons in the other brain areas such as suprachiasmatic nucleus (SC) and periven-tricular hypothalamic nucleus (PE), but these have no significant changes as compared with the controls. During dif-ferent periods of cerebral ischemia (30~ 120 min) and reperfusion (30 min), AVP mRNA expression in SON and PVN were more markedly increased than the controls. Condusions. The transcription of AVP gene elevated, then promoting synthesis and release of AVP in SON,PVN. Under the specific condition of cerebral ischemia and repeffusion, the activity and contents of central AVP in-creased abnormally is one of the important factors which causes ischemia brain damage.

  11. Resonances in -light nucleus systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Khemchandani; N G Kelkar; M Nowakowski; B K Jain

    2006-04-01

    We locate resonances in -light nucleus elastic scattering using the time delay method. We solve few-body equations within the finite rank approximation in order to calculate the -matrices and hence the time delay for the - 3He and - 4He systems. We find a resonance very close to the threshold in - 3 He elastic scattering, at about 0.5 MeV above threshold with a width of ∼ 2 MeV. The calculations also hint at the presence of sub-threshold states in both the cases.

  12. Turbulent mixing condensation nucleus counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavliev, Rashid

    The construction and operating principles of the Turbulent Mixing Condensation Nucleus Counter (TM CNC) are described. Estimations based on the semiempirical theory of turbulent jets and the classical theory of nucleation and growth show the possibility of detecting particles as small as 2.5 nm without the interference of homogeneous nucleation. This conclusion was confirmed experimentally during the International Workshop on Intercomparison of Condensation Nuclei and Aerosol Particle Counters (Vienna, Austria). Number concentration, measured by the Turbulent Mixing CNC and other participating instruments, is found to be essentially equal.

  13. Structures and functions in the crowded nucleus: new biophysical insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald eHancock

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Concepts and methods from the physical sciences have catalysed remarkable progress in understanding the cell nucleus in recent years. To share this excitement with physicists and encourage their interest in this field, this review offers an overview of how the physics which underlies structures and functions in the nucleus is becoming more clear thanks to methods which have been developed to simulate and study macromolecules, polymers, and colloids. The environment in the nucleus is very crowded with macromolecules, making entropic (depletion forces major determinants of interactions. Simulation and experiments are consistent with their key role in forming membraneless compartments such as nucleoli, PML and Cajal bodies, and discrete territories for chromosomes. The chromosomes, giant linear polyelectrolyte polymers, exist in vivo in a state like a polymer melt. Looped conformations are predicted in crowded conditions, and have been confirmed experimentally and are central to the regulation of gene expression. Polymer theory has revealed how the chromosomes are so highly compacted in the nucleus, forming a crumpled globule with fractal properties which avoids knots and entanglements in DNA while allowing facile accessibility for its replication and transcription. Entropic repulsion between looped polymers can explain the confinement of each chromosome to a discrete region of the nucleus. Crowding and looping are predicted to facilitate finding the specific targets of factors which modulate activities of DNA. Simulation shows that entropic effects contribute to finding and repairing potentially lethal double-strand breaks in DNA by increasing the mobility of the broken ends, favouring their juxtaposition for repair. Signaling pathways are strongly influenced by crowding, which favours a processive mode of response (consecutive reactions without releasing substrates. This new information contributes to understanding the sometimes counter

  14. Structures and functions in the crowded nucleus: new biophysical insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Concepts and methods from the physical sciences have catalysed remarkable progress in understanding the cell nucleus in recent years. To share this excitement with physicists and encourage their interest in this field, this review offers an overview of how the physics which underlies structures and functions in the nucleus is becoming more clear thanks to methods which have been developed to simulate and study macromolecules, polymers, and colloids. The environment in the nucleus is very crowded with macromolecules, making entropic (depletion) forces major determinants of interactions. Simulation and experiments are consistent with their key role in forming membraneless compartments such as nucleoli, PML and Cajal bodies, and discrete "territories" for chromosomes. The chromosomes, giant linear polyelectrolyte polymers, exist in vivo in a state like a polymer melt. Looped conformations are predicted in crowded conditions, and have been confirmed experimentally and are central to the regulation of gene expression. Polymer theory has revealed how the chromosomes are so highly compacted in the nucleus, forming a "crumpled globule" with fractal properties which avoids knots and entanglements in DNA while allowing facile accessibility for its replication and transcription. Entropic repulsion between looped polymers can explain the confinement of each chromosome to a discrete region of the nucleus. Crowding and looping are predicted to facilitate finding the specific targets of factors which modulate activities of DNA. Simulation shows that entropic effects contribute to finding and repairing potentially lethal double-strand breaks in DNA by increasing the mobility of the broken ends, favouring their juxtaposition for repair. Signaling pathways are strongly influenced by crowding, which favours a processive mode of response (consecutive reactions without releasing substrates). This new information contributes to understanding the sometimes counter-intuitive consequences.

  15. On Recognition and Enforcement of Arbitral Award Made in China by ICC%ICC在中国作出裁决的承认与执行问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任彦

    2011-01-01

    According to the 1958 New York Convention and the theory of arbitration place, the arbutral award made in China by ICC is a non-domestic award. However, because of the closed arbitral market and the reservation we have made when we joined the New York Convention, the arbitral award made in China by ICC faces lots of problems. ,Only the opened arbitral market, a corrected way of explanation and the amendment of the law at home can make the arbitrall award be recognized and enforced.%事人选择ICC在中国仲裁所作出的裁决根据《纽约公约》的规定以及“仲裁地”理论,应为“非内国裁决”。由于我国尚未开放的仲裁市场以及我国加入《纽约公约》时的保留,此类裁决面临着现实的法律障碍。开放仲裁市场、运用目的解释《纽约公约》下的义务以及修改我国国内法能够最终使ICC在中国作出之判决得到承认与执行。

  16. Determination of Coil Inductances Cylindrical Iron Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeddine Mazouz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the investigation and development of a structure and performance characteristics of a coil iron nucleus cylindrical (C.I.N.C. The coil iron nucleus cylindrical is a nonlinear electro radio in which the moving of the nucleus in a sense or in other causes change in inductance and can reach extreme values at the superposition of nucleus and coil centers. The variation of the inductance and the degree of freedom of movement of the nucleus can lead to a device with electromechanical conversion The aim of this paper is the determination and visualization of self inductance and mutual of the (C.I.N.C based on geometric dimensions and the displacement of the nucleus.  

  17. Formation of Centauro and Strangelets in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the LHC and their Identification by the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z

    1999-01-01

    Presentation made at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference, ICRC'99We present a phenomenological model which describes the formation of a Centauro fireball in nucleus-nucleus interactions in the upper atmosphere and at the LHC, and its decay to non-strange baryons and Strangelets. We describe the CASTOR detector for the ALICE experiment at the LHC. CASTOR will probe, in an event-by-event mode, the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6eta7.2 in 5.5xA TeV central Pb+Pb collisions. We present results of simulations for the response of the CASTOR calorimeter and, in particular, to the transversal of Strangelets.

  18. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, John H.; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St. John, Peter C.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bales, Benjamin B.; Doyle, Francis J.; Herzog, Erik D.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2016-04-04

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure.

  19. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, John H; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St John, Peter C; Wang, Thomas J; Bales, Benjamin B; Doyle, Francis J; Herzog, Erik D; Petzold, Linda R

    2016-04-19

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure.

  20. Squish and squeeze-the nucleus as a physical barrier during migration in confined environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Alexandra Lynn; Hsia, Chieh-Ren; Lammerding, Jan

    2016-06-01

    From embryonic development to cancer metastasis, cell migration plays a central role in health and disease. It is increasingly becoming apparent that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3-D) environments exhibit some striking differences compared with their well-established 2-D counterparts. One key finding is the significant role the nucleus plays during 3-D migration: when cells move in confined spaces, the cell body and nucleus must deform to squeeze through available spaces, and the deformability of the large and relatively rigid nucleus can become rate-limiting. In this review, we highlight recent findings regarding the role of nuclear mechanics in 3-D migration, including factors that govern nuclear deformability, and emerging mechanisms by which cells apply cytoskeletal forces to the nucleus to facilitate nuclear translocation. Intriguingly, the 'physical barrier' imposed by the nucleus also impacts cytoplasmic dynamics that affect cell migration and signaling, and changes in nuclear structure resulting from the mechanical forces acting on the nucleus during 3-D migration could further alter cellular function. These findings have broad relevance to the migration of both normal and cancerous cells inside living tissues, and motivate further research into the molecular details by which cells move their nuclei, as well as the consequences of the mechanical stress on the nucleus.

  1. The exosome and RNA quality control in the nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Vanacova, Stepanka; Stef, Richard

    2007-01-01

    To control the quality of RNA biogenesis in the nucleus, cells use sophisticated molecular machines. These machines recognize and degrade not only RNA trimmings—the leftovers of RNA processing—but also incorrectly processed RNAs that contain defects. By using this mechanism, cells ensure that only high-quality RNAs are engaged in protein synthesis and other cellular processes. The exosome—a complex of several exoribonucleolytic and RNA-binding proteins—is the central 3′-end RNA degradation an...

  2. Crossing axons in the third nerve nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienfang, D C

    1975-12-01

    The research presented in this paper studied the pathway taken by the crossed fibers of the third nerve nucleus in an animal whose nucleus has been well mapped and found to correlate well with higher mammals and man. Autoradiography using tritiated amino acid labeled the cell bodies an axons of the left side of the oculomotor nucleus of the cat. Axons so labeled could be seen emerging from the ventral portion of the left nucleus through the median longitudinal fasciculus (mlf) to join the left oculomotor nerve. Labeled axons were also seen to emerge from the medial border of the caudal left nucleus, cross the midline, and pass through the right nucleus and the right mlf to join the right oculomotor nerve. These latter axons must be the crossed axons of the superior rectus and levator palpebrae subnuclei. Since the path of these crossed axons is through the caudal portion of the nucleus of the opposite side, the destruction of one lateral half of the oculomotor nucleus would result in a bilateral palsy of the crossed subnuclei. Bilateral palsy of the superior rectus and bilateral assymetrical palsy of the levator palpebrae muscles would result.

  3. System-size dependence of strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=17.3 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Alt, C; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, Jerzy; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, A; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Farantatos, G; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P Y; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Grebieszkow, K; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kliemant, M; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Kornas, E; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, Peter; Litov, L; Lungwitz, B; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Markert, C; Mateev, M; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Meurer, C; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczynski, S; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Pühlhofer, F; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R E; Richard, A; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Trainor, T A; Trubnikov, V; Varga, D; Vassiliou, Maria; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wetzler, A; Wlodarczyk, Z; Yoo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J

    2004-01-01

    Emission of pi, K, phi and Lambda was measured in near-central C+C and Si+Si collisions at 158 AGeV beam energy. Together with earlier data for p+p, S+S and Pb+Pb, the system-size dependence of relative strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions is obtained. Its fast rise and the saturation observed at about 60 participating nucleons can be understood as onset of the formation of coherent partonic subsystems of increasing size.

  4. System-size dependence of strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 17.3 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Alt, C; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, A; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Farantatos, G; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Grebieszkow, K; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kliemant, M; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Kornas, E; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, Peter; Litov, L; Lungwitz, B; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Markert, C; Mateev, M; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Meurer, C; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczynski, S; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Pühlhofer, F; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R; Richard, A; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Trainor, T A; Trubnikov, V; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wetzler, A; Wlodarczyk, Z; Yoo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J

    2005-01-01

    Emission of pi plus or minus , K plus or minus , phi, and Lambda was measured in near-central C + C and Si + Si collisions at 158 AGeV beam energy. Together with earlier data for p + p, S + S, and Pb + Pb, the system-size dependence of relative strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions is obtained. Its fast rise and the saturation observed at about 60 participating nucleons can be understood as the onset of the formation of coherent systems of increasing size. copy 2005 The American Physical Society.

  5. Behavior of Charge Fluctuations in Relativistic Nucleus-nucleus Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SA; Ben-hao; TAI; An

    2002-01-01

    Using a hadron and string cascade model JPCIAE, we have investigated the dependence ofevent-by-event charge fluctuations on (pseudo)rapidity window size, final state interaction, resonancedecay, centrality, and reaction energy for Pb + Pb collisions at SPS and LHC energies and for Au + Aucollisions at RHIC energies. The JPCIAE results of the charge fluctuations as a function of rapidity

  6. Exclusive glueball production in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, M V T

    2010-01-01

    The cross sections for the glueball candidates production in quasi-real photon-photon collisions and on central diffraction processes, i.e. double Pomeron exchange, in heavy ion interactions at RHIC and LHC are computed. The rates for these distinct production channels are compared and they may be a fruitful approach to the investigation of glueballs.

  7. Integration of sensory quanta in cuneate nucleus neurons in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Bengtsson

    Full Text Available Discriminative touch relies on afferent information carried to the central nervous system by action potentials (spikes in ensembles of primary afferents bundled in peripheral nerves. These sensory quanta are first processed by the cuneate nucleus before the afferent information is transmitted to brain networks serving specific perceptual and sensorimotor functions. Here we report data on the integration of primary afferent synaptic inputs obtained with in vivo whole cell patch clamp recordings from the neurons of this nucleus. We find that the synaptic integration in individual cuneate neurons is dominated by 4-8 primary afferent inputs with large synaptic weights. In a simulation we show that the arrangement with a low number of primary afferent inputs can maximize transfer over the cuneate nucleus of information encoded in the spatiotemporal patterns of spikes generated when a human fingertip contact objects. Hence, the observed distributions of synaptic weights support high fidelity transfer of signals from ensembles of tactile afferents. Various anatomical estimates suggest that a cuneate neuron may receive hundreds of primary afferents rather than 4-8. Therefore, we discuss the possibility that adaptation of synaptic weight distribution, possibly involving silent synapses, may function to maximize information transfer in somatosensory pathways.

  8. 体外培养的豚鼠阴茎海绵体ICC表达nNOS的实验研究%Study on expression of nNOS in cultured ICC of guinea pig corpus cavernosum.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宇卫; 王江平; 丁国富; 王勤章

    2012-01-01

    目的 探索成年豚鼠阴茎海绵体中Cajal间质细胞(ICC)的分离、培养和鉴定方法以及神经型一氧化氮合酶(nNOS)的表达情况.方法 ①取豚鼠阴茎海绵体组织,采用酶消化法分离细胞,差速帖壁法纯化ICC,将细胞接种于DMEM培养基中培养,48 h后进行c-kit特异性抗体免疫荧光染色法鉴定ICC并用c-kit/nNOS特异性抗体免疫荧光双重染色法观察nNOS的表达情况.结果 培养24 h后细胞帖壁良好,倒置显微镜下显示ICC呈纺锤形,有两个或多个长的突起,48 h后细胞形态趋于稳定,免疫荧光染色可见ICC呈c-kit抗体染色阳性,c-kit/nNOS特异性抗体免疫荧光双重染色显示培养的ICC表达nNOS.结论 用混合酶消化法可以成功分离和培养出豚鼠阴茎海绵体ICC,豚鼠阴茎海绵体ICC可能参与一氧化氮(NO)的分泌和传导,在阴茎勃起中发挥重要作用.%Objective To explore the method for isolation, culture and identification of interstitial cells of Cajal ( ICC ) from corpus cavernosum of guinea pigs and to observe the expression of nJNOS in ICCs. Methods (1)The corporal tissue was obtained from adult guinea pig. These ICCs were isolated by enzyme digestion and purified through differential attachment technique, then cell suspensions were inoculated onto culture dishes and cultured in DMEM medium. After 48 hours, these cells were identified by using c - kit of immunofluorescence staining and the expression of nJNOS in ICCs was observed by c - kit and nJNOS immunofluorescence double staining. Results ICCs adhered well after cultured for 24 hours, and ICCs were spindle - shaped with two or more long processes under phase contrast microscopy. The morphological features of ICCs were stabilized, immunofluorescence staining showed these cultured cells were c -kit positive, and c -kit and nJNOS immunofluorescence double staining showed these c - kit positive cells were nJNOS positive. Conclusion Enzyme digestion method can

  9. Indications for the onset of deconfinement in nucleus nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Flierl, D; Anticic, T; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Betev, L; Białkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, A; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gładysz, E; Grebieszkow, K; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kliemant, M; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Kornas, E; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, P; Litov, L; Lungwitz, B; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Markert, C; Mateev, M; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Meurer, C; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczynski, S; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Pühlhofer, F; Reid, J.G; Renfordt, R; Richard, A; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitar, B; Skrzypczak, E; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Trainor, T A; Trubnikov, V; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wetzler, A; Włodarczyk, Z; Yoo,I K; Zaranek, J; Zimanyi, J

    2005-01-01

    The hadronic final state of central Pb+Pb collisions at 20, 30, 40, 80, and 158 AGeV has been measured by the CERN NA49 collaboration. The mean transverse mass of pions and kaons at midrapidity stays nearly constant in this energy range, whereas at lower energies, at the AGS, a steep increase with beam energy was measured. Compared to p+p collisions as well as to model calculations, anomalies in the energy dependence of pion and kaon production at lower SPS energies are observed. These findings can be explained, assuming that the energy density reached in central A+A collisions at lower SPS energies is sufficient to force the hot and dense nuclear matter into a deconfined phase.

  10. Neuropeptide Y activates urocortin 1 neurons in the nonpreganglionic Edinger-Westphal nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaszner, B.; Korosi, A.; Palkovits, M.; Roubos, E.W.; Kozicz, L.T.

    2007-01-01

    Central regulatory pathways promoting stress adaptation utilize various neurotransmitters/neuropeptides, such as urocortin 1 (Ucn1) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Ucn1 is abundantly expressed in the nonpreganglionic Edinger-Westphal nucleus (npEW), where it is codistributed with NPY-immunoreactive (ir) t

  11. Neuronal Correlates of Fear Conditioning in the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haufler, Darrell; Nagy, Frank Z.; Pare, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Lesion and inactivation studies indicate that the central amygdala (CeA) participates in the expression of cued and contextual fear, whereas the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is only involved in the latter. The basis for this functional dissociation is unclear because CeA and BNST form similar connections with the amygdala and…

  12. Decreased MT1 melatonin receptor expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.H.; Zhou, J.N.; Heerikhuize, J. van; Jockers, R.; Swaab, D.F.

    2006-01-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin is involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms and feeds back to the central biological clock, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) via melatonin receptors. Supplementary melatonin is considered to be a potential treatment for aging and Alzheimer's disease

  13. Formation of the avian nucleus magnocellularis from the auditory anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Susan J; Rubel, Edwin W; Nishi, Rae

    2006-10-01

    In the avian auditory system, the neural network for computing the localization of sound in space begins with bilateral innervation of nucleus laminaris (NL) by nucleus magnocellularis (NM) neurons. We used antibodies against the neural specific markers Hu C/D, neurofilament, and SV2 together with retrograde fluorescent dextran labeling from the contralateral hindbrain to identify NM neurons within the anlage and follow their development. NM neurons could be identified by retrograde labeling as early as embryonic day (E) 6. While the auditory anlage organized itself into NM and NL in a rostral-to-caudal fashion between E6 and E8, labeled NM neurons were visible throughout the extent of the anlage at E6. By observing the pattern of neuronal rearrangements together with the pattern of contralaterally projecting NM fibers, we could identify NL in the ventral anlage. Ipsilateral NM fibers contacted the developing NL at E8, well after NM collaterals had projected contralaterally. Furthermore, the formation of ipsilateral connections between NM and NL neurons appeared to coincide with the arrival of VIIIth nerve fibers in NM. By E10, immunoreactivity for SV2 was heavily concentrated in the dorsal and ventral neuropils of NL. Thus, extensive pathfinding and morphological rearrangement of central auditory nuclei occurs well before the arrival of cochlear afferents. Our results suggest that NM neurons may play a central role in formation of tonotopic connections in the auditory system.

  14. Study of Hadron Production in Hadron-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    Selyuzhenkov, I; Klochkov, V; Kowalski, S; Kaptur, E A; Kowalik, K L; Dominik, W M; Krasnoperov, A; Feofilov, G; Vinogradov, L; Kovalenko, V; Johnson, S R; Mills, G B; Planeta, R J; Rubbia, A; Marton, K; Messerly, B A; Puzovic, J; Bogomilov, M V; Bravar, A; Sgalaberna, D; Renfordt, R A E; Deveaux, M; Engel, R R; Grzeszczuk, A; Davis, N; Kuich, M; Lyubushkin, V; Kondratev, V; Kadija, K; Diakonos, F; Slodkowski, M A; Rauch, W H; Pistillo, C; Laszlo, A; Nakadaira, T; Hasegawa, T; Sadovskiy, A; Morozov, S; Petukhov, O; Szuba, M K; Mathes, H; Herve, A E; Roehrich, D; Marino, A D; Grebieszkow, K; Wlodarczyk, Z; Rybczynski, M A; Wojtaszek-szwarc, A; Nirkko, M C; Sakashita, K; Golubeva, M; Kurepin, A; Manic, D; Kolev, D I; Kisiel, J E; Rondio, E; Larsen, D T; Czopowicz, T R; Seyboth, P; Turko, L; Guber, F; Marin, V; Busygina, O; Taranenko, A; Cirkovic, M; Gazdzicki, M; Roth, M A; Pulawski, S M; Aduszkiewicz, A M; Bunyatov, S; Vechernin, V; Nagai, Y; Anticic, T; Dynowski, K M; Mackowiak-pawlowska, M K; Stefanek, G; Pavin, M; Fodor, Z P; Nishikawa, K; Tada, M; Kobayashi, T; Blondel, A P P; Damyanova, A; Stroebele, H W; Posiadala, M Z; Kolesnikov, V; Andronov, E; Zimmerman, E D; Antoniou, N; Majka, Z; Di luise, S; Veberic, D; Dumarchez, J; Naskret, M; Ivashkin, A; Tsenov, R V; Koziel, M G; Schmidt, K J; Melkumov, G; Popov, B; Panagiotou, A; Richter-was, E M; Ereditato, A; Paolone, V; Unger, M T; Wilczek, A G; Stepaniak, J M; Matulewicz, T N; Seryakov, A; Susa, T; Staszel, P P; Brzychczyk, J; Maksiak, B; Tefelski, D B; Kucewicz, W; Dorosz, P A

    2007-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE (SHINE = SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) experiment is a large acceptance hadron spectrometer at the CERN SPS for the study of the hadronic final states produced in interactions of various beam particles (pions, protons, C, S and In) with a variety of fixed targets at the SPS energies. The main components of the current detector were constructed and used by the NA49 experiment. The physics program of NA61/SHINE consists of three main subjects. In the first stage of data taking (2007-2009) measurements of hadron production in hadron-nucleus interactions needed for neutrino (T2K) and cosmic-ray (Pierre Auger and KASCADE) experiments will be performed. In the second stage (2009-2011) hadron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus interactions needed as reference data for a better understanding of nucleus-nucleus reactions will be studied. In the third stage (2009-2013) energy dependence of hadron production properties will be measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as in p+p a...

  15. Commissural axons of the mouse cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E; Darrow, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorsoventral (i.e., tonotopic) and the rostrocaudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broadband inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears with a quick time course.

  16. Serotonergic modulation of astrocytic activity in the hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J D; Chen, L

    1999-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effects of central serotonin receptor activation on the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of Syrian hamsters. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical procedures were used to examine the effects of systemic application of the serotonin-1A and serotonin-7 receptor agonist, (+/-)-2-dipropyl-amino-8-hydroxyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT; 3.75 mg/kg) on the contents and distribution of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT at midday caused a significant reduction in immunoreactive glial fibrillary acidic protein content within 1 h of injection, compared to vehicle controls. This effect was not evident 3 h after drug injection. Treatment with 8-OH-DPAT during the late dark phase had little effect on glial fibrillary acidic protein content. The 8-OH-DPAT-induced reduction in glial fibrillary acidic protein content seen at midday was blocked partially by pretreatment with the serotonin-2 and serotonin-7 receptor antagonist, ritanserin, and more substantially by pretreatment with the serotonin-1A receptor antagonist, NAN-190. Treatment with 8-OH-DPAT also caused a significant redistribution of immunoreactive glial fibrillary acidic protein, such that the dense mesh-like appearance seen in vehicle controls was significantly reduced. The 8-OH-DPAT treatment also significantly decreased expression of polysialic acid, a cell-surface molecule associated with neural plasticity. Immunoblot assessments of glial fibrillary acidic protein contents 2 h before and 1 h after lights off revealed a significant time-of-day difference in glial fibrillary acidic protein expression, with lowest levels occurring at the latter time-point, associated with maximal endogenous serotonin release in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Collectively, these results indicate that acute plastic changes in glial fibrillary acidic protein

  17. BFKL Pomeron calculus: solution to equations for nucleus-nucleus scattering in the saturation domain

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, Carlos; Meneses, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we solve the equation for nucleus-nucleus scattering in the BFKL Pomeron calculus, suggested by Braun. We find these solutions analytically at high energies as well as numerically in the entire region of energies inside the saturation region. The semi-classical approximation is used to select out the infinite set of the parasite solutions. The nucleus-nucleus cross sections at high energy are estimated and compared with the Glauber-Gribov approach. It turns out that the exact formula gives the estimates that are very close to the ones based on Glauber-Gribov formula which is important for the practical applications

  18. Neuronal cell death in the arcuate nucleus of the medulla oblongata in stillbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkerth, Rebecca D; Zanoni, Sallie; Andiman, Sarah E; Billiards, Saraid S

    2008-02-01

    The hypothesis that unexplained stillbirth arises in a similar manner as the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is based in part on shared neuropathologic features between the two entities, including hypoxic-ischemic lesions such as white matter and brainstem gliosis, as well as aplasia or hypoplasia of the arcuate nucleus on the ventral surface of the medulla. The arcuate nucleus is the putative homologue of the respiratory chemosensory region at the ventral medullary surface in animals that is involved in central chemosensitivity. To determine arcuate nucleus pathology in stillbirth, and its co-occurrence with evidence of hypoxia-ischemia, we reviewed brain specimens from the archives of our hospitals from 22 consecutive stillbirths from 22 to 41 gestational weeks. Explained causes of death (n=17) included nuchal cord, acute chorioamnionitis, placental abruption, and fetal glomerulosclerosis; 5 cases were unexplained. In 12 brains, we observed nuclear karyorrhexis and/or pyknosis with cytoplasmic hypereosinophilia in neurons in the arcuate nucleus in both explained (n=8) and unexplained (n=4) cases (54.5% of total cases). Three additional cases had arcuate aplasia (n=1) or hypoplasia (n=2) (13.6% of total cases); one of the latter cases also had neuronal necrosis in the hypoplastic arcuate. The degree of gliosis in the region of the arcuate nucleus was variable across all cases, without statistically significant differences between groups with and without arcuate nucleus necrosis. Other lesions in association with (n=14) and without (n=8) arcuate nucleus abnormalities were diffuse cerebral white matter gliosis, periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), and neuronal necrosis in the hippocampus, basal ganglia, thalamus, basis pontis, and brainstem tegmentum. In 16/20 (80.0%) cases (with or without histologic necrosis of the arcuate), immunostaining with caspase-3 demonstrated positive neurons. Our findings suggest that neuronal pathology in the arcuate nucleus may be

  19. Morphological association between ICC and signaling pathway of NO in guinea pig corpus cavernosum%豚鼠阴茎海绵体中ICC和NO信号通路的形态学关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宇卫; 王勤章; 王江平; 丁国富

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the distribution of ICC and nNOS positive neurons in the corpus cavernosum of guinea pig and the histological association. Methods Using c-kit/nNOS immunofluorescence double staining of frozen sections of adult guinea pig corpus cavernosum, we observed the morphology and distribution of corpus cavernosum ICC and nNOS-posi-tive neurons under laser scanning confocal microscope(LSCM). Using c-kit/nNOS immunofluorescence double staining of cultured ICC by enzyme digestion, we observed the morphology and the expression of c-kit and nNOS under laser scanning confocal microscope. Results ICC were located near the boundaries of smooth muscle meshwork and interstice of smooth muscle, spindle-shaped, with long processes, round or oval-shaped cell body and expressed nNOS. ICC and nNOS-positive neurons were located on the boundaries of the smooth muscle meshwork and interstice of smooth muscle, and abundant ICC could be seen a-round nNOS-positive nerve trunk. Conclusions ICC are closely associated with nNOS-positive neurons in the corpus cavernosum of guinea pig, indicating that ICC may participate in the transduction of NO signal from nerves to smooth muscle cells.%目的 初步探讨豚鼠阴茎海绵体组织中cajal间质细胞 (ICC)和神经型一氧化氮合成酶(nNOS)阳性神经元的分布及两者的组织学关系.方法 ①制作成年豚鼠阴茎海绵体组织冰冻切片,利用c-kit/nNOS免疫荧光双染技术,激光共聚焦扫描显微镜(LSCM)下观察阴茎海绵体ICC及nNOS阳性神经元的形态及分布情况.②酶消化法体外培养阴茎海绵体ICC,c-kit/nNOS免疫荧光双染,LSCM下观察细胞形态及c-kit和nNOS的表达情况.结果 ICC分布在阴茎海绵体平滑肌小梁边缘及平滑肌肌间,纺锤形,具有长的突起,胞体呈圆形或椭圆形,并且表达nNOS;阴茎海绵体平滑肌小梁边缘及平滑肌肌间同时分布有ICC和nNOS阳性神经元,局部nNOS阳性神经主干附

  20. Sub-Arcsecond 2D Photometry and Spectrography of the Nucleus of M31 The Supermassive Black Hole Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Bacon, R; Monnet, G; Nieto, J L

    1993-01-01

    Sub-arcsecond imagery (HRCAM, 0".35 - 0".57 FWHM) and two-dimensional spectrography (TIGER, 0".9 FWHM) of the central nucleus of M31 have been obtained at CFHT. The photometric data clearly show the double-peaked nucleus, in excellent agreement with a recent HST image by Lauer et al. 1993. We built deconvolved surface brightness models, using the multi-Gaussian expansion method. We then perform a detailed morphological analysis of the three central photometric components (bulge, nucleus and bright secondary peak) and derive various spatial luminosity models (oblate and triaxial). Stellar velocity and velocity dispersion fields were derived from the TIGER data: the former displays an extremely rapid rotation around the true center of the galaxy, while the latter exhibits a peaked structure offset in the opposite direction of the brightest light peak. Neglecting these offsets,both extended versions of the virial theorem and detailed hydrodynamical models confirm the classical strong central mass concentration, ...

  1. The Crime of Rape under the Rome Statute of the ICC (with a special emphasis on the jurisprudence of the Ad Hoc Criminal Tribunals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Brigitte Maier

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available

    This article delivers insight into the purposes and intentions of committing rape within wartimes, its victims, its perpetrators, and, finally, under which circumstances the crime of rape is punishable as a crime against humanity.

    In the first part a definition on crime of rape is given, in this regard relevant literature and case law of both the Yugoslavia Tribunal and the Tribunal of Rwanda will be referred to. On the topics of victims, perpetrators and purposes related literature in the field of psychology, criminology and medical science will be taken into consideration. The discussion on the link between rape and the crime against humanity will focus on relevant cases, judgments and reports, largely of the ICC, the ICTY and the ICTR.

  2. ICC与二代证制作色彩控制%ICC and the Color Control of 2nd-Generation ID Card Making

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 杨滢

    2005-01-01

    ICC是国际色彩组织(International Color Consortium)的简称,于1993年由ADOBE,AGFA,APPLE,KODAK等公司发起成立。ICC建立了ICC色彩特性文件(即ICC Proffle)格式,目前该格式作为色彩输出设备的标准格式得到了广泛的应用。ICC特性文件用于描述色彩输出设备的色彩特性,它主要由描述设备色彩特性的基本数据组成,这些数据反映了设备的色彩输出特性,为色彩管理系统进行色彩转换提供了必要依据,使得色彩管理系统能够对色彩输出进行调整,

  3. Onset of Deconfinement in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions - Past, Present and Future -

    CERN Document Server

    Gazdzicki, Marek

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 Mark I. Gorenstein celebrated his 60th birthday. This report is dedicated to Mark and it sketches the results obtained during the past ten years of our collaboration and friendship. They concern search for and study of the onset of deconfinement in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  4. Gas Accretion in the M32 Nucleus: Past & Present

    CERN Document Server

    Seth, Anil C

    2010-01-01

    Using adaptive optics assisted Gemini/NIFS data, I study the present and past gas accretion in the central 3" of the M32 nucleus. From changes in the spectral slope and CO line depths near the center, I find evidence for unresolved dust emission resulting from BH accretion. With a luminosity of ~2e38 erg/s, this dust emission appears to be the most luminous tracer of current BH accretion, two orders of magnitude more luminous than previously detected X-ray emission. These observations suggest that using high resolution infrared data to search for dust emission may be an effective way to detect other nearby, low luminosity BHs, such as those in globular clusters. I also examine the fossil evidence of gas accretion contained in the kinematics of the stars in the nucleus. The higher-order moments (h3 and h4) of the line-of-sight velocity distribution show patterns that are remarkably similar to those seen on larger scales in elliptical galaxies and in gas-rich merger simulations. The kinematics suggests the pres...

  5. Organisation of the human dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutcherov, Yuri; Mai, Juergen K; Ashwell, Ken W; Paxinos, George

    2004-01-19

    This study used acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry to reveal the organization of the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DM) in the human. Topographically, the human DM is similar to DM in the monkey and rat. It is wedged between the paraventricular nucleus, dorsally, and the ventromedial nucleus, ventrally. Laterally, DM borders the lateral hypothalamic area while medially it approaches the 3rd ventricle. The AChE staining distinguished two subcompartments of the human DM: the larger diffuse and the smaller compact DM. The subcompartmental organization of the human DM appears homologous to that found in the monkey and less complex than that reported in rats. Understanding of the organization of DM creates meaningful anatomical reference for physiological and pharmacological studies in the human hypothalamus.

  6. The nucleus: a black box being opened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, R; Humbel, B; de Jong, L

    1991-12-01

    Until recently our knowledge about the structural and functional organization of the cell nucleus was very limited. Recent technical developments in the field of ultrastructural analysis, combined with ongoing research on the properties of the nuclear matrix, give new insight into how the nucleus is structured. Two types of observations shape our ideas about nuclear organization. First, most nuclear functions (replication, transcription, RNA processing, and RNA transport) are highly localized within the nucleus, rather than diffusely distributed. Moreover, they are associated with the nuclear matrix. Second, chromatin is organized in discrete loops, bordered by nuclear matrix attachment sequences (MARs). Each loop may contain one or several genes. The arrangement of chromatin in loops has profound consequences for the regulation of gene expression.

  7. The ventral premammillary nucleus links leptin action and reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose eDonato

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The amount of body fat and the energy balance are important factors that influence the timing of puberty and the normal reproductive function. Leptin is a key hormone that conveys to the central nervous system information about the individual energy reserve and modulates the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis. Recent findings suggest that the ventral premammillary nucleus (PMV mediates the effects of leptin as a permissive factor for the onset of puberty and the coordinated secretion of luteinizing hormone during conditions of negative energy balance. Thus, in this review we will summarize the existing literature about the potential role played by PMV neurons in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis.

  8. Differential Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, sacral parasympathetic nucleus and colonic motor response to water avoidance stress in Fischer and Lewis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, M; Wang, L; Martinez, V; Taché, Y

    2000-09-22

    The responsiveness of hypothalamic CRF to various stressors is reduced in the young female Lewis relative to the histocompatible Fischer rat. Whether such a difference impacts the brain-gut response to water avoidance stress was investigated by monitoring Fos immunoreactivity in the brain and sacral spinal cord and fecal pellet output. Exposure for 60 min to water avoidance stress increased the number of Fos positive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), and the parasympathetic nucleus of the lumbo-sacral spinal cord (L6-S1) in both Lewis and Fischer rats compared with non stress groups. The Fos response was lower by 32.0% in the PVN, and 63% in sacral parasympathetic nucleus in Lewis compared with Fischer rats while similar Fos expression was observed in the NTS. Stress-induced defecation was reduced by 52% in Lewis compared with Fischer rats while colonic motor response to CRF injected intracisternally resulted in a similar pattern and magnitude of defecation in both strains. The CRF receptor antagonist [D-Phe12,Nle(21,38)C(a)MeLeu(37)]-CRF(12-41) injected intracisternally antagonized partly the defecation response in Lewis and Fischer rats. These data indicate that a lower activation of PVN and sacral parasympathetic nuclei in Lewis compared with Fisher rats may contribute to the differential colonic motor response and that the blunted CRF hypothalamic response to stress, unlike responsiveness to central CRF plays a role.

  9. Inner Structure of Boiling Nucleus and Interfacial Energy Between Nucleus and Bulk Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Dong; TIAN Yong; PENG Xiao-Feng; WANG Bu-Xuan

    2004-01-01

    @@ A model of two-region structure of a nucleus is proposed to describe nucleus evolution. The interfacial tension between bulk liquid phase and nucleus is dependent on the density gradient in the transition region and varies with the structure change of the transition region. With the interfacial tension calculated using this model, the predicted nucleation rate is very close to the experimental measurement. Furthermore, this model and associated analysis provide solid theoretical evidence to clarify the definition of nucleation rate and understand the nucleation phenomenon with insight into the physical nature.

  10. Nucleus-Nucleus Potential at Near-Barrier Energies from Self Consistent Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Skalski, J

    2003-01-01

    We determine the static nucleus-nucleus potential from Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations with the Skyrme interaction. To this aim, HF equations are solved on a spatial mesh, with the initial configuration consisting of target and projectile positioned at various relative distances. For a number of reaction partners, the calculated barrier heights reasonably well compare with those extracted from the measured fusion and capture cross sections. At smaller target-projectile distances, our results show the intrinsic barriers to heavy compound nucleus formation. We speculate on their possible connection with the fusion hindrance observed for large Z sub T Z sub P.

  11. Antiproton Production in 11.5A GeV/c Au+Pb Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Cataldo, G.; Giglietto, N.; Raino, A.; Spinelli, P. [University of Bari/INFN, Bari (Italy); Dover, C.B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Huang, H.Z. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); Hill, J.C.; Libby, B.; Wohn, F.K. [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Rabin, M.S. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Haridas, P.; Pless, I.A.; Van Buren, G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Armstrong, T.A.; Lewis, R.A.; Reid, J.D.; Smith, G.A.; Toothacker, W.S. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Davies, R.; Hirsch, A.S.; Porile, N.T.; Rimai, A.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Srivastava, B.K.; Tincknell, M.L. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Greene, S.V. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Bennett, S.J.; Cormier, T.M.; Dee, P.; Fachini, P.; Kim, B.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Munhoz, M.G.; Pruneau, C.A.; Wilson, W.K.; Zhao, K. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Barish, K.N.; Bennett, M.J.; Chikanian, A.; Coe, S.D.; Diebold, G.E.; Finch, L.E.; George, N.K.; Kumar, B.S.; Lajoie, J.G.; Majka, R.D.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Rotondo, F.S.; Sandweiss, J.; Slaughter, A.J.; Wolin, E.J. [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    1997-11-01

    We present the first results from the E864 Collaboration on the production of antiprotons in 10{percent} central 11.5A GeV /c Au+Pb nucleus collisions at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. We report invariant multiplicities for antiproton production in the kinematic region 1.4{lt}y{lt}2.2 and 50{lt} p{sub T}{lt} 300 MeV/c , and compare our data with a first collision scaling model and previously published results from the E878 Collaboration. The differences between the E864 and E878 antiproton measurements and the implications for antihyperon production are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. An organism arises from every nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurullah Keklikoglu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The fact that, cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT method has been performed, opened new horizons for cloning, and changed the way of our understanding and approach to cell and nucleus. The progress in cloning technology, brought the anticipation of the ability to clone an organism from each somatic cell nucleus. Therefore, the 'Cell Theory' is about to take the additional statement as "An organism arises from every nucleus". The development of gene targeting procedures which can be applied with SCNT, showed us that it may be possible to obtain different versions of the original genetic constitution of a cell. Because of this opportunity which is provided by SCNT, in reproductive cloning, it would be possible to clone enhanced organisms which can adapt to different environmental conditions and survive. Furthermore, regaining the genetic characteristics of ancestors or reverse herediter variations would be possible. On the other hand, in therapeutic cloning, more precise and easily obtainable alternatives for cell replacement therapy could be presented. However, while producing healthier or different organisms from a nucleus, it is hard to foresee the side effects influencing natural processes in long term is rather difficult.

  13. Nucleus-associated actin in Amoeba proteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdieva, Mariia; Bogolyubov, Dmitry; Podlipaeva, Yuliya; Goodkov, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The presence, spatial distribution and forms of intranuclear and nucleus-associated cytoplasmic actin were studied in Amoeba proteus with immunocytochemical approaches. Labeling with different anti-actin antibodies and staining with TRITC-phalloidin and fluorescent deoxyribonuclease I were used. We showed that actin is abundant within the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm of A. proteus cells. According to DNase I experiments, the predominant form of intranuclear actin is G-actin which is associated with chromatin strands. Besides, unpolymerized actin was shown to participate in organization of a prominent actin layer adjacent to the outer surface of nuclear envelope. No significant amount of F-actin was found in the nucleus. At the same time, the amoeba nucleus is enclosed in a basket-like structure formed by circumnuclear actin filaments and bundles connected with global cytoplasmic actin cytoskeleton. A supposed architectural function of actin filaments was studied by treatment with actin-depolymerizing agent latrunculin A. It disassembled the circumnuclear actin system, but did not affect the intranuclear chromatin structure. The results obtained for amoeba cells support the modern concept that actin is involved in fundamental nuclear processes that have evolved in the cells of multicellular organisms.

  14. Nonequilibrium distribution functions of nucleons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Anchishkin, D; Cleymans, J; 10.5488/CMP.16.13201

    2013-01-01

    The collision smearing of the nucleon momenta about their initial values during relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is investigated. To a certain degree, our model belongs to the transport type, and we investigate the evolution of the nucleon system created at a nucleus-nucleus collision. However, we parameterize this development by the number of collisions of every particle during evolution rather than by the time variable. It is assumed that the group of nucleons which leave the system after the same number of collisions can be joined in a particular statistical ensemble. The nucleon nonequilibrium distribution functions, which depend on a certain number of collisions of a nucleon before freeze-out, are derived.

  15. High-spin level structure of the neutron-rich nucleus 91Y

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiao-Feng; Fang, Yong-De; Liu, Min-Liang; Zhang, Yu-Hu; Wang, Kai-Long; Wang, Jian-Guo; Guo, Song; Qiang, Yun-Hua; Zheng, Yong; Zhang, Ning-Tao; Li, Guang-Shun; Gao, Bing-Shui; Wu, Xiao-Guang; He, Chuang-Ye; Zheng, Yun

    2015-01-01

    High-spin level structure of the neutron-rich nucleus 91Y has been reinvestigated via the 82Se(13C, p3n)91Y reaction. A newly constructed level scheme including several key levels clarifies the uncertainties in the earlier studies. These levels are characterized by the breaking of the Z=38 and N=56 subshell closures, which involves in the spin-isospin dependent central force and tensor force.

  16. Deployable centralizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grubelich, Mark C.; Su, Jiann-Cherng; Knudsen, Steven D.

    2017-02-28

    A centralizer assembly is disclosed that allows for the assembly to be deployed in-situ. The centralizer assembly includes flexible members that can be extended into the well bore in situ by the initiation of a gas generating device. The centralizer assembly can support a large load carrying capability compared to a traditional bow spring with little or no installation drag. Additionally, larger displacements can be produced to centralize an extremely deviated casing.

  17. Hypoxia activates nucleus tractus solitarii neurons projecting to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    King, T. Luise; Heesch, Cheryl M.; Clark, Catharine G.; Kline, David D.; Hasser, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral chemoreceptor afferent information is sent to the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS), integrated, and relayed to other brain regions to alter cardiorespiratory function. The nTS projects to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), but activation and phenotype of these projections during chemoreflex stimulation is unknown. We hypothesized that activation of PVN-projecting nTS neurons occurs primarily at high intensities of hypoxia. We assessed ventilation and cardiovascular para...

  18. Study of -nucleus interaction through the formation of -nucleus bound state

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Jha; B J Roy; A Chatterjee; H Machner

    2006-05-01

    The question of possible existence of -mesic nuclei is quite intriguing. Answer to this question will deeply enrich our understanding of -nucleus interaction which is not so well-understood. We review the experimental efforts for the search of -mesic nuclei and describe the physics motivation behind it. We present the description of an experiment for the search of -nucleus bound state using the GeV proton beam, currently being performed at COSY.

  19. The supermassive black hole and double nucleus of the core elliptical NGC5419

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzalay, X; Saglia, R P; Wegner, G A; Bender, R; Erwin, P; Fabricius, M H; Rusli, S

    2016-01-01

    We obtained adaptive-optics assisted SINFONI observations of the central regions of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC5419 with a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec ($\\approx 55$ pc). NGC5419 has a large depleted stellar core with a radius of 1.58 arcsec (430 pc). HST and SINFONI images show a point source located at the galaxy's photocentre, which is likely associated with the low-luminosity AGN previously detected in NGC5419. Both the HST and SINFONI images also show a second nucleus, off-centred by 0.25 arcsec ($\\approx 70$ pc). Outside of the central double nucleus, we measure an almost constant velocity dispersion of $\\sigma \\sim 350$ km/s. In the region where the double nucleus is located, the dispersion rises steeply to a peak value of $\\sim 420$ km/s. In addition to the SINFONI data, we also obtained stellar kinematics at larger radii from the South African Large Telescope. While NGC5419 shows low rotation ($v < 50$ km/s), the central regions (inside $\\sim 4 \\, r_b$) clearly rotate in the opposite direc...

  20. Why do we have a caudate nucleus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villablanca, Jaime R

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand the physiological role of the caudate nucleus, we combine here our laboratory data on cats with reports of patients with selective damage to this nucleus. Cats with bilateral removal of the caudate nuclei showed a stereotyped behavior consisting of persistently approaching and then following a person, another cat, or any object, and attempting to contact the target. Simultaneously, the animals exhibited a friendly disposition and persistent docility together with purring and forelimbs treading/kneading. The magnitude and duration of this behavior was proportional to the extent of the removal reaching a maximum after ablations of 65% or more of the caudate tissue. These cats were hyperactive but they had lost the feline elegance of movements. Additional features of acaudate cats were: (1) postural and accuracy deficits (plus perseveration) in paw usage tasks including bar pressing for food reward; (2) cognitive and perceptual impairments on a T-maze battery of tasks and on the bar pressing tasks; (3) blockage or blunting of the species-specific behavioral response to a single injection of morphine; Unilateral caudate nucleus removal did not produce global behavioral effects, but only deficit in the contralateral paw contact placing reaction and paw usage/bar pressing. Moreover and surprisingly, we found hypertrophy of the ipsilateral caudate nucleus following prenatal focal neocortical removal. The findings in human were also behavioral (not neurological) and also occurred with unilateral caudate damage. The main manifestations consisted of loss of drive (apathy), obsessive-compulsive behavior, cognitive deficits, stimulus-bound perseverative behavior, and hyperactivity. Based on all of the above data we propose that the specific function of the caudate nucleus is to control approach-attachment behavior, ranging from plain approach to a target, to romantic love. This putative function would account well for the caudate involvement in the

  1. Transverse momentum spectra in high-energy nucleus-nucleus, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Jie

    2011-01-01

    The transverse momentum distributions of final-state particles produced in nucleus-nucleus (AA),proton-nucleus (pA),and proton-proton (pp) collisions at high energies are investigated using a multisource ideal gas model.Our calculated results show that the contribution of hard emission can be neglected in the study of transverse momentum spectra of charged pions and kaons produced in Cu-Cu collisions at (√SNN)=22.5 GeV.And if we consider the contribution of hard emission,the transverse momentum spectra of p and (P) produced in Cu-Cu collisions at (√SNN)=22.5 GeV,KsO produced in Pb-Pb collisions at 158 A GeV,J/ψ particles produced in p-Pb collisions at 400 GeV and π+,K+,p produced in proton-proton collisions at (√S)=200 GeV,can be described by the model,especially in the tail part of spectra.

  2. MR findings of degenerative changes of nucleus pulposus in lumbar spine: sequential changes after disc herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Joon [Choong-Ang Gil Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Yoo Mi; Hwang, Hee Young [College of Medicine, Dankook University, Chenoan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    To evaluate the relationship between MR changes of the nucleus pulposus and the time interval after traumatic disc herniation. T2-weighted MR images of 132 patients with back pain and/or sciatica were reviewed. The changes of signal intensity, central cleft and height of the nucleus pulposus were used as criteria of disc degeneration and they were graded as normal, mild, moderate and severe degree of degeneration. Putting these criteria together we provided integrated grade of degeneration of the nucleus pulposus(grade 0-3). To get the preliminary data for normal and age-related disc degeneration, we measured the disc height by age groups and disc levels and analyzed the relationship between the age of the patients and the signal intensity, cleft and height in normal disc levels of the 132 patients. In 68 patients of 88 levels disc herniation, we analyzed the relationship between symptom duration and the degree of degeneration. Among these 68 patients we selected 14 patients(16 levels) who were under 30 years of age and had history of recent trauma to minimize data distortion from age related degeneration and ambiguity of initiation point of degeneration. In this group we analyzed the relationship between the time period after traumatic disc herniation and the degree of degeneration. The age of the patient had close relationship with the grade of signal intensity, central cleft, and disc height and grade of degeneration of the nucleus pulposus in normal discs. In 88 levels of herniated discs, the duration of symptom and degree of degeneration showed moderate correlation. In 14 patients of disc herniation who were under 30 years old and had trauma history in recent 2 years, grade 1 disc degeneration occurred in average 3.7 months after trauma. Although it was difficult to proceed statistical analysis in the last group because of small patients number, the degree of degeneration of nucleus pulposus had close relationship with the duration after traumas or duration of

  3. The supermassive black hole and double nucleus of the core elliptical NGC 5419

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzalay, Ximena; Thomas, Jens; Saglia, Roberto P.; Wegner, Gary A.; Bender, Ralf; Erwin, Peter; Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Rusli, Stephanie P.

    2016-11-01

    We obtained adaptive-optics assisted SINFONI observations of the central regions of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 5419 with a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec (≈55 pc). NGC 5419 has a large depleted stellar core with a radius of 1.58 arcsec (430 pc). HST and SINFONI images show a point source located at the galaxy's photocentre, which is likely associated with the low-luminosity AGN previously detected in NGC 5419. Both the HST and SINFONI images also show a second nucleus, off-centred by 0.25 arcsec (≈70 pc). Outside of the central double nucleus, we measure an almost constant velocity dispersion of σ ˜ 350 km s-1. In the region where the double nucleus is located, the dispersion rises steeply to a peak value of ˜420 km s-1. In addition to the SINFONI data, we also obtained stellar kinematics at larger radii from the South African Large Telescope. While NGC 5419 shows low rotation (v regions (inside ˜4 rb) clearly rotate in the opposite direction to the galaxy's outer parts. We use orbit-based dynamical models to measure the black hole mass of NGC 5419 from the kinematical data outside of the double nuclear structure. The models imply M_BH=7.2^{+2.7}_{-1.9} × 10^9 M⊙. The enhanced velocity dispersion in the region of the double nucleus suggests that NGC 5419 possibly hosts two supermassive black holes at its centre, separated by only ≈70 pc. Yet our measured MBH is consistent with the black hole mass expected from the size of the galaxy's depleted stellar core. This suggests, that systematic uncertainties in MBH related to the secondary nucleus are small.

  4. The Effect of Mechanism ICC Excessive Activity by Stem Cell Factor in Rats with IBS%干细胞因子/c-kit在肠易激综合征中的作用和地位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王景杰; 秦明; 刘震雄; 张超; 杨琦

    2012-01-01

    The c-Kit as the identification of ICC, its ligand-stem cell factor(SCF) can secrete large amounts of c-kit ki-nase stimulate mast cells to hyperplasia. The development and survival of ICC use the same cell signal transduction pathways; therefore, SCF is the most important cytokine to the start of c-kit kinase. Our recently studies show that when SCF excessive activated, the abnormal discharge of ICC increased, then the dorsal commissural nucleusjDCN) that control the movement of left colon produce significant changes in electric activities, which indicates SCF plays an important role in pathogenesis of IBS, From that point, In order to explore the excessive activated SCF leads to abnormal discharge of ICC in the role and pathogenesis of IBS, this study was designed to in vivo and in vitro; using the method of morphology, elec-trophysiology, molecular biology and seropharmacology, provide new ideas for the development of new drugs.%干细胞因子(stem cell factor,SCF)是Cajal间质细胞(ICC)身份识别者c- kit的配体,二者结合可启动其下游细胞信号转导途径,进而大量分泌刺激肥大细胞增生的c- Kit激酶,ICC的存活及功能亦依赖相同细胞信号转导途径,故SCF成为调控c-Kit激酶最关键的细胞因子.如果SCF被过度激活,ICC异常放电增加,接受左半结肠感觉的骶髓后联合核(DCN)电活动变化明显,故SCF过度激活是IBS特征显现的节点.研究SCF过度激活c- kit导致的ICC异常电活动在IBS中作用与机制,可以为新药开发提供新思路.

  5. Single pion production in neutrino nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, E; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2013-01-01

    We study one pion production in both charged and neutral current neutrino nucleus scattering for neutrino energies below 2 GeV. We use a theoretical model for one pion production at the nucleon level that we correct for medium effects. The results are incorporated into a cascade program that apart from production also includes the pion final state interaction inside the nucleus. Besides, in some specific channels coherent pion production is also possible and we evaluate its contribution as well. Our results for total and differential cross sections are compared with recent data from the MiniBooNE Collaboration. The model provides an overall acceptable description of data, better for NC than for CC channels, although theory is systematically below data. Differential cross sections, folded with the full neutrino flux, show that most of the missing pions lie on the forward direction and at high energies.

  6. Protein quality control in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl; Rebula, Caio A.

    2014-01-01

    to aggregate, cells have evolved several elaborate quality control systems to deal with these potentially toxic proteins. First, various molecular chaperones will seize the misfolded protein and either attempt to refold the protein or target it for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system...... to be particularly active in protein quality control. Thus, specific ubiquitin-protein ligases located in the nucleus, target not only misfolded nuclear proteins, but also various misfolded cytosolic proteins which are transported to the nucleus prior to their degradation. In comparison, much less is known about...... these mechanisms in mammalian cells. Here we highlight recent advances in our understanding of nuclear protein quality control, in particular regarding substrate recognition and proteasomal degradation....

  7. Coherency in Neutrino-Nucleus Elastic Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kerman, S; Deniz, M; Wong, H T; Chen, J -W; Li, H B; Lin, S T; Liu, C -P; Yue, Q

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering provides a unique laboratory to study the quantum mechanical coherency effects in electroweak interactions, towards which several experimental programs are being actively pursued. We report results of our quantitative studies on the transitions towards decoherency. A parameter ($\\alpha$) is identified to describe the degree of coherency, and its variations with incoming neutrino energy, detector threshold and target nucleus are studied. The ranges of $\\alpha$ which can be probed with realistic neutrino experiments are derived, indicating complementarity between projects with different sources and targets. Uncertainties in nuclear physics and in $\\alpha$ would constrain sensitivities in probing physics beyond the standard model. The maximum neutrino energies corresponding to $\\alpha$>0.95 are derived.

  8. Correlations in neutrino-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Van Cuyck, Tom; Jachowicz, Natalie; González-Jiménez, Raul; Martini, Marco; Ryckebusch, Jan; Van Dessel, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed study of charged-current quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering and of the influence of correlations on one- and two-nucleon knockout processes. The quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering cross sections, including the influence of long-range correlations, are evaluated within a continuum random phase approximation approach. The short-range correlation formalism is implemented in the impulse approximation by shifting the complexity induced by the correlations from the wave functions to the operators. The model is validated by confronting $(e,e^\\prime)$ cross-section predictions with electron scattering data in the kinematic region where the quasielastic channel is expected to dominate. Further, the $^{12}$C$(\

  9. Rutherford, Radioactivity, and the Atomic Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, Helge

    2012-01-01

    Modern atomic and nuclear physics took its start in the early part of the twentieth century, to a large extent based upon experimental investigations of radioactive phenomena. Foremost among the pioneers of the new kind of physics was Ernest Rutherford, who made fundamental contributions to the structure of matter for more than three decades and, in addition, founded important research schools in Manchester and Cambridge. This paper reviews the most important aspects of Rutherford's scientific work in the period from about 1900 to 1920, and it also refers to some of his last experiments of the 1930s. The emphasis is on his theory of radioactive disintegration (1902), the discovery of the atomic nucleus (1911), and the first artificially produced element transformation (1919). Following the transmutation experiments, Rutherford developed elaborate models of the atomic nucleus, but these turned out to be unsuccessful. Other subjects could be included, but the three mentioned are undoubtedly those of the greates...

  10. Theoretical highlights of neutrino-nucleus interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Ruso, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The recent theoretical developments in the field of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the few-GeV region are reviewed based on the presentations made at the NuInt09 Workshop. The topics of electron scattering and its connections with neutrino interactions, neutrino induced quasielastic scattering and pion production (coherent and incoherent) are covered, with special emphasis on the challenges that arise in the comparison with new experimental data.

  11. Neutrino-nucleus CCQE-like scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Nieves, J; Simo, I Ruiz; Sanchez, F; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2014-01-01

    RPA correlations, spectral function and 2p2h (multi-nucleon) effects on charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions without emitted pions are discussed. We pay attention to the influence of RPA and multi-nucleon mechanisms on the MiniBooNE and MINERvA flux folded differential cross sections, the MiniBooNE flux unfolded total cross section and the neutrino energy reconstruction.

  12. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  13. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gregory [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States); Kulkarni, Gourihar [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70°C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  14. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  15. Neuropeptide Y infusion into the shell region of the rat nucleus accumbens increases extracellular levels of dopamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Wegener, Gregers; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen;

    2009-01-01

    Increases in extracellular dopamine in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens are centrally involved in mediating reinforcement of addictive drugs. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its receptors are present in the nucleus accumbens and have been implicated in addiction mechanisms. This study further...... explored the potential role of NPY in addiction mechanisms using microdialysis to measure extracellular dopamine in vivo after infusion of NPY directly into the accumbal shell region of adult rats. NPY was found to dose-dependently increase extracellular dopamine levels, indicating that NPY could play...

  16. Jet tomography of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions at next-to-leading order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitev, Ivan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Ben - Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that jet observables are highly sensitive to the characteristics of the vacuum and the in-medium QCD parton showers and propose techniques that exploit this sensitivity to constrain the mechanism of quark and gluon energy loss in strongly-interacting plasmas. As a first example, we calculate the inclusive jet cross section in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions to {Omicron}({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}). Theoretical predictions for the medium-induced jet broadening and the suppression of the jet production rate due to cold and hot nuclear matter effects in Au+Au and Cu+Cu reactions at RHIC are presented.

  17. Electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions relating to space radiation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the papers within this report deal with electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions which are of concern in the space radiation program. In particular, the removal of one and two nucleons via both electromagnetic and strong interaction processes has been extensively investigated. The theory of relativistic Coulomb fission has also been developed. Several papers on quark models also appear. Finally, note that the theoretical methods developed in this work have been directly applied to the task of radiation protection of astronauts. This has been done by parameterizing the theoretical formalism in such a fashion that it can be used in cosmic ray transport codes.

  18. Azimuthal correlations of hadrons and fragments in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Two-particle (two-fragment) azimuthal correlation functions are studied by using a simple formula which describes uniformly azimuthal distributions of final-state charged particles and nuclear fragments.This formula is obtained in the framework of a multi-source thermal model (or multi-source ideal gas model).The calculated results are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data of charged hadrons and nuclear fragments in nucleus-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies.

  19. Transverse energy distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baglin, C.; Baldisseri, A.; Bussiere, A.; Guillaud, J.P.; Kossakowski, R.; Liaud, P.; Staley, F. (Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, 74 - Annecy-le-Vieux (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules); Baldit, A.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Felgeyrolles, X.; Force, P.; Fredj, L.; Landaud, G.; Vazeille, F. (Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France)); Sonderegger, P. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Abreu, M.C.; Bordalo, P.; Ferreira, R.; Gago, J.M.; Lourenco, C.; Peralta, L.; Pimenta, M.; Ramos, S.; Silva, S.; Varela, J. (LIP, Lisbon (Portugal)); Gerschel, C.; Jouan, D.; Papillon, S.; Tarrago, X. (Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)); Bus; NA38 Collaboration

    1990-11-22

    The transverse energy E{sub T} distributions of nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the framework of a simple geometrical model. The distributions for inclusive production of J/{psi} and muon pairs in the mass continuum are analyzed. The shape of the E{sub T} distribution of the continuum agrees with the model. The previously observed decrease of the ratio (J/{psi})/continuum with increasing E{sub T} is due to the behavior of the J/{psi}. (orig.).

  20. Aspects of Coulomb dissociation and interference in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystrand, Joakim; Baltz, Anthony; Klein, Spencer R.

    2001-10-21

    Coherent vector meson production in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. These interactions may occur for impact parameters much larger than the sum of the nuclear radii. Since the vector meson production is always localized to one of the nuclei, the system acts as a two-source interferometer in the transverse plane. By tagging the outgoing nuclei for Coulomb dissociation it is possible to obtain a measure of the impact parameter and thus the source separation in the interferometer. This is of particular interest since the life-time of the vector mesons are generally much shorter than the impact parameters of the collisions.

  1. Contemporary models of the atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Nemirovskii, P E

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary Models of the Atomic Nucleus discusses nuclear structure and properties, expounding contemporary theoretical concepts of the low-energy nuclear processes underlying in nuclear models. This book focuses on subjects such as the optical nuclear model, unified or collective model, and deuteron stripping reaction. Other topics discussed include the basic nuclear properties; shell model; theoretical analysis of the shell model; and radiative transitions and alpha-decay. The deuteron theory and the liquid drop nuclear model with its application to fission theory are also mentioned, but o

  2. A thalamic input to the nucleus accumbens mediates opiate dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingjie; Wienecke, Carl F R; Nachtrab, Gregory; Chen, Xiaoke

    2016-02-11

    Chronic opiate use induces opiate dependence, which is characterized by extremely unpleasant physical and emotional feelings after drug use is terminated. Both the rewarding effects of a drug and the desire to avoid withdrawal symptoms motivate continued drug use, and the nucleus accumbens is important for orchestrating both processes. While multiple inputs to the nucleus accumbens regulate reward, little is known about the nucleus accumbens circuitry underlying withdrawal. Here we identify the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus as a prominent input to the nucleus accumbens mediating the expression of opiate-withdrawal-induced physical signs and aversive memory. Activity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus to nucleus accumbens pathway is necessary and sufficient to mediate behavioural aversion. Selectively silencing this pathway abolishes aversive symptoms in two different mouse models of opiate withdrawal. Chronic morphine exposure selectively potentiates excitatory transmission between the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus and D2-receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons via synaptic insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Notably, in vivo optogenetic depotentiation restores normal transmission at these synapses and robustly suppresses morphine withdrawal symptoms. This links morphine-evoked pathway- and cell-type-specific plasticity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus to nucleus accumbens circuit to opiate dependence, and suggests that reprogramming this circuit holds promise for treating opiate addiction.

  3. Comparison of the National Green Building Standard (ICC 700-2008) and LEED for Homes to the Residential Provisions of the 2009 IECC for the Delaware Green for Green Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, Michelle L.; Makela, Eric J.

    2011-01-30

    Adhering to Delaware’s Green for Green program specifications results in homes being built to more energy-efficient levels than the 2009 IECC levels. Specifically: • Certifying at the Silver Performance Level for the ICC 700 standard using either the Prescriptive or Performance Paths will result in a residential building that is more efficient than if the building only complied with the 2009 IECC. • Certifying at the Silver level under LEED for Homes standard, including mandatory compliance with ENERGY STAR 2006 and earning two additional energy points will result in a residential building that is more efficient than if the building only complied with the 2009 IECC.

  4. An increase in intracelluar free calcium ions modulated by cholinergic receptors in rat facial nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Da-wei; ZHOU Rui; LI Na; ZHANG Qiu-gui; ZHU Fu-gao

    2009-01-01

    Background Ca2+in the central nervous system plays important roles in brain physiology, including neuronal survival and regeneration in rats with injured facial motoneurons. The present research was to study the modulations of intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations by cholinergic receptors in rat facial nucleus, and the mechanisms of the modulations. Methods The fluorescence intensity of facial nucleus in Fluo-3 AM loaded acute brainstem slices was detected by applying intracellular free Ca2+ measurement technique via confocal laser scanning microscope. The changes of fluorescence intensity of facial nucleus indicate the average changes of intracellular free Ca2+ levels of the neurons. Results Acetylcholine was effective at increasing the fluorescence intensity of facial nucleus. Muscarine chlorlde induced a marked increase of fluorescence intensity in a concentration dependent fashion. The enhancement of fluorescence intensity by muscarine chloride was significantly reduced by thapsigargin (depletor of intracellular Ca2+ store; P0.05). And the increase of fluorescence intensity was also significantly inhibited by pirenzepine (M1 subtype selective antagonist; P0.05).Conclusions The data provide the evidence that muscarinic receptors may induce the increase of intracellular free Ca2+ levels through the Ca2+ release of intracellular Ca2+ stores, in a manner related to M1 and M3 subtypes of muscarinic receptors in rat facial nucleus. Nicotine may increase intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations via the influx of extracellular Ca2+ mainly across L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, in a manner related to the α4β2 subtype of nicotinic receptors.

  5. Experimental study of collective flow phenomena in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chkhaidze, L V; Kharkhelauri, L L

    2002-01-01

    The results of the experimental study of collective flow phenomena, such as the sideward and elliptic flow of nuclear matter, discovered during the last 10-15 years in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions are presented in this review. Sideward (often termed directed) and elliptic flows have been observed for protons, antiprotons, light nuclei, pions, kaons, and lambdas emitted in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 0.1-1.8 GeV/nucleon of LBL Bevalac and GSI/SIS by Plastic-Ball, Streamer Chamber, EOS-NPC, FOPI, LAND, TAPS, and KAOS collaborations; at 2-4 GeV/nucleon of Dubna JINR by SKM-200-GIBS, Propane Buble Chamber, and Emulsion Chamber collaborations; at 2-14 GeV/nucleon of BNL AGS, by the E877, E895, and E917 collaborations; and at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon of CERN SPS, by the WA98 and NA49 collaborations and more recently by the STAR at RHIC BNL. In the review, the results of the SKM-200-GIBS collaboration of JINR are presented and compared with the results of different experiments by Bevalac, GSI/SIS, BNL, and...

  6. Ventromedial arcuate nucleus communicates peripheral metabolic information to the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, C.-X.; Vliet, J. van der; Dai, J.; Yin, G.; Ru, L.; Buijs, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    The arcuate nucleus (ARC) is crucial for the maintenance of energy homeostasis as an integrator of long- and short-term hunger and satiety signals. The expression of receptors for metabolic hormones, such as insulin, leptin, and ghrelin, allows ARC to sense information from the periphery and signal

  7. Cortical projections to the human red nucleus: a diffusion tensor tractography study with a 1.5-T MRI machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Christophe; Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Service de Neuroimagerie, Centre Hospitalier National d' Optalmologie des Quinze-Vingts, Paris (France)

    2006-10-15

    Previous studies in apes and monkeys have shown that the red nucleus receives projections from the sensorimotor and premotor cortices, whereas other experiments carried out with injured human brains have found corticorubral projections issuing from associative areas. Therefore, we reassessed in vivo the human anatomical projections from the cerebral cortex to the red nucleus using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) axonal tracking. The connectivity between the cerebral cortex and the red nuclei of seven volunteers was studied at 1.5 T using streamlined DTI axonal tracking. Trajectories were constantly tracked between the red nuclei and the ipsilateral pericentral and prefrontal cortices, as well as the temporal cortex and the striatum in two subjects. Within the cerebral trunk, trajectories also include the superior cerebellar peduncle and the central tegmental tract. The human red nucleus receives its main afferences from the sensorimotor and prefrontal cortices. (orig.)

  8. 5-hydroxytryptamine-mediated apnea caused by the habenular nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Weihong Lin; Jinghua Wang; Min Huang; Chunyong Wang; Mingxian Li; Shao Wang

    2011-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine contributes to the control of activities of the dilator muscle in the upper respiratory tract, and is derived from the raphe nuclei, in which the habenular nucleus exerts a sustained inhibitory effect. In the present study, respiratory motion curve of the genioglossus muscle and peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine changes were observed following L-glutamate stimulation of the habenular nucleus of adult Wistar rats. Results showed that the rats had apnea and decreased plasma 5-hydroxytryptamine content after the neurons in habenular nucleus were excited. Genioglossus muscle electromyogram amplitude and integral were significantly reduced. The genioglossus myoelectric activity and respiratory motion curve were similar to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, thus confirming that the habenular nucleus is the key nucleus involved in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and is the primary regulated center in the raphe nuclei. Stimulation of the habenular nucleus may suppress 5-hydroxytryptamine release and result in apnea, which is similar to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  9. Key role of 5-HT3 receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii in cardiovagal stress reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sévoz-Couche, Caroline; Brouillard, Charly

    2017-03-01

    Serotonin plays a modulatory role in central control of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) in the medulla is an area of viscerosomatic integration innervated by both central and peripheral serotonergic fibers. Influences from different origins therefore trigger the release of serotonin into the NTS and exert multiple influences on the ANS. This major influence on the ANS is also mediated by activation of several receptors in the NTS. In particular, the NTS is the central zone with the highest density of serotonin3 (5-HT3) receptors. In this review, we present evidence that 5-HT3 receptors in the NTS play a key role in one of the crucial homeostatic responses to acute and chronic stress: inhibitory modulation of the parasympathetic component of the ANS. The possible functional interactions of 5-HT3 receptors with GABAA and NK1 receptors in the NTS are also discussed.

  10. The planetary nebula Abell 48 and its [WN4] nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Frew, David J; Parker, Q A; Stupar, M; Wachter, S; DePew, K; Danehkar, A; Fitzgerald, M F

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed multi-wavelength study of the peculiar planetary nebula Abell 48 and its central star. We present evidence for a new classification of the nucleus as a helium-rich, hydrogen-deficient star of type [WN4], one of only two currently known examples of its type. The evidence for either a massive WN or a low-mass [WN] interpretation is critically examined, and we firmly conclude that Abell 48 is a planetary nebula around an evolved low-mass star, rather than a Population I ejecta nebula. Importantly, the surrounding nebula has a morphology typical of planetary nebulae, and is not enriched in nitrogen, and thus not the 'peeled atmosphere' of a massive star. We estimate a distance of 1.6 kpc and a reddening, E(B-V) = 1.90 mag, the latter value clearly showing the nebula lies on the near side of the Galactic bar, and therefore cannot be a massive WN star. The planetary nebula has an ionized mass (0.3 M_sun) and electron density (740 cm^-3) typical of somewhat evolved objects. The observed ...

  11. Spontaneous resorption of a large cervical herniated nucleus pulposus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Hsu, Andrew R; Frank, Rachel M; An, Howard S; Andersson, Gunnar B

    2014-07-01

    The majority of patients with symptomatic herniated discs can be successfully and conservatively managed and can achieve clinical improvement without surgical intervention. Resorption of the herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) is 1 conservative mechanism for clinical improvement. We present the case of a 76-year-old healthy man with acute cervical radicular right arm pain and positive Spurling test. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large disc extrusion behind the C6 vertebral body, causing severe central canal stenosis and right-greater-than-left foraminal stenosis. The patient did not want surgical intervention, and his symptoms resolved with conservative treatment. A follow-up MRI 7 months after his initial presentation showed almost complete resorption of the herniated disc. The patient returned to his normal activities and has not had recurrence of symptoms for 2 years. This report provides an interesting example of complete resorption of a large, extruded cervical herniated disc in a symptomatic patient and a review of the literature on resorption of herniated discs. The review suggests that larger herniations with an epidural location (penetration of the posterior longitudinal ligament) have a greater chance of resorption.

  12. In vivo histamine voltammetry in the mouse premammillary nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Srimal; Abdalla, Aya; Robke, Rhiannon; Wood, Kevin M; Zeqja, Anisa; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2015-06-07

    Histamine plays a major role in the mediation of allergic reactions such as peripheral inflammation. This classical monoamine is also a neurotransmitter involved in the central nervous system but its role in this context is poorly understood. Studying histamine neurotransmission is important due to its implications in many neurological disorders. The sensitivity, selectivity and high temporal resolution of fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) offer many advantages for studying electroactive neurotransmitters. Histamine has previously been studied with FSCV; however, the lack of a robust Faradaic electrochemical signal makes it difficult to selectively identify histamine in complex media, as found in vivo. In this work, we optimize an electrochemical waveform that provides a stimulation-locked and unique electrochemical signal towards histamine. We describe in vitro waveform optimization and a novel in vivo physiological model for stimulating histamine release in the mouse premammillary nucleus via stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle. We demonstrate that a robust signal can be used to effectively identify histamine and characterize its in vivo kinetics.

  13. Depolarizing actions of hydrogen sulfide on hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Sahara Khademullah

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a novel neurotransmitter that has been shown to influence cardiovascular functions as well and corticotrophin hormone (CRH secretion. Since the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN is a central relay center for autonomic and endocrine functions, we sought to investigate the effects of H2S on the neuronal population of the PVN. Whole cell current clamp recordings were acquired from the PVN neurons and sodium hydrosulfide hydrate (NaHS was bath applied at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10, and 50 mM. NaHS (1, 10, and 50 mM elicited a concentration-response relationship from the majority of recorded neurons, with almost exclusively depolarizing effects following administration. Cells responded and recovered from NaHS administration quickly and the effects were repeatable. Input differences from baseline and during the NaHS-induced depolarization uncovered a biphasic response, implicating both a potassium and non-selective cation conductance. The results from the neuronal population of the PVN shed light on the possible physiological role that H2S has in autonomic and endocrine function.

  14. Nucleus properties of P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, Karen J.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Mueller, Beatrice E. A.; Dicksion, Matthew W.; Li, Heide R.

    1993-01-01

    Time series photometric measurements are presented of Comet P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 at a heliocentric distance of 5.886 AU when the comet possessed an extensive coma. The light curve shows a modulation caused by the rotation of the nucleus. The rotation period is considerably shorter than the 5 day period found by Whipple (1980), and we find substantial evidence that the nucleus may be in a complex spin state characterized by two periods 14.0 and 32.3 hr. Models of the rate at which the rotational light curve range decreases as a function of the amount of coma in the aperture have determined that the projected maximum to minimum axis ratio of the comet is 2.6 and that the product of the albedo times the rotationally averaged nucleus radius size is 9.54 +/- 0.3 sq km. Assuming a minimum geometric albedo of pR = 0.04, the maximum projected average nucleus radius is 15.44 +/-0.2 km, which is only 44 percent of the size estimated by Roemer (1966). However, using the albedo determined by Cruikshank & Brown (1983) of p = 0.13, the nucleus radius is only RN = 8.6 +/-0.l km. Because of the unknown nucleus orientation, these will be upper limits to the nucleus size. It appears that the nucleus of P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 is not the large nucleus that it has been believed to be for nearly 40 yr.

  15. Thermal Bremsstrahlung probing nuclear multifragmentation in nucleus-nucleus collisions around the Fermi energy; Bremsstrahlung thermique comme sonde de la multifragmentation nucleaire dans les collisions noyau-noyau aux energies de Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Enterria, D.G

    2000-05-15

    The thermodynamical properties of nuclear matter at moderate temperatures and densities, in the vicinity of the predicted nuclear liquid-gas phase transition, are studied using as experimental probe the hard-photons (E{sub {gamma}} > 30 MeV) emitted in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Photon and charged-particle production in four different heavy-ion reactions (Ar{sup 36} + Au{sup 197}, Ag{sup 107}, Ni{sup 58}, C{sup 12} at 60 A*MeV) is measured exclusively and inclusively coupling the TAPS photon spectrometer with two charged-particle and intermediate-mass-fragment detectors covering nearly 4{pi}. We confirm that Bremsstrahlung emission in first-chance (off-equilibrium) proton-neutron collisions (pn{gamma}) is the dominant origin of hard photons. We also firmly establish the existence of a thermal radiation component emitted in second-chance proton-neutron collisions. This thermal Bremsstrahlung emission takes place in semi-central and central nucleus-nucleus reactions involving heavy targets. We exploit this observation i) to demonstrate that thermal equilibrium is reached during the reaction, ii) to establish a new thermometer of nuclear matter based on Bremsstrahlung photons, iii) to derive the thermodynamical properties of the excited nuclear sources and, in particular, to establish a 'caloric curve' (temperature versus excitation energy), and iv) to assess the time-scales of the nuclear break-up process. (author)

  16. The Evolution of the Globular Cluster System in a Triaxial Galaxy Can a Galactic Nucleus Form by Globular Cluster Capture?

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R

    1993-01-01

    Dynamical friction due to field stars and tidal disruption caused by a central nucleus are crucial in determining the evolution of the globular cluster system in an elliptical galaxy. In this paper I examine the possibility that some of galactic nuclei have been formed by frictionally decayied globular clusters moving in a triaxial potential. The initial rapid growth of the nucleus, due mainly to massive clusters on box orbits falling in a short time scale into the galactic centre, is found to be later slowed by tidal disruption induced by the nucleus itself on less massive clusters in the way described by Ostriker, Binney & Saha. The efficiency of dynamical friction is such to carry to the centre of the galaxy enough globular cluster mass available to form a compact nucleus, but the actual modes of its collisionless formation remains to be investigated. The mass of the resulting nucleus is determined by the mutual feedback of the two mentioned processes, together with the knowlegde of the initial spatial...

  17. Projections of medullary and pontine noradrenergic neurons to the horizontal limb of the nucleus of diagonal band in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatorov, V V; Renaud, L P

    1999-01-01

    Recent investigations in the rat have implicated a noradrenergic innervation to the horizontal nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca as a critical link in a neural circuit that conveys baroreceptor information centrally to inhibit the firing of vasopressin-secreting neurons in the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus. In this study we used small intra-diagonal band injections of a retrograde tracer, rhodamine latex microspheres, in combination with tyrosine hydroxylase histochemistry to identify brainstem noradrenergic cells contributing to this innervation. In three cases where tracer injections were limited to the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, we observed 20-50 double-labelled neurons ipsilaterally in the dorsal part of the locus coeruleus (A6) and the caudal nucleus tractus solitarius (A2), and bilaterally in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (A1). Double-labelled neurons were also noted in the ventral tegmental area (dopaminergic A10 cell group). Although all major brainstem noradrenergic cell groups contribute fibers to the horizontal limb of the nucleus of diagonal band, data from physiological studies suggest that the noradrenergic A2 neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius are the most likely pathway through which it receives this baroreceptor information.

  18. [Calcium distribution in the central cell of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) before and after pollination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yi Lan; Liu, Ru Shi; Ye, Lv; Tian, Hui

    2008-02-01

    Potassium antimonite precipitation was used to locate calcium in the central cell of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) before and after pollination. At 3d before anthesis, two polar nuclei of central cell separately located at two polarity of the cell, and few calcium precipitates (ppts) appeared in the polar nuclei and cytoplasm, but some ppts in its small vacuoles. At 2d before anthesis, two polar nuclei moved toward the middle of the cell and fused to form a secondary nucleus, and the ppts evidently increased in the nucleus and cytoplasm. At 1d before anthesis, secondary nucleus again moved toward micropylar end and located near the egg to prepare for fertilization. Calcium precipitates were mainly accumulated in the secondary nucleus. After pollination and before fertilization, the distribution of calcium ppts was similar to that before pollination. At 4h after pollination, the central cell was fertilized, and calcium ppts evidently increased in the cell and numerous were accumulated in its nucleus and cytoplasm. At 6h after pollination, the primary endosperm nucleus completed its first division and formed two dissociate endosperm nuclei, and still many calcium precipitates appeared in the nucleus and cytoplasm. With endosperm development, calcium ppts decreased in the endosperm cell. At 1d after emasculated and without pollination, the secondary nucleus of the cell still bordered on the egg and some calcium ppts appeared in the secondary nucleus. The results indicated that the temporal and spatial changes of calcium in the central cell may play an important physiological role during the development of the central cell and endosperm.

  19. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P. (eds.)

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  20. Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sherwood

    1997-12-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples, held in Milpitas, California, January 16-18, 1989. Conveners are Sherwood Chang (NASA Ames Research Center) and Larry Nyquist (NASA Johnson Space Center). Program Committee members are Thomas Ahrens (ex-officio; California Institute of Technology), Lou Allamandola (NASA Ames Research Center), David Blake (NASA Ames Research Center), Donald Brownlee (University of Washington, Seattle), Theodore E. Bunch (NASA Ames Research Center), Humberto Campins (Planetary Science Institute), Jeff Cuzzi (NASA Ames Research Center), Eberhard Griin (Max-Plank-Institut fiir Kemphysik), Martha Hanner (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Alan Harris (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John Kerrid-e (University of Califomia, Los Angeles), Yves Langevin (University of Paris), Gerhard Schwehm (ESTEC), and Paul Weissman (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Logistics and administrative support for the workshop were provided by the Lunar and Planetary Institute Projects Office.

  1. Infrared spectrophotometry of Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcock (1983d) - A bare nucleus revealed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanner, M. S.; Aitken, D. K.; Knacke, R.; Mccorkle, S.; Roche, P. F.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    Spectra of the central core and surrounding coma of Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcock (1983d) were obtained at 8-13 microns on May 11 and 2-4 microns on May 12, 1983. Spatially resolved measurements at 10 microns with a 4-arcsec beam showed that the central core was more than 100 times brighter than the inner coma only 8 arcsec away; for radially outflowing dust, the brightness ratio would be a factor of 8. The observations of the central core are consistent with direct detection of a nucleus having a radius of approximately 5 km. The temperature of the sunlit hemisphere was greater than 300 K. Spectra of the core are featureless, while spectra of the coma suggest weak silicate emission. The spectra show no evidence for icy grains. The dust production rate on May 11.4 was about 100,000 g/sec, assuming that the gas flux from the dust-producing areas on the nucleus was about 0.00001 g/sq cm per sec.

  2. 孤束核胆碱能与组胺能系统对颈动脉窦压力感受器反射调节的交互作用%Involvement of cross interaction between central cholinergic and histaminergic systems in the nucleus tractus solitarius in regulating carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡力旬; 张国兴; 张玉英; 赵红芬; 于康英; 王国卿

    2013-01-01

    脑胆碱能系统与组胺能系统影响颈动脉窦压力感受器反射(carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex,CSR)活动,然而二者是否在孤束核(nucleus tractus solitarius,NTS)水平相互作用,跨转调节CSR,尚不清楚.本文在麻醉Sprague-Dawley (SD)大鼠孤离的一侧颈动脉窦区,通过窦内逐级加压引发CSR和动脉血压变化,经Logistic五参数曲线拟合,求得窦内压(intracarotid sinus pressure,ISP)-平均动脉压(mean arterial pressure,MAP)关系曲线及其特征参数,观察预先在NTS微量注射各选择性胆碱能受体拮抗剂[M1受体拮抗剂哌仑西平(pirenzepine,PRZ)、M2受体拮抗剂美索曲明(methoctramine,MTR)或N1受体拮抗剂六烃季胺(hexamethonium,HEX)]对侧脑室微量注射(intracerebroventricular injection,i.c.v.)组胺(histamine,HA)所致CSR变化的影响,以及预先在NTS微量注射组胺能H1受体拮抗剂氯苯吡胺(chlorpheniramine,CHL)或H2受体拮抗剂西咪替丁(cimetidine,CIM)对i.c.v.拟胆碱药毒扁豆碱(physostigmine,PHY)所致CSR变化的影响,以期解析中枢两大系统对CSR是否具有跨转调节机制.结果显示:(1)单独NTS内注射所给剂量的各选择性胆碱能受体拮抗剂或组胺能受体拮抗剂对CSR均无明显作用(P>0.05),也不引起动脉血压水平明显变动;(2)预先NTS内注射PRZ或MTR可部分翻转i.c.v.HA所致的CSR重调定,表现为ISP-MAP关系曲线在高窦压区明显左下移位(P<0.05),ISP-Gain关系曲线在中窦压区显著上移(P<0.05),反射参数平均动脉压变动范围和最大增益加大(P<0.05),最大增益时的窦内压值与饱和压减少(P<0.05),上述效应中PRZ的作用不如MTR的显著(P<0.05),但HEX对i.c.v.HA所致的CSR变化无明显作用(P>0.05);(3)预先NTS内注射CHL或CIM对i.c.v.PHY所致CSR变化的影响,类似于NTS内注射PRZ或MTR对i.c.v.HA所致CSR变化的作用,且CHL的效应强于CIM (P< 0.05).上述结果表明:侧脑室注射HA所致的CSR重调定机制

  3. Heavy flavors in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardi Marzia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step setup for heavy-flavor studies in high-energy nucleus-nucleus (AA collisions — addressing within a comprehensive framework the initial QQ¯$Q\\overline Q $ production, the propagation in the hot medium until decoupling and the final hadronization and decays — is presented. The propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described in a framework provided by the relativistic Langevin equation and the corresponding numerical results are compared to experimental data from RHIC and the LHC. In particular, outcomes for the nuclear modification factor RAA and for the elliptic flow υ2 of D/B mesons, heavy-flavor electrons and non-prompt J/ψ’s are displayed.

  4. CASTOR Centauro and Strange Object Research in nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bartke, Jerzy; Chileev, K; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Golubeva, M B; Guber, F F; Karavitcheva, T L; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Tiflov, V V; Wlodarczyk, Z

    2002-01-01

    We describe the CASTOR detector designed to probe the very forward, baryon-rich rapidity region in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC. We present a phenomenological model describing the formation of a QGP fireball in a high baryochemical potential environment, and its subsequent decay into baryons and strangelets. The model explains Centauros and the long-penetrating component and makes predictions for the LHC. Simulations of Centauro-type events were done. To study the response of the apparatus to new effects different exotic species (DCC, Centauros, strangelets etc.) were passed through the deep calorimeter. The energy deposition pattern in the calorimeter appears to be a new clear signature of the QGP.

  5. Experimental and phenomenological investigations of QCD matter in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronic, Anton

    2014-07-15

    This thesis is heterogeneous, comprising experimental papers at low energies (SIS-18 at GSI) and at the LHC, papers on phenomenology of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions, and papers on detectors. The overview covers the experimental papers and those on phenomenology. I have chosen to write it in a general manner, intended to be accessible to non-experts. It emphasizes recent measurements and their understanding at the LHC. The detector papers, which address many principle aspects of gaseous detectors, are summarized and placed in context in the review I co-wrote and which closes the stack. The detector papers included here are the outcome of an R and D program for the Transition Radiation Detector of ALICE.

  6. Jet energy loss and bulk parton collectivity in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Huan-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    Nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC produce high temperature and high energy density matter which exhibits paxtonic degrees of freedom. We will discuss measurements of nuclear modification factors for light hadrons and non-photonic electrons from heavy quark decays, which reflect the flavor dependence of energy loss of high momentum partons traversing the dense QCD medium. The dense QCD medium responds to energy loss of high momentum patrons in a pattern consistent with that expected from a hydrodynamic fluid. The hadronization of bulk partonic matter exhibits collectivity with effective partonic degrees of freedom. Nuclear collisions at RHIC provide an intriguing environment, where many constituent quark ingredients are readily available for possible formation of exotic particles through quark coalescence or recombinations.

  7. A triple nucleus in the Brightest Cluster Galaxy in Abell 193

    CERN Document Server

    Seigar, M S; Chorney, N E; Seigar, Marc S.; Lynam, Paul D.; Chorney, Nicole E.

    2003-01-01

    We present a ground-based near-infrared K-band image and an HST/WFPC2 image of the brightest cluster galaxy in Abell 193 (IC 1695). This object was selected as the central cluster galaxy using X-ray information. Both images reveal a triple nucleus structure. Previously, this galaxy was thought to have only 2 nuclei. We present colours and magnitudes and a colour plot of the three nuclei. The nuclear structure and colours of the nuclei in this galaxy suggest that a merger may have taken place in its recent history.

  8. A Heuristic Model for the Active Galactic Nucleus Based on the Planck Vacuum Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daywitt W. C.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The standard explanation for an active galactic nucleus (AGN is a "central engine" consisting of a hot accretion disk surrounding a supermassive black hole. Energy is generated by the gravitational infall of material which is heated to high temperatures in this dissipative accretion disk. What follows is an alternative model for the AGN based on the Planck vacuum (PV theory, where both the energy of the AGN and its variable luminosity are explained in terms of a variable photon flux emanating from the PV.

  9. A Frame Nucleus on a Two-side Prequantale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUShao-xian; WANGShun-qin; MAFei-fei

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a Frame nucleus and prime elements in a Prequantale are defined. The concrete structure of a Frame prequantic quotient is considered, and the relation between the half-prime element and the Frame nucleus in a two-side Prequantale are obtained.

  10. The subthalamic nucleus : Part I: Development, cytology, topography and connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marani, Enrico; Heida, Tjitske; Lakke, Egbert A.J.F.; Usunoff, Kamen G.

    2008-01-01

    This monograph on the subthalamic nucleus accentuates in Part I the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections. The light and electron microscopical cytology concerns the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types p

  11. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  12. Central line infections - hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infection; Central venous catheter - infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired ...

  13. Open and hidden charm in proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Linnyk, O; Cassing, W

    2008-01-01

    We review the collectivity and the suppression pattern of charmed mesons - produced in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at SPS (158 AGeV) and RHIC energies (21 ATeV) - in comparison to dynamical and thermal models. In particular, we examine the charmonium `melting' and the `comover dissociation' scenarios - implemented in a microscopic transport approach - in comparison to the available data from the SPS and RHIC. The analysis shows that the dynamics of c, c-bar quarks at RHIC are dominated by partonic or `pre-hadronic' interactions in the strongly coupled plasma stage. Both the `charmonium melting' and the hadronic `comover absorption and recreation model' are found, however, to be compatible with the experimental observation at SPS energies; the experimental ratio of Psi'/J/Psi versus centrality clearly favors the `hadronic comover' scenario. We find that the collective flow of charm in the purely hadronic Hadron-String Dynamics (HSD) transport appears compatible with the data at SPS energies, ...

  14. Co-expression of calretinin and parvalbumin in the rat facial nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiben Wang; Linfeng Zheng; Qinghong Huang; Yanbin Meng; Manyuan Kuang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calretinin and parvalbumin are members of the intracellular calcium binding protein family, which transform Ca2+ bioinformation into regulation of neuronal and neural network activities. OBJECTIVE: To observe expression and co-expression of calretinin and parvalbumin in rat facial nucleus neurons. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Neuronal morphology experiment was performed at the Research Laboratory of Applied Anatomy, Department Neurobiology and Anatomy, Xiangya Medical College of Central South University from August to October 2007. MATERIALS: Five healthy, adult Sprague Dawley rats were selected. Polyclonal rabbit-anti-parvalbumin and mouse-anti-calretinin were provided by Sigma, USA. METHODS: Rat brains were obtained and cut into coronal slices using a freezing microtome. Slices from the experimental group were immunofluorescent stained with polyclonal rabbit-anti-parvalbumin and mouse-anti-calretinin antibodies. The control group sections were stained with normal rabbit and mouse sera. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: lmmunofluorescent double-staining was used to detect calretinin and parvalbumin expression. Nissi staining was utilized for facial nucleus localization and neuronal morphology analysis. RESULTS: The majority of facial motor neurons was polygon-shaped, and expressed calretinin and parvalbumin. The calretinin-immunopositive neurons also exhibited parvalbumin immunoreactivity, that is, calretinin and parvalbumin were co-expressed in the same neuron. CONCLUSION: Calretinin and parvalbumin were expressed in facial nucleus neurons, with varied distribution.

  15. Glycine immunoreactivity of multipolar neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus which project to the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, J R; Ross, A T; Gillespie, M B; Ryugo, D K

    1999-06-14

    Certain distinct populations of neurons in the dorsal cochlear nucleus are inhibited by a neural source that is responsive to a wide range of acoustic frequencies. In this study, we examined the glycine immunoreactivity of two types of ventral cochlear nucleus neurons (planar and radiate) in the rat which project to the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and thus, might be responsible for this inhibition. Previously, we proposed that planar neurons provided a tonotopic and narrowly tuned input to the DCN, whereas radiate neurons provided a broadly tuned input and thus, were strong candidates as the source of broadband inhibition (Doucet and Ryugo [1997] J. Comp. Neurol. 385:245-264). We tested this idea by combining retrograde labeling and glycine immunohistochemical protocols. Planar and radiate neurons were first retrogradely labeled by injecting biotinylated dextran amine into a restricted region of the dorsal cochlear nucleus. The labeled cells were visualized using streptavidin conjugated to indocarbocyanine (Cy3), a fluorescent marker. Sections that contained planar or radiate neurons were then processed for glycine immunocytochemistry using diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. Immunostaining of planar neurons was light, comparable to that of excitatory neurons (pyramidal neurons in the DCN), whereas immunostaining of radiate neurons was dark, comparable to that of glycinergic neurons (cartwheel cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus and principal cells in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radiate neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus subserve the wideband inhibition observed in the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

  16. Central Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The Central Solenoid (CS) is a single layer coil wound internally in a supporting cylinder housed in the cryostat of the Liquid Argon Calorimeter. It was successfully tested at Toshiba in December 2000 and was delivered to CERN in September 2001 ready for integration in the LAr Calorimeter in 2003. An intermediate test of the chimney and proximity cryogenics was successfully performed in June 2002.

  17. Europa central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel BARTOSEK

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available La investigación francesa continúa interesándose por Europa Central. Desde luego, hay límites a este interés en el ambiente general de mi nueva patria: en la ignorancia, producto del largo desinterés de Francia por este espacio después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y en el comportamiento y la reflexión de la clase política y de los medios de comunicación (una anécdota para ilustrar este ambiente: durante la preparación de nuestro coloquio «Refugiados e inmigrantes de Europa Central en el movimiento antifascista y la Resistencia en Francia, 1933-1945», celebrado en París en octubre de 1986, el problema de la definición fue planteado concreta y «prácticamente». ¡Y hubo entonces un historiador eminente, para quién Alemania no formaría parte de Europa Central!.

  18. Inside a plant nucleus: discovering the proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovská, Beáta; Šebela, Marek; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear proteins are a vital component of eukaryotic cell nuclei and have a profound effect on the way in which genetic information is stored, expressed, replicated, repaired, and transmitted to daughter cells and progeny. Because of the plethora of functions, nuclear proteins represent the most abundant components of cell nuclei in all eukaryotes. However, while the plant genome is well understood at the DNA level, information on plant nuclear proteins remains scarce, perhaps with the exception of histones and a few other proteins. This lack of knowledge hampers efforts to understand how the plant genome is organized in the nucleus and how it functions. This review focuses on the current state of the art of the analysis of the plant nuclear proteome. Previous proteome studies have generally been designed to search for proteins involved in plant response to various forms of stress or to identify rather a modest number of proteins. Thus, there is a need for more comprehensive and systematic studies of proteins in the nuclei obtained at individual phases of the cell cycle, or isolated from various tissue types and stages of cell and tissue differentiation. All this in combination with protein structure, predicted function, and physical localization in 3D nuclear space could provide much needed progress in our understanding of the plant nuclear proteome and its role in plant genome organization and function.

  19. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nucleus $^{286}$Fl

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, Dorin N

    2016-01-01

    The decimal logarithm of spontaneous fission half-life of the superheavy nucleus $^{286}$Fl experimentally determined is $\\log_{10} T_f^{exp} (s) = -0.632$. We present a method to calculate the half-life based on the cranking inertia and the deformation energy, functions of two independent surface coordinates, using the best asymmetric two center shell model. In the first stage we study the statics. At a given mass asymmetry up to about $\\eta=0.5$ the potential barrier has a two hump shape, but for larger $\\eta$ it has only one hump. The touching point deformation energy versus mass asymmetry shows the three minima, produced by shell effects, corresponding to three decay modes: spontaneous fission, cluster decay and $\\alpha$~decay. The least action trajectory is determined in the plane $(R,\\eta)$ where $R$ is the separation distance of the fission fragments and $\\eta$ is the mass asymmetry. We may find a sequence of several trajectories one of which gives the least action. The parametrization with two deforma...

  20. Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus (4He), also known as the anti-α (α), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the α-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B Collider (RHIC; ref. 6) in 10(9) recorded gold-on-gold (Au+Au) collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic and coalescent nucleosynthesis models, providing an indication of the production rate of even heavier antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of 4He in cosmic radiation.

  1. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of a Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus: The Structure and Dynamics of M81*

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, A.J.; Nowak, M.A.; Markoff, S.; Marshall, H.L.; Canizares, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    We present Chandra HETGS observations of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) of M81. The HETGS is unique in providing high-resolution spectroscopy of the central 1" of M81, including the iron K bandpass. The continuum is a power law of photon index Gamma=1.8, similar to that seen in h

  2. Dual projections of single orexin- or CART-immunoreactive, lateral hypothalamic neurons to the paraventricular thalamic nucleus and nucleus accumbens shell in the rat: Light microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Y; Lee, Hyun S

    2016-03-01

    The paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) is a major relay station to the limbic forebrain areas such as the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh). Both PVT and AcbSh are known to receive feeding/arousal-related peptidergic fibers including orexin (ORX) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide. In the first series of experiments, we examined the peptidergic fiber distribution in the AcbSh; the density of ORX (or CART) fibers in the AcbSh was substantially lower than that in the PVT. At the light microscopic level, ORX (or CART) terminals formed close appositions to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)-, or enkephalin (Enk)-immunoreactive neuronal elements in the AcbSh. In the second series of experiments, we addressed the question of whether single ORX (or CART) cells in the hypothalamus provided divergent axon collaterals to the PVT and AcbSh. ORX neurons with dual projections were found in the medial, central, and lateral subdivisions of the lateral hypothalamus (LH), which amounted to an average of 1.6% of total ORX cells. CART neurons with divergent axon collaterals were observed in the LH, zona incerta, dorsal hypothalamic area, and retrochiasmatic nucleus, which represented a mean of 2.5% of total CART cells. None of arcuate CART cells sent dual projections. These data suggested that a portion of ORX (or CART) neurons in the hypothalamus, via divergent axon collaterals, might concurrently modulate the activity of PVT and AcbSh cells to affect feeding and drug-seeking behaviors.

  3. Development of the human dorsal nucleus of the vagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gang; Zhu, Hua; Zhou, Xiangtian; Qu, Jia; Ashwell, K W S; Paxinos, G

    2008-01-01

    The dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve plays an integral part in the control of visceral function. The aim of the present study was to correlate structural and chemical changes in the developing nucleus with available data concerning functional maturation of human viscera and reflexes. The fetal development (ages 9 to 26 weeks) of the human dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve has been examined with the aid of Nissl staining and immunocytochemistry for calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase. By 13 weeks, the dorsal vagal nucleus emerges as a distinct structure with at least two subnuclei visible in Nissl stained preparations. By 15 weeks, three subnuclei (dorsal intermediate, centrointermediate and ventrointermediate) were clearly discernible at the open medulla level with caudal and caudointermediate subnuclei visible at the level of the area postrema. All subnuclei known to exist in the adult were visible by 21 weeks and cytoarchitectonic differentiation of the nucleus was largely completed by 25 weeks. The adult distribution pattern of calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons was also largely completed by 21 weeks, although morphological differentiation of labeled neurons continued until the last age examined (26 weeks). The structural development of the dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve appears to occur in parallel with functional maturation of the cardiovascular and gastric movements, which the nucleus controls.

  4. Molecular chaperones encoded by a reduced nucleus: the cryptomonad nucleomorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, J M; Cavalier-Smith, T; Maier, U; Douglas, S

    2001-06-01

    Molecular chaperones mediate the correct folding of nascent or denatured proteins and are found in both the organelles and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. Cryptomonad algae are unusual in possessing an extra cytoplasmic compartment (the periplastid space), the result of having engulfed and retained a photosynthetic eukaryote. Within the periplastid space is a diminutive nucleus (the nucleomorph) that encodes mostly genes for its own expression as well as a few needed by the plastid. Two plastid-encoded chaperones (GroEL and DnaK) and a nucleomorph-encoded chaperone (Cpn60) have been reported from the cryptomonad, Guillardia theta. Here we analyse G. theta nucleomorph genes for members of the cytosolic HSP70 and HSP90 families of molecular chaperones, a heat shock transcription factor (HSF), and all eight subunits of the group II chaperonin, CCT. These are presumably all active in the periplastid space, assisting in the maturation of polypeptides required by the cell; we propose a central role for them also in the structure and assembly of a putative relict mitotic apparatus. Curiously, none of the genes for co-chaperones of HSP70, HSP90, or CCT have been detected in the nucleomorph genome; they are either not needed or are encoded in the host nuclear genome and targeted back into the periplastid space. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homologs of HSP70 and HSP90 are also not present. Striking differences in the degree of conservation of the various nucleomorph-encoded molecular chaperones were observed. While the G. theta HSP70 and HSP90 homologs are well conserved, each of the eight CCT subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, epsilon, eta, theta, and zeta) is remarkably divergent. Such differences are likely evidence for reduced/different functional constraints on the various molecular chaperones functioning in the periplastid space.

  5. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation and somatosensory temporal discrimination in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Antonella; Modugno, Nicola; Lena, Francesco; Dispenza, Sabrina; Gandolfi, Barbara; Iezzi, Ennio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2010-09-01

    Whereas numerous studies document the effects of dopamine medication and deep brain stimulation on motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease, few have investigated deep brain stimulation-induced changes in sensory functions. In this study of 13 patients with Parkinson's disease, we tested the effects of deep brain stimulation on the somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold. To investigate whether deep brain stimulation and dopaminergic medication induce similar changes in somatosensory discrimination, somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values were acquired under four experimental conditions: (i) medication ON/deep brain stimulation on; (ii) medication ON/deep brain stimulation off; (iii) medication OFF/deep brain stimulation on; and (iv) medication OFF/deep brain stimulation off. Patients also underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluations during each experimental session. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values obtained in patients were compared with 13 age-matched healthy subjects. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values were significantly higher in patients than in healthy subjects. In patients, somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values were significantly lower when patients were studied in medication ON than in medication OFF conditions. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values differed significantly between deep brain stimulation on and deep brain stimulation off conditions only when the patients were studied in the medication ON condition and were higher in the deep brain stimulation on/medication ON than in the deep brain stimulation off/medication ON condition. Dopamine but not subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation restores the altered somatosensory temporal discrimination in patients with Parkinson's disease. Deep brain stimulation degrades somatosensory temporal discrimination by modifying central somatosensory processing whereas dopamine restores the

  6. On the long-range correlations in hadron-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto, N; Pajares, C

    2007-01-01

    Long-range correlations between multiplicities in different rapidity windows in hadron-nucleus collisions are analyzed. After recalling the standard results in the probabilistic model, we study them in the framework of perturbative QCD. Considering interacting BFKL pomerons in the form of fan diagrams coupled to a dilute projectile, analytic estimates are done for very large rapidities. The correlation strength results weakly depending on energy and centrality or nuclear size, and generically greater than unity. Finally, we turn to the Color Glass Condensate framework. For a saturated projectile, the resulting correlation strength turns out to be smaller than unity and decreasing with increasing energy. Its behavior with increasing centrality or nuclear size depends on the considered rapidity windows.

  7. Quarkonium-nucleus bound states from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, S.  R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chang, E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Cohen, S.  D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Detmold, W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lin, H. -W. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Orginos, K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Parreño, A. [Univ., de Barcelona, Marti Franques (Spain); Savage, M.  J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Quarkonium-nucleus systems are composed of two interacting hadronic states without common valence quarks, which interact primarily through multi-gluon exchanges, realizing a color van der Waals force. We present lattice QCD calculations of the interactions of strange and charm quarkonia with light nuclei. Both the strangeonium-nucleus and charmonium-nucleus systems are found to be relatively deeply bound when the masses of the three light quarks are set equal to that of the physical strange quark. Extrapolation of these results to the physical light-quark masses suggests that the binding energy of charmonium to nuclear matter is B < 40 MeV.

  8. Nonthermal Fluctuations and Mechanics of the Active Cell Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, K; Byrd, H; MacKintosh, F C; Kilfoil, M L

    2013-01-01

    We present direct measurements of fluctuations in the nucleus of yeast cells. While prior work has shown these fluctuations to be active and non-thermal in character, their origin and time dependence are not understood. We show that nuclear fluctuations can be quantitatively understood by uncorrelated, active force fluctuations driving a nuclear medium that is dominated by an uncondensed DNA solution, for which we perform rheological measurements on an in vitro model system under similar conditions to what is expected in the nucleus. We conclude that the eukaryotic nucleus of living cells is a nonequilibrium soft material whose fluctuations are actively driven, and are far from thermal in their time dependence.

  9. Gabapentin inhibits central sensitization during migraine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanbo Zhang; Guo Shao; Wei Zhang; Sijie Li; Jingzhong Niu; Dongmei Hu; Mingfeng Yang; Xunming Ji

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral and central sensitizations are phenomena that occur during migraine. The role of pentin, a migraine preventive drug, on central sensitization remains unclear. In this study, a rat model of migraine was established by electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion, and the an-imals were given intragastric gabapentin. Changes in amino acid content in the cerebrospinal fluid and protein kinase C membrane translocation in the spinal trigeminal nucleus were examined to clarify the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of gabapentin in the treatment of central sensitization during migraine. Electrophysiology, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and western blot analysis results revealed that gabapentin reduces neuronal excitability in the spinal nucleus in the trigeminal nerve, decreases excitatory amino acid content and inhibits the activation of protein ki-nase C. This provides evidence that excitatory amino acids and protein kinase C are involved in the formation and maintenance of central sensitization during migraine. Gabapentin inhibits migraine by reducing excitatory amino acid content in the cerebrospinal fluid and inhibiting protein kinase C ac-tivation.

  10. Central pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Supreet

    2014-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topic addressed in this issue is central pain, a neuropathic pain syndrome caused by a lesion in the brain or spinal cord that sensitizes one's perception of pain. It is a debilitating condition caused by various diseases such as multiple sclerosis, strokes, spinal cord injuries, or brain tumors. Varied symptoms and the use of pharmacological medicines and nonpharmacological therapies will be addressed.

  11. central t

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Piña Monarrez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dado que la Regresión Ridge (RR, es una estimación sesgada que parte de la solución de la regresión de Mínimos Cuadrados (MC, es vital establecer las condiciones para las que la distribución central t de Student que se utiliza en la prueba de hipótesis en MC, sea también aplicable a la regresión RR. La prueba de este importante resultado se presenta en este artículo.

  12. Electromagnetic probes of a pure-glue initial state in nucleus-nucleus collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovchenko, V.; Karpenko, Iu. A.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Satarov, L. M.; Mishustin, I. N.; Kämpfer, B.; Stoecker, H.

    2016-08-01

    Partonic matter produced in the early stage of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is assumed to be composed mainly of gluons, and quarks and antiquarks are produced at later times. To study the implications of such a scenario, the dynamical evolution of a chemically nonequilibrated system is described by ideal (2+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics with a time dependent (anti)quark fugacity. The equation of state interpolates linearly between the lattice data for the pure gluonic matter and the lattice data for the chemically equilibrated quark-gluon plasma. The spectra and elliptic flows of thermal dileptons and photons are calculated for central Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider energy of √{sN N}=2.76 TeV. We test the sensitivity of the results to the choice of equilibration time, including also the case where the complete chemical equilibrium of partons is reached already at the initial stage. It is shown that a suppression of quarks at early times leads to a significant reduction of the yield of the thermal dileptons, but only to a rather modest suppression of the pT distribution of direct photons. It is demonstrated that an enhancement of photon and dilepton elliptic flows might serve as a promising signature of the pure-glue initial state.

  13. The role of hypothalamus tuberomammillary nucleus on the regulation of respiratory movement of rats with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen CHEN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the role of central histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN of posterior hypothalamus on asthma. Methods  Seventy-two healthy male SD rats were served as study objects. Sixty-four rats were sensitized with ovalbumin (OA solution intraperitoneally and challenged with OA aerosol inhalation to prepare asthma model. Asthma attack was evoked in asthmatic rats by OA solution injected intravenously, the electrical activities of TMN in posterior hypothalamus were recorded with biological signal collecting system and the power spectra were analyzed. TMN was lesioned or stimulated electrically by central stereo positioning technology. Histamine H3 receptor agonist R-(α-methylhistamine (RMHA or antagonist thioperamide (THIO was microinjected into TMN by central nuclear group microinjection technology, and the pulmonary function indexes were detected including diaphragm electromyography (EMGdi frequency, EMGdi integral, minute ventilation volume (MVV, expiratory time/inspiratory time (TE/TI, airway resistance (Raw and dynamic pulmonary compliance (Cdyn. Results  Compared with control group, the percentage of α, β1 and β2 wave in the electrical activities of TMN of asthmatic rats increased significantly, while the percentage of δ and θ wave decreased and the total discharge power increased. Compared with the corresponding control group, electric lesion of TMN or TMN microinjected with histamine H3 receptor antagonist increased EMGdi frequency, TE/TI, Raw, and decreased EMGdi integral, MVV and Cdyn. Compared with the corresponding control group, electric stimulation of TMN or TMN microinjected with histamine H3 receptor agonist decreased EMGdi frequency, TE/TI, Raw, and increased EMGdi integral, MVV and Cdyn. Conclusion  Central histaminergic neurons in tuberomammillary nucleus of posterior hypothalamus are activated in asthmatic rats. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.12.09

  14. Structural Description of Polyaromatic Nucleus in Residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Huicheng; Yan Yongjie; Sun Wanfu; Wang Jifeng

    2007-01-01

    The proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy(1H-NMR),the synchronous fluorescence spectrometry(SFS)and the rutheniam ions catalyzed oxidation(RICO)method wen used to determine the chemical structure of polyaromatic nucleus in Oman residue fractions.The results of1H-NMR analyses showed that the average numbers of aromatic rings in the aromatics,resins and asphaltenes units were 3.2,5.6 and 8.2.respectively.SFS was used to investigate the distribution of aromatic tings in residue fractions,the main distribution range of aromatic rings in aromatics,resins and asphaltenes were 3-4 rings,3-5 rings and more than 5 tings,respectively.The aromatic network in residue fractions was oxidized to produce numerous carboxylic acids.The types and content of benzenepolycarboxylic acids,such as phthalic acid,benzenetricarboxylic acids,benzenetetracarbOxylic acids,benzenepentacarboxylic acid and benzenehexacarboxylic acid disclosed the condensed types of aromatic nuclei in the core.The biphenyl fraction(BIPH),the cata-condensed fraction(CATA),the peri-condensed fraction(PERI)and the condensed index(BCI)were calculated based on the benzenepolycarboxylic acids formed.The results implied that there was less biphenyl type structures in all residue fractions.The aromatics fraction was almost composed of the cata-condensed type system,and the asphaltenes fraction was wholly composed of the peri-condensed type system,while in the resins fraction co-existed the two types,herein the peri-condensed type Was predominant over the cata-condensed type.Based on the analytical results obtained in the study,the components-aromatics,resins and asphaltenes-were given the likely structural models.

  15. Quantitative analysis of the fusion cross sections using different microscopic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, A.; Alharbi, T.

    2017-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems are investigated near and above the Coulomb barrier using the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The microscopic nuclear interaction potential is computed by four methods, namely: the double-folding model based on a realistic density-dependent M3Y NN interaction with a finite-range exchange part, the Skyrme energy density functional in the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approximation, the generalized Proximity potential, and the Akyüz-Winther interaction. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the calculations of the DFM give quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, being much better than the other methods. New parameterized forms for the fusion barrier heights and positions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of deformation and orientation degrees of freedom on the distribution of the Coulomb barrier characteristics as well as the fusion cross sections are studied for the reactions 16 O + 70 Ge and 28 Si + 100 Mo. The calculated values of the total fusion cross sections are compared with coupled channel calculations using the code CCFULL and compared with the experimental data. Our results reveal that the inclusion of deformations and orientation degrees of freedom improves the comparison with the experimental data.

  16. Heavy-flavor dynamics in nucleus-nucleus collisions: from RHIC to LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Monteno, M; Beraudo, A; De Pace, A; Molinari, A; Nardi, M; Prino, F

    2011-01-01

    The stochastic dynamics of c and b quarks in the fireball created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC is studied employing a relativistic Langevin equation, based on a picture of multiple uncorrelated random collisions with the medium. Heavy-quark transport coefficients are evaluated within a pQCD approach, with a proper HTL resummation of medium effects for soft scatterings. The Langevin equation is embedded in a multi-step setup developed to study heavy-flavor observables in pp and AA collisions, starting from a NLO pQCD calculation of initial heavy-quark yields, complemented in the nuclear case by shadowing corrections, k_T-broadening and nuclear geometry effects. Then, only for AA collisions, the Langevin equation is solved numerically in a background medium described by relativistic hydrodynamics. Finally, the propagated heavy quarks are made hadronize and decay into electrons. Results for the nuclear modification factor R_AA of heavy-flavor hadrons and electrons from their semi-leptonic decays...

  17. Nuclear mean field and double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Khoa, Dao T; Loan, Doan Thi; Loc, Bui Minh

    2016-01-01

    Realistic density dependent CDM3Yn versions of the M3Y interaction have been used in an extended Hartree-Fock (HF) calculation of nuclear matter (NM), with the nucleon single-particle potential determined from the total NM energy based on the Hugenholtz-van Hove theorem that gives rise naturally to a rearrangement term (RT). Using the RT of the single-nucleon potential obtained exactly at different NM densities, the density- and energy dependence of the CDM3Yn interactions was modified to account properly for both the RT and observed energy dependence of the nucleon optical potential. Based on a local density approximation, the double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential has been extended to take into account consistently the rearrangement effect and energy dependence of the nuclear mean-field potential, using the modified CDM3Yn interactions. The extended double-folding model was applied to study the elastic $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C and $^{16}$O+$^{12}$C scattering at the refractive energies, wher...

  18. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Interaction with the Arcuate Nucleus; Essential for Organizing Physiological Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is generally considered the master clock, independently driving all circadian rhythms. We recently demonstrated the SCN receives metabolic and cardiovascular feedback adeptly altering its neuronal activity. In the present study, we show that microcuts effectively removing SCN-arcuate nucleus (ARC) interconnectivity in Wistar rats result in a loss of rhythmicity in locomotor activity, corticosterone levels, and body temperature in constant dark (DD) conditions. Elimination of these reciprocal connections did not affect SCN clock gene rhythmicity but did cause the ARC to desynchronize. Moreover, unilateral SCN lesions with contralateral retrochiasmatic microcuts resulted in identical arrhythmicity, proving that for the expression of physiological rhythms this reciprocal SCN-ARC interaction is essential. The unaltered SCN c-Fos expression following glucose administration in disconnected animals as compared to a significant decrease in controls demonstrates the importance of the ARC as metabolic modulator of SCN neuronal activity. Together, these results indicate that the SCN is more than an autonomous clock, and forms an essential component of a larger network controlling homeostasis. The present novel findings illustrate how an imbalance between SCN and ARC communication through circadian disruption could be involved in the etiology of metabolic disorders. PMID:28374011

  19. Cytotoxicity of nucleus-targeting fluorescent gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Mingxi; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs.Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell

  20. Nucleus management in manual small incision cataract surgery by phacosection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleus management is critical in manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS, as the integrity of the tunnel, endothelium and posterior capsule needs to be respected. Several techniques of nucleus management are in vogue, depending upon the specific technique of MSICS. Nucleus can be removed in toto or bisected or trisected into smaller segments. The pressure in the eye can be maintained at the desired level with the use of an anterior chamber maintainer or kept at atmospheric levels. In MSICS, unlike phacoemulsification, there is no need to limit the size of the tunnel or restrain the size of capsulorrhexis. Large well-structured tunnels and larger capsulorrhexis provide better control on the surgical maneuvers. Safety and simplicity of MSICS has made it extremely popular. The purpose of this article is to describe nucleus management by phacosection in MSICS.

  1. Isotope Dependence of Superheavy Nucleus Formation Cross Section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zu-Hua; BAG Jing-Dong

    2006-01-01

    The dynamical process in the superheavy nucleus synthesis is studied on the basis of the two-dimensional Smolu-chowski equation. Special attention is paid to the isotope dependence of the cross section for the superheavy nucleus formation by means of making a comparison among the reaction systems of 54Fe + 204Pb, 56Fe + 206Pb, and 58Fe + 208Pb. It is found by this comparison that the formation cross section is very sensitive to the conditional saddle-point height and the neutron separation energy of the compound nucleus. Reaction systems with lower height of conditional saddle-point and smaller neutron separation energy are more favourable for the synthesis of the superheavy nucleus.

  2. Low-energy antinucleon-nucleus interaction revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2015-08-01

    Annihilation cross sections of antiprotons and antineutrons on the proton between 50 and 400 MeV/c show Coulomb focusing below 200 MeV/c and almost no charge-dependence above 200 MeV/c. Similar comparisons for heavier targets are not possible for lack of overlap between nuclear targets studied with and beams. Interpolating between -nucleus annihilation cross sections with the help of an optical potential to compare with -nucleus annihilation cross sections reveal unexpected features of Coulomb interactions in the latter. Direct comparisons between -nucleus and -nucleus annihilations at very low energies could be possible if cross sections are measured on the same targets and at the same energies as the available cross sections for . Such measurements may be feasible in the foreseeable future.

  3. Truncal ataxia from infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyun; Ryoo, Sookyung; Moon, So Young; Seo, Sand Won; Na, Duk L

    2012-08-01

    Truncal ataxia in medullary infarction may be caused by involvement of the lateral part of the medulla; however, truncal ataxia in infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has received comparatively little attention. We report a patient with truncal ataxia due to medial medullary infarction located in the ION. A lesion in the ION could produce a contralateral truncal ataxia due to increased inhibitory input to the contralesional vestibular nucleus from the contralesional flocculus.

  4. The integrative role of the pedunculopontine nucleus in human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Brian; Welter, Marie-Laure; Belaid, Hayat; Fernandez Vidal, Sara; Bardinet, Eric; Grabli, David; Karachi, Carine

    2015-05-01

    The brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus has a likely, although unclear, role in gait control, and is a potential deep brain stimulation target for treating resistant gait disorders. These disorders are a major therapeutic challenge for the ageing population, especially in Parkinson's disease where gait and balance disorders can become resistant to both dopaminergic medication and subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Here, we present electrophysiological evidence that the pedunculopontine and subthalamic nuclei are involved in distinct aspects of gait using a locomotor imagery task in 14 patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing surgery for the implantation of pedunculopontine or subthalamic nuclei deep brain stimulation electrodes. We performed electrophysiological recordings in two phases, once during surgery, and again several days after surgery in a subset of patients. The majority of pedunculopontine nucleus neurons (57%) recorded intrasurgically exhibited changes in activity related to different task components, with 29% modulated during visual stimulation, 41% modulated during voluntary hand movement, and 49% modulated during imaginary gait. Pedunculopontine nucleus local field potentials recorded post-surgically were modulated in the beta and gamma bands during visual and motor events, and we observed alpha and beta band synchronization that was sustained for the duration of imaginary gait and spatially localized within the pedunculopontine nucleus. In contrast, significantly fewer subthalamic nucleus neurons (27%) recorded intrasurgically were modulated during the locomotor imagery, with most increasing or decreasing activity phasically during the hand movement that initiated or terminated imaginary gait. Our data support the hypothesis that the pedunculopontine nucleus influences gait control in manners extending beyond simply driving pattern generation. In contrast, the subthalamic nucleus seems to control movement execution that is not likely to be gait

  5. Shell Correction at the Saddle Point for Superheavy Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张炜; 张时声; 张双全; 孟杰

    2003-01-01

    The potential energy surface for superheavy nucleus has been studied within the framework of the constrained relativistic mean field theory, and the shell correction energy as a function of deformation has been extracted by the Strutinsky shell correction procedure. Contrary to the usual expectation, the shell correction energy at the saddle point is too important to be neglected, and it has essential contribution to the fission barrier in superheavy nucleus.

  6. A FIBER APPARATUS IN THE NUCLEUS OF THE YEAST CELL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinow, C. F.; Marak, J.

    1966-01-01

    The structure and mode of division of the nucleus of budding yeast cells have been studied by phase-contrast microscopy during life and by ordinary microscopy after Helly fixation. The components of the nucleus were differentially stained by the Feulgen procedure, with Giemsa solution after hydrolysis, and with iron alum haematoxylin. New information was obtained in cells fixed in Helly's by directly staining them with 0.005% acid fuchsin in 1% acetic acid in water. Electron micrographs have been made of sections of cells that were first fixed with 3% glutaraldehyde, then divested of their walls with snail juice, and postfixed with osmium tetroxide. Light and electron microscopy have given concordant information about the organization of the yeast nucleus. A peripheral segment of the nucleus is occupied by relatively dense matter (the "peripheral cluster" of Mundkur) which is Feulgen negative. The greater part of the nucleus is filled with fine-grained Feulgen-positive matter of low density in which chromosomes could not be identified. Chromosomes become visible in this region under the light microscope at meiosis. In the chromatin lies a short fiber with strong affinity for acid fuchsin. The nucleus divides by elongation and constriction, and during this process the fiber becomes long and thin. Electron microscopy has resolved it into a bundle of dark-edged 150 to 180 A filaments which extends between "centriolar plaques" that are attached to the nuclear envelope. PMID:5331666

  7. Variable stars and stellar populations in Andromeda XXV: III. A central cluster or the galaxy nucleus?

    CERN Document Server

    Cusano, Felice; Clementini, Gisella; Cignoni, Michele; Federici, Luciana; Marconi, Marcella; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Musella, Ilaria; Testa, Vincenzo; Carini, Roberta; Faccini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We present B and V time-series photometry of Andromeda XXV, the third galaxy in our program on the Andromeda's satellites, that we have imaged with the Large Binocular Cameras of the Large Binocular Telescope. The field of Andromeda XXV is found to contain 63 variable stars, for which we present light curves and characteristics of the light variation (period, amplitudes, variability type, mean magnitudes, etc.). The sample includes 58 RR Lyrae variables (46 fundamental-mode $-$ RRab, and 12 first-overtone $-$RRc, pulsators), three anomalous Cepheids, one eclipsing binary system and one unclassified variable. The average period of the RRab stars ($\\langle Pab \\rangle$ = 0.60 $\\sigma=0.04$ days) and the period-amplitude diagram place Andromeda XXV in the class of the Oosterhoff-Intermediate objects. From the average luminosity of the RR Lyrae stars we derive for the galaxy a distance modulus of (m-M)$_0$=$24.63\\pm0.17$ mag. The color-magnitude diagram reveals the presence in Andromeda XXV of a single, metal-poo...

  8. A comparative neuroanatomical study of the red nucleus of the cat, macaque and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Onodera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human red nucleus (Nr is comparatively less well-studied than that of cats or monkeys. Given the functional importance of reticular and midbrain structures in control of movement and locomotion as well as from an evolutionary perspective, we investigated the nature and extent of any differences in Nr projections to the olivary complex in quadrupedal and bipedal species. Using neuroanatomical tract-tracing techniques we developed a "neural sheet" hypothesis allowing us to propose how rubro-olivary relations differ among the three species. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase staining supports findings that the cat's nucleus accessories medialis of Bechtrew (NB projects mainly to the lateral bend of the principal olive. We clarified boundaries among nucleus of Darkschewitsch (ND, NB and parvicellular red nucleus (pNr of the cat's neural sheet. The macaque's ND-medial accessory olivary projection is rostro-caudally organized and the dorsomedial and ventrolateral parts of the macaque's pNr may project to the principal olive's rostral and caudal dorsal lamella; in cat it projects as well to pNr. Myelin- and Nissl-stained sections show that a well-developed dorsomedial part of the human Nr consists of densely packed cells, deriving small myelinated fibers that continue into the medial central tegmental tract. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these findings we suggest there are distinct bipedal-quadrupedal differences for Nr projections to the olivary complex. We propose the Nr of cats and monkeys comprise the ND, NB and pNr in a zonal sheet-like structure, retaining clear nuclear boundaries and an isolated, well-developed mNr. The human NB may be distinguished from its more specialised ND (ND lies alongside a well-developed pNr in the human central gray. Phylogenetically, the NB may have been translocated into a roll-shaped Nr in the reticular formation, the dorsomedial portion of which might correspond to the cat

  9. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic-production processes due to two-photon exchange in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Feynman diagrams for two-photon exchange are evaluated using quantum electrodynamics. The total cross section and stopping power for projectile and target nuclei of identical charge are found to be significant for heavy nuclei above a few GeV per nucleon-incident energy.

  10. Coherent production of the long-lived pionium nP states in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Gevokyan, S

    2015-01-01

    The coherent production of the $nP$ states of the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atoms ($A_{2\\pi}$) in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is considered as a possible source of the $A_{2\\pi}(nP)$ beam for the pionium Lamb-shift measurement. A general expression for estimation of the $A_{2\\pi}(nP)$ yields is derived in the framework of the equivalent photon approximation.

  11. Dynamically Influenced Molecular Clouds in the Nucleus of NGC 6946: Variations in the CO Isotopic Line Ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, D S; Meier, David S.; Turner, Jean L.

    2004-01-01

    We present high resolution (~5'') maps of the J = 1 - 0 transitions of ^{13}CO and C^{18}O towards the nucleus of NGC 6946, made with the Owens Valley Millimeter Array. The images are compared with existing ^{12}CO(1-0) maps to investigate localized changes in gas properties across the nucleus. As compared to ^{12}CO, both ^{13}CO and C^{18}O are more confined to the central ring of molecular gas associated with the nuclear star formation; that is, ^{12}CO is stronger relative to ^{13}CO and C^{18}O away from the nucleus and along the spiral arms. The ^{12}CO(1-0)/^{13}CO(1-0) line ratio reaches very high values of >40. We attribute the relative ^{13}CO weakness to a rapid change in the interstellar medium from dense star forming cores in a central ring to diffuse, low density molecular gas in and behind the molecular arms. This change is abrupt, occurring in less than a beamsize (90 pc), about the size of a giant molecular cloud. Column densities determined from ^{13}CO(1-0), C^{18}O(1-0), and 1.4 mm dust co...

  12. Role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase Ⅱ alpha in central nucleus of amygdale in fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia in rats: the relationship with mEPSCs%中央杏仁核钙/钙调素依赖性蛋白激酶Ⅱα在芬太尼诱发大鼠痛觉过敏中的作用:与mEPSCs的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李珍; 王忠三; 罗放

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase Ⅱ alpha (CaMK Ⅱα) in the central nucleus of the amygdale (CeA) in fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia in rats and the relationship with miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs).Methods Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats,weighing 50-80 g,in which the CeA was successfully cannulated,were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=8 each) using a random number table:control 1 group (group C1),fentanylinduced hyperalgesia 1 group (group FIH1),KN92 group,and KN93 group.Normal saline was injected subcutaneously,and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was given into the amygdale in group C1.In group FIH1,fentanyl was injected subcutaneously (60 μg/kg per time,4 times in total,15-min interval,cumulative dose of 240 μg/kg) to establish the model of hyperalgesia.In KN92 and KN93 groups,KN92 and KN93 10 nmol were given into the CeA after establishing the model.The mechanical paw withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal paw withdrawal threshold (TWT) were measured at 6 and 7 h after fentanyl or normal saline injection.Another 12 Sprague-Dawley rats were selected and randomly divided into either control 2 group (group C2) or fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia 2 group (group FIH2) using a random number table with 6 rats in each group.The brains were removed and sliced 12 h later,and the frequency and amplitude of mEPSCs were recorded.KN93 10 nmol was then added to the artificial cerebral spinal fluid,and the frequency and amplitude of mEPSCs were recorded by whole cell patch-clamp technique.Results Compared with group C 1,the MWT and TWT were significantly decreased at 6 h after fentanyl or normal saline injection in FIH1,KN92 and KN93 groups,and at 7 h after fentanyl or normal saline injection in FIH and KN92 groups (P<0.05).Compared with group FIH1,the MWT and TWT were significantly increased at 7 h after fentanyl or normal saline injection in group KN93 (P<0.05),and no significant change was found in group KN92 (P

  13. The interfascicular trigeminal nucleus: a precerebellar nucleus in the mouse defined by retrograde neuronal tracing and genetic fate mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuhong; Tvrdik, Petr; Makki, Nadja; Machold, Robert; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2013-02-15

    We have found a previously unreported precerebellar nucleus located among the emerging fibers of the motor root of the trigeminal nerve in the mouse, which we have called the interfascicular trigeminal nucleus (IF5). This nucleus had previously been named the tensor tympani part of the motor trigeminal nucleus (5TT) in rodent brain atlases, because it was thought to be a subset of small motor neurons of the motor trigeminal nucleus innervating the tensor tympani muscle. However, following injection of retrograde tracer in the cerebellum, the labeled neurons in IF5 were found to be choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) negative, indicating that they are not motor neurons. The cells of IF5 are strongly labeled in mice from Wnt1Cre and Atoh1 CreER lineage fate mapping, in common with the major precerebellar nuclei that arise from the rhombic lip and that issue mossy fibers. Analysis of sections from mouse Hoxa3, Hoxb1, and Egr2 Cre labeled lineages shows that the neurons of IF5 arise from rhombomeres caudal to rhombomere 4, most likely from rhombomeres 6-8. We conclude that IF5 is a significant precerebellar nucleus in the mouse that shares developmental gene expression characteristics with mossy fiber precerebellar nuclei that arise from the caudal rhombic lip.

  14. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  15. The red nucleus and the rubrospinal projection in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huazheng; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2012-04-01

    We studied the organization and spinal projection of the mouse red nucleus with a range of techniques (Nissl stain, immunofluorescence, retrograde tracer injections into the spinal cord, anterograde tracer injections into the red nucleus, and in situ hybridization) and counted the number of neurons in the red nucleus (3,200.9 ± 230.8). We found that the rubrospinal neurons were mainly located in the parvicellular region of the red nucleus, more lateral in the rostral part and more medial in the caudal part. Labeled neurons were least common in the rostral and caudal most parts of the red nucleus. Neurons projecting to the cervical cord were predominantly dorsomedially placed and neurons projecting to the lumbar cord were predominantly ventrolaterally placed. Immunofluorescence staining with SMI-32 antibody showed that ~60% of SMI-32-positive neurons were cervical cord-projecting neurons and 24% were lumbar cord-projecting neurons. SMI-32-positive neurons were mainly located in the caudomedial part of the red nucleus. A study of vGluT2 expression showed that the number and location of glutamatergic neurons matched with those of the rubrospinal neurons. In the anterograde tracing experiments, rubrospinal fibers travelled in the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus, between the lateral spinal nucleus and the calretinin-positive fibers of the lateral funiculus. Rubrospinal fibers terminated in contralateral laminae 5, 6, and the dorsal part of lamina 7 at all spinal cord levels. A few fibers could be seen next to the neurons in the dorsolateral part of lamina 9 at levels of C8-T1 (hand motor neurons) and L5-L6 (foot motor neurons), which is consistent with a view that rubrospinal fibers may play a role in distal limb movement in rodents.

  16. Centrality and multiparticle production in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozhzhova, T. A.; Kovalenko, V. N.; Seryakov, A. Yu.; Feofilov, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    A critical analysis of methods for selecting central events in high-energy proton-nucleus ( pA) and nucleus-nucleus ( AA) collisions is presented. A sample of event classes in which background fluctuations associated with the dispersion of the impact parameter of each event or the number of participant nucleons are minimal is examined. At the SPS and LHC energies, the numbers of nucleon-nucleon collisions are estimated with the aid of the Monte Carlo event generators HIJING and AMPT, which take into account energy-momentum conservation, and on the basis of a non-Glauber model involving string fusion and a modified Glauber model. The results obtained in this way demonstrate the need for revising the extensively used application of the Glauber model in normalizing multiplicity yields in experimental data on pA and AA collisions in the soft region of the spectrum.

  17. Differential molecular profiles of astrocytes in degeneration and re-innervation after sensory deafferentation of the adult rat cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrich, Michaela; Zeber, Anne C; Hildebrandt, Heika; Illing, Robert-Benjamin

    2013-07-01

    Ablating the cochlea causes total sensory deafferentation of the cochlear nucleus. Over the first postoperative week, degeneration of the auditory nerve and its synaptic terminals in the cochlear nucleus temporally overlaps with its re-innervation by axon collaterals of medial olivocochlear neurons. At the same time, astrocytes increase in size and density. We investigated the time courses of the expression of ezrin, polysialic acid, matrix metalloprotease-9 and matrix metalloprotease-2 within these astrocytes during the first week following cochlear ablation. All four proteins are known to participate in degeneration, regeneration, or both, following injury of the central nervous system. In a next step, stereotaxic injections of kainic acid were made into the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body prior to cochlear ablation to destroy the neurons that re-innervate the deafferented cochlear nucleus by axon collaterals developing growth-associated protein 43 immunoreactivity. This experimental design allowed us to distinguish between molecular processes associated with degeneration and those associated with re-innervation. Under these conditions, astrocytic growth and proliferation showed an unchanged deafferentation-induced pattern. Similarly, the distribution and amount of ezrin and matrix metalloprotease-9 in astrocytes after cochlear ablation developed in the same way as under cochlear ablation alone. In sharp contrast, the astrocytic expression of polysialic acid and matrix metalloprotease-2 normally invoked by cochlear ablation collapsed when re-innervation of the cochlear nucleus was inhibited by lesioning medial olivocochlear neurons with kainic acid. In conclusion, re-innervation, including axonal growth and synaptogenesis, seems to prompt astrocytes to recompose their molecular profile, paving the way for tissue reorganisation after nerve degeneration and loss of synaptic contacts.

  18. The planetary nebula Abell 48 and its [WN] nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, David J.; Bojičić, I. S.; Parker, Q. A.; Stupar, M.; Wachter, S.; DePew, K.; Danehkar, A.; Fitzgerald, M. T.; Douchin, D.

    2014-05-01

    We have conducted a detailed multi-wavelength study of the peculiar nebula Abell 48 and its central star. We classify the nucleus as a helium-rich, hydrogen-deficient star of type [WN4-5]. The evidence for either a massive WN or a low-mass [WN] interpretation is critically examined, and we firmly conclude that Abell 48 is a planetary nebula (PN) around an evolved low-mass star, rather than a Population I ejecta nebula. Importantly, the surrounding nebula has a morphology typical of PNe, and is not enriched in nitrogen, and thus not the `peeled atmosphere' of a massive star. We estimate a distance of 1.6 kpc and a reddening, E(B - V) = 1.90 mag, the latter value clearly showing the nebula lies on the near side of the Galactic bar, and cannot be a massive WN star. The ionized mass (˜0.3 M⊙) and electron density (700 cm-3) are typical of middle-aged PNe. The observed stellar spectrum was compared to a grid of models from the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) grid. The best-fitting temperature is 71 kK, and the atmospheric composition is dominated by helium with an upper limit on the hydrogen abundance of 10 per cent. Our results are in very good agreement with the recent study of Todt et al., who determined a hydrogen fraction of 10 per cent and an unusually large nitrogen fraction of ˜5 per cent. This fraction is higher than any other low-mass H-deficient star, and is not readily explained by current post-AGB models. We give a discussion of the implications of this discovery for the late-stage evolution of intermediate-mass stars. There is now tentative evidence for two distinct helium-dominated post-AGB lineages, separate to the helium- and carbon-dominated surface compositions produced by a late thermal pulse. Further theoretical work is needed to explain these recent discoveries.

  19. Diálise peritoneal (DP como tratamento da insuficiência cardíaca congestiva (ICC em pacientes com doença renal crônica estágio IV Peritoneal dialysis for treating congestive heart failure in patients with stage IV chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Prompt

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A Insuficiência Cardíaca Congestiva (ICC é uma patologia com incidência crescente e que representa uma condição de grande impacto na saúde pública, com alta morbidade e mortalidade. O excesso de volume é uma complicação prevalente, presente em 80% dos pacientes atendidos com o diagnóstico de ICC. Estratégias farmacológicas e não farmacológicas no manejo terapêutico da ICC visam ao melhor manejo do volume e à redução no uso de diuréticos. A ultrafiltração extracorpórea tem evidenciado melhor controle de peso, redução nos dias de hospitalização e re-hospitalização dos pacientes com ICC. Neste artigo, relatamos dois casos atendidos no Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, relativos a pacientes com diagnóstico de ICC tratados com diálise peritoneal.Congestive heart failure (CHF has a growing incidence, a great impact on public health, and high morbidity and mortality. Excessive blood volume is a prevalent complication present in 80% of the patients diagnosed with CHF. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies in the treatment of CHF aim to better manage blood volume and reduce the use of diuretics. Extracorporeal ultrafiltration has evidenced better weight control, and a reduction in the length of hospitalization and re-hospitalization of patients with CHF. We report the cases of 2 patients diagnosed with CHF and treated with peritoneal dialysis at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre.

  20. Carbocyanine dye usage in demarcating boundaries of the aged human red nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Onodera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Though the adult human magnocellular Red nucleus (mNr is essentially vestigial and its boundaries with neighbouring structures have never been well demarcated, human studies in utero have shown a well developed semilunar mNr wrapping around the caudal parvicellular Red nucleus (pNr, similar to what is seen in quadrupeds. In the present study, we have sought to better delineate the morphological determinants of the adult human Red nucleus (ahRn. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Serial sections of ahRn show fine myelinated fibers arising from pNr and turning toward the central tegmental tract. DiI was deposited within a well restricted region of ahRn at the fasciculus retroflexus level and the extent of label determined. Nissl-stained serial sections allowed production of a 3-D mNr model, showing rudimentary, vestigial morphology compared with its well developed infant homologue. DiI within this vestigial mNr region at the level of the oculomotor nerve showed labeled giant/large mNr neurons, coarse fiber bundles at the ventral tegmental decussation and lateral lemniscal label. CONCLUSIONS: Large amounts of DiI and a long incubation time have proven useful in aged human brain as a marker of long axons and large cell bodies of projecting neurons such as the rubrospinal projection and for clarifying nuclear boundaries of closed nuclei (e.g., the large human pNr. Our 3D model of adult human mNr appeared shrunken in shape and axially rotated compared with the infant mNr, the rotation being a common feature among mammalian mNr.

  1. Alteration of Paramecium candatum germinal nucleus morphology after UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokin, S.I. (Leningradskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Biologicheskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst.)

    1982-09-01

    A study was made on morphologic changes of micronucleus (Mi) after whole-body ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of paramecia as well as after local irradiation of this nucleus or the area of macronucleus (Ma). The whole-body irradiation of its Ma part leads to generative nucleus growth in sizes and chromatin structure change, which is expressed in occurence of large chromatin bodies. Aftereffects of local action on Mi for viable descendants are expressed in nucleus size transformation (usually in reduction), gaining ''comet-shaped'' form and probably in reduction of dna amount. Irradiation of Ma and total effect on cell cause Mi changes of reversible character. All morphologic changes of Mi after local ultraviolet irradiation are conserved in descendants and are not photoreactivated. Possible reasons for this phenomenon are discussed. The results obtained make it possible to speak about different mechanisms of action on Mi in the case of local and whole-body UV irradiation of cell. The effect of irradiated Ma on generative nucleus, but not direct damage of this nucleus is the reason for Mi morphologic reconstruction after whole-body action on paramecium.

  2. Improvements on ICC Color Management Mechanism Based on Image Self-adaptation%基于图像自适应对ICC色彩管理机制的改进方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡圣燕; 刘真

    2004-01-01

    对ICC色彩管理机制进行了分析,提出了一套ICC色彩管理机制的改进方案.改进后的机制不仅能减小设备特性文件的尺寸和数量,而且自动选择渲染目的和分色参数,并采用一种新的色域映射方法.机制改进的目的在于提高色彩管理的灵活性和自动化程度,提高图像复制的保真度,使色彩管理的实施更简便.%After an analysis of the ICC color management mechanism, improvements based on image self-adaptation are suggested The improved mechanism not only can reduce the size and number of profiles, but also automatically choose the suitable rendering intent and color separation parameters. In addition, a new gamut mapping method is suggested. The aim of suggestions is to improve the flexibility, precision and automation of color management, and make it easier to implement.

  3. Fertilization in Torenia fournieri: actin organization and nuclear behavior in the central cell and primary endosperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Studies of the living embryo sacs of Torenia fournieri reveal that the actin cytoskeleton undergoes dramatic changes that correlate with nuclear migration within the central cell and the primary endosperm. Before pollination, actin filaments appear as short bundles randomly distributed in the cortex of the central cell. Two days after anthesis, they become organized into a distinct actin network. At this stage the secondary nucleus, which is located in the central region of the central cell, possesses an associated array of short actin filaments. Soon after pollination, the actin filaments become fragmented in the micropylar end and the secondary nucleus is located next to the egg apparatus. After fertilization, the primary endosperm nucleus moves away from the egg cell and actin filaments reorganize into a prominent network in the cytoplasm of the primary endosperm. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin A and cytochalasin B indicates that actin is involved in the migration of the nucleus in the central cell. Our data also suggest that the dynamics of actin cytoskeleton may be responsible for the reorganization of the central cell and primary endosperm cytoplasm during fertilization.

  4. Chronobiology of Melatonin beyond the Feedback to the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus-Consequences to Melatonin Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2013-03-12

    The mammalian circadian system is composed of numerous oscillators, which gradually differ with regard to their dependence on the pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Actions of melatonin on extra-SCN oscillators represent an emerging field. Melatonin receptors are widely expressed in numerous peripheral and central nervous tissues. Therefore, the circadian rhythm of circulating, pineal-derived melatonin can have profound consequences for the temporal organization of almost all organs, without necessarily involving the melatonin feedback to the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Experiments with melatonin-deficient mouse strains, pinealectomized animals and melatonin receptor knockouts, as well as phase-shifting experiments with explants, reveal a chronobiological role of melatonin in various tissues. In addition to directly steering melatonin-regulated gene expression, the pineal hormone is required for the rhythmic expression of circadian oscillator genes in peripheral organs and to enhance the coupling of parallel oscillators within the same tissue. It exerts additional effects by modulating the secretion of other hormones. The importance of melatonin for numerous organs is underlined by the association of various diseases with gene polymorphisms concerning melatonin receptors and the melatonin biosynthetic pathway. The possibilities and limits of melatonergic treatment are discussed with regard to reductions of melatonin during aging and in various diseases.

  5. Nitric oxide in the nucleus raphe magnus modulates cutaneous blood flow in rats during hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Kourosh Arami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Nucleus Raphe Magnus (NRM that is involved in the regulation of body temperature contains nitric oxide (NO synthase. Considering the effect of NO on skin blood flow control, in this study, we assessed its thermoregulatory role within the raphe magnus. Materials and Methods: To this end, tail blood flow of male Wistar rats was measured by laser doppler following the induction of hypothermia. Results: Intra-NRM injection of SNP (exogenous NO donor, 0.1- 0.2 μl, 0.2 nM increased the blood flow. Similarly, unilateral microinjection of glutamate (0.1- 0.2 μl, 2.3 nM into the nucleus increased the blood flow. This effectof L-glutamate was reduced by prior intra NRM administrationof NO synthase inhibitor NG-methyl-L-arginine or NG-nitro-L-argininemethyl ester (L-NAME, 0.1 µl, 100 nM. Conclusion: It is concluded that NO modulates the thermoregulatory response of NRM to hypothermia and may interactwith excitatory amino acids in central skin blood flow regulation.

  6. Tolerance to non-opioid analgesics is opioid-sensitive in nucleus raphe magnus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merab G Tsagareli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of its effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM in the following four days result in progressively less antinociception, i.e. produce the development of tolerance to these drugs in mail rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with μ-opioid antagonist naloxone in NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs at the first day in behavioral tail flick reflex (TF and hot plate (HP latencies. At the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion on endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  7. Toxic effects of mercury on the cell nucleus of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatti, Lara; Rapallo, Fabio; Viarengo, Aldo; Marsano, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    Governmental agencies (www.epa.gov/mercury) and the scientific community have reported on the high toxicity due to mercury. Indeed, exposure to mercury can cause severe injury to the central nervous system and kidney in humans. Beyond its recognized toxicity, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in the actions of this heavy metal. Mercury has been also observed to form insoluble fibrous protein aggregates in the cell nucleus. We used D. discoideum to evaluate micronuclei formation and, since mercury is able to induce oxidative stress that could bring to protein aggregation, we assessed nuclear protein carbonylation by Western Blot. We observed a significant increase in micronuclei formation and 14 carbonylated proteins were identified. Moreover, we used isotope-coded protein label (ICPL) and mass spectrometry analysis of proteins obtained by lysis of purified nuclei, before of tryptic digestion to quantify nuclear proteins affected by mercury. In particular, we examined the effects of mercury that associate a classical genotoxic assay to proteomic effects into the nucleus. The data present direct evidences for mercury genotoxicity, nuclear protein carbonylation, quantitative change in core histones, and the involvement of pseudouridine synthase in mercury toxicity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 417-425, 2017.

  8. Extreme alpha-clustering in the 18O nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, E D; Goldberg, V Z; Brown, S; Robson, D; Crisp, A M; Cottle, P D; Fu, C; Giles, J; Green, B W; Kemper, K W; Lee, K; Roeder, B T; Tribble, R E

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the 18O nucleus at excitation energies above the alpha decay threshold was studied using 14C+alpha resonance elastic scattering. A number of states with large alpha reduced widths have been observed, indicating that the alpha-cluster degree of freedom plays an important role in this N not equal Z nucleus. However, the alpha-cluster structure of this nucleus is very different from the relatively simple pattern of strong alpha-cluster quasi-rotational bands in the neighboring 16O and 20Ne nuclei. A 0+ state with an alpha reduced width exceeding the single particle limit was identified at an excitation energy of 9.9+/-0.3 MeV. We discuss evidence that states of this kind are common in light nuclei and give possible explanations of this feature.

  9. Reaction cross sections of the deformed halo nucleus 31Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Y; Sagawa, H

    2012-01-01

    Using the Glauber theory, we calculate reaction cross sections for the deformed halo nucleus $^{31}$Ne. To this end, we assume that the $^{31}$Ne nucleus takes the $^{30}$Ne + $n$ structure. In order to take into account the rotational excitation of the core nucleus $^{30}$Ne, we employ the particle-rotor model (PRM). We compare the results to those in the adiabatic limit of PRM, that is, the Nilsson model, and show that the Nilsson model works reasonably well for the reaction cross sections of $^{31}$Ne. We also investigate the dependence of the reaction cross sections on the ground state properties of $^{31}$Ne, such as the deformation parameter and the p-wave component in the ground state wave function.

  10. Separable Representation of Multichannel Nucleon-Nucleus Optical Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Hlophe, Linda

    2016-01-01

    One important ingredient for many applications of nuclear physics to astrophysics, nuclear energy, and stockpile stewardship are cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g. (d,p) reactions, should be used. Those (d,p) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. Optical potentials representing the effective interactions in the neutron (proton) nucleus subsystem are usually non-Hermitian as well as energy-dependent. Including excitations of the nucleus in the calculation requires a multichannel optical potential. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a separable, energy-dependent multichannel representation of complex, energy-dependent optical potentials that contain excitations of the nucleus and that fulfill r...

  11. Microinjection of limonene into caudate nucleus inhibits IMC of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Guo; Xin Yi Zhu; Yi Quan Wei; De Zhi Yang

    2000-01-01

    AIM We have discovered that Limonene modulates interdigestive myoelectrical complexes (IMCs) ofgastrointestinal tract in rats. In this research we will elucidate weather limonene affects acetylcholine M-receptor in caudate nucleus.METHODS Changes of IMCs were studied after limonene and/or atropine were microinjected into caudatenucleus. IMCs were recorded by a RM-6200 four-channel recorder and then delivered to Maclab and PowerMacintosh.RESULTS The active phases of IMCs occupied about 40% of total cycle in average. After microinjection oflimonene into caudate nucleus, the active phases were significantly shortened, while the cycle time of IMCswere not changed significantly. The inhibitory effects of limonene were abolished by pretreatment withatropine, whilst the atropine has no effect on IMCs.CONCLUSION It is suggested that limonene inhabits the gastrointestinal IMCs by affecting M-receptor incaudate nucleus.

  12. Low energy neutron inelastic scattering on /sup 152/Sm nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, D.J.R.; Cabezas, S.R.; Lopez, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of inelastic neutron scattering by the nucleus /sup 152/Sm at incident energies of 2.47 and 2.75 MeV using the coupled-channel method has been made. Consideration is made of the 2/sup +//0.122 MeV/, 4/sup +//0.366 MeV/ and 2/sup +//1.086 MeV/excited states. It is shown that in this energy range the process may be described satisfactorily considering /sup 152/Sm as a deformed nucleus with non-axial symmetry, given the quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations. The scattering process through the compound nucleus is calculated according to the Hauser-Feshbach formula with width fluctuation correction. It is shown that the presence of direct excitation process is partly due to the non-axiality of /sup 152/Sm.

  13. New integral formula and its applications to light nucleus reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    A new integral formula, which has not been compiled in any integral tables or mathematical softwares, is proposed to obtain the analytical energy-angular spectra of the particles that are sequentially emitted from the discrete energy levels of the residual nuclei in the statistical theory of light nucleus reaction (STLN). In the cases of the neutron induced light nucleus reactions, the demonstration of the kinetic energy conservation in the sequential emission processes becomes straightforward thanks to this new integral formula and it is also helpful to largely reduce the volume of file-6 in nuclear reaction databases. Furthermore, taking p+$^9$Be reaction at 18 MeV as an example, this integral formula is extended to calculate the energy-angular spectra of the sequentially emitted neutrons for proton induced light nucleus reactions in the frame of STLN.

  14. Brain networks modulated by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accolla, Ettore A; Herrojo Ruiz, Maria; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Draganski, Bogdan; Kühn, Andrea A

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Given the frequent occurrence of stimulation-induced affective and cognitive adverse effects, a better understanding about the role of the subthalamic nucleus in non-motor functions is needed. The main goal of this study is to characterize anatomical circuits modulated by subthalamic deep brain stimulation, and infer about the inner organization of the nucleus in terms of motor and non-motor areas. Given its small size and anatomical intersubject variability, functional organization of the subthalamic nucleus is difficult to investigate in vivo with current methods. Here, we used local field potential recordings obtained from 10 patients with Parkinson's disease to identify a subthalamic area with an analogous electrophysiological signature, namely a predominant beta oscillatory activity. The spatial accuracy was improved by identifying a single contact per macroelectrode for its vicinity to the electrophysiological source of the beta oscillation. We then conducted whole brain probabilistic tractography seeding from the previously identified contacts, and further described connectivity modifications along the macroelectrode's main axis. The designated subthalamic 'beta' area projected predominantly to motor and premotor cortical regions additional to connections to limbic and associative areas. More ventral subthalamic areas showed predominant connectivity to medial temporal regions including amygdala and hippocampus. We interpret our findings as evidence for the convergence of different functional circuits within subthalamic nucleus' portions deemed to be appropriate as deep brain stimulation target to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Potential clinical implications of our study are illustrated by an index case where deep brain stimulation of estimated predominant non-motor subthalamic nucleus induced hypomanic behaviour.

  15. Silk fibroin porous scaffolds for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Chao; Yang, Qiang [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhu, Meifeng [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Du, Lilong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhang, Jiamin [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ma, Xinlong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Xu, Baoshan, E-mail: xubaoshan99@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Wang, Lianyong, E-mail: wly@nankai.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are structurally complex tissue that hold the vertebrae together and provide mobility to spine. The nucleus pulposus (NP) degeneration often results in degenerative IVD disease that is one of the most common causes of back and neck pain. Tissue engineered nucleus pulposus offers an alternative approach to regain the function of the degenerative IVD. The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of porous silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds fabricated by paraffin-sphere-leaching methods with freeze-drying in the application of nucleus pulposus regeneration. The prepared scaffold possessed high porosity of 92.38 ± 5.12% and pore size of 165.00 ± 8.25 μm as well as high pore interconnectivity and appropriate mechanical properties. Rabbit NP cells were seeded and cultured on the SF scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy, histology, biochemical assays and mechanical tests revealed that the porous scaffolds could provide an appropriate microstructure and environment to support adhesion, proliferation and infiltration of NP cells in vitro as well as the generation of extracellular matrix. The NP cell–scaffold construction could be preliminarily formed after subcutaneously implanted in a nude mice model. In conclusion, The SF porous scaffold offers a potential candidate for tissue engineered NP tissue. - Highlights: • Paraffin microsphere-leaching method is used to fabricate silk fibroin scaffold. • The scaffold has appropriate mechanical property, porosity and pore size • The scaffold supports growth and infiltration of nucleus pulposus cells. • Nucleus pulposus cells can secrete extracellular matrix in the scaffolds. • The scaffold is a potential candidate for tissue engineered nucleus pulposus.

  16. Immobility, inheritance and plasticity of shape of the yeast nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrulis Erik D

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since S. cerevisiae undergoes closed mitosis, the nuclear envelope of the daughter nucleus is continuous with that of the maternal nucleus at anaphase. Nevertheless, several constitutents of the maternal nucleus are not present in the daughter nucleus. The present study aims to identify proteins which impact the shape of the yeast nucleus and to learn whether modifications of shape are passed on to the next mitotic generation. The Esc1p protein of S. cerevisiae localizes to the periphery of the nucleoplasm, can anchor chromatin, and has been implicated in targeted silencing both at telomeres and at HMR. Results Upon increased Esc1p expression, cell division continues and dramatic elaborations of the nuclear envelope extend into the cytoplasm. These "escapades" include nuclear pores and associate with the nucleolus, but exclude chromatin. Escapades are not inherited by daughter nuclei. This exclusion reflects their relative immobility, which we document in studies of prezygotes. Moreover, excess Esc1p affects the levels of multiple transcripts, not all of which originate at telomere-proximal loci. Unlike Esc1p and the colocalizing protein, Mlp1p, overexpression of selected proteins of the inner nuclear membrane is toxic. Conclusion Esc1p is the first non-membrane protein of the nuclear periphery which – like proteins of the nuclear lamina of higher eukaryotes – can modify the shape of the yeast nucleus. The elaborations of the nuclear envelope ("escapades" which appear upon induction of excess Esc1p are not inherited during mitotic growth. The lack of inheritance of such components could help sustain cell growth when parental nuclei have acquired potentially deleterious characteristics.

  17. Rethinking the ICC Framework: Transformation and Telecollaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohinski, Chesla Ann; Leventhal, Yumei

    2015-01-01

    This task-based study, designed with Helm and Guth's (2010) Telecollaboration 2.0 framework in mind, qualitatively investigated a telecollaborative exchange. Two second language (L2) Spanish participants and three L2 English participants carried out a six-week e-mail exchange that centered on specific holidays, giving researchers an opportunity to…

  18. Separable Representation of Proton-Nucleus Optical Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Hlophe, L; Elster, Ch; Nunes, F M; Arbanas, G; Escher, J E; Thompson, I J

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a new approach for solving the three-body problem for (d,p) reactions in the Coulomb-distorted basis in momentum space was proposed. Important input quantities for such calculations are the scattering matrix elements for proton- and neutron-nucleus scattering. We present a generalization of the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler scheme in which a momentum space separable representation of proton-nucleus scattering matrix elements can be calculated in the Coulomb basis. The viability of this method is demonstrated by comparing S-matrix elements obtained for p$+^{48}$Ca and p$+^{208}$Pb for a phenomenological optical potential with corresponding coordinate space calculations.

  19. Odd-Even Nucleus Calculation Using exp(S) Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen

    1997-04-01

    We apply the equation of motion technique to calculate the ground state and excited states of the nucleus ^15N. First, we define a complete basis for ^15N relative to the reference ^16O ground state, | A >. Then, the eigenstate | (A-1)j > with energy Ej are given as a linear superposition of these basis configurations. Assuming that this state is an eigenstate of the many-body Hamiltonian, we solve an eigenvalue problem for the energies and wave functions describing the excited states of the ^15N nucleus.

  20. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  1. Spectra Statistics for the Odd-Odd Nucleus 86Nb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ren-Rong; ZHU Shun-Quan; CHENG Nan-Pu

    2001-01-01

    The energy levels of the odd-odd nucleus 86 Nb at low spins are calculated by using quasi-particles plus a rotor model. The distribution of the nearest-neighbour spacing and the spectral rigidity are studied. We find that the chaotic degree of the energy spectra increases with the increasing spin and reaches a maximum at I = 10; then it decreases gradually for spins above I = 10. The recoil term in the model Haniltonian makes the energy spectra slightly regular. The Coriolis force, however, makes the spectra chaotic and plays a major role in the spectral statistics of the odd-odd nucleus 86Nb.

  2. Formation and decay of a hot compound nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, B.V.; Dalmolin, F.T.; Dutra, M.; Santos, T.J., E-mail: brett@ita.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos SP (Brazil); Souza, S.R. [Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre RS, (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Donangelo, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de la Republica de Uruguay, Montevideo (Uruguay); Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre RS, (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The compound nucleus plays an important role in nuclear reactions over a wide range of projectile-target combinations and energies. The limits that angular momentum places on its formation and existence are, for the most part, well understood. The limits on its excitation energy are not as clear. Here we first analyze general geometrical and thermodynamical features of a hot compound nucleus. We then discuss the manners by which it can decay and close by speculating on the high energy limit to its formation and existence. (author)

  3. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge G. Morfín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  4. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfín, Jorge G.; Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  5. Influence on ICC Treated with Self-Prepared Formula for Removing Stasis and Moistening the Intestine for the Mouse Model with Intractable Constipation%自拟化瘀润肠方对顽固性便秘模型小鼠结肠间质细胞的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国峰

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨化瘀润肠方治疗便秘的机理.方法 采用吗啡皮下注射方法复制顽固性便秘小鼠模型,观察便秘模型小鼠是否存在结肠间质细胞(ICC)的变化,通过药物治疗后是否会恢复ICC的功能和结构.结果 便秘模型小鼠与空白组小鼠比较,ICC数量明显减少(P<0.05),各药物组与模型组比较,小鼠结肠ICC数量均有提高(P<0.05),但化瘀润肠方大剂量组作用程度明显优于中剂量组(P<0.05),中剂量组明显优于麻仁软胶囊组(P<0.05),麻仁软胶囊组优于莫沙比利组(P<0.05),莫沙比利组与化瘀润肠方小剂量组比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).免疫荧光与激光共聚焦显微镜扫描观察小鼠结肠ICC变化,发现化瘀润肠方中、大剂量组能够恢复便秘小鼠ICC结构.结论 便秘模型小鼠结肠ICC存在形态及数量异常,化瘀润肠方能够增加便秘模型小鼠结肠ICC的数量.%Objective To explore the mechanism on constipation treated with the formula for removing stasis and moistening the intestine. Methods The subcutaneous injection of morphine was adopted to duplicate the mouse models of intractable constipation. It was to observe whether the changes of interstitial cells of Cajal( ICC )were induced and whether the function and structure of ICC were recovered after treatment. Results In comparison with the mice in blank group, ICC count for the constipation models decreased obviously( P < 0.05 ). In comparison between every medication group and model group, ICC count was all up - regulated( P <0.05 ). But concerning to the function extent,the result in large - dose group with the formula for removing stasis and moistening the intestine was superior apparently to that in middle - dose group( P < 0.05 ). The result in middle - dose group was superior apparently to that in fructus cannabis capsule group( P < 0.05 ). The result in fructus cannabis capsule group was better than that in mosapride group( P

  6. Mefloquine in the nucleus accumbens promotes social avoidance and anxiety-like behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmati, Mitra; Golden, Sam A; Pfau, Madeline L; Christoffel, Daniel J; Seeley, Elena L; Cahill, Michael E; Khibnik, Lena A; Russo, Scott J

    2016-02-01

    Mefloquine continues to be a key drug used for malaria chemoprophylaxis and treatment, despite reports of adverse events like depression and anxiety. It is unknown how mefloquine acts within the central nervous system to cause depression and anxiety or why some individuals are more vulnerable. We show that intraperitoneal injection of mefloquine in mice, when coupled to subthreshold social defeat stress, is sufficient to produce depression-like social avoidance behavior. Direct infusion of mefloquine into the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key brain reward region, increased stress-induced social avoidance and anxiety behavior. In contrast, infusion into the ventral hippocampus had no effect. Whole cell recordings from NAc medium spiny neurons indicated that mefloquine application increases the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents, a synaptic adaptation that we have previously shown to be associated with increased susceptibility to social defeat stress. Together, these data demonstrate a role for the NAc in mefloquine-induced depression and anxiety-like behaviors.

  7. Outflowing Diffuse Gas in the Active Galactic Nucleus of NGC 1068

    CERN Document Server

    Geballe, T R; Oka, T

    2015-01-01

    Spectra of the archetypal Type II Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 in a narrow wavelength interval near 3.7 microns have revealed a weak absorption feature due to two lines of the molecular ion H3+. The observed wavelength of the feature corresponds to velocity of -70 km/s relative to the systemic velocity of the galaxy, implying an outward flow from the nucleus along the line of sight. The absorption by H3+ along with the previously known broad hydrocarbon absorption at 3.4~microns probably are formed in diffuse gas that is in close proximity to the continuum source, i.e. within a few tens of parsecs of the central engine. Based on that conclusion and the measured H3+ absorption velocity and with the assumption of a spherically symmetric wind we estimate a rate of mass outflow from the AGN of ~1 Msun/yr.

  8. Photo-Disintegration of the Iron Nucleus in Fractured Magnetite Rocks with Magnetostriction

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y N

    2013-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in recent experiments on iron nuclear disintegrations observed when rocks containing such nuclei are crushed and fractured. The resulting nuclear transmutations are particularly strong for the case of magnetite rocks, i.e. loadstones. We argue that the fission of the iron nucleus is a consequence of photo-disintegration. The electro-strong coupling between electromagnetic fields and nuclear giant dipole resonances are central for producing observed nuclear reactions. The large electron energies produced during the fracture of piezomagnetic rocks are closely analogous to the previously discussed case of the fracture of piezoelectric rocks. In both cases electro-weak interactions can produce neutrons and neutrinos from energetic protons and electrons thus inducing nuclear transmutations. The electro-strong condensed matter coupling discussed herein represents new many body collective nuclear photo-disintegration effects.

  9. Centrality Dependence of Hadron Multiplicities in Nuclear Collisions in the Dual Parton Model

    CERN Document Server

    Capella, A

    2001-01-01

    We show that, even in purely soft processes, the hadronic multiplicity in nucleus-nucleus interactions contains a term that scales with the number of binary collisions. In the absence of shadowing corrections, this term dominates at mid rapidities and high energies. Shadowing corrections are calculated as a function of impact parameter and the centrality dependence of mid-rapidity multiplicities is determined. The multiplicity per participant increases with centrality with a rate that increases between SPS and RHIC energies, in agreement with experiment.

  10. Effect of lesion of nucleus robustus archistriatalis on call in bramble finch (Fringilla montifringilla)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JlANG; Jinchang(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Li Dongfeng, Efferent projections of nucleus robustus archistriatalis in songbirds, Chinese Journal of Neuroanatomy (in Chinese), 1997, 13 (1): 71-74.[2]Wild, J. M., Descending projection of the songbird nucleus robustus archistriatalis, J.Comp. Neurol., 1997, 338: 225-241.[3]Nottebohm, F., Stokes, T. M., Leonard, C. M., Central control of song in the canary, Serinus canarius, J. Comp. Neurol.,1976, 207: 344-357.[4]Simpson, H. B., Vicario, D. S., Brain pathways for learned and unlearned vocalizations differ in zebra finch, J. Neurosci.,1990, 10 (5): 1541-1556.[5]Li Dongfeng, Jiang, .J.C., Li, J. et al., Effect of tracheosyrngeal denervation on call in greenfinch (Carduelis sinica), Science in China, Ser. C, 1999, 42 (6): 561-569.[6]Stokes. T. M., Leonard, C. M., Nottebohm, F., The telencephalon diencephalon and mesencephalon of the canary, Serinus canarius, in stereotaxic coordinates, J. Comp. Neurol., 1974, 156: 337-374.[7]Williams, H., Cynx, J., Nottebohm, F., Timbre control in zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata) song syllables, J. Comp. Psychol., 1990, 103: 366-380.[8]Vicario, D. S., Motor mechanisms relevant to auditory-vocal interactions in songbirds, Brain Behav. Evol., 1994, 44:265-278.[9]Vicario, D. S., Nottebohm, F., Organization of the zebra finch song control system: I. Representation of syringeal muscles in the hypoglossal nucleus, J. Comp. Neurol., 1988, 271: 346-354.[10]Vicario. D. S., Organization of the zebra finch song control system: Ⅱ. Functional organization of outputs from nucleus robustus archistriatalis, J. Comp. Neurol., 1991, 309: 456-494.[11]Vicario, D. S., A new brain-stem pathway for vocal control in the zebra finch song system, Neuroreport, 1993, 4: 983-986.[12]Seller, T. J., Midbrain vocalization centers in birds, Trends Neurosci., 1981, 4: 301-303.[13]Vicario, D. S., Contributions of syringeal muscles to respiration and vocalization in the zebra finch, J. Neurobiol.1991,22 (1): 63

  11. Delivering Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes to the Nucleus Using Engineered Nuclear Protein Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Patrick D; Ganesh, Sairaam; Qin, Zhao; Holt, Brian D; Buehler, Markus J; Islam, Mohammad F; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-02-10

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential for cell-based therapies due to their unique intrinsic optical and physical characteristics. Consequently, broad classes of dispersants have been identified that individually suspend SWCNTs in water and cell media in addition to reducing nanotube toxicity to cells. Unambiguous control and verification of the localization and distribution of SWCNTs within cells, particularly to the nucleus, is needed to advance subcellular technologies utilizing nanotubes. Here we report delivery of SWCNTs to the nucleus by noncovalently attaching the tail domain of the nuclear protein lamin B1 (LB1), which we engineer from the full-length LMNB1 cDNA. More than half of this low molecular weight globular protein is intrinsically disordered but has an immunoglobulin-fold composed of a central hydrophobic core, which is highly suitable for associating with SWCNTs, stably suspending SWCNTs in water and cell media. In addition, LB1 has an exposed nuclear localization sequence to promote active nuclear import of SWCNTs. These SWCNTs-LB1 dispersions in water and cell media display near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectra with sharp van Hove peaks and an NIR fluorescence spectra, suggesting that LB1 individually disperses nanotubes. The dispersing capability of SWCNTs by LB1 is similar to that by albumin proteins. The SWCNTs-LB1 dispersions with concentrations ≥150 μg/mL (≥30 μg/mL) in water (cell media) remain stable for ≥75 days (≥3 days) at 4 °C (37 °C). Further, molecular dynamics modeling of association of LB1 with SWCNTs reveal that the exposure of the nuclear localization sequence is independent of LB1 binding conformation. Measurements from confocal Raman spectroscopy and microscopy, NIR fluorescence imaging of SWCNTs, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy show that millions of these SWCNTs-LB1 complexes enter HeLa cells, localize to the nucleus of cells, and interact with DNA. We postulate that the

  12. An intact dorsomedial posterior arcuate nucleus is not necessary for photoperiodic responses in Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teubner, Brett J W; Leitner, Claudia; Thomas, Michael A; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2015-04-01

    Seasonal responses of many animal species are triggered by changes in daylength and its transduction into a neuroendocrine signal by the pineal gland through the nocturnal duration of melatonin (MEL) release. The precise central sites necessary to receive, transduce, and relay the short day (SD) fall-winter MEL signals into seasonal responses and changes in physiology and behavior are unclear. In Siberian hamsters, SDs trigger decreases in body and lipid mass, testicular regression and pelage color changes. Several candidate genes and their central sites of expression have been proposed as components of the MEL transduction system with considerable recent focus on the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and its component, the dorsomedial posterior arcuate nucleus (dmpARC). This site has been postulated as a critical relay of SD information through the modulation of a variety of neurochemicals/receptors important for the control of energy balance. Here the necessity of an intact dmpARC for SD responses was tested by making electrolytic lesions of the Siberian hamster dmpARC and then exposing them to either long days (LD) or SDs for 12wks. The SD typical decreases in body and fat mass, food intake, testicular volume, serum testosterone concentrations, pelage color change and increased UCP-1 protein expression (a proxy for brown adipose tissue thermogenesis) all occurred despite the lack of an intact dmpARC. Although the Siberian hamster dmpARC contains photoperiod-modulated constituents, these data demonstrate that an intact dmpARC is not necessary for SD responses and not integral to the seasonal energy- and reproductive-related responses measured here.

  13. Dietary grape seed polyphenols repress neuron and glia activation in trigeminal ganglion and trigeminal nucleus caudalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durham Paul L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation and pain associated with temporomandibular joint disorder, a chronic disease that affects 15% of the adult population, involves activation of trigeminal ganglion nerves and development of peripheral and central sensitization. Natural products represent an underutilized resource in the pursuit of safe and effective ways to treat chronic inflammatory diseases. The goal of this study was to investigate effects of grape seed extract on neurons and glia in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis in response to persistent temporomandibular joint inflammation. Sprague Dawley rats were pretreated with 200 mg/kg/d MegaNatural-BP grape seed extract for 14 days prior to bilateral injections of complete Freund's adjuvant into the temporomandibular joint capsule. Results In response to grape seed extract, basal expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 was elevated in neurons and glia in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, and expression of the glutamate aspartate transporter was increased in spinal glia. Rats on a normal diet injected with adjuvant exhibited greater basal levels of phosphorylated-p38 in trigeminal ganglia neurons and spinal neurons and microglia. Similarly, immunoreactive levels of OX-42 in microglia and glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes were greatly increased in response to adjuvant. However, adjuvant-stimulated levels of phosphorylated-p38, OX-42, and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly repressed in extract treated animals. Furthermore, grape seed extract suppressed basal expression of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide in spinal neurons. Conclusions Results from our study provide evidence that grape seed extract may be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for temporomandibular joint disorders by suppressing development of peripheral and central sensitization.

  14. CASTOR The ALICE forward detector for identification of Centauros and Strangelets in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z; Kharlov, Yu. V.

    1999-01-01

    The physics motivation for a very forward detector for the ALICE heavy ion experiment at the CERN LHC is discussed. A phenomenological model describing the formation and decay of a Centauro fireball in nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The CASTOR detector which is aimed to measure the hadronic and photonic content of an interaction and to identify deeply penetrating objects in the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6 < eta < 7.2 in an event-by-event mode is described. Results of simulations of the expected response of the calorimeter, and in particular to the passage of strangelets, are presented.

  15. Autoradiographic distribution of /sup 125/I-galanin binding sites in the rat central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skofitsch, G.; Sills, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-11-01

    Galanin (GAL) binding sites in coronal sections of the rat brain were demonstrated using autoradiographic methods. Scatchard analysis of /sup 125/I-GAL binding to slide-mounted tissue sections revealed saturable binding to a single class of receptors with a Kd of approximately 0.2 nM. /sup 125/I-GAL binding sites were demonstrated throughout the rat central nervous system. Dense binding was observed in the following areas: prefrontal cortex, the anterior nuclei of the olfactory bulb, several nuclei of the amygdaloid complex, the dorsal septal area, dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the ventral pallidum, the internal medullary laminae of the thalamus, medial pretectal nucleus, nucleus of the medial optic tract, borderline area of the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus adjacent to the spinal trigeminal tract, the substantia gelatinosa and the superficial layers of the dorsal spinal cord. Moderate binding was observed in the piriform, periamygdaloid, entorhinal, insular cortex and the subiculum, the nucleus accumbens, medial forebrain bundle, anterior hypothalamic, ventromedial, dorsal premamillary, lateral and periventricular thalamic nuclei, the subzona incerta, Forel's field H1 and H2, periventricular gray matter, medial and superficial gray strata of the superior colliculus, dorsal parts of the central gray, peripeduncular area, the interpeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra zona compacta, ventral tegmental area, the dorsal and ventral parabrachial and parvocellular reticular nuclei. The preponderance of GAL-binding in somatosensory as well as in limbic areas suggests a possible involvement of GAL in a variety of brain functions.

  16. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Saturating Cronin effect in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Papp, G; Fái, G; Papp, Gabor; Levai, Peter; Fai, George

    2000-01-01

    Pion and photon production cross sections are analyzed in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions at energies 20 GeV < s^1/2 < 60 GeV. We separate the proton-proton and nuclear contributions to transverse-momentum broadening and suggest a new mechanism for the nuclear enhancement in the high transverse-momentum region.

  18. Rapid feedback processing in human nucleus accumbens and motor thalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schüller, T.; Gründler, T.O.J.; Jocham, G.; Klein, T.A.; Timmermann, L.; Visser-Vandewalle, V.E.R.M.; Kuhn, J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and thalamus are integral parts in models of feedback processing. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been successfully employed to alleviate symptoms of psychiatric conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome (TS). Common target structu

  19. Nucleus accumbens dopamine receptors in the consolidation of spatial memory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mele, A.; Avena, M.; Roullet, P.; Leonibus, E. de; Mandillo, S.; Sargolini, F.; Coccurello, R.; Oliverio, A.

    2004-01-01

    Nucleus accumbens dopamine is known to play an important role in motor activity and in behaviours governed by drugs and natural reinforcers, as well as in non-associative forms of learning. At the same time, activation of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors has been suggested to promote intracellular event

  20. The nucleus of Darkschwitsch in Pantodactylus schreiberii Wiegmann (Lacertilia, Reptilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, J C

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear mass considered the representative of the nucleus of Darkschwitsch in reptiles in studied. It is composed of small, stellate, pyriform or rounded cells, with two or three dendritic trunks resolved in a plexus near the cellular body. Its axons take an ascending direction to the posterior commissure, and not to be medial longitudinal fasciculus as has been conventionally described.

  1. RELATIVISTIC CALCULATIONS OF THE SUPERHEAVY NUCLEUS 114-298

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, HF

    1993-01-01

    We investigate ground-state properties of the superheavy nucleus with N = 184 and Z = 114, (298)114, using conventional relativistic mean-field theory and density-dependent mean-field theory, which reproduces Dirac-Brueckner calculations in nuclear matter. Our calculations provide support for N = 18

  2. Empirical Example of Nucleus with Transitional Dynamical Symmetry X(5)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大立; 赵惠英

    2002-01-01

    By analysing the energy spectrum, E2 transition rates and branching ratios, it is shown explicitly that the nucleus 150Nd provides an empirical example with X(5) symmetry at the critical point of the transition from U(5) to SU(3) symmetry.

  3. Deexcitation of superdeformed bands in the nucleus Tb-151

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finck, C; Appelbe, D; Beck, FA; Byrski, T; Cullen, D; Curien, D; deFrance, G; Duchene, G; Erturk, S; Haas, B; Khadiri, N; Kharraja, B; Prevost, D; Rigollet, C; Stezowski, O; Twin, P; Vivien, JP; Zuber, K

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to get more informations about the decay-out of superdeformed bands. One of the best candidates in the mass A similar or equal to 150 region for that kind of research is the nucleus Tb-151. From previous works, it has been established that the first excited band goes lower in

  4. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Ke-Mian [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Chang, Chia-Chun [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Qing-Ji [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); Sung, Li-Ying, E-mail: liyingsung@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  5. Functional neuroanatomy of the central noradrenergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabadi, Elemer

    2013-08-01

    The central noradrenergic neurone, like the peripheral sympathetic neurone, is characterized by a diffusely arborizing terminal axonal network. The central neurones aggregate in distinct brainstem nuclei, of which the locus coeruleus (LC) is the most prominent. LC neurones project widely to most areas of the neuraxis, where they mediate dual effects: neuronal excitation by α₁-adrenoceptors and inhibition by α₂-adrenoceptors. The LC plays an important role in physiological regulatory networks. In the sleep/arousal network the LC promotes wakefulness, via excitatory projections to the cerebral cortex and other wakefulness-promoting nuclei, and inhibitory projections to sleep-promoting nuclei. The LC, together with other pontine noradrenergic nuclei, modulates autonomic functions by excitatory projections to preganglionic sympathetic, and inhibitory projections to preganglionic parasympathetic neurones. The LC also modulates the acute effects of light on physiological functions ('photomodulation'): stimulation of arousal and sympathetic activity by light via the LC opposes the inhibitory effects of light mediated by the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus on arousal and by the paraventricular nucleus on sympathetic activity. Photostimulation of arousal by light via the LC may enable diurnal animals to function during daytime. LC neurones degenerate early and progressively in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, leading to cognitive impairment, depression and sleep disturbance.

  6. Brackett Gamma Imaging of the Nucleus of M83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosthwaite, L. P.; Turner, J. L.; Beck, S. C.; Meier, D. S.

    2004-12-01

    The gas-rich nucleus of barred spiral galaxy, M83, is a hotbed of star formation, with a total infrared luminosity of 4 X 109 Lo. We have observed the nucleus of M83 with the near infrared spectrometer, NIRSPEC, on Keck 2 to obtain high resolution Brγ recombination line spectra of the nucleus. Simultaneous imaging with the SCAM camera in a broadband K filter shows the position of the slit on the near-infrared galaxy. This allows us to map the nucleus with a continuum reference. The SCAM image shows a bright peak at the nucleus and a complex semi-circular arc of emission to the southwest. We stepped the 0.5'' X 24'' length slit in small declination increments to map a 20'' X 20'' region just west of the nucleus. Individual spectra were used to form a ra-dec-lambda cube and an integrated intensity map of Brγ . A total of 1.1 X 10-16 W m-2 of Brγ emission is detected in the map, in good agreement with previous low resolution observations (Turner, Ho, & Beck 1987, ApJ, 313, 644). This is not corrected for extinction within the molecular clouds in M83 or to the nebulae themselves and is therefore a lower limit to the true Brγ flux. Extinction is estimated to be at least a magnitude in the near-IR as measured in larger (4'') beams (Turner et al.) The bulk of the Brγ emission extends along the northern portion of the near-IR continuum semi-circle. Twenty percent of the total Brγ emission comes from single a 3'' (FWHM) source located 5'' west of the near-IR nucleus. The complementary NIRSPEC Brα data we have obtained will eventually allow us to evaluate the near-IR extinction on subarcsecond sizescales and obtain an extinction-corrected estimate of the Lyman continuum rate and therefore the number of ionizing stars.

  7. Physical interrelation of volatile and refractories in a cometary nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulle, Marco; Alice Team; Stern, Alan; CONSTERT Team; Kofman, Wlodek; COSIMA Team; Hilchenbach, Martin; GIADA Team; Rotundi, Alessandra; MIDAS Team; Bentley, Mark; MIRO Team; Hofstadter, Mark; OSIRIS Team; Sierks, Holger; ROSINA Team; Altwegg, Kathrin; RPC Team; Nilsson, Hans; Burch, James; Eriksson, Anders; Heinz-Glassmeier, Karl; Henri, Pierre; Carr, Christopher; RSI Team; Paetzold, Martin; , VIRTIS Team; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Lander Team; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; IDS Team; Gruen, Eberhard; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Weissman, Paul; Project Scientist Team; Taylor, Matt; Buratti, Bonnie; Altobelli, Nicolas; Choukroun, Mathieu; Ground-Based Observations Team; Snodgrass, Colin

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta mission has been taking measurements of its target comet Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since early 2014 and will complete operations at the end of September 2016. The mission Science Management Plan, in 1994, laid out the the prime goals and themes of the mission. These five themes were: 1) To study the global characterisation of the Nuclues, the determination of the dynamics properties , surface morpholy and composition of the comet. 2) Examination of the Chemical, Mineralogical and isotopic compositions of volatiles and refractories in a cometary nucleus.3) Physical interrelation of volatile and refractories in a cometary nucleus4) Study the development of cometary activity and the process in the surface layer of the nucleus and in the inner coma5) The origins of comets, the relationship between cometary and interstellar material and the implications for the origin of the solar system,To cover all aspects of the Rosetta mission in this special Show case session, this abstracts is one of 5, with this particular presentation focusing on theme 3, in particular on a) The dust-to-gas ratio; b) distributed sources of volatiles; c) seasonal evolution of the dust size distribution.a) The dust-to-gas ratio has been provided by coma observations measuring the gas and dust loss rates from the nucleus surface. The ratio of these two loss rates provides a lower limit of the dust-to-gas ratio at the nucleus surface, since it does not take into account the largest chunks unable to leave the nucleus, or falling back due to the dominant gravity. We review the value inferred so far, its time evolution, and new techniques to directly measure it in the nucleus.b) Evidences offered by Rosetta observations of gas sublimating from dust particles are up to now faint. We report the few available observations and an estimate of the probable average water content in dust particles inferred by 3D gas-dynamical codes of 67P coma.c) The dust-size distribution tunes the sizes

  8. Realignment of signal processing within a sensory brainstem nucleus as brain temperature declines in the Syrian hamster, a hibernating species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizawa, Shin-Ichi; Horowitz, John M.; Horwitz, Barbara A.; Chen, Chao-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Crucial for survival, the central nervous system must reliably process sensory information over all stages of a hibernation bout to ensure homeostatic regulation is maintained and well-matched to dramatically altered behavioral states. Comparing neural responses in the nucleus tractus solitarius of rats and euthermic Syrian hamsters, we tested the hypothesis that hamster nucleus tractus solitarius neurons have adaptations sustaining signal processing while conserving energy. Using patch-clamp techniques, we classified second-order nucleus tractus solitarius neurons as rapid-onset or delayed-onset spiking phenotypes based on their spiking-onset to a depolarizing pulse (following a −80 mV prepulse). As temperature decreased from 33°C to 15°C, the excitability of all neurons decreased. However, hamster rapid-onset neurons had the highest spiking response and shortest action potential width at every temperature, while hamster delayed-onset neurons had the most negative resting membrane potential. Spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic current frequency in both phenotypes decreased as temperature decreased, yet tractus solitarius stimulation-evoked excitatory post-synaptic current amplitudes were greater in hamsters than in rats regardless of phenotype and temperature. Changes were significant (P<0.05), supporting our hypothesis by showing that, as temperature falls, rapid-onset neurons contribute more to signal processing but less to energy conservation than do delayed-onset neurons. PMID:22262373

  9. Antiproton-nucleus inelastic scattering and the spin-isospin dependence of the N anti N interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    A general overview of the utility of antinucleon (anti N)-nucleus inelastic scattering studies is presented, emphasizing both the sensitivity of the cross sections to various components of the N anti N transition amplitudes and the prospects for the exploration of some novel aspects of nuclear structure. We start with an examination of the relation between NN and N anti N potentials, focusing on the coherences predicted for the central, spin-orbit and tensor components, and how these may be revealed by measurements of two-body spin observables. We next discuss the role of the nucleus as a spin and isospin filter, and show how, by a judicious choice of final state quantum numbers (natural or unnatural parity states, isospin transfer ..delta..T=0 or 1) and momentum transfer q, one can isolate different components of the N anti N transition amplitude. Various models for the N anti N interaction which give reasonable fits to the available two-body data are shown to lead to strikingly different predictions for certain spin-flip nuclear transitions. We suggest several possible directions for future anti N-nucleus inelastic scattering experiments at LEAR, for instance the study of spin observables which would be accessible with polarized anti N beams, charge exchange reactions, and higher resolution studies of the (anti p, anti p') reaction. We compare the antinucleon and the nucleon as a probe of nuclear modes of excitation. 34 refs.

  10. Interplay between low threshold voltage-gated K+ channels and synaptic inhibition in neurons of the chicken nucleus laminaris along its frequency axis

    OpenAIRE

    William eHamlet; Yu-Wei eLiu; Zhengquang eTang; Yong eLu

    2014-01-01

    Central auditory neurons that localize sound in horizontal space have specialized intrinsic and synaptic cellular mechanisms to tightly control the threshold and timing for action potential generation. However, the critical interplay between intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and extrinsic synaptic conductances in determining neuronal output are not well understood. In chicken, neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) encode sound location using interaural time difference (ITD) as a cue. Along...

  11. Responses of primate caudal parabrachial nucleus and Kolliker-fuse nucleus neurons to whole body rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Carey D.; McGee, David M.; Zhou, Jianxun; Scudder, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    The caudal aspect of the parabrachial (PBN) and Kolliker-Fuse (KF) nuclei receive vestibular nuclear and visceral afferent information and are connected reciprocally with the spinal cord, hypothalamus, amygdala, and limbic cortex. Hence, they may be important sites of vestibulo-visceral integration, particularly for the development of affective responses to gravitoinertial challenges. Extracellular recordings were made from caudal PBN cells in three alert, adult female Macaca nemestrina through an implanted chamber. Sinusoidal and position trapezoid angular whole body rotation was delivered in yaw, roll, pitch, and vertical semicircular canal planes. Sites were confirmed histologically. Units that responded during rotation were located in lateral and medial PBN and KF caudal to the trochlear nerve at sites that were confirmed anatomically to receive superior vestibular nucleus afferents. Responses to whole-body angular rotation were modeled as a sum of three signals: angular velocity, a leaky integration of angular velocity, and vertical position. All neurons displayed angular velocity and integrated angular velocity sensitivity, but only 60% of the neurons were position-sensitive. These responses to vertical rotation could display symmetric, asymmetric, or fully rectified cosinusoidal spatial tuning about a best orientation in different cells. The spatial properties of velocity and integrated velocity and position responses were independent for all position-sensitive neurons; the angular velocity and integrated angular velocity signals showed independent spatial tuning in the position-insensitive neurons. Individual units showed one of three different orientations of their excitatory axis of velocity rotation sensitivity: vertical-plane-only responses, positive elevation responses (vertical plane plus ipsilateral yaw), and negative elevation axis responses (vertical plane plus negative yaw). The interactions between the velocity and integrated velocity components

  12. [A case of Avellis' syndrome with ipsilateral central facial palsy due to a small medullary infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K; Kitani, M; Fukuda, H

    2000-04-01

    We report a 51-year-old man with mild left central facial palsy and left Avellis' syndrome due to a small medullary infarction. On admission, neurological examination revealed hoarseness, dysphasia, absent left gag reflex, palsies of the left vocal cord and left soft palate, and hypalgesia and thermohypesthesia on the right side of the trunk and extremities. In addition, he had a mild left central facial palsy. He had no nausea, vomiting, vertigo, hiccups, nystagmus, Horner's sign, facial numbness, or paresis or ataxia of the limbs. A T2 weighted MRI showed a small, high signal intensity area in the left dorsal region of the medulla and this lesion was presumed to involve the nucleus ambiguus and a part of the spinothalamic tract. These findings suggest that an aberrant supranuclear pathway, looping around the nucleus ambiguus to the facial nucleus exists in our patient.

  13. Characteristics of Nucleus-Nucleus Interaction with Relativistic Heavy-Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gourisankar

    A systematic study of relativistic heavy-ion collisions in nuclear emulsion, initiated by ('40)Ar, ('56)Fe at E = 1.8 GeV/N, ('56)Fe at 0.8 GeV/N, and ('12)C at 400 MeV/N, has been made. Projectile fragmentation reactions, where there is no visual indication of target excitation, are studied in terms of multiplicity and projected angular distributions. The standard deviation widths of the projected angular distributions are compared with the first order theory of Lepore and Riddell. In quasi-central collisions, where a part of both the projectile and target nuclei participate, we have undertaken a study of the space angle distributions of the relativistic alpha particles, emitted in ('40)Ar -emulsion interactions at E = 1.8 GeV/N and ('56)Fe-emulsion interactions at E = 0.8 GeV/N. The large angle alpha particle distributions are fitted with moving relativistic Boltzmann distributions, and compared with distributions obtained by Monte Carlo simulation of (alpha)-p hard scattering process. Mean free path of secondary relativistic projectile fragments, emitted in such collisions, are carefully studied to verify the presence of 'anomalous' mfp component among these fragments. This is followed by a study of the mean free path of secondary alpha particles. Finally, in central collisions, the angular distributions of singly charged particles with (beta) > 0.7 are studied with a view to observe collective phenomena, such as nuclear shock wave in nuclear matter.

  14. Search for Signal on Percolation Cluster Formation in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at Relativistic Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abdinov, O B; Kuznetsov, A A; Suleymanov, M K; Vodopyanov, A S; Vokal, S

    2005-01-01

    The appearance of the strongly interacting matter mixed phase (MP)has been suggested to consider to understand qualitatively the regime change existence in the behavior of some centrality depending characteristics of events. The MP has been predicted by QCD for the temperatures around the critical temperature Tc and could be formed as a result of nucleon percolation in the density nuclear matter. Our main goal is to get a new experimental confirmation of the percolation cluster formation as an accompanying effect of the MP formation. To reach the goal, the experimental data on Kr+Em - reaction at 0.95 GeV/nuc and Au+Em - reaction at 10.6 GeV/nucl. with a number of target fragments N_h > 8, have been analyzed. The behavior of the distributions of the target and the projectile fragments has been studied. The experimental data have been compared of the data coming from the cascade-evaporation model. We can conclude that: -- the centrality of the collision could be defined as a number of the target g-fragments in...

  15. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  3. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. Exporting RNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Alwin; Hurt, Ed

    2007-10-01

    The transport of RNA molecules from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is fundamental for gene expression. The different RNA species that are produced in the nucleus are exported through the nuclear pore complexes via mobile export receptors. Small RNAs (such as tRNAs and microRNAs) follow relatively simple export routes by binding directly to export receptors. Large RNAs (such as ribosomal RNAs and mRNAs) assemble into complicated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles and recruit their exporters via class-specific adaptor proteins. Export of mRNAs is unique as it is extensively coupled to transcription (in yeast) and splicing (in metazoa). Understanding the mechanisms that connect RNP formation with export is a major challenge in the field.

  11. The identification of musical instruments through nucleus cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasmeder, M L; Lutman, M E

    2006-09-01

    In this study, self-reported ability to recognize musical instruments was investigated by means of a questionnaire, which was sent to a group of adult Nucleus cochlear implant users and a group of normally hearing subjects. In addition, spectrograms and electrodograms were produced and analysed for samples of music played on 10 different musical instruments. Self-reported ability to recognize some instruments was poor in the group of implant users, particularly for the saxophone, tuba and clarinet. Electrodograms showed that these instruments could only be identified using distorted spectral information or reduced temporal information. Other instruments, such as the drum and piano, could be identified using temporal information. Limited spectral resolution makes the recognition of musical instruments difficult for Nucleus implant users.

  12. Relativistic Spin-Isospin Dependent Response Function of Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liang-Gang; CHEN Wei; AI Bao-Quan; ZHENG Xiao-Ping; Masahiro Nakano

    2000-01-01

    A full relativistic formalism is employed to derive the relativistic particle-hole and delta-hole excitation polariza tion insertion of pion propagator in nuclear matter. The spin-isospin-dependent response function of nucleus at high energy-momentum transfer is calculated with the nuclear matter approximation. The short range correlation effect, two-nucleon absorption and nucleus form factor effects are included in the calculation. The position and width of the resonance peak of the spin-isospin mode are reproduced and found to be coincident with experiment data. The position of the peak and its width is sensitive to Landau-Migdal parameter g' which is about 0.6.

  13. Efficient And Portable SDR Waveform Development: The Nucleus Concept

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, Venkatesh; Kempf, Torsten; Kammler, David; Ascheid, Gerd; Meyr, Heinrich; Adrat, Marc; Antweiler, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Future wireless communication systems should be flexible to support different waveforms (WFs) and be cognitive to sense the environment and tune themselves. This has lead to tremendous interest in software defined radios (SDRs). Constraints like throughput, latency and low energy demand high implementation efficiency. The tradeoff of going for a highly efficient implementation is the increase of porting effort to a new hardware (HW) platform. In this paper, we propose a novel concept for WF development, the Nucleus concept, that exploits the common structure in various wireless signal processing algorithms and provides a way for efficient and portable implementation. Tool assisted WF mapping and exploration is done efficiently by propagating the implementation and interface properties of Nuclei. The Nucleus concept aims at providing software flexibility with high level programmability, but at the same time limiting HW flexibility to maximize area and energy efficiency.

  14. Proton emission from an oblate nucleus {sup 151}Lu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procter, M.G., E-mail: mark.procter@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cullen, D.M.; Taylor, M.J.; Alharshan, G.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ferreira, L.S. [Centro de Física das Interacções Fundamentais, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Maglione, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Galilei”, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via Marzolo 8, I-3513, Padova (Italy); Auranen, K.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jakobsson, U.; Julin, R.; Herzáň, A.; Konki, J.; Leino, M. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Pakarinen, J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Partanen, J. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937, Köln (Germany); Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); and others

    2013-08-09

    Excited states in the proton-unbound nucleus {sup 151}Lu have been established using γ-ray coincidence techniques. The lifetime of the first excited state above the proton-emitting ground state has been measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method combined with recoil-decay tagging. The experimental level scheme and extracted lifetime have been compared with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations based upon a non-adiabatic deformed Woods–Saxon potential. This comparison suggests that the proton-emitting ground state in {sup 151}Lu is mildly oblate with a deformation β=−0.11{sub −0.05}{sup +0.02} and represents the best evidence to date for proton emission from an oblate nucleus.

  15. Experiments on parity violation in the compound nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, J.D.

    1996-09-01

    Results from experiments that measure parity-violating longitudinal asymmetries in the scattering of epithermal neutrons from compound-nuclear resonances at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos are discussed. Parity non-conserving asymmetries have been observed for many p-wave resonances in a single target. Measurements were performed on several nuclei in the mass region of A-100 and A-230. The statistical model of the compound nucleus provides a theoretical basis for extracting mean-squared matrix elements from the experimental asymmetry data, and for interpreting the mean-squared matrix elements. The constraints on the weak meson-exchange couplings calculated from the compound-nucleus asymmetry data agree qualitatively with the results from few-body and light-nuclei experiments. For all nuclei but {sup 232}Th measured asymmetries have random signs. For {sup 232}Th eight of eight measured asymmetries are positive. This phenomenon is discussed in terms or doorway models.

  16. Theoretical description of the decay chain of the nucleus 294118

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiczewski, Adam

    2016-09-01

    The decay chain of the nucleus 294118, the heaviest nucleus observed (at JINR-Dubna) up to now, is analyzed theoretically. The α-decay energies {Q}α , the α-decay and the spontaneous-fission half-lives, {T}α and {T}{{sf}}, are studied. The analysis of the α decay is based on a phenomenological model using only three parameters. The calculations are performed in three variants using masses obtained with three nuclear-mass models accurately describing masses of heaviest nuclei. The experimental {Q}α energies are reconstructed with the average of the absolute values of the discrepancies: 180 keV, 270 keV and 290 keV, in the three variants considered. Measured half-lives {T}α are reproduced within the average ratios: 2.9, 9.8 and 5.2 in these variants.

  17. $K^+$-nucleus potentials from $K^+$-nucleon amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, E

    2016-01-01

    Optical potentials for $K^+$-nucleus interactions are constructed from $K^+$-nucleon amplitudes using recently developed algorithm based on $K^+$-N kinematics in the nuclear medium. With the deep penetration of $K^+$ mesons into the nucleus at momenta below 800~MeV/c it is possible to test this approach with greater sensitivity than hitherto done with $K^-$ and pions. The energy-dependence of experimental reaction and total cross sections on nuclei is better reproduced with this approach compared to fixed-energy amplitudes. The inclusion of Pauli correlations in the medium also improves the agreement between calculation and experiment. The absolute scale of the cross sections is reproduced very well for $^6$Li but for C, Si and Ca calculated cross sections are (23$\\pm4$)\\% smaller than experiment, in agreement with earlier analyses. Two phenomenological models that produce such missing strength suggest that the imaginary part of the potential needs about 40\\% enhancement.

  18. Pairing reentrance in warm rotating $^{104}$Pd nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, N Quang; Agrawal, B K; Datar, V M; Mitra, A; Chakrabarty, D R

    2015-01-01

    Pairing reentrance phenomenon in the warm rotating $^{104}$Pd nucleus is studied within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-based approach (the FTBCS1). The theory takes into account the effect of quasiparticle number fluctuations on the pairing field at finite temperature and angular momentum within the pairing model plus noncollective rotation along the symmetry axis. The numerical calculations for the pairing gaps and nuclear level densities (NLD), of which an anomalous enhancement has been experimentally observed at low excitation energy $E^*$ and high angular momentum $J$, show that the pairing reentrance is seen in the behavior of pairing gap obtained within the FTBCS1 at low $E$ and high $J$. This leads to the enhancement of the FTBCS1 level densities, in good agreement with the experimental observation. This agreement indicates that the observed enhancement of the NLD might be the first experimental detection of the pairing reentrance in a finite nucleus.

  19. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of the nucleus {sup 139}Ce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Cata-Danil, I.; Ivascu, M.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihailescu, L.C.; Rusu, C.; Suliman, G. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest (Romania)

    2006-03-15

    Gamma-ray coincidence techniques are used to determine new level structures in the N=81 nucleus {sup 139}Ce, at low spins and excitation energies with the {sup 139}La(p,n{gamma}) reaction at 5.0 and 6.0 MeV incident energy, and at high spins with the {sup 130}Te({sup 12}C,3n{gamma}) reaction at 50.5 MeV, respectively. Lifetime determinations are also made in the (p,n{gamma}) reaction with the centroid DSA method. The observed level structures are discussed by comparison with existing calculations and with those in the neighbouring nucleus {sup 140}Ce. (orig.)

  20. Neutral current neutrino-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Leitner, T; Mosel, U

    2006-01-01

    We have extended our model for charged current neutrino-nucleus interactions to neutral current reactions. For the elementary neutrino-nucleon interaction, we take into account quasielastic scattering, Delta excitation and the excitation of the resonances in the second resonance region. Our model for the neutrino-nucleus collisions includes in-medium effects such as Fermi motion, Pauli blocking, nuclear binding, and final-state interactions. They are implemented by means of the Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) coupled-channel transport model. This allows us to study exclusive channels, namely pion production and nucleon knockout. We find that final-state interactions modify considerably the distributions through rescattering, charge-exchange and absorption. Side-feeding induced by charge-exchange scattering is important in both cases. In the case of pions, there is a strong absorption associated with the in-medium pionless decay modes of the Delta, while nucleon knockout exhibits a considerable enh...

  1. Charge, neutron, and weak size of the atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, G; Forssén, C; Jansen, G R; Nazarewicz, W; Papenbrock, T; Wendt, K A; Bacca, S; Barnea, N; Carlsson, B; Drischler, C; Hebeler, K; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Miorelli, M; Orlandini, G; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J

    2015-01-01

    What is the size of the atomic nucleus? This deceivably simple question is difficult to answer. While the electric charge distributions in atomic nuclei were measured accurately already half a century ago, our knowledge of the distribution of neutrons is still deficient. In addition to constraining the size of atomic nuclei, the neutron distribution also impacts the number of nuclei that can exist and the size of neutron stars. We present an ab initio calculation of the neutron distribution of the neutron-rich nucleus $^{48}$Ca. We show that the neutron skin (difference between radii of neutron and proton distributions) is significantly smaller than previously thought. We also make predictions for the electric dipole polarizability and the weak form factor; both quantities are currently targeted by precision measurements. Based on ab initio results for $^{48}$Ca, we provide a constraint on the size of a neutron star.

  2. ηproduction in proton-nucleus collisions near threshold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG You-Chang; CHEN Hong; JIANG Huan-Qing

    2008-01-01

    The η-meson production in proton-nucleus(pA)collisions near threshold is studied within a relativistic meson-exchange model.The primary production amplitude is presented in the distorted-wave impulse approximation for the nucleus with isospin 0 or [1]by assuming that N*(1535)is excited via a meson exchange and then decays into η and nucleon pair(ηN).Taking 18O and 12C nuclei as examples,we evaluate the production cross sections as a function of the incident proton energy,and analyze the effects of nuclear medium and various meson-exchange contributions.Finally we discuss implications for further experimental studies at the Cooling Storage Ring(CSR)in Lanzhou.

  3. Determination of the {\\eta}'-nucleus optical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Nanova, M; Paryev, E Ya; Bayadilov, D; Bantes, B; Beck, R; Beloglazov, Y A; Böse, S; Brinkmann, K -T; Challand, Th; Crede, V; Dahlke, T; Dietz, F; Drexler, P; Eberhardt, H; Elsner, D; Ewald, R; Fornet-Ponse, K; Friedrich, S; Frommberger, F; Funke, Ch; Gottschall, M; Gridnev, A; Grüner, M; Gutz, E; Hammann, Ch; Hammann, D; Hannappel, J; Hartmann, J; Hillert, W; Hoffmeister, P; Honisch, Ch; Jaegle, I; Kaiser, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammer, S; Keshelashvili, I; Kleber, V; Klein, F; Klempt, E; Krusche, B; Lang, M; Lopatin, I V; Maghrbi, Y; Makonyi, K; Müller, J; Odenthal, T; Piontek, D; Schaepe, S; Schmidt, Ch; Schmieden, H; Schmitz, R; Seifen, T; Thiel, A; Thoma, U; van Pee, H; Walther, D; Wendel, Ch; Wiedner, U; Wilson, A; Winnebeck, A; Zenke, F

    2013-01-01

    The excitation function and momentum distribution of $\\eta^\\prime$ mesons have been measured in photon induced reactions on $^{12}{}$C in the energy range of 1250-2600 MeV. The experiment was performed with tagged photon beams from the ELSA electron accelerator using the Crystal Barrel and TAPS detectors. The data are compared to model calculations to extract information on the sign and magnitude of the real part of the $\\eta^\\prime$-nucleus potential. Within the model, the comparison indicates an attractive potential of -($37 \\pm 10(stat)\\pm10(syst)$) MeV depth at normal nuclear matter density. Since the modulus of this depth is larger than the modulus of the imaginary part of the $\\eta^\\prime$-nucleus potential of -($10\\pm2.5$) MeV, determined by transparency ratio measurements, a search for resolved $\\eta^\\prime$-bound states appears promising.

  4. Leading Neutrons From Polarized Proton-Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeliovich, B Z; Schmidt, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Leading neutron production on protons is known to be subject to strong absorptive corrections, which have been under debate for a long time. On nuclear targets these corrections are significantly enhanced and push the partial cross sections of neutron production to the very periphery of the nucleus. As a result, the A-dependences of inclusive and diffractive neutron production turn out to be similar. The mechanism of \\pi-a_1 interference, which successfully explained the observed single-spin asymmetry of neutrons in polarized pp interactions, is extended here to polarized pA collisions. Corrected for nuclear effects it explains well the magnitude and sign of the asymmetry A_N observed in inelastic events, resulting in a violent break up of the nucleus. However the excessive magnitude of A_N observed in the diffractive sample, remains a challenge.

  5. Neutrino-nucleus interactions at the LBNF near detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosel, Ulrich [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The reaction mechanisms for neutrino interactions with an {sup 40}Ar nucleus with the LBNF flux are calculated with the Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) transport-theoretical implementation of these interactions. Quasielastic scattering, many-body effects, pion production and absorption and Deep Inelastic Scattering are discussed; they all play a role at the LBNF energies and are experimentally entangled with each other. Quasielastic scattering makes up for only about 1/3 of the total cross section whereas pion production channels make up about 2/3 of the total. This underlines the need for a consistent description of the neutrino-nucleus reaction that treats all channels on an equal, consistent footing. The results discussed here can also serve as useful guideposts for the Intermediate Neutrino Program.

  6. Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions at the LBNF Near Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mosel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The reaction mechanisms for neutrino interactions with an $^{40}Ar$ nucleus with the LBNF flux are calculated with the Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) transport-theoretical implementation of these interactions. Quasielastic scattering, many-body effects, pion production and absorption and Deep Inelastic Scattering are discussed; they all play a role at the LBNF energies and are experimentally entangled with each other. Quasielastic scattering makes up for only about 1/3 of the total cross section whereas pion production channels make up about 2/3 of the total. This underlines the need for a consistent description of the neutrino-nucleus reaction that treats all channels on an equal, consistent footing. The results discussed here can also serve as useful guideposts for the Intermediate Neutrino Program.

  7. Electromagnetic properties of the Beryllium-11 nucleus in Halo EFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammer H.-W.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We compute electromagnetic properties of the Beryllium-11 nucleus using an effective field theory that exploits the separation of scales in this halo system. We fix the parameters of the EFT from measured data on levels and scattering lengths in the 10Be plus neutron system. We then obtain predictions for the B(E1 strength of the 1/2+ to 1/2− transition in the 11Be nucleus. We also compute the charge radius of the ground state of 11Be. Agreement with experiment within the expected accuracy of a leading-order computation in this EFT is obtained. We also indicate how higher-order corrections that affect both s-wave and p-wave 10 Be-neutron interactions will affect our results.

  8. K+-nucleus potentials from K+-nucleon amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2016-10-01

    Optical potentials for K+-nucleus interactions are constructed from K+-nucleon amplitudes using recently developed algorithm based on K+-N kinematics in the nuclear medium. With the deep penetration of K+ mesons into the nucleus at momenta below 800 MeV / c it is possible to test this approach with greater sensitivity than hitherto done with K- and pions. The energy-dependence of experimental reaction and total cross sections on nuclei is better reproduced with this approach compared to fixed-energy amplitudes. The inclusion of Pauli correlations in the medium also improves the agreement between calculation and experiment. The absolute scale of the cross sections is reproduced very well for 6Li but for C, Si and Ca calculated cross sections are (23 ± 4)% smaller than experiment, in agreement with earlier analyses. Two phenomenological models that produce such missing strength suggest that the imaginary part of the potential needs about 40% enhancement.

  9. NPY and VGF Immunoreactivity Increased in the Arcuate Nucleus, but Decreased in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, of Type-II Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Saderi; Roberto Salgado-Delgado; Rafael Avendaño-Pradel; Maria del Carmen Basualdo; Gian-Luca Ferri; Laura Chávez-Macías; Juan E Olvera Roblera; Carolina Escobar; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2012-01-01

    Ample animal studies demonstrate that neuropeptides NPY and α-MSH expressed in Arcuate Nucleus and Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, modulate glucose homeostasis and food intake. In contrast is the absence of data validating these observations for human disease. Here we compare the post mortem immunoreactivity of the metabolic neuropeptides NPY, αMSH and VGF in the infundibular nucleus, and brainstem of 11 type-2 diabetic and 11 non-diabetic individuals. α-MSH, NPY and tyrosine hydroxylase i...

  10. Central bank Financial Independence

    OpenAIRE

    J.Ramon Martinez-Resano

    2004-01-01

    Central bank independence is a multifaceted institutional design. The financial component has been seldom analysed. This paper intends to set a comprehensive conceptual background for central bank financial independence. Quite often central banks are modelled as robot like maximizers of some goal. This perspective neglects the fact that central bank functions are inevitably deployed on its balance sheet and have effects on its income statement. A financially independent central bank exhibits ...

  11. Quantitative receptor radioautography in the study of receptor-receptor interactions in the nucleus tractus solitarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fior-Chadi D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS in the dorsomedial medulla comprises a wide range of neuropeptides and biogenic amines. Several of them are related to mechanisms of central blood pressure control. Angiotensin II (Ang II, neuropeptide Y (NPY and noradrenaline (NA are found in the NTS cells, as well as their receptors. Based on this observation we have evaluated the modulatory effect of these peptide receptors on a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. Using quantitative receptor radioautography, we observed that NPY and Ang II receptors decreased the affinity of a2-adrenoceptors for their agonists in the NTS of the rat. Cardiovascular experiments agreed with the in vitro data. Coinjection of a threshold dose of Ang II or of the NPY agonists together with an ED50 dose of adrenergic agonists such as NA, adrenaline and clonidine counteracted the depressor effect produced by the a2-agonist in the NTS. The results provide evidence for the existence of an antagonistic interaction between Ang II at1 receptors and NPY receptor subtypes with the a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. This receptor interaction may reduce the transduction over the a2-adrenoceptors which can be important in central cardiovascular regulation and in the development of hypertension

  12. ALMA reveals the feeding of the Seyfert 1 nucleus in NGC 1566

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F; Casasola, V; Hunt, L; Krips, M; Baker, A J; Boone, F; Eckart, A; Marquez, I; Neri, R; Schinnerer, E; Tacconi, L J

    2014-01-01

    We report ALMA observations of CO(3-2) emission in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 1566, at a spatial resolution of 25 pc. Our aim is to investigate the morphology and dynamics of the gas inside the central kpc, and to probe nuclear fueling and feedback phenomena. NGC 1566 has a nuclear bar of 1.7 kpc radius and a conspicuous grand design spiral starting from this radius. The ALMA field of view, of diameter 0.9 kpc, lies well inside the nuclear bar and reveals a molecular trailing spiral structure of \\sim 100 pc in size, which is possibly fueling the nucleus. The spiral starts with a large pitch angle from the center and then winds up in a pseudo-ring at the inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) of the nuclear bar. This is the first time that a trailing spiral structure is clearly seen driving the gas inwards inside the ILR ring of the nuclear bar. This phenomenon shows that the massive central black hole has a significant dynamical influence on the gas, triggering its fueling. The gaseous spiral is well correlated with th...

  13. An XMM-Newton view of the `bare' nucleus of Fairall 9

    CERN Document Server

    Emmanoulopoulos, D; McHardy, I M; Nicastro, F; Bianchi, S; Arevalo, P

    2011-01-01

    We present the spectral results from a 130 ks observation, obtained from the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission-Newton (XMM-Newton) observatory, of the type I Seyfert galaxy Fairall 9. An X-ray hardness-ratio analysis of the light-curves, reveals a `softer-when-brighter' behaviour which is typical for radio-quiet type I Seyfert galaxies. Moreover, we analyse the high spectral-resolution data of the reflection grating spectrometer and we did not find any significant evidence supporting the presence of warm-absorber in the low X-ray energy part of the source's spectrum. This means that the central nucleus of Fairall 9 is `clean' and thus its X-ray spectral properties probe directly the physical conditions of the central engine. The overall X-ray spectrum in the 0.5-10 keV energy-range, derived from the EPIC data, can be modelled by a relativistically blurred disc-reflection model. This spectral model yields for Fairall 9 an intermediate black-hole best-fit spin parameter of $\\alpha=0.39^{+0.48}_{-0.30}$.

  14. Three-dimensional Keplerian orbit-superposition models of the nucleus of M31

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Calum K; 10.1093/mnras/stt104

    2013-01-01

    We present three-dimensional eccentric disc models of the nucleus of M31, modelling the disc as a linear combination of thick rings of massless stars orbiting in the potential of a central black hole. Our models are nonparametric generalisations of the parametric models of Peiris & Tremaine. The models reproduce well the observed WFPC2 photometry, the detailed line-of-sight velocity distributions from STIS observations along P1 and P2, together with the qualitative features of the OASIS kinematic maps. We confirm Peiris & Tremaine's finding that nuclear discs aligned with the larger disc of M31 are strongly ruled out. Our optimal model is inclined at 57 degrees with respect to the line of sight of M31 and has a position angle of 55 degrees. It has a central black hole of mass 10^8 solar masses, and, when viewed in three dimensions, shows a clear enhancement in the density of stars around the black hole. The distribution of orbit eccentricities in our models is similar to Peiris & Tremaine's model,...

  15. The Role of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus in Cardiac Autonomic Control during Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joustra, S. D.; Reijntjes, R. H.; Pereira, A. M.; Lammers, G. J.; Biermasz, N. R.; Thijs, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) may play an important role in central autonomic control, since its projections connect to (para)sympathetic relay stations in the brainstem and spinal cord. The cardiac autonomic modifications during nighttime may therefore not only result from direct effects of the sleep-related changes in the central autonomic network, but also from endogenous circadian factors as directed by the SCN. To explore the influence of the SCN on autonomic fluctuations during nighttime, we studied heart rate and its variability (HRV) in a clinical model of SCN damage. Methods Fifteen patients in follow-up after surgical treatment for nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma (NFMA) compressing the optic chiasm (8 females, 26–65 years old) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls (5 females, 30–63 years) underwent overnight ambulatory polysomnography. Eleven patients had hypopituitarism and received adequate replacement therapy. HRV was calculated for each 30-second epoch and corrected for sleep stage, arousals, and gender using mixed effect regression models. Results Compared to controls, patients spent more time awake after sleep onset and in NREM1-sleep, and less in REM-sleep. Heart rate, low (LF) and high frequency (HF) power components and the LF/HF ratio across sleep stages were not significantly different between groups. Conclusions These findings suggest that the SCN does not play a dominant role in cardiac autonomic control during sleep. PMID:27010631

  16. Neonatal sensory nerve injury-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal principal sensory nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Erzurumlu, Reha S

    2016-01-01

    Sensory deprivation studies in neonatal mammals, such as monocular eye closure, whisker trimming, and chemical blockade of the olfactory epithelium have revealed the importance of sensory inputs in brain wiring during distinct critical periods. But very few studies have paid attention to the effects of neonatal peripheral sensory nerve damage on synaptic wiring of the central nervous system (CNS) circuits. Peripheral somatosensory nerves differ from other special sensory afferents in that they are more prone to crush or severance because of their locations in the body. Unlike the visual and auditory afferents, these nerves show regenerative capabilities after damage. Uniquely, damage to a somatosensory peripheral nerve does not only block activity incoming from the sensory receptors but also mediates injury-induced neuro- and glial chemical signals to the brain through the uninjured central axons of the primary sensory neurons. These chemical signals can have both far more and longer lasting effects than sensory blockade alone. Here we review studies which focus on the consequences of neonatal peripheral sensory nerve damage in the principal sensory nucleus of the brainstem trigeminal complex.

  17. Nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptors mediate social reward

    OpenAIRE

    Trezza, Viviana; Damsteegt, Ruth; Achterberg, E J Marijke; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J

    2011-01-01

    Positive social interactions are essential for emotional well-being and proper behavioral development of young individuals. Here, we studied the neural underpinnings of social reward, by investigating the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in social play behavior, a highly rewarding social interaction in adolescent rats. Intra-NAc infusion of morphine (0.05–0.1 μg) increased pinning and pouncing, characteristic elements of social play behavior in rats, and ...

  18. Nucleus-associated intermediate filaments from chicken erythrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Chicken erythrocyte nuclei prepared by isolation in isotonic KCl and Nonidet P-40 detergent were found to contain numerous attached filaments with a mean diameter of 11.0 nm. In polypeptide content and solubility properties, they resembled the vimentin type of intermediate filament found in cells of mesenchymal origin. Examination of their association with the nucleus suggests that more than a simple membrane attachment is involved.

  19. High-spin states in the {sup 96}Tc nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Cata-Danil, I.; Ivascu, M.; Marginean, N.; Rusu, C.; Stroe, L.; Ur, C.A. [National Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Gizon, A.; Gizon, J. [Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, IN2P3-CNRS/UPJ, Grenoble (France); Nyako, B.; Timar, J.; Zolnai, L. [Inst. of Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Boston, A.J.; Joss, D.T.; Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T. [Oliver Lodge Lab., Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom); Parry, C.M. [Dept. of Physics, York Univ., Heslington, York (United Kingdom)

    2001-03-01

    High-spin states in the {sup 96}Tc nucleus have been studied with the reactions {sup 82}Se({sup 19}F,5n{gamma}) at 68 MeV and Zn({sup 36}S,{alpha}pxn) at 130 MeV. Two {gamma}-ray cascades (irregular bandlike structures) have been observed up to an excitation energy of about 10 MeV and spin 21-22{Dirac_h}. (orig.)

  20. High-spin states in the {sup 97}Tc nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Cata-Danil, I.; Ivascu, M.; Marginean, N.; Rusu, C.; Stroe, L.; Ur, C.A. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest 76900 (Romania); Gadea, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy)

    2003-04-01

    High-spin states in the {sup 97}Tc nucleus have been studied by in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy with the reaction {sup 82}Se({sup 19}F,4n{gamma}) at 68 MeV incident energy. Excited states have been observed up to about 8 MeV excitation and spin 43/2{Dirac_h}. The observed level scheme is compared with results of shell model calculations. (orig.)

  1. {alpha}-nucleus potentials and photon-induced nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galaviz, D. E-mail: redondo@ikp.tu-darmstadt.de; Babilon, M.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Hillier, R.; Mate, Z.; Mohr, P.; Rauscher, T.; Somorjai, E.; Zilges, A.; Zolnai, L

    2003-05-05

    New data for the {sup 112,124}Sn({alpha},{alpha}){sup 112,124}Sn reaction have been measured and are presently analyzed. Results of the {sup 112} Sn x {alpha} potential at the energy E{sub c.m.} {approx} 14 MeV are presented. The determination of this {alpha}-nucleus potential may allow a prediction of the {sup 112}Sn({alpha},{gamma}){sup 116}Te cross section.

  2. How did nucleus and sexual reproduction come into being?

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Xie

    2016-01-01

    The origin of eukaryote is a fundamental, forbidding evolutionary puzzle, and the popular scenarios of eukaryogenesis are far from being clear. So far, there have been various theories (e.g., syntrophic model, autogenous model, viral eukaryogenesis model, exomembrane hypothesis), but few explain why. I observed that C-value (the amount of DNA contained within a haploid nucleus) increased by 3.5 orders of magnitude from prokaryote to eukaryotes, which is inconceivably close to the packing rati...

  3. Theoretical Aspects of Coherent Elastic Neutrino Nucleus Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Gail

    2014-09-01

    We will discuss the physics potential of coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. This standard model process has never been directly measured, although there are a number of experiments proposed at stopped pion/muon or reactor sites that could make such a first detection. Such a measurement opens up the possibility for a number of interesting physics probes. We will review these from a theoretical point of view, with a particular focus on the nuclear-neutron form factor.

  4. Decay of the N =126 , 213Fr nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pragati, Deo, A. Y.; Podolyák, Zs.; Walker, P. M.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Agramunt, J.; Fraile, L. M.; Al-Dahan, N.; Alkhomashi, N.; Briz, J. A.; Aguado, M. E. Estevez; Farrelly, G.; Gelletly, W.; Herlert, A.; Köster, U.; Maira, A.

    2016-12-01

    γ rays following the EC/β+ and α decay of the N = 126, 213Fr nucleus have been observed at the CERN isotope separator on-line (ISOLDE) facility with the help of γ -ray and conversion-electron spectroscopy. These γ rays establish several hitherto unknown excited states in 213Rn. Also, five new α -decay branches from the 213Fr ground state have been discovered. Shell model calculations have been performed to understand the newly observed states in 213Rn.

  5. PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF HYPERALGESIA EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza Grava, André Luiz; Ferrari,Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, indomethacin, atenolol and indomethacin plus atenolol) and analgesic drugs (morphine) on hyperalgesia experimentally induced by the nucleus pulposus (NP) in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats of weights ranging from 220 to 250 g were used in the study. Hyperalgesia was induced by means of a fragment of NP removed from the sacrococcygeal region that was placed in contact w...

  6. Cloud condensation nucleus behaviour of selected dicarboxylic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mia Frosch Mogensbæk; Nielsen, Ole Faurskov; Bilde, Merete

    .g. Anttila et al, 2005). Particles composed of two such compounds, namely glutaric acid and pimelic acid, have been studied using a cloud condensation nucleus counter (University of Wyoming, Model 100B). The behaviour of pimelic acid seems to agree quite well with the predictions of Köhler theory. This......., and Riekkola, M.L , Determination of organic acids in aerosol particles from a coniferous forest by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, Journal of Separation Science, 28, 337-346, 2005....

  7. K--Nucleus Potentials Consistent with Kaonic Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieply, A.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mares, J.

    2004-03-01

    Various models of the K- nucleus potential have been compared and tested in fits to kaonic atom data. The calculations give basically two vastly different predictions for the depth of the K- optical potential at the nuclear density. The study of the (K-stop, π ) reaction could help to distinguish between K- optical potentials as the Λ -hypernuclear formation rates are sensitive to the details of the initial-state K- wave function.

  8. Hidden Glashow resonance in neutrino–nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Alikhanov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Today it is widely believed that s-channel excitation of an on-shell W boson, commonly known as the Glashow resonance, can be initiated in matter only by the electron antineutrino in the process ν¯ee−→W− at the laboratory energy around 6.3 PeV. In this Letter we argue that the Glashow resonance within the Standard Model also occurs in neutrino–nucleus collisions. The main conclusions are as follows. 1 The Glashow resonance can be excited by both neutrinos and antineutrinos of all the three flavors scattering in the Coulomb field of a nucleus. 2 The Glashow resonance in a neutrino–nucleus reaction does not manifest itself as a Breit–Wigner-like peak in the cross section but the latter exhibits instead a slow logarithmic-law growth with the neutrino energy. The resonance turns thus out to be hidden. 3 More than 98% of W bosons produced in the sub-PeV region in neutrino-initiated reactions in water/ice will be from the Glashow resonance. 4 The vast majority of the Glashow resonance events in a neutrino detector are expected at energies from a few TeV to a few tens of TeV, being mostly initiated by the conventional atmospheric neutrinos dominant in this energy range. Calculations of the cross sections for Glashow resonance excitation on the oxygen nucleus as well as on the proton are carried out in detail. The results of this Letter can be useful for studies of neutrino interactions at large volume water/ice neutrino detectors. For example, in the IceCube detector one can expect 0.3 Glashow resonance events with shower-like topologies and the deposited energies above 300 TeV per year. It is therefore likely already to have at least one Glashow resonance event in the IceCube data set.

  9. Cosmic Train Wreck by Massive Black Holes: Discovery of a kpc-Scale Triple Active Galactic Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xin; Strauss, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Hierarchical galaxy mergers will lead to the formation of binary and, in particular, triple SMBHs, given that most massive galaxies harbor central SMBHs. A triple of SMBHs becomes visible as a triple Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) when the BHs accrete large amounts of gas at the same time. Here we report the discovery of a kpc-scale triple AGN, SDSSJ1027+1749 at z = 0.066, from our systematic search for hierarchical mergers of AGNs. The galaxy contains three emission-line nuclei, two of which are offset by ~ 450 and 110 km/s in velocity and by 2.4 and 3.0 kpc in projected separation from the central nucleus. All three nuclei are classified as obscured AGNs based on optical diagnostic emission line ratios, with black hole mass estimates M_BH >~ 10^8 M_sun from stellar velocity dispersions measured in the associated stellar components. Based on dynamical friction timescale estimates, the three stellar components in SDSSJ1027+1749 will merge in ~ 40 Myr, and their associated SMBHs may evolve into a gravitationall...

  10. The TLC: a novel auditory nucleus of the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña, Enrique; Viñuela, Antonio; Marshall, Allen F; Fitzpatrick, Douglas C; Aparicio, M-Auxiliadora

    2007-11-28

    We have identified a novel nucleus of the mammalian brain and termed it the tectal longitudinal column (TLC). Basic histologic stains, tract-tracing techniques and three-dimensional reconstructions reveal that the rat TLC is a narrow, elongated structure spanning the midbrain tectum longitudinally. This paired nucleus is located close to the midline, immediately dorsal to the periaqueductal gray matter. It occupies what has traditionally been considered the most medial region of the deep superior colliculus and the most medial region of the inferior colliculus. The TLC differs from the neighboring nuclei of the superior and inferior colliculi and the periaqueductal gray by its distinct connections and cytoarchitecture. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings show that TLC neurons respond to auditory stimuli with physiologic properties that differ from those of neurons in the inferior or superior colliculi. We have identified the TLC in rodents, lagomorphs, carnivores, nonhuman primates, and humans, which indicates that the nucleus is conserved across mammals. The discovery of the TLC reveals an unexpected level of longitudinal organization in the mammalian tectum and raises questions as to the participation of this mesencephalic region in essential, yet completely unexplored, aspects of multisensory and/or sensorimotor integration.

  11. Nucleus- and cell-specific gene expression in monkey thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Karl D; Choudary, Prabhakara V; Jones, Edward G

    2007-02-06

    Nuclei of the mammalian thalamus are aggregations of neurons with unique architectures and input-output connections, yet the molecular determinants of their organizational specificity remain unknown. By comparing expression profiles of thalamus and cerebral cortex in adult rhesus monkeys, we identified transcripts that are unique to dorsal thalamus or to individual nuclei within it. Real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization analyses confirmed the findings. Expression profiling of individual nuclei microdissected from the dorsal thalamus revealed additional subsets of nucleus-specific genes. Functional annotation using Gene Ontology (GO) vocabulary and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis revealed overrepresentation of GO categories related to development, morphogenesis, cell-cell interactions, and extracellular matrix within the thalamus- and nucleus-specific genes, many involved in the Wnt signaling pathway. Examples included the transcription factor TCF7L2, localized exclusively to excitatory neurons; a calmodulin-binding protein PCP4; the bone extracellular matrix molecules SPP1 and SPARC; and other genes involved in axon outgrowth and cell matrix interactions. Other nucleus-specific genes such as CBLN1 are involved in synaptogenesis. The genes identified likely underlie nuclear specification, cell phenotype, and connectivity during development and their maintenance in the adult thalamus.

  12. An off-centered active galactic nucleus in NGC 3115

    CERN Document Server

    Menezes, R B; Ricci, T V

    2014-01-01

    NGC 3115 is an S0 galaxy that has always been considered to have a pure absorption-line spectrum. Some recent studies have detected a compact radio-emitting nucleus in this object, coinciding with the photometric center and with a candidate for the X-ray nucleus. This is evidence of the existence of a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the galaxy, although no emission line has ever been observed. We report the detection of an emission-line spectrum of a type 1 AGN in NGC 3115, with an H$\\alpha$ luminosity of $L_{H\\alpha} = (4.2 \\pm 0.4) \\times 10^{37}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Our analysis revealed that this AGN is located at a projected distance of $\\sim 0.29" \\pm 0.05"$ (corresponding to $\\sim 14.3 \\pm 2.5$ pc) from the stellar bulge center, which is coincident with the kinematic center of this object's stellar velocity map. The black hole corresponding to the observed off-centered AGN may form a binary system with a black hole located at the stellar bulge center. However, it is also possible that the dis...

  13. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paves Heiti

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area.

  14. Study of the structure of borromean nucleus 17Ne

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fei; HUA Hui; YE Yan-Lin; LI Zhi-Huan; JIANG Dong-Xing; MA Li-Ying; GE Yu-Cheng; ZHENG Tao; SONG Yu-Shou; LI Xiang-Qing; Qureshi Faisal-Jamil

    2009-01-01

    The 17Ne nucleus is a possible candidate with a two-proton borromean halo structure. Since the theoretical model is difficult to handle the three-body system, it is difficult to determine the two-proton halo structure in 17Ne. In the present research, we try to study the breakup reaction of 17Ne. For the Borromean nuclei, one-proton knockout results in an unstable nucleus which is decaying further by proton emission. This process will result in an angular correlation between the direction of the aligned recoiling unstable nucleus and its decay products. The angular correlations can give us information about the configuration of the valence proton in the 17Ne. Furthermore, theoretical calculations indicate that the momentum distributions of 16F c.m are sensitive to the structure of the halo in 17Ne. Thus the measurement of momentum distributions of 16F c.m may also give us conclusive information on the structure of 17Ne. The present experiment has been done at IMP in Lanzhou using the radioactive beam 17Ne at 30.8 MeV/u on a 43mg/cm2 12C target. The data analysis is under procedure and the primary results are provided.

  15. Neutrino-Nucleus Cross Sections for Oscillation Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Katori, Teppei

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations physics is entered in the precision era. In this context accelerator-based neutrino experiments need a reduction of systematic errors to the level of a few percent. Today one of the most important sources of systematic errors are neutrino-nucleus cross sections which in the hundreds-MeV to few-GeV energy region are known with a precision not exceeding 20%. In this article we review the present experimental and theoretical knowledge of the neutrino-nucleus interaction physics. After introducing neutrino oscillation physics and accelerator-based neutrino experiments, we overview general aspects of the neutrino-nucleus cross sections, both theoretical and experimental views. Then we focus on these quantities in different reaction channels. We start with the quasielastic and quasielastic-like cross section, putting a special emphasis on multinucleon emission channel which attracted a lot of attention in the last few years. We review the main aspects of the different microscopic models for th...

  16. Maturation of firing pattern in chick vestibular nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, M; Hirsch, J C; Peusner, K D

    2006-08-25

    The principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus are vestibular nucleus neurons participating in the vestibuloocular and vestibulocollic reflexes. In birds and mammals, spontaneous and stimulus-evoked firing of action potentials is essential for vestibular nucleus neurons to generate mature vestibular reflex activity. The emergence of spike-firing pattern and the underlying ion channels were studied in morphologically-identified principal cells using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from brain slices of late-term embryos (embryonic day 16) and hatchling chickens (hatching day 1 and hatching day 5). Spontaneous spike activity emerged around the perinatal period, since at embryonic day 16 none of the principal cells generated spontaneous action potentials. However, at hatching day 1, 50% of the cells fired spontaneously (range, 3 to 32 spikes/s), which depended on synaptic transmission in most cells. By hatching day 5, 80% of the principal cells could fire action potentials spontaneously (range, 5 to 80 spikes/s), and this activity was independent of synaptic transmission and showed faster kinetics than at hatching day 1. Repetitive firing in response to depolarizing pulses appeared in the principal cells starting around embryonic day 16, when calcium-dependent potassium current modulated both the spontaneous and evoked spike firing activity. Altogether, these in vitro studies showed that during the perinatal period, the principal cells switched from displaying no spontaneous spike activity at resting membrane potential and generating one spike on depolarization to the tonic firing of spontaneous and evoked action potentials.

  17. Tolerance to Non-Opioid Analgesics is Opioid Sensitive in the Nucleus Raphe Magnus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagareli, Merab G; Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz

    2011-01-01

    Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) into the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac, and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) in the following 4 days result in progressively less antinociception compare to the saline control, i.e., tolerance develops to these drugs in male rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with the μ-opioid antagonist naloxone into the NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs on the first day of testing in the tail-flick (TF) reflex and hot plate (HP) latency tests. On the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests and impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion of endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain-control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine, and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  18. Lesions of the posterior paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus attenuate fear expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui eLi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT has generated interest because of its strong projections to areas of the brain associated with the regulation of emotional behaviors. The posterior aspect of the PVT (pPVT is notable for its projection to the central nucleus of the amygdala which is essential for the expression of a conditioned fear response. The present study was done to determine if the pPVT is involved in the expression of fear by examining the effect of post-conditioning lesions of the pPVT. Male rats were trained to bar press for food pellets on a variable ratio schedule. Fear conditioning was done using auditory tones (30 s that co-terminate with footschocks (0.65 mA, 1.0 s. Rats were anesthetized 24 hours later and small bilateral electrolytic lesions of the pPVT were made. Fear expression to the tone was assessed using suppression of bar-pressing and freezing after one week of recovery from the surgical procedure. Small bilateral lesions of the pPVT increased bar-pressing for food and decreased freezing during the presentation of the conditioned tone. Lesions of the pPVT had no effect on fear extinction, fear conditioning to a novel tone, or the motivation for food as assessed using a progressive ratio schedule. The results of the experiment support a role for the pPVT in fear expression. In contrast, the pPVT does not appear to be involved in fear learning or extinction nor does it appear to play a role in the motivation of rats to bar press for food.

  19. Connections of Barrington's nucleus to the sympathetic nervous system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, G; Card, J P; Rinaman, L; Sved, A F

    2000-03-15

    Barrington's nucleus (BN) has been considered a pontine center related exclusively to the control of pelvic parasympathetic activity. The present study demonstrates an anatomical linkage between BN and autonomic outflow to visceral targets innervated exclusively by the sympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. Temporal analysis of infection after injection of pseudorabies virus (PRV), a retrograde transynaptic tracer, into two sympathetically innervated organs, the spleen and the kidney, revealed the presence of infected neurons in BN at early post-inoculation survival intervals. Immunohistochemical localization of PRV after spleen injections showed that a small subpopulation of BN neurons became labeled in a time frame coincident with the appearance of infected neurons in other brain regions known to project to sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) in the thoracic spinal cord; a larger number of infected neurons appeared in BN at intermediate intervals after PRV injections into the spleen or kidney. Coinjection of the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold i.p. and PRV into the spleen demonstrated that parasympathetic preganglionic neurons in the caudal medulla or lumbo-sacral spinal cord were not infected, indicating that infected BN neurons were not infected via a parasympathetic route. Thus, BN neurons become infected after PRV injections into the spleen or kidney either directly through BN projections to SPNs, or secondarily via BN projections to infected pre-preganglionic neurons. These results demonstrate an anatomical linkage, either direct or indirect, between BN and sympathetic activity. Because BN receives numerous inputs from diverse brain regions, the relation of BN with both branches of the autonomic nervous system suggests that this nucleus might play a role in the integration of supraspinal inputs relevant to the central coordination of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity.

  20. Synaptic reorganization in the adult rat's ventral cochlear nucleus following its total sensory deafferentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heika Hildebrandt

    Full Text Available Ablation of a cochlea causes total sensory deafferentation of the cochlear nucleus in the brainstem, providing a model to investigate nervous degeneration and formation of new synaptic contacts in the adult brain. In a quantitative electron microscopical study on the plasticity of the central auditory system of the Wistar rat, we first determined what fraction of the total number of synaptic contact zones (SCZs in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN is attributable to primary sensory innervation and how many synapses remain after total unilateral cochlear ablation. Second, we attempted to identify the potential for a deafferentation-dependent synaptogenesis. SCZs were ultrastructurally identified before and after deafferentation in tissue treated for ethanolic phosphotungstic acid (EPTA staining. This was combined with pre-embedding immunocytochemistry for gephyrin identifying inhibitory SCZs, the growth-associated protein GAP-43, glutamate, and choline acetyltransferase. A stereological analysis of EPTA stained sections revealed 1.11±0.09 (S.E.M.×10(9 SCZs per mm(3 of AVCN tissue. Within 7 days of deafferentation, this number was down by 46%. Excitatory and inhibitory synapses were differentially affected on the side of deafferentation. Excitatory synapses were quickly reduced and then began to increase in number again, necessarily being complemented from sources other than cochlear neurons, while inhibitory synapses were reduced more slowly and continuously. The result was a transient rise of the relative fraction of inhibitory synapses with a decline below original levels thereafter. Synaptogenesis was inferred by the emergence of morphologically immature SCZs that were consistently associated with GAP-43 immunoreactivity. SCZs of this type were estimated to make up a fraction of close to 30% of the total synaptic population present by ten weeks after sensory deafferentation. In conclusion, there appears to be a substantial potential

  1. Lurbinectedin Inactivates the Ewing Sarcoma Oncoprotein EWS-FLI1 by Redistributing It within the Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Matt L; Maloney, Nichole; Roland, Joseph; Guillen Navarro, Maria Jose; Easton, Matthew K; Kitchen-Goosen, Susan M; Boguslawski, Elissa A; Madaj, Zachary B; Johnson, Ben K; Bowman, Megan J; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Winn, Mary E; Turner, Lisa; Hostetter, Galen; Galmarini, Carlos María; Aviles, Pablo M; Grohar, Patrick J

    2016-11-15

    There is a great need to develop novel approaches to target oncogenic transcription factors with small molecules. Ewing sarcoma is emblematic of this need, as it depends on the continued activity of the EWS-FLI1 transcription factor to maintain the malignant phenotype. We have previously shown that the small molecule trabectedin interferes with EWS-FLI1. Here, we report important mechanistic advances and a second-generation inhibitor to provide insight into the therapeutic targeting of EWS-FLI1. We discovered that trabectedin functionally inactivated EWS-FLI1 by redistributing the protein within the nucleus to the nucleolus. This effect was rooted in the wild-type functions of the EWSR1, compromising the N-terminal half of the chimeric oncoprotein, which is known to be similarly redistributed within the nucleus in the presence of UV light damage. A second-generation trabectedin analogue lurbinectedin (PM01183) caused the same nuclear redistribution of EWS-FLI1, leading to a loss of activity at the promoter, mRNA, and protein levels of expression. Tumor xenograft studies confirmed this effect, and it was increased in combination with irinotecan, leading to tumor regression and replacement of Ewing sarcoma cells with benign fat cells. The net result of combined lurbinectedin and irinotecan treatment was a complete reversal of EWS-FLI1 activity and elimination of established tumors in 30% to 70% of mice after only 11 days of therapy. Our results illustrate the preclinical safety and efficacy of a disease-specific therapy targeting the central oncogenic driver in Ewing sarcoma. Cancer Res; 76(22); 6657-68. ©2016 AACR.

  2. A transport set-up for heavy-flavour observables in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, Marzia; Beraudo, A; De Pace, A; Molinari, A; Monteno, M; Prino, F; Sitta, M

    2014-01-01

    A multi-step setup for heavy-flavour studies in high-energy nucleus–nucleus collisions is presented. The initial hard production of View the MathML sourceQ$\\bar{Q}$ pairs is simulated with the POWHEG pQCD event generator, interfaced with the PYTHIA parton shower. In a nucleus–nucleus collision the propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described through the relativistic Langevin equation. The numerical results are compared to experimental data from the RHIC and the LHC. In particular we show the comparisons of the nuclear modification factor of D-mesons, non-prompt J/ψJ/ψ's and heavy-flavour electrons. Furthermore, first results on azimuthal correlations of heavy quark pair and open charm/beauty meson pairs are presented.

  3. CASTOR A Forward Detector for the Identification of Centauro and Strangelets in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z

    2000-01-01

    Presentation made at the XXVIIIth Symposium on Multiparticle Dynamics, 6-11 September 1998, Delphi and published in World ScientificThe physics motivation for a very forward detector to be employed in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC is discussed. A phenomenological model describing the formation and decay of a Centauro fireball in nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The CASTOR detector which is aimed to measure the hadronic and photonic content of an interaction and to identify deeply penetrating objects in the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6eta7.2 in an event-by-event mode is described. Results of simulations of the expected response of the calorimeter and, in particular, to the passage of strangelets, are presented.

  4. Distinct effect of orphanin FQ in nucleus raphe magnus and nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis on the rat tail flick reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z; Zhang, Y; Wu, G

    2001-06-22

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of orphanin FQ (OFQ) microinjected into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) and the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NGC) on pain modulation. The tail-flick latency (TFL) was used as a behavioral index of nociceptive responsiveness. The result showed microinjection of OFQ into the NRM significantly increased the TFL, whereas microinjection of OFQ into the NGC decreased the TFL, suggesting the analgesic effect of OFQ in the NRM and the hyperalgesic effect of OFQ in the NGC. As there are three classes of putative pain modulating neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), the hyperalgesic or analgesic effect of OFQ in the RVM might depend upon the different class of the neurons being acted.

  5. Nucleus-encoded periplastid-targeted EFL in chlorarachniophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gile, Gillian H; Keeling, Patrick J

    2008-09-01

    Chlorarachniophytes are cercozoan amoeboflagellates that acquired photosynthesis by enslaving a green alga, which has retained a highly reduced nucleus called a nucleomorph. The nucleomorph lacks many genes necessary for its own maintenance and expression, suggesting that some genes have been moved to the host nucleus and their products are now targeted back to the periplastid compartment (PPC), the reduced eukaryotic cytoplasm of the endosymbiont. Protein trafficking in chlorarachniophytes is therefore complex, including nucleus-encoded plastid-targeted proteins, nucleomorph-encoded plastid-targeted proteins, and nucleus-encoded periplastid-targeted proteins. A major gap in our understanding of this system is the PPC-targeted proteins because none have been described in any chlorarachniophytes. Here we describe the first such protein, the GTPase EFL. EFL was characterized from 7 chlorarachniophytes, and 2 distinct types were found. One is related to foraminiferan EFL and lacks an amino-terminal extension. The second, distantly related, type encodes an amino-terminal extension consisting of a signal peptide followed by sequence sharing many characteristics with transit peptides from nucleus-encoded plastid-targeted proteins and which we conclude is most likely PPC targeted. Western blotting with antibodies specific to putative host and PPC-targeted EFL from the chlorarachniophytes Bigelowiella natans and Gymnochlora stellata is consistent with posttranslational cleavage of the leaders from PPC-targeted proteins. Immunolocalization of both proteins in B. natans confirmed the cytosolic location of the leaderless EFL and a distinct localization pattern for the PPC-targeted protein but could not rule out a plastid location (albeit very unlikely). We sought other proteins with a similar leader and identified a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 1 encoding a bipartite extension with the same properties. Transit peptide sequences were characterized from all 3

  6. Superscaling in electron-nucleus scattering and its link to CC and NC QE neutrino-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Barbaro, M B; Caballero, J A; Donnelly, T W; Gonzalez-Jimenez, R; Ivanov, M; Udias, J M

    2013-01-01

    The superscaling approach (SuSA) to neutrino-nucleus scattering, based on the assumed universality of the scaling function for electromagnetic and weak interactions, is reviewed. The predictions of the SuSA model for bot CC and NC differential and total cross sections are presented and compared with the MiniBooNE data. The role of scaling violations, in particular the contribution of meson exchange currents in the two-particle two-hole sector, is explored.

  7. Superscaling in electron-nucleus scattering and its link to CC and NC QE neutrino-nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, M. B. [Università di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Amaro, J. E. [Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Caballero, J. A.; González-Jiménez, R. [Universidad de Sevilla, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Donnelly, T. W. [CTP, LNS and Department of Physics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ivanov, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Udías, J. M. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The superscaling approach (SuSA) to neutrino-nucleus scattering, based on the assumed universality of the scaling function for electromagnetic and weak interactions, is reviewed. The predictions of the SuSA model for bot CC and NC differential and total cross sections are presented and compared with the MiniBooNE data. The role of scaling violations, in particular the contribution of meson exchange currents in the two-particle two-hole sector, is explored.

  8. Peptide and lipid modulation of glutamatergic afferent synaptic transmission in the solitary tract nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Andresen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The brainstem nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS holds the first central neurons in major homeostatic reflex pathways. These homeostatic reflexes regulate and coordinate multiple organ systems from gastrointestinal to cardiopulmonary functions. The core of many of these pathways arise from cranial visceral afferent neurons that enter the brain as the solitary tract (ST with more than two-thirds arising from the gastrointestinal system. About one quarter of ST afferents have myelinated axons but the majority are classed as unmyelinated C-fibers. All ST afferents release the fast neurotransmitter glutamate with remarkably similar, high-probability release characteristics. Second order NTS neurons receive surprisingly limited primary afferent information with one or two individual inputs converging on single second order NTS neurons. A- and C-fiber afferents never mix at NTS second order neurons. Many transmitters modify the basic glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC often by reducing glutamate release or interrupting terminal depolarization. Thus, a distinguishing feature of ST transmission is presynaptic expression of G-protein coupled receptors for peptides common to peripheral or forebrain (e.g. hypothalamus neuron sources. Presynaptic receptors for angiotensin (AT1, vasopressin (V1a, oxytocin (OT, opioid (MOR, ghrelin (GHSR1 and cholecystokinin (CCK differentially control glutamate release on particular subsets of neurons with most other ST afferents unaffected. Lastly, lipid-like signals are transduced by two key ST presynaptic receptors, the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 and the cannabinoid receptor (CB1 that oppositely control glutamate release. Increasing evidence suggests that peripheral nervous signaling mechanisms are repurposed at central terminals to control excitation and are major sites of signal integration of peripheral and central inputs particularly from the hypothalamus.

  9. Directed flow in asymmetric nucleus-nucleus collisions and the inverse Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect

    CERN Document Server

    Toneev, V D; Kolomeitsev, E E; Cassing, W

    2016-01-01

    It is proposed to identify a strong electric field - created during relativistic collisions of asymmetric nuclei - via the observation of pseudorapidity and transverse momentum distributions of hadrons with the same mass but opposite charge. The results of detailed calculations within the Parton-Hadron String Dynamics (PHSD) approach for the charge-dependent directed flow $v_1$ are presented for semi-central Cu+Au collision at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV incorporating the inverse Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (iLPM) effect, which accounts for a delay in the electromagnetic interaction with the charged degree of freedom. Including the iLPM effect we achieve a reasonable agreement of the PHSD results for the charge splitting in $v_1(p_T)$ in line with the recent measurements of the STAR Collaboration for Cu+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV while an instant appearance and coupling of electric charges at the hard collision vertex overestimates the splitting by about a factor of 10. We predict that the iLPM effect...

  10. Evidence of the mixed phase formation in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sagun, V V; Ivanytskyi, A I; Oliinychenko, D R

    2016-01-01

    Searchers for various irregularities in the behavior of thermodynamic quantities at chemical freeze-out (CFO) are rather important in a view of experimental studies of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Using the multicomponent hadron resonance gas model (HRGM), developed in (Sagun, 2014; Bugaev et al., 2015), we performed a high-quality fit of 111 hadronic ratios measured for 14 values of the center of mass collision energies between 2.7 GeV and 200 GeV with the overall fit quality $\\chi^2/dof \\simeq 0.95$. In addition to previously reported singularities (Bugaev et al., 2015) at CFO we found that the hadron yield ratios $\\frac{\\Lambda}{p}$, $\\frac{K^{+}}{p}$, $\\frac{K^{+}}{\\Lambda}$, $\\frac{\\Omega^{-}}{p}$ and $\\frac{\\Xi^{-}}{p}$ measured in central nuclear collisions demonstrate a significant change of slope in the same range of center of mass collision energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 4.3-4.9$ GeV (Bugaev et al., 2015). This change of slopes is accompanied by a dramatic increase of resonance decays at CFO. Also at CFO the ...

  11. Activation of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons following central administration of histamine is mediated by H1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, A E; Lookingland, K J; Moore, K E

    1993-01-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular administration of histamine on the activity of mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) neurons was determined in male rats. The activity of these neurons was estimated by measuring: (1) the accumulation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) after administration of a decarboxylase inhibitor, and (2) the concentration of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the nucleus accumbens and striatum, which contain the terminals of these neurons. Central administration of histamine increased both DOPA accumulation and DOPAC concentrations in the nucleus accumbens, but was without effect in the striatum. The increase in DOPAC concentrations in the nucleus accumbens occurred within 10 min and was sustained for at least 120 min. The H1 antagonist mepyramine blocked whereas the H2 antagonist zolantidine did not affect histamine-induced increases in DOPAC concentrations in the nucleus accumbens. Neither mepyramine nor zolantidine affected basal DOPAC concentrations in the nucleus accumbens. These results indicate that central administration of histamine stimulates mesolimbic DA neurons through an action at the H1 receptor, but has no effect upon the activity of nigrostriatal DA neurons.

  12. NIDDK Central Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIDDK Central Repository stores biosamples, genetic and other data collected in designated NIDDK-funded clinical studies. The purpose of the NIDDK Central...

  13. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed.

  14. Central venous catheter - flushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... during cancer treatment Bone marrow transplant - discharge Central venous catheter - dressing change Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing Sterile technique Surgical wound care - open Review Date 9/22/2016 Updated by: ...

  15. Examinations of the early degrees of freedom in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, P.; Linnyk, O.; Cassing, W.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.

    2016-04-01

    The parton-hadron string dynamics (PHSD) transport model is used to study the impact of the choice of initial degrees of freedom on the final hadronic and electromagnetic observables in Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV. We find that a nonperturbative system of massive gluons (scenario I) and a system dominated by quarks and antiquarks (scenario II) lead to different hadronic observables when imposing the same initial energy-momentum tensor Tμ ν(x ) just after the passage of the impinging nuclei. In case of the gluonic initial condition the formation of s ,s ¯ pairs in the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) proceeds rather slowly, such that the antistrange quarks and accordingly the K+ mesons do not achieve chemical equilibrium even in central Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV. Accordingly, the K+ rapidity distribution is suppressed in the gluonic scenario, and is in conflict with the data from the BRAHMS Collaboration. The proton and antiproton rapidity distributions also disfavor scenario I. Furthermore, a clear suppression of direct photon and dilepton production is found for the pure gluonic initial conditions, which is not so clearly seen in the present photon and dilepton spectra from Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV due to a large contribution from other channels. It is argued that dilepton spectra in the invariant mass range 1.2

  16. Respiratory activity in the facial nucleus in an in vitro brainstem of tadpole, Rana catesbeiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao G-S; Kubin, L; Galante, R J; Fishman, A P; Pack, A I

    1996-04-15

    1. In studies of the central neural control of breathing, little advantage has been taken of comparative approaches. We have developed an in vitro brainstem preparation using larval Rana catesbeiana which generates two rhythmic neural activities characteristic of lung and gill ventilation. Based on the pattern of the facial (VII) nerve activity both lung and gill rhythm-related respiratory cycles were divided into three distinct phases. The purpose of this study was to characterize and classify membrane potential trajectories of respiratory motoneurons in the VII nucleus at intermediate stages (XII-XVII) of development. 2. Seventy-five respiratory-modulated neurons were recorded intracellularly within the facial motor nucleus region. Their resting membrane potential was between -40 and -80 mV. Sixty of them were identified as VII motoneurons and fifteen were non-antidromically activated. Membrane potentials of fifty-six of the seventy-five neurons were modulated with both lung (5-27 mV) and gill rhythms (3-15 mV) and the remaining nineteen neurons had only a modulation with lung rhythmicity (6-23 mV). No cells with gill modulation alone were observed. 3. All of the cells modulated with lung rhythmicity had only phase-bound depolarizing or hyperpolarizing membrane potential swings which could be categorized into four distinct patterns. In contrast, of the fifty-six cells modulated with gill rhythmicity, thirty-two were phasically depolarized during distinct phases of the gill cycle (four patterns were distinguished), whereas the remaining twenty-four were phase spanning with two distinct patterns. The magnitudes of lung and gill modulations were proportionally related to each other in the cells modulated with both rhythms. 4. In all sixteen neurons studied, a reduction or a reversal of phasic inhibitory inputs during a portion of the lung or gill respiratory cycle was observed following a negative current or chloride ion (Cl-) injection. The phasic membrane

  17. Stereotactic localization and visualization of the subthalamic nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wei-gao; WANG Hai-yang; LIN Zhi-guo; SHEN Hong; CHEN Xiao-guang; FU Yi-li; GAO Wen-peng

    2009-01-01

    Background The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is widely recognized as one of the most important and commonly targeted nuclei in stereotactic and functional neurosurgery. The success of STN surgery depends on accuracy in target determination. Construction of a digitalized atlas of STN based on stereotactic MRI will play an instrumental role in the accuracy of anatomical localization. The aim of this study was to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) target location of STN in stereotactic space and construct a digitalized atlas of STN to accomplish the visualization of the STN on stereotactic MRI, thus providing clinical guidance on the precise anatomical localization of STN.Methods One hundred and twenty healthy people volunteered to be scanned by 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning with 1-mm-thick slice in the standard stereotactic space between 2005 and 2006. One adult male was selected for 3D reconstruction of STN. The precess of 3D reconstruction included identification, manual segmentation, extraction,conservation and reconstruction.Results There was a significant correlation between the coordinates and age (P <0.05). The volume of left STN was significantly larger than the right STN, and there was a significant negative correlation between volume and age (P <0.05).The surface of the STN nucleus after 3D reconstruction appeared smooth, natural and realistic. The morphological feature of STN on the individual brain could be visualized directly in 3D. The 3D reconstructed STN could be rotated,zoomed and displayed at any direction in the stereotactic space. The anteroposterior diameter of the STN nucleus was longer than the vertical and transverse diameters in 3D space. The 3D reconstruction of STN manifested typical structure of the "dual lens".Conclusions The visualization of individual brain atlas based on stereotactic MRI is feasible. However, software for automated segmentation, extraction and registration of MR images need to be further developed.

  18. Tractography patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas-Arroyave, Nora; Lauro, Peter M; Huang, Ling; Hallett, Mark; Horovitz, Silvina G; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Lungu, Codrin

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation therapy is an effective symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease, yet the precise mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic effects remain unclear. Although the targets of deep brain stimulation are grey matter structures, axonal modulation is known to play an important role in deep brain stimulation's therapeutic mechanism. Several white matter structures in proximity to the subthalamic nucleus have been implicated in the clinical benefits of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. We assessed the connectivity patterns that characterize clinically beneficial electrodes in Parkinson's disease patients, after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We evaluated 22 patients with Parkinson's disease (11 females, age 57 ± 9.1 years, disease duration 13.3 ± 6.3 years) who received bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus at the National Institutes of Health. During an initial electrode screening session, one month after deep brain stimulation implantation, the clinical benefits of each contact were determined. The electrode was localized by coregistering preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative computer tomography images and the volume of tissue activated was estimated from stimulation voltage and impedance. Brain connectivity for the volume of tissue activated of deep brain stimulation contacts was assessed using probabilistic tractography with diffusion-tensor data. Areas most frequently connected to clinically effective contacts included the thalamus, substantia nigra, brainstem and superior frontal gyrus. A series of discriminant analyses demonstrated that the strength of connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus were positively associated with clinical effectiveness. The connectivity patterns observed in our study suggest that the modulation of white matter tracts directed to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus is associated with favourable clinical

  19. Isospin symmetry violation, meson production and -nucleus interaction studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B J Roy; V Jha; A Chatterje; H Machner; GEM Collaboration

    2006-05-01

    We have studied isospin symmetry violation in nuclear reactions by measuring simultaneously the cross-section of the following two reactions + → 3H + and + → 3He 0. The experiment was perfomed at the cooler synchrotron accelerator. COSY, Jülich at several beam energies close to the corresponding production threshold. We also have ongoing programmes on -nucleus final-state interaction studies via + 6Li → 7Be + reactions, high resolution search for dibaryonic resonances and lambda-proton final state interaction studies. The experimental details and results obtained so far are presented here.

  20. New method of estimation of cosmic ray nucleus energy

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkova, N A; Postnikov, E B; Roganova, T M; Sveshnikova, L G; Turundaevskij, A N

    2002-01-01

    The new approach to estimation of primary cosmic nucleus energy is presented. It is based on measurement of spatial density of secondary particles, originated in nuclear interactions in the target and strengthened by thin converter layer. The proposed method allows creation of relatively lightweight apparatus of large square with large geometrical factor and can be applied in satellite and balloon experiments for all nuclei in a wide energy range of 10 sup 1 sup 1 -10 sup 1 sup 6 eV/particle. The physical basis of the method, full Monte Carlo simulation, the field of application are presented

  1. Research Program towards Observation of Neutrino-Nucleus Coherent Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H T

    2006-01-01

    The article describes the research program pursued by the TEXONO Collaboration towards an experiment to observe coherent scattering between neutrinos and the nucleus at the power reactor. The motivations of studying this process are surveyed. In particular, a threshold of 100-200 eV has been achieved with an ultra-low-energy germanium detector prototype. This detection capability at low energy can also be adapted to conduct searches of Cold Dark Matter in the low-mass region as well as to enhance the sensitivities in the study of neutrino magnetic moments.

  2. Spin Symmetry for Anti-Lambda Spectrum in Atomic Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Chun-Yan; YAO Jiang-Ming; MENG Jie

    2009-01-01

    The spin symmetry of the anti-Lambda spectrum in nucleus ~(16)O is studied in the relativistic mean field theory.The spin-orbit splittings of spin doublets are found to be around 0.03-0.07 MeV and the dominant components of the Dirac spinor for the anti-Lambda spin doublets are found to be near identical.It is indicated that there is an even better spin symmetry in the anti-Lambda spectrum than that in the anti-nucleon spectrum.

  3. Collective Band Structures in Neutron-Rich 108Mo Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Huai-Bo; WANG Jian-Guo; XU Qiang; ZHU Sheng-Jiang; J. H. Hamilton; A. V. Ramayya; J. K. Hwang; Y. X. Luo; J. O. Rasmussen; I. Y. Lee; CHE Xing-Lai

    2007-01-01

    High spin states in the neutron-rich 108Mo nucleus are studied by measuring prompt γ-rays following the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with a Gammasphere detector array. The ground-state band is confirmed, and the one-phonon γ-vibrational band is updated with spin up to 12 h. A new collective band with the band head level at 1422.4 keV is suggested as a two-phonon γ-vibrational band. Another new band is proposed as a two-quasi-proton excitation band. Systematic characteristics of the collective bands are discussed.

  4. Hypersexuality following subthalamic nucleus stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Paresh; Bhargava, Pranshu

    2008-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation is an established surgical treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). Though the motor benefits of STN stimulation are well understood, its cognitive and behavioral effects are still not fully understood. Manic psychosis, hypersexuality, pathological gambling and mood swings are associated with advanced PD. There have been reports to suggest improvement or worsening in these symptoms following STN deep brain stimulation (DBS). We report two cases as the sole behavioral side-effects of STN stimulation despite good clinical improvement on long-term follow-up. These patients and literature review suggests the complex role of STN stimulation in motor and behavioral control.

  5. Hypersexuality following subthalamic nucleus stimulation for Parkinson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doshi Paresh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Subthalamic nucleus (STN stimulation is an established surgical treatment for Parkinson′s disease (PD. Though the motor benefits of STN stimulation are well understood, its cognitive and behavioral effects are still not fully understood. Manic psychosis, hypersexuality, pathological gambling and mood swings are associated with advanced PD. There have been reports to suggest improvement or worsening in these symptoms following STN deep brain stimulation (DBS. We report two cases as the sole behavioral side-effects of STN stimulation despite good clinical improvement on long-term follow-up. These patients and literature review suggests the complex role of STN stimulation in motor and behavioral control.

  6. Electric multipole response of the halo nucleus {sup 6}He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jagjit; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Chatterjee, R. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee (India)

    2016-07-15

    The role of different continuum components in the weakly bound nucleus {sup 6}He is studied by coupling unbound spd-waves of {sup 5}He by means of simple pairing contact-delta interaction. The results of our previous investigations in a model space containing only p-waves showed the collective nature of the ground state and allowed the calculation of the electric quadrupole transitions. We extend this simple model by including also sd-continuum neutron states and we investigate the electric monopole, dipole and octupole response of the system for transitions to the continuum, discussing the contribution of different configurations. (orig.)

  7. [Mutations in the personality nucleus at puberty and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiopu, U

    1989-01-01

    The author considers that analysing the personality by means of concrete research, the axis "self-perceptual Ego and the prospective, ideal Ego" make up an operational axis included in personality nucleus. The selected interference of the alter image about the Ego permanently readjusts this axis. In this purpose an adjective checklist and the projective test TST in two alternative have been used. The author concludes that during puberty and adolescence several changes take place as far as the number of adjective used, descriptors prevailing characteristics, and affective finality are concerned.

  8. Spatial regulation and organization of DNA replication within the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U

    2010-01-01

    Duplication of chromosomal DNA is a temporally and spatially regulated process. The timing of DNA replication initiation at various origins is highly coordinated; some origins fire early and others late during S phase. Moreover, inside the nuclei, the bulk of DNA replication is physically organized in replication factories, consisting of DNA polymerases and other replication proteins. In this review article, we discuss how DNA replication is organized and regulated spatially within the nucleus and how this spatial organization is linked to temporal regulation. We focus on DNA replication in budding yeast and fission yeast and, where applicable, compare yeast DNA replication with that in bacteria and metazoans.

  9. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Blanton, Elizabeth L; Sarazin, Craig L; Randall, Scott W; McNamara, Brian R; ),

    2010-01-01

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves.

  10. Magnetic Moment of Proton Drip-Line Nucleus (9)C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuta, K.; Fukuda, M.; Tanigaki, M.; Minamisono, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Mihara, M.; Onishi, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Harada, A.; Sasaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic moment of the proton drip-line nucleus C-9(I(sup (pi)) = 3/2, T(sub 1/2) = 126 ms) has been measured for the first time, using the beta-NMR detection technique with polarized radioactive beams. The measure value for the magnetic moment is 1mu(C-9)! = 1.3914 +/- 0.0005 (mu)N. The deduced spin expectation value of 1.44 is unusually larger than any other ones of even-odd nuclei.

  11. Spin Symmetry for Anti-Lambda Spectrum in atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Chunyan; Meng, Jie

    2009-01-01

    The spin symmetry of anti-Lambda spectrum in nucleus ^{16}O has been studied in the relativistic mean field theory. The spin-orbit splittings of spin doublets are found to be around 0.03-0.07 MeV and the dominant components of the Dirac spinor for the anti-Lambda spin doublets are found to be near identical. It indicates that there is an even better spin symmetry in the anti-Lambda spectrum than that in the anti-nucleon spectrum.

  12. On the symmetries of the 12C nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Cseh, J

    2016-01-01

    The consequences of some symmetries of the three-alpha system are discussed. In particular, the recent description of the low-energy spectrum of the 12C nucleus in terms of the Algebraic Cluster Model (ACM) is compared to that of the Semimicroscopic Algebraic Cluster Model (SACM). The previous one applies interactions of a D3h geometric symmetry [1], while the latter one has a U(3) multichannel dynamical symmetry, that connects the shell and cluster pictures. The available data is in line with both descriptions.

  13. Natural orbital description of the halo nucleus 6He

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, Ch; Vary, J P; Maris, P

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio calculations of nuclei face the challenge of simultaneously describing strong short-range internucleon correlations and the long-range properties of weakly-bound halo nucleons. Natural orbitals, which diagonalize the one-body density matrix, provide a basis which is better matched to the physical structure of the many-body wave function. We demonstrate that the use of natural orbitals significantly improves convergence for ab initio no-core configuration interaction calculations of the neutron halo nucleus 6He, relative to the traditional oscillator basis.

  14. Neutrino-nucleus interactions and the determination of oscillation parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Benhar, Omar; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide

    2015-01-01

    We review the status and prospects of theoretical studies of neutrino-nucleus interactions, and discuss the influence of the treatment of nuclear effects on the determination of oscillation parameters. The models developed to describe the variety of reaction mechanisms contributing to the nuclear cross sections are analysed, with emphasis placed on their capability to reproduce the available electron scattering data.The impact of the uncertainties associated with the description of nuclear dynamics on the the oscillation parameters is illustrated through examples, and possible avenues towards a better understanding of the signals detected by long baseline experiments are outlined.

  15. Modelling of compound nucleus formation in fusion of heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Torres, A

    2004-01-01

    A new model that includes the time-dependent dynamics of the single-particle (s.p.) motion in conjunction with the macroscopic evolution of the system is proposed for describing the compound nucleus (CN) formation in fusion of heavy nuclei. The diabaticity initially keeps the entrance system around its contact configuration, but the gradual transition from the diabatic to the adiabatic potential energy surface (PES) leads to fusion or quasifission. Direct measurements of the probability for CN formation are crucial to discriminate between the current models.

  16. Anisomycin infusions in the parabrachial nucleus and taste neophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-You; Amodeo, Leslie Renee; Arthurs, Joe; Reilly, Steve

    2012-11-01

    To investigate whether de novo protein synthesis in the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) is required for recovery from taste neophobia, anisomycin (a protein synthesis inhibitor) was infused immediately after consumption of a novel saccharin solution (Experiment 1). Unexpectedly, this PBN treatment caused a reduction in saccharin intake. In addition, we found that the anisomycin-induced suppression of tastant intake was attenuated by prior intra-PBN infusions of lidocaine (Experiment 2). This pattern of results raises concerns about using anisomycin to investigate memory consolidation processes in the PBN. Thus, a different manipulation may be needed to examine the nature of the neuroplastic changes that occur in the PBN during taste memory formation.

  17. Hyperpolarisation effects on the electric field gradient at a nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, P. W.

    1989-04-01

    The electric field gradient at the nucleus of an atom or ion depends quadratically on the external electric field through the ɛ hyperpolarisability. Ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations on the He, Ne and Ar isoelectronic series show that ɛ is positive for s 2 and negative for p 6 electronic configurations, always having the opposite sign to the Sternheimer antishielding factor. The ab initio values for free atoms and ions conflict in sign with the effective hyperpolarisation term in one ionic model of nuclear quadrupole constants of gaseous alkali halides but the sign of the empirical parameter could change if overlap damping of the Sternheimer response were included in the model.

  18. Immunonucleochemistry: a new method for in situ detection of antigens in the nucleus of cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Il Soo; Lee, Hyunsook; Park, Sung Dong; Seog, Dae-Hyun

    2010-04-01

    The advancement of immunocytochemistry (ICC) allows one to observe detailed spatial distribution of cellular antigens, but, with some limitations. Using conventional ICC, it is difficult to distinguish the nuclear localization from cytoplasm, as two large subcellular compartments overlap on the z-axis. In this study, we have investigated whether in situ immunostaining of 'naked' nuclei could provide an unambiguous method for detection of nuclear antigens. We have designed a protocol that efficiently lyses plasmalemma, while keeping the nuclear envelope intact. The optimal condition for lysing the plasmalemma was 0.5% Nonidet P-40 for 5 min in both neuronal and non-neuronal cultured cells. Using this protocol, we could unambiguously isolate nuclear from cytoplasmic ICC signals. Since the present protocol has been designed for immunostaining of 'naked' nuclei from cultured or isolated cells, we have coined a new term to refer to this procedure as 'immunonucleochemistry' ('INC' for abbreviation).

  19. Red nucleus and rubrospinal tract disorganization in the absence of Pou4f1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus E. eMartinez-Lopez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The red nucleus is a neuronal population that plays an important role in forelimb motor control and locomotion. Histologically it is subdivided into two subpopulations, the parvocellular red nucleus located in the diencephalon and the magnocellular red nucleus in the mesencephalon. The red nucleus integrates signals from motor cortex and cerebellum and projects to spinal cord interneurons and motor neurons through the rubrospinal tract. Pou4f1 is a transcription factor highly expressed in this nucleus that has been related to its specification. Here we profoundly analyzed consequences of Pou4f1 loss-of-function in development, maturation and axonal projection of the red nucleus. Surprisingly, red nucleus neurons are specified and maintained in the mutant, no cell death was detected. Nevertheless, the nucleus appeared disorganized with a strong delay in radial migration and with a wider neuronal distribution; the neurons did not form a compacted population as they do in controls, Robo1 and Slit2 were miss-expressed. Cplx1 and Npas1, expressed in the red nucleus, are transcription factors involved in neurotransmitter release, neuronal maturation and motor function processes among others. In our mutant mice, both transcription factors are lost, suggesting an abnormal maturation of the red nucleus. The resulting altered nucleus occupied a wider territory. Finally, we examined rubrospinal tract development and found that the red nucleus neurons were able to project to the spinal cord but their axons appeared defasciculated. These data suggest that Pou4f1 is necessary for the maturation of red nucleus neurons but not for their specification and maintenance.

  20. Oscillations of moments in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Hongyan(

    2001-01-01

    Hong, Liu Lianshou et al., Digitized controling measurement of particle tracks in nucler emulsion chamber at high energy, Nucler Technique (in Chinese), 1990, 13: 733-739.[13]Nilsson-Almqvist, B., Stenlund, E., Interactions between hadrons and nuclei: The Lund Monte Carlo-Fritiof version 1.6,Comput. Phys. Commu., 1987, 43: 387-397.[14]Adamovich, M. I., Aggarwal, M. M., Alexandrov, Y. A. et al., (EMU01 Collaboration) Local particle densities and global multiplicities in central heavy-ion interactions at 3.7, 14.6, 60 and 200 A GeV, Z. Phys. C, 1992, 56: 509-520.[15]Wu Tao, Zhou Daicui, Analysis on origin of oscillation of H moment in high-energy hh collision, Chin. Phys. Lett., 2000,17: 792-794.

  1. Automatic leukocyte nucleus segmentation by intuitionistic fuzzy divergence based thresholding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jati, Arindam; Singh, Garima; Mukherjee, Rashmi; Ghosh, Madhumala; Konar, Amit; Chakraborty, Chandan; Nagar, Atulya K

    2014-03-01

    The paper proposes a robust approach to automatic segmentation of leukocyte's nucleus from microscopic blood smear images under normal as well as noisy environment by employing a new exponential intuitionistic fuzzy divergence based thresholding technique. The algorithm minimizes the divergence between the actual image and the ideally thresholded image to search for the final threshold. A new divergence formula based on exponential intuitionistic fuzzy entropy has been proposed. Further, to increase its noise handling capacity, a neighborhood-based membership function for the image pixels has been designed. The proposed scheme has been applied on 110 normal and 54 leukemia (chronic myelogenous leukemia) affected blood samples. The nucleus segmentation results have been validated by three expert hematologists. The algorithm achieves an average segmentation accuracy of 98.52% in noise-free environment. It beats the competitor algorithms in terms of several other metrics. The proposed scheme with neighborhood based membership function outperforms the competitor algorithms in terms of segmentation accuracy under noisy environment. It achieves 93.90% and 94.93% accuracies for Speckle and Gaussian noises, respectively. The average area under the ROC curves comes out to be 0.9514 in noisy conditions, which proves the robustness of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Monte Carlo Simulation for Statistical Decay of Compound Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick M.B.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We perform Monte Carlo simulations for neutron and γ-ray emissions from a compound nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory. This Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach (MCHF method calculation, which gives us correlated information between emitted particles and γ-rays. It will be a powerful tool in many applications, as nuclear reactions can be probed in a more microscopic way. We have been developing the MCHF code, CGM, which solves the Hauser-Feshbach theory with the Monte Carlo method. The code includes all the standard models that used in a standard Hauser-Feshbach code, namely the particle transmission generator, the level density module, interface to the discrete level database, and so on. CGM can emit multiple neutrons, as long as the excitation energy of the compound nucleus is larger than the neutron separation energy. The γ-ray competition is always included at each compound decay stage, and the angular momentum and parity are conserved. Some calculations for a fission fragment 140Xe are shown as examples of the MCHF method, and the correlation between the neutron and γ-ray is discussed.

  3. Nucleus-Dependent Valence-Space Approach to Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroberg, S. R.; Calci, A.; Hergert, H.; Holt, J. D.; Bogner, S. K.; Roth, R.; Schwenk, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a nucleus-dependent valence-space approach for calculating ground and excited states of nuclei, which generalizes the shell-model in-medium similarity renormalization group to an ensemble reference with fractionally filled orbitals. Because the ensemble is used only as a reference, and not to represent physical states, no symmetry restoration is required. This allows us to capture three-nucleon (3 N ) forces among valence nucleons with a valence-space Hamiltonian specifically targeted to each nucleus of interest. Predicted ground-state energies from carbon through nickel agree with results of other large-space ab initio methods, generally to the 1% level. In addition, we show that this new approach is required in order to obtain convergence for nuclei in the upper p and s d shells. Finally, we address the 1+/3+ inversion problem in 22Na and 46V. This approach extends the reach of ab initio nuclear structure calculations to essentially all light- and medium-mass nuclei.

  4. Finding Hierarchical and Overlapping Dense Subgraphs using Nucleus Decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshadhri, Comandur [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Pinar, Ali [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catalyurek, Umit [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Finding dense substructures in a graph is a fundamental graph mining operation, with applications in bioinformatics, social networks, and visualization to name a few. Yet most standard formulations of this problem (like clique, quasiclique, k-densest subgraph) are NP-hard. Furthermore, the goal is rarely to nd the \\true optimum", but to identify many (if not all) dense substructures, understand their distribution in the graph, and ideally determine a hierarchical structure among them. Current dense subgraph nding algorithms usually optimize some objective, and only nd a few such subgraphs without providing any hierarchy. It is also not clear how to account for overlaps in dense substructures. We de ne the nucleus decomposition of a graph, which represents the graph as a forest of nuclei. Each nucleus is a subgraph where smaller cliques are present in many larger cliques. The forest of nuclei is a hierarchy by containment, where the edge density increases as we proceed towards leaf nuclei. Sibling nuclei can have limited intersections, which allows for discovery of overlapping dense subgraphs. With the right parameters, the nuclear decomposition generalizes the classic notions of k-cores and k-trusses. We give provable e cient algorithms for nuclear decompositions, and empirically evaluate their behavior in a variety of real graphs. The tree of nuclei consistently gives a global, hierarchical snapshot of dense substructures, and outputs dense subgraphs of higher quality than other state-of-theart solutions. Our algorithm can process graphs with tens of millions of edges in less than an hour.

  5. Evaluation of novel injectable hydrogels for nucleus pulposus replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernengo, J; Fussell, G W; Smith, N G; Lowman, A M

    2008-01-01

    Branched copolymers composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) are being investigated as an in situ forming replacement for the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc. A family of copolymers was synthesized by varying the molecular weight of the PEG blocks and molar ratio of NIPAAm monomer units to PEG branches. Gel swelling, dissolution, and compressive mechanical properties were characterized over 90 days and stress relaxation behavior over 30 days immersion in vitro. It was found that the NIPAAm to PEG molar ratio did not affect the equilibrium swelling and compressive mechanical properties. However, gel elasticity exhibited a dependency on both the PEG block molecular weight and content. The equilibrium gel water content increased and compressive modulus decreased with increasing PEG block size. While all of the branched copolymers showed significant increases in stress relaxation time constant compared to the homopolymer (p < 0.05), the high PEG content PNIPAAm-PEG (4600 and 8000 g/mol) exhibited the maximum elasticity. Because of its high water content, requisite stiffness and high elastic response, PNIPAAm-PEG (4600 g/mol) will be further evaluated as a candidate material for nucleus pulposus replacement.

  6. Neutrino-nucleus reactions based on recent structure studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshio [Department of Physics and Graduate School of Integrated Basic Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    Neutrino-nucleus reactions are studied with the use of new shell model Hamiltonians, which have proper tensor components in the interactions and prove to be successful in the description of Gamow-Teller (GT) strengths in nuclei. The new Hamiltonians are applied to obtain new neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections in {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 56}Fe and {sup 56}Ni induced by solar and supernova neutrinos. The element synthesis by neutrino processes in supernova explosions is discussed with the new cross sections. The enhancement of the production yields of {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B and {sup 55}Mn is obtained while fragmented GT strength in {sup 56}Ni with two-peak structure is found to result in smaller e-capture rates at stellar environments. The monopole-based universal interaction with tensor force of π+ρ meson exchanges is used to evaluate GT strength in {sup 40}Ar and ν-induced reactions on {sup 40}Ar. It is found to reproduce well the experimental GT strength in {sup 40}Ar.

  7. Black hole in the West Nucleus of Arp 220

    CERN Document Server

    Downes, D

    2007-01-01

    We present new observations with the IRAM Interferometer, in its longest-baseline configuration, of the CO(2-1) line and the 1.3mm dust radiation from the Arp 220 nuclear region. The dust source in the West nucleus has a size of 0.19 x 0.13 arcsec and a 1.3mm brightness temperature of 90K. This implies that the dust ring in the West nucleus has a high opacity, with tau = 1 at 1.1mm. Not only is the dust ring itself optically thick in the submm and far-IR, but it is surrounded by the previously-known, rapidly rotating molecular disk of size 0.5 arcsec that is also optically thick in the mid-IR. The molecular ring is cooler than the hot dust disk because the CO(2-1) line is seen in absorption against the dust disk. The dust ring is massive (1E9 solar masses), compact (radius 35pc), and hot (true dust temperature 170K). It resembles rather strikingly the dust ring detected around the quasar APM 08279+52, and is most unlike the warm, extended dust sources in starburst galaxies. Because there is a strong temperatu...

  8. Nucleus accumbens functional connectivity discriminates medication-overuse headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Torta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication-overuse headache (MOH is a secondary form of headache related to the overuse of triptans, analgesics and other acute headache medications. It is believed that MOH and substance addiction share some similar pathophysiological mechanisms. In this study we examined the whole brain resting state functional connectivity of the dorsal and ventral striatum in 30 patients (15 MOH and 15 non-MOH patients to investigate if classification algorithms can successfully discriminate between MOH and non-MOH patients on the basis of the spatial pattern of resting state functional connectivity of the dorsal and ventral striatal region of interest. Our results indicated that both nucleus accumbens and dorsal rostral putamen functional connectivity could discriminate between MOH and non-MOH patients, thereby providing possible support to two interpretations. First, that MOH patients show altered reward functionality in line with drug abusers (alterations in functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens. Second, that MOH patients show inability to break habitual behavior (alterations in functional connectivity of the dorsal striatum. In conclusion, our data showed that MOH patients were characterized by an altered functional connectivity of motivational circuits at rest. These differences could permit the blind discrimination between the two conditions using classification algorithms. Considered overall, our findings might contribute to the development of novel diagnostic measures.

  9. Induction of neuropeptide Y gene expression in the dorsal medial hypothalamic nucleus in two models of the agouti obesity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesterson, R A; Huszar, D; Lynch, C A; Simerly, R B; Cone, R D

    1997-05-01

    Dominant mutations at the agouti locus induce several phenotypic changes in the mouse including yellow pigmentation (phaeomelanization) of the coat and adult-onset obesity. Nonpigmentary phenotypic changes associated with the agouti locus are due to ectopic expression of the agouti-signaling protein (ASP), and the pheomelanizing effects on coat color are due to ASP antagonism of alpha-MSH binding to the melanocyte MC1 receptor. Recently it has been demonstrated that pharmacological antagonism of hypothalamic melanocortin receptors or genetic deletion of the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4-R) recapitulates aspects of the agouti obesity syndrome, thus establishing that chronic disruption of central melanocortinergic signaling is the cause of agouti-induced obesity. To learn more about potential downstream effectors involved in these melanocortinergic obesity syndromes, we have examined expression of the orexigenic peptides galanin and neuropeptide Y (NPY), as well as the anorexigenic POMC in lethal yellow (A(y)), MC4-R knockout (MC4-RKO), and leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice. No significant changes in galanin or POMC gene expression were seen in any of the obese models. In situ hybridizations using an antisense NPY probe demonstrated that in obese A(y) mice, arcuate nucleus NPY mRNA levels were equivalent to that of their C57BL/6J littermates. However, NPY was expressed at high levels in a new site, the dorsal medial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH). Expression of NPY in the DMH was also seen in obese MC4-RKO homozygous (-/-) mice, but not in lean heterozygous (+/-) or wild type (+/+) control mice. This identifies the DMH as a brain region that is functionally altered by the disruption of melanocortinergic signaling and suggests that this nucleus, possibly via elevated NPY expression, may have an etiological role in the melanocortinergic obesity syndrome.

  10. The Effects of Histaminergic Agents in the Nucleus ccumbens of Rats in the Elevated Plus-Maze Test of Anxiety

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    Ameneh Rezayof

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: "n The nucleus accumbens (NAc receive histaminergic neurons from tuberomammillary nuclei. There are reports indicating that central histamine systems are involved in many physiological behavioral processes, including anxiety. The aim of the present study was to assess whether the histaminergic system of the NAc is involved in anxiety-related behaviors. Methods: Rats were anesthetized with intra-peritoneal injection of ketamine hydrochloride, plus xylazine and then were placed in a stereotaxic apparatus. In addition, two stainless-steel cannuale were placed 2 mm above the nucleus accumbens shell. Seven days after recovery from surgery, the behavioral testing was started. As a model of anxiety, the elevated plus maze which is a useful test to investigate the effects of anxiogenic or anxiolytic drugs in rodents, was used in male Wistar rats.  "nResults: Intra-NAc administration of histamine (0.01, 0.1 and 1 µg/rat increased the percentage of open arm time (%OAT and open arm entries (%OAE ,but not locomotor activity, indicating an anxiolytic response. Furthermore, bilateral  microinjections of different doses of the H1 receptor  antagonist pyrilamine (0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 µg/rat or the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 µg/rat into the NAc increased %OAT and %OAE , but not locomotor activity. However, both histamine and histamine receptor antagonists showed an anxiolytic-like effect ; the antagonists (1 µg/rat also decreased the histamine response. "n "n Conclusion: The results may indicate a modulatory effect for the H1 and H2 histamine receptors of nucleus accumbens in the anxiety behavior of rats.

  11. Critical nucleus size for disease-related polyglutamine aggregation is repeat length dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Karunakar; Jayaraman, Murali; Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Kodali, Ravindra; Wetzel, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Since polyglutamine (polyQ) aggregate formation has been implicated as playing an important role in expanded CAG repeat diseases, it is important to understand the biophysics underlying the initiation of aggregation. Previously we showed that relatively long polyQ peptides aggregate by nucleated growth polymerization and a monomeric critical nucleus. We show here that, over a short repeat length range from Q26 to Q23, the size of the critical nucleus for aggregation increases from monomeric to dimeric to tetrameric. This variation in nucleus size suggests a common duplex anti-parallel β-sheet framework for the nucleus, and further supports the feasibility of an organized monomeric aggregation nucleus for longer polyQ repeat peptides. The data also suggest that a change in aggregation nucleus size may play a role in the pathogenicity of polyQ expansion in this series of familial neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21317897

  12. Pilot biomechanical design of biomaterials for artificial nucleus prosthesis using 3D finite-element modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qijin Huang; Guoquan Liu; Yong Li; Jin Gao; Zhengqiu Gu; Yuanzheng Ma; Haibin Xue

    2004-01-01

    Pilot biomechanical design of biomaterials for artificial nucleus prosthesis was carried out based on the 3D finite-element method. Two 3D models of lumbar intervertebral disc respectively with a real human nucleus and with the nucleus removed were developed and validated using published experimental and clinical data. Then the models with a stainless steel nucleus prosthesis implanted and with polymer nucleus prostheses of various properties implanted were used for the 3D finite-element biomechanical analysis. All the above simulation and analysis were carried out for the L4/L5 disc under a human worst-daily compression load of 2000 N. The results show that the polymer materials with Young's modulus of elasticity E = 0.1-100 MPa and Poisson's ratio v=0.35-0.5 are suitable to produce artificial nucleus prosthesis in view of biomechanical consideration.

  13. Effects of pedunculopontine nucleus area stimulation on gait disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraye, Murielle; Debû, Bettina; Fraix, Valérie; Goetz, Laurent; Ardouin, Claire; Yelnik, Jérôme; Henry-Lagrange, Christelle; Seigneuret, Eric; Piallat, Brigitte; Krack, Paul; Le Bas, Jean-François; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Chabardès, Stephan; Pollak, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Gait disturbances are frequent and disabling in advanced Parkinson's disease. These symptoms respond poorly to usual medical and surgical treatments but were reported to be improved by stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus. We studied the effects of stimulating the pedunculopontine nucleus area in six patients with severe freezing of gait, unresponsive to levodopa and subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Electrodes were implanted bilaterally in the pedunculopontine n...

  14. Evidence that urocortin is absent from neurons of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus in pigeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavani J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWN is a central preganglionic parasympathetic cell group that gives rise to cholinergic input to the ciliary ganglion, thereby regulating several neurovegetative ocular functions. Recently, the supposed presence of the neuropeptide urocortin (UCN has been reported in EWN neurons in rodent brain. The purpose of the present study was to examine the distribution of UCN in avian brain and to investigate by immunohistochemical analysis the possible use of this substance as an EWN marker in a non-mammalian class of vertebrates. Brain tissue of pigeons was incubated with a specific antibody against UCN and the results showed labeling of many small neurons, forming a double wing in the dorsal mesodiencephalic transition area. Their size and shape, however, differed from those of EWN neurons, and they were preferentially located rostral to the EWN. Double-label experiments employing an antibody against the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT showed that UCN is not localized to the cholinergic cells of the EWN and confirmed the rostral distributionof UCN never overlapping the ChAT+ EWN cells. Taken together, these results suggest that, at least in pigeons, the UCN+ population does not belong to the traditionally defined EWN.

  15. Effect of sex steroid hormones on the number of serotonergic neurons in rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimura, Yuyu; Iwata, Kinuyo; Iijima, Norio; Kobayashi, Makito; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2015-05-01

    Disorders caused by the malfunction of the serotonergic system in the central nervous system show sex-specific prevalence. Many studies have reported a relationship between sex steroid hormones and the brain serotonergic system; however, the interaction between sex steroid hormones and the number of brain neurons expressing serotonin has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we determined whether sex steroid hormones altered the number of serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) of adult rat brains. Animals were divided into five groups: ovariectomized (OVX), OVX+low estradiol (E2), OVX+high E2, castrated males, and intact males. Antibodies against 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) and tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph), an enzyme for 5-HT synthesis, were used as markers of 5-HT neurons, and the number of 5-HT-immunoreactive (ir) or Tph-ir cells was counted. We detected no significant differences in the number of 5-HT-ir or Tph-ir cells in the DR among the five groups. By contrast, the intensity of 5-HT-ir showed significant sex differences in specific subregions of the DR independent of sex steroid levels, suggesting that the manipulation of sex steroid hormones after maturation does not affect the number and intensive immunostaining of serotonergic neurons in rat brain. Our results suggest that, the sexual dimorphism observed in the serotonergic system is due to factors such as 5-HT synthesis, transportation, and degradation but not to the number of serotonergic neurons.

  16. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects limbic and associative circuits: a PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Jeune, Florence [Centre Eugene Marquis, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Rennes (France); Universite Rennes 1, Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Unite de Recherche Universitaire ' ' Comportement et Noyaux Gris Centraux' ' , Rennes (France); Centre Eugene Marquis, Service Medecine Nucleaire, Rennes (France); Peron, Julie [Universite Rennes 1, Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Unite de Recherche Universitaire ' ' Comportement et Noyaux Gris Centraux' ' , Rennes (France); Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Clinique Neurologique, Rennes (France); University of Geneva, Neuroscience of Emotion and Affective Dynamics, Department of Psychology and Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, Geneva (Switzerland); Grandjean, Didier [University of Geneva, Neuroscience of Emotion and Affective Dynamics, Department of Psychology and Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, Geneva (Switzerland); Drapier, Sophie; Verin, Marc [Universite Rennes 1, Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Unite de Recherche Universitaire ' ' Comportement et Noyaux Gris Centraux' ' , Rennes (France); Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Clinique Neurologique, Rennes (France); Haegelen, Claire [Universite Rennes 1, Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Unite de Recherche Universitaire ' ' Comportement et Noyaux Gris Centraux' ' , Rennes (France); Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Service de Neurochirurgie, Rennes (France); Garin, Etienne [Centre Eugene Marquis, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Rennes (France); Millet, Bruno [Universite Rennes 1, Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Unite de Recherche Universitaire ' ' Comportement et Noyaux Gris Centraux' ' , Rennes (France); S.H.U. Psychiatrie Adulte, CH Guillaume Regnier, Rennes (France)

    2010-08-15

    Although high-frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) improves motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), clinical studies have reported cognitive, motivational and emotional changes. These results suggest that the STN forms part of a broadly distributed neural network encompassing the associative and limbic circuits. We sought to pinpoint the cortical and subcortical brain areas modulated by STN DBS, in order to assess the STN's functional role and explain neuropsychological modifications following STN DBS in PD. We studied resting state glucose metabolism in 20 PD patients before and after STN DBS and 13 age-matched healthy controls using {sup 18}F-FDG PET. We used statistical analysis (SPM2) first to compare pre-stimulation metabolism in PD patients with metabolism in healthy controls, then to study metabolic modifications in PD patients following STN DBS. The first analysis revealed no pre-stimulation metabolic abnormalities in associative or limbic circuitry. After STN DBS, metabolic modifications were found in several regions known for their involvement in the limbic and associative circuits. These metabolic results confirm the STN's central role in associative and limbic basal ganglia circuits. They will provide information for working hypotheses for future studies investigating neuropsychological changes and metabolic modifications related to STN DBS, with a view to improving our knowledge of this structure's functional role. (orig.)

  17. Fractal patterns of neural activity exist within the suprachiasmatic nucleus and require extrinsic network interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kun; Meijer, Johanna H; Shea, Steven A; vanderLeest, Henk Tjebbe; Pittman-Polletta, Benjamin; Houben, Thijs; van Oosterhout, Floor; Deboer, Tom; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian central circadian pacemaker (the suprachiasmatic nucleus, SCN) contains thousands of neurons that are coupled through a complex network of interactions. In addition to the established role of the SCN in generating rhythms of ~24 hours in many physiological functions, the SCN was recently shown to be necessary for normal self-similar/fractal organization of motor activity and heart rate over a wide range of time scales--from minutes to 24 hours. To test whether the neural network within the SCN is sufficient to generate such fractal patterns, we studied multi-unit neural activity of in vivo and in vitro SCNs in rodents. In vivo SCN-neural activity exhibited fractal patterns that are virtually identical in mice and rats and are similar to those in motor activity at time scales from minutes up to 10 hours. In addition, these patterns remained unchanged when the main afferent signal to the SCN, namely light, was removed. However, the fractal patterns of SCN-neural activity are not autonomous within the SCN as these patterns completely broke down in the isolated in vitro SCN despite persistence of circadian rhythmicity. Thus, SCN-neural activity is fractal in the intact organism and these fractal patterns require network interactions between the SCN and extra-SCN nodes. Such a fractal control network could underlie the fractal regulation observed in many physiological functions that involve the SCN, including motor control and heart rate regulation.

  18. Collimation and scattering of the active galactic nucleus emission in the Sombrero galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Menezes, R B; Ricci, T V; 10.1088/2041-8205/765/2/L40

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of a data cube of the central region of M104, the Sombrero galaxy, obtained with the GMOS-IFU of the Gemini-South telescope, and report the discovery of collimation and scattering of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission in the circumnuclear region of this galaxy. Analysis with PCA Tomography and spectral synthesis revealed the existence of collimation and scattering of the AGN featureless continuum and also of a broad component of the H{\\alpha} emission line. The collimation and scattering of this broad H{\\alpha} component was also revealed by fitting the [NII] {\\lambda}{\\lambda}6548,6583 and H{\\alpha} emission lines as a sum of Gaussian functions. The spectral synthesis, together with a V-I image obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, showed the existence of circumnuclear dust, which may cause the light scattering. We also identify a dusty feature that may be interpreted as a torus/disk structure. The existence of two opposite regions with featureless continuum (P.A. = -18{\\de...

  19. Landscape and Astronomy in Megalithic Portugal: the Carregal do Sal Nucleus and Star Mountain Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Silva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Central Portugal, delimited by the Douro river to the north and the Mondego to the south, is the second densest region of megalithic monuments in the country. The Neolithic archaeological record indicates seasonal transhumance between higher pastures in the summer and lower grounds in the winter. The monuments are found in lower ground and it has been suggested that they were built during the winter occupation of their surroundings. The astronomical orientation of their entrances lends further support to this hypothesis. A recent survey of the orientation of the chambers and corridors of these dolmens, conducted by the author, found good agreement with prior surveys, but also demonstrated that other interpretations are possible. This paper presents an update on the survey, including extra sites surveyed in the spring of 2011, as well as the GIS confirmation of all horizon altitudes that couldn’t be empirically measured. The megalithic nucleus of Carregal do Sal, on the Mondego valley, is then looked at in more detail. It is found that there is a preference for the orientation of dolmens towards Star Mountain Range in-line with the topographic arguments of landscape archaeology. In addition, it was found that the topography also marks the rise of particular red stars, Betelgeuse and Aldebaran, during the period of megalithic building, at the onset of spring marking the transition from low ground to the high pastures. This hypothesis finds further support from toponymic folktales that explain the origin of the name of the mountain range.

  20. Photoionization Modeling of the Low Luminosity Seyfert 1 Nucleus in NGC 3516

    CERN Document Server

    Devereux, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of the low luminosity Seyfert 1 nucleus in NGC 3516 obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope show that the visible spectrum is dominated by the Balmer emission lines of Hydrogen (H) and a continuum luminosity that rises into the UV. The anomalous H${\\alpha}$/H${\\beta}$ emission line ratio, the Balmer emission line luminosity and the distinctive shape observed for the H${\\alpha}$ emission line profile serve as important constraints in any photoionization model aimed at explaining the visible emission line spectrum of NGC 3516. Photoionization modeling using Cloudy demonstrates that the central UV-X-ray source is able to completely ionize the H gas in between the Balmer and dust reverberation radii if the electron density is ${\\le}$ 3 ${\\times}$ 10${^7}$ cm${^{-3}}$ throughout. Thus, according to this model the region responsible for producing the visible H lines is a dust free shell of ionized H gas. Interestingly, the model predicts a rapid rise in the electron temperature as the ce...